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Sample records for cell mediated hypersensitivity

  1. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  2. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  3. Different immune cells mediate mechanical pain hypersensitivity in male and female mice

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Robert E.; Mapplebeck, Josiane C.S.; Rosen, Sarah; Beggs, Simon; Taves, Sarah; Alexander, Jessica K.; Martin, Loren J.; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Sotocinal, Susana G.; Chen, Di; Yang, Mu; Shi, Xiang Qun; Huang, Hao; Pillon, Nicolas J.; Bilan, Philip J.; Tu, Yu Shan; Klip, Amira; Ji, Ru-Rong; Zhang, Ji; Salter, Michael W.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A large and rapidly increasing body of evidence indicates that microglia-neuron signaling is essential for chronic pain hypersensitivity. Here we show using multiple approaches that microglia are not required for mechanical pain hypersensitivity in female mice; female mice achieve similar levels of pain hypersensitivity using adaptive immune cells, likely T-lymphocytes. This sexual dimorphism suggests that male mice cannot be used as proxies for females in pain research. PMID:26120961

  4. Intestinal B cell-activating factor: an indicator of non-IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to food?

    PubMed

    Lied, G Arslan; Lillestøl, K; Valeur, J; Berstad, A

    2010-07-01

    Medically confirmed hypersensitivity reactions to food are usually IgE-mediated. Non-IgE-mediated reactions are not only seldom recognized but also more difficult to diagnose. To examine B cell-activating factor (BAFF) in serum and gut lavage fluid of patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity, and to study its relationship to atopic disease. Gut lavage fluid was obtained from 60 and serum from another 17 patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls, gut lavage fluid was obtained in all, serum from 11 of 20. The patients were divided into atopic and non-atopic subgroups. BAFF was measured by ELISA in both serum and gut lavage fluid. B cell-activating factor levels in serum and gut lavage fluid were significantly higher in patients than in controls (P < 0.03 and P < 0.002 respectively). Non-atopic patients had significantly higher levels of BAFF in serum than both atopic patients (P < 0.05) and controls (P < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between serum levels of BAFF and IgE. The results suggest that BAFF might be a new mediating mechanism in food hypersensitivity reactions. Significantly higher levels in non-atopic compared with atopic patients, and no correlation between BAFF and IgE, suggest that BAFF might be involved particularly in non-IgE-mediated reactions.

  5. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ∼30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells mediate mechanical inflammatory pain hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Chiu, Isaac M.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Pain hypersensitivity at the site of inflammation as a result of chronic immune diseases, pathogenic infection, and tissue injury is a common medical condition. However, the specific contributions of the innate and adaptive immune system to the generation of pain during inflammation have not been systematically elucidated. We therefore set out to characterize the cellular and molecular immune response in two widely used preclinical models of inflammatory pain: (i) intraplantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) as a model of adjuvant- and pathogen-based inflammation and (ii) a plantar incisional wound as a model of tissue injury-based inflammation. Our findings reveal differences in temporal patterns of immune cell recruitment and activation states, cytokine production, and pain in these two models, with CFA causing a nonresolving granulomatous inflammatory response whereas tissue incision induced resolving immune and pain responses. These findings highlight the significant differences and potential clinical relevance of the incisional wound model compared with the CFA model. By using various cell-depletion strategies, we find that, whereas lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G (Ly)6G+CD11b+ neutrophils and T-cell receptor (TCR) β+ T cells do not contribute to the development of thermal or mechanical pain hypersensitivity in either model, proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells were necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity during incisional pain, and, to a lesser extent, CFA-induced inflammation. However, inflammatory (CCR2+Ly6Chi) monocytes were not responsible for these effects. The finding that a population of proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells contribute to mechanical inflammatory pain provides a potential cellular target for its treatment in wound inflammation. PMID:26598697

  7. Molecular mechanisms of CD8+ T cell-mediated delayed hypersensitivity: implications for allergies, asthma, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R S; Askenase, P W

    1999-02-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is defined as the recruitment of T cells into tissues to be activated by antigen-presenting cells to produce cytokines that mediate local inflammation. CD8+ T cells are now known to mediate DTH responses in allergic contact dermatitis, drug eruptions, asthma, and autoimmune diseases. This inflammatory effector capability of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was previously poorly recognized, but there is now considerable evidence that these diseases may be mediated by CD8+ DTH. The difference between CD8+ T cells and CD4+ T cells mediating DTH relates to the molecular mechanisms by which antigens are processed and presented to the T cells. Antigens external to the cell are phagocytosed and processed for presentation on MHC class II molecules (eg, HLA-DR) to CD4+ T cells. In contrast, internal cytoplasmic antigens are processed by the endogenous pathway for presentation on MHC class I molecules (eg, HLA-A, -B, and -C) to CD8+ T cells. External allergens can also enter the endogenous pathway to be presented to CD8+ T cells. These include many contact sensitizers, chemical and protein respiratory allergens, viral antigens, metabolic products of drugs, and autoantigens. The resulting CD8+ T-cell response explains the role of CD8+ T-cell DTH mechanisms in allergic contact dermatitis, asthma, drug eruptions, and autoimmune diseases.

  8. Cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and cephalosporins in subjects with a T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.

    PubMed

    Romano, Antonino; Gaeta, Francesco; Valluzzi, Rocco Luigi; Maggioletti, Michela; Caruso, Cristiano; Quaratino, Donato

    2016-07-01

    The few studies performed in adults with T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins have found a rate of cross-reactivity with cephalosporins ranging from 2.8% to 31.2% and an absence of cross-reactivity with aztreonam. We sought to evaluate the possibility of using cephalosporins and aztreonam in subjects with documented delayed hypersensitivity to penicillins who especially require them. We conducted a prospective study of 214 consecutive subjects who had 307 nonimmediate reactions to penicillins (almost exclusively aminopenicillins) and had positive patch test and/or delayed-reading skin test responses to at least 1 penicillin reagent. To assess cross-reactivity with cephalosporins and aztreonam and the tolerability of such alternative β-lactams, all subjects underwent skin tests with cephalexin, cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam. Subjects with negative responses were challenged with the alternative β-lactams concerned. All subjects had negative skin test results to cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam and tolerated challenges. Forty (18.7%) of the 214 subjects had positive skin test responses to at least 1 aminocephalosporin. Of the 174 subjects with negative responses, 170 underwent challenges; 1 reacted to cefaclor. These data demonstrate a rate of cross-reactivity between aminopenicillins and aminocephalosporins (ie, cephalexin, cefaclor, and cefadroxil) of around 20%, as well as the absence of cross-reactivity between penicillins and cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam in all subjects with T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins, almost exclusively aminopenicillins. Therefore these subjects could be treated with cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam. In those who especially require cephalosporin or aztreonam treatment, however, we recommend pretreatment skin tests because negative responses indicate tolerability. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc

  9. Specific V beta T cell subsets mediate the immediate hypersensitivity response to ragweed allergen.

    PubMed

    Renz, H; Saloga, J; Bradley, K L; Loader, J E; Greenstein, J L; Larsen, G; Gelfand, E W

    1993-08-15

    T and B cell responses after sensitization to ragweed (RW) were examined in a mouse model in which BALB/c mice were exposed to the allergen by ultrasonic nebulization. Sensitization resulted in the stimulation of an IgE anti-RW response and was paralleled by a rise in IgG1 anti-RW titers. Skin testing for immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity revealed the presence of allergic type I reactions to RW. Sensitization to RW in this way was also associated with the development of increased airways responsiveness as determined by electrical field stimulation of preparations of tracheal smooth muscle. Histologic examination of the airways and the lung indicated the presence of a mononuclear cell infiltrate in the mucosa and submucosa of the airways that was accompanied by an enlargement of local draining lymph nodes of the airways and the lung. T cell populations were analyzed for the frequency of V beta-expressing T cells. Such analysis indicated that RW sensitization stimulated the expression of V beta 8.1+, V beta 8.2+, and V beta 13+ T cells in the local lymphoid tissue and of V beta 8.1+, V beta 8.2+, V beta 8.3+, V beta 9+ and V beta 14+ T cells in the spleen. Co-culture of these T cell populations with RW-primed B cells indicated that in the presence of RW, V beta 8.2 T cells stimulated IgE and IgG1 production, whereas the other T cell populations showed a different stimulation profile for Ig isotypes and IgG subclasses. The transfer of V beta 8.2 T cells from sensitized but not from nonsensitized control mice stimulated an allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 response and increased airways responsiveness in naive recipients. These data provide additional support for the pivotal role of specific V beta-expressing T cell subpopulations in the stimulation of IgE/IgG1 production and increased airways responsiveness.

  10. PDIA3 gene induces visceral hypersensitivity in rats with irritable bowel syndrome through the dendritic cell-mediated activation of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhaomeng; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Xiaoteng; Tao, Liyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism of protein disulfide-isomerase A3 (PDIA3)-induced visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Rats were treated with saline (control), acetic acid and restraint stress (IBS model), empty vector (RNAi control) and PDIA3-RNAi vector (PDIA3-RNAi). Mesenteric lymph node DCs (MLNDCs) and splenic CD4+/CD8+ T cells were isolated for co-cultivation. Compared with control, MLNDCs co-cultured with CD4+ or CD8+ T cells showed an increased ability to promote T cell proliferation and produced more IL-4 or IL-9 secretion. Compared with the RNAi control, MLNDCs from the PDIA3 knockdown models were less effective in promoting the proliferation of CD4+/CD8+ T cells. It is concluded that PDIA3 plays an important role in the development of IBS through the DC-mediated activation of T cells, resulting in degranulation of MCs and visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:27896022

  11. Suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity mediated by macrophage-like cells in mice with experimental liver injury.

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, S; Nishimura, N; Ito, K

    1985-01-01

    The intensity of picryl chloride-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (PCl-DTH) was significantly lowered in mice with experimental liver injury induced by the injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or 1-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT). Adherent spleen cells prepared from mice with liver injury suppressed the PCl-DTH in normal syngeneic mice by adoptive transfer at the time of immunization with picryl chloride (PCl). Cianidanol, administered orally to recipient mice immediately after the transfer of adherent spleen cells, caused total prevention of the PCl-DTH from suppression by the transferred adherent spleen cells. In in vitro studies, the adherent spleen cells from both CCl4-treated and ANIT-treated mice produced higher amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than those from normal mice. The addition of cianidanol at the beginning of incubation caused an inhibition of PGE2 production of the adherent spleen cells. Furthermore, the spleen cell suspensions from CCl4-treated mice gave a marked increase in generation of superoxide anions (O2-), also inhibited by the addition of cianidanol. Gathered results support the adherent spleen cell as being the cell causing the suppression of DTH in mice with experimental liver injury; the important role of PGE2 and O2- in the suppression of DTH mediated by the adherent spleen cells was demonstrated. Cianidanol eliminated the suppression of DTH, owing principally to the inhibitory effect on the production of PGE2 and O2- from the adherent spleen cells. PMID:2982732

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticles suppressed T helper 1 cell-mediated immunity in a murine model of delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chien-Chang; Liang, Hong-Jen; Wang, Chia-Chi; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Background It was recently reported that iron oxide nanoparticles attenuated antigen-specific humoral responses and T cell cytokine expression in ovalbumin-sensitized mice. It is presently unclear whether iron oxide nanoparticles influence T helper 1 cell-mediated immunity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), whose pathophysiology requires the participation of T helper 1 cells and macrophages. Methods DTH was elicited by a subcutaneous challenge with ovalbumin to the footpads of mice sensitized with ovalbumin. Iron oxide nanoparticles (0.2–10 mg iron/kg) were administered intravenously 1 hour prior to ovalbumin sensitization. Local inflammatory responses were examined by footpad swelling and histological analysis. The expression of cytokines by splenocytes was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Administration of iron oxide nanoparticles, in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly attenuated inflammatory reactions associated with DTH, including the footpad swelling, the infiltration of T cells and macrophages, and the expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the inflammatory site. Iron oxide nanoparticles also demonstrated a suppressive effect on ovalbumin-stimulated production of interferon-γ by splenocytes and the phagocytic activity of splenic CD11b+ cells. Conclusion These results demonstrated that a single dose of iron oxide nanoparticles attenuated DTH reactions by suppressing the infiltration and functional activity of T helper 1 cells and macrophages in response to antigen stimulation. PMID:22701318

  13. IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Gotua, M; Lomidze, N; Dolidze, N; Gotua, T

    2008-04-01

    Food allergy has become a serious health concern especially in developed countries in the past two decades. In general population approximately 4-6% of children and 1-3% of adults experience food allergy. The article reviews IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders. Epidemiology, Mechanism, Clinical manifestations, Genetically modified crops (GMOs), Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment of IgE-mediated food allergies are discussed. The investigations show that over 90% of IgE-mediated food allergies in childhood are caused by: cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish and shellfish. Also the causes of food allergy are food additives, genetically modified crops. Risk factors for food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis include asthma and previous allergic reactions to the causative food. Food allergy is one of the most common causes of systematic anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, with an annual incidence of four cases per million populations and estimated 500 deaths annually. In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, individuals may experience urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, oral syndrome, asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, hypotension, shock and cardiac arrhythmias, caused by the massive release of mediators from mast cells and basophiles. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on history, detailed dietary analysis, skin testing, measuring specific IgE in blood serum and challenge tests. Treatment and prevention includes: avoidance diet, application of auto-injectable epinephrine, H1 and H2 antihistamines, corticosteroids, antileukotrienes, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, cromolyn sodium, etc.

  14. Allergen endotoxins induce T-cell-dependent and non-IgE-mediated nasal hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Naruhito; Matsushita, Kazufumi; Fukuoka, Ayumi; Nakahira, Masakiyo; Matsumoto, Makoto; Akasaki, Shoko; Yasuda, Koubun; Shimizu, Takeshi; Yoshimoto, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Allergen-mediated cross-linking of IgE on mast cells/basophils is a well-recognized trigger for type 1 allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR). However, allergens may not be the sole trigger for AR, and several allergic-like reactions are induced by non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. We sought to describe a novel non-IgE-mediated, endotoxin-triggered nasal type-1-hypersensitivity-like reaction in mice. To investigate whether endotoxin affects sneezing responses, mice were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA), then nasally challenged with endotoxin-free or endotoxin-containing OVA. To investigate the role of T cells and mechanisms of the endotoxin-induced response, mice were adoptively transferred with in vitro-differentiated OVA-specific TH2 cells, then nasally challenged with endotoxin-free or endotoxin-containing OVA. Endotoxin-containing, but not endotoxin-free, OVA elicited sneezing responses in mice independent from IgE-mediated signaling. OVA-specific TH2 cell adoptive transfer to mice demonstrated that local activation of antigen-specific TH2 cells was required for the response. The Toll-like receptor 4-myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway was indispensable for endotoxin-containing OVA-elicited rhinitis. In addition, LPS directly triggered sneezing responses in OVA-specific TH2-transferred and nasally endotoxin-free OVA-primed mice. Although antihistamines suppressed sneezing responses, mast-cell/basophil-depleted mice had normal sneezing responses to endotoxin-containing OVA. Clodronate treatment abrogated endotoxin-containing OVA-elicited rhinitis, suggesting the involvement of monocytes/macrophages in this response. Antigen-specific nasal activation of CD4(+) T cells followed by endotoxin exposure induces mast cell/basophil-independent histamine release in the nose that elicits sneezing responses. Thus, environmental or nasal residential bacteria may exacerbate AR symptoms. In addition, this novel phenomenon might explain

  15. Cell penetrable-mouse forkhead box P3 suppresses type 1 T helper cell-mediated immunity in a murine model of delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Qihong; Yin, Lei; Wu, Weijiang; Xia, Sheng; Shao, Qixiang

    2017-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), which is a transcription factor, has a primary role in the development and function of regulatory T cells, and thus contributes to homeostasis of the immune system. A previous study generated a cell-permeable fusion protein of mouse FOXP3 conjugated to a protein transduction domain (PTD-mFOXP3) that successfully blocked differentiation of type 17 T helper cells in vitro and alleviated experimental arthritis in mice. In the present study, the role of PTD-mFOXP3 in type 1 T helper (Th1) cell-mediated immunity was investigated and the possible mechanisms for its effects were explored. Under Th1 polarization conditions, cluster of differentiation 4+ T cells were treated with PTD-mFOXP3 and analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro, which revealed that PTD-mFOXP3 blocked Th1 differentiation in vitro. Mice models of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions were generated by subcutaneous sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to the ears of mice. PTD-mFOXP3, which was administered via local subcutaneous injection, significantly reduced DTH-induced inflammation, including ear swelling (ear swelling, P<0.001; pinnae weight, P<0.05 or P<0.01 with 0.25 and 1.25 mg/kg PTD-mFOXP3, respectively), infiltration of T cells, and expression of interferon-γ at local inflammatory sites (mRNA level P<0.05) compared with the DTH group. The results of the present study demonstrated that PTD-mFOXP3 may attenuate DTH reactions by suppressing the infiltration and activity of Th1 cells.

  16. Diagnostic tools for hypersensitivity to platinum drugs and taxanes: skin testing, specific IgE, and mast cell/basophil mediators.

    PubMed

    Caiado, Joana; Picard, Matthieu

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to platinum drugs and taxanes are increasing in cancer patients, and rapid drug desensitization has emerged as a safe and effective method to reintroduce these drugs in reactive patients. Optimal management of patients presenting HSRs to chemotherapy depends on the use of various diagnostic tools, which include measurement of mast cell/basophil mediator release following a HSR and skin testing. Serum tryptase should be measured in patients presenting chemotherapy HSRs, and its elevation would support mast cell/basophil activation. Skin testing to platinum drugs has a high sensitivity and specificity and is critical to guide the management of platinum-reactive patients. Taxane skin testing is also emerging as a useful diagnostic and risk stratification tool in the evaluation of patients with HSRs to taxanes. Platinum sIgE assays have been recently developed and can be helpful in combination with skin testing or as an alternative when skin testing is not available.

  17. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca2+ in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  18. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, N

    2009-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity represents an immune-mediated reaction to a drug. Although several drug hypersensitivity reactions are confined to the skin and rather mild, some may be life threatening and also involve further organs such as liver, kidney and bone marrow. The exact pathogenesis of many drug hypersensitivity reactions is still obscure. In this review the concepts on how small molecular drugs can activate the immune system are discussed and the hapten, prohapten and p-i concept are explained. Furthermore, the classification of drug hypersensitivity reactions and some common and severe clinical manifestations of drug-induced T cell mediated reactions are presented.

  19. Nude mice produce a T cell-derived antigen-binding factor that mediates the early component of delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W R; Meade, R; Pettinicchi, A; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1989-03-15

    The elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in mice is caused by the sequential action of two different T cells. An early-acting, DTH-initiating T cell produces an Ag-specific T cell factor, that is analogous to IgE antibody and initiates DTH by sensitizing the local tissues for release of the vasoactive amine serotonin. In picryl chloride or oxazolone contact sensitivity, this T cell factor is Ag-specific, but MHC unrestricted. We, therefore, hypothesized that DTH-initiating T cells are primitive T cells with Ag receptors that can bind Ag without MHC restriction. In order to characterize the origin of this DTH-initiating T cell and the conditions that are necessary for its development, we contact-sensitized various strains of immunodeficient mice. Surprisingly, we found that the early phase of DTH was present in athymic nude mice. In contrast, the early component of DTH was absent in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. These mice lack T and B cells, but have NK cells. These findings suggested that the early component of DTH was not caused by NK cells, and was caused by cells belonging to a lineage from a rearranging gene family. The early component of DTH in nude mice was Ag specific, was caused by MHC unrestricted Thy-1+ T cells, and was mediated by Ag-binding, Ag-specific T cell factors. We found that DTH-initiating, T cell-derived, Ag-binding molecules from nude mice and normal CBA/J mice had the same functional properties. The early component of DTH was elicited in two different systems (contact sensitivity and SRBC-specific DTH) in two strains of nude mice (BALB/c athymic nudes and CByB6F1/J-nu) from two different suppliers, but not in BALB/c and athymic nudes from a third supplier. From these findings we concluded that DTH-initiating T cells, which produce IgE-like Ag-specific T cell factors, are present in some strains of athymic nude mice and thus are relatively thymic independent T cells.

  20. Chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species are involved in hypersensitive response-like cell death mediated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Pike, Sharon; Pallardy, Stephen; Gassmann, Walter; Zhang, Shuqun

    2007-09-01

    Plant defense against pathogens often includes rapid programmed cell death known as the hypersensitive response (HR). Recent genetic studies have demonstrated the involvement of a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade consisting of three tobacco MAPKs, SIPK, Ntf4 and WIPK, and their common upstream MAPK kinase (MAPKK or MEK), NtMEK2. Potential upstream MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs or MEKKs) in this cascade include the orthologs of Arabidopsis MEKK1 and tomato MAPKKKalpha. Activation of the SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK pathway induces cell death with phenotypes identical to pathogen-induced HR at macroscopic, microscopic and physiological levels, including loss of membrane potential, electrolyte leakage and rapid dehydration. Loss of membrane potential in NtMEK2(DD) plants is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is preceded by disruption of metabolic activities in chloroplasts and mitochondria. We observed rapid shutdown of carbon fixation in chloroplasts after SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK activation, which can lead to the generation of ROS in chloroplasts under illumination. Consistent with a role of chloroplast-generated ROS in MAPK-mediated cell death, plants kept in the dark do not accumulate H(2)O(2) in chloroplasts after MAPK activation, and cell death is significantly delayed. Similar light dependency was observed in HR cell death induced by tobacco mosaic virus, which is known to activate the same MAPK pathway in an N-gene-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of the SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK cascade by pathogens actively promotes the generation of ROS in chloroplasts, which plays an important role in the signaling for and/or execution of HR cell death in plants.

  1. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals That Ethylene/H2O2-Mediated Hypersensitive Response and Programmed Cell Death Determine the Compatible Interaction of Sand Pear and Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jing; Chang, Youhong; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A major restriction on sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) production is black spot disease caused by the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata. However, the pear response mechanism to A. alternata is unknown at the molecular level. Here, host responses of a resistant cultivar Cuiguan (CG) and a susceptible cultivar Sucui1 (SC1) to A. alternata infection were investigated. We found that the primary necrotic lesion formed at 1 dpi and the expansion of lesions was aggressive in SC1. Data from transcriptomic profiles using RNA-Seq technology identified a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between CG and SC1 in the early phase of A. alternata infection. K-mean cluster and Mapman analysis revealed that genes involved in ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and ET signaling pathway, such as ACS, ACOs, and ERFs, and in hypersensitive response (HR) and programmed cell death (PCD) were significantly enriched and up-regulated in the susceptible cultivar SC1. Conversely, genes involved in response to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were differentially up-regulated in the resistant cultivar CG after inoculation with the fungus. Furthermore, ET levels were highly accumulated in SC1, but not in CG. Higher activities of detoxifying enzymes such as catalases were detected in CG. Our results demonstrate that the ET-/H2O2-mediated PCD and detoxifying processes play a vital role in the interaction of pear and A. alternata. PMID:28261248

  2. A novel methodology for quantitating the enhancement of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity by IMREG-1: a measure of the immunopotentiation of cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Sizemore, R C; Kern, C H; Gottlieb, M S; Gottlieb, A A

    1995-09-01

    IMREG-1, a low-molecular-weight immunomodulator derived from normal human leukocyte dialysates, has been shown to enhance cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to recall antigens. Both IMREG-1 and the biologically active peptides (Tyr-Gly[YG] and Tyr-Gly-Gly[YGG]) identified therein are able to accelerate and enhance DTH in a concentration-dependent manner. In this study, we describe a novel methodology for analyzing and quantitating this response and demonstrate its use with data comparing drug to placebo. Subjects demonstrating prior sensitivity to a recall antigen (tetanus toxoid) received intradermal injections of tetanus toxoid alone (control) and either dilutions of IMREG-1 plus antigen, or placebo plus antigen, on the volar surface of the forearm. The response, as measured by area of erythema, was calculated and plotted as a function of time. The area under the resulting curve (AUC) was then determined by use of the trapezoidal rule, whereby the area of a trapezoid formed between each sequential pair of time points was calculated. The AUC computed for each site receiving a dilution of IMREG-1 or placebo (test) was compared with the AUC computed at the site that received antigen alone (control) by means of a test to control (T/C) ratio. The respective T/C ratios for designated dilutions of IMREG-1 or placebo provided a basis of comparison between responses to IMREG-1 and to placebo, while also controlling for individual sensitivity in response to antigen. We demonstrate in this study that the enhanced response to IMREG-1 plus antigen is statistically different from that seen with placebo plus antigen. This response, as a function to time, predominantly appears in the 12- to 24-hr period after injection, illustrating the ability of the immunomodulator to accelerate, enhance, and sustain a DTH response. We further conclude that the effect of IMREG-1 in this context is one of immunopotentiation of cell-mediated immunity.

  3. Mast Cells in Lung Homeostasis: Beyond Type I Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-06-01

    Lungs are indispensable organs for the respiratory process, and maintaining their homeostasis is essential for human health and survival. However, during the lifetime of an individual, the lungs suffer countless insults that put at risk their delicate organization and function. Many cells of the immune system participate to maintain this equilibrium and to keep functional lungs. Among these cells, mast cells have recently attracted attention because of their ability to rapidly secrete many chemical and biological mediators that modulate different processes like inflammation, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, etc. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the role that mast cells play in lung protection during infections, and of the relation of mast cell responses to type I hypersensitivity-associated pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of mast cells during wound healing in the lung and its association with lung cancer, and how mast cells could be exploited as therapeutic targets in some diseases.

  4. Mast Cells in Lung Homeostasis: Beyond Type I Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-01-01

    Lungs are indispensable organs for the respiratory process, and maintaining their homeostasis is essential for human health and survival. However, during the lifetime of an individual, the lungs suffer countless insults that put at risk their delicate organization and function. Many cells of the immune system participate to maintain this equilibrium and to keep functional lungs. Among these cells, mast cells have recently attracted attention because of their ability to rapidly secrete many chemical and biological mediators that modulate different processes like inflammation, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, etc. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the role that mast cells play in lung protection during infections, and of the relation of mast cell responses to type I hypersensitivity-associated pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of mast cells during wound healing in the lung and its association with lung cancer, and how mast cells could be exploited as therapeutic targets in some diseases PMID:25484639

  5. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Hypersensitivity Reaction to Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, John; Nicholls, Katherine; Jones, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine is a commonly used analgesic agent in the management of both acute and chronic pain. While dose-dependent side effects are well described, allergy to ketamine is extremely rare. A 41-year-old woman with chronic pelvic pain and previous ketamine exposure developed a widespread urticarial rash and mild perioral edema following the initiation of a ketamine infusion. The infusion was ceased and the patient was treated with oral antihistamine, with rapid resolution of symptoms. Serum tryptase levels were elevated at 2 and 6 hours after the infusion was ceased, and subsequent intradermal skin testing supported the diagnosis of type I hypersensitivity reaction to ketamine. This case represents a likely immunoglobulin E-mediated type I hypersensitivity reaction to ketamine, supported by elevated tryptase levels and positive intradermal skin testing. The interpretation of these results and likely mechanism of the hypersensitivity reaction are described. The patient and treating team were advised against subsequent use of ketamine, due to the risk of serious adverse systemic reaction with repeat exposure. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  6. Increased 5-hydroxytryptamine mediates post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity via the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Dong; Sung, Tae-Sik; Kim, Hyun-Ju; La, Jun-Ho; Kim, Tae-Wan; Yang, Il-Suk

    2008-11-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity often develops after intestinal inflammation, but the pathogenic mechanism has not been clearly elucidated. We investigated whether this post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity is mediated by 5-hydroxytryptamine through activation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor. In male Sprague-Dawley rats recovered from acetic acid-induced colitis, we monitored visceral nociceptive response by scoring the abdominal withdrawal reflex and simultaneously measuring the changes in arterial pulse rate. Seven days after induction of colitis, 52% of the rats showed an increased abdominal withdrawal reflex score and arterial pulse rate changes to colorectal distension, indicating that they had post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists, alosetron (20 mg/kg, p.o.) and granisetron (10 microg/kg, s.c.), inhibited post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity. Administration of a 5-hydroxytryptamine precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan; 10 mg/kg, s.c.), induced visceral hypersensitivity in naïve rats, which was antagonized by granisetron. Increase in 5-hydroxytryptamine immunoreactive cells in colonic mucosal layer was found both in the rats with post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity and in the 5-hydroxytryptophan-treated rats. These results suggest that increased 5-hydroxytryptamine in colonic mucosa mediates post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity through activation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor.

  7. Hepatic NK cell-mediated hypersensitivity to ConA-induced liver injury in mouse liver expressing hepatitis C virus polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuxia; Yan, Shaoduo; Wang, Licui; Duan, Xiangguo; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yue; Wu, Tao; Wang, Xiaohui; An, Jie; Zhang, Yulong; Zhou, Qianqian; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-08-04

    The role of hepatic NK cells in the pathogenesis of HCV-associated hepatic failure is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of HCV on ConA-induced immunological hepatic injury and the influence of HCV on hepatic NK cell activation in the liver after ConA administration. An immunocompetent HCV mouse model that encodes the entire viral polyprotein in a liver-specific manner based on hydrodynamic injection and φC31o integrase was used to study the role of hepatic NK cells. Interestingly, the frequency of hepatic NK cells was reduced in HCV mice, whereas the levels of other intrahepatic lymphocytes remained unaltered. Next, we investigated whether the reduction in NK cells within HCV mouse livers might elicit an effect on immune-mediated liver injury. HCV mice were subjected to acute liver injury models upon ConA administration. We observed that HCV mice developed more severe ConA-induced immune-mediated hepatitis, which was dependent on the accumulated intrahepatic NK cells. Our results indicated that after the administration of ConA, NK cells not only mediated liver injury through the production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and perforin) with direct antiviral activity, but they also killed target cells directly through the TRAIL/DR5 and NKG2D/NKG2D ligand signaling pathway in HCV mice. Our findings suggest a critical role for NK cells in oversensitive liver injury during chronic HCV infection.

  8. Colonic mast cell infiltration in rats with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Katsuyo; Sato, Yasushi; Iwata, Hiroshi; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2007-12-01

    Colonic mucosal mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndromes. This study was designed to investigate the roles of mucosal mast cells in development of an experimental visceral hypersensitivity induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. TNBS, when injected into the proximal colon through laparotomy, produced a significant decrease in pain threshold of the distal colon to mechanical distention, indicating a visceral hypersensitivity. In the proximal colon that was directly insulted by TNBS, mucosal necrosis and extensive inflammatory cell infiltration were observed with concomitant increase in tissue myeloperoxide (MPO) activity. In the distal colon where distention stimuli were applied, the number of mucosal mast cells significantly increased following TNBS treatment, although neither mucosal injury nor increase in tissue MPO activity was observed. In an organ culture, spontaneous release of a mucosal mast cell-specific protease (RMCP-2) from the distal colon tissue of TNBS-treated rats was significantly larger than that of sham animals. Furthermore, TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed by subcutaneous pretreatment with a mast cell stabilizer doxantrazole in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that prominent colonic mast cell infiltration associated with an enhanced spontaneous mediator release is responsible, at least partly, for development of visceral hypersensitivity induced by TNBS in rats.

  9. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity. PMID:26770021

  10. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity.

  11. PERSISTENT SUPPRESSION OF CONTACT HYPERSENSITIVITY, AND ALTERED T-CELL PARAMETERS IN F344 RATS EXPOSED PERINATALLY TO 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    The outcome of perinatal low-level TCDD exposure on the T cell-mediated contact hypersensitivity response (CHS) in adult F344 rats was investigated. Suppression of the 2,4- dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-specific contact hypersensitivity reponse occurred in mature off...

  12. PERSISTENT SUPPRESSION OF CONTACT HYPERSENSITIVITY, AND ALTERED T-CELL PARAMETERS IN F344 RATS EXPOSED PERINATALLY TO 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    The outcome of perinatal low-level TCDD exposure on the T cell-mediated contact hypersensitivity response (CHS) in adult F344 rats was investigated. Suppression of the 2,4- dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-specific contact hypersensitivity reponse occurred in mature off...

  13. Bidirectional amygdaloid control of neuropathic hypersensitivity mediated by descending serotonergic pathways acting on spinal 5-HT3 and 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sagalajev, B; Bourbia, N; Beloushko, E; Wei, H; Pertovaara, A

    2015-04-01

    Amygdala is involved in processing of primary emotions and particularly its central nucleus (CeA) also in pain control. Here we studied mechanisms mediating the descending control of mechanical hypersensitivity by the CeA in rats with a peripheral neuropathy in the left hind limb. For drug administrations, the animals had a guide cannula in the right CeA and an intrathecal catheter or another guide cannula in the medullary raphe. Hypersensitivity was tested with monofilaments. Glutamate administration in the CeA produced a bidirectional effect on hypersensitivity that varied from an increase at a low-dose (9μg) to a reduction at high doses (30-100μg). The increase but not the reduction of hypersensitivity was prevented by blocking the amygdaloid NMDA receptor with a dose of MK-801 that alone had no effects. The glutamate-induced increase in hypersensitivity was reversed by blocking the spinal 5-HT3 receptor with ondansetron, whereas the reduction in hypersensitivity was reversed by blocking the spinal 5-HT1A receptor with WAY-100635. Both the increase and decrease of hypersensitivity induced by amygdaloid glutamate treatment were reversed by medullary administration of a 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, that presumably produced autoinhibition of serotonergic cell bodies in the medullary raphe. The results indicate that depending on the dose, glutamate in the CeA has a descending facilitatory or inhibitory effect on neuropathic pain hypersensitivity. Serotoninergic raphe neurons are involved in mediating both of these effects. Spinally, the 5-HT3 receptor contributes to the increase and the 5-HT1A receptor to the decrease of neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by amygdaloid glutamate.

  14. The C-terminal half of Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector AVR3a is sufficient to trigger R3a-mediated hypersensitivity and suppress INF1-induced cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Bos, Jorunn I B; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Young, Carolyn; Cakir, Cahid; Huitema, Edgar; Win, Joe; Armstrong, Miles R; Birch, Paul R J; Kamoun, Sophien

    2006-10-01

    The RXLR cytoplasmic effector AVR3a of Phytophthora infestans confers avirulence on potato plants carrying the R3a gene. Two alleles of Avr3a encode secreted proteins that differ in only three amino acid residues, two of which are in the mature protein. Avirulent isolates carry the Avr3a allele, which encodes AVR3aKI (containing amino acids C19, K80 and I103), whereas virulent isolates express only the virulence allele avr3a, encoding AVR3aEM (S19, E80 and M103). Only the AVR3aKI protein is recognized inside the plant cytoplasm where it triggers R3a-mediated hypersensitivity. Similar to other oomycete avirulence proteins, AVR3aKI carries a signal peptide followed by a conserved motif centered on the consensus RXLR sequence that is functionally similar to a host cell-targeting signal of malaria parasites. The interaction between Avr3a and R3a can be reconstructed by their transient co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We exploited the N. benthamiana experimental system to further characterize the Avr3a-R3a interaction. R3a activation by AVR3aKI is dependent on the ubiquitin ligase-associated protein SGT1 and heat-shock protein HSP90. The AVR3aKI and AVR3aEM proteins are equally stable in planta, suggesting that the difference in R3a-mediated death cannot be attributed to AVR3aEM protein instability. AVR3aKI is able to suppress cell death induced by the elicitin INF1 of P. infestans, suggesting a possible virulence function for this protein. Structure-function experiments indicated that the 75-amino acid C-terminal half of AVR3aKI, which excludes the RXLR region, is sufficient for avirulence and suppression functions, consistent with the view that the N-terminal region of AVR3aKI and other RXLR effectors is involved in secretion and targeting but is not required for effector activity. We also found that both polymorphic amino acids, K80 and I103, of mature AVR3a contribute to the effector functions.

  15. Calcium is involved in the R Mc1 (blb)-mediated hypersensitive response against Meloidogyne chitwoodi in potato.

    PubMed

    Davies, Laura J; Brown, Charles R; Elling, Axel A

    2015-01-01

    Functional characterization of the Columbia root-knot nematode resistance gene R Mc1 ( blb ) in potato revealed the R gene-mediated resistance is dependent on a hypersensitive response and involves calcium. The resistance (R) gene R Mc1(blb) confers resistance against the plant-parasitic nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi. Avirulent and virulent nematodes were used to functionally characterize the R Mc1(blb)-mediated resistance mechanism in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Histological observations indicated a hypersensitive response (HR) occurred during avirulent nematode infection. This was confirmed by quantifying reactive oxygen species activity in response to avirulent and virulent M. chitwoodi. To gain an insight into the signal transduction pathways mediating the R Mc1(blb)-induced HR, chemical inhibitors were utilized. Inhibiting Ca(2+) channels caused a significant reduction in electrolyte leakage, an indicator of cell death. Labeling with a Ca(2+)-sensitive dye revealed high Ca(2+) levels in the root cells surrounding avirulent nematodes. Furthermore, the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), StCDPK4 had a higher transcript level in R Mc1(blb) potato roots infected with avirulent nematodes in comparison to roots infected with virulent M. chitwoodi. The results of this study indicate Ca(2+) plays a role in the R Mc1(blb)-mediated resistance against M. chitwoodi in potato.

  16. In vitro diagnosis of immediate IgE-mediated drug hypersensitivity: warnings and (unmet) needs.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Astrid P; Sabato, Vito; Bridts, Chris H; Ebo, Didier G

    2014-08-01

    Immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) constitute an important health condition, with serious consequences of inadequate diagnosis. In this article, some of the most important issues related to in vitro diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergies are discussed. In vitro diagnostics will benefit from expanded and novel insights and understandings in drug chemical reactivity, protein binding, biotransformation, degradation, identification of (cross-reactive) drug antigenic determinants, and deeper understanding of sensitization routes. Collective efforts should be undertaken to activate fundamental and clinical investigations.

  17. Basophil activation test for investigation of IgE-mediated mechanisms in drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Markus; Harrer, Andrea; Lang, Roland; Schneider, Michael; Ferreira, Tima; Hawranek, Thomas; Himly, Martin

    2011-09-16

    Hypersensitivity reactions against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like propyphenazone (PP) and diclofenac (DF) can manifest as Type I-like allergic reactions (1). In clinical practice, diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity is mainly performed by patient history, as skin testing is not reliable and oral provocation testing bears life-threatening risks for the patient (2). Hence, evidence for an underlying IgE-mediated pathomechanism is hard to obtain. Here, we present an in vitro method based on the use of human basophils derived from drug-hypersensitive patients that mimics the allergic effector reaction in vivo. As basophils of drug-allergic patients carry IgE molecules specific for the culprit drug, they become activated upon IgE receptor crosslinking and release allergic effector molecules. The activation of basophils can be monitored by the determination of the upregulation of CD63 surface expression using flow cytometry (3). In the case of low molecular weight drugs, conjugates are designed to enable IgE receptor crosslinking on basophils. As depicted in Figure 1, two representatives of NSAIDs, PP and DF, are covalently bound to human serum albumin (HSA) via a carboxyl group reacting with the primary amino group of lysine residues. DF carries an intrinsic carboxyl group and, thus, can be used directly (4), whereas a carboxyl group-containing derivative of PP had to be organochemically synthesized prior to the study (1). The coupling degree of the low molecular weight compounds on the protein carrier molecule and their spatial distribution is important to guarantee crosslinking of two IgE receptor molecules. The here described protocol applies high performance-size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) equipped with a sequential refractive index (RI) and ultra violet (UV) detection system for determination of the coupling degree. As the described methodology may be applied for other drugs, the basophil activation test (BAT) bears the potential to be

  18. Adrenergic β2-receptors mediates visceral hypersensitivity induced by heterotypic intermittent stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Rui, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Yuan-Yuan; Ju, Zhong; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Xiao, Ying; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been difficult to treat effectively partially because its pathophysiology is not fully understood. Recent studies show that norepinephrine (NE) plays an important role in the development of visceral hypersensitivity. In this study, we designed to investigate the role of adrenergic signaling in visceral hypersensitivity induced by heterotypical intermittent stress (HIS). Abdominal withdrawal reflex scores (AWRs) used as visceral sensitivity were determined by measuring the visceromoter responses to colorectal distension. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRGs) were labeled by injection of DiI into the colon wall and were acutely dissociated for whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Blood plasma level of NE was measured using radioimmunoassay kits. The expression of β2-adrenoceptors was measured by western blotting. We showed that HIS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was attenuated by systemic administration of a β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, in a dose-dependent manner, but not by a α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine. Using specific β-adrenoceptor antagonists, HIS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was alleviated by β2 adrenoceptor antagonist but not by β1- or β3-adrenoceptor antagonist. Administration of a selective β2-adrenoceptor antagonist also normalized hyperexcitability of colon-innervating DRG neurons of HIS rats. Furthermore, administration of β-adrenoceptor antagonist suppressed sustained potassium current density (IK) without any alteration of fast-inactivating potassium current density (IA). Conversely, administration of NE enhanced the neuronal excitability and produced visceral hypersensitivity in healthy control rats, and blocked by β2-adrenoceptor antagonists. In addition, HIS significantly enhanced the NE concentration in the blood plasma but did not change the expression of β2-adrenoceptor in DRGs and the muscularis externa of the colon. The

  19. Chronic otitis media and immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity in adults: is it a contributor of cholesteatoma?

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang Duk; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho; Chung, Kyu-Whan

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between chronic otitis media (COM) and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity in adults. A prospective comparative study. One hundred seventeen patients with COM from July 2005 to April 2007 were enrolled. All subjects had a questionnaire on allergic rhinitis symptoms and performed allergy tests that included a total IgE and the multiple radioallergosorbent chemiluminescence assay to check the presence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. The prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity and allergic rhinitis were 22.2% and 7.7% in patients with COM, respectively. The mean total IgE was 157.2 ranging from 3 to 1833. The prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity was similar with regard to the recurrence or bilaterality. However, patients with cholesteatoma had a higher prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity than patients without that condition. The prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity and allergic rhinitis in adults with COM appeared to be higher than in the general population. Allergy might contribute to COM especially in cases with a cholesteatoma.

  20. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated (“allergic”) and non-immune-mediated (“pseudo allergic”) reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  1. Adrenergic Stimulation Mediates Visceral Hypersensitivity to Colorectal Distension following Heterotypic Chronic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Winston, John H.; Xu, Guang-Yin; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic stress exacerbates or causes relapse of symptoms such as abdominal pain and cramping in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether chronic stress increases plasma norepinephrine and sensitizes colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by increasing the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the colon wall. Methods Heterotypic chronic stress (HeCS) was induced in male Wistar rats and neurologic and molecular responses were analyzed. Tissues were analyzed for NGF expression. Results HeCS significantly increased the visceromoter response to colorectal distension; expression of NGF increased in colonic muscularis externa and mucosa/submucosa. Rheobase decreased, resting membrane potential was depolarized, and electrogenesis of action potentials increased in colon-specific thoracolumbar DRG neurons. Luminal administration of resiniferatoxin in distal colon, systemic administration of anti-NGF antibody, or inhibition of the NGF receptor TrkA by k252A or antisense oligonucleotides in thoracolumbar DRG blocked the chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. Blockade of α1/α2- and β1/β2-adrenergic receptors prevented the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity and increased expression of NGF in the colon wall. HeCS did not induce any inflammatory response in the colon wall. Conclusion The peripheral stress mediator norepinephrine induces visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension in response to HeCS by increasing the expression of NGF in the colon wall, which sensitizes primary afferents in the absence of an inflammatory response. PMID:19800336

  2. Jasmonic acid signaling modulates ozone-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Rao, M V; Lee, H; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Davis, K R

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and ethylene-dependent signaling pathways regulates plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress factors. Earlier studies demonstrated that ozone (O(3)) exposure activates a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death pathway in the Arabidopsis ecotype Cvi-0. We now have confirmed the role of SA and JA signaling in influencing O(3)-induced cell death. Expression of salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) in Cvi-0 reduced O(3)-induced cell death. Methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) pretreatment of Cvi-0 decreased O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) content and SA concentrations and completely abolished O(3)-induced cell death. Cvi-0 synthesized as much JA as did Col-0 in response to O(3) exposure but exhibited much less sensitivity to exogenous Me-JA. Analyses of the responses to O(3) of the JA-signaling mutants jar1 and fad3/7/8 also demonstrated an antagonistic relationship between JA- and SA-signaling pathways in controlling the magnitude of O(3)-induced HR-like cell death.

  3. Langerhans cell function dictates induction of contact hypersensitivity or unresponsiveness to DNFB in Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Streilein, J.W.; Bergstresser, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between distribution and function of Langerhans cells within the epidermis and the capacity of cutaneous surfaces to promote the induction of contact hypersensitivity to DNFB have been examined in inbred Syrian hamsters. In a manner very similar to previous findings in mice, the results indicate that hamster cutaneous surfaces deficient in normally functioning Langerhans cells, naturally (cheek pouch epithelium) or artificially (after perturbation with ultraviolet light), are inefficient at promoting DNFB sensitization. Instead, DNFB applied to these regions of skin results in the induction of a state of specific unresponsiveness. Viable lymphoid cells from unresponsive hamsters can transfer the unresponsiveness to naive hamsters suggesting that active suppression is at least partly responsible, probably mediated by T lymphocytes.

  4. A subset of AID-dependent B-1a cells initiates hypersensitivity and pneumococcal pneumonia resistance

    PubMed Central

    Askenase, Phillip W.; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Paliwal, Vipin; Redegeld, Frank; Groot Kormelink, Thomas; Kerfoot, Steven; Hutchinson, Andrew T.; van Loveren, Henk; Campos, Regis; Itakura, Atsuko; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Yamamoto, Natsuo; Nazimek, Katarzyn; Szczepanik, Marian; Ptak, Wold

    2015-01-01

    We propose that there is a special B-1a B cell subset (“sB-1a” cells) that mediates linked processes very early after immunization to initiate cutaneous contact sensitivity (CS), delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), and immune resistance to pneumococcal pneumonia. Our published data indicate that in CS and DTH these initiating processes are required for elicitation of the delayed onset and late-occurring classical T cell–mediated responses. sB-1a cells resemble memory B2 cells, as they are stimulated within 1-hour of immunization and depend on T helper cytokines—uniquely IL-4 from hepatic iNKT cells–for activation and rapid migration from the peritoneal cavity to the spleen to secrete IgM antibody (Ab) and Ab-derived free light chains (FLC) by only one day after immunization. Unlike conventional B-1a (cB-1a) cell–produced IgM natural Ab, IgM Ab produced by sB-1a cells has high Ag affinity owing to immunoglobulin V-region mutations induced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). The dominant cB-1a cells are increased in immunized AID-deficient mice but do not mediate initiation, CS, or pneumonia resistance because natural Ab has relatively low Ag-affinity because of unmutated germ line V-regions. In CS and DTH, sB-1a IgM Ag affinity is sufficiently high to mediate complement activation for generation of C5a that, together with vasoactive mediators such as TNF-α released by FLC-sensitized mast cells activate local endothelium for extravascular recruitment of effector T cells. We conclude by discussing the possibility of functional sB-1 cells in humans. PMID:26662721

  5. Heat shock proteins HSP27 and HSP70 are present in the skin and are important mediators of allergic contact hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Nasti, Tahseen H; Huang, Chun-Ming; Huber, Brad S; Jaleel, Tarannum; Lin, Hui-Yi; Xu, Hui; Elmets, Craig A

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of murine skin has shown that a variety of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are constitutively expressed in the skin. Using murine allergic contact hypersensitivity as a model, we investigated the role of two heat shock proteins – HSP27 and HSP70 – in the induction of cutaneous cell-mediated immune responses. Immunohistochemical examination of skin specimens showed that HSP27 was present in the epidermis and HSP70 was present in both the epidermis and dermis. Inhibition of HSP27 and HSP70 produced a reduction in the DNFB contact hypersensitivity response and resulted in the induction of antigen specific unresponsiveness. Treatment of dendritic cell cultures with recombinant HSP27 caused in the upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19, which was inhibited when antibodies to HSP27 were added. DNFB conjugated dendritic cells that had been treated with HSP27 had an increased capacity to initiate contact hypersensitivity responses compared to control dendritic cells. This augmented capacity required TLR4 signaling because neither cytokine production by dendritic cells nor the increased induction of contact hypersensitivity responses occurred in TLR4 deficient C3H/HeJ mice. Our findings indicate that a cascade of events occurs following initial interaction of hapten with the skin that includes increased activity of heat shock proteins, their interaction with TLR4 and, in turn, increased production of cytokines that are known to enhance antigen presentation by T-cells. The results suggest that heat shock proteins form a link between adaptive and innate immunity during the early stages of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:19109201

  6. Heat shock proteins HSP27 and HSP70 are present in the skin and are important mediators of allergic contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Nasti, Tahseen H; Huang, Chun-Ming; Huber, Brad S; Jaleel, Tarannum; Lin, Hui-Yi; Xu, Hui; Elmets, Craig A

    2009-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of murine skin has shown that a variety of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are constitutively expressed in the skin. Using murine allergic contact hypersensitivity as a model, we investigated the role of two heat shock proteins, HSP27 and HSP70, in the induction of cutaneous cell-mediated immune responses. Immunohistochemical examination of skin specimens showed that HSP27 was present in the epidermis and HSP70 was present in both the epidermis and dermis. Inhibition of HSP27 and HSP70 produced a reduction in the 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene contact hypersensitivity response and resulted in the induction of Ag-specific unresponsiveness. Treatment of dendritic cell cultures with recombinant HSP27 caused in the up-regulation of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12p70, and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19, which was inhibited when Abs to HSP27 were added. The 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene-conjugated dendritic cells that had been treated with HSP27 had an increased capacity to initiate contact hypersensitivity responses compared with control dendritic cells. This augmented capacity required TLR4 signaling because neither cytokine production by dendritic cells nor the increased induction of contact hypersensitivity responses occurred in TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice. Our findings indicate that a cascade of events occurs following initial interaction of hapten with the skin that includes increased activity of HSPs, their interaction with TLR4, and, in turn, increased production of cytokines that are known to enhance Ag presentation by T cells. The results suggest that HSPs form a link between adaptive and innate immunity during the early stages of contact hypersensitivity.

  7. Blast cells transfer experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Schuyler, M.; Cook, C.; Listrom, M.; Fengolio-Preiser, C.

    1988-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) can be transferred by lymph node cells (LNC) cultured in vitro with antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the cells responsible for transfer and to determine if pulmonary cells can transfer HP. We cultured LNC from sensitized Strain 2 guinea pigs with a soluble extract of Micropolyspora faeni for 72 h, separated lymphoblasts from small lymphocytes, and transferred both subpopulations intravenously to syngeneic recipients. We also transferred irradiated lymphoblasts (1,500 rads), macrophage-depleted, lymphoblast-enriched populations, and pulmonary cells either without culture or after culture with M. faeni. Control animals received an equal volume of medium. All recipient animals were challenged intratracheally (i.t.) with M. faeni 48 h after the cell transfer, and they were killed 4 days after i.t. challenge. Randomly selected microscopic fields of the lung (250/animal) were judged to be normal or abnormal without knowledge of treatment. This measurement was reproducible (r = 0.95 for duplicate measurements, n = 55). All guinea pigs were maintained in HEPA-filtered air. There was a low level of pulmonary response to an i.t. challenge of M. faeni in animals that received medium. Animals that received pulmonary cells, either cultured or noncultured, did not differ from those in the control group. There was a substantial increase (p less than 0.01) in the extent of pulmonary abnormalities in the recipients of the lymphoblast population, with significant correlation (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01) between the number of lymphoblasts transferred and the extent of pulmonary abnormalities.

  8. Tolerability of aztreonam and carbapenems in patients with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, Francesco; Valluzzi, Rocco Luigi; Alonzi, Cristiana; Maggioletti, Michela; Caruso, Cristiano; Romano, Antonino

    2015-04-01

    Studies performed on samples larger than 100 subjects with a documented IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins have demonstrated a cross-reactivity rate of approximately 1% between penicillins and both imipenem and meropenem, whereas a single study found a cross-reactivity rate of 6.2% with aztreonam in 16 such subjects. To assess the cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and 3 carbapenems (imipenem-cilastatin, meropenem, and ertapenem) in patients with documented IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins. A total of 212 consecutive subjects with immediate reactions to penicillins and positive results on skin tests to at least 1 penicillin reagent underwent skin tests with aztreonam and carbapenems; subjects with negative results were challenged with escalating doses of aztreonam and carbapenems. All subjects displayed negative skin test results to both aztreonam and carbapenems; 211 accepted challenges and tolerated them. Challenges were not followed by full therapeutic courses. These data indicate the tolerability of both aztreonam and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic subjects. In those who especially require these alternative β-lactams, however, we recommend pretreatment skin tests, both because rare cases of cross-reactivity have been reported and because negative results indicate tolerability. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tolerability of cefazolin after immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to nafcillin in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Youngster, Ilan; Shenoy, Erica S; Banerji, Aleena; Nelson, Sandra B

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the safety and tolerability of cefazolin therapy among patients with methicillin-sensitive Gram-positive bacterial infections who develop non-IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to nafcillin. In this retrospective cohort analysis of the Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy program at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2007 through 2013, we identified patients switched from nafcillin to cefazolin after an immune-mediated HSR. We reviewed patient demographics, details about the original HSR, and outcomes after the switch to cefazolin therapy. HSRs were classified by reaction type and likely mechanism. There were 467 patients treated with nafcillin, of which 60 (12.8%) were switched to cefazolin during their prescribed course. Of the 60 patients who transitioned to cefazolin, 17 (28.3%) were switched because of non-IgE-mediated HSRs. HSRs included maculopapular rash (n = 10), immune-mediated nephritis (n = 3), isolated eosinophilia (n = 2), immune-mediated hepatitis (n = 1), and a serum sickness-like reaction (n = 1). All but one patient (94.1%) who switched to cefazolin tolerated the drug with resolution of the HSR and completed their therapy with cefazolin. No patient experienced worsening of their rash or progressive organ dysfunction. With appropriate monitoring, therapy with cefazolin after non-IgE-mediated HSRs to nafcillin appears to be safe. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  11. Drug hypersensitivity reactions during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Scherer Hofmeier, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Drugs may elicit a considerable variety of clinical signs, often affecting the skin and the mucous membranes. The most common are maculopapular exanthema, urticaria and angioedema. More rarely pustular, vesiculobullous, vasculitic and lichenoid lesions may be observed. Apart from the morphology, also the chronology of the occurrence and the evolution of the single skin lesions and the exanthema are paramount in the clinical diagnosis. Often, the skin is the only affected organ; however, it may herald a systemic involvement of internal organs, such as in severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndromes or anaphylaxis. Cutaneous manifestations, particularly maculopapular exanthemas have a high incidence among patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In many cases, a virus- or drug-induced origin or a combination of both is responsible. However, the transplantation itself may also induce similar skin changes. These exanthemas include most often graft-versus-host disease, and rarely engraftment syndrome or eruption of lymphocyte recovery. The elucidation of the underlying cause of the exanthemas occurring in immune compromised patients and the determination of the correct diagnosis remain challenging. An extensive differential diagnosis has to be put forward. This includes several groups of disorders with sometimes very similar cutaneous manifestations. Manifestations form the underlying disease, complications from therapy, infections and drug reactions are the most common differential diagnoses.

  12. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  13. Ten weeks of infection with a tissue-invasive helminth protects against local immune complex-mediated inflammation, but not cutaneous type I hypersensitivity, in previously sensitized mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Holly; Killoran, Kristin E.; Mitre, Blima K.; Morris, C. Paul; Kim, So-Young; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect chronic helminth infection has on allergic disease in mice previously sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). 10 weeks of infection with Litomosoides sigmodontis reduced immunological markers of type I hypersensitivity, including OVA-specific IgE, basophil activation, and mast cell degranulation. Despite these reductions, there was no protection against immediate clinical hypersensitivity following intradermal OVA challenge. However, late phase ear swelling, due to type III hypersensitivity, was significantly reduced in chronically infected animals. Levels of total IgG2a, OVA-specific IgG2a, and OVA-specific IgG1 were reduced in the setting of infection. These reductions were likely due to increased antibody catabolism as ELISPOT assays demonstrated that infected animals do not have suppressed antibody production. Ear histology 24 hours after challenge showed infected animals have reduced cellular infiltration in the ear, with significant decreases in numbers of neutrophils and macrophages. Consistent with this, infected animals had less neutrophil-specific chemokines CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 in the ear following challenge. Additionally, in vitro stimulation with immune-complexes resulted in significantly less CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 production by eosinophils from chronically infected mice. Expression of FcγRI was also significantly reduced on eosinophils from infected animals. These data indicate that chronic filarial infection suppresses eosinophilic responses to antibody-mediated activation and has the potential to be used as a therapeutic for pre-existing hypersensitivity diseases. PMID:26324775

  14. Effects of magnolialide isolated from the leaves of Laurus nobilis L. (Lauraceae) on immunoglobulin E-mediated type I hypersensitivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taehun; Lee, Sooryun; Ho Kim, Kyeong; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon; Mar, Woongchon

    2013-09-16

    Laurus nobilis L. (Lauraceae) has been used for folk medicines in the Mediterranean area and Europe to treat various disorders including skin inflammation (dermatitis) and asthma. Our aim was to investigate the scientific evaluation of the compounds from Laurus nobilis L. on immuniglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I hypersensitivity responses in vitro such as atopic dermatitis and asthma. Seven compounds were isolated and examined for the mast cell stabilizing effect on IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 mast cells by measuring the β-hexosaminidase activity. In addition, the effects on interleukin (IL)-4 production and IL-5-dependent Y16 early B cell proliferation were investigated as well as their cytotoxic effects on RBL-2H3 cells. Among the seven isolated compounds, magnolialide attenuated the release of β-hexosaminidase from RBL-2H3 cells with an IC50 value of 20.2 μM, while the other compounds revealed no significant effects at concentrations tested. Furthermore, magnolialide significantly inhibited the IL-4 release with an IC50 value of 18.1 μM and IL-4 mRNA expression with an IC50 value of 15.7 μM in IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells. In addition, the inhibition of IL-5-dependent proliferation of early B cells (Y16 cells) by magnolialide was demonstrated with an IC50 value of 18.4 μM. These results suggest that the magnolialide might be a candidate for the treatment of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity responses such as atopic dermatitis and asthma by inhibiting mast cell degranulation, the IL-4 production, and IL-5-dependent early B cell proliferation, key factors in the development and amplification of type I hypersensitivity reactions. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Vector Based on the Chicken Hypersensitive Site 4 Insulator Element Replicates Episomally in Mammalian Cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Wang, Xiao-Yin; Jia, Yan-Long; Guo, Xiao; Wang, Yan-Fang; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-02-02

    Gene therapy in mammalian cells requires vectors exhibiting long-term stability and high expression. Episomal gene expression vectors offer a safe and attractive alternative to those that integrate into the host cell genome. In the present study, we developed a new episomal vector based on the insulator, chicken hypersensitive site 4 (cHS4). The cHS4 element was artificially synthesized, cloned into the pEGFP-C1 vector, and used to transfect Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human Chang liver cells. The stably transfected cell colonies were further cultured in either the presence or absence of G418 selection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and vector rescue experiments demonstrated that the vector replicated episomally in both CHO and human Chang liver cells. Compared with episomal vectors mediated by matrix attachment region sequences, the cHS4 element-containing vector yielded increased transgene expression levels, transfection efficiency, and stability during long-term culture. The vector was present at a very low copy number in the cells and was stably maintained over more than 100 generations without selection pressure. In conclusion, apart from a few free vector forms, the cHS4-containing vector mainly replicates episomally in mammalian cells and out-performs comparable systems in terms of yielding both higher expression levels and stability levels.

  16. Immunological Mechanisms of Drug Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoli; Ariza, Adriana; Waddington, James; Park, Kevin; Naisbitt, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are adverse drug reactions that may be divided into several categories; namely pharmacologic intolerance, idiosyncratic reactions, pseudo-allergic reactions and allergic reactions. Drug allergic reactions are those DHRs that are mediated by either antibodies or drug-specific T cells. They vary in terms of severity, time-to-onset of clinical manifestations and target organ. Skin is most commonly implicated in drug hypersensitivity reactions; however, it is now apparent that reactions targeting internal organs fall under the definition of drug hypersensitivity. Multiple hypotheses have been proposed to explain the diverse immune mechanisms involved and the heterogeneous clinical presentation. The discovery of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) risk alleles for some DHRs has provided insights in the pathogenesis of these reactions. In this review we summarize immune cells involved in DHRs, discuss the possible immunological mechanisms of DHRs, with an emphasis on the IgE-mediated immediate reactions and T cell-dependent delayed type reactions.

  17. Diospyros kaki calyx inhibits immediate-type hypersensitivity via the reduction of mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jong; Park, Hae Ran; Shin, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-12-01

    Diospyros kaki L. (Ebenaceae) fruit is widely distributed in Asia and is known to exert anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects. We evaluated the inhibitory effect of aqueous extract of D. kaki calyx (AEDKC) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity and underlying mechanism of action. For in vivo, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced active systemic anaphylaxis (ASA) and immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) models were used. In the ASA, AEDKC (1-100 mg/kg) was orally administered 3 times during 14 days. In the PCA, AEDKC was orally treated 1 h before the antigen challenge. The control drug dexamethasone was used to compare the effectiveness of AEDKC. For in vitro, IgE-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells and primary cultured peritoneal mast cells were used to determine the role of AEDKC (0.01-1 mg/mL). Oral administration of AEDKC dose dependently suppressed rectal temperature decrease and increases in serum histamine, total IgE, OVA-specific IgE, and interleukin (IL)-4 in the ASA. In the PCA, AEDKC reduced Evans blue pigmentation. Compared to dexamethasone (10 mg/kg), AEDKC (100 mg/kg) showed similar inhibitory effects in vivo. AEDKC concentration dependently suppressed the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase through the reduction of intracellular calcium in mast cells. In addition, AEDKC decreased the expression and secretion of tumour necrosis factor-α and IL-4 by the reduction of nuclear factor-κB. The inhibitory potential of AEDKC (1 mg/mL) was similar with dexamethasone (10 μM) in vitro. We suggest that AEDKC may be a potential candidate for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases.

  18. Abolishment of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mast cell deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Katsuyo; Sato, Yasushi; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2008-02-13

    Mucosal mast cells are implicated in visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, we investigated the role of mast cells in the development of visceral hypersensitivity by using mast cell deficient (Ws/Ws) rats and their control (W+/W+). In W+/W+ rats, an injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into the proximal colon produced a significant decrease in pain threshold of the distal colon. Severe mucosal necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration with concomitant increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity were observed in the proximal colon that was directly insulted by TNBS, whereas neither necrosis nor increased myeloperoxidase activity occurred in the distal colon, indicating that TNBS-induced hypersensitivity is not caused by the local tissue damage or inflammation in the region of the gut where distention stimuli were applied. On the other hand, TNBS failed to elicit visceral hypersensitivity in Ws/Ws rats. This finding indicates that mast cells are essential for development of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in rats. Since the severity of TNBS-induced proximal colon injury and MPO activity was not affected by mast cell deficiency, it is unlikely that abolishment of visceral hypersensitivity in mast cell deficient rats was a result of altered development of the primary injury in the proximal colon. There was no difference between sham-operated Ws/Ws and W+/W+ rats in colonic pain threshold to distention stimuli, indicating that mast cells play no modulatory roles in normal colonic nociception. The present results support the view that mucosal mast cells play key roles in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  19. TRPA1 in mast cell activation-induced long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal afferent C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z; Ouyang, Ann

    2009-07-01

    Sensitization of esophageal sensory afferents by inflammatory mediators plays an important role in esophageal nociception. We have shown esophageal mast cell activation induces long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity in vagal nodose C-fibers. However, the roles of mast cell mediators and downstream ion channels in this process are unclear. Mast cell tryptase via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)-mediated pathways sensitizes sensory nerves and induces hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) plays an important role in mechanosensory transduction and nociception. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cell activation via a PAR2-dependent mechanism sensitizes TRPA1 to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in esophageal vagal C-fibers. The expression profiles of PAR2 and TRPA1 in vagal nodose ganglia were determined by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings from esophageal nodose neurons were performed in ex vivo guinea pig esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distention and chemical perfusion were compared. Both PAR2 and TRPA1 expressions were identified in vagal nodose neurons by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Ninety-one percent of TRPA1-positive neurons were of small and medium diameters, and 80% coexpressed PAR2. Esophageal mast cell activation significantly enhanced the response of nodose C-fibers to esophageal distension (mechanical hypersensitivity). This was mimicked by PAR2-activating peptide, which sustained for 90 min after wash, but not by PAR2 reverse peptide. TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 pretreatment significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity induced by either mast cell activation or PAR2 agonist. Collectively, our data provide new evidence that sensitizing TRPA1 via a PAR2-dependent mechanism plays an important role in mast cell activation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal nodose C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

  20. Fanconi anemia complementation group A cells are hypersensitive to chromium(VI)-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Vilcheck, Susan K; O'Brien, Travis J; Pritchard, Daryl E; Ha, Linan; Ceryak, Susan; Fornsaglio, Jamie L; Patierno, Steven R

    2002-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diverse developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure, and a markedly increased incidence of malignancy. FA cells are hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, suggesting a general defect in the repair of DNA cross-links. Some forms of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] are implicated as respiratory carcinogens and induce several types of DNA lesions, including ternary DNA-Cr-DNA interstrand cross-links (Cr-DDC). We hypothesized that human FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells would be hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis. Using phosphatidylserine translocation and caspase-3 activation, human FA-A fibroblasts were found to be markedly hypersensitive to chromium-induced apoptosis compared with CRL-1634 cells, which are normal human foreskin fibroblasts (CRL). The clonogenicity of FA-A cells was also significantly decreased compared with CRL cells after Cr(VI) treatment. There was no significant difference in either Cr(VI) uptake or Cr-DNA adduct formation between FA-A and CRL cells. These results show that FA-A cells are hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr-induced apoptosis and that this hypersensitivity is not due to increased Cr(VI) uptake or increased Cr-DNA adduct formation. The results also suggest that Cr-DDC may be proapoptotic lesions. These results are the first to show that FA cells are hypersensitive to an environmentally relevant DNA cross-linking agent. PMID:12426130

  1. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  2. Histamine Receptor H1-Mediated Sensitization of TRPV1 Mediates Visceral Hypersensitivity and Symptoms in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Mira M; Balemans, Dafne; Van Wanrooy, Sander; Dooley, James; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo E; Nasser, Yasmin; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Vanbrabant, Winde; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Mols, Raf; Ghesquière, Bart; Cirillo, Carla; Kortekaas, Inge; Carmeliet, Peter; Peetermans, Willy E; Vermeire, Séverine; Rutgeerts, Paul; Augustijns, Patrick; Hellings, Peter W; Belmans, Ann; Vanner, Stephen; Bulmer, David C; Talavera, Karel; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Liston, Adrian; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2016-04-01

    ; this effect could be reproduced by histamine and imidazole acetaldehyde. Compared with subjects given placebo, those given ebastine had reduced visceral hypersensitivity, increased symptom relief (ebastine 46% vs placebo 13%; P = .024), and reduced abdominal pain scores (ebastine 39 ± 23 vs placebo 62 ± 22; P = .0004). In studies of rectal biopsy specimens from patients, we found that HRH1-mediated sensitization of TRPV1 is involved in IBS. Ebastine, an antagonist of HRH1, reduced visceral hypersensitivity, symptoms, and abdominal pain in patients with IBS. Inhibitors of this pathway might be developed as a new treatment approach for IBS. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT01144832. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TRPV1, but not TRPA1, in primary sensory neurons contributes to cutaneous incision-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Barabas, Marie E; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2013-03-04

    Mechanisms underlying postoperative pain remain poorly understood. In rodents, skin-only incisions induce mechanical and heat hypersensitivity similar to levels observed with skin plus deep incisions. Therefore, cutaneous injury might drive the majority of postoperative pain. TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are known to mediate inflammatory and nerve injury pain, making them key targets for pain therapeutics. These channels are also expressed extensively in cutaneous nerve fibers. Therefore, we investigated whether TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to mechanical and heat hypersensitivity following skin-only surgical incision. Behavioral responses to mechanical and heat stimulation were compared between skin-incised and uninjured, sham control groups. Elevated mechanical responsiveness occurred 1 day post skin-incision regardless of genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1. To determine whether functional changes in TRPA1 occur at the level of sensory neuron somata, we evaluated cytoplasmic calcium changes in sensory neurons isolated from ipsilateral lumbar 3-5 DRGs of skin-only incised and sham wild type (WT) mice during stimulation with the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. There were no changes in the percentage of neurons responding to cinnamaldehyde or in their response amplitudes. Likewise, the subpopulation of DRG somata retrogradely labeled specifically from the incised region of the plantar hind paw showed no functional up-regulation of TRPA1 after skin-only incision. Next, we conducted behavior tests for heat sensitivity and found that heat hypersensitivity peaked at day 1 post skin-only incision. Skin incision-induced heat hypersensitivity was significantly decreased in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, we conducted calcium imaging with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. DRG neurons from WT mice exhibited sensitization to TRPV1 activation, as more neurons (66%) from skin-incised mice responded to capsaicin compared to controls (46%), and the sensitization

  4. TRPV1, but not TRPA1, in primary sensory neurons contributes to cutaneous incision-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanisms underlying postoperative pain remain poorly understood. In rodents, skin-only incisions induce mechanical and heat hypersensitivity similar to levels observed with skin plus deep incisions. Therefore, cutaneous injury might drive the majority of postoperative pain. TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are known to mediate inflammatory and nerve injury pain, making them key targets for pain therapeutics. These channels are also expressed extensively in cutaneous nerve fibers. Therefore, we investigated whether TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to mechanical and heat hypersensitivity following skin-only surgical incision. Results Behavioral responses to mechanical and heat stimulation were compared between skin-incised and uninjured, sham control groups. Elevated mechanical responsiveness occurred 1 day post skin-incision regardless of genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1. To determine whether functional changes in TRPA1 occur at the level of sensory neuron somata, we evaluated cytoplasmic calcium changes in sensory neurons isolated from ipsilateral lumbar 3–5 DRGs of skin-only incised and sham wild type (WT) mice during stimulation with the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. There were no changes in the percentage of neurons responding to cinnamaldehyde or in their response amplitudes. Likewise, the subpopulation of DRG somata retrogradely labeled specifically from the incised region of the plantar hind paw showed no functional up-regulation of TRPA1 after skin-only incision. Next, we conducted behavior tests for heat sensitivity and found that heat hypersensitivity peaked at day 1 post skin-only incision. Skin incision-induced heat hypersensitivity was significantly decreased in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, we conducted calcium imaging with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. DRG neurons from WT mice exhibited sensitization to TRPV1 activation, as more neurons (66%) from skin-incised mice responded to capsaicin compared to controls (46%), and the

  5. Resolvin E1 inhibits dendritic cell migration in the skin and attenuates contact hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Yu; Honda, Tetsuya; Hanakawa, Sho; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Murata, Teruasa; Ueharaguchi-Tanada, Yuri; Ono, Sachiko; Amano, Wataru; Nakajima, Saeko; Egawa, Gyohei; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kitoh, Akihiko; Dainichi, Teruki; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Arita, Makoto; Nakamura, Motonobu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-10-19

    Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is a lipid mediator derived from ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that exerts potent antiinflammatory roles in several murine models. The antiinflammatory mechanism of RvE1 in acquired immune responses has been attributed to attenuation of cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we newly investigated the effect of RvE1 on DC motility using two-photon microscopy in a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model and found that RvE1 impaired DC motility in the skin. In addition, RvE1 attenuated T cell priming in the draining lymph nodes and effector T cell activation in the skin, which led to the reduced skin inflammation in CHS. In contrast, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induced actin filament reorganization in DCs and increased DC motility by activating Cdc42 and Rac1 via BLT1, which was abrogated by RvE1. Collectively, our results suggest that RvE1 attenuates cutaneous acquired immune responses by inhibiting cutaneous DC motility, possibly through LTB4-BLT1 signaling blockade. © 2015 Sawada et al.

  6. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species do not elicit hypersensitive cell death but induce apoptosis in the adjacent cells during the defense response of oat.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yasuomi; Mori, Tomoyo; Shinogi, Takeshi; Yao, Nan; Takahashi, Satsuki; Betsuyaku, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Masaru; Park, Pyoyun; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Tosa, Yukio; Mayama, Shigeyuki

    2004-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) acts as a signaling molecule in many cellular responses in plants and animals. Oat plants (Avena sativa L.) evoke the hypersensitive response (HR), which shares morphological and biochemical features with mammalian apoptosis, such as DNA laddering and heterochromatin condensation, in response to the avirulent crown rust fungus (Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae). We examined the role of NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the initiation of hypersensitive cell death, which is induced by direct contact with the pathogen, and apoptotic cell death in the adjacent cells. Cytofluorimetric analysis using the fluorescent NO probe DAF and the H2O2 probe DCF demonstrated that NO and H2O2 were generated simultaneously in primary leaves at an early stage of the defense response. The NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) markedly enhanced H2O2 accumulation detected by 3,3-diaminobenzidine staining and DCF, whereas treatment with the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) strongly suppressed it. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased NO accumulation, suggesting that endogenous NO may modulate the level of H2O2 by interacting with O2- in the HR lesion. Cytological observation showed that administration of cPTIO, SNAP, or SOD had no effect on elicitation of hypersensitive cell death, but clearly reduced heterochromatin condensation in the nearby cells and DNA laddering. These findings indicate that NO and ROS are not essential mediators for the initiation of hypersensitive cell death. However, NO and O2- but not H2O2 are required for the onset of apoptotic cell death in the adjacent cells, where excess NO may exert its anti-apoptotic function by regulating cellular redox state.

  7. Defective DNA cross-link removal in Chinese hamster cell mutants hypersensitive to bifunctional alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy, C.A.; Thompson, L.H.; Mooney, C.L.; Salazar, E.P.

    1985-04-01

    DNA repair-deficient mutants from five genetic complementation groups isolated previously from Chinese hamster cells were assayed for survival after exposure to the bifunctional alkylating agents mitomycin C or diepoxybutane. Groups 1, 3, and 5 exhibited 1.6- to 3-fold hypersensitivity compared to the wild-type cells, whereas Groups 2 and 4 exhibited extraordinary hypersensitivity. Mutants from Groups 1 and 2 were exposed to 22 other bifunctional alkylating agents in a rapid assay that compared cytotoxicity of the mutants to the wild-type parental strain, AA8. With all but two of the compounds, the Group 2 mutant (UV4) was 15- to 60-fold more sensitive than AA8 or the Group 1 mutant (UV5). UV4 showed only 6-fold hypersensitivity to quinacrine mustard. Alkaline elution measurements showed that this compound produced few DNA interstrand cross-links but numerous strand breaks. Therefore, the extreme hypersensitivity of mutants from Groups 2 and 4 appeared specific for compounds the main cytotoxic lesions of which were DNA cross-links. Mutant UV5 was only 1- to 4-fold hypersensitive to all the compounds. Although the initial number of cross-links was similar for the three cell lines, the efficiency of removal of cross-links was lowest in UV4 and intermediate in UV5. These results suggest that the different levels of sensitivity are specifically related to different efficiencies of DNA cross-link removal. The phenotype of hypersensitivity to both UV radiation and cross-link damage exhibited by the mutants in Groups 2 and 4 appears to differ from those of the known human DNA repair syndromes.

  8. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  9. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are consumed during allergic inflammation and affect T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-mediated hypersensitivity differently

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, S; Lönnqvist, A; Östman, S; Sandberg, A-S; Wold, A E

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that atopic individuals have decreased serum levels of n-3 fatty acids. Indicating these compounds may have a protective effect against allergic reaction and/or are consumed during inflammation. This study investigated whether fish (n-3) or sunflower (n-6) oil supplementation affected T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-mediated hypersensitivity in the skin and airways, respectively, and whether the fatty acid serum profile changed during the inflammatory response. Mice were fed regular chow, chow + 10% fish oil or chow + 10% sunflower oil. Mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) resolved in Th1 or Th2 adjuvant. For Th1 hypersensitivity, mice were challenged with OVA in the footpad. Footpad swelling, OVA-induced lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production in the draining lymph node were evaluated. In the airway hypersensitivity model (Th2), mice were challenged intranasally with OVA and the resulting serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and eosinophilic lung infiltration were measured. In the Th1 model, OVA-specific T cells proliferated less and produced less interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 in fish oil-fed mice versus controls. Footpad swelling was reduced marginally. In contrast, mice fed fish oil in the Th2 model produced more OVA-specific IgE and had slightly higher proportions of eosinophils in lung infiltrate. A significant fall in serum levels of long-chain n-3 fatty acids accompanied challenge and Th2-mediated inflammation in Th2 model. Fish oil supplementation affects Th1 and Th2 immune responses conversely; significant consumption of n-3 fatty acids occurs during Th2-driven inflammation. The latter observation may explain the association between Th2-mediated inflammation and low serum levels of n-3 fatty acids. PMID:20148912

  10. The pepper RNA-binding protein CaRBP1 functions in hypersensitive cell death and defense signaling in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2012-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression via post-transcriptional modification by RNA-binding proteins is crucial for plant disease and innate immunity. Here, we report the identification of the pepper (Capsicum annuum) RNA-binding protein1 gene (CaRBP1) as essential for hypersensitive cell death and defense signaling in the cytoplasm. CaRBP1 contains an RNA recognition motif and is rapidly and strongly induced in pepper by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. CaRBP1 displays in vitro RNA- and DNA-binding activity and in planta nucleocytoplasmic localization. Transient expression of CaRBP1 in pepper leaves triggers cell-death and defense responses. Notably, cytoplasmic localization of CaRBP1, mediated by the N-terminal region of CaRBP1, is essential for the hypersensitive cell-death response. Silencing of CaRBP1 in pepper plants significantly enhances susceptibility to avirulent Xcv infection. This is accompanied by compromised hypersensitive cell death, production of reactive oxygen species in oxidative bursts, expression of defense marker genes and accumulation of endogenous salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Over-expression of CaRBP1 in Arabidopsis confers reduced susceptibility to infection by the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Together, these results suggest that cytoplasmic localization of CaRBP1 is required for plant signaling of hypersensitive cell-death and defense responses. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer in suggested metal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burkandt, Andreas; Katzer, Alexander; Thaler, Karlheinz; Von Baehr, Volker; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Rüther, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael; Zustin, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Synovial tissues in joints with prostheses display characteristic morphological changes in cases with aseptic failure, particularly macrophage infiltration. Since proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer represents a feature characteristic of autoimmune joint diseases, the possibility of morphological changes of the synovial lining cell layer in periprosthetic tissues was investigated. Synovial biopsies from five groups of morphologically well-defined lesions (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, aseptic loosened metal-on-polyethylene and metal-on-metal arthroplasty and suggested metal hypersensitivity) were compared using a conventional staining method and immunohistochemistry. The synovial lining cell layer was substantially enlarged in both rheumatoid arthritis and cases suggestive of metal hypersensitivity. Macrophage infiltrates were apparent in rheumatoid arthritis and all specimens from retrieved hip arthroplasties. Although both synovial and subsynovial macrophages were positive for CD163 (indicating synovial M2 macrophages), the remaining fibroblast-like synoviocytes and scattered stromal fibroblasts showed a positive reaction with the D2-40 antibody (indicating fibroblast-like synoviocytes). Furthermore, in contrast to CD163-positive macrophages, the enlarged D2-40-positive fibroblast-like synoviocytes displayed cytoplasmatic tubular projections. Proliferation of the periprosthetic synovial lining cell layer occurred in cases with unexplained groin pain following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty, suggestive of hypersensitivity. Despite some important study limitations, the present observation adds to the evidence that metal hypersensitivity shares characteristic morphological features with autoimmune diseases of the joints.

  12. Pharmacogenetics of hypersensitivity drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Simone; Becquemont, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden on the healthcare system. Some of those reactions are immunologically mediated (hypersensitivity reactions) and can be clinically subdivided into two categories: immediate reactions (IgE-related) and delayed reactions (T-cell-mediated). Delayed hypersensitivity reactions include both systemic syndromes and organ-specific toxicities and can be triggered by a wide range of chemically diverse drugs. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between human leukocyte antigen alleles and susceptibility to delayed drug hypersensitivity. Most notable examples include human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*57:01 allele and abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome or HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*58:01 alleles related to severe cutaneous reactions induced by carbamazepine and allopurinol, respectively. This review aims to explore our current understanding in the field of pharmacogenomics of HLA-associated drug hypersensitivities and its translation into clinical practice for predicting adverse drug reactions. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of the potassium chloride cotransporter isoform 2-mediated spinal chloride homeostasis in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dong; Qian, Ai-Hua; Song, Dan-Dan; Ben, Qi-Wen; Yao, Wei-Yan; Sun, Jing; Li, Wei-Guang; Xu, Tian-Le; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2015-05-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity represents an important hallmark in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), of which the mechanisms remain elusive. The present study was designed to examine whether cation-chloride cotransporter (CCC)-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis of the spinal cord is involved in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Chronic visceral hypersensitivity was induced by exposing male Wistar rats to water avoidance stress (WAS). RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of CCCs in the spinal cord. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on adult spinal cord slices to evaluate Cl(-) homeostasis and Cl(-) extrusion capacity of lamina I neurons. Visceral sensitivity was estimated by measuring the abdominal withdrawal reflex in response to colorectal distension (CRD). After 10 days of WAS exposure, levels of both total protein and the oligomeric form of the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter isoform 2 (KCC2), but not Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), were significantly decreased in the dorsal horn of the lumbosacral spinal cord. The downregulation of KCC2 resulted in a depolarizing shifted equilibrium potential of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic current and impaired Cl(-) extrusion capacity in lamina I neurons of the lumbosacral spinal cord from WAS rats. Acute noxious CRD disrupted spinal KCC2 expression and function 2 h after the final distention in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. Pharmacological blockade of KCC2 activity by intrathecal injection of a KCC2 inhibitor [(dihydroindenyl)oxy] alkanoic acid enhanced visceral nociceptive sensitivity in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. These results suggest that KCC2 downregulation-mediated impairment of spinal cord Cl(-) homeostasis may play an important role in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Real-time PCR mapping of DNaseI-hypersensitive sites using a novel ligation-mediated amplification technique

    PubMed Central

    Follows, George A.; Janes, Mary E.; Vallier, Ludovic; Green, Anthony R.; Gottgens, Berthold

    2007-01-01

    Mapping sites within the genome that are hypersensitive to digestion with DNaseI is an important method for identifying DNA elements that regulate transcription. The standard approach to locating these DNaseI-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) has been to use Southern blotting techniques, although we, and others, have recently published alternative methods using a range of technologies including high-throughput sequencing and genomic array tiling paths. In this article, we describe a novel protocol to use real-time PCR to map DHS. Advantages of the technique reported here include the small cell numbers required for each analysis, rapid, relatively low-cost experiments with minimal need for specialist equipment. Presented examples include comparative DHS mapping of known TAL1/SCL regulatory elements between human embryonic stem cells and K562 cells. PMID:17389645

  15. Drug Hypersensitivity: How Drugs Stimulate T Cells via Pharmacological Interaction with Immune Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J; Adam, Jacqueline; Watkins, Stephen; Wuillemin, Natascha; Yun, James; Yerly, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Small chemicals like drugs tend to bind to proteins via noncovalent bonds, e.g. hydrogen bonds, salt bridges or electrostatic interactions. Some chemicals interact with other molecules than the actual target ligand, representing so-called 'off-target' activities of drugs. Such interactions are a main cause of adverse side effects to drugs and are normally classified as predictable type A reactions. Detailed analysis of drug-induced immune reactions revealed that off-target activities also affect immune receptors, such as highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or T cell receptors (TCR). Such drug interactions with immune receptors may lead to T cell stimulation, resulting in clinical symptoms of delayed-type hypersensitivity. They are assigned the 'pharmacological interaction with immune receptors' (p-i) concept. Analysis of p-i has revealed that drugs bind preferentially or exclusively to distinct HLA molecules (p-i HLA) or to distinct TCR (p-i TCR). P-i reactions differ from 'conventional' off-target drug reactions as the outcome is not due to the effect on the drug-modified cells themselves, but is the consequence of reactive T cells. Hence, the complex and diverse clinical manifestations of delayed-type hypersensitivity are caused by the functional heterogeneity of T cells. In the abacavir model of p-i HLA, the drug binding to HLA may result in alteration of the presenting peptides. More importantly, the drug binding to HLA generates a drug-modified HLA, which stimulates T cells directly, like an allo-HLA. In the sulfamethoxazole model of p-i TCR, responsive T cells likely require costimulation for full T cell activation. These findings may explain the similarity of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to graft-versus-host disease, and how systemic viral infections increase the risk of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.

  16. Lactobacillus farciminis treatment suppresses stress induced visceral hypersensitivity: a possible action through interaction with epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction

    PubMed Central

    Ait‐Belgnaoui, A; Han, W; Lamine, F; Eutamene, H; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L; Theodorou, V

    2006-01-01

    Background Stress induced increase in colonic paracellular permeability results from epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction and is responsible for stress induced hypersensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD). The probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis releases spontaneously nitric oxide (NO) in the colonic lumen in vivo and exerts anti‐inflammatory effects. This study aimed: (i) to evaluate the effects of L farciminis on stress induced hypersensitivity to CRD and increase in colonic paracellular permeability; and (ii) to ascertain whether these effects are NO mediated and related to changes in colonocyte myosin light chain phosphorylation (p‐MLC). Methods Female Wistar rats received either 1011 CFU/day of L farciminis or saline orally over 15 days before partial restraint stress (PRS) or sham‐PRS application. Visceral sensitivity to CRD and colonic paracellular permeability was assessed after PRS or sham‐PRS. Haemoglobin was used as an NO scavenger. Western blotting for MLC kinase, MLC, and p‐MLC were performed in colonic mucosa from L farciminis treated and control rats after PRS or sham‐PRS. Results PRS significantly increased the number of spike bursts for CRD pressures of 30–60 mm Hg as well as colonic paracellular permeability. L farciminis treatment prevented both effects, while haemoglobin reversed the protective effects of L farciminis. p‐MLC expression increased significantly from 15 to 45 minutes after PRS, and L farciminis treatment prevented this increase. Conclusion L farciminis treatment prevents stress induced hypersensitivity, increase in colonic paracellular permeability, and colonocyte MLC phosphorylation. This antinociceptive effect occurs via inhibition of contraction of colonic epithelial cell cytoskeleton and the subsequent tight junction opening, and may also involve direct or indirect effects of NO produced by this probiotic. PMID:16507583

  17. Cells deficient in the FANC/BRCA pathway are hypersensitive to plasma levels of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, John R; Nakamura, Ayumi; Tano, Keizo; Luke, April M; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Gillespie, David A F; Sale, Julian E; Yamazoe, Mitsuyoshi; Bishop, Douglas K; Takata, Minoru; Takeda, Shunichi; Watanabe, Masami; Swenberg, James A; Nakamura, Jun

    2007-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an aliphatic monoaldehyde and is a highly reactive environmental human carcinogen. Whereas humans are continuously exposed to exogenous formaldehyde, this reactive aldehyde is a naturally occurring biological compound that is present in human plasma at concentrations ranging from 13 to 97 micromol/L. It has been well documented that DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) likely play an important role with regard to the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde. However, little is known about which DNA damage response pathways are essential for cells to counteract formaldehyde. In the present study, we first assessed the DNA damage response to plasma levels of formaldehyde using chicken DT40 cells with targeted mutations in various DNA repair genes. Here, we show that the hypersensitivity to formaldehyde is detected in DT40 mutants deficient in the BRCA/FANC pathway, homologous recombination, or translesion DNA synthesis. In addition, FANCD2-deficient DT40 cells are hypersensitive to acetaldehyde, but not to acrolein, crotonaldehyde, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal. Human cells deficient in FANCC and FANCG are also hypersensitive to plasma levels of formaldehyde. These results indicate that the BRCA/FANC pathway is essential to counteract DPCs caused by aliphatic monoaldehydes. Based on the results obtained in the present study, we are currently proposing that endogenous formaldehyde might have an effect on highly proliferating cells, such as bone marrow cells, as well as an etiology of cancer in Fanconi anemia patients.

  18. Hypersensitivity and growth adaptation of oestrogen-deprived MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Darbre, Philippa D

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of endocrine therapy is compromised when human breast cancer cells circumvent imposed growth inhibition. The model of long-term oestrogen-deprived MCF-7 human breast cancer cells has suggested the mechanism results from hypersensitivity to low levels of residual oestrogen. MCF-7 cells were maintained for up to 30 weeks in phenol-red-free medium and charcoal-stripped serum with 10(-8) M 17β-oestradiol and 10 μg/ml insulin (stock 1), 10(-8) M 17β-oestradiol (stock 2), 10 μg/ml insulin (stock 3) or no addition (stock 4). Loss of growth response to oestrogen was observed only in stock 4 cells. Long-term maintenance with insulin in the absence of oestradiol (stock 3) resulted in raised oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) levels (measured by western immunoblotting) and development of hypersensitivity (assayed by oestrogen-responsive reporter gene induction and dose response to oestradiol for proliferation under serum-free conditions), but with no loss of growth response to oestrogen. Hypersensitivity can develop without any growth adaptation and therefore is not a prerequisite for loss of growth response in MCF-7 cells.

  19. Lymphoid tissue phospholipase A2 group IID resolves contact hypersensitivity by driving antiinflammatory lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kei; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Hiroyasu; Shimo, Kanako; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Kabashima, Kenji; Arita, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki; Lambeau, Gérard; Bollinger, James M.; Hara, Shuntaro; Gelb, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is an active process that is mediated in part by antiinflammatory lipid mediators. Although phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes have been implicated in the promotion of inflammation through mobilizing lipid mediators, the molecular entity of PLA2 subtypes acting upstream of antiinflammatory lipid mediators remains unknown. Herein, we show that secreted PLA2 group IID (PLA2G2D) is preferentially expressed in CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and displays a pro-resolving function. In hapten-induced contact dermatitis, resolution, not propagation, of inflammation was compromised in skin and LNs of PLA2G2D-deficient mice (Pla2g2d−/−), in which the immune balance was shifted toward a proinflammatory state over an antiinflammatory state. Bone marrow-derived DCs from Pla2g2d−/− mice were hyperactivated and elicited skin inflammation after intravenous transfer into mice. Lipidomics analysis revealed that PLA2G2D in the LNs contributed to mobilization of a pool of polyunsaturated fatty acids that could serve as precursors for antiinflammatory/pro-resolving lipid mediators such as resolvin D1 and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, which reduced Th1 cytokine production and surface MHC class II expression in LN cells or DCs. Altogether, our results highlight PLA2G2D as a “resolving sPLA2” that ameliorates inflammation through mobilizing pro-resolving lipid mediators and points to a potential use of this enzyme for treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:23690440

  20. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities.

  1. Hypersensitivities for Acetaldehyde and Other Agents among Cancer Cells Null for Clinically Relevant Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R.; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K.; Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C.; Ren, Yunzhao R.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Azad, Nilofer A.; Kern, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities. PMID:24200853

  2. Induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity by the T cell line specific to bacterial peptidoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, M.; Kakimoto, K.; Kawata, S.; Kotani, S.; Koga, T.

    1987-12-01

    A T cell line specific for the chemically well-defined peptidoglycan of bacterial cell wall, disaccharide tetrapeptide, was established from Lewis rats immunized with the antigen covalently linked to the autologous rat serum albumin. The antigen specificity was examined with various analogues or derivatives of the peptidoglycan. The cell line was reactive to analogues with the COOH-terminal D-amino acid, but least reactive to those with L-amino acid as COOH terminus. Transferring of the T cell line into X-irradiated normal Lewis rats induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in an antigen specific manner.

  3. Nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloys used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Chen, Weiqing; Ke, Wei; Wu, Shaohua

    2009-11-01

    Although nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloy prothesis is widely used in orthodontics, its potential biologic hazards, hypersensitivity in particular, are still uncertain as yet. And only a few studies in vivo have considered the biocompatibility. However, several case reports show adverse effects of immunologic alterations, such as urticaria, respiratory disease, nickel contact dermatitis, microscopic hematuria and proteinuria, and even exacerbated to hepatocyte injury and renal injury. So nickel-based alloy used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity. The metal surface would occur electrochemical corrosion as metal edge of porcelain-fused-to-nichrome crown exposed to oral cavity rich in electrolytes after restoration, and metal ion would release to oral cavity then come into contact with cells and tissues in the immediate environment, or be distributed throughout the body, mainly to the intestine canal. Once these ions are not biocompatible, the human system may be injured (toxicity and risk of sensitization) if they are absorbed in sufficient quantity. Thus, it is necessary to determine the long-term biocompatibility properties of nickel-based alloy, reduce sensitization, and grasp the information of individual differences in the appearance of adverse reactions in further research.

  4. Azuki Bean Cells Are Hypersensitive to Cadmium and Do Not Synthesize Phytochelatins1

    PubMed Central

    Inouhe, Masahiro; Ito, Rika; Ito, Shoko; Sasada, Naoki; Tohoyama, Hiroshi; Joho, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of azuki bean (Vigna angularis) as well as the original root tissues were hypersensitive to Cd (<10 μm). Repeated subculturings with a sublethal level of Cd (1–10 μm) did not affect the subsequent response of cells to inhibitory levels of Cd (10–100 μm). The azuki bean cells challenged to Cd did not contain phytochelatin (PC) peptides, unlike tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells that have a substantial tolerance to Cd (>100 μm). Both of the cell suspensions contained a similar level of reduced glutathione (GSH) when grown in the absence of Cd. Externally applied GSH to azuki bean cells recovered neither Cd tolerance nor PC synthesis of the cells. Furthermore, enzyme assays in vitro revealed that the protein extracts of azuki bean cells had no activity converting GSH to PCs, unlike tomato. These results suggest that azuki bean cells are lacking in the PC synthase activity per se, hence being Cd hypersensitive. We concluded that the PC synthase has an important role in Cd tolerance of suspension-cultured cells. PMID:10889252

  5. The phytoalexin resveratrol regulates the initiation of hypersensitive cell death in Vitis cell.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaoli; Heene, Ernst; Qiao, Fei; Nick, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a major phytoalexin produced by plants in response to various stresses and promotes disease resistance. The resistance of North American grapevine Vitis rupestris is correlated with a hypersensitive reaction (HR), while susceptible European Vitis vinifera cv. 'Pinot Noir' does not exhibit HR, but expresses basal defence. We have shown previously that in cell lines derived from the two Vitis species, the bacterial effector Harpin induced a rapid and sensitive accumulation of stilbene synthase (StSy) transcripts, followed by massive cell death in V. rupestris. In the present work, we analysed the function of the phytoalexin resveratrol, the product of StSy. We found that cv. 'Pinot Noir' accumulated low resveratrol and its glycoside trans-piceid, whereas V. rupestris produced massive trans-resveratrol and the toxic oxidative δ-viniferin, indicating that the preferred metabolitism of resveratrol plays role in Vitis resistance. Cellular responses to resveratrol included rapid alkalinisation, accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein 5 (PR5) transcripts, oxidative burst, actin bundling, and cell death. Microtubule disruption and induction of StSy were triggered by Harpin, but not by resveratrol. Whereas most responses proceeded with different amplitude for the two cell lines, the accumulation of resveratrol, and the competence for resveratrol-induced oxidative burst differed in quality. The data lead to a model, where resveratrol, in addition to its classical role as antimicrobial phytoalexin, represents an important regulator for initiation of HR-related cell death.

  6. The Phytoalexin Resveratrol Regulates the Initiation of Hypersensitive Cell Death in Vitis Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Heene, Ernst; Qiao, Fei; Nick, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a major phytoalexin produced by plants in response to various stresses and promotes disease resistance. The resistance of North American grapevine Vitis rupestris is correlated with a hypersensitive reaction (HR), while susceptible European Vitis vinifera cv. ‘Pinot Noir’ does not exhibit HR, but expresses basal defence. We have shown previously that in cell lines derived from the two Vitis species, the bacterial effector Harpin induced a rapid and sensitive accumulation of stilbene synthase (StSy) transcripts, followed by massive cell death in V. rupestris. In the present work, we analysed the function of the phytoalexin resveratrol, the product of StSy. We found that cv. ‘Pinot Noir’ accumulated low resveratrol and its glycoside trans-piceid, whereas V. rupestris produced massive trans-resveratrol and the toxic oxidative δ-viniferin, indicating that the preferred metabolitism of resveratrol plays role in Vitis resistance. Cellular responses to resveratrol included rapid alkalinisation, accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein 5 (PR5) transcripts, oxidative burst, actin bundling, and cell death. Microtubule disruption and induction of StSy were triggered by Harpin, but not by resveratrol. Whereas most responses proceeded with different amplitude for the two cell lines, the accumulation of resveratrol, and the competence for resveratrol-induced oxidative burst differed in quality. The data lead to a model, where resveratrol, in addition to its classical role as antimicrobial phytoalexin, represents an important regulator for initiation of HR-related cell death. PMID:22053190

  7. Cutting Edge: Redox signaling hypersensitivity distinguishes human germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    Polikowsky, Hannah G.; Wogsland, Cara E.; Diggins, Kirsten E.

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the quality of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling control key steps of B cell maturation and differentiation. Endogenously produced H2O2 is thought to fine tune the level of BCR signaling by reversibly inhibiting phosphatases. However, relatively little is known about how B cells at different stages sense and respond to such redox cues. Here, we used phospho-specific flow cytometry and high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare BCR signaling responses in mature human tonsillar B cells undergoing germinal center (GC) reactions. GC B cells, in contrast to mature naïve B cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts, were hypersensitive to a range of H2O2 concentrations and responded by phosphorylating SYK and other membrane proximal BCR effectors in the absence of BCR engagement. These findings reveal that stage specific redox responses distinguish human GC B cells. PMID:26157177

  8. Salicylic acid in the machinery of hypersensitive cell death and disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M E

    2000-10-01

    Although extensive data has described the key role of salicylic acid (SA) in signaling pathogen-induced disease resistance, its function in physiological processes related to cell death is still poorly understood. Recent studies have explored the requirement of SA for mounting the hypersensitive response (HR) against an invading pathogen, where a particular cell death process is activated at the site of attempted infection causing a confined lesion. Biochemical data suggest that SA potentiates the signal pathway for HR by affecting an early phosphorylation-sensitive step preceding the generation of pro-death signals, including those derived from the oxidative burst. Accordingly, the epistatic relationship between cell death and SA accumulation, analyzed in crosses between lesion-mimic mutants (spontaneous lesion formation) and the transgenic nahG line (depleted in SA) places the SA activity in a feedback loop downstream and upstream of cell death. Exciting advances have been made in the identification of cellular protective functions and cell death suppressors that might operate in HR. Moreover, the spatio-temporal patterns of the SA accumulation (non-homogeneous distribution, biphasic kinetics) described in some HR lesions, may also reveal important clues for unraveling the complex cellular network that tightly balances pro- and anti-death functions in the hypersensitive cell death.

  9. Type III hypersensitivity reactions to a B cell epitope antigen are abrogated using a depot forming vaccine platform.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Lisa D; MacKay, Alecia; Kaliaperumal, Valarmathy; Weir, Genevieve; Penwell, Andrea; Rajagopalan, Rajkannan; Langley, Joanne; Halperin, Scott; Mansour, Marc; Stanford, Marianne M

    2017-09-21

    Peptide antigens are combined with an adjuvant in order to increase immunogenicity in vivo. The immunogenicity and safety of a RSV vaccine formulated in a novel oil-based platform, DepoVax™ (DPX), was compared to an alum formulation. A peptide B cell epitope derived from RSV small hydrophobic ectodomain (SHe) served as the antigen. Both vaccines induced SHe-specific antibodies after immunization of mice. A single dose of the DPX-based formulation resulted in anti-SHe titres for up to 20 weeks. Boosting with Alum-SHe, but not with DPX-SHe, led to unexpected clinical signs such as decreased activity, cyanosis and drop in body temperature in mice but not in rabbits. The severity of adverse reactions correlated with magnitude of SHe-specific IgG immune responses and decreased complement component 3 plasma levels, indicating a type III hypersensitivity reaction. By RP-HPLC analysis, we found that only 8-20% of the antigen was found to be adsorbed to alum in vitro, indicating that this antigen is likely released systemically upon injection in vivo. Clinical signs were not observed in rabbits, indicating the response correlates with peptide dose relative to size of animal. These results suggest that peptide antigens targeted to produce B cell mediated response may result in increased incidence of type III hypersensitivity reactions when delivered in non-depot forming vaccines. The DPX formulation induced strong antibody titres to the antigen without causing adverse events, likely due to the strength of the depot in vivo, and demonstrates the potential safety and immunogenicity of this platform for B cell peptide antigens.

  10. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis, bird fancier’s lung, farmer’s lung, hot tub lung, and humidifier lung. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a rare immune system disorder that affects the lungs. It occurs in ...

  11. Drug Induced Hypersensitivity and the HLA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, Ana; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions are of major concern and present a burden for national healthcare systems due to their often severe nature, high rate of hospital admissions and high mortality. They manifest with a wide range of symptoms and signs, and can be initiated by a wide range of structurally diverse chemical compounds. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity reactions are not well understood, but it is thought that they are immune mediated. MHC region on Chromosome 6 contains many genes with immune function. Classical MHC molecules are highly polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins whose function is to present peptide antigens to T cells. In addition to conferring protection from some diseases, HLA alleles are also associated with an increased risk of other diseases, including drug-induced hypersensitivity. Pharmacogenetic approach to predict the risk of drug-induced hypersensitivity has been established for several drugs. We will discuss the progress of hypersensitivity pharmacogenetics over the last few years and focus on current efforts of the international community to develop consortia which aim to standardize disease phenotypes and to identify affected individuals through international collaborations. In addition, we will discuss the clinical utility of HLA typing as predictive or diagnostic testing for drug-induced hypersensitivity.

  12. CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine signaling in spinal glia induces pain hypersensitivity through MAPKs-mediated neuroinflammation in bone cancer rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Liu, Yan-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Long; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Li-Ping; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    The activation of MAPK pathways in spinal cord and subsequent production of proinflammatory cytokines in glial cells contribute to the development of spinal central sensitization, the basic mechanism underlying bone cancer pain (BCP). Our previous study showed that spinal CXCL12 from astrocytes mediates BCP generation by binding to CXCR4 in both astrocyters and microglia. Here, we verified that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling contributed to BCP through a MAPK-mediated mechanism. In naïve rats, a single intrathecal administration of CXCL12 considerably induced pain hyperalgesia and phosphorylation expression of spinal MAPK members (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase), which could be partially prevented by pre-treatment with CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3100. This CXCL12-induced hyperalgesia was also reduced by MAPK inhibitors. In bone cancer rats, tumor cell inoculation into the tibial cavity caused prominent and persistent pain hyperalgesia, and associated with up-regulation of CXCL12 and CXCR4, activation of glial cells, phosphorylation of MAPKs, and production of proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord. These tumor cell inoculation-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations were all suppressed by blocking CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling or MAPK pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that spinal MAPK pathways mediated CXCL12/CXCR4-induced pain hypersensitivity in bone cancer rats, which could be druggable targets for alleviating BCP and glia-derived neuroinflammation. Following tumor cell inoculation, chemokine CXCL12 from astrocytes spreads around the spinal environment, resulting in functional activation of CXCR4-expressing astrocytes and microglia. Once glia are activated, they may initiate MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathways, and subsequently produce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Among them, CXCL12 could reinforce the astrocytic and microglial activation in autocrine and paracrine manners

  13. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation.

  14. Genotyping for Severe Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Eric; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and pharmacogenomics of severe immunologically-mediated adverse drug reactions. Such T-cell-mediated adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug-induced liver disease (DILI) and other drug hypersensitivity syndromes have more recently been shown to be mediated through interactions with various class I and II HLA alleles. Key examples have included the associations of HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN in Southeast Asian populations and HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity exemplifies a successful translational roadmap from pharmacogenomic discovery through to widespread clinical implementation. Ultimately, our increased understanding of the interaction between drugs and the MHC could be used to inform drug design and drive pre-clinical toxicity programs to improve drug safety. PMID:24429903

  15. Chapter 28: Classification of hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Uzzaman, Ashraf; Cho, Seong H

    2012-01-01

    The original Gell and Coomb's classification categorizes hypersensitivity reactions into four subtypes according to the type of immune response and the effector mechanism responsible for cell and tissue injury: type I, immediate or IgE mediated; type II, cytotoxic or IgG/IgM mediated; type III, IgG/IgM immune complex mediated; and type IV, delayed-type hypersensitivity or T-cell mediated. The classification has been improved so that type IIa is the former type II and type IIb is antibody-mediated cell stimulating (Graves Disease and the "autoimmune" type of chronic idiopathic urticaria). Type IV has four major categories: type IVa is CD4(+)Th1 lymphocyte mediated with activation of macrophages (granuloma formation and type I diabetes mellitus); type IVb is CD4(+)Th2 lymphocyte mediated with eosinophilic involvement (persistent asthma and allergic rhinitis); type IVc is cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocyte with involvement of perforin-granzme B in apoptosis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis); type IVd is T-lymphocyte-driven neutrophilic inflammation (pustular psoriasis and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis). Some diseases have multiple types of immunologic hypersensitivity.

  16. An ITAM-Syk-CARD9 signalling axis triggers contact hypersensitivity by stimulating IL-1 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Shinsuke; Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshii, Chika; Nakaya, Mako; Ozaki, Naoko; Toda, Shuji; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Natsuaki, Yohei; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kabashima, Kenji; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Takai, Toshiyuki; Saito, Takashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Malissen, Bernard; Ohno, Naohito; Furue, Masutaka; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2014-05-07

    A variety of reactive organic compounds, called haptens, can cause allergic contact dermatitis. However, the innate immune mechanisms by which haptens stimulate dendritic cells (DCs) to sensitize T cells remain unclear. Here we show that the coupling of ITAM-Syk-CARD9 signalling to interleukin-1 (IL-1) secretion in DCs is crucial for allergic sensitization to haptens. Both MyD88 and Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) signalling are required for contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Naïve T cells require signals received through IL-1R1-MyD88 for effector differentiation, whereas DCs require CARD9 and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) signalling for hapten-induced IL-1α/β secretion and their ability to prime T cells. DC-specific deletion of CARD9, DAP12, Syk or NLRP3, but not MyD88, is sufficient to abolish CHS. All tested haptens, but not irritants, can induce Syk activation, leading to both the CARD9/BCL10-dependent pro-IL-1 synthesis (signal1) and reactive oxygen species-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation (signal2), required for IL-1 secretion. These data unveil an innate immune mechanism crucial for allergic contact sensitization to chemical compounds.

  17. Hypersensitivity to aurora kinase inhibitors in cells resistant against platinum- containing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masaki; Izumi, Hiroto; Wang, Ke-Yong; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Harada, Yoshikazu; Oya, Ryoichi; Yamaguchi, Koji; Iwai, Yoshiko; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2014-01-01

    The aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that are essential for mitosis and contribute to tumorigenesis. Therefore, aurora kinases hold promise for molecularly targeted therapy. In the present study, we demonstrated that aurora B kinase (AURKB) is overexpressed in both cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant cells. Downregulation of AURKB sensitized cells to both cisplatin and oxaliplatin, but not to paclitaxel, 5-FU or hydrogen peroxide. Interestingly, we found that both cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant cells were hypersensitive to the AURKB specific inhibitors, AZD1152 HQPA and ZM447439, suggesting that both cisplatin- and oxaliplatinresistant cells develop an addiction to AURKB. These data provide evidence that aurora kinase inhibitors can overcome both cisplatin and oxaliplatin resistance. Therefore, AURKB inhibitors could offer potential benefits if used after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.

  18. Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Ring, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) are unpredictable and are a concern for radiologists and cardiologists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions manifest as anaphylaxis, and an allergic IgE-mediated mechanism has been continuously discussed for decades. Non-immediate reactions clinically are exanthemas resembling other drug-induced non-immediate hypersensitivities. During the past years, evidence is increasing that some of these reactions may be immunological. Repeated reactions after re-exposure, positive skin tests, and presence of specific IgE antibodies as well as positive basophil activation tests in some cases, and positive lymphocyte transformation or lymphocyte activation tests in others, indicate that a subgroup of both immediate and non-immediate reactions are of an allergic origin, although many questions remain unanswered. Recently reported cases highlight that pharmacological premedication is not safe to prevent RCM hypersensitivity in patients with previous severe reactions. These insights may have important consequences. A large multicenter study on the value of skin tests in RCM hypersensitivity concluded that skin testing is a useful tool for diagnosis of RCM allergy. It may have a role for the selection of a safe product in previous reactors, although confirmatory validation data is still scarce. In vitro tests to search for RCM-specific cell activation still are in development. In conclusion, recent data indicate that RCM hypersensitivity may have an allergic mechanism and that allergological testing is useful and may indicate tolerability. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Topical azithromycin and clarithromycin inhibit acute and chronic skin inflammation in sensitized mice, with apparent selectivity for Th2-mediated processes in delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ivetić Tkalčević, Vanesa; Cužić, Snježana; Kramarić, Miroslava Dominis; Parnham, Michael J; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2012-02-01

    Macrolide antibiotics inhibit the secretion of Th1 cytokines while their effects on the release of Th2 cytokines are variable. We investigated molecular and cellular markers of Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory mechanisms and the anti-inflammatory activity of azithromycin and clarithromycin in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and oxazolone (OXA)-induced skin inflammation. Dexamethasone (50 μg/ear), azithromycin, and clarithromycin (500 μg/ear) reduced TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-1β concentration in ear tissue by inhibiting inflammatory cell accumulation in PMA-induced inflammation. In OXA-induced early delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), the macrolides (2 mg/ear) and dexamethasone (25 μg/ear) reduced ear tissue inflammatory cell infiltration and secretion of IL-4 while clarithromycin also decreased IFN-γ concentration. Macrolides showed better activity when administered after the challenge. In OXA-induced chronic DTH, azithromycin (1 mg/ear) reduced the number of ear tissue mast cells and decreased the concentration of IL-4 in ear tissue and of immunoglobulin (Ig)E in serum. Clarithromycin (1 mg/ear) reduced serum IgE concentration, possibly by a mechanism independent of IL-4, while both macrolides attenuated mast cell degranulation. In conclusion, azithromycin and clarithromycin attenuate pro-inflammatory cytokine production and leukocyte infiltration during innate immune reactions, while selectively affecting Th2 rather than Th1 immunity in DTH reactions.

  20. Role of T Cells and Gamma Interferon during Induction of Hypersensitivity to Lipopolysaccharide by Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Martin M.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2001-01-01

    The superantigenic function of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is generally regarded as an important determinant of its lethal effects in humans or experimental animals. This study examined the role of superantigenicity in a BALB/c mouse model of lethal TSST-1-induced hypersensitivity to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this model, TSST-1 greatly potentiated both LPS-induced lethality, as well as LPS-induced serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) activity. Although BALB/c-SCID mice were resistant to these LPS enhancement effects of TSST-1, BALB/c-SCID mice reconstituted with T cells were completely susceptible to the enhancement effect of TSST-1 on LPS-induced serum TNF-α. Mice pretreated with cyclosporine (Cs) or neutralizing antibodies against gamma interferon (IFN-γ) did not develop lethal LPS hypersensitivity when injected with TSST-1, and these agents reduced the enhancement effect of TSST-1 on LPS-induced serum TNF-α by 99 and 85%, respectively. Cs pretreatment also completely inhibited the known capacity of TSST-1 to amplify LPS-induced levels of IFN-γ in serum. In contrast, mice given Cs after a priming injection of TSST-1, but before LPS, still exhibited lethal hypersensitivity to LPS. Cs given after TSST-1 also did not inhibit enhancement of LPS-induced serum TNF-α by TSST-1 but inhibited the enhancement effect of TSST-1 on LPS-induced serum IFN-γ by 50%. These experiments support the theory that TSST-1-induced hypersensitivity to LPS is mediated primarily by IFN-γ derived from superantigen-activated T cells. PMID:11179286

  1. NADPH Oxidase-Derived ROS Induced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mediates Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Zhuang, Wei-Ling; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the airways, is associated with hyperreactive airway diseases. ROS, particularly when created by NADPH oxidase, are known to sensitize lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs), which may contribute to airway hypersensitivity pathogenesis. We investigated whether CIH augments the reflex and afferent responses of LVCFs to chemical stimulants and the roles of ROS and NADPH oxidase in such airway hypersensitivity. Rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH with/without daily treatment with MnTMPyP (a superoxide anion scavenger), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or vehicle. At 16 h after their last exposure, intravenous capsaicin, adenosine, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked an augmented apneic response in anesthetized rats with 14-days CIH exposure, compared to anesthetized rats with 14-days RA exposure. The augmented apneic responses to these LVCF stimulants were abolished by bilateral vagotomy or perivagal capsaicin treatment, which block LVCFs neural conduction and were significantly suppressed by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin, but not vehicle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that 14-days CIH exposure potentiated the responses of LVCFs to these stimulants. This effect was inhibited by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin treatment and was not seen in rats who received 7-days of CIH exposure. Biochemical analysis indicated that 14-days CIH exposure increased both lung lipid peroxidation, which is indicative of oxidative stress, and expression of the p47phox subunit in the membrane fraction of lung tissue, which is an index of NADPH oxidase activation. The former was prevented by treatment with either MnTMPyP or apocynin, while the later was prevented by treatment with apocynin only. These results suggest that 14-days CIH exposure sensitizes LVCFs in rats, leading to an exaggerated reflex and afferent responses to

  2. IL-21 reduces immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mouse skin by suppressing mast cell activation or IgE production.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Katoh, Norito

    2011-07-01

    IL-21 regulates activation, proliferation, and differentiation of various immune cells. We have previously shown that exogenous IL-21 administration reduces allergic reactions in mouse models of anaphylaxis and allergic rhinitis. However, the effects of IL-21 in allergic cutaneous reactions remain unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of IL-21 in a mouse model of the IgE-mediated cutaneous immediate hypersensitivity reaction (IHR). We also investigated the mechanism of IL-21-induced regulation of allergic cutaneous reactions. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA) injection and challenged by injecting OVA intradermally into the ears, with intraperitoneal administration of recombinant murine (rm)IL-21 during the sensitization period or after completion of sensitization. After challenge, IL-21-untreated allergic mice developed biphasic responses characterized by early-phase and late-phase reactions. The biphasic reactions were significantly reduced by rmIL-21 treatment during sensitization or after completion of sensitization. Administration of rmIL-21 during sensitization reduced the cutaneous IHR by suppressing allergen-specific IgE production. In contrast, administration of rmIL-21 after completion of sensitization did not decrease serum levels of allergen-specific IgE, but significantly suppressed mast cell degranulation in skin. These results suggest that the regulatory effects of IL-21 on the cutaneous IHR involve suppression of allergen-specific IgE production or mast cell degranulation.

  3. β-Lactam hypersensitivity involves expansion of circulating and skin-resident TH22 cells.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Andrew; Wang, Eryi; Farrell, John; Whitaker, Paul; Faulkner, Lee; Peckham, Daniel; Park, B Kevin; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2017-02-20

    β-Lactam hypersensitivity has been classified according to the phenotype and function of drug-specific T cells. However, new T-cell subsets have not been considered. The objective of this study was to use piperacillin as a model of β-lactam hypersensitivity to study the nature of the drug-specific T-cell response induced in the blood and skin of hypersensitive patients and healthy volunteers. Drug-specific T cells were cloned from blood and inflamed skin, and cellular phenotype and function were explored. Naive T cells from healthy volunteers were primed to piperacillin, cloned, and subjected to the similar analyses. PBMC and T-cell clones (n = 570, 84% CD4(+)) from blood of piperacillin-hypersensitive patients proliferated and secreted TH1/TH2 cytokines alongside IL-22 after drug stimulation. IL-17A secretion was not detected. Drug-specific clones from inflamed skin (n = 96, 83% CD4(+)) secreted a similar profile of cytokines but displayed greater cytolytic activity, secreting perforin, granzyme B, and Fas ligand when activated. Blood- and skin-derived clones expressed high levels of skin-homing chemokine receptors and migrated in the presence of the ligands CCL17 and CCL27. Piperacillin-primed naive T cells from healthy volunteers also secreted IFN-γ, IL-13, IL-22, and cytolytic molecules. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor blockade prevented differentiation of the naive T cells into antigen-specific IL-22-secreting cells. Together, our results reveal that circulating and skin-resident, antigen-specific, IL-22-secreting T cells are detectable in patients with β-lactam hypersensitivity. Furthermore, differentiation of naive T cells into antigen-specific TH22 cells is dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  5. α4β7 Integrin is essential for contact hypersensitivity by regulating migration of T cells to skin.

    PubMed

    Ohmatsu, Hanako; Kadono, Takafumi; Sugaya, Makoto; Tomita, Manabu; Kai, Hiromichi; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Saeki, Hidehisa; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Steeber, Douglas A; Tedder, Thomas F; Sato, Shinichi

    2010-12-01

    β7 Integrin, a cell adhesion molecule, is present in the form of α4β7 integrin or αEβ7 integrin. α4β7 Integrin is expressed on most leucocytes and is essential for their migration to gut-associated lymphoid tissues by interacting with its primary ligand, mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1, which is preferentially expressed in gut-associated lymphoid tissues. Although the importance of α4β7 integrin in intestinal inflammation has been established, its role in cutaneous inflammation remains to be elucidated. We sought to investigate the role of β7 integrin in cutaneous inflammation. We used a murine contact hypersensitivity model and examined the role of β7 integrin by using β7 integrin-deficient and αE integrin-deficient mice. β7 Integrin-deficient mice, not αE integrin-deficient mice, are defective in contact hypersensitivity responses. β7 Integrin deficiency does not affect irritant contact dermatitis. The distribution, migration, and function of antigen presenting cells from β7 integrin-deficient mice are comparable to those from wild-type mice. Moreover, sensitized β7 integrin-deficient T cells are able to respond to antigen stimuli in vitro and elicit contact hypersensitivity responses when directly injected into the skin. However, they are defective in reaching the skin under inflammatory conditions, resulting in reduced contact hypersensitivity responses when intravenously injected. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of anti-α4β7 integrin neutralizing antibody elicit impaired contact hypersensitivity responses. α4β7 Integrin contributes to contact hypersensitivity responses by regulating T-cell migration to inflammatory skin. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Disruption of Microtubular Cytoskeleton Induced by Cryptogein, an Elicitor of Hypersensitive Response in Tobacco Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Binet, Marie-Noëlle; Humbert, Claude; Lecourieux, David; Vantard, Marylin; Pugin, Alain

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of microtubular cytoskeleton were studied in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) cells in response to two different plant defense elicitors: cryptogein, a protein secreted by Phytophthora cryptogea and oligogalacturonides (OGs), derived from the plant cell wall. In tobacco plants cryptogein triggers a hypersensitive-like response and induces systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, whereas OGs induce defense responses, but fail to trigger cell death. The comparison of the microtubule (MT) dynamics in response to cryptogein and OGs in tobacco cells indicates that MTs appear unaffected in OG-treated cells, whereas cryptogein treatment caused a rapid and severe disruption of microtubular network. When hyperstabilized by the MT depolymerization inhibitor, taxol, the MT network was still disrupted by cryptogein treatment. On the other hand, the MT-depolymerizing agent oryzalin and cryptogein had different and complementary effects. In addition to MT destabilization, cryptogein induced the death of tobacco cells, whereas OG-treated cells did not die. We demonstrated that MT destabilization and cell death induced by cryptogein depend on calcium influx and that MT destabilization occurs independently of active oxygen species production. The molecular basis of cryptogein-induced MT disruption and its potential significance with respect to cell death are discussed. PMID:11161014

  7. BHK cell lines with increased rates of gene amplification are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Giulotto, E.; Bertoni, L.; Attolini, C.; Rainaldi, G.; Anglana, M. )

    1991-04-15

    Four cell lines (MP1, -4, -5, -7), isolated from baby hamster kidney cells after simultaneous selection with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate and methotrexate, have previously been shown to amplify their DNA at an increased rate. We now show that all four lines are hypersensitive to killing by UV light and mitomycin C. At high doses of UV light or mitomycin C, the MP lines survived less than 10% or less than 5% as well as parental cells, respectively. After UV irradiation, inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis was greater in MP than in parental cells, and recovery was slower or absent. A 2- to 3.5-fold increase in the frequency of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange was also seen in the four cell lines. In MP5, unscheduled DNA replication after treatment with UV light was only approximately 70% as great as in parental cells and the other MP lines. In MP4 and MP7 cells S phase was elongated. Although their individual properties confirm that the four cell lines are independent, their common properties suggest a relationship between tolerance of DNA damage and gene amplification.

  8. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersensitivity remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of the GDNF family receptor α-3 (GFRα3) signaling in visceral hypersensitivity by quantifying visceromotor responses (VMR) to colorectal distension before and after intracolonic treatment with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baseline responses to colorectal distension did not differ between C57BL/6 and GFRα3 knockout (KO) mice. Relative to intracolonic saline treatment, TNBS significantly enhanced the VMR to colorectal distension in C57BL/6 mice 2, 7, 10, and 14 days posttreatment, whereas TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed in GFRα3 KO mice. The proportion of GFRα3 immunopositive thoracolumbar and lumbosacral colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly elevated 2 days after TNBS treatment. In single fiber recordings, responses to circumferential stretch of colorectal afferent endings in C57BL/6 mice were significantly increased (sensitized) after exposure to an inflammatory soup, whereas responses to stretch did not sensitize in GFRα3 KO mice. These findings suggest that enhanced GFRα3 signaling in visceral afferents may contribute to development of colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:21193524

  9. Genome-wide Detection of DNase I Hypersensitive Sites in Single Cells and FFPE Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wenfei; Tang, Qingsong; Wan, Mimi; Cui, Kairong; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Gang; Ni, Bing; Sklar, Jeffrey; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Childs, Richard; Levens, David; Zhao, Keji

    2015-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) provide important information on the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and the state of chromatin in mammalian cells1–3. Conventional DNase-Seq for genome-wide DHSs profiling is limited by the requirement of millions of cells4,5. Here we report an ultrasensitive strategy, called Pico-Seq, for detection of genome-wide DHSs in single cells. We show that DHS patterns at the single cell level are highly reproducible among individual cells. Among different single cells, highly expressed gene promoters and the enhancers associated with multiple active histone modifications display constitutive DHS while chromatin regions with fewer histone modifications exhibit high variation of DHS. Furthermore, the single-cell DHSs predict enhancers that regulate cell-specific gene expression programs and the cell-to-cell variations of DHS are predictive of gene expression. Finally, we apply Pico-Seq to pools of tumor cells and pools of normal cells, dissected from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue slides from thyroid cancer patients, and detect thousands of tumor-specific DHSs. Many of these DHSs are associated with promoters and enhancers critically involved in cancer development. Analysis of the DHS sequences uncovers one single-nucleotide variant (chr18:52417839 G>C) in the tumor cells of a follicular thyroid carcinoma patient, which affects the binding of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and correlates with decreased expression of its target gene TXNL1. In conclusion, Pico-Seq can reliably detect DHSs in single cells, greatly extending the range of applications of DHS analysis for both basic and translational research and may provide critical information for personalized medicine. PMID:26605532

  10. Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease: hypersensitivity to X rays in cultured cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, J H; Otsuka, F; Tarone, R E; Polinsky, R J; Brumback, R A; Nee, L E

    1985-01-01

    Fibroblast and/or lymphoblastoid lines from patients with several inherited primary neuronal degenerations are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents. Therefore, lymphoblastoid lines were irradiated from patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mean survival values of the eight Parkinson's disease and of the six Alzheimer's disease lines, but not of the five amyotrophic lateral sclerosis lines, were less than that of the 28 normal lines. Our results with Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease cells can be explained by a genetic defect arising as a somatic mutation during embryogenesis, causing defective repair of the X-ray type of DNA damage. Such a DNA repair defect could cause an abnormal accumulation of spontaneously occurring DNA damage in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease neurons in vivo, resulting in their premature death. PMID:3876409

  11. Cold hypersensitivity increases with age in mice with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Zappia, Katherine J.; Garrison, Sheldon R.; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with acute vaso-occlusive crises that trigger painful episodes and frequently involves ongoing, chronic pain. Additionally, both humans and mice with SCD experience heighted cold sensitivity. However, studies have not addressed the mechanism(s) underlying the cold sensitization, nor its progression with age. Here we measured thermotaxis behavior in young and aged mice with severe SCD. Sickle mice had a marked increase in cold sensitivity measured by a cold preference test. Further, cold hypersensitivity worsened with advanced age. We assessed whether enhanced peripheral input contributes to the chronic cold pain behavior by recording from C fibers, many of which are cold-sensitive, in skin-nerve preparations. We observed that C fibers from sickle mice displayed a shift to warmer (more sensitive) cold-detection thresholds. To address mechanisms underlying the cold sensitization in primary afferent neurons, we quantified mRNA expression levels for ion channels thought to be involved in cold detection. These included the Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (Trpm8) and TRP Ankyrin 1 (Trpa1) channels, as well as the two-pore domain potassium channels, TREK-1 (Kcnk2), TREK-2 (Kcnk4), and TRAAK (Kcnk10). Surprisingly, transcript expression levels of all of these channels were comparable between sickle and control mice. We further examined transcript expression of 83 additional pain-related genes and found increased mRNA levels for endothelin 1 and tachykinin receptor 1. These factors may contribute to hypersensitivity in sickle mice at both the afferent and behavioral levels. Sensory neurons from sickle cell disease mice are sensitized to cold, mirroring behavioral observations, and have increased expression of endothelin 1 and tachykinin receptor 1. PMID:24953902

  12. Lymphocyte-mediated regulation of platelet activation during desensitization in patients with hymenoptera venom hypersensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Ledru, E; Pestel, J; Tsicopoulos, A; Joseph, M; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A

    1988-01-01

    T cells from peripheral blood of hymenoptera sensitive patients were studied before and after venom desensitization. Before treatment, T cells showed a variable but higher proliferative response to allergen than T cells of treated patients or controls. While before desensitization, T cell products, specifically released after in vitro allergen stimulation, were able to amplify the IgE-dependent platelet activity, we showed that after treatment of the same patients, T cell products strongly reduced platelet activation. Considering the modifications in platelet activation previously observed in patients treated by specific immunotherapy, the present results suggest that, through a modification of T cell reactivity to allergen, T cell functions are modulated by desensitization, and emphasize the involvement of T cell products in the desensitization mechanisms. PMID:3263227

  13. JAK inhibitor JTE-052 regulates contact hypersensitivity by downmodulating T cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Amano, Wataru; Nakajima, Saeko; Yamamoto, Yasuo; Tanimoto, Atsuo; Matsushita, Mutsuyoshi; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Using JAK inhibitors to inhibit cytokine signaling is presumed to be a possible means of treating skin inflammatory disorders such as contact dermatitis. To clarify the action site of JAK inhibitors in skin inflammatory disorders. We analyzed the mechanism of action of the JAK inhibitor JTE-052 using murine skin inflammation models, including contact hypersensitivity (CHS) and irritant contact dermatitis. Cells isolated from ear tissue or lymph node (LN) were analyzed by flow cytometry. The amounts of cytokines in the culture medium were measured by ELISA or bead array system. Proliferation of LN cells was evaluated by measurement of tritiated thymidine incorporation. Oral administration of JTE-052 during both sensitization and elicitation phase attenuated CHS, but did not affect croton oil-induced irritant contact dermatitis. JTE-052 potently inhibited T cell proliferation and activation by antigen presentation in vitro, and attenuated skin inflammation in a sensitized-lymphocyte transfer model without suppressing T cell migration. JTE-052 did not affect hapten-induced cutaneous dendritic cell migration into draining lymph nodes or their costimulatory molecule expressions. The JAK inhibitor JTE-052 exerts an inhibitory effect on antigen-specific T cell activation and subsequent inflammation in acquired skin immunity, such as CHS. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p<0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4(+)CD8(-) and peripheral CD4(+) T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8(+) population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4(+) T cells, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4(+) T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression.

  15. Natural evolution of skin-test sensitivity in patients with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Romano, A; Gaeta, F; Valluzzi, R L; Zaffiro, A; Caruso, C; Quaratino, D

    2014-06-01

    There are studies demonstrating that skin-test sensitivity to penicillins can decrease over time and that allergic patients may lose sensitivity if the responsible compounds are avoided. With regard to subjects with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins, however, such studies are lacking. We evaluated prospectively in a 5-year follow-up 72 cephalosporin-allergic patients. After the first evaluation, patients were classified into two groups according to their patterns of allergologic-test positivity: to both penicillins and cephalosporins (group A), or only to cephalosporins (group B). Skin tests and serum-specific IgE assays were repeated 1 year later and, in case of persistent positivity, 3 and 5 years after the first allergologic examination. Seven (43.7%) of the 16 subjects of group A and 38 (67.8%) of the 56 patients of group B became negative; one was lost to follow-up. Patients of group B became negative sooner and more frequently than group A subjects.

  16. Functional roles of the pepper leucine-rich repeat protein and its interactions with pathogenesis-related and hypersensitive-induced proteins in plant cell death and immunity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2017-05-15

    Pepper leucine-rich repeat protein (CaLRR1) interacts with defense response proteins to regulate plant cell death and immunity. This review highlights the current understanding of the molecular functions of CaLRR1 and its interactor proteins. Plant cell death and immune responses to microbial pathogens are controlled by complex and tightly regulated molecular signaling networks. Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv)-inducible pepper (Capsicum annuum) leucine-rich repeat protein 1 (CaLRR1) serves as a molecular marker for plant cell death and immunity signaling. In this review, we discuss recent advances in elucidating the functional roles of CaLRR1 and its interacting plant proteins, and understanding how they are involved in the cell death and defense responses. CaLRR1 physically interacts with pepper pathogenesis-related proteins (CaPR10 and CaPR4b) and hypersensitive-induced reaction protein (CaHIR1) to regulate plant cell death and defense responses. CaLRR1 is produced in the cytoplasm and trafficked to the extracellular matrix. CaLRR1 binds to CaPR10 in the cytoplasm and CaPR4b and CaHIR1 at the plasma membrane. CaLRR1 synergistically accelerates CaPR10-triggered hypersensitive cell death, but negatively regulates CaPR4b- and CaHIR1-triggered cell death. CaHIR1 interacts with Xcv filamentous hemagglutinin (Fha1) to trigger disease-associated cell death. The subcellular localization and cellular function of these CaLRR1 interactors during plant cell death and defense responses were elucidated by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, virus-induced gene silencing, and transgenic overexpression studies. CaPR10, CaPR4b, and CaHIR1 positively regulate defense signaling mediated by salicylic acid and reactive oxygen species, thereby activating hypersensitive cell death and disease resistance. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular functions of CaLRR1 and its interacting protein partners in cell death and defense responses will provide valuable

  17. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  18. Type IV hypersensitivity reactions following Dermabond adhesive utilization in knee surgery: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Yagnatovsky, Michelle; Pham, Hien; Rokito, Andrew; Jazrawi, Laith; Strauss, Eric

    2017-01-25

    ​We retrospectively reviewed the records of 3 patients (3 knees) with a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction following Dermabond exposure after an orthopaedic knee procedure. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions are mediated by CD4+ helper T cells. The use of skin adhesives in place of traditional sutures is increasing in popularity given Dermabond's potential benefits of decreased wound infection rate and better wound approximation. However, hypersensitivity reactions to the cyanoacrylate material in Dermabond have been described. Differentiating hypersensitivity reactions from post-operative infections is important as septic arthritis is a potentially devastating complication. This case series presents the challenge of properly diagnosing and managing hypersensitivity reactions. Consultation with allergists and dermatologists may be appropriate for ascertaining the nature of the surgical site complication and proper management. The recommended management of hypersensitivity-type reactions is a course of topical steroids and infection work up if needed.

  19. Delayed-type skin hypersensitivity and in vitro lymphocyte immunostimulation responses of swine following inoculation with Mycobacterium avium cell walls and a mycobacterial immunopotentiating glycolipid.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, H W; Gessner, J W; Woodard, L F; Everson, D O

    1983-06-01

    Miniature swine (n = 5 per group) were inoculated intradermally with mineral oil-in-water emulsions containing either 150 micrograms of mycobacterial immunopotentiating glycolipid P3 (EP3), 150 micrograms of lyophilized Mycobacterium avium (serotype 8) cell walls (E-MaCW), or 150 micrograms P3 and 150 micrograms M. avium cell walls (EP3-MaCW). Swine vaccinated with E-MaCW and EP3-MaCW developed antigen-sensitive lymphocytes detectable with delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests and lymphocyte transformation assays. Swine injected with EP3 were not sensitized. In general EP3-MaCW evoked a more pronounced in vivo DTH tuberculin skin test and in vitro lymphocyte transformation responses than E-MaCW. Time-course studies indicated a more persistent response in swine injected with EP3-MaCW than in those given E-MaCW. Commercial type Yorkshire swine (n = 5) inoculated intradermally with EP3-MaCW developed cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to avian tuberculin detectable in vivo with delayed-type skin hypersensitivity and in vitro with lymphocyte immunostimulation responses.

  20. Eukaryotic Cells Producing Ribosomes Deficient in Rpl1 Are Hypersensitive to Defects in the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Kerri B.; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Willis, Ian M.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the misassembly of ribosomes in eukaryotic cells can have deleterious effects that go far beyond a simple shortage of ribosomes. In this work we find that cells deficient in ribosomal protein L1 (Rpl1; Rpl10a in mammals) produce ribosomes lacking Rpl1 that are exported to the cytoplasm and that can be incorporated into polyribosomes. The presence of such defective ribosomes leads to slow growth and appears to render the cells hypersensitive to lesions in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several genes that were reasonable candidates for degradation of 60S subunits lacking Rpl1 fail to do so, suggesting that key players in the surveillance of ribosomal subunits remain to be found. Interestingly, in spite of rendering the cells hypersensitive to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, shortage of Rpl1 partially suppresses the stress-invoked temporary repression of ribosome synthesis caused by MG132. PMID:21858174

  1. Eukaryotic cells producing ribosomes deficient in Rpl1 are hypersensitive to defects in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Kerri B; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Willis, Ian M; Warner, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the misassembly of ribosomes in eukaryotic cells can have deleterious effects that go far beyond a simple shortage of ribosomes. In this work we find that cells deficient in ribosomal protein L1 (Rpl1; Rpl10a in mammals) produce ribosomes lacking Rpl1 that are exported to the cytoplasm and that can be incorporated into polyribosomes. The presence of such defective ribosomes leads to slow growth and appears to render the cells hypersensitive to lesions in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several genes that were reasonable candidates for degradation of 60S subunits lacking Rpl1 fail to do so, suggesting that key players in the surveillance of ribosomal subunits remain to be found. Interestingly, in spite of rendering the cells hypersensitive to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, shortage of Rpl1 partially suppresses the stress-invoked temporary repression of ribosome synthesis caused by MG132.

  2. Effect of pollen-mediated oxidative stress on immediate hypersensitivity reactions and late-phase inflammation in allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Choudhury, Barun K.; Sur, Sanjiv; Boldogh, Istvan

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic eye diseases are complex inflammatory conditions of the conjunctiva that are becoming increasingly prevalent and present an increasing economic burden because of direct and indirect health expenditures. Objective We sought to identify factors that may synergize with antigen-induced allergic inflammation and lead to allergic conjunctivitis. We used a murine model of allergic conjunctivitis to test the effect of oxidative stress generated by pollen oxidases using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NAD[P]H) as an electron donor present in pollen grains. Methods Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by hydrated Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen (short ragweed pollen; RWP) grains was determined by using 2′-7′-dihydro-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and Amplex Red assay. The RWP-induced changes in intracellular ROS levels were examined in A549 cells, human primary bronchial epithelial cells, and murine conjunctiva. Results Ragweed pollen grains contain NAD(P)H oxidase activity, which is diphenyleneiodonium-sensitive and quinacrine-sensitive and sodium azide-resistant. These NAD(P)H oxidases generate a superoxide anion that can be converted to H2O2 by pollen grain–associated superoxide dismutase. These diffusible oxygen radicals from pollen grains increase intracellular ROS levels in cultured epithelial cells and murine conjunctiva. Similar phenomena were observed in sensitized and naive mice, indicating that the RWP-induced oxidative stress in conjunctival epithelium is independent of adaptive immunity. Inactivation of NAD(P)H oxidase activity in RWP decreases the immediate-type hypersensitivity and inflammatory cell infiltration into the conjunctiva. Conclusion Our data suggest that ROS generated by NAD(P)H oxidases in pollen grains intensify immediate allergic reactions and recruitment of inflammatory cells in murine conjunctiva. PMID:16210058

  3. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  4. Stable form of galectin-9, a Tim-3 ligand, inhibits contact hypersensitivity and psoriatic reactions: a potent therapeutic tool for Th1- and/or Th17-mediated skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Haruna; Satoh, Takahiro; Matsushima, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuki; Saeki, Kazumi; Niki, Toshiro; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2009-08-01

    Tim-3 is a cell surface molecule preferentially expressed in Th1 and Th17 cells. Galectin-9 is a ligand for Tim-3 and the binding of galectin-9 to Tim-3 induces apoptosis. We recently developed a stable form of galectin-9 (sGal-9) by partial deletion of the linker peptide. In this study, we characterized the therapeutic effects of sGal-9 on inflammatory reactions in contact hypersensitivity and IL-23-induced psoriatic mouse models. In contact hypersensitivity in mice, the ear swelling response was suppressed by sGal-9. In vitro treatment with sGal-9 resulted in cell apoptosis of CD4, CD8, and hepatic NK cells. sGal-9-treated mice had decreased IFN-gamma- and IL-17-producing T cells. Similarly, sGal-9 reduced epidermal thickness and dermal cellular infiltrate levels in IL-23-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation. This was accompanied by decreased skin lesion levels of IL-17 and IL-22. sGal-9 may be a unique and useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of Th1- and/or Th17-mediated skin inflammation.

  5. Ibuprofen-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanau, Radu M; Neuman, Manuela G

    2010-06-01

    Ibuprofen is a widely used antipyretic and analgesic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID). With the aging of the population, there will be a significant increase in the prevalence of painful degenerative and inflammatory rheumatic conditions. This increase likely will lead to a parallel increase in the use of NSAIDs, including ibuprofen. The primary effect of the NSAIDs is to inhibit cyclooxygenase (prostaglandin synthase), thereby impairing the ultimate transformation of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxanes. Although in the majority of cases it is safe, this NSAID, ibuprofen, can produce an unpredictable, idiosyncratic, type B reaction that may pose a major concern in clinical practice. Type B reactions are known to occur in susceptible individuals. The true hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a systemic disease defined by the triad of fever, rash, and internal organ involvement that starts 1 day to 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. HSR has limited the therapeutic use of many drugs, including ibuprofen. Hypersensitivity syndrome associated with ibuprofen is a host-dependent drug reaction that is idiosyncratic in nature. This reaction likely is caused by a combination of metabolic and immunologic factors. Immune mediated components, such as T-cell and their products cytokines and chemokines, can exacerbate cellular responses and create complex pathways that lead to a variety of clinical manifestations. Our review presents an ibuprofen-induced clinical manifestation of hypersensitivity syndrome and the necessity of wisely monitoring the patients clinically and by laboratory investigations when prescribing this drug.

  6. Immunosuppressive Effect of Litsea cubeba L. Essential Oil on Dendritic Cell and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Chun; Chang, Wen-Te; Hseu, You-Cheng; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chuang, Cheng Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Lin, Ming-Kuem

    2016-01-01

    Litsea cubeba L., also named as Makauy, is a traditional herb and has been used as cooking condiment or tea brewing to treat diseases for aborigines. The present study was undertaken to explore the chemical compositions of the fruit essential oil of L. cubeba (LCEO) and the immunomodulatory effect of LCEO on dendritic cells and mice. The LCEO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with direct injection (DI/GC) or headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME/GC). In total, 56 components were identified, of which 48 were detected by DI/GC and 49 were detected by HS-SPME/GC. The principal compounds were citral (neral and geranial). An immunosuppressive activity of LCEO was investigated with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) which have a critical role to trigger the adaptive immunity. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of LCEO on immune response was elucidated by performing the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses in mice. Our results clearly showed that LCEO decreases the production of TNF-α and cytokine IL-12 in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. CHS response and the infiltrative T cells were inhibited in the tested ears of the mice co-treated with LCEO. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the LCEO mainly containing citral exhibits an immunosuppressive effect on DCs and mice, indicating that LCEO can potentially be applied in the treatment of CHS, inflammatory diseases, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27529236

  7. Genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote axonal regeneration and prevent hypersensitivity after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Gentaro; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Toh, Satoshi; McNiece, Ian; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2013-10-01

    Neurotrophins and the transplantation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs) are both candidate therapies targeting spinal cord injury (SCI). While some studies have suggested the ability of MSCs to transdifferentiate into neural cells, other SCI studies have proposed anti-inflammatory and other mechanisms underlying established beneficial effects. We grafted rat MSCs genetically modified to express MNTS1, a multineurotrophin that binds TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, and p75(NTR) receptors or MSC-MNTS1/p75(-) that binds mainly to the Trk receptors. Seven days after contusive SCI, PBS-only, GFP-MSC, MSC-MNTS1/GFP or MSC-MNTS1/p75(-)/GFP were delivered into the injury epicenter. All transplanted groups showed reduced inflammation and cystic cavity size compared to control SCI rats. Interestingly, transplantation of the MSC-MNTS1 and MSC-MNTS1/p75(-), but not the naïve MSCs, enhanced axonal growth and significantly prevented cutaneous hypersensitivity after SCI. Moreover, transplantation of MSC-MNTS1/p75(-) promoted angiogenesis and modified glial scar formation. These findings suggest that MSCs transduced with a multineurotrophin are effective in promoting cell growth and improving sensory function after SCI. These novel data also provide insight into the neurotrophin-receptor dependent mechanisms through which cellular transplantation leads to functional improvement after experimental SCI.

  8. Immunosuppressive Effect of Litsea cubeba L. Essential Oil on Dendritic Cell and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chun; Chang, Wen-Te; Hseu, You-Cheng; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chuang, Cheng Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Lin, Ming-Kuem

    2016-08-12

    Litsea cubeba L., also named as Makauy, is a traditional herb and has been used as cooking condiment or tea brewing to treat diseases for aborigines. The present study was undertaken to explore the chemical compositions of the fruit essential oil of L. cubeba (LCEO) and the immunomodulatory effect of LCEO on dendritic cells and mice. The LCEO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with direct injection (DI/GC) or headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME/GC). In total, 56 components were identified, of which 48 were detected by DI/GC and 49 were detected by HS-SPME/GC. The principal compounds were citral (neral and geranial). An immunosuppressive activity of LCEO was investigated with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) which have a critical role to trigger the adaptive immunity. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of LCEO on immune response was elucidated by performing the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses in mice. Our results clearly showed that LCEO decreases the production of TNF-α and cytokine IL-12 in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. CHS response and the infiltrative T cells were inhibited in the tested ears of the mice co-treated with LCEO. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the LCEO mainly containing citral exhibits an immunosuppressive effect on DCs and mice, indicating that LCEO can potentially be applied in the treatment of CHS, inflammatory diseases, and autoimmune diseases.

  9. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually occurs in people who work in places where there are high levels of organic dusts, fungus, or molds. Long-term exposure can lead to lung inflammation and acute lung disease . ...

  10. Quantification of Etoposide Hypersensitivity: A Sensitive, Functional Method for Assessing Pluripotent Stem Cell Quality.

    PubMed

    Secreto, Frank J; Li, Xing; Smith, Alyson J; Bruinsma, Elizabeth S; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Oommen, Saji; Hawse, Gresin; Hrstka, Sybil C L; Arendt, Bonnie K; Brandt, Emma B; Wigle, Dennis A; Nelson, Timothy J

    2017-10-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) hold great promise in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, translation of hiPSC technology depends upon a means of assessing hiPSC quality that is quantitative, high-throughput, and can decipher malignant teratocarcinoma clones from normal cell lines. These attributes are lacking in current approaches such as detection of cell surface makers, RNA profiling, and/or teratoma formation assays. The latter remains the gold standard for assessing clone quality in hiPSCs, but is expensive, time-consuming, and incompatible with high-throughput platforms. Herein, we describe a novel method for determining hiPSC quality that exploits pluripotent cells' documented hypersensitivity to the topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide (CAS No. 33419-42-0). Based on a study of 115 unique hiPSC clones, we established that a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) value of <300 nM following 24 hours of exposure to etoposide demonstrated a positive correlation with RNA profiles and colony morphology metrics associated with high quality hiPSC clones. Moreover, our etoposide sensitivity assay (ESA) detected differences associated with culture maintenance, and successfully distinguished malignant from normal pluripotent clones independent of cellular morphology. Overall, the ESA provides a simple, straightforward method to establish hiPSC quality in a quantitative and functional assay capable of being incorporated into a generalized method for establishing a quality control standard for all types of pluripotent stem cells. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1829-1839. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  11. Fitness of cell-mediated immunity independent of repertoire diversity.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Rebrovich, Michelle; Wettstein, Peter J; Vuk-Pavlovic, Zvezdana; Limper, Andrew H; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2007-03-01

    Fitness of cell-mediated immunity is thought to depend on TCR diversity; however, this concept has not been tested formally. We tested the concept using JH(-/-) mice that lack B cells and have TCR Vbeta diversity <1% that of wild-type mice and quasimonoclonal (QM) mice with oligoclonal B cells and TCR Vbeta diversity 7% that of wild-type mice. Despite having a TCR repertoire contracted >99% and defective lymphoid organogenesis, JH(-/-) mice rejected H-Y-incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild-type mice. JH(-/-) mice exhibited T cell priming by peptide and delayed-type hypersensitivity, although these responses were less than normal owing either to TCR repertoire contraction or defective lymphoid organogenesis. QM mice with TCR diversity contracted >90%, and normal lymphoid organs rejected H-Y incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild type mice and exhibited normal T cell priming and normal delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. QM mice also resisted Pneumocystis murina like wild-type mice. Thus, cell-mediated immunity can function normally despite contractions of TCR diversity >90% and possibly >99%.

  12. Cellular Players and Role of Selectin Ligands in Leukocyte Recruitment in a T-Cell-Initiated Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Doebis, Cornelia; Siegmund, Kerstin; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Lowe, John B.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Hamann, Alf; Huehn, Jochen; Syrbe, Uta

    2008-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions are characterized by a strong cellular infiltrate, including neutrophils, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. In all these cell types, both E- and P-selectin-dependent adhesion pathways play a significant role in recruitment into the inflamed skin. Accordingly, inhibition of selectin-mediated interactions (eg, by antibodies) results in impairment of acute DTH reactions. However, whether inhibition of a specific cell type is responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect or whether all leukocytes are affected remains unclear. To address this question, we used fucosyltransferase-VII knockout mice that lack functional selectin ligands as either donors or recipients in a DTH model elicited by Th1 cell and antigen transfer. We found that selectin-mediated adhesion is required by Th1 effector cells to enter the DTH reaction site and, additionally, to elicit the DTH reaction. On the other hand, elimination of selectin binding in the recipient’s neutrophils and macrophages by use of fucosyltransferase-deficient mice receiving wild-type Th1 effector cells resulted in a strongly reduced infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages but unimpaired footpad swelling. These findings demonstrate a major role for both E- and P-selectin in the recruitment of different leukocyte cell types. However, only the presence of selectin ligands on T cells was critical for the inflammatory reaction. These findings reveal T cells as the predominant targets for selectin blockade that aim to suppress skin inflammation. PMID:18755847

  13. IgE Receptor-Mediated Mast-Cell Renin Release

    PubMed Central

    Aldi, Silvia; Robador, Pablo A.; Tomita, Kengo; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Levi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Renin is a newly discovered constituent of mast cells. Given that mast cells play a major role in IgE-mediated allergic hypersensitivity, we investigated whether activation of the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI elicits release of mast-cell renin. Cross-linking of FcεRI on the surface of mature bone marrow–derived mast cells elicited release of enzymatically active renin protein. The angiotensin I–forming activity of the renin protein was completely blocked by the selective renin inhibitor BILA 2157, which excludes formation of angiotensin I by proteases other than renin. FcεRI-mediated mast-cell renin release was inhibited by dexamethasone and potentiated by the proinflammatory mediator PGE2. Furthermore, cross-linking of mast-cell FcεRI in ex vivo murine hearts passively sensitized with monoclonal anti-DNP IgE also resulted in mast-cell degranulation and overflow of renin. Our findings indicate that IgE-mediated allergic hypersensitivity provokes release of renin from both cultured and resident cardiac mast cells, a process likely to be exacerbated in a chronic inflammatory background. Given the widespread distribution of mast cells, and the presence of angiotensinogen and angiotensin-converting enzyme in many tissues, renin release in immediate hypersensitivity reactions could result in local angiotensin II generation and multiorgan dysfunctions. PMID:24262755

  14. Cross-reactivity and Tolerability of Ertapenem in Patients With IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity to β-Lactams.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, A; Pascolini, L; Rizzi, A; Aruanno, A; Pecora, V; Ricci, A G; Mezzacappa, S; Di Rienzo, A; Centrone, M; Nucera, E; Schiavino, D

    2016-01-01

    Administration of carbapenems to β-lactam-allergic patients has always been considered potentially harmful because of a 47.4% rate of cross-reactivity to imipenem reported in a single study. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that the rate of cross-reactivity of imipenem and meropenem with penicillins is lower than 1%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using ertapenem in patients with an established IgE-mediated β-lactam allergy. We studied all participants who came to our allergy unit and had a clinical history of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to β-lactams. The inclusion criteria were a positive skin test result to at least 1 β-lactam molecule and/or positive specific IgE (when available). All participants underwent immediate-type skin tests with several β-lactam molecules including ertapenem. Challenges with intravenous ertapenem were performed on 2 different days in patients with negative skin test results. We examined 49 patients with a clinical history of immediate reactions to β-lactams. All the patients had positive skin tests and/or positive specific IgE to at least 1 β-lactam reagent and negative carbapenem skin tests. Thirty-six patients agreed to undergo the challenges and 35 tolerated the full dose of ertapenem. The practice of avoiding carbapenems in patients with β-lactam allergy should be abandoned considering the very low rate of cross-reactivity. β-Lactam-allergic patients who need ertapenem therapy should undergo skin tests and, if negative, a graded challenge to assess tolerability.

  15. Transcription of the hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer in erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, D.; Suming Kong; Hu, K. )

    1992-12-01

    In the human genome, the erythroid-specific hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer regulates the transcription of the downstream [beta]-like globin genes 10-50 kilobases away. The mechanism of HS2 enhancer function is not known. The present study employs RNA protection assays to analyze the transcriptional status of the HS2 enhancer in transfected recombinant chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) plasmids. In erythroid K562 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is active, the HS2 sequence directs the synthesis of long enhancer transcripts that are initiated apparently from within the enhancer and elongated through the intervening DNA into the cis-linked CAT gene. In nonerythroid HL-60 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is inactive, long enhancer transcripts are not detectable. Splitting the HS2 enhancer between two tandem Ap1 sites abolishes the synthesis of a group of long enhancer transcripts and results in loss of enhancer function and transcriptional silencing of the cis-linked CAT gene. In directing the synthesis of RNA through the intervening DNA and the gene by a tracking and transcription mechanism, the HS2 enhancer may (i) open up the chromatin structure of a gene domain and (ii) deliver enhancer binding proteins to the promoter sequence where they may stimulate the transcription of the gene at the cap site. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The Relationship between Photosynthesis and a Mastoparan-Induced Hypersensitive Response in Isolated Mesophyll Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lisa J.; MacGregor, Kennaway B.; Koop, Randall S.; Bruce, Doug H.; Karner, Julie; Bown, Alan W.

    1999-01-01

    The G-protein activator mastoparan (MP) was found to elicit the hypersensitive response (HR) in isolated Asparagus sprengeri mesophyll cells at micromolar concentrations. The HR was characterized by cell death, extracellular alkalinization, and an oxidative burst, indicated by the reduction of molecular O2 to O2⋅−. To our knowledge, this study was the first to monitor photosynthesis during the HR. MP had rapid and dramatic effects on photosynthetic electron transport and excitation energy transfer as determined by variable chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements. A large increase in nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence accompanied the initial stages of the oxidative burst. The minimal level of fluorescence was also quenched, which suggests the origin of this nonphotochemical quenching to be a decrease in the antenna size of photosystem II. In contrast, photochemical quenching of fluorescence decreased dramatically during the latter stages of the oxidative burst, indicating a somewhat slower inhibition of photosystem II electron transport. The net consumption of O2 and the initial rate of O2 uptake, elicited by MP, were higher in the light than in the dark. These data indicate that light enhances the oxidative burst and suggest a complex relationship between photosynthesis and the HR. PMID:10198081

  17. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  18. Immunosuppressive effect of zhankuic acid C from Taiwanofungus camphoratus on dendritic cell activation and the contact hypersensitivity response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Kuem; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Chang, Wen-Te; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chen, Jin-Fu; Li, Yi-Rong; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-10-15

    Some ergostane triterpenoids from Taiwanofungus camphoratus have been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. However, the effect of ergostane triterpenoids on the immune response remains unknown. In this study, we elucidated that ergostane triterpenoids significantly decreased the cytokines and chemokine release by dendritic cells (DC) and that, in the case of zhankuic acid C (ZAC), the decrease was dose-dependent and inhibited DC maturation. ZAC inhibited the contact hypersensitivity response and infiltrative T cells in the ears of DNFB-stimulated mice. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that ZAC exhibits an immunosuppressive effect on DC activation and the contact hypersensitivity response. It is suggested that ZAC can potentially be used for treating chronic inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

  19. Enhanced reactive oxygen species metabolism of air space cells in hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, W.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by phagocytic cells as part of host defense mechanisms, but these same products released by air space cells have been shown to contribute to pulmonary inflammation in interstitial lung diseases and likely represent a general mechanism of lung injury. However, the possible contribution of these compounds to lung inflammation in hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) has yet to be reported. We performed 11 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) studies in six patients with HP and compared the results with results from studies in 21 healthy normal volunteers. In patients with HP, spontaneous and stimulated measures of ROS metabolism by air space cells were significantly higher than those seen in normal volunteers. When alveolar macrophages were purified by depleting neutrophils and eosinophils on density gradients of Percoll (specific gravity 1.075 gm/ml), ROS metabolism remained elevated when compared with that in cells obtained from healthy controls, confirming that alveolar macrophage ROS metabolism is enhanced in patients with HP. Further, we found significant elevations in BAL total protein, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils in patients with HP when they were compared with normal volunteers, with an increased proportion of BAL T lymphocytes expressing CD8 and natural killer surface antigens, consistent with previous work. Lavage samples from patients with HP with clinically active disease had higher proportions of BAL eosinophils and concentrations of total protein, lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second, lower forced vital capacity, and lower arterial oxygen tensions, and higher indices of ROS metabolism than samples from patients with HP with inactive disease. HP is associated with evidence of air space inflammation, to which alveolar macrophage-derived ROS may contribute.

  20. Hymenolepis nana: adoptive transfer of protective immunity and delayed type hypersensitivity response with mesenteric lymph node cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Okamoto, K

    1991-01-01

    A marked degree of footpad swelling was observed in BALB/c mice infected with Hymenolepis nana eggs, when soluble egg antigen was injected into their footpads 4 to 21 days after the egg infection, indicating delayed type hypersensitivity responses in infected mice. Adoptive transfer with mesenteric lymph node cells from donor mice (BALB/c strain; +/+) infected with eggs 4 days before cell collection could confer this hypersensitivity to recipient nude mice (BALB/c strain; nu/nu). These mesenteric lymph node cells were then divided into two fractions, blast-enriched and blast-depleted cells, by density gradient centrifugation with Percoll. The recipients intravenously injected with the blast-depleted cell fraction showed a marked increase in footpad thickness, whereas the intravenous transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction resulted in an insignificant increase in footpad thickness. The transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction, but not of the blast-depleted cell fraction, conferred a strong adoptive immunity on syngeneic recipient nude mice, when the immunity transferred was assessed by examining cysticercoids developed in the intestinal villi on Day 4 of challenge infection. The lack of delayed type hypersensitivity response in mice that received the blast-enriched cell population was not due to a lack of the capacity of the cells to induce the response, because the cells were capable of inducing a significant increase in thickness of footpads of normal mice when these cells were locally injected into the footpad together with soluble egg antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Testing for Drug Hypersensitivity Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Rive, Craig M; Bourke, Jack; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Type B drug reactions comprise only 20% of all drug reactions but they tend to be primarily immunologically mediated and less dependent on the drug’s pharmacological action and dose. Common Type B reactions seen in clinical practice are those of the immediate, IgE, Gell-Coombs Type I reactions, and the delayed, T-cell mediated, Type IV reactions. Management of these types of reactions, once they have occurred, requires careful consideration and recognition of the utility of routine diagnostic tests followed by ancillary specialised diagnostic testing. For Type I, IgE mediated reactions this includes prick/intradermal skin testing and oral provocation. For Type IV, T-cell mediated reactions this includes a variety of in vivo (patch testing) and ex vivo tests, many of which are currently mainly used in highly specialised research laboratories. The recent association of many serious delayed (Type IV) hypersensitivity reactions to specific drugs with HLA class I and II alleles has created the opportunity for HLA screening to exclude high risk populations from exposure to the implicated drug and hence prevent clinical reactions. For example, the 100% negative predictive value of HLA-B*5701 for true immunologically mediated abacavir hypersensitivity and the development of feasible, inexpensive DNA-based molecular tests has led to incorporation of HLA-B*5701 screening in routine HIV clinical practice. The mechanism by which drugs specifically interact with HLA has been recently characterised and promises to lead to strategies for pre-clinical screening to inform drug development and design. PMID:23592889

  2. Two phenotypically distinct T cells are involved in ultraviolet-irradiated urocanic acid-induced suppression of the efferent delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.

    1987-09-01

    When UVB-irradiated urocanic acid, the putative photoreceptor/mediator for UVB suppression, is administered to mice it induces a dose-dependent suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1), of similar magnitude to that induced by UV irradiation of mice. In this study, the efferent suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity by UV-irradiated urocanic acid is demonstrated to be due to 2 phenotypically distinct T cells, (Thy1+, L3T4-, Ly2+) and (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-). The suppression is specific for HSV-1. This situation parallels the generation of 2 distinct T-suppressor cells for HSV-1 by UV irradiation of mice and provides further evidence for the involvement of urocanic acid in the generation of UVB suppression.

  3. Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites as the primary clinical manifestation of a juvenile type of Epstein-Barr virus-associated natural killer cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Y; Ishihara, S; Tagawa, S; Seo, N; Ohshima, K; Takigawa, M

    2001-10-01

    Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites or mosquito allergy is a mysterious disorder that has been reported mainly in Japanese patients (at least 58 patients) in the first two decades of life. The skin lesion at bite sites is typically a bulla that develops into necrosis. Patients simultaneously exhibit a high temperature and general malaise and subsequently may experience lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Recent studies have revealed that this mosquito hypersensitivity is associated with chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection and natural killer cell leukemia/lymphoma. The natural killer cell, infected with monoclonal (or oligoclonal) Epstein-Barr virus, seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of the hypersensitivity. Half of the patients reported died of hemophagocytic syndrome (or malignant histiocytosis), granular lymphocyte proliferative disorder, or lymphomas. We propose that this disease, defined as the triad of hypersensitivity to mosquito bites, chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection, and natural killer cell leukemia/lymphoma, is a clinical entity mostly seen in Asians.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of mAMSA-hypersensitive Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Rogojina, Anna T.; Nitiss, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (Top2) is the primary target for active anti-cancer agents. We developed an efficient approach for identifying hypersensitive Top2 mutants and isolated a panel of mutants in yeast Top2 conferring hypersensitivity to the intercalator N-[4-(9-acridinylamino)-3-methoxyphenyl]methanesulphonanilide (mAMSA). Some mutants conferred hypersensitivity to etoposide as well as mAMSA, whereas other mutants exhibited hypersensitivity only to mAMSA. Two mutants in Top2, changing Pro473 to Leu and Gly737 to Val, conferred extraordinary hypersensitivity to mAMSA and were chosen for further characterization. The mutant proteins were purified, and their biochemical activities were assessed. Both mutants encode enzymes that are hypersensitive to inhibition by mAMSA and other intercalating agents and exhibited elevated levels of mAMSA-induced Top2:DNA covalent complexes. While Gly737 → Val Top2p generated elevated levels of Top2-mediated double strand breaks in vitro, the Pro473 → Leu mutant protein showed only a modest increase in Top2-mediated double strand breaks but much higher levels of Top2-mediated single strand breaks. In addition, the Pro473 → Leu mutant protein also generated high levels of mAMSA-stabilized covalent complexes in the absence of ATP. We tested the role of single strand cleavage in cell killing with alleles of Top2 that could generate single strand breaks, but not double strand breaks. Expression in yeast of a Pro473 → Leu mutant that could only generate single strand breaks conferred hypersensitivity to mAMSA. These results indicate that generation of single strand breaks by Top2-targeting agents can be an important component of cell killing by Top2-targeting drugs. PMID:18723844

  5. Alternate monolayers of CdSe nanocrystals and perylene tetracarboxylate: quantum dot hypersensitization for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, B; Zotti, G; Berlin, A

    2012-06-27

    Mono- and multilayers from CdSe nanocrystal dispersion and perylene tetracarboxylate solution are reported for the first time. The layers were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, photoconductivity, and photoelectrochemical techniques. The n-type organic semiconductor gives enhanced photoconductivity to the CdSe-NC multilayer structure. The photoactive perylene monolayer acts also as hypersensitizer of CdSe-NC structures. The perylene-modified CdSe-NC monolayer on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode in a three-electrode photoelectrochemical cell upon illumination in the presence of oxygen generates an intense steady photocurrent as high as 10-20 times that expected from the individual contributions of perylene and CdSe-NCs. The hypersensitization mechanism is discussed on the basis of the energy level diagram of the components.

  6. Langerhans cells that migrate to skin after intravenous infusion regulate the induction of contact hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, P.D. Jr.; Tigelaar, R.E.; Bergstresser, P.R. )

    1990-04-01

    Intravenous infusion of hapten-derivatized epidermal cells (EC) in syngeneic mice leads to two competing signals for contact hypersensitivity (CH), a dominant effector signal attributable to Langerhans cells (LC) and a suppressor signal from Thy-1+ EC. In vitro exposure of LC to low dose ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation before hapten-derivatization and infusion not only results in the abrogation of their effector signal but also causes the down-regulation of subsequent CH responses. To delineate the relevance of i.v. immunization to the study of CH and of LC as the immunologic targets of low dose UVB radiation, we examined the migratory and immunogenic properties of EC after i.v. infusion. Unsorted EC migrated from blood to skin and lymphoid tissues, reaching steady state distributions at 16 h after infusion. No significant differences were observed between the trafficking of EC in syngeneic and allogeneic transfers. LC localized preferentially to skin, whereas Thy-1+ EC trafficked to skin, the thymus, mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen. The pattern of trafficking of unirradiated and low dose UVB-irradiated LC were identical, suggesting that low dose UVB radiation had little effect on LC migration. Finally, skin graft experiments demonstrated i.v. infused, hapten-derivatized LC that migrate to skin to retain their capacity to induce CH, a property that was converted by in vitro pretreatment with low dose UVB radiation into down-regulation. These findings confirm the relevance and utility of the i.v. immunization model in the study of CH and the influence of low dose UVB on this immune response. Our data also provide a basis for investigating the role of disparate trafficking patterns in generating effector and suppressor signals when hapten-derivatized EC are employed for CH.

  7. A Case of Hypersensitivity to Mosquito Bite Associated with Epstein-Barr Viral Infection and Natural Killer Cell Lymphocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eui Jung; Chang, Young Pyo; Myoung, Na Hye; Jee, Young Koo; Seo, Min; Kang, Jin Han

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is a disorder characterized by a necrotic skin reaction and generalized symptoms subsequent to mosquito bites. It has been suggested that HMB is associated with chronic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and natural killer cell leukemia/lymphoma. We describe here a Korean child who had HMB associated with chronic EBV infection and natural killer cell lymphocytosis. A 5-yr-old boy was suffered from necrotic skin lesions on the right ear lobe. Type A EB virus was detected from hlood cells and bone marrow biospy recognized hemophagocyrosis. PMID:20119592

  8. A case of hypersensitivity to mosquito bite associated with Epstein-barr viral infection and natural killer cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eui Jung; Chung, Eun Hee; Chang, Young Pyo; Myoung, Na Hye; Jee, Young Koo; Seo, Min; Kang, Jin Han

    2010-02-01

    Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is a disorder characterized by a necrotic skin reaction and generalized symptoms subsequent to mosquito bites. It has been suggested that HMB is associated with chronic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and natural killer cell leukemia/lymphoma. We describe here a Korean child who had HMB associated with chronic EBV infection and natural killer cell lymphocytosis. A 5-yr-old boy was suffered from necrotic skin lesions on the right ear lobe. Type A EB virus was detected from hlood cells and bone marrow biospy recognized hemophagocyrosis.

  9. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It’s reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  10. Colonic mucosal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated visceral hypersensitivity in a mouse model of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qing Qing; Chen, Fei Xue; Zhao, Dong Yan; Li, Li Xiang; Wang, Peng; Li, Yan Qing; Zuo, Xiu Li

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether colonic mucosal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) participates in visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). C57BL/6 mice were administered intrarectally with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) for the establishment of an IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity model. Those received an equivalent volume of 50% ethanol were regarded as the controls. Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores in response to colorectal distention (CRD) were used to assess visceral sensitivity. NMDAR levels in the colonic mucosa were detected by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The concentrations of glutamate and ammonia in the feces of the mice were measured. Changes in visceral sensitivity after the intracolonic administration of ammonia or NMDAR antagonist were recorded. The established IBS-like mouse model of visceral hypersensitivity showed no evident inflammation in the colon. NMDAR levels in the colonic mucosa of the IBS-like mice were significantly higher compared with the controls, and were positively associated with AWR scores. The glutamate level in the feces of the TNBS-treated mice was similar to that of the controls, although the ammonia level was significantly higher. Intracolonic administration of ammonia induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice, which was repressed by pretreatment with NMDAR antagonist MK801. Overexpressed NMDAR in the colonic mucosa may participate in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. Our study identifies the effect of ammonia in the colonic lumen on NMDAR in the colonic mucosa as a potential novel targeted mechanism for IBS treatment. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Changes in mast cell infiltration: a possible mechanism in detrusor overactivity induced by visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nian-Zhao; Ma, Lin; Jun, Chen; Guo, Yan-Xia; Yuan, Hui-Qing

    2016-01-01

    To establish the detrusor overactivity (DO) model induced by visceral hypersensitivity (VH) and investigate the relationship between mast cell (MC) infiltration and DO. Sixty rats are divided into 4 groups randomly: Group 1:Baseline group; Group 2: DO group; Group 3: CON group; Group 4: VH group. The colorectal distension (CRD) and abdominal withdral reflex (AWR) scores are performed to evaluate VH. The cystometric investigation and histological test of MC infiltration are assessed. The threshold pressure of CRD in the VH group is significantly lower than that in the CON group (P<0.001). At the distension pressure ≥20 mmHg, the AWR scores of the VH group are significantly higher than those of the CON group (10 mmHg: P=0.33; 20 mmHg: P=0.028; 40 mmHg: P<0.001; 60 mmHg: P<0.001; 80 mmHg: P<0.001). DO model is successfully established in the VH group (DO rate=100%). Compared with the CON group, the numbers of MC infiltration are significantly increased in the VH group, including submucosa of bladder (P<0.001), mucosa lamina propria/mesentery of small intestine (P<0.001), and mucosa lamina propria/mesentery of large intestine (P<0.001). Furthermore, more MC activation as well as degranulation are observed in the VH group. It is indicated that DO model can be established in the VH rats. The MC infiltration may play an important role in DO induced by VH, and may be helpful to understand the mechanisms of DO in VH patients.

  13. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  14. Dietary hypersensitivity in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Mandigers, Paul; German, Alexander J

    2010-10-01

    Adverse reactions to food or dietary hypersensitivity are frequently seen problems in companion animal medicine and may be difficult to differentiate from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Dietary hypersensitivity can be divided into two subgroups: immunological and nonimmunological problems. Non-immunological problems can be subdivided into food intolerance, food poisoning, and dietary indiscretion. The immunological group can be subdivided into true food allergy (IgE mediated) and anaphylaxis (non-IgE mediated). This article gives an outline of what dietary hypersensitivity is, and more specifically food allergy and how to deal with patients with possible dietary hypersensitivity.

  15. Copper hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions.

  16. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Before the arrival of modern pharmacotherapy, drug hypersensitivity reactions were virtually unknown. Toxicity from the many plant-, animal- and inorganic material-derived remedies must have been much more common. One famous example is the intoxications from mercury, which has been used in many ailments, but particularly for the treatment of syphilis. It was only in the 19th century when more and more active principles from e.g. plants were identified, and when the observations of skin reactions became more prevalent. In 1877, Heinrich Köbner used for the first time the term 'drug exanthema' (Arznei-Exanthem). Since then, many different types of exanthemas from the mild macular-papular forms to the severe life-threatening bullous exanthemas such as toxic epidermal necrolysis have been observed from numerous drugs. The systematic investigation of severe drug reactions has only started in the second half of the 20th century, parallel to the increasing knowledge in immunology. Drug hypersensitivity reactions still remain one of the most challenging problems in allergology due to their manifold clinical manifestations and their very diverse pathophysiology. The introduction of new drugs and in turn the emergence of new hypersensitivity reactions will remain a challenge in the future. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  18. Hypersensitivity to mutation and sister-chromatid-exchange induction in CHO cell mutants defective in incising DNA containing UV lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Dillehay, L.E.; Mooney, C.L.; Carrano, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five UV-sensitive mutant strains of CHO cells representing different genetic complementation groups were analyzed for their ability to perform the incision step of nucleotide excision repair after UV exposure. The assay utilized inhibitors of DNA synthesis to accumulate the short-lived strand breaks resulting from repair incisions. After 6 J/m/sup 2/, each of the mutants showed < 10% of the incision rate of the parental AA8 cells. After 50 J/m/sup 2/, the rate in AA8 was similar to that at 6 J/m/sup 2/, but the rates in the mutants were significantly higher (approx. 20% of the rate of AA8). Thus by this incision assay the mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable. Each of the mutants were hypersensitive to mutation induction at both the hprt and aprt loci by a factor of 10, and in the one strain tested ouabain resistance was induced sevenfold more efficiently than in AA8 cells. Sister chromatid exchange was also induced with sevenfold increased efficiency in the two mutant strains examined. Thus, here CHO mutants resemble xeroderma pigmentosum cells in terms of their incision defects and their hypersensitivity to DNA damage by UV.

  19. Loss of ubiquitin E2 Ube2w rescues hypersensitivity of Rnf4 mutant cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Maure, Jean-François; Moser, Sandra C.; Jaffray, Ellis G.; F. Alpi, Arno; Hay, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    SUMO and ubiquitin play important roles in the response of cells to DNA damage. These pathways are linked by the SUMO Targeted ubiquitin Ligase Rnf4 that catalyses transfer of ubiquitin from a ubiquitin loaded E2 conjugating enzyme to a polySUMO modified substrate. Rnf4 can functionally interact with multiple E2s, including Ube2w, in vitro. Chicken cells lacking Rnf4 are hypersensitive to hyroxyurea, DNA alkylating drugs and DNA crosslinking agents, but this sensitivity is suppressed by simultaneous depletion of Ube2w. Cells depleted of Ube2w alone are not hypersensitive to the same DNA damaging agents. Similar results were also obtained in human cells. These data indicate that Ube2w does not have an essential role in the DNA damage response, but is deleterious in the absence of Rnf4. Thus, although Rnf4 and Ube2w functionally interact in vitro, our genetic experiments indicate that in response to DNA damage Ube2w and Rnf4 function in distinct pathways. PMID:27185577

  20. Sensitization of P2X3 receptors by cystathionine β-synthetase mediates persistent pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhu, Hongyan; Zou, Kang; Yuan, Bo; Zhou, You-Lang; Jiang, Xinghong; Yan, Jun; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-03-20

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a major cause of discogenic low back pain and sciatica, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is becoming recognized for its involvement in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. The present study was designed to investigate the roles of the H2S signaling pathway in the regulation of expression and function of purinergic receptors (P2XRs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats with LDH. LDH was induced by implantation of autologous nucleus pulposus (NP), harvested from rat tail, in lumbar 5 and 6 spinal nerve roots. Implantation of autologous NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity, which was partially reversed by an intrathecal injection of A317491, a potent inhibitor of P2X3Rs and P2X2/3Rs. The NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity was associated with the increased expression of P2X3Rs, but not P2X1Rs and P2X2Rs, receptors in L5-6 DRGs. NP implantation also produced a 2-fold increase in ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons when compared to those of controls (P < 0.05). Interestingly, NP implantation significantly enhanced expression of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme, cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS). Systematic administration of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of CBS, suppressed the upregulation of P2X3R expression and the potentiation of ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons (P < 0.05). Intrathecal injection of AOAA markedly attenuated NP induced- persistent pain hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that sensitization of P2X3Rs, which is likely mediated by CBS-H2S signaling in primary sensory neurons, contributes to discogenic pain. Targeting CBS/H2S-P2X3R signaling may represent a potential treatment for neuropathic pain caused by LDH.

  1. THE INHIBITION BY CORTISONE OF THE CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF PPD ON TUBERCULIN-HYPERSENSITIVE CELLS IN TISSUE CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, Robert H.; Morgan, Herbert R.

    1952-01-01

    Using the roller tube method of tissue culture, it has been shown that cortisone and compound F inhibit the cytotoxic action of PPD upon macrophages from the splenic tissue of tuberculous guinea pigs. Pretreatment of the cells for 24 hours with hormones before exposure to PPD was found to be essential. Estrone and desoxycorticosterone glucoside had no protective activity. Certain advantages of the tissue culture method in studies of tuberculin hypersensitivity and possible mechanisms and implications of this protective action of cortisone are discussed. PMID:13022849

  2. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  3. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  4. Spinal toll-like receptor 4-mediated signalling pathway contributes to visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal colonic irritation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z-Y; Zhang, X-W; Yu, L; Hua, R; Zhao, X-P; Qin, X; Zhang, Y-M

    2015-02-01

    Although visceral hypersensitivity is a major pathophysiological feature of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a critical pattern recognition molecule of the innate immune system. In this study, we investigated whether the TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway in the spinal cord contributed to the visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal colonic irritation (CI) in rats. The Sprague-Dawley rat model of IBS was induced by colon irritation on post-natal day (PND) 8, PND10 and PND12. Experiments were conducted in adult rats. TLR4 mRNA and protein, and its downstream signalling molecules, MyD88, inhibitory nuclear factor-kappa B (IκB) and NF-κB protein expressions in L2-S4 spinal segments were detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as well as Western blotting. TLR4 co-localization was determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that neonatal CI treatment induced long-lasting visceral hypersensitivity without identifiable structural abnormalities in descending colons of adult rats. Neonatal CI treatment evoked a significant up-regulation of the expressions of TLR4 in glia, MyD88, p-IκB-α and NF-κB in adult rats. Neonatal CI treatment also increased the levels of its downstream inflammatory agents TNF-α and IL-1β in the L2-S4 regions of the spinal cord of adult rats. These results suggest that neonatal CI stimulates the production of IL-1β and TNF-α through the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signalling pathway in the spinal cord, which contributed to visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal CI in rats. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  5. RepA Protein Encoded by Oat dwarf virus Elicits a Temperature-Sensitive Hypersensitive Response-Type Cell Death That Involves Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajuan; Hou, Huwei; Shen, Qingtang; Cai, Xinzhong; Sunter, Garry; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a component of disease resistance that is often induced by pathogen infection, but essentially no information is available for members of the destructive mastreviruses. We have investigated an HR-type response elicited in Nicotiana species by Oat dwarf virus (ODV) and have found that expression of the ODV RepA protein but not other ODV-encoded proteins elicits the HR-type cell death associated with a burst of H2O2. Deletion mutagenesis indicates that the first nine amino acids (aa) at the N terminus of RepA and the two regions located between aa residues 173 and 195 and between aa residues 241 and 260 near the C terminus are essential for HR-type cell-death elicitation. Confocal and electron microscopy showed that the RepA protein is localized in the nuclei of plant cells and might contain bipartite nuclear localization signals. The HR-like lesions mediated by RepA were inhibited by temperatures above 30°C and involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in HR was identified by gain- and loss-of-function experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an elicitor of HR-type cell death from mastreviruses.

  6. Hypersensitive Cell Death and Papilla Formation in Barley Attacked by the Powdery Mildew Fungus Are Associated with Hydrogen Peroxide but Not with Salicylic Acid Accumulation1

    PubMed Central

    Hückelhoven, Ralph; Fodor, József; Preis, Christine; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the pathogenesis-related generation of H2O2 using the microscopic detection of 3,3-diaminobenzidine polymerization in near-isogenic barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) lines carrying different powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei) resistance genes, and in a line expressing chemically activated resistance after treatment with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (DCINA). Hypersensitive cell death in Mla12 and Mlg genotypes or after chemical activation by DCINA was associated with H2O2 accumulation throughout attacked cells. Formation of cell wall appositions (papillae) mediated in Mlg and mlo5 genotypes and in DCINA-activated plants was paralleled by H2O2 accumulation in effective papillae and in cytosolic vesicles of up to 2 μm in diameter near the papillae. H2O2 was not detected in ineffective papillae of cells that had been successfully penetrated by the fungus. These findings support the hypothesis that H2O2 may play a substantial role in plant defense against the powdery mildew fungus. We did not detect any accumulation of salicylic acid in primary leaves after inoculation of the different barley genotypes, indicating that these defense responses neither relied on nor provoked salicylic acid accumulation in barley. PMID:10198083

  7. Visceral hypersensitivity induced by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 is mediated through the serotonin pathway in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong-yan; Luo, Jia-lie; Qi, Sheng-da; Xu, Hong-xi; Sung, Joseph J Y; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2010-11-25

    This study aimed to clarify the relationship between TRPV1 activation-induced visceral pain and the serotonin pathway in the colon of rats. The effects of para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) on visceral pain threshold pressure were assessed in capsaicin -induced visceral pain of rats. The expression of TRPV1 in the colon was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and TRPV1 excitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was examined by whole-cell patch-clamp recording in pCPA-treated rats. Calcineurin and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the important proteins in maintaining TRPV1 function in the colon, were also tested by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Results showed that pCPA significantly increased the capsaicin-induced visceral pain threshold by 2.3-fold, and the enhanced visceral pain threshold corresponded with decreased 5-HT content (58% depleted) and enterochromaffin cell number (80% reduced). The reduced excitability of TRPV1 in DRG neurons, instead of changed TRPV1 expression, is responsible for the enhanced visceral pain threshold in 5-HT-depleted rats, and the mechanism may be related to the decreased expression of pCaMKII. These results indicate that visceral hypersensitivity induced by TRPV1 activation is modulated through 5-HT pathways and the attenuated function of TRPV1 and decreased protein expression of pCaMKII may play an important role in capsaicin-induced TRPV1 desensitization under 5-HT-depleted condition. The important role of TRPV1 and 5-HT in generating and maintaining visceral hypersensitivity may provide insights for the treatment of visceral hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19147836

  9. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Dai; Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-02-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions.

  10. An animal model of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, V L; Hensley, G T; Fink, J N

    1975-01-01

    This study was devised to produce an animal model of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in order to study both the induction and the elicitation of the disease. Rabbits exposed by aerosol to large quantities of pigeon antigens developed a humoral, but not cellular, immunologic response. Moreover, their lungs were essentially normal histologically. A single i.v. injection of killed BCG in oil permitted the induction of pulmonary cell-medid hypersensitivity to the inhaled antigen, as well as the development of pulmonary lesions which were more severe than that caused by the administration of BCG alone. The humoral immunologic response to the inhaled antigen was not increased after BCG injection. Since many individuals are exposed to the etiologic agents of hypersensitivity pneumonitis for extended periods without developing the disease, these findings in animals suggest that some event may occur to induce cell mediated hypersensitivity in order to initiate the disease process. In addition, we have shown that animals with normal lung histology and circulating complement-fixing antibodies undergo serum complement (CH50) depression after an aerosol challenge with the specific antigen. Animals with circulating, complement-fixing antibodies, and inflamed lungs (BCG-induced failed to undergo a complement depression subsequent to an aerosol challenge with specific antigens. These results re consistent with those seen in symptomatic and asymptomatic pigeon breeders and suggest that antigen distribution through the lung is important in the pathogenesis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Images PMID:1099122

  11. Circulating T cells to infliximab are detectable mainly in treated patients developing anti‐drug antibodies and hypersensitivity reactions

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, A.; Petroni, G.; Pratesi, S.; Nencini, F.; Cammelli, D.; Milla, M.; Prignano, F.; Annese, V.; Romagnani, S.; Matucci, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Antibodies recognizing infliximab (IFX) may develop in a proportion of treated patients, leading to loss of response or hypersensitivity reactions (HRs). T cell response to IFX has been poorly investigated. This paper was addressed to detect IFX‐specific T cells in treated patients with inflammatory diseases developing, or not, anti‐drug antibodies (ADA) and to correlate the presence of specific T cells with the clinical outcomes of the treatment. A co‐culture system of IFX‐loaded dendritic cells and purified autologous CD4+ T cells was used to detect memory T cells in 32 ADA+ and 39 ADA– IFX‐treated patients and control groups. The cytokine profile of IFX‐specific T cells was also studied in culture supernatants. IFX‐specific cell proliferation was detected mainly in cells from ADA+ patients, irrespective of their different diseases. HR patients displayed higher T cell proliferation than non‐responder and tolerant patients. A mixed [interferon (IFN)‐γ, interleukin (IL)‐13, IL‐10] cytokine profile was shown in cells from ADA+ patients, while IL‐10 was the most frequently detected cytokine in the supernatants of cultures from ADA‐ patients. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E+ADA+ patients with previous HRs exhibited a more pronounced type 2 profile than IgE–ADA+ patients. This work provides evidence that IFX‐specific circulating T cells are detectable mainly in ADA+ patients with HRs, regardless of their disease. The IFX‐induced cytokine pattern partially correlates with the ADA isotype. PMID:27569750

  12. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions - new concepts.

    PubMed

    Posadas, S J; Pichler, W J

    2007-07-01

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds such as drugs can cause a variety of diseases mainly involving skin, but also liver, kidney, lungs and other organs. In addition to the well-known immediate, IgE-mediated reactions to drugs, many drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed. Recent data have shown that in these delayed reactions drug-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells recognize drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR) in an MHC-dependent way. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthems revealed that distinct T cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T cell reactions, which by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions. Drugs are not only immunogenic because of their chemical reactivity, but also because they may bind in a labile way to available TCRs and possibly MHC-molecules. This seems to be sufficient to stimulate certain, probably preactivated T cells. The drug seems to bind first to the fitting TCR, which already exerts some activation. For full activation, an additional interaction of the TCR with the MHC molecules is needed. The drug binding to the receptor structures is reminiscent of a pharmacological interaction between a drug and its (immune) receptor and was thus termed the p-i concept. In some patients with drug hypersensitivity, such a response occurs within hours even upon the first exposure to the drug. The T cell reaction to the drug might thus not be due to a classical, primary response, but is due to peptide-specific T cells which happen to be stimulated by a drug. This new concept has major implications

  13. [Food hypersensitivity in children].

    PubMed

    Kolacek, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity affects children and adults with an increasing prevalence, and is therefore an important public health problem in the majority of developed countries. Moreover, self-reported reactions to food are of several times higher prevalence, compared to hypersensitivity diagnosed following well established evidence-based diagnostic guidelines. In children, allergic food reactions are more common compared to non-allergic food hypersensitivity reactions, and 90% of them are caused with only 8 food allergens: cow's milk, soya, egg, fish, shellfish, peanut, tree-nuts and gluten. Diagnosis should be based on challenge tests with the potentially offending food allergens. Concerning other, more conservative diagnostic procedures, negative serology and negative skin-prick tests can exclude IgE-mediated food allergy, but positive tests, due to high rate of false positive reactions are not sufficient for diagnosis. Strict dietary avoidance of incriminated allergens is the only well established management strategy. However, this should be applied only if food allergy is well documented - following the exposition tests. Introducing elimination diet in a paediatric population, particularly with the elimination of multiple foods, could cause inappropriate growth and disturb organ maturation. Concerning allergy prevention, avoidance of allergens is not efficacious either during pregnancy and lactation or weaning period, and is therefore, not recommended neither as a population preventive measure, nor in children at risk.

  14. Changes in cytosolic ATP levels and intracellular morphology during bacteria-induced hypersensitive cell death as revealed by real-time fluorescence microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Perez Koldenkova, Vadim; Imamura, Hiromi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2012-10-01

    Hypersensitive cell death is known to involve dynamic remodeling of intracellular structures that uses energy released during ATP hydrolysis. However, the relationship between intracellular structural changes and ATP levels during hypersensitive cell death remains unclear. Here, to visualize ATP dynamics directly in real time in individual living plant cells, we applied a genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based fluorescent ATP indicator, ATeam1.03-nD/nA, for plant cells. Intracellular ATP levels increased approximately 3 h after inoculation with the avirulent strain DC3000/avrRpm1 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), which was accompanied by the simultaneous disappearance of transvacuolar strands and appearance of bulb-like structures within the vacuolar lumen. Approximately 5 h after bacterial inoculation, the bulb-like structures disappeared and ATP levels drastically decreased. After another 2 h, the large central vacuole was disrupted. In contrast, no apparent changes in intracellular ATP levels were observed in the leaves inoculated with the virulent strain Pst DC3000. The Pst DC3000/avrRpm1-induced hypersensitive cell death was strongly suppressed by inhibiting ATP synthesis after oligomycin A application within 4 h after bacterial inoculation. When the inhibitor was applied 7 h after bacterial inoculation, cell death was unaffected. These observations show that changes in intracellular ATP levels correlate with intracellular morphological changes during hypersensitive cell death, and that ATP is required just before vacuolar rupture in response to bacterial infection.

  15. Pepper suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1 interacts with the receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase1 and type III effector AvrBsT and promotes the hypersensitive cell death response in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Kim, Dae Sung; Chung, Eui Hwan; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-05-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria type III effector protein, AvrBsT, triggers hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). Here, we have identified the pepper SGT1 (for suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1) as a host interactor of AvrBsT and also the pepper PIK1 (for receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase1). PIK1 specifically phosphorylates SGT1 and AvrBsT in vitro. AvrBsT specifically binds to the CHORD-containing protein and SGT1 domain of SGT1, resulting in the inhibition of PIK1-mediated SGT1 phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear transport of the SGT1-PIK1 complex. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of the proteolytic peptides of SGT1 identified the residues serine-98 and serine-279 of SGT1 as the major PIK1-mediated phosphorylation sites. Site-directed mutagenesis of SGT1 revealed that the identified SGT1 phosphorylation sites are responsible for the activation of AvrBsT-triggered cell death in planta. SGT1 forms a heterotrimeric complex with both AvrBsT and PIK1 exclusively in the cytoplasm. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated coexpression of SGT1 and PIK1 with avrBsT promotes avrBsT-triggered cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana, dependent on PIK1. Virus-induced silencing of SGT1 and/or PIK1 compromises avrBsT-triggered cell death, hydrogen peroxide production, defense gene induction, and salicylic acid accumulation, leading to the enhanced bacterial pathogen growth in pepper. Together, these results suggest that SGT1 interacts with PIK1 and the bacterial effector protein AvrBsT and promotes the hypersensitive cell death associated with PIK1-mediated phosphorylation in plants.

  16. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs.

  17. Interleukin-4 production by follicular helper T cells requires the conserved Il4 enhancer hypersensitivity site V.

    PubMed

    Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Seumois, Grégory; Simpson, Laura J; Abdul-Wajid, Sarah; Baumjohann, Dirk; Panduro, Marisella; Huang, Xiaozhu; Interlandi, Jeneen; Djuretic, Ivana M; Brown, Daniel R; Sharpe, Arlene H; Rao, Anjana; Ansel, K Mark

    2012-02-24

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh cells) are the major producers of interleukin-4 (IL-4) in secondary lymphoid organs where humoral immune responses develop. Il4 regulation in Tfh cells appears distinct from the classical T helper 2 (Th2) cell pathway, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We found that hypersensitivity site V (HS V; also known as CNS2), a 3' enhancer in the Il4 locus, is essential for IL-4 production by Tfh cells. Mice lacking HS V display marked defects in type 2 humoral immune responses, as evidenced by abrogated IgE and sharply reduced IgG1 production in vivo. In contrast, effector Th2 cells that are involved in tissue responses were far less dependent on HS V. HS V facilitated removal of repressive chromatin marks during Th2 and Tfh cell differentiation and increased accessibility of the Il4 promoter. Thus, Tfh and Th2 cells utilize distinct but overlapping molecular mechanisms to regulate Il4, a finding with important implications for understanding the molecular basis of allergic diseases.

  18. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  19. Phosphorylated CaMKII post-synaptic binding to NR2B subunits in the anterior cingulate cortex mediates visceral pain in visceral hypersensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Zhijun; Chen, Shengliang; Cao, Bing; Liu, Jin

    2012-05-01

    The NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is up-regulated in viscerally hypersensitive (VH) rats induced by colonic anaphylaxis. It plays a critical role in modulation of ACC sensitization and visceral pain responses. Given the key role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in synaptic plasticity and behavior learning and memory, we hypothesize that phosphorylation of CaMKII binding to NR2B mediates visceral pain in VH states. We performed in vivo electroporation of CaMKII siRNA produced inhibition of colorectal distension-induced visceromotor response in the VH rats. The NR2B, CaMKII and P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein levels were increased in 180%, 220% and 304% fold in the post-synaptic density (PSD) fraction in VH rats separately. Western blotting following co-immunoprecipitation showed that P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ bound to NR2B in the PSD, which was increased to 267% of control in VH rats. Administration of CaMKII antagonist Antennapedia-CaMKIINtide suppressed visceromotor response in VH rats in parallel with decrease of NR2B levels and reduction of the NR2B-P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein complex in PSD. In conclusion, CaMKII is a critical signaling molecule in the ACC glutamatergic synaptic transmission and phosphorylation of CaMKII at Thr286, which binds to NR2B subunit at post-synaptic site, modulates visceral pain in viscerally hypersensitive state.

  20. Nerve growth factor-mediated neuronal plasticity in spinal cord contributes to neonatal maternal separation-induced visceral hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsang, S W; Zhao, M; Wu, J; Sung, J J Y; Bian, Z-X

    2012-04-01

    Visceral hyperalgesia is a multifactorial gastrointestinal disorder which featured with alterations of abdominal motility and/or gut sensitivity, and is believed to be triggered by environmental stressor or psychological factors. However, its etiology remains incompletely understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neuronal plasticity is involved in neonatal maternal separation (NMS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats, and whether NGF antagonist can attenuate or block such development. In our experiments, animals subjected to NMS were developed with visceral hyperalgesia at age of 8 weeks. The threshold for visceral pain among these NMS rats was remarkably lowered than that of the normal handling (NH) rats; however, the expression levels of NGF, c-fos, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), Substance P, and tyrosine kinases A (TrkA) were notably elevated in lumbosacral spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglion (DRG) when comparing to those of the NH rats. Further, as intra-peritoneal administration of NGF (10 μl at 1 μg/kg/day) was given to NH rats during neonatal period, effects that comparable to NMS induction were observed in the adulthood. In contrast, when NMS rats were treated with NGF antagonist K252a (10 μl/day from postnatal days 2-14), which acts against tyrosine kinases, the neonatal stress-induced down-shifted visceral pain threshold was restored and neuronal activation, specifically NGF and neuropeptide production, was attenuated. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that NGF triggers neuronal plasticity and plays a crucial role in NMS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in which NGF antagonism provides positive inhibition via blocking the tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkA.

  1. Clinical heterogeneity of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Roujeau, Jean-Claude

    2005-04-15

    Skin is the most frequent target of drug reactions that are reported, may be because they are easily detected. Most (probably more than 90%) are related to drug hypersensitivity, i.e. an individually tailored, unexpected effect mediated by a drug specific activation of the immune response. The clinical presentation of "drug eruptions" is highly variable, from the most common transient and benign erythema that occurs 6-9 days after the introduction of a new drug in 1 to 3 % of users to the most severe forms, that fortunately affect less than 1/10,000 users. Even though there are some overlapping or unclassifiable cases, it is important for clinicians to recognize and categorize severe cutaneous adverse reactions/SCAR (bullous fixed drug eruptions/bFDE, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis/AGEP, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms/DRESS, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis/TEN). First they must suspect rapidly that an unusual eruption with high fever and severe constitutional symptoms is caused by a medication and not by an infection. Second they have to look for involvement of organs that differ according to the type of reaction. Third they can determine a prognosis, the mortality rate being virtually 0 for bFDE, 5% for AGEP, 10% for "hypersensitivity syndrome"/DRESS and 25% for SJS or TEN. In addition if some medications are "usual suspects" for all types (e.g. anticonvulsants), some other are more specific of a given pattern (pristinamycine, hydroxychloroquine, diltiazem for AGEP, minocycline for DRESS, anti-infectious sulfonamides, allopurinol for epidermal necrolysis). The "phenotypic" diversity of the final expression drug reactions can be explained by the engagement of a variety of cytokines and inflammatory cells and by regulatory mechanisms. For example, memory cytotoxic T-Cells are key effectors in both localized blisters of bFDE and in extensive blisters of epidermal necrolysis.

  2. Chemokine-dependent T cell migration requires aquaporin-3–mediated hydrogen peroxide uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chikuma, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Kabashima, Kenji; Verkman, Alan S.; Inoue, Shintaro; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine-dependent trafficking is indispensable for the effector function of antigen-experienced T cells during immune responses. In this study, we report that the water/glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is expressed on T cells and regulates their trafficking in cutaneous immune reactions. T cell migration toward chemokines is dependent on AQP3-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) uptake but not the canonical water/glycerol transport. AQP3-mediated H2O2 transport is essential for the activation of the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 and the subsequent actin dynamics. Coincidentally, AQP3-deficient mice are defective in the development of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity, which is attributed to the impaired trafficking of antigen-primed T cells to the hapten-challenged skin. We therefore suggest that AQP3-mediated H2O2 uptake is required for chemokine-dependent T cell migration in sufficient immune response. PMID:22927550

  3. Therapeutic potential of B and T lymphocyte attenuator expressed on CD8+ T cells for contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, Daiki; Suzuki, Kotaro; Hosokawa, Junichi; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Suto, Akira; Takatori, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Norihiko; Matsue, Hiroyuki; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M; Shimada, Shinji; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    In the past decade, mechanisms underlying allergic contact dermatitis have been intensively investigated by using contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models in mice. However, the regulatory mechanisms, which could be applicable for the treatment of allergic contact dermatitis, are still largely unknown. To determine the roles of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), a CD28 family coinhibitory receptor, in hapten-induced CHS, BTLA-deficient (BTLA(-/-)) mice and littermate wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to DNFB-induced CHS, severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were injected with CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells from either WT mice or BTLA(-/-) mice were subjected to CHS. BTLA(-/-) mice showed enhanced DNFB-induced CHS and proliferation and IFN-γ production of CD8(+) T cells as compared with WT mice. SCID mice injected with WT CD4(+) T cells and BTLA(-/-) CD8(+) T cells exhibited more severe CHS as compared with those injected with WT CD4(+) T cells and WT CD8(+) T cells. On the other hand, SCID mice injected with BTLA(-/-) CD4(+) T cells and WT CD8(+) T cells exhibited similar CHS to those injected with WT CD4(+) T cells and WT CD8(+) T cells. Finally, to evaluate the therapeutic potential of an agonistic agent for BTLA on CHS, the effects of an agonistic anti-BTLA antibody (6A6) on CHS were examined. In vivo injection of 6A6 suppressed DNFB-induced CHS and IFN-γ production of CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulation of BTLA with agonistic agents has therapeutic potential in CHS.

  4. Maternal and postnatal dietary probiotic supplementation enhances splenic regulatory T helper cell population and reduces peanut allergen-induced hypersensitivity responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Toomer, Ondulla T; Ferguson, Martine; Pereira, Marion; Do, Andrew; Bigley, Elmer; Gaines, Dennis; Williams, Kristina

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal to early childhood is the critical period for establishing a balance of T helper 1 (Th1) versus T helper 2 (Th2) cellular immunity within the gut, which is strongly influenced by the source and establishment of gut microflora. Probiotic administration has been shown to attenuate Th2-biased cellular immunity and predisposition to food allergies. To test this hypothesis we provided ad libitum a probiotic-supplemented (Primalac 454 Feed Grade Microbials) or control diet to lactating dams with suckling pups and weaned pups until 10 weeks of age. Weaned mice were sensitized/challenged with peanut extract, saline or adjuvant at 6, 8 and 10 weeks of age. At 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks, fecal samples were collected for microbial analysis, while blood samples were analyzed for total plasma IgE levels. At termination (10 weeks of age), splenic T lymphocyte population subtypes were determined using FACS analysis and Th1/Th2/Th17 gene expression by PCR array. Mice given the probiotic-supplemented diet had significantly enhanced probiotic fecal counts compared to controls at 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks. Moreover, mice fed the probiotic-supplemented diet had enhanced splenic naturally occurring T regulatory cell populations, and reduced splenic gene expression of allergic mediator IL-13 compared to controls. These results provide evidence that early probiotic supplementation may provide host protection to hypersensitivity reactions to food allergens by attenuating food allergen inflammatory responses. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Comprehensive transcriptional and functional analyses of melatonin synthesis genes in cassava reveal their novel role in hypersensitive-like cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yunxie; Hu, Wei; Wang, Qiannan; Liu, Wei; Wu, Chunjie; Zeng, Hongqiu; Yan, Yu; Li, Xiaolin; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is a widely known hormone in animals. Since melatonin was discovered in plants, more and more studies highlight its involvement in a wide range of physiological processes including plant development and stress responses. Many advances have been made in the terms of melatonin-mediated abiotic stress resistance and innate immunity in plants, focusing on model plants such as rice and Arabidopsis. In this study, 7 melatonin synthesis genes were systematically analyzed in cassava. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that all these genes were commonly regulated by melatonin, flg22, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv manihotis (Xam) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed the subcellular locations and possible roles of these melatonin synthesis genes. Notably, we highlight novel roles of these genes in hypersensitive-like cell death, as confirmed by the results of several physiological parameters. Moreover, transient expression of these genes had significant effects on the transcripts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and defense-related genes, and triggered the burst of callose depositions and papillae-associated plant defense, indicating the possible role of them in plant innate immunity. Taken together, this study reveals the comprehensive transcripts and putative roles of melatonin synthesis genes as well as melatonin in immune responses in cassava. PMID:27739451

  6. Absence of cross-reactivity to carbapenems in patients with delayed hypersensitivity to penicillins.

    PubMed

    Romano, A; Gaeta, F; Valluzzi, R L; Alonzi, C; Maggioletti, M; Zaffiro, A; Caruso, C; Quaratino, D

    2013-12-01

    Studies performed on subjects with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins have demonstrated a 1% rate of cross-reactivity between penicillins and both imipenem and meropenem, while a single study found a 5.5% rate of cross-reactivity with imipenem/cilastatin in subjects with T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to β-lactams, mostly penicillins. We studied 204 consecutive subjects with a well-demonstrated T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to assess the cross-reactivity with carbapenems and the tolerability of such alternative β-lactams. All 204 subjects underwent skin tests with imipenem/cilastatin and meropenem; 130 of them were skin-tested also with ertapenem. Subjects with negative test results were challenged with these carbapenems. All subjects displayed negative skin tests to carbapenems and tolerated challenges. These data demonstrate the absence of clinically significant T-cell-mediated cross-reactivity between penicillins and carbapenems. Negative delayed-reading skin testing with carbapenems in individuals with documented T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins correlates well with subsequent clinical tolerance of therapeutic doses of carbapenems.

  7. Uncoupling resistance from cell death in the hypersensitive response of Nicotiana species to cauliflower mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, A B; Király, L; Ross, K; Schoelz, J E

    2001-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus strain W260 elicits a hypersensitive response (HR) in leaves of Nicotiana edwardsonii, an interspecific hybrid derived from a cross between N. glutinosa and N. clevelandii. Interestingly, we found that N. glutinosa is resistant to W260, but responds with local chlorotic lesions rather than necrotic lesions. In contrast, N. clevelandii responds to W260 with systemic cell death. The reactions of the progenitors of N. edwardsonii to W260 infection indicated that each contributed a factor toward the development of HR. In this study, we present two lines of evidence to show that the resistance and cell death that comprise the HR elicited by W260 can indeed be uncoupled. First, we showed that the non-necrotic resistance response of N. glutinosa could be converted to HR when these plants were crossed with N. clevelandii. Second, we found that cell death and resistance segregated independently in the F2 population of a cross between N. edwardsonii and N. clevelandii. We concluded that the resistance of N. edwardsonii to W260 infection was conditioned by a gene derived from N. glutinosa, whereas cell death was conditioned by a gene derived from N. clevelandii. An analysis of pathogenesis-related (PR) protein expression in response to W260 infection revealed that elicitation of PR proteins was associated with resistance rather than with the onset of cell death.

  8. Use of contact hypersensitivity in immunotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Descotes, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The histopathological examination of lymphoid organs together with a T-dependent antibody (TDAR) assay are the primary components of preclinical immunotoxicity assessment. Additional testing including measurement of cellular immunity may be considered. Besides ex vivo lymphocyte proliferation assays, either delayed or contact hypersensitivity models can be used. Contact hypersensitivity testing is typically performed either in mice or in guinea pigs and is directly derived from classical models used for the detection of contact sensitizing chemicals. Whatever the selected model, it is comprised of a sensitizing phase where the animals are applied a strong contact sensitizer topically, then a rest phase, and finally an eliciting phase where sensitized animals are challenged topically with the same contact sensitizer.In mice, the ear-swelling test is the reference procedure in which mice are sensitized to the ear or shaved abdominal skin and then challenged on the ear. Ear swelling usually measured from ear thickness reflects a cell-mediated immune response. In guinea pigs, a strong sensitizer is applied on the shaved skin of the abdomen or the interscapular area. The sensitized animals are challenged on another area of the shaved abdomen, and the cell-mediated response is assessed semiquantitatively from the magnitude of induced erythema inconsistently associated with edema. Treatment or exposure with immunosuppressive chemicals can result in a significantly decreased ear swelling or skin reaction. Contact hypersensitivity models are seldom used nowadays in preclinical immunotoxicity testing, most likely because of the lack of standardization and extensive validation as well as their use being restricted to mice or guinea pigs.

  9. Cell-mediated immune responses in owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus) with trachoma to soluble antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D L; Todd, W J; Macdonald, A B

    1978-01-01

    The first temporal study of the cell-mediated immune responses (CMI) following ocular infections with Chlamydia trachomatis is presented. We examined the CMI of owl monkeys infected with trachoma to soluble antigens of C. trachomatis by leucocyte migration inhibition (LIF) and delayed hypersensitivity skin testing. Delayed hypersensitivity of a systemic nature developed after a local eye infection in owl monkeys; clearance of inclusions from conjunctival cells coincided with the onset of this response. The association of eye secretion and circulating antibodies with recovery from primary infection was not so striking. Both cellular and humoral immune responses persisted for at least 2 months, at which time all test animals were completely resistant to re-infection. The elicitation of cell-mediated immune reactions with solubilized chlamydial antigens may permit the isolation of specific antigens involved in the generation of protective immunity in the owl monkey model. PMID:101327

  10. Affinity of Avr2 for tomato cysteine protease Rcr3 correlates with the Avr2-triggered Cf-2-mediated hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Van't Klooster, John W; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Vervoort, Jacques; Beekwilder, Jules; Boeren, Sjef; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Thomma, Bart P H J; De Wit, Pierre J G M

    2011-01-01

    The Cladosporium fulvum Avr2 effector is a novel type of cysteine protease inhibitor with eight cysteine residues that are all involved in disulphide bonds. We have produced wild-type Avr2 protein in Pichia pastoris and determined its disulphide bond pattern. By site-directed mutagenesis of all eight cysteine residues, we show that three of the four disulphide bonds are required for Avr2 stability. The six C-terminal amino acid residues of Avr2 contain one disulphide bond that is not embedded in its overall structure. Avr2 is not processed by the tomato cysteine protease Rcr3 and is an uncompetitive inhibitor of Rcr3. We also produced mutant Avr2 proteins in which selected amino acid residues were individually replaced by alanine, and, in one mutant, all six C-terminal amino acid residues were deleted. We determined the inhibitory constant (K(i) ) of these mutants for Rcr3 and their ability to trigger a Cf-2-mediated hypersensitive response (HR) in tomato. We found that the two C-terminal cysteine residues and the six amino acid C-terminal tail of Avr2 are required for both Rcr3 inhibitory activity and the ability to trigger a Cf-2-mediated HR. Individual replacement of the lysine-17, lysine-20 or tyrosine-21 residue by alanine did not affect significantly the biological activity of Avr2. Overall, our data suggest that the affinity of the Avr2 mutants for Rcr3 correlates with their ability to trigger a Cf-2-mediated HR.

  11. Skin-infiltrating T cells and cytokine expression in Icelandic horses affected with insect bite hypersensitivity: a possible role for regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Mareike; Janda, Jozef; Sigurdardottir, Olöf G; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Klukowska, Jolanta; von Tscharner, Claudia; Doherr, Marcus; Broström, Hans; Andersson, Lisa S; Einarsson, Sigurjón; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjörg

    2011-03-15

    Equine insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a seasonally recurrent, pruritic skin disorder caused by an IgE-mediated reaction to salivary proteins of biting flies, predominantly of the genus Culicoides. The aim of this study was to define T cell subsets and cytokine profile in the skin of IBH-affected Icelandic horses with particular focus on the balance between T helper (Th) 1, Th2 and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Distribution and number of CD4+, CD8+ and Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells were characterized by immunohistochemical staining in lesional and non-lesional skin of moderately and severely IBH-affected horses (n=14) and in the skin of healthy control horses (n=10). Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, mRNA expression levels of Th2 cytokines (Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13), Th1 cytokines (Interferon-γ), regulatory cytokines (Transforming Growth Factor β1, IL-10) and the Treg transcription factor FoxP3 were measured in skin and blood samples. Furthermore, Culicoides nubeculosus specific serum IgE levels were assessed. Lesions of IBH-affected horses contained significantly higher numbers of CD4+ cells than skin of healthy control horses. Furthermore, the total number of T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) was significantly increased in lesional compared to non-lesional skin and there was a tendency (p=0.07) for higher numbers of CD4+ cells in lesional compared to non-lesional skin. While the number of FoxP3+ T cells did not differ significantly between the groups, the ratio of Foxp3 to CD4+ cells was significantly lower in lesions of severely IBH-affected horses than in moderately affected or control horses. Interestingly, differences in FoxP3 expression were more striking at the mRNA level. FoxP3 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in lesional skin, compared both to non-lesional and to healthy skin and were also significantly lower in non-lesional compared to healthy skin. Expression levels of IL-13, but not IL-4 or IL-5

  12. Multiple Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Werner J.; Srinoulprasert, Yuttana; Yun, James; Hausmann, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Multiple drug hypersensitivity (MDH) is a syndrome that develops as a consequence of massive T-cell stimulations and is characterized by long-lasting drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) to different drugs. The initial symptoms are mostly severe exanthems or drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Subsequent symptoms due to another drug often appear in the following weeks, overlapping with the first DHR, or months to years later after resolution of the initial presentation. The second DHR includes exanthema, erythroderma, DRESS, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), hepatitis, and agranulocytosis. The eliciting drugs can be identified by positive skin or in vitro tests. The drugs involved in starting the MDH are the same as for DRESS, and they are usually given in rather high doses. Fixed drug combination therapies like sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim or piperacillin/tazobactam are frequently involved in MDH, and 30–40% of patients with severe DHR to combination therapy show T-cell reactions to both components. The drug-induced T-cell stimulation appears to be due to the p-i mechanism. Importantly, a permanent T-cell activation characterized by PD-1+/CD38+ expression on CD4+/CD25low T cells can be found in the circulation of patients with MDH for many years. In conclusion, MDH is a drug-elicited syndrome characterized by a long-lasting hyperresponsiveness to multiple, structurally unrelated drugs with clinically diverse symptoms. PMID:28315874

  13. The effect of oxygen on low-dose hypersensitivity and increased radioresistance in Chinese hamster V79-379A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marples, B.; Skov, K.A.; Joiner, M.C.

    1994-04-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated in air are hypersensitive to X-ray doses less than 0.5 Gy and show an increased radioresistance over the dose range 0.5-1 Gy. Of considerable interest from both a mechanistic and clinical viewpoint is the response of hypoxic cells over this dose range. The data presented here indicate that hypoxic cells are also hypersensitive to low X-ray doses and exhibit an increased radioresistant response, albeit triggered at a somewhat higher dose (0.69 Gy, SEM {+-} 0.18 Gy) than observed in oxygenated cells (0.5 Gy, SEM {+-} 0.21 Gy). These data indicate that the triggering event for increased radioresistance may be independent of oxygen. As reported by others previously, the oxygen enhancement ratio was found to decrease with a decreasing X-ray dose. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. HYPERSENSITIVE TO RED AND BLUE 1, a ZZ-type zinc finger protein, regulates phytochrome B-mediated red and cryptochrome-mediated blue light responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojun; Chong, Jason; Ni, Min

    2005-03-01

    Plant photoreceptors that regulate photomorphogenic development include red/far-red-light-absorbing phytochromes and blue/UV-A-light-absorbing cryptochromes. We have undertaken a genetic screen to identify additional components downstream of the photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified a short hypocotyl mutant under red and blue light, hypersensitive to red and blue 1 (hrb1). Mutation in HRB1 also enhances the end-of-day far-red light response, inhibits leaf expansion and petiole elongation, and attenuates the expression of CAB3 and CHS. Double mutant analysis indicates that phyB is epistatic to hrb1 under red light, and cry1 cry2 is epistatic to hrb1 under blue light for both hypocotyl growth and light-regulated gene expression responses. HRB1 localizes to the nucleus and belongs to a protein family of Drought induced 19 (Di19). HRB1 and all other family members contain a ZZ-type zinc finger domain, which in other organisms is implicated in protein-protein interactions between dystrophin and calmodulin and between transcriptional adaptors and activators. HRB1 activity is also required for red and blue light-induced expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4). pif4 shows a very similar hypersensitive response as hrb1 to both red light and blue light and is epistatic to hrb1 in control of light-regulated gene expression responses. Thus, the roles of HRB1 and PIF4 together in regulating both red and blue light responses may represent points where red light signaling and blue light signaling intersect.

  15. Calcium is involved in the RMc1(blb)-mediated hypersensitive response against Meloidogyne chitwoodi in potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The resistance (R) gene RMc1(blb) confers resistance against the plant-parasitic nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi. Avirulent and virulent nematodes were used to functionally characterize the RMc1(blb)-mediated resistance mechanism in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Histological observations indicated a h...

  16. UVA irradiation of the eye modulates the contact hypersensitivity of the skin and intestines by affecting mast cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamate, Yurika; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Kasahara, Emiko; Sato, Eisuke F

    2015-05-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation before allergic sensitization induces immunosuppression, but the precise mechanism remained unclear. In this study, we examined the influence of UVA irradiation of the eye on contact hypersensitivity (CHS) and the role of mast cells in CHS. We used two types of haptens, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC: a Th2 type hapten) and 4-ethoxymethylene-2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one (oxazolone: a Th1 type hapten). A 300 kJ/m(2) dose of UVA irradiation was delivered to the eyes. After UVA irradiation, we sensitized abdominal shaved skin and challenged the ear epidermis and colons of these mice with each hapten. After UVA irradiation, the CHS of the skin and colon were not inhibited in the FITC-sensitized mice. However, in the oxazolone-sensitized mice, only the CHS of the skin was inhibited by UVA irradiation. The inflammation of the colon became more severe after UVA irradiation. In mast cell-deficient (W/Wv) mice sensitized to FITC, the CHS was weaker than that in WT mice. Moreover, the reduction of immunosuppression in ear swelling was seen for one of the two models they used. These results suggest that the mast cells induced by UVA irradiation of the eye have different roles in the epidermis and colon and have different responses to different haptens. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs.

  18. Spinal 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending facilitation and contribute to behavioral hypersensitivity via a reciprocal neuron-glial signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been recently recognized that the descending serotonin (5-HT) system from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in the brainstem and the 5-HT3 receptor subtype in the spinal dorsal horn are involved in enhanced descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of the 5-HT3 receptor and its contribution to facilitation of pain remain unclear. Results In the present study, activation of spinal 5-HT3 receptors by intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR 57227 induced spinal glial hyperactivity, neuronal hyperexcitability and pain hypersensitivity in rats. We found that there was neuron-to-microglia signaling via the chemokine fractalkine, microglia to astrocyte signaling via cytokine IL-18, astrocyte to neuronal signaling by IL-1β, and enhanced activation of NMDA receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Glial hyperactivation in spinal dorsal horn after hindpaw inflammation was also attenuated by molecular depletion of the descending 5-HT system by intra-RVM Tph-2 shRNA interference. Conclusions These findings offer new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms at the spinal level responsible for descending 5-HT-mediated pain facilitation during the development of persistent pain after tissue and nerve injury. New pain therapies should focus on prime targets of descending facilitation-induced glial involvement, and in particular the blocking of intercellular signaling transduction between neurons and glia. PMID:24913307

  19. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity.

  20. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  1. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during the hypersensitive reaction of lettuce cells to Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, C S; Brown, I R; Bennett, M H; Mansfield, J W

    1997-02-01

    The active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was detected cytochemically by its reaction with cerium chloride to produce electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. In uninoculated lettuce leaves, H2O2 was typically present within the secondary thickened walls of xylem vessels. Inoculation with wild-type cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola caused a rapid hypersensitive reaction (HR) during which highly localized accumulation of H2O2 was found in plant cell walls adjacent to attached bacteria. Quantitative analysis indicated a prolonged burst of H2O2 occurring between 5 to 8 hr after inoculation in cells undergoing the HR during this example of non-host resistance. Cell wall alterations and papilla deposition, which occurred in response to both the wild-type strain and a nonpathogenic hrpD mutant, were not associated with intense staining for H2O2, unless the responding cell was undergoing the HR. Catalase treatment to decompose H2O2 almost entirely eliminated staining, but 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor) did not affect the pattern of distribution of H2O2 detected. H2O2 production was reduced more by the inhibition of plant peroxidases (with potassium cyanide and sodium azide) than by inhibition of neutrophil-like NADPH oxidase (with diphenylene iodonium chloride). Results suggest that CeCl3 reacts with excess H2O2 that is not rapidly metabolized during cross-linking reactions occurring in cell walls; such an excess of H2O2 in the early stages of the plant-bacterium interaction was only produced during the HR. The highly localized accumulation of H2O2 is consistent with its direct role as an antimicrobial agent and as the cause of localized membrane damage at sites of bacterial attachment.

  2. Transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C; Lamprokostopoulou, Agaristi; Polyzos, Alexandros; Kino, Tomoshige; Katsantoni, Eleni; Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Christophoridis, Athanasios; Katzos, George; Dracopoulou, Maria; Sertedaki, Amalia; Chrousos, George P; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2015-12-01

    Transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity is a rare disorder characterized by increased tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids and compensatory hypo-activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The condition itself and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. To present the clinical manifestations, endocrinologic evaluation and transcriptomic profile in a patient with transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity. A 9-year-old girl presented with an 8-month history of clinical manifestations suggestive of Cushing syndrome. Endocrinologic evaluation revealed undetectable 08:00 h ACTH (<1 pg/mL) and cortisol (0·025 μg/dL) concentrations, which remained decreased throughout the 24-h period and did not respond to stimulation with ovine CRH. The disease gradually resolved spontaneously over the ensuing 3 months. Sequencing of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene revealed no mutations or polymorphisms. Western blot analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed equal protein expression of hGRα of the patient in the disease and postresolution phases compared with a control subject. Transcriptomic analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the disease and postresolution phases identified 903 differentially expressed genes. Of these, 106 genes were up-regulated and 797 were down-regulated in the disease compared with the resolution phase. Bioinformatics analysis on the differentially expressed gene networks revealed Nuclear Factor-κB as the predominant transcription factor influencing the expression of the majority of differentially expressed genes. Our findings indicate that a transient postreceptor defect, or a virus- or bacterium-encoded molecule, may have enhanced glucocorticoid signal transduction, leading to transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity and hypo-activation of the HPA axis. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  3. T-cell infiltration and signaling in the adult dorsal spinal cord is a major contributor to neuropathic pain-like hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Costigan, Michael; Moss, Andrew; Latremoliere, Alban; Johnston, Caroline; Verma-Gandhu, Monica; Herbert, Teri A; Barrett, Lee; Brenner, Gary J; Vardeh, Daniel; Woolf, Clifford J; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2009-11-18

    Partial peripheral nerve injury in adult rats results in neuropathic pain-like hypersensitivity, while that in neonatal rats does not, a phenomenon also observed in humans. We therefore compared gene expression profiles in the dorsal horn of adult and neonatal rats in response to the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of peripheral neuropathic pain. The 148 differentially regulated genes in adult, but not young, rat spinal cords indicate a greater microglial and T-cell response in adult than in young animals. T-cells show a large infiltration in the adult dorsal horn but not in the neonate after SNI. T-cell-deficient Rag1-null adult mice develop less neuropathic mechanical allodynia than controls, and central expression of cytokines involved in T-cell signaling exhibits large relative differences between young and adult animals after SNI. One such cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), is upregulated in the dorsal horn after nerve injury in the adult but not neonate, and we show that IFNgamma signaling is required for full expression of adult neuropathic hypersensitivity. These data reveal that T-cell infiltration and activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury contribute to the evolution of neuropathic pain-like hypersensitivity. The neuroimmune interaction following peripheral nerve injury has therefore a substantial adaptive immune component, which is absent or suppressed in the young CNS.

  4. T-Cell Infiltration and Signaling in the Adult Dorsal Spinal Cord Is a Major Contributor to Neuropathic Pain-Like Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Moss, Andrew; Latremoliere, Alban; Johnston, Caroline; Verma-Gandhu, Monica; Herbert, Teri A.; Barrett, Lee; Brenner, Gary J.; Vardeh, Daniel; Woolf, Clifford J.; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Partial peripheral nerve injury in adult rats results in neuropathic pain-like hypersensitivity, while that in neonatal rats does not, a phenomenon also observed in humans. We therefore compared gene expression profiles in the dorsal horn of adult and neonatal rats in response to the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of peripheral neuropathic pain. The 148 differentially regulated genes in adult, but not young, rat spinal cords indicate a greater microglial and T-cell response in adult than in young animals. T-cells show a large infiltration in the adult dorsal horn but not in the neonate after SNI. T-cell-deficient Rag1-null adult mice develop less neuropathic mechanical allodynia than controls, and central expression of cytokines involved in T-cell signaling exhibits large relative differences between young and adult animals after SNI. One such cytokine, interferon-γ (IFNγ), is upregulated in the dorsal horn after nerve injury in the adult but not neonate, and we show that IFNγ signaling is required for full expression of adult neuropathic hypersensitivity. These data reveal that T-cell infiltration and activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury contribute to the evolution of neuropathic pain-like hypersensitivity. The neuroimmune interaction following peripheral nerve injury has therefore a substantial adaptive immune component, which is absent or suppressed in the young CNS. PMID:19923276

  5. Exploring the Hypersensitivity of PTEN Deleted Prostate Cancer Stem Cells to WEE1 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    by sorting cells following staining with the CD44-PE antibodies. About 500- 5000 cells could be sorted from 5 million cells. 6  (Figure 4). CD44...Individual colonies were counted after staining cells with crystal violet. An average of 3 counts is plotted for each concentration and each cell line...from 5 of 6 normal mice in each group (Figure 12). b. Immunohistochemical staining of resected tumors for necropsy of the tumor tissue. Ki67

  6. Maternal and postnatal dietary probiotic supplementation enhances splenic regulatory T helper cell population and reduces ovalbumin allergen-induced hypersensitivity responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Toomer, Ondulla T; Ferguson, Martine; Pereira, Marion; Do, Andrew; Bigley, Elmer; Gaines, Dennis; Williams, Kristina

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal to early childhood is the critical period for establishing a balance of T helper 1 (Th1) versus T helper 2 (Th2) cellular immunity within the gut, which is strongly influenced by the source and establishment of gut microflora. Probiotic administration has been shown to attenuate Th2-biased cellular immunity and predisposition to food allergies. To test this hypothesis we provided ad libitum a probiotic-supplemented (Primalac 454 Feed Grade Microbials) or control diet to lactating dams with suckling pups and weaned pups until 10 weeks of age. Weaned mice were sensitized/challenged with egg allergen ovalbumin, saline or adjuvant at 6, 8 and 10 weeks of age. At 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks, fecal samples were collected for microbial analysis, while blood samples were analyzed for ovalbumin-IgE and total plasma IgE levels. At termination, splenic T helper cell lymphocyte population subtypes were determined using FACS analysis and Th1/Th2/Th17 gene expression by PCR array. At 21 days of age, pups suckled by lactating dams fed the probiotic supplemented diet had significantly enhanced Lactobacillus acidophilus fecal counts compared to controls. Moreover, mice fed the probiotic supplemented diet had enhanced splenic naturally occurring and induced regulatory T cell populations, enhanced TGFβ gene expression and reduced expression of allergic mediator IL13 compared to controls. These results provide evidence that early probiotic supplementation may provide host protection from hypersensitivity reactions to food allergens by attenuating food allergen inflammatory responses. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  8. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  9. Immunomodulation of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses by mesenchymal stem cells is associated with bystander T cell apoptosis in the draining lymph node.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong-Hyung; Kim, Jung-Sik; Yoon, Il-Hee; Shin, Jun-Seop; Nam, Hye-Young; Yang, Seung-Ha; Kim, Sang-Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2010-10-01

    Disease amelioration by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to be closely related to their immunomodulatory functions on the host immune system in many disease models. However, the underlying mechanisms of how these cells affect the immune cells in vivo are not fully understood. In this study, we report findings that a small but significant number of MSCs accumulate in the secondary lymphoid organs and attenuate delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response by inducing apoptotic cell death of surrounding immune cells in the draining lymph node (LN). In the migration study, i.v. infused GFP-MSCs preferentially accumulated at the boundary between the paracortical area and the germinal center in the LNs, in close proximity to various types of immune cells including T, B, and dendritic cells in a dose-dependent manner. As a result, accumulated MSCs markedly attenuated DTH response in proportion to the number of MSCs infused. During the DTH response, the infiltration of T cells in the challenged site was significantly decreased, whereas a number of apoptotic T cells were remarkably increased in the draining LN. Apoptosis was significantly induced in activated T cells (CD3(+) and BrdU(+)), but not in the resting T cells (CD3(+) and BrdU(-)). NO was associated with these apoptotic events. Taken together, we conclude that significant numbers of i.v. infused MSCs preferentially localize in the draining LN, where they induce apoptosis of the activated T cells by producing NO and thus attenuate the DTH response.

  10. Mosquito salivary gland extracts induce EBV-infected NK cell oncogenesis via CD4 T cells in patients with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    Asada, Hideo; Saito-Katsuragi, Mamiko; Niizeki, Hironori; Yoshioka, Akira; Suguri, Setsuo; Isonokami, Masaaki; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Tokura, Yoshiki; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Miyagawa, Sachiko

    2005-11-01

    Severe hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is characterized by intense local skin reactions and systemic symptoms such as high fever, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. Patients with HMB often have natural killer (NK) cell lymphocytosis associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Here we investigated whether mosquito bites have any influence on the oncogenesis of EBV-infected NK cells. We examined six HMB patients with EBV-infected NK cell lymphocytosis. We first demonstrated that CD4+ T cells, but not NK cells, proliferated well in response to mosquito salivary gland extracts (SGE), especially to SGE of Aedes albopictus. When NK cells were cocultured with autologous CD4+ T cells stimulated by mosquito SGE, the expression of viral oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was remarkably enhanced. Next, we stimulated mononuclear cells of the patients with mosquito SGE, and NK cell counts were monitored for 28 d. The counts changed little from initial levels in the culture with mosquito SGE, whereas they decreased steadily in the culture without the extracts. Furthermore, we detected LMP1 mRNA in the skin lesion induced by mosquito SGE. These results suggest that mosquito bites can induce expression of the viral oncogene LMP1 in NK cells via mosquito antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, which is involved in the oncogenesis of NK cells in vivo.

  11. Resistance to fungal pathogens triggered by the Cf9-Avr9 response in tomato and oilseed rape in the absence of hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Hennin, Caroline; Diederichsen, Elke; Höfte, Monica

    2002-01-01

    summary In tomato and related species, the Cf9 resistance gene induces hypersensitive cell death and activates downstream defence pathways upon recognition of the Avr9 elicitor. We investigated whether the Cf9-Avr9 response without hypersensitive cell death symptoms increases resistance to several fungi. A low Avr9 dose that does not cause hypersensitive cell death was injected in Cf9 tomato and transgenic Cf9 oilseed rape plants. Subsequently, the injected leaves were infected with different fungal pathogens. The disease development of Botrytis cinerea was delayed in Cf9 tomato when the pathogen was inoculated on, or around, the Avr9 injection site. Disease development of Leptosphaeria maculans and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was delayed on Cf9 oilseed rape plant parts located around the Avr9 injection site. Disease development of Oidium lycopersicum in Cf9 tomato or Erysiphe polygoni in Cf9 oilseed rape was not restricted on leaves injected with Avr9. The Avr9 injection induced systemic resistance to L. maculans and E. polygoni in Cf9 oilseed rape. F(1)(Cf9xAvr9) oilseed rape plants, obtained from crosses of transgenic Cf9x transgenic Avr9 oilseed rape, exhibited higher levels of resistance to L. maculans and E. polygoni but not to S. sclerotiorum, than wild-type plants. F(1)(Cf9xAvr9) plants treated with benzothiadiazole (BTH) did not show elevated levels of expression of some pathogenesis-related genes but developed higher levels of resistance to L. maculans than BTH-treated wild-type plants. This report demonstrates that the hypersensitive cell death which is associated with the Cf9-Avr9 response is not required for quantitative disease resistance.

  12. Two distinct types of cellular mechanisms in the development of delayed hypersensitivity in mice: requirement of either mast cells or macrophages for elicitation of the response.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, I; Morikawa, S; Harada, T; Kitamura, Y

    1993-01-01

    Using mast cell-deficient mutant W/Wv mice and their normal counterpart we re-evaluated the significance of participation of mast cells in allergic inflammatory response. W/Wv mice developed immediate hypersensitivity (IH) footpad reaction (FPR) to a somewhat lesser degree than the normal mice, suggesting that the mast cell might amplify the response. To exert classical tuberculin (tbc) delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) mast cells were not an essential cellular component. Vasoactive amines were essential to develop the response, but it did not necessarily originate from mast cells. When mice were immunized with methylated human serum albumin (MHSA) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), mast cells were required to elicit DTH FPR. This was confirmed by the lack of the response in W/Wv mice, and the restoration of FPR by local transplantation of mature mast cells into mutant mice. This mast cell-dependent (MD) DTH was different from tbc DTH as follows: mast cell dependency, macrophage dependency as revealed by ferritin sensitivity, kinetics of sensitization, effect of host's age and histopathology. Thus we concluded that there are two types of DTH in mice; one is macrophage-dependent tbc and the other is mast cell-dependent DTH. The correspondence of the DTH to the Jones-Mote (JM) DTH is discussed, although the dominance of mast cells in MD DTH lesion was not observed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8478030

  13. Suppression of gastric acid increases the risk of developing Immunoglobulin E-mediated drug hypersensitivity: human diclofenac sensitization and a murine sensitization model

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, A. B.; Gruber, S.; Pali-Schöll, I.; Kinaciyan, T.; Untersmayr, E.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Hypersensitivity reactions towards non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are common, although true allergies are detectable only in a subgroup of patients. The current study was prompted by a case observation, where a patient experienced generalized urticaria following his second course of diclofenac and proton pump inhibitor medication, and was found to have diclofenac-specific IgE. During recent years, our group has been investigating the importance of gastric digestion in the development of food allergies, demonstrating anti-acid medication as a risk factor for sensitization against food proteins. Objective Here, we aimed to investigate whether the mechanism of food allergy induction described can also be causative in NSAID allergy, using diclofenac as a paradigm. Methods We subjected BALB/c mice to several oral immunization regimens modelled after the patient’s medication intake. Diclofenac was applied with or without gastric acid suppression, in various doses, alone or covalently coupled to albumin, a protein abundant in gastric juices. Immune responses were assessed on the antibody level, and functionally examined by in vitro and in vivo crosslinking assays. Results Only mice receiving albumin-coupled diclofenac under gastric acid suppression developed anti-diclofenac IgG1 and IgE, whereas no immune responses were induced by the drug alone or without gastric acid suppression. Antibody induction was dose dependent with the group receiving the higher dose of the drug showing sustained anti-diclofenac titres. The antibodies induced triggered basophil degranulation in vitro and positive skin tests in vivo. Conclusion Gastric acid suppression was found to be a causative mechanism in the induction of IgE-mediated diclofenac allergy. PMID:19817752

  14. Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces β-arrestin2-mediated cocaine hypersensitivity and alters cellular D2 responses in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Goertz, Richard B; Puttick, Daniel J; Bowles, Dawn E; Meyer, Rebecca C; Hall, Randy A; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine blocks plasma membrane monoamine transporters and increases extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT). The addictive properties of cocaine are mediated primarily by DA, while NE and 5-HT play modulatory roles. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), which converts DA to NE, increases the aversive effects of cocaine and reduces cocaine use in humans, and produces behavioral hypersensitivity to cocaine and D2 agonism in rodents, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found a decrease in β-arrestin2 (βArr2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition, and overexpression of βArr2 in the NAc normalized cocaine-induced locomotion in DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice. The D2/3 agonist quinpirole decreased excitability in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from control, but not Dbh -/- animals, where instead there was a trend for an excitatory effect. The Gαi inhibitor NF023 abolished the quinpirole-induced decrease in excitability in control MSNs, but had no effect in Dbh -/- MSNs, whereas the Gαs inhibitor NF449 restored the ability of quinpirole to decrease excitability in Dbh -/- MSNs, but had no effect in control MSNs. These results suggest that chronic loss of noradrenergic tone alters behavioral responses to cocaine via decreases in βArr2 and cellular responses to D2/D3 activation, potentially via changes in D2-like receptor G-protein coupling in NAc MSNs. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. DOLICHOL PHOSPHATE MANNOSE SYNTHASE1 Mediates the Biogenesis of Isoprenyl-Linked Glycans and Influences Development, Stress Response, and Ammonium Hypersensitivity in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Jadid, Nurul; Mialoundama, Alexis Samba; Heintz, Dimitri; Ayoub, Daniel; Erhardt, Mathieu; Mutterer, Jérôme; Meyer, Denise; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rahier, Alain; Camara, Bilal; Bouvier, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The most abundant posttranslational modification in nature is the attachment of preassembled high-mannose-type glycans, which determines the fate and localization of the modified protein and modulates the biological functions of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored and N-glycosylated proteins. In eukaryotes, all mannose residues attached to glycoproteins from the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) derive from the polyprenyl monosaccharide carrier, dolichol P-mannose (Dol-P-Man), which is flipped across the ER membrane to the lumen. We show that in plants, Dol-P-Man is synthesized when Dol-P-Man synthase1 (DPMS1), the catalytic core, interacts with two binding proteins, DPMS2 and DPMS3, that may serve as membrane anchors for DPMS1 or provide catalytic assistance. This configuration is reminiscent of that observed in mammals but is distinct from the single DPMS protein catalyzing Dol-P-Man biosynthesis in bakers’ yeast and protozoan parasites. Overexpression of DPMS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in disorganized stem morphology and vascular bundle arrangements, wrinkled seed coat, and constitutive ER stress response. Loss-of-function mutations and RNA interference–mediated reduction of DPMS1 expression in Arabidopsis also caused a wrinkled seed coat phenotype and most remarkably enhanced hypersensitivity to ammonium that was manifested by extensive chlorosis and a strong reduction of root growth. Collectively, these data reveal a previously unsuspected role of the prenyl-linked carrier pathway for plant development and physiology that may help integrate several aspects of candidate susceptibility genes to ammonium stress. PMID:21558543

  16. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception. PMID:27755539

  17. Exploring the Hypersensitivity of PTEN Deleted Prostate Cancer Stem Cells to WEE1 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    with faster repair of IR-induced DSBs, clinically correlated with increased chromosome stability and favorable prognosis of childhood neuroblastomas ...repair by upregulating the expression of the NHEJ protein XRCC4 in neuroblastoma cell lines (43). Similarly, fusion tyrosine kinases drive drug...tyrosine kinase alters the double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity of SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. DNA Repair, 7, 1757–1764. 44. Lammering,G., Hewit,T.H

  18. Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kathrin; Bircher, Andreas J

    2005-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics cause immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions, and may also affect internal organs and circulating blood cells. The underlying pathomechanisms are only partly understood. The extent of cross-reactivity among different quinolones depends on the type of clinical manifestation and its underlying mechanism. Despite recent advances, reliable diagnostic tests are still lacking. Recent studies have shown quinolone-specific IgE in vitro in more than 50% of patients with immediate-type reactions and a considerable cross-reactivity with related compounds. In maculopapular drug exanthems from ciprofloxacin, specific T-cell clones were identified, and cross-reactivity to related compounds was detected in approximately 50% of the clones. From re-exposure studies in patients with exanthems, cross-reactivity appears to be lower. Cellular tests such as lymphocyte transformation tests are currently not very useful. For prick and intradermal skin tests, widely divergent nonirritant test concentrations have been recommended. Desensitization may be possible in selected patients.

  19. Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Exposed to Microorganisms Involved in Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Induce a Th1-Polarized Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Pallandre, Jean-René; Borg, Christophe; Loeffert, Sophie; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Millon, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an immunoallergic disease characterized by a prominent interstitial infiltrate composed predominantly of lymphocytes secreting inflammatory cytokines. Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to play a pivotal role in the lymphocytic response. However, their cross talk with microorganisms that cause HP has yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the initial interactions between human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and four microorganisms that are different in nature (Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula [actinomycetes], Mycobacterium immunogenum [mycobacteria], and Wallemia sebi and Eurotium amstelodami [filamentous fungi]) and are involved in HP. Our objectives were to determine the cross talk between MoDCs and HP-causative agents and to determine whether the resulting immune response varied according to the microbial extract tested. The phenotypic activation of MoDCs was measured by the increased expression of costimulatory molecules and levels of cytokines in supernatants. The functional activation of MoDCs was measured by the ability of MoDCs to induce lymphocytic proliferation and differentiation in a mixed lymphocytic reaction (MLR). E. amstelodami-exposed (EA) MoDCs expressed higher percentages of costimulatory molecules than did W. sebi-exposed (WS), S. rectivirgula-exposed (SR), or M. immunogenum-exposed (MI) MoDCs (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). EA-MoDCs, WS-MoDCs, SR-MoDCs, and MI-MoDCs induced CD4+ T cell proliferation and a Th1-polarized immune response. The present study provides evidence that, although differences were initially observed between MoDCs exposed to filamentous fungi and MoDCs exposed to bacteria, a Th1 response was ultimately promoted by DCs regardless of the microbial extract tested. PMID:23720369

  20. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity.

  1. Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Calogiuri, Gianfranco

    2017-06-01

    To describe hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. PubMed search of articles published during the past 30 years with an emphasis on publications in the past decade. Case reports and review articles describing hypersensitivity reactions in the context of hemodialysis. Pharmacologic agents are the most common identifiable cause of hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis. These include iron, erythropoietin, and heparin, which can cause anaphylactic or pseudoallergic reactions, and topical antibiotics and anesthetics, which lead to delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Many hypersensitivity reactions are triggered by complement activation and increased bradykinin resulting from contact system activation, especially in the context of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use. Several alternative pharmacologic preparations and dialyzer membranes are available, such that once an etiology for the reaction is established, recurrences can be prevented without affecting the quality of care provided to patients. Although hypersensitivity reactions are uncommon in patients receiving hemodialysis, they can be life-threatening. Moreover, considering the large prevalence of the end-stage renal disease population, the implications of such reactions are enormous. Most reactions are pseudoallergic and not mediated by immunoglobulin E. The multiplicity of potential exposures and the complexity of the environment to which patients on dialysis are exposed make it challenging to identify the precise cause of these reactions. Great diligence is needed to investigate hypersensitivity reactions to avoid recurrence in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuron-glial communication mediated by TNF-α and glial activation in dorsal root ganglia in visceral inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Song, Dan-dan; Li, Yong; Tang, Dong; Huang, Li-ya; Yuan, Yao-zong

    2014-05-01

    Communication between neurons and glia in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the central nervous system is critical for nociception. Both glial activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction underlie this communication. We investigated whether satellite glial cell (SGC) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activation in DRG participates in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat model of visceral hyperalgesia. In TNBS-treated rats, TNF-α expression increased in DRG and was colocalized to SGCs enveloping a given neuron. These SGCs were activated as visualized under electron microscopy: they had more elongated processes projecting into the connective tissue space and more gap junctions. When nerves attached to DRG (L6-S1) were stimulated with a series of electrical stimulations, TNF-α were released from DRG in TNBS-treated animals compared with controls. Using a current clamp, we noted that exogenous TNF-α (2.5 ng/ml) increased DRG neuron activity, and visceral pain behavioral responses were reversed by intrathecal administration of anti-TNF-α (10 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)). Based on our findings, TNF-α and SGC activation in neuron-glial communication are critical in inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia.

  3. Practical Management of Patients with a History of Immediate Hypersensitivity to Common non-Beta-Lactam Drugs.

    PubMed

    Macy, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to medications are among the most feared adverse drug reactions, because of their close association with anaphylaxis. This review discusses a practical management approach for patients with a history of an immediate hypersensitivity to a non-beta-lactam medication, where reexposure to the implicated, or similar, medication is clinically necessary. Mechanisms associated with severe immediate hypersensitivity reactions include IgE-mediated mast cell activation, complement-mediated mast cell activation, and direct mast cell activation. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions may also be mediated by vasodilators, other pharmacologic mechanisms, or be secondary to underlying patient-specific biochemical abnormalities such as endocrine tumors or chronic spontaneous urticaria. The key features in the reaction history and the biochemistry of the implicated medication are discussed. Most individuals with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to a medication, who require reuse of that drug, can be safely retreated with a therapeutic course of the implicated drug after a full-dose challenge, graded challenge, or desensitization, with or without premedication and/or any preliminary diagnostic testing, depending on the specific situation.

  4. MicroRNA-21 limits in vivo immune response-mediated activation of the IL-12/interferon gamma pathway, Th1 polarization, and the severity of delayed-type hypersensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas X.; Hartner, Jochen; Lim, Eun-Jin; Fabry, Victoria; Mingler, Melissa K.; Cole, Eric T.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2011-01-01

    An altered balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines is responsible for a variety of immuno-inflammatory disorders such as asthma, yet the role of post-transcriptional mechanisms, such as those mediated by microRNAs, in adjusting the relative magnitude and balance of Th cytokine expression have been largely unexplored. Here we show that miR-21 has a central role in setting a balance between Th1 and Th2 responses to antigens. Targeted ablation of miR-21 in mice led to reduced lung eosinophilia after allergen challenge, with a broadly reprogrammed immunoactivation transcriptome, and significantly increased levels of the Th1 cytokine IFNγ. Biological network-based transcriptome analysis of OVA-challenged miR-21-/-mice identified an unexpected prominent dysregulation of IL-12/IFNγ pathways as the most significantly affected in the lungs with a key role for miR-21 in IFNγ signaling and T-cell polarization, consistent with a functional miR-21 binding site in IL-12p35. In support of these hypotheses, miR-21 deficiency led dendritic cells to produce more IL-12 after LPS stimulation, and OVA-challenged CD4+ T lymphocytes to produce increased IFNγ and decreased IL-4. Further, loss of miR-21 significantly enhanced the Th1-associated delayed-type hypersensitivity cutaneous responses. Thus, our results define miR-21 as a major regulator of Th1 vs. Th2 responses, defining a new mechanism for regulating polarized immuno-inflammatory responses. PMID:21849676

  5. N-Acetylcysteine Attenuates Hexavalent Chromium-Induced Hypersensitivity through Inhibition of Cell Death, ROS-Related Signaling and Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Lin, Chia-Ho; Wang, Ying-Jan; Wang, Bour-Jr

    2014-01-01

    Chromium hypersensitivity (chromium-induced allergic contact dermatitis) is an important issue in occupational skin disease. Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) can activate the Akt, Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and induce cell death, via the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, cell death stimuli have been proposed to regulate the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1). However, the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules and cytotoxicity involved in Cr(VI)-induced hypersensitivity have not yet been fully demonstrated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could increase glutathione levels in the skin and act as an antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effects of NAC on attenuating the Cr(VI)-triggered ROS signaling in both normal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT cells) and a guinea pig (GP) model. The results showed the induction of apoptosis, autophagy and ROS were observed after different concentrations of Cr(VI) treatment. HaCaT cells pretreated with NAC exhibited a decrease in apoptosis and autophagy, which could affect cell viability. In addition, Cr (VI) activated the Akt, NF-κB and MAPK pathways thereby increasing IL-1α and TNF-α production. However, all of these stimulation phenomena could be inhibited by NAC in both of in vitro and in vivo studies. These novel findings indicate that NAC may prevent the development of chromium hypersensitivity by inhibiting of ROS-induced cell death and cytokine expression. PMID:25248126

  6. N-acetylcysteine attenuates hexavalent chromium-induced hypersensitivity through inhibition of cell death, ROS-related signaling and cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Lin, Chia-Ho; Wang, Ying-Jan; Wang, Bour-Jr

    2014-01-01

    Chromium hypersensitivity (chromium-induced allergic contact dermatitis) is an important issue in occupational skin disease. Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) can activate the Akt, Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and induce cell death, via the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, cell death stimuli have been proposed to regulate the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1). However, the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules and cytotoxicity involved in Cr(VI)-induced hypersensitivity have not yet been fully demonstrated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could increase glutathione levels in the skin and act as an antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effects of NAC on attenuating the Cr(VI)-triggered ROS signaling in both normal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT cells) and a guinea pig (GP) model. The results showed the induction of apoptosis, autophagy and ROS were observed after different concentrations of Cr(VI) treatment. HaCaT cells pretreated with NAC exhibited a decrease in apoptosis and autophagy, which could affect cell viability. In addition, Cr (VI) activated the Akt, NF-κB and MAPK pathways thereby increasing IL-1α and TNF-α production. However, all of these stimulation phenomena could be inhibited by NAC in both of in vitro and in vivo studies. These novel findings indicate that NAC may prevent the development of chromium hypersensitivity by inhibiting of ROS-induced cell death and cytokine expression.

  7. Flea bite hypersensitivity: new aspects on the involvement of mast cells.

    PubMed

    von Ruedorffer, U; Fisch, R; Peel, J; Roosje, P; Griot-Wenk, M; Welle, M

    2003-03-01

    A study was performed to test the effect of sensitization to flea antigen, followed by exposure to fleas on mast cells (MCs), their subtypes, and IgE+ cells. Biopsies were taken from flea-sensitized dogs (n=28) and non-sensitized dogs (n=5) that had been exposed to fleas. Control groups consisted of flea-sensitized (n=12) and non-sensitized dogs (n=9) that were not exposed to fleas. Biopsies, taken before, 24 and 72 h after local flea exposure, were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), toluidine blue, a double labelling technique for MC chymase and tryptase and anti-IgE. An intradermal test for flea antigen was performed and serum titres of allergen-specific IgE and IgG were measured. Significantly higher numbers (P<0.001) of double labelled MCs compared to toluidine blue stained MCs were detectable in flea-sensitized dogs independent of flea exposure. In contrast, in non-sensitized dogs, the number of toluidine blue stained MCs and the number of double labelled MCs did not differ. In flea-sensitized dogs after flea exposure the percentage of C-MC was significantly increased at day 1 (P<0.001) and day 3 (P<0.001), whereas the percentage of TC-MCs decreased significantly at day 1 (P<0.001) and day 3 (P<0.05). The percentage of T-MCs decreased (P<0.05 day 0 versus day 1; P<0.05 day 0 versus day 3). No significant difference was detectable after toluidine blue staining and staining for IgE+ cells between the groups nor between the MC density and the number of IgE+ cells. All flea-sensitized dogs had positive skin tests to flea antigen and high serum titres of flea-specific serum IgE and IgG antibodies. In non-sensitized dogs, these results were negative. Our data provide strong evidence for an upregulation of MC proteases during the process of sensitization and a generalized selective release of mast cell tryptase after exposure to the antigen.

  8. Spinal TLR4 mediates the transition to a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity after the resolution of inflammation in serum-transferred arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Christina A.; Dumlao, Darren S.; Stokes, Jennifer A.; Dennis, Edward A.; Svensson, Camilla I.; Corr, Maripat; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent pain after resolution of clinically appreciable signs of arthritis poses a therapeutic challenge and immunosuppressive therapies do not meet this medical need. To investigate this conversion to persistent pain, we utilized the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model, which has persistent mechanical hypersensitivity despite the resolution of visible inflammation. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 has been implicated as a potential therapeutic target in neuropathic and other pain models. We compared the relative courses of serum transfer arthritis and mechanical hypersensitivity in wild type (WT) and Tlr4−/− mice. K/BxN serum transfer induced similar joint swelling and inflammation from days 4–22 in WT and Tlr4−/− mice. Unlike WT mice, Tlr4−/− mice displayed a significant reversal in mechanical hypersensitivity and diminished appearance of glial activation markers after resolution of peripheral inflammation. Intrathecal (IT) delivery of a TLR4 antagonist, LPS-RS (10μg), on days 6, 9, and 12 abrogated the transition to persistent mechanical hypersensitivity in WT arthritic mice, while later administration had no impact. We utilized a lipodomics LC/MS/MS methodology to determine spinal cord profiles of bioactive lipid species following early LPS-RS treatment compared to vehicle treated controls. WT arthritic mice had reduced spinal levels of the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 on day 6, compared to IT LPS-RS treated mice. Direct IT application of 15d-PGJ2 (0.5μg) on day 6 improved mechanical hypersensitivity in arthritic mice within 15 minutes. Hence, TLR4 signaling altered spinal bioactive lipid profiles in the serum transfer model and played a critical role in the transition from acute to chronic post-inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:22019135

  9. The extracellular EXO protein mediates cell expansion in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Florian; Lisso, Janina; Lange, Peggy; Müssig, Carsten

    2009-02-13

    The EXO (EXORDIUM) gene was identified as a potential mediator of brassinosteroid (BR)-promoted growth. It is part of a gene family with eight members in Arabidopsis. EXO gene expression is under control of BR, and EXO overexpression promotes shoot and root growth. In this study, the consequences of loss of EXO function are described. The exo loss of function mutant showed diminished leaf and root growth and reduced biomass production. Light and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that impaired leaf growth is due to reduced cell expansion. Epidermis, palisade, and spongy parenchyma cells were smaller in comparison to the wild-type. The exo mutant showed reduced brassinolide-induced cotyledon and hypocotyl growth. In contrast, exo roots were significantly more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of synthetic brassinolide. Apart from reduced growth, exo did not show severe morphological abnormalities. Gene expression analyses of leaf material identified genes that showed robust EXO-dependent expression. Growth-related genes such as WAK1, EXP5, and KCS1, and genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism showed weaker expression in exo than in wild-type plants. However, the vast majority of BR-regulated genes were normally expressed in exo. HA- and GFP-tagged EXO proteins were targeted to the apoplast. The EXO gene is essential for cell expansion in leaves. Gene expression patterns and growth assays suggest that EXO mediates BR-induced leaf growth. However, EXO does not control BR-levels or BR-sensitivity in the shoot. EXO presumably is involved in a signalling process which coordinates BR-responses with environmental or developmental signals. The hypersensitivity of exo roots to BR suggests that EXO plays a diverse role in the control of BR responses in the root.

  10. A case of hypersensitivity to mosquito bites without peripheral natural killer cell lymphocytosis in a 6-year-old Korean boy.

    PubMed

    Seon, Han-Su; Roh, Ji-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kang, Eun-Kyeong

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is a rare disease characterized by intense skin reactions such as bulla and necrotic ulcerations at bite sites, accompanied by general symptoms such as high-grade fever and malaise occurred after mosquito bites. It has been suggested that HMB is associated with chronic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and natural killer (NK) cell leukemia/lymphoma. We describe here a Korean child who presented with 3-yr history of HMB without natural killer cell lymphocytosis. He has been ill for 6 yr with HMB. Close observation and examination for the development of lymphoproliferative status or hematologic malignant disorders is needed.

  11. A connected set of genes associated with programmed cell death implicated in controlling the hypersensitive response in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rp1-D21 is a maize auto-active resistance gene that confers a spontaneous hypersensitive response (HR). Depending on the genetic background in which it operates; variable levels of HR are observed. This offers a convenient system to identify alleles that modulate HR and genes involved in disease res...

  12. Early H2O2 Accumulation in Mesophyll Cells Leads to Induction of Glutathione during the Hyper-Sensitive Response in the Barley-Powdery Mildew Interaction1

    PubMed Central

    Vanacker, Helene; Carver, Tim L.W.; Foyer, Christine H.

    2000-01-01

    H2O2 production and changes in glutathione, catalase, and peroxidase were followed in whole-leaf extracts from the susceptible (AlgS [Algerian/4* (F14) Man.(S)]; ml-a1 allele) and resistant (AlgR [Algerian/4* (F14) Man.(R)]; Ml-a1 allele) barley (Hordeum vulgare) isolines between 12 and 24 h after inoculation with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis [DC]. Speer [syn. Erysiphe graminis DC] f.sp hordei Marchal). Localized papilla responses and cell death hypersensitive responses were not observed within the same cell. In hypersensitive response sites, H2O2 accumulation first occurred in the mesophyll underlying the attacked epidermal cell. Subsequently, H2O2 disappeared from the mesophyll and accumulated around attacked epidermal cells. In AlgR, transient glutathione oxidation coincided with H2O2 accumulation in the mesophyll. Subsequently, total foliar glutathione and catalase activities transiently increased in AlgR. These changes, absent from AlgS, preceded inoculation-dependent increases in peroxidase activity that were observed in both AlgR and AlgS at 18 h. An early intercellular signal precedes H2O2, and this elicits anti-oxidant responses in leaves prior to events leading to death of attacked cells. PMID:10938348

  13. A genome-wide association study of the maize hypersensitive defense response identifies genes that cluster in related pathways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controling the plant hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mappe...

  14. Assessing the potential to induce respiratory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Holsapple, Michael P; Jones, David; Kawabata, Thomas T; Kimber, Ian; Sarlo, Kathy; Selgrade, MaryJane K; Shah, Jui; Woolhiser, Michael R

    2006-05-01

    Acute and repeat dose inhalation studies have been an important part of the safety assessment of drugs, chemicals, and other products throughout the world for many years. It is known that damage to the respiratory tract can be triggered either by nonspecific irritation or by specific immune-mediated pathogenesis, and it is acknowledged that traditional inhalation studies are not designed to address fully the impact of the latter. It is also recognized that different types of immune-mediated responses can be triggered by different classes of compounds and that some immune reactions in the lung are life threatening. As such, it is important to understand as fully as possible the basis for the immune-mediated damage to the lung in order to characterize adequately the risks of individual chemicals or proteins. It is against this background that a review of the methods used to assess the potential for immune-mediated respiratory hypersensitivity was conducted. The primary objectives of this review are to discuss appropriate methods for identifying and characterizing respiratory hypersensitivity hazards and risks; and to identify key data gaps and related research needs with respect to respiratory hypersensitivity testing. The following working definition of respiratory hypersensitivity was formulated: a hypersensitivity response in the respiratory tract precipitated by a specific immune response, mediated by multiple mechanisms, including IgE antibody. Because of the importance played by various classes of compounds, the subsequent sections of this review will consider protein-specific, chemical-specific, and drug-specific aspects of respiratory hypersensitivity.

  15. [Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin].

    PubMed

    Becerril-Ángeles, Martín; Moctezuma-Trejo, Cristina; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin are infrequent, yet of clinical importance. The mechanisms of hypersensitivity involved can be of three types: I, III and IV. To describe the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity to insulin, its clinical features and diagnostic and therapeutic approach, that help identify the cases of allergy to insulin and begin a treatment, or if necessary, to refer patients to a specialists or appropriate medical attention. An electronic search of papers related to insulin hypersensitivity was performed in PubMed and the articles selected were those considered the most relevant for this review. Thirty eight papers about pathophysiology, mechanisms of injury and the different types of insulin involved in hypersensitivity reactions were included. Likewise, information for the diagnosis of insulin hypersensitivity and some options of treatment for first contact physicians or the referral of patients to specialists in endocrinology and allergy were included. Insulin hypersensitivity has a low prevalence and diverse clinical manifestations. The different types of insulin suitable allow the majority of cases of hypersensitivity to continue the treatment in a efficient and flexible manner.

  16. Treating dentin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Wataha, John C.; Zhou, Lingmei; Manning, Walter; Trantow, Michael; Bettendorf, Meishan M.; Heaton, Lisa J.; Berg, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Background Methods used by dental practitioners to diagnose and treat dentin hypersensitivity are not well documented. The authors conducted a survey of dentists in the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) to ascertain the treatment methods they used. Methods Via an Internet survey, the authors collected data regarding methods used for diagnosis and treatment of dentin hypersensitivity from 209 Northwest PRECEDENT dentists. Results The PRECEDENT dentists indicated that they most often used fluoride varnishes and gels, advice regarding toothbrushing and diet, bonding agents, restorative materials and glutaraldehyde/2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) to treat dentin hypersensitivity. They reported that the most successful treatments were fluorides, glutaraldehyde/HEMA, bonding agents, potassium nitrates and restorative treatments; they considered observation, advice regarding toothbrushing and diet and laser therapy to be the least successful. Dentists listed fluorides, calcium phosphates, glutaraldehyde/HEMA and bonding agents as the treatments most desirable for inclusion in a future randomized clinical trial of dental hypersensitivity treatments. Conclusions Dentists rely on patients to assess the severity of dentin hypersensitivity. Modalities for the diagnosis and treatment of hypersensitivity are diverse. Methods used to diagnose and treat dentin hypersensitivity in practice are challenging to justify. Clinical Implications Practitioners should be aware of the diversity of methods available for diagnosing and treating dentin hypersensitivity as they manage the care of their patients with this condition. PMID:20807910

  17. Hypersensitivity to laminaria: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Tania; Figueroa, Melissa M; Chen, Katherine T; Lunde, Britt; Jacobs, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of laminaria hypersensitivity treated with diphenhydramine and corticosteroids. A literature review identified 10 previously reported cases, with 8 recognized as anaphylaxis, and good outcomes with corticosteroids and antihistamines despite limited epinephrine utilization. Laminaria hypersensitivity is likely IgE mediated with an increased anaphylaxis risk with prior exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Hypersensitivity of skin fibroblasts from basal cell nevus syndrome patients to killing by ultraviolet B but not by ultraviolet C radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Goldberg, L.H.; Ley, R.D.; Ananthaswamy, H.N. )

    1990-02-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder in which the afflicted individuals are extremely susceptible to sunlight-induced skin cancers, particularly basal cell carcinomas. However, the cellular and molecular basis for BCNS is unknown. To ascertain whether there is any relationship between genetic predisposition to skin cancer and increased sensitivity of somatic cells from BCNS patients to killing by UV radiation, we exposed skin fibroblasts established from unexposed skin biopsies of several BCNS and age- and sex-matched normal individuals to either UV-B (280-320 nm) or UV-C (254 nm) radiation and determined their survival. The results indicated that skin fibroblasts from BCNS patients were hypersensitive to killing by UV-B but not UV-C radiation as compared to skin fibroblasts from normal individuals. DNA repair studies indicated that the increased sensitivity of BCNS skin fibroblasts to killing by UV-B radiation was not due to a defect in the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that there is an association between hypersensitivity of somatic cells to killing by UV-B radiation and the genetic predisposition to skin cancer in BCNS patients. In addition, these results suggest that DNA lesions (and repair processes) other than the pyrimidine dimer are also involved in the pathogenesis of sunlight-induced skin cancers in BCNS patients. More important, the UV-B sensitivity assay described here may be used as a diagnostic tool to identify presymptomatic individuals with BCNS.

  20. Induction of suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus by epidermal cells exposed to UV-irradiated urocanic acid in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.P. )

    1987-01-01

    Urocanic acid (UCA), the putative photoreceptor for ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced suppression, undergoes a UV-dependent trans to cis isomerisation. Epidermal cells from mice painted with UCA, containing a known proportion of the cis-isomer, generate suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) when transferred to naive syngeneic recipients at the same time and site as infection with HSV-1. One T suppressor cell subset, of phenotype (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-), is induced by the cis-UCA modified epidermal cell transfer. Flow cytometric analysis of the epidermal cells from skin treated with UV or cis-UCA indicates an overall reduction from normal in the number of cells expressing MHC Class II antigens, but no alteration in the number expressing I-J antigens.

  1. Hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in cultured cells from patients with Usher's syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, J H; Scudiero, D A; Otsuka, F; Tarone, R E; Brumback, R A; Wirtschafter, J D; Polinsky, R J; Barrett, S F; Moshell, A N; Scarpinato, R G

    1984-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid lines from nine Usher's syndrome (recessively inherited retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural deafness) patients (representing eight kindreds) and from ten Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients (representing seven kindreds) showed a small but statistically significant hypersensitivity to the lethal effects of X-rays, as measured by the cellular ability to exclude the vital dye trypan blue, when compared with lines from 26 normal control subjects. Fibroblast lines from the Usher's syndrome patients, treated with X-rays or the radiomimetic, DNA-damaging chemical N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, also showed a statistically significant hypersensitivity when compared to normal fibroblast lines. These findings are consistent with the possibility that defective DNA repair mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of these degenerative diseases. PMID:6726265

  2. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  3. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-07-08

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee.

  4. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  5. Epstein-Barr virus-associated extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma following mosquito bites in an elderly patient without prior hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Naoto; Kanamori, Heiwa; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Fujisawa, Shin; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2004-10-01

    We describe a 73-year-old woman who developed fever and inflammation with ulceration at the site of mosquito bites in the lower thigh. Soon she developed disseminated skin lesions characterized by redness, induration, and local heat. Some lesions showed necrosis and ulceration, including those located in the nasal cavity. She had no history of hypersensitivity to mosquito bites, and the serum IgE concentration was within the reference range. A skin biopsy specimen from the lower thigh adjoining the mosquito bites was diagnosed pathologically as showing extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type. Southern analysis of the biopsy specimen showed an oligoclonal band representing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA. Bone marrow examination revealed infiltration by lymphoma cells and marked hemophagocytosis. The patient underwent three cycles of chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, ifosfamide, and dexamethasone (DeVIC), but died of lymphoma progression during treatment. We speculate that, rather than an allergic reaction, this late-life occurrence of hypersensitivity to mosquito bites might represent lymphoproliferative disease induced by a direct action of mosquito salivary gland secretions on EBV- infected NK cells.

  6. Tetracycline hypersensitivity of an ezrA mutant links GalE and TseB (YpmB) to cell division.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Pamela; Rietkötter, Eva; Daniel, Richard A; Hamoen, Leendert W

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is initiated by the polymerization of FtsZ into a ring-like structure at midcell that functions as a scaffold for the other cell division proteins. In Bacillus subtilis, the conserved cell division protein EzrA is involved in modulation of Z-ring formation and coordination of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that an ezrA mutant is hypersensitive to tetracycline, even when the tetracycline efflux pump TetA is present. This effect is not related to the protein translation inhibiting activity of tetracycline. Overexpression of FtsL suppresses this phenotype, which appears to be related to the intrinsic low FtsL levels in an ezrA mutant background. A transposon screen indicated that the tetracycline effect can also be suppressed by overproduction of the cell division protein ZapA. In addition, tetracycline sensitivity could be suppressed by transposon insertions in galE and the unknown gene ypmB, which was renamed tseB (tetracycline sensitivity suppressor of ezrA). GalE is an epimerase using UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as substrate. Deletion of this protein bypasses the synthetic lethality of zapA ezrA and sepF ezrA double mutations, indicating that GalE influences cell division. The transmembrane protein TseB contains an extracytoplasmic peptidase domain, and a GFP fusion shows that the protein is enriched at cell division sites. A tseB deletion causes a shorter cell phenotype, indicating that TseB plays a role in cell division. Why a deletion of ezrA renders B. subtilis cells hypersensitive for tetracycline remains unclear. We speculate that this phenomenon is related to the tendency of tetracycline analogs to accumulate into the lipid bilayer, which may destabilize certain membrane proteins.

  7. Tetracycline hypersensitivity of an ezrA mutant links GalE and TseB (YpmB) to cell division

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Pamela; Rietkötter, Eva; Daniel, Richard A.; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is initiated by the polymerization of FtsZ into a ring-like structure at midcell that functions as a scaffold for the other cell division proteins. In Bacillus subtilis, the conserved cell division protein EzrA is involved in modulation of Z-ring formation and coordination of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that an ezrA mutant is hypersensitive to tetracycline, even when the tetracycline efflux pump TetA is present. This effect is not related to the protein translation inhibiting activity of tetracycline. Overexpression of FtsL suppresses this phenotype, which appears to be related to the intrinsic low FtsL levels in an ezrA mutant background. A transposon screen indicated that the tetracycline effect can also be suppressed by overproduction of the cell division protein ZapA. In addition, tetracycline sensitivity could be suppressed by transposon insertions in galE and the unknown gene ypmB, which was renamed tseB (tetracycline sensitivity suppressor of ezrA). GalE is an epimerase using UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as substrate. Deletion of this protein bypasses the synthetic lethality of zapA ezrA and sepF ezrA double mutations, indicating that GalE influences cell division. The transmembrane protein TseB contains an extracytoplasmic peptidase domain, and a GFP fusion shows that the protein is enriched at cell division sites. A tseB deletion causes a shorter cell phenotype, indicating that TseB plays a role in cell division. Why a deletion of ezrA renders B. subtilis cells hypersensitive for tetracycline remains unclear. We speculate that this phenomenon is related to the tendency of tetracycline analogs to accumulate into the lipid bilayer, which may destabilize certain membrane proteins. PMID:25954268

  8. Optimistic Expectancies and Cell-Mediated Immunity: The Role of Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimistic expectancies affect many psychosocial outcomes and may also predict immune system changes and health, but the nature and mechanisms of any such physiological effects have not been identified. The present study related law-school expectancies to cell-mediated immunity (CMI), examining the within- and between-person components of this relationship and affective mediators. First-year law students (N = 124) completed questionnaire measures of expectancies and affect and received delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests at five time points. A positive relationship between optimistic expectancies and CMI occurred, in which that changes in optimism correlated with changes in CMI. Likewise, changes in optimism predicted changes in positive and, to a lesser degree, negative affect, but the relationship between optimism and immunity was partially accounted for only by positive affect. This dynamic relationship between expectancies and immunity has positive implications for psychological interventions to improve health, particularly those that increase positive affect. PMID:20424083

  9. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-09-13

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions.

  10. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions. PMID:27619816

  11. Hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Fields, C L; Robinson, J W; Roy, T M; Ossorio, M A; Byrd, R P

    1998-05-01

    Adverse drug reactions can vary from a simple rash to anaphylactic shock. While certain medications including the penicillins are well known to cause such reactions, other drugs are not as commonly recognized. Azathioprine hypersensitivity reactions tend to be benign and self-limiting with cessation of drug ingestion. We report a patient who had a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine, which manifested as distributive shock that mimicked sepsis. We also reviewed the English language literature for risk factors for a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine and its possible mechanism.

  12. Esophageal hypersensitivity in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-09-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is an often-encountered clinical problem. Although many patients suffer from persistent or recurrent chest pain, treatment remains a challenge owing to its various possible etiologies. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of NCCP. In GERD-related NCCP, proton pump inhibitor treatment appears to be effective. However, the pathophysiology remains to be fully elucidated in NCCP patients without GERD. Treatment for non-GERD-related NCCP has been aimed at esophageal motility disorders and visceral hypersensitivity. As there is growing evidence that esophageal visceral hypersensitivity plays a role in NCCP, pain modulators have become the mainstay of therapy in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP. However, there is an unmet need for the treatment of esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP due to modest evidence for the benefit of pain modulators, including antidepressants, in non-GERD-related NCCP. Recent studies have demonstrated that esophageal mast cell infiltration and impaired mucosal integrity are related to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with NCCP. Thus, esophageal mast cell stabilization and restoration of esophageal mucosal integrity could be considered potential therapeutic targets in selected NCCP patients with hypersensitivity. However, further observations are necessary to shed light on esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP.

  13. Development of a Hypersensitive Periodate-Cleavable Amino Acid that is Methionine- and Disulfide-Compatible and its Application in MHC Exchange Reagents for T Cell Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Amore, Alessia; Wals, Kim; Koekoek, Evelyn; Hoppes, Rieuwert; Toebes, Mireille; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib

    2013-01-01

    Incorporation of cleavable linkers into peptides and proteins is of particular value in the study of biological processes. Here we describe the synthesis of a cleavable linker that is hypersensitive to oxidative cleavage as the result of the periodate reactivity of a vicinal amino alcohol moiety. Two strategies directed towards the synthesis of a building block suitable for solid-phase peptide synthesis were developed: a chemoenzymatic route, involving l-threonine aldolase, and an enantioselective chemical route; these led to α,γ-diamino-β-hydroxybutanoic acids in diastereoisomerically mixed and enantiopure forms, respectively. Incorporation of the 1,2-amino alcohol linker into the backbone of a peptide generated a conditional peptide that was rapidly cleaved at very low concentrations of sodium periodate. This cleavable peptide ligand was applied in the generation of MHC exchange reagents for the detection of antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood cells. The extremely low concentration of periodate required to trigger MHC peptide exchange allowed the co-oxidation of methionine and disulfide residues to be avoided. Conditional MHC reagents hypersensitive to periodate can now be applied without limitations when UV irradiation is undesired or less practical. PMID:23280887

  14. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of substances. The most common causes are food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are more commonly implicated in intraoral hypersensitivity ...

  15. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. X-ray induction of persistent hypersensitivity to mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, J.P.; Williams, J.R.

    1982-04-16

    The progeny of x-irradiated V79 cells are hypersensitive to PUVA-(8-methoxypsoralen plus longwave ultraviolet light) induced mutation at the locus for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This hypersensitivity is most evident at low doses of pUVA that do not induce mutation in non-x-irradiated cells. The hypersensitivity is evoked by x-irradiation delivered as a single dose or as multiple fractions over a long period and persists for at least 108 days of exponential growth. This radiation-induced hypersensitivity to subsequent mutation is a new phenomenon that may be relevant to multistage carcinogenesis.

  17. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bonnetblanc, J M

    1993-01-01

    Some types of hypersensitivity to drugs are defined either by the generic name of the drug or descriptive terms. They are sometimes assimilated to pseudolymphoma because the causative drugs are often the same, although the eruption lacks clinical and histopathological criteria of pseudolymphoma. It is then suggested to use 'idiosyncratic drug hypersensitivity syndrome' to define this type of drug reaction. As the skin and other organs may be involved, a generic name would help to determine a better definition and a surveillance program.

  18. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Proton Pump Inhibitors: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs.

  19. Clues for the differential diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis as an expectant variant of diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Kupeli, E; Karnak, D; Kayacan, O; Beder, S

    2004-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, also called extrinsic allergic alveolitis, a type of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), is an immunologically mediated pulmonary disease induced by inhalation of various antigens. As data on the frequency of hypersensitivity pneumonitis are lacking in Turkey, a retrospective analyses was performed in 43 patients with DPLD, followed up over seven years. The objective was to discover cases fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for hypersensitivity pneumonitis, to determine the frequency and/or the new characteristics of the disease, and to pick up clues for differentiating it from other DPLDs. The four subjects with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (9%) who lived in an urban area were studied in detail. The most common symptoms were dry cough and dyspnoea. According to the symptom duration, clinical features, radiological and pathological findings, three were diagnosed with chronic and one with subacute hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis and those with DPLD were compared by means of age, sex, smoking status, symptom duration, haematology, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, peripheral cell count, spirometric parameters, blood gases, and diffusion capacity. No statistically significant difference was detected in these parameters except for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). In conclusion, patients with a history of antigen exposure, with mild symptoms such as dry cough and dyspnoea, and who have diffuse interstitial lung involvement on radiology should be carefully evaluated for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Moreover, among other DPLDs, stable FEV1 or FVC values may be the clues for establishing the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. However, further studies are needed in larger series of patients. PMID:15192166

  20. P2X3 Receptors Mediate Visceral Hypersensitivity during Acute Chemically-Induced Colitis and in the Post-Inflammatory Phase via Different Mechanisms of Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, Annemie; van der Linden, Laura; de Wit, Anouk; Ceuleers, Hannah; Buckinx, Roeland; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Moreels, Tom G.; Pelckmans, Paul A.; De Man, Joris G.; De Winter, Benedicte Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Experiments using P2X3 knock-out mice or more general P2X receptor antagonists suggest that P2X3 receptors contribute to visceral hypersensitivity. We aimed to investigate the effect of the selective P2X3 antagonist A-317491 on visceral sensitivity under physiological conditions, during acute colitis and in the post-inflammatory phase of colitis. Methods Trinitrobenzene sulphonic-acid colitis was monitored by colonoscopy: on day 3 to confirm the presence of colitis and then every 4 days, starting from day 10, to monitor convalescence and determine the exact timepoint of endoscopic healing in each rat. Visceral sensitivity was assessed by quantifying visceromotor responses to colorectal distension in controls, rats with acute colitis and post-colitis rats. A-317491 was administered 30 min prior to visceral sensitivity testing. Expression of P2X3 receptors (RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry) and the intracellular signalling molecules cdk5, csk and CASK (RT-PCR) were quantified in colonic tissue and dorsal root ganglia. ATP release in response to colorectal distension was measured by luminiscence. Results Rats with acute TNBS-colitis displayed significant visceral hypersensitivity that was dose-dependently, but not fully, reversed by A-317491. Hypersenstivity was accompanied by an increased colonic release of ATP. Post-colitis rats also displayed visceral hypersensitivity that was dose-dependently reduced and fully normalized by A-317491 without increased release of ATP. A-317491 did not modify visceral sensitivity in controls. P2X3 mRNA and protein expression in the colon and dorsal root ganglia were similar in control, acute colitis and post-colitis groups, while colonic mRNA expression of cdk5, csk and CASK was increased in the post-colitis group only. Conclusions These findings indicate that P2X3 receptors are not involved in sensory signaling under physiological conditions whereas they modulate visceral hypersensitivity during acute TNBS-colitis and even

  1. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  2. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  3. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  4. [HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity reaction].

    PubMed

    Servonnet, A; Leclercq, E; Delacour, H; Ceppa, F

    2010-12-01

    A potentially life-threatening hypersensitive reaction occurs in association with initiation of HIV nucleoside analogue abacavir therapy in 4 to 8% of patients. Preliminary studies appear to confirm the role of the immune system in abacavir hypersensitivity. The reaction is possibly the result of presentation of drug peptides onto HLA, that may induce a pathogenic T-cell response. Hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir is strongly associated with the presence of the HLA-B*5701 allele and prospective HLA-B*5701 genetic screening has now been instituted in clinical practice to reduce the risk of hypersensitivity reaction. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of IgE-Mediated Food Allergy by IL-9 Producing Mucosal Mast Cells and Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-Boong

    2016-08-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence and number of life-threatening cases, food allergy has emerged as a major health concern. The classic immune response seen during food allergy is allergen-specific IgE sensitization and hypersensitivity reactions to foods occur in the effector phase with often severe and deleterious outcomes. Recent research has advanced understanding of the immunological mechanisms occurring during the effector phase of allergic reactions to ingested food. Therefore, this review will not only cover the mucosal immune system of the gastrointestinal tract and the immunological mechanisms underlying IgE-mediated food allergy, but will also introduce cells recently identified to have a role in the hypersensitivity reaction to food allergens. These include IL-9 producing mucosal mast cells (MMC9s) and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). The involvement of these cell types in potentiating the type 2 immune response and developing the anaphylactic response to food allergens will be discussed. In addition, it has become apparent that there is a collaboration between these cells that contributes to an individual's susceptibility to IgE-mediated food allergy.

  6. Retroviral transfer of a human beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene linked to beta locus control region hypersensitive site 2 aimed at the gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, K J; Oh, Y H; Westerman, K W; London, I M; Leboulch, P

    1995-01-01

    Human gamma-globin and delta-globin chains have been previously identified as strong inhibitors of the polymerization of hemoglobin S, in contrast to the beta-globin chain, which exerts only a moderate antisickling effect. However, gamma-globin and delta-globin are normally expressed at very low levels in adult erythroid cells, in contrast to beta-globin. We report the design of a beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene, beta/delta-sickle cell inhibitor 1 (beta/delta-SCI1) and its transduction by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. The beta/delta-SCI1-encoding gene retains the overall structure of the human beta-globin gene, while incorporating specific amino acid residues from the delta chain previously found responsible for its enhanced antisickling properties. To achieve high expression levels of beta/delta-SCI1 in adult erythrocytes, the hybrid gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the human beta-globin promoter and the DNase I hypersensitive site 2 of the human beta locus control region. High-titer retroviruses were generated, and stable proviral transmission was achieved in infected cells. The mRNA expression levels of the beta/delta-SCI1 gene in infected, dimethyl sulfoxide-induced murine erythroleukemia cells approached 85% of the endogenous murine beta maj-globin mRNA, on a per gene basis, evidence that high gene expression levels were achieved in adult erythroid cells. Further evaluation of this strategy in transgenic animal models of sickle cell disease should assess its efficacy for the gene therapy of human patients. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708766

  7. VZV T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Levin, Myron J

    2010-01-01

    Primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection (varicella) induces VZV-specific antibody and VZV-specific T cell-mediated immunity. T cell-mediated immunity, which is detected within 1-2 weeks after appearance of rash, and consists of both CD4 and CD8 effector and memory T cells, is essential for recovery from varicella. Administration of a varicella vaccine also generates VZV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The memory cell responses that develop during varicella or after vaccination contribute to protection following re-exposure to VZV. These responses are subsequently boosted either by endogenous re-exposure (silent reactivation of latent virus) or exogenous re-exposure (environmental). VZV-specific T cell-mediated immunity is also necessary to maintain latent VZV in a subclinical state in sensory ganglia. When these responses decline, as occurs with aging or iatrogenic immune suppression, reactivation of VZV leads to herpes zoster. Similarly, the magnitude of these responses early after the onset of herpes zoster correlates with the extent of zoster-associated pain. These essential immune responses are boosted by the VZV vaccine developed to prevent herpes zoster.

  8. Role of Delayed Hypersensitivity in Blastomycosis of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Harry D.; Cozad, George C.

    1973-01-01

    C57BL/6J mice rendered hypersensitive to Blastomyces dermatitidis were protected from the lethal effects of a blastomyces infection. This protection was observed following a lethal intraperitoneal challenge with viable cells 15 days after subcutaneous inoculation with 3.9 × 104 viable cells. Delayed hypersensitivity was induced in C57 mice by two injections of Merthiolate-killed cells in adjuvant or by a single injection of viable cells. Development of hypersensitivity was determined at appropriate intervals by footpad injection with killed yeast cells. PMID:4713689

  9. Influence of Blockade of beta-Adrenoreceptors and Acute Stress on Antibody Formation, Delayed Type of Hypersensitivity, Phagocytic Cell Activity in Local Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Shilov, Juri I.; Gein, Sergei V.; Chereshnev, Valery A.

    2001-10-01

    In the experiments on male Wistar rats a study was made on the effect of acute 6-h immobilization stress on antibody formation, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), functional activity of phagocytes in the case of a local form of immune response to sheep red blood cells at the background of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. It was established that immobilization stress resulted in substantial inhibition of the expressibility of immune inflammation in the case of DTH, cancellation of an increase of the phagocytic activity of macrophages of the regional lymph node and the level of antibodies. The blockade of the beta-adrenergic receptors with propranolol antagonized with these effects of stress. After termination of the immobilization, activation of neutrophil phagocytosis was detected, this being related to an increase of neutrophil immigration from the bone marrow. Eosinophilic phagocytosis at the early period of stress was inhibited, the blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors canceled this effect.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effect of 1-methylnicotinamide in contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone in mice; involvement of prostacyclin.

    PubMed

    Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Biedron, Rafal; Jakubowski, Andrzej; Chlopicki, Stefan; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2008-01-14

    1-methylnicotinamide (MNA) displays anti-inflammatory effects in patients with contact dermatitis, though the mechanisms involved remain unknown. Herein, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of MNA and its parent molecule, nicotinamide, in the contact hypersensitivity reaction to oxazolone in CBA/J inbred mice. Feeding mice with MNA or nicotinamide (100 mg/kg, 10 days) resulted in the inhibition of the development of contact hypersensitivity reaction by 37% and 35%, respectively, as assessed by the magnitude of ear swelling. This effect was not associated with changes in the expression of adhesion molecules (CD49d(+) and CD54(+)) on CD4(+) and CD8(+) oxazolone-specific T lymphocytes, the major cell component of an inflammatory infiltrate in contact hypersensitivity reaction. Furthermore, in the adoptive transfer model of contact hypersensitivity reaction, pretreatment of mice (recipients of oxazolone-specific T cells), with MNA, resulted in a remarkable anti-inflammatory effect (inhibition of contact hypersensitivity reaction by 66%). Interestingly, in the presence of prostanoid IP receptor antagonist R-3-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-2-[5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-benzofuran-2-ylmethoxycarbonylamino]-propionic acid (RO-3244794) (10 mg/kg) the MNA was inactive. In summary, pretreatment with MNA profoundly attenuated contact hypersensitivity reaction in vivo. In particular, the vessel dependent phase of contact hypersensitivity reaction was affected, in spite of the fact that MNA did not alter the expression of adhesive molecules on oxazolone-specific T lymphocytes. However, the anti-inflammatory action of MNA was completely reversed by the antagonist of prostanoid IP receptor. Accordingly, our results demonstrate for the first time that anti-inflammatory properties of MNA are linked to endothelial, PGI(2)-mediated mechanisms.

  11. Clinical value of radiocontrast media skin tests as a prescreening and diagnostic tool in hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Yeong; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kim, Min-Hye; Yang, Min-Suk; Song, Woo-Jung; Choi, Sang-Il; Kim, Jae-Hyoung; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-04-01

    Some radiocontrast media (RCM) hypersensitivity reactions may have underlying IgE- or T-cell-mediated mechanisms. RCM skin testing may be useful for predicting future reactions. To investigate the clinical value of RCM skin testing before computed tomography and after RCM hypersensitivity reactions. Patients who underwent RCM skin testing were a prospective sample of convenience at a single medical center and were tested just before their pending nonionic RCM-enhanced computed tomogram. In addition, skin test data of patients who were referred to the allergy clinic because of their previous RCM hypersensitivity reactions were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 1048 patients enrolled in the study prospectively. Of these, 672 (64.1%) had never been exposed to RCM. Of the 376 previously exposed to RCM, 61 (16.2%) had a history of at least one mild RCM-associated reaction, 56 (91.8%) had immediate reactions, and 5 had no-immediate reactions. There was only 1 positive immediate hypersensitivity RCM skin test result (0.09%). There were 51 mild immediate reactions (4.9%), 1 moderate immediate reaction (0.09%), 8 mild nonimmediate reactions (0.76%), and 1 moderate nonimmediate reaction (0.09%). There was only 1 positive delayed hypersensitivity skin test result (0.09%), retrospectively determined, in 1 (11.1%) of the nonimmediate RCM-associated reactions. Sensitivity of RCM skin testing was significantly higher with severe immediate reactions (57.1%) than mild reactions (12.9%) and moderate reactions (25.0%) in the retrospective review of diagnostic skin test data (P = .03). RCM skin testing for screening is of no clinical utility in predicting hypersensitivity reactions. RCM skin testing may have modest utility in retrospectively evaluating severe adverse reactions. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective effect of rutin on humoral and cell mediated immunity in rat model.

    PubMed

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Saluja, Ajay K

    2017-08-01

    Diet and dietary intake can persuade the development, safeguard and proper functioning of immune system. Ruin, an important bioflavonoid, is abundantly found in various foodstuffs. Rutin has been acknowledged for its protective and beneficial effects on various aspects of the biological system. The present study was aimed to examine the effect of rutin on the regulation of the immune response in experimental animal models. Effect of rutin of cellular immunity was determined by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, carbon clearance assay, leucocyte mobilization test, and cyclophosphamide-induced myelosuppression, whereas humoral immunity was analyzed by the haemagglutinating antibody (HA) titre assay. Rutin (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) evoked a significant increase in antibody titre in the haemagglutination test, increased immunoglobulin levels, and enhanced the delayed type hypersensitivity reaction induced by sheep red blood cells. It also significantly restored the functioning of leucocytes in cyclophosphamide treated rats and augmented phagocytic index in the carbon clearance assay. The outcomes from the present study indicate that rutin possesses sufficient potential for increasing immune activity by cellular and humoral mediated mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Reaginic hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, D. P.; Truelove, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Reaginic hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis has been investigated in respect of a hypersensitivity to the cow's milk proteins and the frequency of atopic asthma, hay fever, and eczema. Intradermal tests were frequently positive, especially to casein, but the results did not differ from those found in healthy individuals and in groups of patients with Crohn's disease, hypolactasia, and the irritable colon syndrome. No circulating IgE-specific antibodies to the milk proteins were found. An increased frequency of atopic diseases was found in patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (15·7%) and Crohn's disease (13·3%) compared with the findings in a control group (1·2%). It is concluded that, if an allergy to milk proteins is a factor in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis, it is not mediated by reaginic antibodies. It is possible, however, that the frequent occurrence of atopy indicates a susceptibility to develop reaginic responses even though this mechanism does not apply to the milk proteins. PMID:4646293

  14. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug). We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug) interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. Case presentation We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die) that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. Conclusions The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration) and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse. PMID:20205923

  15. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Ivan; Talamo, Maria; Borgia, Guglielmo

    2010-03-06

    Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug). We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug) interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die) that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration) and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse.

  16. Hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Tahia D.; Ariza, Adriana; Palomares, Francisca; Montañez, María I.; Salas, María; Martín-Serrano, Angela; Fernández, Rubén; Ruiz, Arturo; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are generally well-tolerated antibiotics, increasing numbers of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. These can be evaluated in vitro by basophil activation tests (BATs); however, sensitivity is not optimal. Many factors could influence sensitivity such as basophil activation markers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different activations markers, CD63 and CD203c, on the sensitivity of BAT to FQ. We studied 17 patients with immediate allergic reactions to FQ. BAT was performed with moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin using CD193 (CCR3) for basophil selection and CD203c or CD63 as activation markers. Stimulation with ciprofloxacin induced a significantly higher expression of CD63 in ciprofloxacin-allergic patients compared to moxifloxacin-allergic patients (P = 0.002). In patients allergic to moxifloxacin with anaphylactic shock, we have observed an increase in the percentage of cells that upregulate CD203c, whereas patients with anaphylaxis preferentially upregulate CD63. The best sensitivity–specificity was obtained using a cutoff of 3 and the culprit FQ, using CD203c for moxifloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 36.4%; specificity = 94.4%), and CD63 for ciprofloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 83.3%; specificity = 88.9%). A negative correlation was found between the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c and the time interval between the reaction occurrence and the performance of the test (Spearman r = −0.446; P < 0.001 for CD63 and Spearman r = −0.386; P < 0.001 for CD203c). The performance of BAT for FQ allergy must be optimized for each drug, taking into account possible differences in the stimulation mechanism that leads to the upregulation of different activation markers. PMID:27281069

  17. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  18. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  19. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  20. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  1. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  2. Multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca M; Demoly, Pascal

    2013-08-01

    The multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome (MDH) is a distinct clinical entity, different from cross-reactivity and flare-up reactions. Following its initial description in 1989 by Sullivan et al., several authors have addressed the issues surrounding this peculiar form of drug hypersensitivity. Whether this syndrome is single or can be further classified in several entities is still a matter of debate. Case reports, case series or studies involving large populations on MDH are few. The use of this term in the literature is heterogeneous, and the definitions variable. Given the major advances in the study of drug hypersensitivities in general, and ongoing research regarding severe cutaneous adverse reactions in particular, careful study of the subgroup of patients with demonstrated immunological basis of MDH has enabled the generation of possible pathogenetic hypotheses. Together with the studies (despite their limitations) to estimate the prevalence of this syndrome in adult and paediatric patients these emerging data need confirmation through larger studies with well defined populations. Bringing together the experience of groups involved in the field of drug allergy should help to move knowledge regarding this peculiar form of drug hypersensitivity forward.

  3. T cell-mediated reactions to iodinated contrast media: evaluation by skin and lymphocyte activation tests.

    PubMed

    Kanny, Gisèle; Pichler, Werner; Morisset, Martine; Franck, Patricia; Marie, Béatrice; Kohler, Chantal; Renaudin, Jean-Marie; Beaudouin, Etienne; Laudy, Jean Sainte; Moneret-Vautrin, D Anne

    2005-01-01

    In addition to immediate reactions, late adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) were reported in 2% to 5% of patients exposed to ICM and, as a consequence, have recently gained more attention. A few well-documented case reports postulate a hypersensitivity mechanism. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a T cell-mediated mechanism to the ICM by using in vitro and ex vivo tests. We analyzed 12 patients with 13 adverse ICM reactions, 9 of whom were women. Clinical history suggested an immune reaction to ICM. Skin tests (skin prick, intradermal, and patch tests) were performed with various ICM and read after 15 minutes and 24 and 48 hours. Skin biopsy specimens of positive test sites of 11 patients were evaluated by means of immunohistology. T-cell reactivity to ICM in vitro was analyzed with lymphocyte activation tests. Seven patients showed generalized maculopapular eruptions, one of them with fever; 4 had a so-called drug hypersensitivity syndrome with exanthema, eosinophilia, and fever; 1 had maculopapular eruptions and fever; 1 had late-onset urticaria with loss of consciousness; and 1 had facial edema and respiratory distress. An immune reaction to ICM was inferred from positive skin prick test (2 patients), positive patch test (10 patients), and positive intradermal test (9 patients) at 24 and 48 hours. Skin biopsy specimens revealed a T-cell infiltrate in the dermis with predominantly CD4 + T cells in 8 patients, CD8 + T cells in 1 patient, and equal numbers in 1 patient. Cross-sensitivities to several ICM were observed (9/12). Other drug allergies were noted in 6 of the 12 patients. Delayed reactions to ICM are most likely caused by immune reactions to these drugs and can elicit different clinical features. The involvement of T cells is suggested by positive skin test, as well as positive proliferative responses, to the drugs in vitro . A high degree of cross-reactivity with other than the eliciting ICM was observed. Moreover, 50% of these

  4. Disordered expression of inhibitory receptors on the NK1-type natural killer (NK) leukaemic cells from patients with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites

    PubMed Central

    Seo, N; Tokura, Y; Ishihara, S; Takeoka, Y; Tagawa, S; Takigawa, M

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the existence of a distinct type of NK cell leukaemia of the juvenile type, which presents with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) as an essential clinical manifestation and is infected with clonal Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). This disorder is thus called HMB-EBV-NK disease and has been reported in Orientals, mostly from Japan. We investigated the profile of cytokine production and the expression of both types of NK inhibitory receptors, i.e. CD94 lectin-like dimers and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, in NK leukaemic cells from three patients with HMB-EBV-NK disease. It was found that freshly isolated NK leukaemic cells expressed mRNA for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and additionally produced IL-10 upon stimulation with IL-2, indicating that the NK cells were of NK1 type. More than 98% of NK cells from the patients bore CD94 at a higher level than did normal NK cells, whereas p70 or NKAT2, belonging to immunoglobulin-like receptor, was not expressed in those NK cells. Freshly isolated leukaemic NK cells transcribed mRNA for CD94-associated molecule NKG2C at an abnormally high level, and upon stimulation with IL-2 and/or IL-12 they expressed NKG2A as well. The disordered expression of these inhibitory receptors not only provides some insights into the pathogenesis of HMB-EBV-NK disease but also can be used as phenotypic markers for the diagnosis of this type of NK cell leukaemia. PMID:10844517

  5. The effect of CTLA-4Ig, a CD28/B7 antagonist, on the lung inflammation and T cell subset profile during murine hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Alvarez, Luis; Arreola, José Luis; Ramírez-Martínez, Gustavo; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Gaxiola, Miguel; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Avila-Moreno, Federico; Urrea, Francisco; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés; Zuñiga, Joaquín

    2011-12-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inflammatory lung disease characterized by an influx of activated T cells to the lung, in which the CD28/B7 costimulatory signals are essential for the T cell activation and the outcome of the inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of the CD28/B7 antagonist, CTLA-4Ig, on the lung inflammation and the T cell subset profile in experimental Saccharopolyspora recivirgula (SR)-induced HP. C57BL/6 mice were treated with SR or saline during two and three weeks and in addition of CTLA-4Ig was administrated after either the second or third week and mice were sacrificed seven days later. The extent of the lung inflammation was quantified by histopathology and the lung T cell subsets (Treg, Th17, γδT and NKT) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Mice treated with CTLA-4Ig showed a significant decrease in the extent of lung damage (p<0.05), and exhibited a decreased number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) with diminished CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Also, a significant increase in the percentage of lung γδT (p<0.01) and NKT (p<0.05) cells was observed in two weeks SR-treated mice with the administration of CTLA-4Ig/SR. At 3 weeks, SR-treated mice showed an increased percentage of regulatory T cells but no significantly differences were found in the percentage of Th17 cells when compared with CTLA-4Ig/SR-treated mice. Our findings suggest that the treatment with CTLA-4Ig affects the HP progression and the lung T cell subset kinetics in mice.

  6. Drosophila neurotactin mediates heterophilic cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Barthalay, Y; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R; de la Escalera, S; Jiménez, F; Piovant, M

    1990-01-01

    Neurotactin is a 135 kd membrane glycoprotein which consists of a core protein, with an apparent molecular weight of 120 kd, and of N-linked oligosaccharides. In vivo, the protein can be phosphorylated in presence of radioactive orthophosphate. Neurotactin expression in the larval CNS and in primary embryonic cell cultures suggests that it behaves as a contact molecule between neurons or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy studies reveal that neurotactin is uniformly expressed along the areas of contacts between cells, without, however, being restricted to a particular type of junction. It putative adhesive properties have been tested by transfecting non adhesive Drosophila S2 cells with neurotactin cDNA. Heat shocked transfected cells do not aggregate, suggesting that neurotactin does not mediate homophilic cell adhesion. However, these transfected cells bind to a subpopulation of embryonic cells which probably possess a related ligand. The location at cellular junctions between specific neurons or epithelial cells, the heterophilic binding to a putative ligand and the ability to be phosphorylated are consistent with the suggestion that neurotactin functions as an adhesion molecule. Images Fig.1 Fig.2 Fig.3 Fig.4 Fig.5 PMID:2120048

  7. MicroRNA-mediated somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-02-01

    Since the first report of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), much focus has been placed on iPSCs due to their great therapeutic potential for diseases such as abnormal development, degenerative disorders, and even cancers. Subsequently, Takahashi and Yamanaka took a novel approach by using four defined transcription factors to generate iPSCs in mice and human fibroblast cells. Scientists have since been trying to refine or develop better approaches to reprogramming, either by using different combinations of transcription factors or delivery methods. However, recent reports showed that the microRNA expression pattern plays a crucial role in somatic cell reprogramming and ectopic introduction of embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs revert cells back to an ESC-like state, although, the exact mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. This review describes recent work that has focused on microRNA-mediated approaches to somatic cell reprogramming as well as some of the pros and cons to these approaches and a possible mechanism of action. Based on the pivotal role of microRNAs in embryogenesis and somatic cell reprogramming, studies in this area must continue in order to gain a better understanding of the role of microRNAs in stem cells regulation and activity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nature of "memory" in T-cell-mediated antibacterial immunity: anamnestic production of mediator T cells.

    PubMed Central

    North, R J

    1975-01-01

    Mice that survived an immunizing infection with Listeria monocytogenes remained specifically resistant to lethal secondary infection for several months. This acquired, long-lived state of resistance was not dependent on activated macrophages that remained after the primary response. It depended, instead, on an acquired long-lived capacity on the part of immunized mice for generating mediator T cells faster and in larger numbers than normal mice. The number of mediator T cells generated in response to secondary infection was proportional to the level of infection. The results suggest that the accelerated production of mediator T cells that occurs in response to secondary infection represents the expression of a state of immunological T-cell memory. PMID:811558

  9. A novel regulatory mechanism of naringenin through inhibition of T lymphocyte function in contact hypersensitivity suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Feng; Tang, Yijun; Gao, Zhe; Xu, Qiang

    2010-06-25

    Naringenin, a flavonoid in grapefruits and citrus fruits, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated immune reaction, and the factors released from macrophages also contribute to this response. Previous studies showed that naringenin suppressed CHS by inhibiting activation and migration of macrophages. However, little is known about naringenin's effects on T lymphocytes. Our study indicated that naringenin potently suppressed picryl chloride (PCl)-induced contact hypersensitivity by inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes. In vitro, both of the activated hapten-specific T cells and the T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 showed growth arrest after naringenin treatment. Furthermore, naringenin reduced CD69 (the protein level) and cytokines such as IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} (the mRNA level) expressions which highly expressed by activated T cells. Meanwhile, naringenin also induced T cell apoptosis by upregulation of Bax, Bad, PARP, cleaved-caspase 3 and downregulation of phosphorylated Akt, Bcl-2. These findings suggest that, besides its anti-inflammatory activities in macrophages, naringenin also showed inhibitory effects on the activation and proliferation of T cells to alleviate symptoms of contact hypersensitivity.

  10. Expression of CD73 slows down migration of skin dendritic cells, affecting the sensitization phase of contact hypersensitivity reactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, A; Ring, S; Silva-Vilches, C; Schrader, J; Enk, A; Mahnke, K

    2017-09-01

    Application of haptens to the skin induces release of immune stimulatory ATP into the extracellular space. This "danger" signal can be converted to immunosuppressive adenosine (ADO) by the action of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73, expressed by skin and immune cells. Thus, the expression and regulation of CD73 by skin derived cells may have crucial influence on the outcome of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reactions. To investigate the role of CD73 expression during 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB) induced CHS reactions. Wild type (wt) and CD73 deficient mice were subjected to TNCB induced CHS. In the different mouse strains the resulting ear swelling reaction was recorded along with a detailed phenotypic analysis of the skin migrating subsets of dendritic cells (DC). In CD73 deficient animals the motility of DC was higher as compared to wt animals and in particular after sensitization we found increased migration of Langerin(+) DC from skin to draining lymph nodes (LN). In the TNCB model this led to a stronger sensitization as indicated by increased frequency of interferon-γ producing T cells in the LN and an increased ear thickness after challenge. CD73 derived ADO production slows down migration of Langerin(+) DC from skin to LN. This may be a crucial mechanism to avoid over boarding immune reactions against haptens. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act through FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burton, Oliver T; Logsdon, Stephanie L; Zhou, Joseph S; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Noval Rivas, Magali; Koleoglou, Kyle J; Chatila, Talal A; Schneider, Lynda C; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T; Oettgen, Hans C

    2014-12-01

    Food-induced anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some subjects with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. We sought to test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis and whether this occurs through the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient (IgE(-/-)) Il4raF709 mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMCs) exposed to allergen or to passively transfer allergy to naive hosts. In parallel experiments sera obtained from patients with peanut allergy before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay by using basophils from nonallergic donors. Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMCs for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE(-/-) mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG mediated and FcγRIIb dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act via FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Oliver T.; Logsdon, Stephanie L.; Zhou, Joseph S.; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Rivas, Magali Noval; Koleoglou, Kyle J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Schneider, Lynda C.; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T.; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Food anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some individuals with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. Objective To test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis, and whether this occurs via the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Methods Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMC) exposed to allergen, or to passively transfer allergy to naïve hosts. In parallel experiments, sera obtained from peanut allergic patients before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay using basophils from non-allergic donors. Results Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMC for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG-mediated and FcγRIIb-dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT, but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Conclusion Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. PMID:25042981

  13. Gamma-irradiated scrub typhus immunogens: development of cell-mediated immunity after vaccination of inbred mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jerrells, T R; Palmer, B A; Osterman, J V

    1983-01-01

    Mice immunized with three injections of gamma-irradiated Karp strain of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were evaluated for the presence of cell-mediated immunity by using delayed-type hypersensitivity, antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-induced lymphokine production. These animals also were evaluated for levels of circulating antibody after immunization as well as for the presence of rickettsemia after intraperitoneal challenge with viable Karp rickettsiae. After immunization with irradiated Karp rickettsiae, a demonstrable cell-mediated immunity was present as evidenced by delayed-type hypersensitivity responsiveness, lymphocyte proliferation, and production of migration inhibition factor and interferon by immune spleen lymphocytes. Also, a reduction in circulating rickettsiae was seen in mice immunized with irradiated rickettsiae after challenge with 1,000 50% mouse lethal doses of viable, homologous rickettsiae. All responses except antibody titer and reduction of rickettsemia were similar to the responses noted in mice immunized with viable organisms. Antibody levels were lower in mice immunized with irradiated rickettsiae than in mice immunized with viable rickettsiae. Furthermore, mice that were immunized with viable rickettsiae demonstrated markedly lower levels of rickettsemia after intraperitoneal challenge compared with either mice immunized with irradiated rickettsiae or nonimmunized mice. PMID:6185433

  14. Effect of unilateral testicular rupture on histopathology and germ cell delayed-type hypersensitivity in C3H/He and A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Naito, Munekazu; Sakamoto, Yasuki; Terayama, Hayato; Hirai, Shuichi; Ning, Qu; Aota, Yoichi; Itoh, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    Contralateral orchitis induced by unilateral testicular injury has been reported as sympathetic orchitis in men and experimental animals. In mice, experimental sympathetic orchitis (ESO) was first demonstrated in the C3H/He strain after experimental testicular trauma. Delayed-typed hypersensitivity (DTH) to testicular germ cells is induced by testicular trauma and treatment with cyclophosphamide before the trauma further enhances anti-testicular germ cell DTH. In the present study we investigated ESO induction with or without cyclophosphamide pretreatment in two murine strains, C3H/He and A/J mice, that are susceptible to testicular autoimmunity. The results show that traumatized testes undergo early degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium followed by neutrophilic inflammation and later fibrosis with little lymphocytic infiltration, in both murine strains. In the contralateral testes, ESO characterized by both lymphocytic inflammation and spermatogenic disturbance was induced in both strains. However, the incidence and severity of ESO in A/J mice tended to be higher than in C3H/He mice. In contrast, cyclophosphamide pretreatment significantly augmented both pathological stages of ESO and anti-testicular germ cell DTH in C3H/He mice, while those in A/J mice were fully developed by testicular rupture alone and were not further augmented by cyclophosphamide pretreatment. We conclude that A/J mice are more sensitive to trauma-induced testicular autoimmunity than C3H/He mice.

  15. A MYB transcription factor regulates very-long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis for activation of the hypersensitive cell death response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Vailleau, Fabienne; Léger, Amandine; Joubès, Jérôme; Miersch, Otto; Huard, Carine; Blée, Elisabeth; Mongrand, Sébastien; Domergue, Frédéric; Roby, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    Plant immune responses to pathogen attack include the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death occurring at invasion sites. We previously reported on Arabidopsis thaliana MYB30, a transcription factor that acts as a positive regulator of a cell death pathway conditioning the HR. Here, we show by microarray analyses of Arabidopsis plants misexpressing MYB30 that the genes encoding the four enzymes forming the acyl-coA elongase complex are putative MYB30 targets. The acyl-coA elongase complex synthesizes very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), and the accumulation of extracellular VLCFA-derived metabolites (leaf epidermal wax components) was affected in MYB30 knockout mutant and overexpressing lines. In the same lines, a lipid extraction procedure allowing high recovery of sphingolipids revealed changes in VLCFA contents that were amplified in response to inoculation. Finally, the exacerbated HR phenotype of MYB30-overexpressing lines was altered by the loss of function of the acyl-ACP thioesterase FATB, which causes severe defects in the supply of fatty acids for VLCFA biosynthesis. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which MYB30 modulates HR via VLCFAs by themselves, or VLCFA derivatives, as cell death messengers in plants.

  16. Inhibitory effects of Piper betle on production of allergic mediators by bone marrow-derived mast cells and lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wirotesangthong, Mali; Inagaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Thanakijcharoenpath, Witchuda; Nagai, Hiroichi

    2008-03-01

    The leaves of the Piper betle Linn. (Piperaceae) are used in traditional medicine and possess anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-diabetic and radioprotective activities. However, little is known about their anti-allergic activity. Therefore, the effects of P. betle ethanolic extract (PE) on the production of histamine and granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by murine bone marrow mast cells (BMMCs) and on the secretion of eotaxin and IL-8 by the human lung epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, were investigated in vitro. PE significantly decreased histamine and GM-CSF produced by an IgE-mediated hypersensitive reaction, and inhibited eotaxin and IL-8 secretion in a TNF-alpha and IL-4-induced allergic reaction. The results suggest that P. betle may offer a new therapeutic approach for the control of allergic diseases through inhibition of production of allergic mediators.

  17. Resolution of cell-mediated airways diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    "Inflammation resolution" has of late become a topical research area. Activation of resolution phase mechanisms, involving select post-transcriptional regulons, transcription factors, 'autacoids', and cell phenotypes, is now considered to resolve inflammatory diseases. Critical to this discourse on resolution is the elimination of inflammatory cells through apoptosis and phagocytosis. For major inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD we propose an alternative path to apoptosis for cell elimination. We argue that transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes, followed by mucociliary clearance, efficiently and non-injuriously eliminates pro-inflammatory cells from diseased airway tissues. First, it seems clear that numerous infiltrated granulocytes and lymphocytes can be speedily transmitted into the airway lumen without harming the epithelial barrier. Then there are a wide range of 'unexpected' findings demonstrating that clinical improvement of asthma and COPD is not only associated with decreasing numbers of airway wall inflammatory cells but also with increasing numbers of these cells in the airway lumen. Finally, effects of inhibition of transepithelial migration support the present hypothesis. Airway inflammatory processes have thus been much aggravated when transepithelial exit of leukocytes has been inhibited. In conclusion, the present hypothesis highlights risks involved in drug-induced inhibition of transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes. It helps interpretation of common airway lumen data, and suggests approaches to treat cell-mediated airway inflammation. PMID:20540713

  18. Dermal γδ T Cells Do Not Freely Re-Circulate Out of Skin and Produce IL-17 to Promote Neutrophil Infiltration during Primary Contact Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaodong; Park, Chang Ook; Geddes Sweeney, Jenna; Yoo, Min Jae; Gaide, Olivier; Kupper, Thomas Seth

    2017-01-01

    The role of mouse dermal γδ T cells in inflammatory skin disorders and host defense has been studied extensively. It is known that dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) have a monomorphic γδ T cell receptor (TCR) and reside in murine epidermis from birth. We asked if dermal γδ cells freely re-circulated out of skin, or behaved more like dermal resident memory T cells (TRM) in mice. We found that, unlike epidermal γδ T cells (DETC), dermal γδ cells are not homogeneous with regard to TCR, express the tissue resident T cell markers CD69 and CD103, bear skin homing receptors, and produce IL-17 and IL-22. We created GFP+: GFP− parabiotic mice and found that dermal γδ T cells re-circulate very slowly—more rapidly than authentic αβ TCR TRM, but more slowly than the recently described dermal αβ TCR T migratory memory cells (TMM). Mice lacking the TCR δ gene (δ-/-) had a significant reduction of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS). We created mice deficient in dermal γδ T cells but not DETC, and these mice also showed a markedly reduced CHS response after DNFB challenge. The infiltration of effector T cells during CHS was not reduced in dermal γδ T cell-deficient mice; however, infiltration of Gr-1+CD11b+ neutrophils, as well as ear swelling, was reduced significantly. We next depleted Gr-1+ neutrophils in vivo, and demonstrated that neutrophils are required for ear swelling, the accepted metric for a CHS response. Depletion of IL-17-producing dermal Vγ4+ cells and neutralization of IL-17 in vivo, respectively, also led to a significantly reduced CHS response and diminished neutrophil infiltration. Our findings here suggest that dermal γδ T cells have an intermediate phenotype of T cell residence, and play an important role in primary CHS through producing IL-17 to promote neutrophil infiltration. PMID:28081153

  19. Evaluation of innate, humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice following in vivo implantation of electrospun polycaprolactone.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Colleen E; Smith, Matthew J; Auttachoat, Wimolnut; Bowlin, Gary L; White, Kimber L

    2012-06-01

    Electrospun polycaprolactone (EPCL) is currently being investigated for use in tissue engineering applications such as vascular grafts. However, the effects of electrospun polymers on systemic immune responses following in vivo exposure have not previously been examined. The work presented evaluates whether EPCL in either a microfibrous or nanofibrous form affects innate, humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity using a standard immunotoxicological testing battery. Holistic in vivo endpoints examined include the antibody-forming cell assay (AFC or plaque assay) and the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to Candida albicans. In addition, natural killer cell cytotoxic activity was assessed using an ex vivo assay and splenic cell population phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry for material exposure-related changes. Results indicated that 28 day subcutaneous implantation of EPCL, either in microfibrous or nanofibrous form, did not affect the systemic functions of the immune system in 12-16 week old female B6C3F1 mice.

  20. IL-4 abrogates TH17 cell-mediated inflammation by selective silencing of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Guenova, Emmanuella; Skabytska, Yuliya; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Weindl, Günther; Sauer, Karin; Tham, Manuela; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Seo, Ji Hae; Ignatova, Desislava; Cozzio, Antonio; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Volz, Thomas; Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Thomas, Peter; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Schäkel, Knut; Amarov, Boyko; Eichner, Martin; Schaller, Martin; Clark, Rachael A.; Röcken, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions (DTHRs), including organ-specific autoimmune diseases in mice and humans. Despite the broadly documented antiinflammatory effect of IL-4, the underlying mode of action remains incompletely understood, as IL-4 also promotes IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs) and IFN-γ–producing TH1 cells in vivo. Studying the impact of IL-4 on the polarization of human and mouse DCs, we found that IL-4 exerts opposing effects on the production of either IL-12 or IL-23. While promoting IL-12–producing capacity of DCs, IL-4 completely abrogates IL-23. Bone marrow chimeras proved that IL-4–mediated suppression of DTHRs relies on the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-dependent abrogation of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IL-4 therapy attenuated DTHRs by STAT6- and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-dependent suppression of the IL-23/TH17 responses despite simultaneous enhancement of IL-12/TH1 responses. As IL-4 therapy also improves psoriasis in humans and suppresses IL-23/TH17 responses without blocking IL-12/TH1, selective IL-4–mediated IL-23/TH17 silencing is promising as treatment against harmful inflammation, while sparing the IL-12–dependent TH1 responses. PMID:25646481

  1. The role of iodine in hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.

    PubMed

    Scherer, K; Harr, T; Bach, S; Bircher, A J

    2010-03-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated radio contrast media (RCM) are either immediate-type (IT) or delayed reactions (DT). In IT, the pathomechanism is unclear. In DT, delayed positive patch (PT) and intradermal tests (IDT) and RCM-specific T cells suggest a T cell-mediated mechanism. In both, the role of iodine has not been clarified; however, patients are often labelled as 'iodine allergic'. Occasionally, positive skin tests to iodine-containing drugs are observed. We investigated the presence of hypersensitivity to iodine in patients with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to RCM. Nineteen patients with a history of IT (n=9) or DT (n=10) to RCM were investigated. Skin prick tests, IDT and PT with several RCM and iodine formulations were carried out. All underwent oral provocation with Lugol's solution (LS). Two patients each with iodine mumps, contact dermatitis to iodized antiseptics and chronic idiopathic urticaria served as control or proof of concept. In the IT group, skin tests were positive in three out of nine patients to one RCM. One patient with negative skin tests reacted twice to oral iodine with urticaria. In the DT group, sensitization to one or several RCM was identified in 10 out of 10 patients. In seven out of 10 patients, additional sensitizations to the iodine formulations were found. Two patients developed a mild exanthema after oral provocation with LS. We have previously demonstrated in patients with iodine mumps that an oral challenge with LS is a valid means to elicit hypersensitivity reactions to iodine. In 19 patients, we showed that iodine is rarely the eliciting agent in hypersensitivity reactions to RCM. Only one patient with a late urticaria to an RCM with a late urticaria to LS and two patients with DT and broad sensitization to all RCM tested reacted to LS with an exanthema. In most cases, more likely the RCM molecules and not iodine are the eliciting compounds.

  2. [Electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Sobiczewska, Elzbieta; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2009-01-01

    The development of industry, particularly of new technologies in communication systems, gives rise to the number and diversty of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources in the environment. These sources, including power-frequent, radiofrequent and microwaves, make human life richer, safer and easier. But at the same time, there is growing concern about possible health risks connected with EMF exposure. An increasing number of persons have recently reported on a variety of health problems induced, in their opinion, by exposure to EMF. It is important to note that EMF levels to which these individuals are exposed are generally well below the recommended exposure limits and are certainly far below those known to produce any adverse effects. These persons call themselves "electromagnetic hypersensitivity individuals" And complain about experiencing various types of non-specific symptoms, including dermatological, neurological and vegetative. In the present paper, the problem of electromagnetic hypersensitivity phenomenon is discussed based on the recently published literature.

  3. A novel TMV-induced hot pepper cell wall protein gene (CaTin2) is associated with virus-specific hypersensitive response pathway.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Chang-Jin; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2003-03-01

    Incompatible plant-pathogen interactions result in the rapid cell death response known as hypersensitive response (HR) and activation of host defense related genes. To understand the cellular mechanism controlling defense response better, a novel pathogenesis-related (PR) gene and putative cell wall protein gene, CaTin2, was isolated through differential screening of a hot pepper cDNA library and characterized. CaTin2 gene was locally and systemically induced in hot pepper plants upon TMV-P0 inoculation which induces HR. However, CaTin2 gene wasn't regulated by bacterial HR-specific signal pathway. The full-length cDNA for CaTin2, which is 864 nucleotides long, contained the open reading frame of 200 amino acids including cell wall targeting sequences of 26 amino acids. CaTin2 gene has no sequence similarity with other cell wall protein genes except the signal sequence and exists as only one copy in hot pepper genome. CaTin2 gene contains repeated helix-turn-helix motif consisting of 39 amino acids. CaTin2 mRNA accumulation was induced in response to various treatments such as ethylene, SA, MeJA, ABA, methyl viologen, NaCl and wounding at early time points. Subcelluar localization of CaTin2 was confirmed in the cell wall in hot pepper leaves by making CaTin2::smGFP fusion protein. The transgenic plants overexpressing CaTin2 cDNA were resistant to TMV and CMV inoculation. From these results, CaTin2 gene may encode a virus-related new cell wall protein member.

  4. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Hamann, Alf; Bach, Emil; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Serikawa, Kyle; Fox, Brian; Kruse, Kim; Haase, Claus; Skov, Søren; Nansen, Anneline

    2016-04-01

    Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA), a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregsand the role of IL-17 in connection with Tregdepletion. Given the relevance of Tregsin RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregsin inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregswas achieved using aFoxp3-DTR-eGFPmouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of theFoxp3gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregsincreased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregsresulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Tregdepletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregsare important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using theFoxp3-DTR-eGFPmouse on a C57BL/6 background for Tregdepletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregsand IL-17 in arthritis.

  5. Allotype specific interactions of drugs and HLA molecules in hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Illing, Patricia T; Mifsud, Nicole A; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-10-01

    It is hypothesised that associations between adverse drug reactions and specific alleles of the human leukocyte antigens arise due to specific interactions between the human leukocyte antigen molecules and the causative drug that stimulate immune responses targeting drug exposed tissues. To date this has only been definitively demonstrated for abacavir, an antiretroviral that causes a systemic adverse drug reaction, abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome, solely in HLA-B*57:01(+) individuals. Whilst this has informed the modification of abacavir to remove immunogenicity, there remains an imperative to define other interactions between drugs and specific HLA in order to understand the scope of interactions that can drive T cell mediated drug hypersensitivity. Here we review the current state of understanding of these interactions.

  6. [Hypersensitivity to mosquito bite manifested as Skeeter síndrome].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Palma-Gómez, Samuel; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; García-Calderín, Diego; Ibarra, Jesús Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The reactions to mosquito bites are immunological reactions with involvement of IgE, IgG and T cells mediated hypersensitivity. These reactions are common and range from small local reactions, large local reactions to systemic allergic reactions. Skeeter syndrome is defined as a large local induced inflammatory reaction to mosquito bite and sometimes accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever and vomiting. Diagnosis is based on clinical history and physical examination, supported by the identification of specific IgE by skin testing. Treatment includes prevention, antihistamines and steroids in some cases. Specific immunotherapy still requires further study. This paper reports two cases of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to mosquito bites, which were evaluated in our center presenting positive skin tests.

  7. Management Strategies for Clopidogrel Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Craig J; Carris, Nicolas W; Ruf, Kathryn M

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel is a cornerstone of dual antiplatelet therapy. Hypersensitivity reactions potentially limit the use of this treatment and present a significant clinical challenge. The authors have developed recommendations for the management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity with consideration for the etiology, pathophysiology, and critical evaluation of potential management strategies. The clopidogrel hypersensitivity reaction is complex in mechanism and presents generally around day 5 of treatment. Generalized reactions are most common, but the reaction may also be localized or systemic. Screening patients for hypersensitivity is not always possible because the type IV delayed reaction is not detected reliably by conventional skin prick, intradermal challenge, or patch testing. Proposed strategies for management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity include treatment of the reaction with corticosteroids, clopidogrel desensitization, substituting an alternative P2Y12 inhibitor, or clopidogrel avoidance. The safety, efficacy, and cost of each potential strategy must be considered when managing a patient with clopidogrel hypersensitivity.

  8. [Pathogenesis and treatment of hypersensitivity pneumonitis].

    PubMed

    Ando, M

    2000-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a granulomatous interstitial lung disease resulting from an immunologic reaction to the repeated inhalation of organic dusts and active chemicals. There are 50 or more groups of HP, but the prevalence varies from country to country, and even within a country, depending on a variety of occupational or environmental inhalants. In Western coutries farmer's lung, bird fancier's disease, humidifier lung, and air-conditioner disease are common, but in Japan summer-type HP is the most prevalent group. Summer-type HP is a house-related illnes induced by Trichosporon asahii and Trichosporon mucoides which contaminate the patients' home environments in hot and humid conditions. The polysaccharide antigen contains mannan backbone attached with short side chains consi-sting of mannose, xylose, and glucuronic acid residues. Both immune complex-mediated and T cell-mediated immune responses to the yeast are involved in the induction and development of the disease. Host factors such as HLA-DQw3 and cigarette smoking also play an important role in the develop-ment or suppression of the disease. An assay for serum anti-Trichosporon antibody by a Triko Kit is very useful for the serodiagnosis, and sanitization by cleaning, disinfecting, and removing from the colonizing location of Trichosporon prevents recurrence of the disease. Summer-type HP induced by Trichosporon is a new type of HP. It can be found in other countries including most Western countries, because Trichosporon asahii and Trichosporon mucoides distribute in the temperate and subtropical areas of the world.

  9. Effect of treatment with cyclophosphamide in low doses upon the onset of delayed type hypersensitivity in mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: involvement of heart interstitial dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Thé, Torriceli Souza; Portella, Renata Siqueira; Guerreiro, Marcos Lázaro; Andrade, Sonia Gumes

    2013-09-01

    Acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi results in intense myocarditis, which progresses to a chronic, asymptomatic indeterminate form. The evolution toward this chronic cardiac form occurs in approximately 30% of all cases of T. cruzi infection. Suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) has been proposed as a potential explanation of the indeterminate form. We investigated the effect of cyclophosphamide (CYCL) treatment on the regulatory mechanism of DTH and the participation of heart interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs) in this process using BALB/c mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. One group was treated with CYCL (20 mg/kg body weight) for one month. A DTH skin test was performed by intradermal injection of T. cruzi antigen (3 mg/mL) in the hind-footpad and measured the skin thickness after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The skin test revealed increased thickness in antigen-injected footpads, which was more evident in the mice treated with CYCL than in those mice that did not receive treatment. The thickened regions were characterised by perivascular infiltrates and areas of necrosis. Intense lesions of the myocardium were present in three/16 cases and included large areas of necrosis. Morphometric evaluation of lymphocytes showed a predominance of TCD8 cells. Heart IDCs were immunolabelled with specific antibodies (CD11b and CD11c) and T. cruzi antigens were detected using a specific anti-T. cruzi antibody. Identification of T. cruzi antigens, sequestered in these cells using specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies was done, showing a significant increase in the number of these cells in treated mice. These results indicate that IDCs participate in the regulatory mechanisms of DTH response to T. cruzi infection.

  10. [Nonallergic hypersensitivity to environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Fedoseeva, V N; Makovetskaia, A K; Fedoskova, T G

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of manifestations of non-allergic hypersensitivity to chemical environmental factors pose the question about the need to study the mechanisms of its formation in population. It should be borne in mind that, in the absence of immunological mechanisms of formation of the mentioned state, the term "chemical sensitization" must be replaced by the term "non-allergic hypersensitivity." The investigation of this problem should permit to reduce the risk of formation of different types of hypersensitivity in population.

  11. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  12. Ndfip1 mediates peripheral tolerance to self and exogenous antigen by inducing cell cycle exit in responding CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Altin, John A.; Daley, Stephen R.; Howitt, Jason; Rickards, Helen J.; Batkin, Alison K.; Horikawa, Keisuke; Prasad, Simon J.; Nelms, Keats A.; Kumar, Sharad; Wu, Lawren C.; Tan, Seong-Seng; Cook, Matthew C.; Goodnow, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The NDFIP1 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated protein 4 family-interacting protein 1) adapter for the ubiquitin ligase ITCH is genetically linked to human allergic and autoimmune disease, but the cellular mechanism by which these proteins enable foreign and self-antigens to be tolerated is unresolved. Here, we use two unique mouse strains—an Ndfip1-YFP reporter and an Ndfip1-deficient strain—to show that Ndfip1 is progressively induced during T-cell differentiation and activation in vivo and that its deficiency causes a cell-autonomous, Forkhead box P3-independent failure of peripheral CD4+ T-cell tolerance to self and exogenous antigen. In small cohorts of antigen-specific CD4+ cells responding in vivo, Ndfip1 was necessary for tolerogen-reactive T cells to exit cell cycle after one to five divisions and to abort Th2 effector differentiation, defining a step in peripheral tolerance that provides insights into the phenomenon of T-cell anergy in vivo and is distinct from the better understood process of Bcl2-interacting mediator of cell death-mediated apoptosis. Ndfip1 deficiency precipitated autoimmune pancreatic destruction and diabetes; however, this depended on a further accumulation of nontolerant anti-self T cells from strong stimulation by exogenous tolerogen. These findings illuminate a peripheral tolerance checkpoint that aborts T-cell clonal expansion against allergens and autoantigens and demonstrate how hypersensitive responses to environmental antigens may trigger autoimmunity. PMID:24520172

  13. Vascular endothelial cells in cell-mediated immunity: adoptive transfer with in vitro conditioned cells is genetically restricted at the endothelial cell barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Standage, B.A.; Vetto, R.M.; Jones, R.; Burger, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is a cell-mediated immune response that can be adoptively transferred in rats when greater than 2 X 10(8) cells from peritoneal exudate, lymph nodes, or spleen are used. We have shown that by using an in vitro conditioning step with antigen, transfer can be subsequently carried out with as few as 2 X 10(7) spleen cells. The magnitude of DTH was reflected in ear swelling after intradermal injection of antigen (tuberculin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)) and confirmed histologically. The transfer was antigen specific, requiring the sensitizing antigen in both the in vitro conditioning step and in the ear test challenge. Adoptive transfer with conditioned cells was genetically restricted by alleles of the RT-1 region (major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the rat). Brown Norway strain (n haplotype) immune cells would not transfer DTH to Lewis (1 haplotype), ACI (a haplotype), or Buffalo (b haplotype) rats, whereas each strain would transfer DTH to syngeneic recipients. Moreover, this pattern of restriction held for all strains when tested in reciprocal fashion. In additional experiments, F1 to parental bone marrow chimeras were constructed so that bone-marrow-derived cells and non-bone-marrow-derived cells were of different RT-1 haplotypes. When these chimeras were used as recipients, transfer of DTH was only observed when immune donor cells and recipient non-bone-marrow-derived cells were syngeneic. These results point to the critical role of non-bone-marrow-derived cells (endothelial cells) in the DTH reaction.

  14. Release of palladium from biomechanical prostheses in body fluids can induce or support PD-specific IFNgamma T cell responses and the clinical setting of a palladium hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cristaudo, A; Bordignon, V; Petrucci, F; Caimi, S; De Rocco, M; Picardo, M; Cordiali Fei, P; Ensoli, F

    2009-01-01

    The increased use of Palladium (Pd) for biomedical applications, which has more than doubled in the last ten years, appears to be associated with an increased frequency of adverse reactions to Pd. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the implant of a biomechanical apparatus containing Pd and the setting of a hypersensitivity to Pd by determining the levels of the metal released in biological fluids, assessing the effects of Pd on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine production and exploring the clinical setting of skin sensitization. Of a total of 3,093 subjects examined in 2006, sensitization to Pd alone or in association with nickel (Ni) was observed in 1.6% and 13.03% of the individuals, respectively. Of these, a group of six subjects positive to Pd and negative to Ni at patch testing were selected on the basis of the oral clinical symptoms in order to measure both the levels of Pd in biological fluids and the degradation of the dental prostheses. Specific Pd measurements were carried out on salivary fluid, urine and serum samples by High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. In addition, the degradation of the dental prostheses was assessed by both a leaching test and an analysis of the micro morphology of orthodontic prostheses. The induction of IFN-gamma production by Pd was assessed in PBMC by the ELISpot assay. Skin sensitization to Pd was evaluated by patch testing and clinical examination. Ten healthy subjects were comparatively tested as controls. We found a specific induction of an IFN-gamma response by Pd in PBMC collected from all the subjects positive to Pd at patch testing. On the contrary, control subjects did not show any response to Pd as assessed by IFN-gamma ELISpot assay or by skin testing. Remarkably, the levels of Pd in all biological samples (saliva, sera, urine) were significantly higher in Pd-sensitized patients than in those collected from controls, reaching the highest

  15. [Analysis and differentiation of cytergic immune reactions: tuberculine type and cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Günther, O

    1975-07-01

    The classic delayed tuberculine reaction represents a T-cell mediated immune reaction, detectable already before the formation of antibodies in the course of proteine sensitization. Myocobacteria stimulate and enhance this reaction. The skin test reaction needs the whole antigen for induction. The reaction starts 6 to 8 hours later, shows maximal development 24 to 28 (-72) hours later and is characterized by inflammation, induration, sometimes with hemorrhagies, necroses and ulceration, a macrophage infiltration is typical in the histological picture. During the reaction between antigen and sensitized T-cells mediators are set free which act by the way of unspecific stimulation on T-, B-lymphocytes and macrophages, otherwise they may inhibit macrophage migration. The delayed reaction is active in many infectious diseases and in the rejection of transplants and tumours. The cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity (Jones-Mote) is a T-cell mediated immune reaction, detectable even before the classic delayed reaction after sensitization with tiny up to large doses of proteines. The skin reaction needs the whole antigen for induction, is visible 2 to 4 hours later in form of an inflammation with slight swelling and reaches maximal development 12 to 24 hours later without hemorrhagies or necroses. The infiltration consists mainly of basophilic leucocytes. There exists a weaker avidity of the T-cells of the cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity compared to the T-cells of the delayed reaction or to the amount of antibodies. Therefore this reaction is easily suppressed by other immune reactions. In contactdermatitis and vaccine virus infections of the guinea pig the cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity consists for weeks and months because under these circumstances other immune reactions do not compete. The differentiation of the two reactions shall develop to a routine laboratory procedure due to their therapeutic consequences in the immune diagnostic field.

  16. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Characterization of the effector cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Bracco, M M; Isturiz, M A; Manni, J A

    1976-01-01

    Isolated human mononuclear cells were fractionated according to their membrane characteristics or physical properties. Adherent cells were depleted by filtration through glass columns; phagocytic cells were removed by iron treatment and cell subpopulations capable of forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes (E), erythrocyte-antibody-complement (EAC) and chicken erythrocyte-antibody complexes (CEA) were separated by centrifugation of Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. The functional activity of the cell subpopulations obtained was assayed by testing PHA-induced cytoxicity (PIC), antibody-dependent cytoxicity (ADCC) and blast transformation by PHA. The results of this study demonstrate that: (1) cells reacting in PIC and ADCC assays are different, adherent and phagocytic cells being necessary for full expression of PIC and not for ADCC; (2) PHA induces direct blast transformation of purified E-RFC in the absence of PIC cytotoxic cells; (3) cell populations specifically enriched in E or EAC rosette-forming cells are not cytotoxic neither in the PHA nor in antibody mediated cytotoxic assays; (4) cells participating in ADCC can be selectively purified by centrifugation of CEA rosettes. PMID:1254320

  17. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Resistance to citrus canker induced by a variant of Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri is associated with a hypersensitive cell death response involving autophagy-associated vacuolar processes.

    PubMed

    Roeschlin, Roxana A; Favaro, María A; Chiesa, María A; Alemano, Sergio; Vojnov, Adrián A; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Filippone, María P; Gmitter, Frederick G; Gadea, José; Marano, María R

    2016-09-20

    Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (X. citri) is the causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker, a disease that seriously affects most commercially important Citrus species worldwide. We have identified previously a natural variant, X. citri A(T) , that triggers a host-specific defence response in Citrus limon. However, the mechanisms involved in this canker disease resistance are unknown. In this work, the defence response induced by X. citri A(T) was assessed by transcriptomic, physiological and ultrastructural analyses, and the effects on bacterial biofilm formation were monitored in parallel. We show that X. citri A(T) triggers a hypersensitive response associated with the interference of biofilm development and arrest of bacterial growth in C. limon. This plant response involves an extensive transcriptional reprogramming, setting in motion cell wall reinforcement, the oxidative burst and the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and phenolic compounds. Ultrastructural analyses revealed subcellular changes involving the activation of autophagy-associated vacuolar processes. Our findings show the activation of SA-dependent defence in response to X. citri A(T) and suggest a coordinated regulation between the SA and flavonoid pathways, which is associated with autophagy mechanisms that control pathogen invasion in C. limon. Furthermore, this defence response protects C. limon plants from disease on subsequent challenges by pathogenic X. citri. This knowledge will allow the rational exploitation of the plant immune system as a biotechnological approach for the management of the disease.

  19. High cytokinin levels induce a hypersensitive-like response in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Novák, Jan; Pavlů, Jaroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Nožková-Hlaváčková, Vladimíra; Špundová, Martina; Hlavinka, Jan; Koukalová, Šárka; Skalák, Jan; Černý, Martin; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Cytokinins are positive regulators of shoot development. However, it has previously been demonstrated that efficient activation of the cytokinin biosynthesis gene ipt can cause necrotic lesions and wilting in tobacco leaves. Some plant pathogens reportedly use their ability to produce cytokinins in disease development. In response to pathogen attacks, plants can trigger a hypersensitive response that rapidly kills cells near the infection site, depriving the pathogen of nutrients and preventing its spread. In this study, a diverse set of processes that link ipt activation to necrotic lesion formation were investigated in order to evaluate the potential of cytokinins as signals and/or mediators in plant defence against pathogens. Methods The binary pOp-ipt/LhGR system for dexamethasone-inducible ipt expression was used to increase endogenous cytokinin levels in transgenic tobacco. Changes in the levels of cytokinins and the stress hormones salicylic, jasmonic and abscisic acid following ipt activation were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Trends in hydrogen peroxide content and lipid peroxidation were monitored using the potassium iodide and malondialdehyde assays. The subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide was investigated using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine staining. The dynamics of transcripts related to photosynthesis and pathogen response were analysed by reverse transcription followed by quantitative PCR. The effects of cytokinins on photosynthesis were deciphered by analysing changes in chlorophyll fluorescence and leaf gas exchange. Key Results Plants can produce sufficiently high levels of cytokinins to trigger fast cell death without any intervening chlorosis – a hallmark of the hypersensitive response. The results suggest that chloroplastic hydrogen peroxide orchestrates the molecular responses underpinning the hypersensitive-like response, including the

  20. Histamine in the locus coeruleus promotes descending noradrenergic inhibition of neuropathic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Jin, Cong-Yu; Viisanen, Hanna; You, Hao-Jun; Pertovaara, Antti

    2014-12-01

    Among brain structures receiving efferent projections from the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus is the pontine locus coeruleus (LC) involved in descending noradrenergic control of pain. Here we studied whether histamine in the LC is involved in descending regulation of neuropathic hypersensitivity. Peripheral neuropathy was induced by unilateral spinal nerve ligation in the rat with a chronic intracerebral and intrathecal catheter for drug administrations. Mechanical hypersensitivity in the injured limb was assessed by monofilaments. Heat nociception was assessed by determining radiant heat-induced paw flick. Histamine in the LC produced a dose-related (1-10μg) mechanical antihypersensitivity effect (maximum effect at 15min and duration of effect 30min), without influence on heat nociception. Pretreatment of LC with zolantidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist), but not with pyrilamine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), and spinal administration of atipamezole (an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), prazosine (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) or bicuculline (a GABAA receptor antagonist) attenuated the antihypersensitivity effect of histamine. The histamine-induced antihypersensitivity effect was also reduced by pretreatment of LC with fadolmidine, an α2-adrenoceptor agonist inducing autoinhibition of noradrenergic cell bodies. Zolantidine or pyrilamine alone in the LC failed to influence pain behavior, while A-960656 (histamine H3 receptor antagonist) suppressed hypersensitivity. A plausible explanation for these findings is that histamine, due to excitatory action mediated by the histamine H2 receptor on noradrenergic cell bodies, promotes descending spinal α1/2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of neuropathic hypersensitivity. Blocking the autoinhibitory histamine H3 receptor on histaminergic nerve terminals in the LC facilitates release of histamine and thereby, increases descending noradrenergic pain inhibition.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor involvement in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated endotoxin hypersensitivity in C57BL/6J mice congenic at the Ah locus.

    PubMed

    Clark, G C; Taylor, M J; Tritscher, A M; Lucier, G W

    1991-12-01

    An experimental model of endotoxin-induced release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) into the serum of C57BL/6J mice congenic at the Ah locus was used to investigate the effects of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on TNF production. TCDD exposure of Ah-responsive mice (Ahbb) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the concentration of TNF in the serum of endotoxin-exposed mice, with a significant increase observed at a dose of 10 micrograms/kg TCDD. At a dose of 500 micrograms/kg TCDD, Ahbb mice demonstrated a 46-fold increase in serum TNF levels compared to control. In contrast, congenic Ah-receptor deficient mice (Ahdd) did not show a significant increase in serum TNF levels until exposed to 150 micrograms/kg TCDD, and the maximum response was an 8-fold increase over control. These data suggest that increased TNF production may be responsible for endotoxin hypersensitivity in TCDD-treated mice and that the Ah locus mediates this response.

  2. [Post anthrax vaccine delayed hypersensitivity. II--delayed hypersensitivity in humans vaccinated against anthrax].

    PubMed

    Shlyakhov, E; Rubinstein, E

    1994-01-01

    To detect cell immunity characterized by delayed postvaccination hypersensitivity to anthrax in man and assess its dynamics, vaccination using unencapsulated live anthrax vaccine was performed in 668 healthy volunteers. Vaccination was performed either by scarification (n = 172), subcutaneous injection (n = 202), or low-dose (n = 202) or high-dose (n = 83) inhalation. The anthraxin intradermal tests were performed in each patient at various times during the year following vaccination (D7, D15, D90, D180, D365). This study confirm that, regardless of the mode of administration, the vaccine induces cell-mediated immunity in man, as determined by positive anthraxine skin test. The incidence of positive tests decreases with time regardless of the mode of vaccination. After one year, the test remained positive in 34.8% of subjects vaccinated by subcutaneous injection, 37.5% vaccinated by low-dose inhalation, 34.2% vaccinated by high-dose inhalation, and 22.4% vaccinated by scarification. These findings are in agreement with those obtained in clinical epidemiological studies documenting the effectiveness of encapsulated live anthrax vaccine in man.

  3. Beta-cell hypertrophy in fa/fa rats is associated with basal glucose hypersensitivity and reduced SNARE protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chan, C B; MacPhail, R M; Sheu, L; Wheeler, M B; Gaisano, H Y

    1999-05-01

    In normal isolated beta-cells, the response to glucose is heterogeneous and characterized by an increasing number of secretory cells as glucose concentration rises (Pipeleers DG, Kiekens R, Ling Z, Wilikens A, Schuit F: Physiologic relevance of heterogeneity in the pancreatic beta-cell population. Diabetologia 37 (Suppl. 2):S57-S64, 1994). We hypothesized that fasting hyperinsulinemia in obesity might be explained by altered beta-cell heterogeneity of signal transduction mechanisms, possibly involving exocytotic proteins. Insulin secretion from individual beta-cells sorted according to the size of the islet donor (<125 microm, >250 microm, and intermediate diameter) was measured by reverse hemolytic plaque assay. Beta-cells from fa/fa rats were hypertrophied 25-40%, independent of donor islet size. This was accompanied by an increased proportion of secretory cells (recruitment) at 5.5-11.0 mmol/l glucose, increased secretion per cell at 2.8 mmol/l glucose, and decreased insulin content after acute glucose exposure without an increase in secretion per cell. Decreased expression of exocytotic (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein receptor [SNARE]) proteins, vesicle-associated membrane protein isoform 2 (VAMP-2), synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and syntaxin-1 and -2 in fa/fa beta-cells may contribute to the failure to sustain excessive plaque size at higher glucose concentrations. Fasting hyperinsulinemia may be maintained by increased recruitment and an exaggerated secretory response in all fa-derived islet populations. Glucose regulates beta-cell responsiveness in the short term, and these effects may involve altered expression of SNARE proteins.

  4. Endothelial cells mediate the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Bailey, Alexis S.; Jiang, Shuguang; Liu, Bin; Goldman, Devorah C.; Fleming, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endothelial cells are a critical component of the normal hematopoietic microenvironment. Therefore, we sought to determine whether primary endothelial cells have the capacity to repair damaged hematopoietic stem cells. Highly purified populations of primary CD31+ microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the brain or lung did not express the pan hematopoietic marker CD45, hematopoietic lineage markers, or the progenitor marker c-kit and did not give rise hematopoietic cells in vitro or in vivo. Remarkably, the transplantation of small numbers of these microvascular endothelial cells consistently restored hematopoiesis following bone marrow lethal doses of irradiation. Analysis of the peripheral blood of rescued recipients demonstrated that both short term and long term multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution was exclusively of host origin. Secondary transplantation studies revealed that microvascular endothelial cell-mediated hematopoietic regeneration also occurs at the level of the hematopoietic stem cell. These findings suggest a potential therapeutic role for microvascular endothelial cells in the self-renewal and repair of adult hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:19720572

  5. Intradermal injections of equine allogeneic umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells are well tolerated and do not elicit immediate or delayed hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Carrade, Danielle D; Affolter, Verena K; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Watson, Johanna L; Galuppo, Larry D; Buerchler, Sabine; Kumar, Vijay; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS. The use of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to treat acute equine lesions would greatly expand equine cellular therapy options; however, the safety and antigenicity of these cells have not been well-studied. We hypothesized that equine allogeneic umbilical cord tissue (UCT)-derived MSC would not elicit acute graft rejection or a delayed-type hypersensitivity response when injected intradermally. METHODS. Six Quarterhorse yearlings received 12 intradermal injections (autologous MSC, allogeneic MSC, positive control and negative control, in triplicate) followed by the same series of 12 injections, 3-4 weeks later, at another site. Wheals were measured and palpated at 0.25, 4, 24, 48, 72 h and 7 days post-injection. Biopsies were obtained at 48 and 72 h and 7 days post-injection. Mixed leukocyte reactions were performed 1 week prior to the first injections and 3 weeks after the second injections. RESULTS. There were no adverse local or systemic responses to two intradermal injections of allogeneic MSC. MSC injection resulted in minor wheal formation, characterized by mild dermatitis, dermal edema and endothelial hyperplasia, that fully resolved by 48-72 h. No differences were noted between allogeneic and autologous MSC. The second injection of MSC did not elicit more significant physical or histomorphologic alterations compared with the first MSC injection. Neither allogeneic nor autologous UCT-derived MSC stimulated or suppressed baseline T-cell proliferation in vitro prior to or after two MSC administrations. CONCLUSIONS. Equine allogeneic UCT MSC may be safely administered intradermally on multiple occasions without eliciting a measurable cellular immune response.

  6. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos AC; Gimenez, Andréa; Kuranishi, Lilian; Storrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary. PMID:27703382

  7. The effect of two topoisomerase inhibitors on low-dose hypersensitivity and increased radioresistance in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Skov, K.; Zhou, H.; Marples, B.

    1994-04-01

    A preliminary investigation of the effect of topoisomerase inhibitors on the structure of the survival curve at low doses has been carried out in Chinese hamster V79 cells, where there is a deviation from the predicted response to radiation. Cells were treated with one representative drug for each enzyme (topoisomerase I or II) prior to X irradiation in air and assessed for cell survival using automated microscopic location of cells. VP-16 causes little or no effect, while camptothecin has a measurable effect up to 2 Gy. The results are discussed in terms of the role of DNA damage and cell cycle in increased radioresistance, which encourage further investigation of the effects of this class of drugs at low doses. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Establishment of ku70-deficient lung epithelial cell lines and their hypersensitivity to low-dose x-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-05-01

    In clinical situations, cellular resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy is a significant component of tumor treatment failure. The DNA repair protein Ku70 is a key contributor to chemoresistance to anticancer agents, e.g., etoposide and bleomycin, or radioresistance. Ku70 plays a key role as a sensor of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced following exposure to ionizing radiation as well as treatment with some chemotherapeutic drugs. The responses of different organs to radiation vary widely and likely depend on the cell population in the organs. However, it is not clear whether Ku70 plays a role in the low-dose radioresistance of lung epithelial cells. In this study, we established Ku70-deficient epithelial cell lines from murine lungs lacking Ku70. Ku70-/- lung epithelial cells exhibited reduced Ku80 expression. Moreover, Ku70-/- lung epithelial cells were more sensitive than controls (Ku70+/- lung epithelial cells) to low-dose X-irradiation (< 0.5 Gy). We also found that consistent with the Ku70 function as a sensor of DSBs, Ku70 mainly localized in the nuclei of murine lung epithelial cells. These findings clearly indicate that Ku70 plays a key role in regulation of the Ku80 expression level in and the radioresistance of lung epithelial cells. Our data also suggest that these cell lines might be useful not only for study of Ku70 functions and the DSB repair pathway, but also for study of the molecular mechanism underlying the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation in lung epithelial cells.

  9. Cell Cholesterol Homeostasis: Mediation by Active Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Theodore L.; Lange, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the major pathways mediating cell cholesterol homeostasis respond to a common signal: active membrane cholesterol. Active cholesterol is that fraction which exceeds the complexing capacity of the polar bilayer lipids. Increments in plasma membrane cholesterol exceeding this threshold have an elevated chemical activity (escape tendency) and redistribute via diverse transport proteins to both circulating plasma lipoproteins and intracellular organelles. Active cholesterol prompts several feedback responses thereby. It is the substrate for its own esterification and for the synthesis of regulatory side-chain oxysterols. It also stimulates manifold pathways that down-regulate the biosynthesis, curtail the ingestion and increase the export of cholesterol. Thus, the abundance of cholesterol is tightly coupled to that of its polar lipid partners through active cholesterol. PMID:20843692

  10. Cre-mediated cell ablation contests mast cell contribution in models of antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Weiser, Anne; Tietz, Annette; Stassen, Michael; Harris, Nicola; Kopf, Manfred; Radermacher, Peter; Möller, Peter; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2011-11-23

    Immunological functions of mast cells remain poorly understood. Studies in Kit mutant mice suggest key roles for mast cells in certain antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. However, Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin. Here, we show that targeted insertion of Cre-recombinase into the mast cell carboxypeptidase A3 locus deleted mast cells in connective and mucosal tissues by a genotoxic Trp53-dependent mechanism. Cre-mediated mast cell eradication (Cre-Master) mice had, with the exception of a lack of mast cells and reduced basophils, a normal immune system. Cre-Master mice were refractory to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis, and this defect was rescued by mast cell reconstitution. This mast cell-deficient strain was fully susceptible to antibody-induced autoimmune arthritis and to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Differences comparing Kit mutant mast cell deficiency models to selectively mast cell-deficient mice call for a systematic re-evaluation of immunological functions of mast cells beyond allergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stachybotrys chartarum-Induced Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Is TLR9 Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Urvashi; Newstead, Michael J.; Zeng, Xianying; Ballinger, Megan N.; Standiford, Louis R.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), an inflammatory lung disease, develops after repeated exposure to inhaled particulate antigen and is characterized by a vigorous T helper type 1-mediated immune response, resulting in the release of IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ. These T helper type 1 cytokines may participate in the pathogenesis of HP. Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) is a dimorphic fungus implicated in a number of respiratory illnesses, including HP. Here, we have developed a murine model of SC-induced HP that reproduces pathology observed in human HP and hypothesized that toll receptor-like 9 (TLR9)-mediated dendritic cell responses are required for the generation of granulomatous inflammation induced by inhaled SC. Mice sensitized and challenged with 106 SC spores develop granulomatous inflammation with multinucleate giant cells, accompanied by increased accumulation of neutrophils and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. SC sensitization and challenge resulted in robust pulmonary expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-12, and IFN-γ. SC-mediated granulomatous inflammation required IFN-γ and was TLR9 dependent, because TLR9−/− mice displayed reduced peribronchial inflammation, decreased accumulation and/or activation of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and reduced lung expression of type 1 cytokines and chemokines. T-cell production of IFN-γ was IL-12 dependent. Our studies suggest that TLR9 is critical for dendritic cell-mediated development of a type 1 granulomatous inflammation in the lung in response to SC. PMID:21982832

  12. Stachybotrys chartarum-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis is TLR9 dependent.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Urvashi; Newstead, Michael J; Zeng, Xianying; Ballinger, Megan N; Standiford, Louis R; Standiford, Theodore J

    2011-12-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), an inflammatory lung disease, develops after repeated exposure to inhaled particulate antigen and is characterized by a vigorous T helper type 1-mediated immune response, resulting in the release of IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ. These T helper type 1 cytokines may participate in the pathogenesis of HP. Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) is a dimorphic fungus implicated in a number of respiratory illnesses, including HP. Here, we have developed a murine model of SC-induced HP that reproduces pathology observed in human HP and hypothesized that toll receptor-like 9 (TLR9)-mediated dendritic cell responses are required for the generation of granulomatous inflammation induced by inhaled SC. Mice sensitized and challenged with 10(6) SC spores develop granulomatous inflammation with multinucleate giant cells, accompanied by increased accumulation of neutrophils and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. SC sensitization and challenge resulted in robust pulmonary expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-12, and IFN-γ. SC-mediated granulomatous inflammation required IFN-γ and was TLR9 dependent, because TLR9(-/-) mice displayed reduced peribronchial inflammation, decreased accumulation and/or activation of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and reduced lung expression of type 1 cytokines and chemokines. T-cell production of IFN-γ was IL-12 dependent. Our studies suggest that TLR9 is critical for dendritic cell-mediated development of a type 1 granulomatous inflammation in the lung in response to SC. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytoneme-mediated cell-cell contacts for Hedgehog reception.

    PubMed

    González-Méndez, Laura; Seijo-Barandiarán, Irene; Guerrero, Isabel

    2017-08-21

    Morphogens regulate tissue patterning through their distribution in concentration gradients. Emerging research establishes a role for specialized signalling filopodia, or cytonemes, in morphogen dispersion and signalling. Previously we demonstrated that Hedgehog (Hh) morphogen is transported via vesicles along cytonemes emanating from signal-producing cells to form a gradient in Drosophila epithelia. However, the mechanisms for signal reception and transfer are still undefined. Here, we demonstrate that cytonemes protruding from Hh-receiving cells contribute to Hh gradient formation. The canonical Hh receptor Patched is localized in these cellular protrusions and Hh reception takes place in membrane contact sites between Hh-sending and Hh-receiving cytonemes. These two sets of cytonemes have similar dynamics and both fall in two different dynamic behaviours. Furthermore, both the Hh co-receptor Interference hedgehog (Ihog) and the glypicans are critical for this cell-cell cytoneme mediated interaction. These findings suggest that the described contact sites might facilitate morphogen presentation and reception.

  14. T Cell Mediation of Pregnancy Analgesia Affecting Chronic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sarah F; Ham, Boram; Drouin, Shannon; Boachie, Nadia; Chabot-Dore, Anne-Julie; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Diatchenko, Luda; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2017-09-06

    It has been consistently reported that many female chronic pain sufferers have an attenuation of symptoms during pregnancy. Rats display increased pain tolerance during pregnancy, due to an increase in opioid receptors in the spinal cord. These past studies did not consider the role of non-neuronal cells, now appreciated to play an important role in chronic pain processing. Using an inflammatory (complete Freund's adjuvant) or neuropathic (spared nerve injury) model of persistent pain, we observe that young adult female mice in early pregnancy switch from a micgrolia-independent to a microglia-dependent pain hypersensitivity mechanism. During late pregnancy, female mice show no evidence of chronic pain whatsoever. This pregnancy-related analgesia is reversible by intrathecal administration of naloxone, suggesting an opioid-mediated mechanism; pharmacological and genetic data suggest the importance of δ-opioid receptors. We also observe that T-cell deficient (nude and Rag1 null mutant) pregnant mice do not exhibit pregnancy analgesia, which can be rescued with the adoptive transfer of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells from late-pregnant wildtype mice. These results suggest that T cells are a mediator of the opioid analgesia exhibited during pregnancy.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTChronic pain symptoms often subside during pregnancy. This pregnancy-related analgesia has been demonstrated for acute pain in rats. Here we show that pregnancy analgesia can produce a complete cessation of chronic pain behaviors in mice. We show that the phenomenon is dependent on pregnancy hormones (estrogen and progesterone), δ-opioid receptors, and T cells of the adaptive immune system. These findings add to the recent but growing evidence of sex-specific T cell involvement in chronic pain processing. Copyright © 2017 the authors.

  15. Hypersensitivity of prediabetic JCR:LA-cp rats to fine airborne combustion particle-induced direct and noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Spencer D; Dreher, Kevin L; Kelly, Sandra E; Russell, James C

    2006-04-01

    Particulate matter with mean aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm (PM(2.5)), from diesel exhaust, coal or residual oil burning, and from industrial plants, is a significant component of airborne pollution. Type 2 diabetes is associated with enhanced risk of adverse cardiovascular events following exposure to PM(2.5). Particle properties, sources, and pathophysiological mechanisms responsible are unknown. We studied effects of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) from a large U.S. powerplant on vascular function in a prediabetic, hyperinsulinemic model, the JCR:LA-cp rat. Residual oil fly ash leachate (ROFA-L) was studied using aortic rings from young-adult, obese, insulin-resistant rats and lean normal rats in vitro. Contractile response to phenylephrine and relaxant response to acetylcholine were determined in the presence and absence of L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In a separate series of studies, the direct contractile effects of ROFA-L on repeated exposure were determined. ROFA-L (12.5 microg ml(-1)) increased phenylephrine-mediated contraction in obese (p < 0.05), but not in lean rat aortae, with the effect being exacerbated by L-NAME, and it reduced acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of both obese and lean aortae (p < 0.0001). Initial exposure of aortae to ROFA-L caused a small contractile response (<0.05 g), which was markedly greater on second exposure in the obese (approximately 0.6 g, p < 0.0001) aortae but marginal in lean (approximately 0.1 g) aortae. Our data demonstrate that bioavailable constituents of oil combustion particles enhance noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction, impair endothelium-mediated relaxation, and induce direct vasocontraction in prediabetic rats. These observations provide the first direct evidence of the causal properties of PM(2.5) and identify the pathophysiological role of the early prediabetic state in susceptibility to environmentally induced cardiovascular disease. These are important implications for public

  16. Immunomodulatory activity of Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Salvia officinalis L. and Syzygium aromaticum L. essential oils: evidence for humor- and cell-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Fábio Ricardo; Schmidt, Gustavo; Romero, Adriano Lopez; Sartoretto, Juliano Luiz; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2009-07-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of ginger, Zingiber officinale (Zingiberaceae), sage, Salvia officinalis (Lamiaceae) and clove, Syzygium aromaticum (Myrtaceae), essential oils were evaluated by studying humor- and cell-mediated immune responses. Essential oils were administered to mice (once a day, orally, for a week) previously immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBCs). Clove essential oil increased the total white blood cell (WBC) count and enhanced the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in mice. Moreover, it restored cellular and humoral immune responses in cyclophosphamide-immunosuppressed mice in a dose-dependent manner. Ginger essential oil recovered the humoral immune response in immunosuppressed mice. Contrary to the ginger essential oil response, sage essential oil did not show any immunomodulatory activity. Our findings establish that the immunostimulatory activity found in mice treated with clove essential oil is due to improvement in humor- and cell-mediated immune response mechanisms.

  17. The elimination of low-dose hypersensitivity in Chinese hamster V79-379A cells by pretreatment with X rays or hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marples, B.; Joiner, M.C.

    1995-02-01

    To explain increased radioresistance over the X-ray dose range {approximately} 0.5-1 Gy an inducible radioprotective mechanism triggered by DNA damage was proposed; hypersensitivity to doses {much_lt} Gy reflected the response prior to the activation of this system. To test this hypothesis, cells were pre-exposed to DNA-damaging agents in an attempt to induce the process prematurely. An increase in survival was evident at X-ray doses below 0.3 Gy after a priming treatment of X rays (0.05, 0.2, 1 Gy) given 6 h earlier. The protective effect was found to be transitory, requiring time for development and diminishing after two to three cell cycle times. Cycloheximide administered in the interval between the priming and challenge doses of X rays abolished the protection conferred by pretreatment, indicating the involvement of de novo protein synthesis. Oxidative damage by nontoxic doses of hydrogen peroxide (10{sup {minus}4} M, but not 10{sup {minus}6} M) also produced a protective effect against subsequent X irradiation. These experiments indicate survival in the hyper-radiosensitive region ({much_lt}0.5 Gy) can be modified by pretreatment with agents known to affect DNA repair. In addition, the development of increased radioresistance after single doses of X rays was inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. These studies provide evidence to support the explanations proposed previously for the phenomena of increased radioresistance and hyper-radiosensitivity observed at very low X-ray doses. 57 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) immune response related with EBV-DNA in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with autologous dendritic cell vaccination after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Song, Dan; Lu, Yue; Zhu, Huanfeng; Chen, Zhenzhang; He, Xia

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the outcome of an autologous dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in patients with stage II/III nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC). From 38 patients with stage II/III Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated NPCs after a radiotherapy, 16 human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2)-positive patients were enrolled and medicated with autologous DCs, which were pulsed with HLA-A2-restricted EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) peptides. The lymphocyte subsets, serum cytokines, and EBV-DNA levels as well as the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were determined after vaccination combined with a radiotherapy/chemotherapy. The serum levels of interleukin-2 and interferon-γ (P<0.05) as well as the percentage of natural killer and CD4+T cells increased significantly (P<0.05) after the vaccination. Nine of 16 (56.25%) patients showed a positive skin response to the HLA-A2 restricted EBV LMP2A peptides in a DTH test. The serum EBV-DNA level decreased significantly from 1519 ± 384 to 1214 ± 211 copies/mL in the 9 DTH-positive patients (P=0.0310). No unanticipated or serious toxicity was observed and the vaccine was well tolerated. In conclusion, in NPC patients vaccinated after radiotherapy with autologous DCs, which were pulsed with EBV LMP2A peptides, Th1-specific immune responses were elicited particularly in DTH test positive individuals. The clinical results obtained are encouraging and the EBV-specific HLA-A2-restricted DC vaccination is a promising treatment for EBV-related NPCs.

  19. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome: incidence, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Knowles, S R; Shapiro, L E; Shear, N H

    1999-12-01

    Although the anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome was first described in 1950, confusion still abounds regarding the syndrome. The triad of fever, rash and internal organ involvement occurring 1 to 8 weeks after exposure to an anticonvulsant heralds this rare (1 in 1,000 to 10,000 exposures) but serious reaction. Aromatic anticonvulsants [phenytoin, phenobarbital (phenobarbitone) and carbamazepine] are the most frequently involved drugs; however, there have also been several cases of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome associated with lamotrigine. Fever, in conjunction with malaise and pharyngitis, is often the first sign. This is followed by a rash which can range from a simple exanthem to toxic epidermal necrolysis. Internal organ involvement usually involves the liver, although other organs such as the kidney, CNS or lungs may be involved. Hypothyroidism may be a complication in these patients approximately 2 months after occurrence of symptoms. The aromatic anticonvulsants are metabolised to hydroxylated aromatic compounds, such as arene oxides. If detoxification of this toxic metabolite is insufficient, the toxic metabolite may bind to cellular macromolecules causing cell necrosis or a secondary immunological response. Cross-reactivity among the aromatic anticonvulsants may be as high as 75%. In addition, there is a familial tendency to hypersensitivity to anticonvulsants. Discontinuation of the anticonvulsant is essential in patients who develop symptoms compatible with anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome. A minimum battery of laboratory tests, such as liver transaminases, complete blood count and urinalysis and serum creatinine, should be performed. Corticosteroids are usually administered if symptoms are severe. Patients with anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome should avoid all aromatic anticonvulsants; benzodiazepines, valproic acid (sodium valproate) or one of the newer anticonvulsants can be used for seizure control. However, valproic

  20. Cell mediated immunity after measles in Guinea-Bissau: historical cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, S. O.; Aaby, P.; Hall, A. J.; Barker, D. J.; Heyes, C. B.; Shiell, A. W.; Goudiaby, A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether children who have had measles have reduced general cell mediated immunity three years later compared with vaccinated children who have not had measles. DESIGN: Historical cohort study. SETTING: Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. SUBJECTS: 391 children aged 3-13 years who were living in Bissau during a measles epidemic in 1991 and still lived there. These included 131 primary cases and 139 secondary cases from the epidemic and 121 vaccinated controls with no history of measles. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: General cell mediated immunity assessed by measurement of delayed type hypersensitivity skin responses to seven recall antigens. Anergy was defined as a lack of response to all antigens. RESULTS: 82 out of 268 cases of measles (31%) were anergic compared with 20 of the 121 vaccinated controls (17%) (odds ratio adjusted for potential confounding variables 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.0); P 0.009). The prevalence of anergy was higher in secondary cases (33% (46/138)) than in primary cases (28% (36/130)), although this difference was not significant. Anergy was more common in the rainy season (unadjusted prevalence 31% (91/291) than in the dry season (11% (11/98)) (adjusted odds ratio 4.8 (2.2 to 10.3)). This seasonal increase occurred predominantly in the case of measles. CONCLUSION: Reduced general cell mediated immunity may contribute to the higher long term mortality in children who have had measles compared with recipients of standard measles vaccine and to the higher child mortality in the rainy season in west Africa. PMID:8892416

  1. Cold-pressed flaxseed oil reverses age-associated depression in a primary cell-mediated adaptive immune response in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, L M; Sandiford, A M; Gray, C E; Woodward, Bill

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the influence of flaxseed oil on responses representative of primary humoral and cell-mediated adaptive immune competence in immunosenescent mice. Male and female C57BL/6J mice, 85 weeks old, were randomized between two complete purified diets differing only in oil source (cold-pressed safflower or flaxseed). After 8 weeks, humoral competence was assessed in six mice per group as the serum haemagglutinin titre to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and cell-mediated competence was assessed, in an additional six mice per group, as the delayed hypersensitivity response to SRBC. A zero-time control group (88 weeks old) and a young adult positive control group (12 weeks old) were each tested similarly (six per immune response), revealing age-related depression in both antibody and cell-mediated competence at 88 weeks of age. After the 8-week experimental period, the antibody response of the two test groups of geriatric mice remained below the young adult level (P=0.04) and the cell-mediated response of the safflower oil group also continued to exhibit age-related depression (20 % of young adult level, P=0.0002). By contrast, the anti-SRBC delayed hypersensitivity response of the flaxseed group no longer differed from the response of the young adults but exceeded that of the safflower and zero-time control senescent groups (P=0.0002). Depression in primary cell-mediated competence, the most outstanding aspect of immunosenescence, can be addressed by means of a dietary source of 18 : 3n-3 without longer-chain PUFA.

  2. Chromium(VI) causes interstrand DNA crosslinking in vitro but shows no hypersensitivity in crosslink repair-deficient human cells

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Jessica L.; Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a human carcinogen activated primarily by direct reduction with cellular ascorbate and to a lesser extent, by glutathione. Cr(III), the final product of Cr(VI) reduction, forms six bonds allowing intermolecular crosslinking. In this work, we investigated the ability of Cr(VI) to cause interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs) whose formation mechanisms and the presence in human cells are currently uncertain. We found that in vitro reduction of Cr(VI) with glutathione showed a sublinear production of ICLs, yield of which was less than 1% of total Cr-DNA adducts at the optimal conditions. Formation of ICLs in fast ascorbate-Cr(VI) reactions occurred during a short reduction interval and displayed a linear dose-dependence with the average yield of 1.3% of total adducts. In vitro production of ICLs was strongly suppressed by increasing buffer molarity, indicating inhibitory effects of ligand-Cr(III) binding on the formation of crosslinking species. The presence of ICLs in human cells was assessed from the impact of ICL repair deficiencies on Cr(VI) responses. We found that ascorbate-restored FANCD2-null and isogenic FANCD2-complemented cells showed similar cell cycle inhibition and toxicity by Cr(VI). XPA-null cells are defective in repair of Cr-DNA monoadducts but stable knockdowns of ERCC1 or XPF in these cells with extended time for the completion of crosslinking reactions did not produce any sensitization to Cr(VI). Our results together with chemical and steric considerations of Cr(III) reactivity suggest that ICL generation by chromate is probably an in vitro phenomenon occurring at conditions permitting formation of Cr(III) polymers. PMID:24059640

  3. Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Saff, Rebecca R; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Because of widespread use, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the second most common cause of all adverse drug reactions, with hypersensitivity reported in ∼1% of the population. NSAID hypersensitivity can be categorized into five types by the underlying disease, symptoms of reaction, and timing of reaction. These include rhinitis and asthma induced by NSAIDs (also known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (NECD), urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, single NSAID-induced reactions, and delayed NSAID reactions. NECD occurs in one-third of patients with chronic urticaria who develop an exacerbation of their urticaria, sometimes with angioedema, typically beginning 30-90 minutes after ingestion of NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. In urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, patients without underlying disease develop urticaria or angioedema 30-90 minutes after ingestion of COX-1-inhibiting NSAIDs including aspirin. Single NSAID-induced reactions are immediate and specific to a single NSAID and are thought to occur because of an IgE-mediated reaction against a specific epitope of the NSAID. Delayed NSAID reactions occur days to weeks after initiating an NSAID. These are T-cell mediated and not amenable to desensitization or rechallenge. Classifying the type of NSAID hypersensitivity is important because many patients with a prior history of urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs will often tolerate aspirin test dose. This would allow the use of an aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease despite a presumed history of NSAID hypersensitivity.

  4. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of delayed-type drug hypersensitivity reactions, from bedside to bench and back.

    PubMed

    Schrijvers, Rik; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) have been present since the advent of drugs. In particular T-cell mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions represent a heterogeneous clinical entity with a diverse pathogenesis and result in a considerable burden of morbidity and mortality not only driven by the reactions themselves but also by the use of alternatives which are sometimes less effective or even more dangerous. Diagnostic procedures rely on clinical history, skin testing and potential provocation testing, whereas validated in vitro diagnostic procedures are still lacking for most of them. Recent work in the field of pharmacogenomics combined with basic scientific research has provided insights in the pathogenesis of abacavir and carbamazepine hypersensitivities linked with certain human leucocyte antigen risk alleles. Nevertheless, important scientific questions on how other DHR arise and how host-drug interactions occur, remain unanswered. Recent work indicates an intricate relation between host, drug and pathogens in severe cutaneous and systemic reactions and provides more insights in the role of regulatory T-cells and viral reactivation in these reactions. In this review we focus on type IV delayed-type DHR, and address recent advances in the pathogenesis, pharmacogenomics, and diagnosis of these reactions with an emphasis on the understandings arising from basic research.

  5. TRPA1 contributes to cold hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    del Camino, Donato; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B; Earley, Taryn J; Cook, Colby A; Petrus, Matt J; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J; Chong, Jayhong A; Fanger, Christopher M; Woolf, Clifford J; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M

    2010-11-10

    TRPA1 is a nonselective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. Although it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions in which reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1(-/-) mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide] reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

  6. Self-report prevalence and associated factors to drug hypersensitivity in Mexican young adults.

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; Puente-Fernández, Cecilia; Flores-Merino, Miriam V; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Domínguez-García, Ma Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Drug hypersensitivity is defined as any unfavorable reaction that occurs after the administration of any drug. It may or may not be mediated by the involvement of the immune system. Epidemiological data related to drug hypersensitivity reactions in our country are scarce. To determine the prevalence of drug hypersensitivity in a group of young adults, as well as to identify associated factors. A structured questionnaire was applied to young people aged 18 to 25 years. The instrument was oriented to identify reactions of drug hypersensitivity, as well as the most prevalent drugs involved. In addition, a personal and family history of atopic diseases was included. Analysis for associations between variables was been done through logistic regression. The prevalence of drug hypersensitivity reactions was 12% (144 of 1,200). The antibiotics were the agents most related to hypersensitivity reactions (9.8%) followed by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (1.6%). Factors associated with drug hypersensitivity were a personal history of asthma, odds ratio (OR) 3.15 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-6.91), maternal and paternal history of drug hypersensitivity, OR 2.33 (95% CI, 1.21-4.48) and OR 3.11 (95% CI, 1.22-7.92), respectively. The results of this research show that drug hypersensitivity in young adults is a highly prevalent event and it is associated with personal history of asthma and history of drug hypersensitivity in parents.

  7. Optimization of cell-wall skeleton derived from Mycobacterium bovis BCG Tokyo 172 (SMP-105) emulsion in delayed-type hypersensitivity and antitumor models.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, M; Murata, M; Fukushima, A; Sato, T; Nakagawa, M; Fujii, T; Koseki, N; Chiba, N; Kashiwazaki, Y

    2012-08-01

    Cell-wall skeleton prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG-CWS) is known as a potent adjuvant and has been shown to possess antitumor activity in many non-clinical and clinical studies. As there are no approved BCG-CWS formulations for cancer therapy, we investigated the potential for cancer immunotherapy of SMP-105, our originally produced BCG-CWS. For optimizing SMP-105 emulsion, we compared the effects of drakeoland squalane-based SMP-105 emulsions on IFN-γ production in rats and evaluated their ability to induce skin reaction in guinea pigs. Both emulsions had the same activity in both experiments. We selected squalane as base material and produced two types of squalane-based formulations (vialed emulsion and pumped emulsion) that can easily be prepared as oil-in-water emulsions. Although the vialed emulsion showed the same pattern of distribution as a usual homogenized emulsion, the pumped emulsion showed more uniform distribution than the other two emulsions. Whereas both emulsions enhanced strong delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in a mouse model, the pumped emulsion induced slightly smaller edema. Data on oil droplet size distribution suggest that few micrometer oil droplet size might be appropriate for oil-in-water microemulsion of SMP-105. The antitumor potency of SMP-105 emulsion was stronger than that of some of the launched toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists (Aldara cream, Picibanil, and Immunobladder). Aldara and Picibanil showed limited antitumor effectiveness, while Immunobladder had almost the same effect as SMP-105 at the highest dose, but needed about 10 times the amount of SMP-105. These findings first indicate that SMP-105 has great potential in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Gut pain & visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Visceral pain is a highly complex entity whose experience is variable in health and disease. It can occur in patients with organic disease and also in those without any readily identifiable structural or biochemical abnormality such as in the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the culpable underlying mechanisms significant knowledge gaps remain, representing a significant unmet need in gastroenterology. A key, but not universal, pathological feature is that patients with FGID often display heightened sensitivity to experimental gut stimulation, termed visceral hypersensitivity. A plethora of factors have been proposed to account for this epiphenomenon including peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, aberrant central processing, genetic, psychological and abnormalities within the stress responsive systems. Further research is needed, bringing together complementary research themes from a diverse array of academic disciplines ranging from gastroenterology to nociceptive physiology to functional neuro-imaging, to address this unmet need. PMID:26516496

  9. Insect and arachnid hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bevier, D E

    1999-11-01

    Insect hypersensitivity reactions can have a large number of clinical presentations. The majority of reactions are pruritic and involve the short- or sparsely haired areas of the body. Most are associated with eosinophilic infiltration into the skin, often in a perivascular pattern. The diagnosis may be based on compatible clinical signs and improvement with aggressive insect control and, in some cases, confirmation via provocative exposure. Intradermal, prick, or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE can be used to document the presence of reaginic antibodies against insect allergens. Treatments include avoidance, aggressive insect control, and symptomatic support; in some cases, immunotherapy may be useful in decreasing the severity of clinical reactions to insects.

  10. Food hypersensitivity by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Daniel A; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-01-01

    Though not widely recognized, food hypersensitivity by inhalation can cause major morbidity in affected individuals. The exposure is usually more obvious and often substantial in occupational environments but frequently occurs in non-occupational settings, such as homes, schools, restaurants, grocery stores, and commercial flights. The exposure can be trivial, as in mere smelling or being in the vicinity of the food. The clinical manifestations can vary from a benign respiratory or cutaneous reaction to a systemic one that can be life-threatening. In addition to strict avoidance, such highly-sensitive subjects should carry self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert® identification. Asthma is a strong predisposing factor and should be well-controlled. It is of great significance that food inhalation can cause de novo sensitization. PMID:19232116

  11. Systemic Administration of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Reverts Nociceptive Hypersensitivity in an Experimental Model of Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sacerdote, Paola; Niada, Stefania; Franchi, Silvia; Arrigoni, Elena; Rossi, Alice; Yenagi, Vijay; de Girolamo, Laura; Panerai, Alberto Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, it has been proved that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) elicit anti-inflammatory effects. MSCs from adipose tissue (hASCs) differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage and transdifferentiate into ectodermal-origin cells. Although there are various etiologies to chronic pain, one common feature is that painful states are associated with increased inflammation. We believe in hASCs as a therapeutic tool also in pathologies involving neuroinflammation and neuronal tissue damage. We have investigated the effect of hASCs injected in a model of neuropathic pain [(mouse sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI)]. hASCs from 5 donors were characterized, and no major differences were depicted. hASCs were cryopreserved and grown on demand. About 1×106, 3×106, and 6×106 hASCs were intravenously injected into normal immunocompetent mice. No mouse died, and no macroscopic toxicity or behavioral changes were observed, confirming the safety of hASCs. hASCs, intravenously (i.v.) injected into C57BL/6 mice when the neuropathic pain was already established, induced a significant reduction in mechanical allodynia and a complete reversion of thermal hyperalgesia in a dose–response fashion, already 1 day after administration. Moreover, the hASCs effect can be boosted by repeated administrations, allowing a prolonged therapeutic effect. Treatment decreased the level of the CCI-induced proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β and activated the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the lesioned nerve. hASCs treatment also restored normal inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in the spinal cord of CCI animals. Our data suggest that hASCs are worthy of further studies as an anti-inflammatory therapy in the treatment of neuropathic pain or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23190263

  12. Studies of delayed hypersensitivity responses in children in an industrialized region of Italy

    SciTech Connect

    La Rosa, M.; Mancuso, G.R.; Greco, D.; Di Paola, M.; Schiliro, G.; Bagnato, G.F.; Bellanti, J.A. )

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to chemical pollutants on cell mediated immune responses in a pediatric population living in Priolo, an industrialized area of Italy, by means of skin test (Multitest CMI). The results suggest that children living in Priolo display significantly lower delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response than those seen in an age-matched and socioeconomically similar group of children living in Taormina, a nonindustrialized area. The lowered incidence of DTH scores in Priolo is not due to the number of positive skin test responses to individual antigens, but rather to the size of individual reactions.

  13. Proteasome Dysfunction Mediates High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rodent Beta Cells and Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Broca, Christophe; Varin, Elodie; Armanet, Mathieu; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Bosco, Domenico; Dalle, Stéphane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS), a major cellular protein degradation machinery, plays key roles in the regulation of many cell functions. Glucotoxicity mediated by chronic hyperglycaemia is detrimental to the function and survival of pancreatic beta cells. The aim of our study was to determine whether proteasome dysfunction could be involved in beta cell apoptosis in glucotoxic conditions, and to evaluate whether such a dysfunction might be pharmacologically corrected. Therefore, UPS activity was measured in GK rats islets, INS-1E beta cells or human islets after high glucose and/or UPS inhibitor exposure. Immunoblotting was used to quantify polyubiquitinated proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through CHOP expression, and apoptosis through the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, whereas total cell death was detected through histone-associated DNA fragments measurement. In vitro, we found that chronic exposure of INS-1E cells to high glucose concentrations significantly decreases the three proteasome activities by 20% and leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. We showed that pharmacological blockade of UPS activity by 20% leads to apoptosis in a same way. Indeed, ER stress was involved in both conditions. These results were confirmed in human islets, and proteasome activities were also decreased in hyperglycemic GK rats islets. Moreover, we observed that a high glucose treatment hypersensitized beta cells to the apoptotic effect of proteasome inhibitors. Noteworthily, the decreased proteasome activity can be corrected with Exendin-4, which also protected against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings reveal an important role of proteasome activity in high glucose-induced beta cell apoptosis, potentially linking ER stress and glucotoxicity. These proteasome dysfunctions can be reversed by a GLP-1 analog. Thus, UPS may be a potent target to treat deleterious metabolic conditions leading to type 2 diabetes. PMID:24642635

  14. TIM-1 glycoprotein binds the adhesion receptor P-selectin and mediates T cell trafficking during inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Angiari, Stefano; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Rossi, Barbara; Dusi, Silvia; Pietronigro, Enrica; Zenaro, Elena; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Toffali, Lara; Piacentino, Gennj; Budui, Simona; Rennert, Paul; Xiao, Sheng; Laudanna, Carlo; Casasnovas, Jose M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Constantin, Gabriela

    2014-04-17

    Selectins play a central role in leukocyte trafficking by mediating tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces. Here we have reported that T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) is a P-selectin ligand. We have shown that human and murine TIM-1 binds to P-selectin, and that TIM-1 mediates tethering and rolling of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17, but not Th2 and regulatory T cells on P-selectin. Th1 and Th17 cells lacking the TIM-1 mucin domain showed reduced rolling in thrombin-activated mesenteric venules and inflamed brain microcirculation. Inhibition of TIM-1 had no effect on naive T cell homing, but it reduced T cell recruitment in a skin hypersensitivity model and blocked experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Uniquely, the TIM-1 immunoglobulin variable domain was also required for P-selectin binding. Our data demonstrate that TIM-1 is a major P-selectin ligand with a specialized role in T cell trafficking during inflammatory responses and the induction of autoimmune disease.

  15. Role of CCL7 in Type I Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chuan-Hui; Collins, Andrea M.; Boettner, Douglas R.; Yang, YanFen

    2017-01-01

    Molecules that are necessary for ocular hypersensitivity reactions include the receptors CCR1 and CCR3; CCL7 is a ligand for these receptors. Therefore, we explored the role of CCL7 in mast cell activity and motility in vitro and investigated the requirement for CCL7 in a murine model of IgE-mediated allergic conjunctivitis. For mast cells treated with IgE and Ag, the presence of CCL7 synergistically enhanced degranulation and calcium influx. CCL7 also induced chemotaxis in mast cells. CCL7-deficient bone marrow–derived mast cells showed decreased degranulation following IgE and Ag treatment compared with wild-type bone marrow–derived mast cells, but there was no difference in degranulation when cells were activated via an IgE-independent pathway. In vivo, CCL7 was upregulated in conjunctival tissue during an OVA-induced allergic response. Notably, the early-phase clinical symptoms in the conjunctiva after OVA challenge were significantly higher in OVA-sensitized wild-type mice than in control challenged wild-type mice; the increase was suppressed in CCL7-deficient mice. In the OVA-induced allergic response, the numbers of conjunctival mast cells were lower in CCL7-deficient mice than in wild-type mice. Our results demonstrate that CCL7 is required for maximal OVA-induced ocular anaphylaxis, mast cell recruitment in vivo, and maximal FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation in vitro. A better understanding of the role of CCL7 in mediating ocular hypersensitivity reactions will provide insights into mast cell function and novel treatments for allergic ocular diseases. PMID:27956527

  16. Nanomedicine-mediated cancer stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Song; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most tumours are heterogeneous and contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that exhibit distinctive self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation capabilities, which are believed to play a crucial role in tumour progression, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis in multiple malignancies. Given that the existence of CSCs is a primary obstacle to cancer therapy, a tremendous amount of effort has been put into the development of anti-CSC strategies, and several potential approaches to kill therapeutically-resistant CSCs have been explored, including inhibiting ATP-binding cassette transporters, blocking essential signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and survival of CSCs, targeting CSCs surface markers and destroying the tumour microenvironment. Meanwhile, an increasing number of therapeutic agents (e.g. small molecule drugs, nucleic acids and antibodies) to selectively target CSCs have been screened or proposed in recent years. Drug delivery technology-based approaches hold great potential for tackling the limitations impeding clinical applications of CSC-specific agents, such as poor water solubility, short circulation time and inconsistent stability. Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. In this review, we summarise the distinctive biological processes related to CSCs to highlight strategies against inherently drug-resistant CSCs. We then focus on some representative examples that give a glimpse into state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed for CSCs elimination. A perspective on innovative therapeutic

  17. Hypersensitivity to aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    PubMed

    de Weck, A L; Gamboa, P M; Esparza, R; Sanz, M L

    2006-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to aspirin and other non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) manifesting in the airways (rhinosinusitis, polyps, asthma) or in the skin (urticaria, angioedema) is the second most frequent untoward allergic reaction to drugs. Various aspects of this syndrome, such as its clinical features, the cell types and mediators involved, the role of underlying chronic inflammatory processes, the patterns of cross-reactivity between NSAIDs, the major role of sulfidoleukotrienes (LTC4) and of some other mediators such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and C5a are briefly reviewed. It has been assumed for a long time that there were no reliable in vitro tests for that condition and that diagnostic confirmation can only be ascertained by provocation challenge. This appears no longer to be true, since several recent studies using a leukotriene release test (CAST) or a basophil activation test (BAT) on blood basophils, or a combination of both tests, yields positive results (70-75%) in a sizeable number of clinically validated cases, with a high specificity (above 85%). The finding in that syndrome of hyperreactive basophils suggests that the NSAID hypersensitivity syndrome is due to the associated effect of several factors: 1) Localized inflammatory processes causing a non specific cellular hyperreactivity; 2) An abnormal pharmacogenetic reaction to NSAIDs resulting in a hyperproduction of LTC4 and other mediators by activated mast cells, basophils and eosinophils.

  18. Immune responses to ectoparasites of horses, with a focus on insect bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D

    2014-11-01

    Horses are affected by a wide variety of arthropod ectoparasites, ranging from lice which spend their entire life on the host, through ticks which feed over a period of days, to numerous biting insects that only transiently visit the host to feed. The presence of ectoparasites elicits a number of host responses including innate inflammatory responses, adaptive immune reactions and altered behaviour; all of which can reduce the severity of the parasite burden. All of these different responses are linked through immune mechanisms mediated by mast cells and IgE antibodies which have an important role in host resistance to ectoparasites, yet immune responses also cause severe pathological reactions. One of the best described examples of such pathological sequelae is insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) of horses; an IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity to the salivary proteins of Culicoides spp. associated with T-helper-2 production of IL4 and IL13. Importantly, all horses exposed to Culicoides have an expanded population of Culicoides antigen-specific T cells with this pattern of cytokine production, but in those which remain healthy, the inflammatory reaction is tempered by the presence of FoxP3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells that express IL10 and TGF-beta, which suppresses the IL4 production by Culicoides antigen-activated T cells.

  19. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  20. Cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs injected with inactivated chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Senyk, G; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1980-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to chlamydial antigens was readily induced in guinea pigs by a single injection of Betaprone-inactivated chlamydiae in complete Freund adjuvant. The CMI was measured in vivo by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, and in vitro by inhibition of migration of peritoneal exudate cells and by proliferation of lymph node lymphocytes. There was an overall correlation between in vivo and in vitro responses. Of the in vitro assays, migration inhibition reflected the state of sensitization, as judged by skin tests, more uniformly than lymphocyte stimulation. Extensive inter- and intra-species cross-reactivity was noted between LB-1, a strain of C. trachomatis, and three strains of C. psittaci, 6BC, GPIC, and 562F. Cross-reactivity between LB-1 and 6BC was one-way only, by all three parameters: LB-1 elicited strong cross-reactions in 6BC-immunized animals but not vice versa. Antichlamydial antibodies could not be demonstrated in any of the animals by microimmunofluorescence.

  1. Histamine suppresses regulatory T cells mediated by TGF-β in murine chronic allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tamaka, Kyoko; Seike, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Tamio; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress effector T cells and ameliorate contact hypersensitivity (CH); however, the role of Tregs in chronic allergic contact dermatitis (CACD) has not been assessed. Repeated elicitation of CH has been used to produce CACD models in mice. We previously showed that the presence of histamine facilitates the creation of eczematous lesions in this model using histidine decarboxylase (HDC) (-/-) mice. Therefore, the effects of histamine on Tregs in the CACD model were investigated in this study. CACD was developed by repeated epicutaneous application of 2, 4, 6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on HDC (+/+) and HDC (-/-) murine skin to assess the effects of histamine in CACD. Histamine aggravated CACD in the murine model and suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin. Histamine also suppressed the level of TGF-β1 in this model. Recombinant TGF-β1 or anti-TGF-β1 antibody was injected into the dorsal dermis of HDC (+/+) mice daily just before TNCB challenge to determine the effects of histamine-regulated TGF-β on the Treg population in CACD. Recombinant TGF-β1 injection promoted the infiltration of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10; however, anti-TGF-β1 antibody injection suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10. Histamine suppresses the number of Tregs in CACD, and this effect is mediated by TGF-β.

  2. Enkephalins and immunity. II: In vivo modulation of cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Marić, D; Janković, B D

    1987-01-01

    Body, thymus, and spleen weights, and cellular makeup of lymphoid tissues of rat were not affected to a great extent by intraperitoneal injections of met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, or naloxone. However, enkephalins induced a diminution of peripheral blood leukocytes and lymphocytes. In addition, met-enkephalin depleted the population of T4 helper/inducer lymphocytes. On the other hand, there was an increase of blood leukocytes and lymphocytes in naloxone-treated animals. Arthus and delayed skin hypersensitivity reactions to bovine serum albumin and old tuberculin were sharply reduced in enkephalin-treated rats. Rejection of allogenic thyroid graft implanted under the renal capsule was considerably delayed by repeated injections of enkephalins. Mesenteric mast cell degranulation in rats sensitized to ovalbumin and injected with a shocking dose of antigen was less pronounced after treatment with enkephalins. These results show that enkephalins, in dosage levels of 5 mg/kg b.w., exert a suppressive influence on cell-mediated immune reactions. Other experiments from our laboratory, reported in a companion paper in this volume, suggest that much lower doses may have opposite (immunoenhancing) effects.

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide from the Oxidative Burst Is Neither Necessary Nor Sufficient for Hypersensitive Cell Death Induction, Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase Stimulation, Salicylic Acid Accumulation, or Scopoletin Consumption in Cultured Tobacco Cells Treated with Elicitin

    PubMed Central

    Dorey, Stéphan; Kopp, Marguerite; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Fritig, Bernard; Kauffmann, Serge

    1999-01-01

    H2O2 from the oxidative burst, cell death, and defense responses such as the production of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), salicylic acid (SA), and scopoletin were analyzed in cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells treated with three proteinaceous elicitors: two elicitins (α-megaspermin and β-megaspermin) and one glycoprotein. These three proteins have been isolated from Phytophthora megasperma H20 and have been previously shown to be equally efficient in inducing a hypersensitive response (HR) upon infiltration into tobacco leaves. However, in cultured tobacco cells these elicitors exhibited strikingly different biological activities. β-Megaspermin was the only elicitor that caused cell death and induced a strong, biphasic H2O2 burst. Both elicitins stimulated PAL activity similarly and strongly, while the glycoprotein caused only a slight increase. Only elicitins induced SA accumulation and scopoletin consumption, and β-megaspermin was more efficient. To assess the role of H2O2 in HR cell death and defense response expression in elicitin-treated cells, a gain and loss of function strategy was used. Our results indicated that H2O2 was neither necessary nor sufficient for HR cell death, PAL activation, or SA accumulation, and that extracellular H2O2 was not a direct cause of intracellular scopoletin consumption. PMID:10482671

  4. The hypersensitive glucocorticoid response specifically regulates period 1 and expression of circadian genes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Timothy E; Gertz, Jason; Crawford, Gregory E; Garabedian, Michael J; Myers, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate gene expression by binding and activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While ligand affinity determines the global sensitivity of the response, additional proteins act on the genome to tune sensitivity of some genes. However, the genomic extent and specificity of dose-specific glucocorticoid responses are unknown. We show that dose-specific glucocorticoid responses are extraordinarily specific at the genomic scale, able to distinctly express a single gene, the circadian rhythm gene for Period 1 (PER1), at concentrations consistent with the nighttime nadir of human cortisol. We mapped the PER1 response to a single GR binding site. The specific GR binding sequence did not impact sensitivity, and we instead attributed the response to a combination of additional transcription factors and chromatin accessibility acting in the same locus. The PER1 hypersensitive response element is conserved in the mouse, where we found similar upregulation of Per1 in pituitary cells. Targeted and transient overexpression of PER1 led to regulation of additional circadian rhythm genes hours later, suggesting that hypersensitive expression of PER1 impacts circadian gene expression. These findings show that hypersensitive GR binding occurs throughout the genome, drives targeted gene expression, and may be important to endocrine mediation of peripheral circadian rhythms.

  5. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  6. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Janney, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  7. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G R; Janney, R P

    1992-02-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  8. Src family kinase mediated negative regulation of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization involves both intrinsic and microenvironmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Borneo, Jovencio; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Sims, Emily Catherine; Vemula, Sasidhar; Orschell, Christie M.; Yoder, Merv; Kapur, Reuben

    2007-01-01

    Objective The intracellular signals that contribute to G-CSF receptor induced stem cell mobilization are poorly characterized. Methods We show enhanced G-CSF induced mobilization of stem cells in mice deficient in the expression of Src family kinases (SFK−/−), which is associated with hypersensitivity of SFK−/− bone marrow cells to G-CSF as well as sustained activation of Stat3. Results A proteome map of the bone marrow fluid derived from wildtype and SFK−/− mice revealed a significant global reduction in the number of proteins in SFK−/− mice compared to controls, which was associated with elevated MMP-9 levels, reduced SDF-1 expression, and enhanced break down of VCAM-1. Transplantation of wildtype or SFK−/− stem cells into wildtype mice and treatment with G-CSF recapitulated the G-CSF induced increase in stem cell mobilization noted in SFK−/− non-transplanted mice; however, the increase was significantly less. G-CSF treatment of SFK−/− mice engrafted with wildtype stem cells also demonstrated a modest increase in stem cell mobilization compared to controls, however the observed increase was greatest in mice completely devoid of SFKs. Conclusions These data suggest an involvement of both hematopoietic intrinsic and microenvironmental factors in Src kinase mediated mobilization of stem cells and identify Src kinases as potential targets for modulating stem cell mobilization. PMID:17588471

  9. Cytoneme-mediated cell-cell contacts for Hedgehog reception

    PubMed Central

    González-Méndez, Laura; Seijo-Barandiarán, Irene; Guerrero, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Morphogens regulate tissue patterning through their distribution in concentration gradients. Emerging research establishes a role for specialized signalling filopodia, or cytonemes, in morphogen dispersion and signalling. Previously we demonstrated that Hedgehog (Hh) morphogen is transported via vesicles along cytonemes emanating from signal-producing cells to form a gradient in Drosophila epithelia. However, the mechanisms for signal reception and transfer are still undefined. Here, we demonstrate that cytonemes protruding from Hh-receiving cells contribute to Hh gradient formation. The canonical Hh receptor Patched is localized in these cellular protrusions and Hh reception takes place in membrane contact sites between Hh-sending and Hh-receiving cytonemes. These two sets of cytonemes have similar dynamics and both fall in two different dynamic behaviours. Furthermore, both the Hh co-receptor Interference hedgehog (Ihog) and the glypicans are critical for this cell-cell cytoneme mediated interaction. These findings suggest that the described contact sites might facilitate morphogen presentation and reception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24045.001 PMID:28825565

  10. Sulfite hypersensitivity. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Jacobsen, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfiting agents (sulfur dioxide and the sodium and potassium salts of bisulfite, sulfite, and metabisulfite) are widely used as preservatives in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Within the past 5 years, there have been numerous reports of adverse reactions to sulfiting agents. This review presents a comprehensive compilation and discussion of reports describing reactions to ingested, inhaled, and parenterally administered sulfite. Sulfite hypersensitivity is usually, but not exclusively, found within the chronic asthmatic population. Although there is some disagreement on its prevalence, a number of studies have indicated that 5 to 10% of all chronic asthmatics are sulfite hypersensitive. This review also describes respiratory sulfur dioxide sensitivity which essentially all asthmatics experience. Possible mechanisms of sulfite hypersensitivity and sulfur dioxide sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sulfite metabolism and the role of sulfite oxidase in the detoxification of exogenous sulfite are reviewed in relationship to the etiology of sulfite hypersensitivity. 147 references.

  11. Neuron-glia crosstalk gets serious: Role in pain hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent studies show that peripheral injury activates both neuronal and non-neuronal or glial components of the peripheral and central cellular circuitry. The subsequent neuron-glial interactions contribute to pain hypersensitivity. This review will briefly discuss novel findings that have shed light on the cellular mechanisms of neuron-glial interactions in persistent pain. Recent findings Two fundamental questions related to neuron-glial interactions in pain mechanisms have been addressed: 1) what are the signals that lead to central glial activation after injury and 2) how glial cells affect CNS neuronal activity and promote hyperalgesia. Summary Evidence indicates that central glial activation depends on nerve inputs from the site of injury and release of chemical mediators. Hematogenous immune cells may migrate/infiltrate to the brain and circulating inflammatory mediators may penetrate the blood brain barrier to participate in central glial responses to injury. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β released from glia may facilitate pain transmission through its coupling to neuronal glutamate receptors. This bidirectional neuron-glial signaling plays a key role in glial activation, cytokine production and the initiation and maintenance of hyperalgesia. Recognition of the contribution of the mutual neuron-glial interactions to central sensitization and hyperalgesia prompts new treatment for chronic pain. PMID:18784481

  12. Jaundice induced by stanozolol hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Davidson, J. F.; Patrick, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 66-year-old male patient developed jaundice after 7 months of treatment with the anabolic steroid, stanozolol. When the drug was withdrawn he made a full and uneventful recovery. A liver biopsy showed the histology of a hypersensitivity reaction. This is believed to be the first time jaundice has been recorded with stanozolol therapy and the first time a hypersensitivity-type jaundice has been recorded with any anabolic steroid. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1273017

  13. Drug hypersensitivity in Phramongkutklao Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sangasapasviliya, Atik; Prakongwong, Tharatip; Ayuthaya, Pinyapat Kanechorn Na; Ayuthaya, Rajyani Kanechaun Na

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of drug hypersensitivity, clinical manifestations, type of drugs involved, severity, and patients demographic data. A cross-sectional descriptive study. The study was performed from January 1st, 2008 to December 31th, 2008 at Phramongkutklao Hospital. Data were collected from Pharmaceutical Department, Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine including adverse events reported by pharmacists. All records of in-patients and out-patients including gender, age, causative drugs, type of drug hypersensitivity and severity of hypersensitivity were collected. A total of 140 patients who had drug hypersensitivity were recorded. The most common drug hypersensitivity was due to antimicrobial agents which penicillin group was the most frequently involved. Of 61 patients (43.57%), 27 (19.28%) received anti-inflammatory and muscle relaxant drugs and 18 (12.85%) had drugs acting on the central nervous system. The most common manifestration of drug allergy was maculopapular rash (34.99%), followed by nonspecific erythrematous rash (16.42%), fixed drug eruption (9.28%) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (8.57%), respectively. Majority (80.71%) of drug hypersensitivity was mild in severity. Moderate, severe and lethal hypersensitivity accounted for 8.51%, 10.0%, 0.71% respectively. Female were 51.77% while 48.22% were male. The mean age was 47.0 years (ranged from 8-100 years). There were 57 (40.71%) patients over 50 years of age and 103 (73.57%) patients had taken more than one medication. Antimicrobial agents were the common cause while maculopapular rash was the most frequent clinical manifestation of drug hypersensitivity.

  14. Regulatory T-cell-mediated attenuation of T-cell responses to the NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX vaccine in patients with advanced malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nicholaou, Theo; Ebert, Lisa M; Davis, Ian D; McArthur, Grant A; Jackson, Heather; Dimopoulos, Nektaria; Tan, Bee; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Miloradovic, Lena; Hopkins, Wendie; Pan, Linda; Venhaus, Ralph; Hoffman, Eric W; Chen, Weisan; Cebon, Jonathan

    2009-03-15

    NY-ESO-1 is a highly immunogenic antigen expressed in a variety of malignancies, making it an excellent target for cancer vaccination. We recently developed a vaccine consisting of full-length recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein formulated with ISCOMATRIX adjuvant, which generated strong humoral and T-cell-mediated immune responses and seemed to reduce the risk of disease relapse in patients with fully resected melanoma. This study examines the clinical and immunologic efficacy of the same vaccine in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, circulating NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and proportions of regulatory T cells (Treg) were assessed in patients. In contrast to patients with minimal residual disease, advanced melanoma patients showed no clinical responses to vaccination. Although strong antibody responses were mounted, the generation of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses was significantly impaired. The proportion of patients with circulating NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells was also reduced, and although many patients had CD8(+) T cells specific to a broad range of NY-ESO-1 epitopes, the majority of these responses were preexisting. Tregs were enumerated in the blood by flow cytometric detection of cells with a CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) phenotype. Patients with advanced melanoma had a significantly higher proportion of circulating Treg compared with those with minimal residual disease. Our results point to a tumor-induced systemic immune suppression, showing a clear association between the stage of melanoma progression, the number of Treg in the blood, and the clinical and immunologic efficacy of the NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX cancer vaccine.

  15. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nageswari, K S; Sarma, K R; Rajvanshi, V S; Sharan, R; Sharma, M; Barathwal, V; Singh, V

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoic chambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months (P less than 0.01, delta % 21.5%) and during follow-up (P less than 0.01, delta % 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (delta mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (delta % +12.4 vs. +7.54). The animals were sacrificed and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  17. Cell fusion-mediated improvement in transfection competence for repair-deficient mutant of mouse T cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomi, T.; Hieda-Shiomi, N.; Sato, K.; Yoshizumi, T.; Nakazawa, T.

    1988-03-01

    A multiple mutagen-sensitive mutant (XUM1) of mouse T-cell lymphoma line, L5178Y, is hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet (UV) light, and cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C). The frequency of transfection for XUM1 cells after exposure to calcium phosphate-coprecipitated pSV2neo DNA was more than 10(4)-fold less effective than that for Ltk-aprt- (LTA) cells. Other transfection methods (DEAE-dextran and polybrene-DMSO) were not effective for L5178Y and XUM1 cells. The transfection-proficient trait of LTA cells was demonstrated to be genetically dominant by examining the the transfection frequency in hybrid clones constructed between XUM1 and LTA cells. To circumvent the problem with XUM1, the LTA genes necessary for transformation processes were introduced into XUM1 cells by constructing hybrids between XUM1 and LTA cells irradiated with X-rays which causes directional chromosome elimination for hybrid cells. Four of 194 hybrid clones tested were transfection-proficient and hypersensitive to UV (XL102, XL107, XL215, and XL216). All four clones were not hypersensitive to X-rays or mitomycin C. The frequencies of transfection for XL102 and XL216 were nearly the same level as that for LTA cells. The efficiency of transfection for XL107 and XL215 was 10 to 100-fold lower than that for LTA cells.

  18. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswari, K. Sri; Sarma, K. R.; Rajvanshi, V. S.; Sharan, R.; Sharma, Manju; Barathwal, Vinita; Singh, Vinod

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoicchambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months ( P<0.01, Δ% 21.5%) and during follow-up ( P<0.01, Δ% 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (Δ mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (Δ%+12.4 vs.+7.54). The animals were sacrified and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed. No significant variation was observed in the tissue T lymphocyte counts of microwave-irradiated rabbits. From these results it is speculated that the T lymphocytes are sequestered to various lymphoid organs under the influence of microwaves. A sub-population of T cells known as T helper cells (mediating DTH response) are

  19. Oncostatin M induces heat hypersensitivity by gp130-dependent sensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Michiel; Constantin, Cristina E; Andratsch, Manfred; Quarta, Serena; Mair, Norbert; Kress, Michaela

    2011-12-23

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family and regulates eg. gene activation, cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. OSM binds to a receptor complex consisting of the ubiquitously expressed signal transducer gp130 and the ligand binding OSM receptor subunit, which is expressed on a specific subset of primary afferent neurons. In the present study, the effect of OSM on heat nociception was investigated in nociceptor-specific gp130 knock-out (SNS-gp130-/-) and gp130 floxed (gp130fl/fl) mice.Subcutaneous injection of pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of OSM into the hind-paw of C57BL6J wild type mice significantly reduced paw withdrawal latencies to heat stimulation. In contrast to gp130fl/fl mice, OSM did not induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo in SNS-gp130-/- mice. OSM applied at the receptive fields of sensory neurons in in vitro skin-nerve preparations showed that OSM significantly increased the discharge rate during a standard ramp-shaped heat stimulus. The capsaicin- and heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1, expressed on a subpopulation of nociceptive neurons, has been shown to play an important role in inflammation-induced heat hypersensitivity. Stimulation of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons with OSM resulted in potentiation of capsaicin induced ionic currents. In line with these recordings, mice with a null mutation of the TRPV1 gene did not show any signs of OSM-induced heat hypersensitivity in vivo.The present data suggest that OSM induces thermal hypersensitivity by directly sensitizing nociceptors via OSMR-gp130 receptor mediated potentiation of TRPV1.

  20. Lung Transplantation for Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan P.; Koth, Laura; Mooney, Joshua; Golden, Jeff; Hays, Steven; Greenland, John; Wolters, Paul; Ghio, Emily; Jones, Kirk D.; Leard, Lorriana; Kukreja, Jasleen; Blanc, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inhaled antigen-mediated interstitial lung disease (ILD). Advanced disease may necessitate the need for lung transplantation. There are no published studies addressing lung transplant outcomes in HP. We characterized HP outcomes compared with referents undergoing lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). METHODS: To identify HP cases, we reviewed records for all ILD lung transplantation cases at our institution from 2000 to 2013. We compared clinical characteristics, survival, and acute and chronic rejection for lung transplant recipients with HP to referents with IPF. We also reviewed diagnoses of HP discovered only by explant pathology and looked for evidence of recurrent HP after transplant. Survival was compared using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard modeling. RESULTS: We analyzed 31 subjects with HP and 91 with IPF among 183 cases undergoing lung transplantation for ILD. Survival at 1, 3, and 5 years after lung transplant in HP compared with IPF was 96%, 89%, and 89% vs 86%, 67%, and 49%, respectively. Subjects with HP manifested a reduced adjusted risk for death compared with subjects with IPF (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08-0.74; P = .013). Of the 31 cases, the diagnosis of HP was unexpectedly made at explant in five (16%). Two subjects developed recurrent HP in their allografts. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, subjects with HP have excellent medium-term survival after lung transplantation and, relative to IPF, a reduced risk for death. HP may be initially discovered only by review of the explant pathology. Notably, HP may recur in the allograft. PMID:25412059

  1. Mediators in cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.J.; Maizel, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among seven sections. The section headings are: Cell Cycle and Control of Cell Growth, Growth Factors for Nonlymphoid Cells, Colony-Stimulating Factors, Stem Cells and Hematopoiesis, Lymphoid Growth Factors, Growth Factors in Neoplasia, Interferon, and Differentiation in Normal and Neoplastic Cells.

  2. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome induced by meglumine antimoniate.

    PubMed

    Jeddi, Fakhri; Caumes, Eric; Thellier, Marc; Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Mazier, Dominique; Buffet, Pierre A

    2009-06-01

    We report a case of drug hypersensitivity syndrome (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms [DRESS]) induced by parenteral meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) in a 40-year-old man who traveled to Bolivia and was treated for mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Two weeks after starting therapy, the patient had fever, joint pain, a cutaneous eruption, and hypereosinophilia (1,358 cells/mm(3)). These symptoms resolved after drug withdrawal but reappeared upon reintroduction of the drug. Pentavalent antimonials should be definitively withdrawn in patients with hypereosinophilia > 1,000 cells/mm(3) accompanied by systemic manifestations consistent with DRESS.

  3. Pro and Contra: Provocation Tests in Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Soyer, Ozge; Sahiner, Umit Murat; Sekerel, Bulent Enis

    2017-01-01

    Drug provocation test (DPT) is the controlled administration of a drug to diagnose immune- or non-immune-mediated drug hypersensitivity and the last step for accurate recognition of drug hypersensitivity reactions when the previous diagnostic evaluations are negative or unavailable. A DPT is performed only if other conventional tests fail to yield conclusive results. In each clinical presentation, “to provoke or not to provoke” a patient should be decided after careful assessment of the risk–benefit ratio. Well-defined benefits of DPT include confirmative exclusion of diagnoses of drug hypersensitivity and provision of safe alternatives. However, disadvantages such as safety, difficulty in interpretations of results, lack of objective biomarkers, risks of resensitization, efficiency in daily practice, and lack of standardized protocols, are poorly debated. This review summarizes the current published research concerning DPT, with particular emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of DPT in an evidence-based manner. PMID:28677662

  4. Angiotensin II receptor type 2 activation is required for cutaneous sensory hyperinnervation and hypersensitivity in a rat hind paw model of inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Many pain syndromes are associated with abnormal proliferation of peripheral sensory fibers. We showed previously that angiotensin II, acting through its type 2 receptor (AT2), stimulates axon outgrowth by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. In this study, we assessed whether AT2 mediates nociceptor hyperinnervation in the rodent hind paw model of inflammatory pain. Plantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), but not saline, produced marked thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity through 7 days. This was accompanied by proliferation of dermal and epidermal PGP9.5- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) axons, and dermal axons immunoreactive for GFRα2 but not tyrosine hydroxylase or neurofilament H. Continuous infusion of the AT2 antagonist PD123319 beginning with CFA injection completely prevented hyperinnervation as well as hypersensitivity over a 7 day period. A single PD123319 injection 7 days after CFA also reversed thermal hypersensitivity and partially reversed mechanical hypersensitivity 3 hours later, without affecting cutaneous innervation. Angiotensin II synthesizing proteins renin and angiotensinogen were largely absent after saline but abundant in T-cells and macrophages in CFA-injected paws with or without PD123319. Thus, emigrant cells at the site of inflammation apparently establish a renin-angiotensin system, and AT2 activation elicits nociceptor sprouting and heightened thermal and mechanical sensitivity. Perspective Short-term AT2 activation is a potent contributor to thermal hypersensitivity, while long-term effects (such as hyperinnervation) also contribute to mechanical hypersensitivity. Pharmacological blockade of AT2 signaling represents a potential therapeutic strategy aimed at biological mechanisms underlying chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:23726047

  5. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Associated with Diminished Cell-Mediated Immunity in Antarctic Expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cooley, Helen; Dubow, Robin; Lugg, Desmond

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at two Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, which was evaluated two times before winter isolation and three times during isolation. At all five evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished. CMI response. Diminished CMI was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal CMI responses for all five tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, after, and during the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least one occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (p=0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (p<0.0005) when CMI responsiveness was diminished than when CMI status was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter results in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  7. Dynamical optical imaging monocytes/macrophages migration and activation in contact hypersensitivity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory monocytes/macrophages (Mon/Mφ) play an important role in cutaneous allergic inflammation. However, their migration and activation in dermatitis and how they accelerate the inflammatory reaction are largely unknown. Optical molecular imaging is the most promising tool for investigating the function and motility of immune cells in vivo. We have developed a multi-scale optical imaging approach to evaluate the spatio-temporal dynamic behavior and properties of immune cells from the whole field of organs to the cellular level at the inflammatory site in delayed type hypersensitivity reaction. Here, we developed some multi-color labeling mouse models based on the endogenous labeling with fluorescent proteins and the exogenous labeling with fluorescent dyes. We investigated the cell movement, cell interaction and function of immunocytes (e.g. Mon/Mφ, DC, T cells and neutrophils) in the skin allergy inflammation (e.g., contact hypersensitivity) by using intravital microscopy. The long-term imaging data showed that after inflammatory Mon/Mφ transendothelial migration in dermis, they migrating in interstitial space of dermis. Depletion of blood monocyte with clodronate liposome extremely reduced the inflammatory reaction. Our finding provided further insight into inflammatory Mon/Mφ mediating the inflammatory cascade through functional migration in allergic contact dermatitis.

  8. E-prostanoid 2 receptors dampen mast cell degranulation via cAMP/PKA-mediated suppression of IgE-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Pages, Mariona; Olivera, Ana; Torres, Rosa; Picado, César; de Mora, Fernando; Rivera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The experimental administration of PGE2 for the treatment of asthma dampens clinical symptoms, and similar efficacy has been found in dust mite-induced hypersensitivity reactions in animal models. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which PGE2 mediates suppression of MC degranulation. We find that the effect of PGE2 on FcεRI-dependent MC degranulation varies from activating to suppressing, depending on the relative ratio of EP2 to EP3 expression on these cells with suppression evident only in cells having increased EP2 to EP3 expression. Consistent with a role for EP2 in suppressing MC responses in vitro, we found that a selective EP2 agonist, Butaprost, inhibited MC-mediated FcεRI-induced immediate hypersensitivity in a model of PCA. EP2 engagement on MCs increased cAMP production and inhibited FcεRI-mediated calcium influx. In addition, it also decreased the extent of FcεRI-induced Fyn kinase activity, leading to decreased phosphorylation of key signaling molecules such as Gab2 and Akt. Treatment with an antagonist of cAMP or shRNA down-regulation of PKA (the principal intracellular target of cAMP) reversed the EP2-mediated inhibitory effect on MC degranulation and restored calcium influx and phosphorylation of Akt. Collectively, the findings demonstrate that EP2 suppresses the Fyn-mediated signals that are central to FcεRI-dependent MC degranulation, suggesting that engagement of the EP2 on MCs may be beneficial in dampening allergic responses. PMID:22859831

  9. Interferon-gamma is necessary for the expression of hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, G; Hunninghake, G W

    1997-01-01

    Farmers lung disease is a common form of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) and is characterized by inflammation and granuloma formation in the lung. Interferon-gamma is important for the expression of granulomatous diseases caused by infectious agents; however, the role this mediator in regulating expression of the granulomatous response to inhaled antigen is not known. To evaluate this, we compared the response to inhaled antigen of mice that do not express the gene coding for interferon-gamma (GKO) with that of their normal littermates (WT). GKO and WT mice on a BALB/c background were exposed to 150 microg of the thermophilic bacteria Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula or saline alone, for three consecutive days a week, for 3 wk. After exposure to antigen, WT mice developed a marked granulomatous inflammation associated with an increase in lung weight and numbers of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL). Although GKO mice also exhibited an increase in lung weight and numbers of cells in BAL fluid, they developed minimal inflammation and no granulomas after a similar exposure to antigen. To further evaluate if the lack of a response to antigen in GKO mice was due to lack of IFN-gamma, we replaced this mediator via intraperitoneal injections. When given replacement IFN-gamma, the GKO mice developed granulomatous inflammation in the lung. These studies show that IFN-gamma is essential for the expression of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. PMID:9153280

  10. Cellular Tests for the Evaluation of Drug Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; Montanez, Maria I; Fernandez, Tahia D; Perkins, James R; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) is complex, with many potential pitfalls. Although the use of clinical history and skin testing can be valuable, drug provocation testing (DPT) remains the gold standard for many DHR. However, DPT carries some potential risk and should not be performed for severe reactions. There is therefore a general consensus on the need to improve in vitro tests to achieve safe and accurate diagnosis of DHR. A range of in vitro approaches can be applied depending on the type of reaction and the immunological mechanism involved, i.e. IgE- or T-cell-mediated. However, commercially available tests only exist for a handful of drugs, and only for drugs that provoke IgEmediated DHR. Of the cellular tests that focus on the identification of the culprit drug, the best validated is the basophil activation test used for evaluating IgE-mediated reactions. For T-cell-mediated DHR, the lymphocyte transformation test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot appear to be the most promising. However, these tests often show low sensitivity. Despite their current drawbacks, in vitro tests can complement in vivo testing and further work in this area will be crucial to improve our current arsenal of tools for the detection and assessment of DHR. For this, the use of appropriate and relevant drug metabolites as well as other factors that can amplify the cell response as well as the use of multiple tests in concert key to improving in vitro diagnosis. Such improvements will be crucial to diagnose patients with severe reactions for whom DPT cannot be performed.

  11. Dissociation between tumour resistance and delayed-type hypersensitivity to tumour-associated antigens in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, D C; Parker, D; Turk, J L

    1980-01-01

    A comparison was made in mice between resistance to growth of a syngeneic methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma (Meth A) and specific delayed-type hypersensitivity to this tumour. Resistance could be induced in 90% of mice following a single injection of 10(4) Meth A cells. This resistance could be transferred by spleen cells but not serum. Delayed skin reactivity to ultrasonicated Meth A cells was found in both tumour-resistant and tumour-bearing mice and could be passively transferred by spleen cells and serum. These findings suggest a dissociation between tumour resistance and specific delayed-type hypersensitivity. It would appear that, in this system, delayed skin reactivity to Meth A tumour cells is mediated by humoral antibody despite a mononuclear cell infiltrate at 24 and 48 h and that this could be the reason for its lack of correlation with host resistance to tumour growth which is cell-mediated and not transferable by serum. Images Figure 3 PMID:7380461

  12. Cell-cell interactions mediate cytoskeleton organization and collective endothelial cell chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, Amir

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the role of cell-cell and cell-ligand interactions in cytoskeleton organization of endothelial cells (ECs) and their directional migration within a microfluidic device. The migration of ECs in response to a biochemical factor was studied. Mathematical analysis of the cell migration pathways and cellular cytoskeleton revealed that directional migration, migration persistence length, migration speed, and cytoskeletal stress fiber alignment can be mediated by the level of cell contacts as well as the presence or absence of a biochemical polarizing factor. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, higher cell density and more frequent cell contacts has a reinforcing effect on collective cell chemotaxis. In contrast, in the absence of a polarizing factor, high cell density can decrease or suppress the ability of the cells to migrate. Also, the correlation of actin stress fiber organization and alignment with directional migration of ECs was investigated. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, stress fibers within the cytoskeleton of ECs can be significantly aligned parallel to the gradient direction when the cells have higher level of contacts. The results also show that the organization and alignment of actin stress fibers is mediated by cell adhesion junctions during collective cell migration and introduce cell-cell interactions as a key factor during collective cell chemotaxis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R.J.; Tse, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents. Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects. For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test. It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs. PMID:445303

  14. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Warrington, R J; Tse, K S

    1979-05-05

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents.Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects.For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test.It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs.

  15. Altered iron homeostasis involvement in arsenite-mediated cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Eckard, Jonathan; Chen, Haobin; Costa, Max; Frenkel, Krystyna; Huang, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposure to low doses of arsenite causes transformation of human osteogenic sarcoma (HOS) cells. Although oxidative stress is considered important in arsenite-induced cell transformation, the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which arsenite transforms human cells are still unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether altered iron homeostasis, known to affect cellular oxidative stress, can contribute to the arsenite-mediated cell transformation. Using arsenite-induced HOS cell transformation as a model, it was found that total iron levels are significantly higher in transformed HOS cells in comparison to parental control HOS cells. Under normal iron metabolism conditions, iron homeostasis is tightly controlled by inverse regulation of ferritin and transferrin receptor (TfR) through iron regulatory proteins (IRP). Increased iron levels in arsenite transformed cells should theoretically lead to higher ferritin and lower TfR in these cells than in controls. However, the results showed that both ferritin and TfR are decreased, apparently through two different mechanisms. A lower ferritin level in cytoplasm was due to the decreased mRNA in the arsenite-transformed HOS cells, while the decline in TfR was due to a lowered IRP-binding activity. By challenging cells with iron, it was further established that arsenite-transformed HOS cells are less responsive to iron treatment than control HOS cells, which allows accumulation of iron in the transformed cells, as exemplified by significantly lower ferritin induction. On the other hand, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an antioxidant previously shown to suppress As-mediated cell transformation, prevents As-mediated ferritin depletion. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered iron homeostasis contributes to arsenite-induced oxidative stress and, thus, may be involved in arsenite-mediated cell transformation. PMID:16443159

  16. Functions of Exosomes and Microbial Extracellular Vesicles in Allergy and Contact and Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Askenase, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are newly recognized intercellular conveyors of functional molecular mechanisms. Notably, they transfer RNAs and proteins between different cells that can then participate in the complex pathogenesis of allergic and related hypersensitivity responses and disease mechanisms, as described herein. This review highlights this important new appreciation of the in vivo participation of such extracellular vesicles in the interactions between allergy-mediating cells. We take into account paracrine epigenetic exchanges mediated by surrounding stromal cells and the endocrine receipt of exosomes from distant cells via the circulation. Exosomes are natural ancient nanoparticles of life. They are made by all cells and in some form by all species down to fungi and bacteria, and are present in all fluids. Besides a new focus on their role in the transmission of genetic regulation, exosome transfer of allergens was recently shown to induce allergic inflammation. Importantly, regulatory and tolerogenic exosomes can potently inhibit allergy and hypersensitivity responses, usually acting nonspecifically, but can also proceed in an antigen-specific manner due to the coating of the exosome surface with antibodies. Deep analysis of processes mediated by exosomes should result in the development of early diagnostic biomarkers, as well as allergen-specific, preventive and therapeutic strategies. These will likely significantly diminish the risks of current allergen-specific parenteral desensitization procedures, and of the use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs. Since extracellular vesicles are physiological, they can be fashioned for the specific delivery of therapeutic molecular instructions through easily tolerated, noninvasive routes, such as oral ingestion, nasal administration, and perhaps even inhalation.

  17. Structural basis of chronic beryllium disease: linking allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W

    2014-07-03

    T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. Here, we show that the T cell ligand is created when a Be(2+) cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be(2+) itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be(2+) and an accompanying Na(+) cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of preexisting self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural Basis of Chronic Beryllium Disease: Linking Allergic Hypersensitivity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Falta, Michael T.; Bowerman, Natalie A.; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P.; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. We show here that the T cell ligand is created when a Be2+ cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be2+ itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be2+ and an accompanying Na+ cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of pre-existing self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. PMID:24995984

  19. Cockroach hypersensitivity in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Pola, J; Valdivieso, R; Zapata, C; Moneo, I; Duce, F; Larrad, L; Losada, E

    1988-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to cockroach antigen has been recognized as an important cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and asthma. To assess the frequency of cockroach hypersensitivity in our country, 150 asthmatic atopic subjects were studied using skin testing and in vitro assays for cockroach-specific IgE antibodies (Oriental and German cockroaches). Twenty-two of 61 patients who had a positive history of cockroach exposure had positive skin tests, and only 3 of 89 patients who had no history of exposure had positive skin reactions. Of 25 patients with positive skin tests, 23 showed specific IgE antibodies against oriental and German cockroaches using RAST and EIA techniques. In summary, approximately 15% of asthmatic atopics in Madrid area are sensitive to cockroaches (positive skin test + specific IgE antibodies). These results indicate that cockroach hypersensitivity should be considered in every patient with perennial asthma.

  20. Myc inhibits JNK-mediated cell death in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiuhong; Feng, Yu; Chen, Xinhong; Li, Wenzhe; Xue, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The proto-oncogene Myc is well known for its roles in promoting cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. However, in this study, we found from a genetic screen that Myc inhibits, rather than promotes, cell death triggered by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in Drosophila. Firstly, expression of Drosophila Myc (dMyc) suppresses, whereas loss of dMyc enhances, ectopically activated JNK signaling-induced cell death. Secondly, dMyc impedes physiologically activated JNK pathway-mediated cell death. Thirdly, loss of dMyc triggers JNK pathway activation and JNK-dependent cell death. Finally, the mammalian cMyc gene, when expressed in Drosophila, impedes activated JNK signaling-induced cell death. Thus, besides its well-studied apoptosis promoting function, Myc also antagonizes JNK-mediated cell death in Drosophila, and this function is likely conserved from fly to human.

  1. Effect of premedications in a murine model of asparaginase hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Christian A; Smith, Colton; Karol, Seth E; Ramsey, Laura B; Liu, Chengcheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Evans, William E; Finkelman, Fred D; Relling, Mary V

    2015-03-01

    A murine model was developed that recapitulates key features of clinical hypersensitivity to Escherichia coli asparaginase. Sensitized mice developed high levels of anti-asparaginase IgG antibodies and had immediate hypersensitivity reactions to asparaginase upon challenge. Sensitized mice had complete inhibition of plasma asparaginase activity (P = 4.2 × 10(-13)) and elevated levels of mouse mast cell protease 1 (P = 6.1 × 10(-3)) compared with nonsensitized mice. We investigated the influence of pretreatment with triprolidine, cimetidine, the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist CV-6209 [2-(2-acetyl-6-methoxy-3,9-dioxo-4,8-dioxa-2,10-diazaoctacos-1-yl)-1-ethyl-pyridinium chloride], or dexamethasone on the severity of asparaginase-induced allergies. Combining triprolidine and CV-6209 was best for mitigating asparaginase-induced hypersensitivity compared with nonpretreated, sensitized mice (P = 1.2 × 10(-5)). However, pretreatment with oral dexamethasone was the only agent capable of mitigating the severity of the hypersensitivity (P = 0.03) and partially restoring asparaginase activity (P = 8.3 × 10(-4)). To rescue asparaginase activity in sensitized mice without requiring dexamethasone, a 5-fold greater dose of asparaginase was needed to restore enzyme activity to a similar concentration as in nonsensitized mice. Our results suggest a role of histamine and PAF in asparaginase-induced allergies and indicate that mast cell-derived proteases released during asparaginase allergy may be a useful marker of clinical hypersensitivity.

  2. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rituximab-Induced Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Adriano R.; Lottenberg, Richard; Allan, Robert W.; Sriram, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody used to treat CD20+ non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although pulmonary adverse reactions such as cough, rhinitis, bronchospasm, dyspnea and sinusitis are relatively common, other respiratory conditions like cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, interstitial pneumonitis and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage have rarely been reported. Only 2 possible cases of rituximab-associated hypersensitivity pneumonitis have been described to date. We present a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis with classic radiographic and histopathologic findings in a patient treated with rituximab who responded to prednisone. PMID:18843175

  4. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis: an EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Vandenplas, O; Campo, P; Cruz, M J; de Blay, F; Koschel, D; Moscato, G; Pala, G; Raulf, M; Sastre, J; Siracusa, A; Tarlo, S M; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Cormier, Y

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this document was to provide a critical review of the current knowledge on hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by the occupational environment and to propose practical guidance for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis (OHP) is an immunologic lung disease resulting from lymphocytic and frequently granulomatous inflammation of the peripheral airways, alveoli, and surrounding interstitial tissue which develops as the result of a non-IgE-mediated allergic reaction to a variety of organic materials or low molecular weight agents that are present in the workplace. The offending agents can be classified into six broad categories that include bacteria, fungi, animal proteins, plant proteins, low molecular weight chemicals, and metals. The diagnosis of OHP requires a multidisciplinary approach and relies on a combination of diagnostic tests to ascertain the work relatedness of the disease. Both the clinical and the occupational history are keys to the diagnosis and often will lead to the initial suspicion. Diagnostic criteria adapted to OHP are proposed. The cornerstone of treatment is early removal from exposure to the eliciting antigen, although the disease may show an adverse outcome even after avoidance of exposure to the causal agent.

  5. IL-4 abrogates T(H)17 cell-mediated inflammation by selective silencing of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Guenova, Emmanuella; Skabytska, Yuliya; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Weindl, Günther; Sauer, Karin; Tham, Manuela; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Seo, Ji Hae; Ignatova, Desislava; Cozzio, Antonio; Levesque, Mitchell P; Volz, Thomas; Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Thomas, Peter; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Schäkel, Knut; Amarov, Boyko; Eichner, Martin; Schaller, Martin; Clark, Rachael A; Röcken, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo

    2015-02-17

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions (DTHRs), including organ-specific autoimmune diseases in mice and humans. Despite the broadly documented antiinflammatory effect of IL-4, the underlying mode of action remains incompletely understood, as IL-4 also promotes IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs) and IFN-γ-producing T(H)1 cells in vivo. Studying the impact of IL-4 on the polarization of human and mouse DCs, we found that IL-4 exerts opposing effects on the production of either IL-12 or IL-23. While promoting IL-12-producing capacity of DCs, IL-4 completely abrogates IL-23. Bone marrow chimeras proved that IL-4-mediated suppression of DTHRs relies on the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-dependent abrogation of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IL-4 therapy attenuated DTHRs by STAT6- and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-dependent suppression of the IL-23/T(H)17 responses despite simultaneous enhancement of IL-12/TH1 responses. As IL-4 therapy also improves psoriasis in humans and suppresses IL-23/T(H)17 responses without blocking IL-12/T(H)1, selective IL-4-mediated IL-23/T(H)17 silencing is promising as treatment against harmful inflammation, while sparing the IL-12-dependent T(H)1 responses.

  6. The role for decorin in delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Daniela G.; Mohamed, Negia A.; Bocian, Carla; Stadtmann, Anika; Hermann, Sven; Schäfers, Klaus; Schäfers, Michael; Iozzo, Renato V.; Zarbock, Alexander; Götte, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, regulates extracellular matrix organization, growth factor-mediated signaling and cell growth. As decorin may directly modulate immune responses, we investigated its role in a mouse model of contact allergy (oxazolone-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity, DTH) in decorin-deficient (Dcn−/−) and wild-type mice. Dcn−/− mice showed a reduced ear swelling 24 hours after oxazolone treatment with a concurrent attenuation of leukocyte infiltration. These findings were corroborated by reduced glucose metabolism as determined by 18FDG uptake in positron emission tomography scans. Unexpectedly, polymorphonuclear leukocyte numbers in Dcn−/− blood vessels were significantly increased, accompanied by large numbers of flattened leukocytes adherent to the endothelium. Intravital microscopy, flow chamber and static adhesion assays confirmed increased adhesion and reduced transmigration of Dcn−/− leukocytes. Circulating blood neutrophil numbers were significantly increased in Dcn−/− mice 24 hours after DTH elicitation, but only moderately increased in wild-type mice. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was reduced, while syndecan-1 and ICAM-1 were overexpressed in inflamed ears of Dcn−/− mice, indicating that these adhesion molecules could be responsible for increased leukocyte adhesion. Decorin treatment of endothelial cells increased tyrosine phosphorylation and reduced syndecan-1 expression. Notably, absence of syndecan-1 in a genetic background lacking decorin rescued the attenuated DTH phenotype of Dcn−/− mice. Collectively, these results implicate a role for decorin in mediating DTH responses by influencing polymorphonuclear leukocyte attachment to the endothelium. This occurs via two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms that involve a direct anti-adhesive effect on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and a negative regulation of ICAM-1 and syndecan-1 expression. PMID:22043007

  7. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  8. T follicular helper cell programming by cytokine-mediated events.

    PubMed

    Read, Kaitlin A; Powell, Michael D; Oestreich, Kenneth J

    2016-11-01

    CD4(+) T cells, or T helper cells, are critical mediators and coordinators of adaptive immunity. Unique effector T helper cell populations have been identified that perform distinct functions in response to pathogenic infection. The T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are one such subset, which has been identified as the primary T-cell population responsible for interacting with B cells to promote effective antibody-mediated immune responses. Since their initial description at the turn of the century, and subsequent classification as a distinct T helper cell subset, there has been substantial interest in elucidating the regulatory mechanisms that govern Tfh cell formation. The collective insight from this body of work has demonstrated that Tfh cell differentiation is a complex and multistage process regulated by a litany of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors. As with the development of the other recognized T helper cell subsets, specific cytokines exercise prominent roles in both the positive and negative regulation of Tfh cell development. However, the exact composition of, and stage-specific requirements for, these environmental factors in the governance of Tfh cell differentiation remain incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding the role of cytokines in both the promotion and inhibition of Tfh cell differentiation and function. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles.

  10. Mediators involved in the immunomodulatory effects of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Saas, Philippe; Bonnefoy, Francis; Kury-Paulin, Stephanie; Kleinclauss, François; Perruche, Sylvain

    2007-07-15

    Immunomodulatory properties are attributed to apoptotic cells. These properties have been used to modulate allogeneic immune responses in experimental transplantation settings. In independent studies, apoptotic cell infusion has been shown to favor hematopoietic cell engraftment, to increase heart graft survival, and to delay the lethal onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The goal of this review was to discuss how apoptotic cell infusion interferes with graft rejection or host rejection (i.e., GVHD) and to focus on the potential mediators or "perpetuators" involved in apoptotic cell-induced immunomodulation. Particular emphasis on apoptotic cell phagocytosis, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta secretion, and regulatory T cell induction was performed. Stimulating "naturally" immunosuppressive molecules (i.e., TGF-beta) or immunomodulatory cells ("alternatively-activated" macrophages, certain dendritic cell subsets, or regulatory T cells) in a physiological manner by using apoptotic cell infusion can be a promising way to induce tolerance.

  11. In vivo induction of dendritic cell-mediated cytotoxicity against allogeneic pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Stift, Anton; Friedl, Josef; Dubsky, Peter; Bachleitner-Hofmann, Thomas; Benkoe, Thomas; Brostjan, Christine; Jakesz, Raimund; Gnant, Michael

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity and immunological response induced by autologous dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with allogeneic tumor lysate in a pancreatic cancer patient. The lack of available tumor peptides in pancreatic cancer strongly supports the idea to use allogeneic tumor cells as a source of antigens. The patient suffering from a stage IV pancreatic cancer received 1-2x10(7) autologous monocyte-derived DCs in three-week intervals injected into a groin lymph node. Monocytes from peripheral blood were isolated by magnetic bead selection. For the first ten vaccinations DCs were loaded with autologous tumor cell lysate obtained during surgical exploration. After consumption of the autologous lysate, equal numbers of DCs were pulsed with lysate of the tumor cell line AsPc-1 and BxPc-3 for a further five vaccinations. Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNCs) were harvested after the seventh and compared with PMNCs obtained after the fourteenth vaccination for immunological response. Delayed type hypersensitivity reactivity to DCs pulsed with autologous and allogeneic tumor lysate was also assessed. The patient received a total of fifteen vaccinations. There was no toxicity or evidence of autoimmunity observed. Delayed type hypersensitivity was found to be positive for the autologous as well as the allogeneic tumor lysate pulsed DCs. in vitro cytotoxicity assays demonstrated a dramatic increase of the PMNC killing capacity against the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPc-1 and BxPc-3 after the fourteenth compared to the seventh vaccination. CT scans revealed a stable disease for six months. The administration of autologous DCs pulsed with allogeneic tumor lysate is non-toxic and suitable for inducing an immunological anti-tumor response. Even though this study was confined to a single patient, the data might open a door for novel immunotherapeutical strategies.

  12. A histamine release assay to identify sensitization to Culicoides allergens in horses with skin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bettina; Childs, Bronwen A; Erb, Hollis N

    2008-12-15

    Skin hypersensitivity is an allergic disease induced in horses by allergens of Culicoides midges. The condition is typically diagnosed by clinical signs and in some horses in combination with allergy testing such as intradermal skin testing or serological allergen-specific IgE determination. Here, we describe an alternative method for allergy testing: a histamine release assay (HRA) that combines the functional aspects of skin testing with the convenience of submitting a blood sample. The assay is based on the principle that crosslinking of allergen-specific IgE bound via high-affinity IgE receptors to the surfaces of mast cells and basophils induces the release of inflammatory mediators. One of these mediators is histamine. The histamine was then detected by a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histamine assay was used to test 33 horses with skin hypersensitivity and 20 clinically healthy control animals for histamine release from their peripheral blood basophils after stimulation with Culicoides allergen extract or monoclonal anti-IgE antibody. An increased histamine release was observed in the horses with skin hypersensitivity compared to the control group after allergen-specific stimulation with Culicoides extract (p=0.023). In contrast, stimulation with anti-IgE induced similar amounts of released histamine in both groups (p=0.46). For further evaluation of the HRA, we prepared a receiver operating-characteristic (ROC) curve and performed a likelihood-ratio analysis for assay interpretation. Our results suggested that the assay is a valuable diagnostic tool to identify sensitization to Culicoides allergens in horses. Because some of the clinically healthy horses also showed sensitization to Culicoides extract, the assay cannot be used to distinguish allergic from non-allergic animals. The observation that sensitization is sometimes detectable in non-affected animals suggested that clinically healthy horses use immune mechanisms to control the

  13. LLLT in treating dentinary hypersensitivity: new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima; Ladalardo, Thereza C.; Pinheiro, Antonio; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2006-02-01

    Dental hypersensitivity has been studied for several years and it is reported as a strikingly painful condition originating from the exposition of dentinal tubuli . The exposed area is subjected to several kinds of stimuli, resulting in a rapid sharp acute pain. LLLT has been shown to have antiinflammatory, analgesic and cellular effects in both hyperemia and inflammation of the dental pulp. Our previous histological study showed that irradiated animals presented an increased production of dentine and shutting of dentinal tubuli. On the other hand, non-irradiated subjects still showed signals of intense inflammatory reaction and even necrosis at the same experimental times. Irradiated teeth did not show cell degeneration. The LLLT was shown to be efficient in the stimulation of odontoblast cells, producing reparative dentin and closing dentin tubuli. Our clinical studies with 660nm, 790nm and 830nm diode laser, and the total dose per tooth of 4J/cm was shown effective in treating dentinal hypersensitivity as it quickly reduces pain and maintains a prolonged painless status in 91.27 % to 97% of the cases. In a recent study our team observed that significant levels of dentinal desensitization were only found in patients belonging to the 25-35 age group. In conclusion, the results demonstrated indeed that LLLT, when based on the use of correct irradiations parameters is effective in treating hypersensitivity, but the age of patients is one of the factors that may alter the success of treatment due to dentinal sclerosis, which makes the penetration of light more difficult.

  14. Inflammation and Proliferation Act Together to Mediate Intestinal Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Swain, John R.; Wong, Melissa H.

    2009-01-01

    Cell fusion between circulating bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and non-hematopoietic cells is well documented in various tissues and has recently been suggested to occur in response to injury. Here we illustrate that inflammation within the intestine enhanced the level of BMDC fusion with intestinal progenitors. To identify important microenvironmental factors mediating intestinal epithelial cell fusion, we performed bone marrow transplantation into mouse models of inflammation and stimulated epithelial proliferation. Interestingly, in a non-injury model or in instances where inflammation was suppressed, an appreciable baseline level of fusion persisted. This suggests that additional mediators of cell fusion exist. A rigorous temporal analysis of early post-transplantation cellular dynamics revealed that GFP-expressing donor cells first trafficked to the intestine coincident with a striking increase in epithelial proliferation, advocating for a required fusogenic state of the host partner. Directly supporting this hypothesis, induction of augmented epithelial proliferation resulted in a significant increase in intestinal cell fusion. Here we report that intestinal inflammation and epithelial proliferation act together to promote cell fusion. While the physiologic impact of cell fusion is not yet known, the increased incidence in an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment suggests a potential role for cell fusion in mediating the progression of intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:19657387

  15. γδ T cells are indispensable for interleukin-23-mediated protection against Concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in hepatitis B virus transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ziyu; Wang, Jingya; Yuan, Yifang; Cao, Guangchao; Fan, Shuobing; Gao, Chao; Wang, Li; Li, Zheng; Wu, Xiaoli; Wu, Zhenzhou; Zhao, Liqing; Yin, Zhinan

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers are highly susceptible to liver injury triggered by environmental biochemical stimulation. Previously, we have reported an inverse correlation between γδ T cells and liver damage in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, whether γδ T cells play a role in regulating the hypersensitivity of HBsAg carriers to biochemical stimulation-induced hepatitis is unknown. In this study, using HBV transgenic (HBs-Tg) and HBs-Tg T-cell receptor-δ-deficient (TCR-δ(-/-) ) mice, we found that mice genetically deficient in γδ T cells exhibited more severe liver damage upon Concanavalin A (Con A) treatment, as indicated by substantially higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels, further elevated interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels and more extensive necrosis. γδ T-cell deficiency resulted in elevated IFN-γ in CD4(+) T cells but not in natural killer or natural killer T cells. The depletion of CD4(+) T cells and neutralization of IFN-γ reduced liver damage in HBs-Tg and HBs-Tg-TCR-δ(-/-) mice to a similar extent. Further investigation revealed that HBs-Tg mice showed an enhanced interleukin-17 (IL-17) signature. The administration of exogenous IL-23 enhanced IL-17A production from Vγ4 γδ T cells and ameliorated liver damage in HBs-Tg mice, but not in HBs-Tg-TCR-δ(-/-) mice. In summary, our results demonstrated that γδ T cells played a protective role in restraining Con A-induced hepatitis by inhibiting IFN-γ production from CD4(+) T cells and are indispensable for IL-23-mediated protection against Con A-induced hepatitis in HBs-Tg mice. These results provided a potential therapeutic approach for treating the hypersensitivity of HBV carriers to biochemical stimulation-induced liver damage.

  16. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  17. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:24567781

  18. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  19. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  20. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation.

    PubMed

    Giannou, Anastasios D; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell-induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable.

  1. Studies of migration inhibition tests in penicillin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R J; Sauder, P J; Rutherford, W J

    1979-01-01

    The release of the migration inhibition factors, leucocyte inhibitory factor (LIF) and macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) from stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes has been compared in patients with immediate (IgE-mediated) penicillin allergy and in patients with delayed hypersensitivity to tuberculin PPD. It has been shown that in these two groups of subjects, a comparable specific proliferative response can occur following stimulation with the appropriate drug (benzylpenicillin) or antigen (PPD). By cell fractionation studies, the proliferation was found to occur in the isolated T cell population in both subject groups. However, the lymphocyte response to benzylpenicillin was rarely associated with the release of LIF or MIF, in contrast to the situation in tuberculin sensitivity where a concomitant release of LIF and MIF was found. In about one third of penicillin allergic subjects, culture supernatants from specifically stimulated lymphocyte cultures induced migration inhibition in the indirect leucocyte migration test, but the inhibitory activity apparently resulted from the presence of penicillin-specific antibody and not from LIF. PMID:393437

  2. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  3. Mediators involved in the immunomodulatory effects of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Saas, Philippe; Bonnefoy, Francis; Kury-Paulin, Stephanie; Kleinclauss, François M.; Perruche, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    Immunomodulatory properties are attributed to apoptotic cells. These properties have been used to modulate allogeneic immune responses in experimental transplantation settings. In independent studies, apoptotic cell infusion has been shown to favor hematopoietic cell engraftment, to increase heart graft survival and to delay the lethal onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The goal of this review was to discuss how apoptotic cell infusion interferes with graft rejection or host rejection (i.e., GVHD) and to focus on the potential mediators or “perpetuators” involved in apoptotic cell-induced immunomodulation. Particular emphasis on apoptotic cell phagocytosis, TGF-β secretion and regulatory T cell induction was performed. Stimulating “naturally” immunosuppressive molecules (i.e., TGF-β) or immunomodulatory cells (“alternatively-activated” macrophages, certain DC subsets or regulatory T cells) in a physiological manner by using apoptotic cell infusion can be a promising way to induce tolerance. PMID:17632410

  4. Tetanus immunisation in hypersensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Williams, A N; Kabuubi, J B L; Owen, J P; Wells, J

    2002-06-01

    We report on a case of an officer cadet who was inadvertently allowed to commence training with a history suggestive of hypersensitivity to tetanus immunisation and who, eventually, successfully underwent a graduated immunisation regimen. This case combines a search for good evidence with the extraordinary complexities of military medical management and the law. It is a lesson in all three.

  5. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  6. Selective immediate hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Canto, Maria Gabriela; Andreu, Isabel; Fernandez, Javier; Blanca, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs imply that patients develop a urticarial/anaphylactic response to a single drug with good tolerance to other compounds. No systematic review of these reactions has yet been made. With the increase in consumption of NSAIDs, these have become one of the most common drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. Although cross-intolerance reactions are the most common, a significant proportion is selective responses. As specific IgE antibodies are not always found, there is only indirect evidence supporting an IgE-mediated mechanism in selective NSAID reactors. Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs must be considered when a patient develops urticaria or anaphylaxis after intake of one drug with good tolerance to drugs from other groups or even a drug from the same group with a slightly different chemical structure. Further research is required to identify the antigenic determinant structures recognized.

  7. Antibiotic hypersensitivity reactions and approaches to desensitization.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Davey P; Muzny, Christina A; Marshall, Gailen D; Swiatlo, Edwin

    2014-04-01

    Before initiating antibiotic therapy, drug hypersensitivity is an important consideration, and a common strategy is to avoid giving patients medications when a high likelihood of severe reactions exists. With an increase in antibiotic resistance and a decrease in novel antibiotics, there is greater pressure to consider antibiotics in patients with a history of adverse reactions. The major concerns include IgE-mediated, or type I, reactions, anaphylaxis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Some antibiotics with similar characteristics, such as cephalosporins and penicillins, may be given safely to patients with a certain allergy profile. There is still greater concern when considering antibiotics for patients with reported allergy. Desensitization is a strategy to safely induce drug tolerance to a specific drug to limit the possibility of a type I reaction.

  8. Squid hypersensitivity: a clinical and immunologic study.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, T; Castillo, R; Caminero, J; Cuevas, M; Rodriguez, J C; Acosta, O; Rodriguez de Castro, F

    1992-06-01

    Hypersensitivity to mollusk has rarely been described in the literature. Among the mollusks, the cephalopods are a group of great importance as a food source. We report seven patients who had had symptoms highly suggestive of IgE-mediated reactions after ingesting squid or inhaling vapors from cooking squid. All had previously suffered from persistent rhinitis or asthma for years. In addition, six of the seven patients had had symptoms after ingesting shrimp. Skin prick tests were strongly positive for boiled squid extract and for various commercial crustacean extracts. Specific IgE antibodies against boiled extract and several crustacean extracts were demonstrated in all patients by RAST and reverse enzyme immunoassay. Cross reactivity between squid and shrimp and other crustaceans was demonstrated by reverse immunoassay inhibition studies. Cross reactivity could not be demonstrated between squid and octopus, which are both cephalopods, nor between squid and other mollusks.

  9. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  10. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  11. Production of proinflammatory cytokines without invocation of cytotoxic effects by an Epstein-Barr virus-infected natural killer cell line established from a patient with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Takenobu; Fujii, Kazuyasu; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2010-10-01

    Cumulative evidence supports that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected natural killer (NK) cells induce severe systemic and cutaneous inflammation in patients with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB). In order to understand the pathogenesis of HMB, we established an EBV-infected cell line and characterized the cytological profiles. A novel EBV-infected NK-cell line, designated NKED, was established from a patient with HMB and used for the present study along with two other NK-cell lines, KAI3 and KHYG-1. NKED expressed the latency II-related transcripts. NKED cells were positive for CD2 and CD161 antigens, and negative for CD3, CD16, CD34, CD56, and T-cell receptor α/β and γ/δ antigens. Although NKED cells contained several cytotoxic molecules, the cells had an extremely poor cytotoxic activity. The majority of NKED cells were negative for perforin, major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted NK-cell receptors, CD94 and KIR2D, and an activating receptor, NKG2D. NKED cells, however, secreted higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α. Stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or tumor necrosis factor-α induced expression of BZLF1 messenger RNA in the NKED and KAI3 cells, indicating the transition from the latent- to the lytic-cycle infection. These data suggested that NKED cells revealed a very low cytotoxic effect probably because of the low expression levels of perforin, but had the ability to release proinflammatory cytokines. NKED cells did not reflect the characteristics of HMB, as they were different from pathogenic NK cells proliferating in the HMB patient, but the difference indicated that pathogenic NK cells could change their character in the presence of interleukin-2. Copyright © 2010 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interleukin-21 Receptor Gene Induction in Human T Cells Is Mediated by T-Cell Receptor-Induced Sp1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zheng; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo; Xue, Hai-Hui; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Keji; Leonard, Warren J.

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) plays important roles in regulating the immune response. IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) mRNA is expressed at a low level in human resting T cells but is rapidly induced by mitogenic stimulation. We now investigate the basis for IL21R gene regulation in T cells. We found that the −80 to −20 region critically regulates IL-21R promoter activity and corresponds to a major DNase I-hypersensitive site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, DNA affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Sp1 binds to this region in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, mutation of the Sp1 motif markedly reduced IL-21R promoter activity, and Sp1 small interfering RNAs effectively diminished IL-21R expression in activated T cells. Interestingly, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation, T cells increased IL-21R expression and Sp1 protein levels while decreasing Sp1 phosphorylation. Moreover, phosphatase inhibitors that increased phosphorylation of Sp1 diminished IL-21R transcription. These data indicate that TCR-induced IL-21R expression is driven by TCR-mediated augmentation of Sp1 protein levels and may partly depend on the dephosphorylation of Sp1. PMID:16260592

  13. Characterisation of the clinical and activated T cell response to repeat delayed-type hypersensitivity skin challenges in human subjects, with KLH and PPD, as a potential model to test T cell-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Belson, Alexandra; Schmidt, Tim; Fernando, Disala; Hardes, Kelly; Scott, Nicola; Brett, Sara; Clark, Deborah; Oliveira, João Joaquim; Davis, Bill; McHugh, Simon; Stone, John

    2016-05-01

    To characterise the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reaction to repeated challenges of keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) in healthy volunteers, as a potential model to test T cell-targeted investigational agents. Forty-nine subjects received either KLH, PPD, or PBS repeat skin challenges, and clinical assessments including induration, erythema and Laser Doppler Imaging. Skin biopsies or suction blisters were taken after challenge to investigate the cellular infiltrate of the challenge site, the T cell activation status, as determined by LAG-3 expression, and, specifically for the blister, the concentrations of inflammatory cytokines. Point estimates, estimates of variation and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were constructed for each type of challenge and timepoint. The DTH response could be measured at 48 and 120 h post-KLH and PPD challenge with induration, erythema and Laser Doppler Imaging, with 48 h post-challenge demonstrating the peak of the response. PPD was well tolerated in subjects after multiple challenges, however, a significant number of KLH-treated subjects demonstrated an injection site reaction 6-7 days following the SC injection. PPD demonstrated a boost effect on the second challenge as measured by increased induration, where as this was not noted consistently for KLH. Compared to unchallenged and PBS control-injected skin, increased T cell numbers were detected in the challenge site by both the skin suction blister and biopsy technique, at either time point following KLH or PPD challenge. Use of the T cell activation marker LAG-3 demonstrated the activated phenotype of these cells. In skin blisters, higher numbers of LAG-3+ T cells were detected at 48 h post-challenge, whereas in the biopsies, similar numbers of LAG-3+ cells were observed at both 48 and 120 h. Analysis of blister T cell subpopulations revealed some differences in phenotypes between the time points and between the CD4

  14. Acquired cancer stem cell phenotypes through Oct4-mediated dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh M.; Liu, Shujing; Lu, Hezhe; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Paul J.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Guerra, Matthew; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    There is enormous interest to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) for clinical treatment because these cells are highly tumorigenic and resistant to chemotherapy. Oct4 is expressed by CSC-like cells in different types of cancer. However, function of Oct4 in tumor cells is unclear. In this study, we showed that expression of Oct4 gene or transmembrane delivery of Oct4 protein promoted dedifferentiation of melanoma cells to CSC-like cells. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells showed significantly decreased expression of melanocytic markers and acquired the ability to form tumor spheroids. They showed markedly increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and hypoxic injury. In the subcutaneous xenograft and tail vein injection assays, these cells had significantly increased tumorigenic capacity. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells acquired features associated with CSCs such as multipotent differentiation capacity and expression of melanoma CSC markers such as ABCB5 and CD271. Mechanistically, Oct4 induced dedifferentiation was associated with increased expression of endogenous Oct4, Nanog and Klf4, and global gene expression changes that enriched for transcription factors. RNAi mediated knockdown of Oct4 in dedifferentiated cells led to diminished CSC phenotypes. Oct4 expression in melanoma was regulated by hypoxia and its expression was detected in a subpopulation of melanoma cells in clinical samples. Our data indicate that Oct4 is a positive regulator of tumor dedifferentiation. The results suggest that CSC phenotype is dynamic and may be acquired through dedifferentiation. Oct4 mediated tumor cell dedifferentiation may play an important role during tumor progression. PMID:22286766

  15. Multiple Proteins Mediate IQGAP1-Stimulated Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mataraza, Jennifer M.; Zhigang, Li; Jeong, Ha-Won; Brown, Matthew D.; Sacks, David B.

    2007-01-01

    Cell migration, a highly complex physiological phenomenon that requires the co-ordinated and tightly regulated function of several proteins, is mediated by a number of signalling pathways. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of cell migration impacts our comprehension of numerous cell functions, ranging from development and immune surveillance to angiogenesis and metastasis. The scaffold protein IQGAP1, which binds multiple proteins and regulates their functions, promotes cell motility. Many of the IQGAP1 binding proteins have been implicated in cell migration. In this study, we employed a multifaceted strategy to identify proteins that contribute to IQGAP1-stimulated cell migration. Using specific IQGAP1 point mutant constructs, an interaction with actin was shown to be essential for IQGAP1 to increase cell migration. In contrast, eliminating the binding of Ca2+/calmodulin, but not Ca2+-free calmodulin, augmented the ability of IQGAP1 to stimulate cell migration. Consistent with these findings, selective inhibition of calmodulin function at the plasma membrane with a specific peptide inhibitor enhanced cell migration mediated by IQGAP1. Interestingly, immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy suggest that localization of Cdc42 at the leading edge is not necessary for maximal migration of epithelial cells. Coupled with the observations that Cdc42 and Rac1 contribute to IQGAP1-stimulated cell migration, these data suggest that IQGAP1 serves as a junction to integrate multiple signalling molecules to facilitate cell migration. PMID:17544257

  16. Lnk negatively regulates self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells by modifying thrombopoietin-mediated signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Seita, Jun; Ema, Hideo; Ooehara, Jun; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Tadokoro, Yuko; Yamasaki, Akiko; Eto, Koji; Takaki, Satoshi; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    One of the central tasks of stem cell biology is to understand the molecular mechanisms that control self-renewal in stem cells. Several cytokines are implicated as crucial regulators of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but little is known about intracellular signaling for HSC self-renewal. To address this issue, we attempted to clarify how self-renewal potential is enhanced in HSCs without the adaptor molecule Lnk, as in Lnk-deficient mice HSCs are expanded in number >10-fold because of their increased self-renewal potential. We show that Lnk negatively regulates self-renewal of HSCs by modifying thrombopoietin (TPO)-mediated signal transduction. Single-cell cultures showed that Lnk-deficient HSCs are hypersensitive to TPO. Competitive repopulation revealed that long-term repopulating activity increases in Lnk-deficient HSCs, but not in WT HSCs, when these cells are cultured in the presence of TPO with or without stem cell factor. Single-cell transplantation of each of the paired daughter cells indicated that a combination of stem cell factor and TPO efficiently induces symmetrical self-renewal division in Lnk-deficient HSCs but not in WT HSCs. Newly developed single-cell immunostaining demonstrated significant enhancement of both p38 MAPK inactivation and STAT5 and Akt activation in Lnk-deficient HSCs after stimulation with TPO. Our results suggest that a balance in positive and negative signals downstream from the TPO signal plays a role in the regulation of the probability of self-renewal in HSCs. In general, likewise, the fate of stem cells may be determined by combinational changes in multiple signal transduction pathways. PMID:17284614

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions to Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Hye

    2014-01-01

    Cephalosporins can cause a range of hypersensitivity reactions, including IgE-mediated, immediate reactions. Cephalosporin allergy has been reported with use of a specific cephalosporin, as a cross-reaction between different cephalosporins or as a cross-reaction to other β-lactam antibiotics. Unlike penicillins, the exact allergenic determinants of cephalosporins are less well understood and thus, standardized diagnostic skin testing is not available. Nevertheless, skin testing with diluted solutions of cephalosporins can be valuable in confirming IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. In vitro tests are in development using recent technological advances and can be used as complementary tests. However, they are not commonly used because of their reduced sensitivity and limited availability. In selected cases of inconclusive results in both skin tests and IgE assays, a graded challenge or induction of drug tolerance with the implicated cephalosporin should be performed. PMID:25374747

  18. Transcriptional regulator Id2 mediates CD8+ T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Cannarile, Michael A; Lind, Nicholas A; Rivera, Richard; Sheridan, Alison D; Camfield, Kristin A; Wu, Bei Bei; Cheung, Kitty P; Ding, Zhaoqing; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2006-12-01

    Transcriptional programs that initiate and sustain the proliferation, differentiation and survival of CD8(+) T cells during immune responses are not completely understood. Here we show that inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2), an antagonist of E protein transcription factors, was upregulated in CD8(+) T cells during infection and that expression of Id2 was maintained in memory CD8(+) T cells. Although Id2-deficient naive CD8(+) T cells recognized antigen and proliferated normally early after infection, effector CD8(+) T cells did not accumulate because the cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis. Id2-deficient CD8(+) T cells responding to infection had changes in the expression of genes that influence survival and had altered memory formation. Our data emphasize the importance of Id2 in regulating gene expression by CD8(+) T cells and the magnitude of effector responses, suggesting a mechanism involving Id protein- and E protein-mediated survival and differentiation of mature T cells.

  19. Modulation of delayed-type hypersensitivity during the time course of immune response to a protein antigen

    PubMed Central

    Jacysyn, J F; Abrahamsohn, I A; Macedo, M S

    2001-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions elicited in the footpad of ovalbumin-sensitized mice after challenge with aggregated ovalbumin on day 4 or 8 of immunization are distinct. The former was characterized by a dense mononuclear infiltrate and, macroscopically, the reaction peaked at 48 hr after antigen challenge; the latter was preceded by immediate-type reactions, reached the maximum at 24 hr and faded drastically later. Histologically, oedema a