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Sample records for cell nicotinic cholinergic

  1. Mixed nicotinic and muscarinic features of cholinergic receptor coupled to secretion in bovine chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, M.H.; Pollard, H.B.; Heldman, E. )

    1991-06-01

    Acetylcholine evokes release from cultured bovine chromaffin cells by a mechanism that is believed to be classically nicotinic. However, the authors found that the full muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) induced a robust catecholamine (CA) secretion. By contrast, muscarine, pilocarpine, bethanechol, and McN-A-343 did not elicit any secretory response. Desensitization of the response to nicotine by Oxo-M and desensitization of the response to Oxo-M by nicotine suggest that both nicotine and Oxo-M were acting at the same receptor. Additional experiments supporting this conclusion show that nicotine-induced secretion and Oxo-M-induced secretion were similarly blocked by various muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists. Moreover, secretion induced by nicotine and Oxo-M were Ca{sup 2+} dependent, and both agonists induced {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Equilibrium binding studies showed that ({sup 3}H)Oxo-M bound to chromaffin cell membranes with a K{sub d} value of 3.08 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M and a Hill coefficient of 1.00, suggesting one binding site for this ligand. Nicotine inhibited Oxo-M binding in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that both ligands bind at two different sites on the same receptor. They propose that the receptor on bovine chromaffin cells that is coupled to secretion represents an unusual cholinergic receptor that has both nicotinic and muscarinic features.

  2. Phylogenetic differences in calcium permeability of the auditory hair cell cholinergic nicotinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lipovsek, Marcela; Im, Gi Jung; Franchini, Lucía F.; Pisciottano, Francisco; Katz, Eleonora; Fuchs, Paul Albert; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2012-01-01

    The α9 and α10 cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunits assemble to form the receptor that mediates efferent inhibition of hair cell function within the auditory sensory organ, a mechanism thought to modulate the dynamic range of hearing. In contrast to all nicotinic receptors, which serve excitatory neurotransmission, the activation of α9α10 produces hyperpolarization of hair cells. An evolutionary analysis has shown that the α10 subunit exhibits signatures of positive selection only along the mammalian lineage, strongly suggesting the acquisition of a unique function. To establish whether mammalian α9α10 receptors have acquired distinct functional properties as a consequence of this evolutionary pressure, we compared the properties of rat and chicken recombinant and native α9α10 receptors. Our main finding in the present work is that, in contrast to the high (pCa2+/pMonovalents ∼10) Ca2+ permeability reported for rat α9α10 receptors, recombinant and native chicken α9α10 receptors have a much lower permeability (∼2) to this cation, comparable to that of neuronal α4β2 receptors. Moreover, we show that, in contrast to α10, α7 as well as α4 and β2 nicotinic subunits are under purifying selection in vertebrates, consistent with the conserved Ca2+ permeability reported across species. These results have important consequences for the activation of signaling cascades that lead to hyperpolarization of hair cells after α9α10 gating at the cholinergic–hair cell synapse. In addition, they suggest that high Ca2+ permeability of the α9α10 cholinergic nicotinic receptor might have evolved together with other features that have given the mammalian ear an expanded high-frequency sensitivity. PMID:22371598

  3. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark H; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2014-10-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine induced larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age.

  4. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Mark H.; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L.; Leonard, Christopher S.; Kohlmeier, Kristi A.

    2015-01-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on several parameters affecting LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine was found to induce larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age. PMID:24863041

  5. The nicotinic cholinergic system function in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Nees, Frauke

    2015-09-01

    Research on the nicotinic cholinergic system function in the brain was previously mainly derived from animal studies, yet, research in humans is growing. Up to date, findings allow significant advances on the understanding of nicotinic cholinergic effects on human cognition, emotion and behavior using a range of functional brain imaging approaches such as pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Studies provided insights across various mechanistic psychological domains using different tasks as well as at rest in both healthy individuals and patient populations, with so far partly mixed results reporting both enhancements and decrements of neural activity related to the nicotinic cholinergic system. Moreover, studies on the relation between brain structure and the nicotinic cholinergic system add important information in this context. The present review summarizes the current status of human brain imaging studies and presents the findings within a theoretical and clinical perspective as they may be useful not only for an advancement of the understanding of basic nicotinic cholinergic-related mechanisms, but also for the development and integration of psychological and pharmacological treatment approaches. Patterns of functional neuroanatomy and neural circuitry across various cognitive and emotional domains may be used as neuropsychological markers of mental disorders such as addiction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease or schizophrenia, where nicotinic cholinergic system changes are characteristic. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'.

  6. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD. PMID:27827986

  7. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-11-07

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4,CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  8. Layer-specific interference with cholinergic signaling in the prefrontal cortex by smoking concentrations of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Poorthuis, Rogier B; Bloem, Bernard; Verhoog, Matthijs B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-03-13

    Adolescence is a period in which the developing prefrontal cortex (PFC) is sensitive to maladaptive changes when exposed to nicotine. Nicotine affects PFC function and repeated exposure to nicotine during adolescence impairs attention performance and impulse control during adulthood. Nicotine concentrations experienced by smokers are known to desensitize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but the impact thereof on PFC circuits is poorly understood. Here, we investigated how smoking concentrations of nicotine (100-300 nm) interfere with cholinergic signaling in the mouse PFC. nAChR desensitization depends on subunit composition. Since nAChR subunits are differentially expressed across layers of the PFC neuronal network, we hypothesized that cholinergic signaling through nAChRs across layers would suffer differentially from exposure to nicotine. Throughout the PFC, nicotine strongly desensitized responses to ACh in neurons expressing β2* nAChRs, whereas ACh responses mediated by α7 nAChRs were not hampered. The amount of desensitization of β2* nAChR currents depended on neuron type and cortical layer. β2*-mediated responses of interneurons in LII-III and LVI completely desensitized, while cholinergic responses in LV interneurons and LVI pyramidal cells showed less desensitization. This discrepancy depended on α5 subunit expression. Two-photon imaging of neuronal population activity showed that prolonged exposure to nicotine limited cholinergic signaling through β2* nAChRs to deep PFC layers where α5 subunits were expressed. Together, our results demonstrate a layer-dependent decrease in cholinergic activation of the PFC through nAChRs by nicotine. These mechanisms may be one of the first steps leading up to the pathophysiological changes associated with nicotine exposure during adolescence.

  9. Permanent, sex-selective effects of prenatal or adolescent nicotine exposure, separately or sequentially, in rat brain regions: indices of cholinergic and serotonergic synaptic function, cell signaling, and neural cell number and size at 6 months of age.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; MacKillop, Emiko A; Rudder, Charles L; Ryde, Ian T; Tate, Charlotte A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2007-05-01

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen that disrupts neurodevelopment and synaptic function, with vulnerability extending into adolescence. We assessed the permanence of effects in rats on indices of neural cell number and size, and on acetylcholine and serotonin (5HT) systems, conducting assessments at 6 months of age, after prenatal nicotine exposure, adolescent exposure, or sequential exposure in both periods. For prenatal nicotine, indices of cell number and size showed few abnormalities by 6 months, but there were persistent deficits in cerebrocortical choline acetyltransferase activity and hemicholinium-3 binding to the presynaptic choline transporter, a pattern consistent with cholinergic hypoactivity; these effects were more prominent in males than females. The expression of 5HT receptors also showed permanent effects in males, with suppression of the 5HT(1A) subtype and upregulation of 5HT(2) receptors. In addition, cell signaling through adenylyl cyclase showed heterologous uncoupling of neurotransmitter responses. Nicotine exposure in adolescence produced lasting effects that were similar to those of prenatal nicotine. However, when animals were exposed to prenatal nicotine and received nicotine subsequently in adolescence, the adverse effects then extended to females, whereas the net effect in males was similar to that of prenatal nicotine by itself. Our results indicate that prenatal or adolescent nicotine exposure evoke permanent changes in synaptic function that transcend the recovery of less-sensitive indices of structural damage; further, prenatal exposure sensitizes females to the subsequent adverse effects of adolescent nicotine, thus creating a population that may be especially vulnerable to the lasting behavioral consequences of nicotine intake in adolescence.

  10. Dopaminergic and cholinergic learning mechanisms in nicotine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyan, Manivannan

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine addiction drives tobacco use by one billion people worldwide, causing nearly six million deaths a year. Nicotine binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are normally activated by the endogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The widespread expression of nicotinic receptors throughout the nervous system accounts for the diverse physiological effects triggered by nicotine. A crucial influence of nicotine is on the synaptic mechanisms underlying learning that contribute to the addiction process. Here, we focus on the acquisition phase of smoking addiction and review animal model studies on how nicotine modifies dopaminergic and cholinergic signaling in key nodes of the reinforcement circuitry: ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens (NAc), amygdala, and hippocampus. Capitalizing on mechanisms that subserve natural rewards, nicotine activates midbrain dopamine neurons directly and indirectly, and nicotine causes dopamine release in very broad target areas throughout the brain, including the NAc, amygdala, and hippocampus. In addition, nicotine orchestrates local changes within those target structures, alters the release of virtually all major neurotransmitters, and primes the nervous system to the influence of other addictive drugs. Hence, understanding how nicotine affects the circuitry for synaptic plasticity and learning may aid in developing reasoned therapies to treat nicotine addiction. PMID:26301866

  11. Neurocircuitry of the nicotinic cholinergic system

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Continuing to discover how the brain works is one of the great challenges ahead of us. Although understanding the brain anatomy and its functional organization provided a first and indispensable foundation, it became clear that a static view was insufficient. To understand the complexity of neuronal communication, it is necessary to examine the chemical nature of the neurotransmission and, using the example of the acetylcholine receptors, follow the different layers of networks that can be distinguished. The natural alkaloid nicotine contained in tobacco leaves acts as an agonist with a subclass of acetylcholine receptors, and provides an interesting tool to approach brain functions. Analysis of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which are ligand gated channels, revealed that these receptors are expressed at different critical locations on the neurons including the synaptic boutons, neurites, cell bodies, and even on the axons. These receptors can modulate the activity at the microcircuit synaptic level, in the cell processing of information, and, by acting on the velocity of action potential, the synchrony of communication between brain areas. These actions at multiple levels of brain organization provide an example of the complexity of brain neurocircuitry and an illustration of the relevance of this knowledge for psychiatry. PMID:21319492

  12. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  13. The α7-nicotinic receptor is upregulated in immune cells from HIV-seropositive women: consequences to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Vélez, Manuel; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Gerena, Yamil; Quesada, Orestes; Santiago-Pérez, Laura I; Capó-Vélez, Coral M; Wojna, Valerie; Meléndez, Loyda; León-Rivera, Rosiris; Silva, Walter; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy partially restores the immune system and markedly increases life expectancy of HIV-infected patients. However, antiretroviral therapy does not restore full health. These patients suffer from poorly understood chronic inflammation that causes a number of AIDS and non-AIDS complications. Here we show that chronic inflammation in HIV+ patients may be due to the disruption of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway by HIV envelope protein gp120IIIB. Our results demonstrate that HIV gp120IIIB induces α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7) upregulation and a paradoxical proinflammatory phenotype in macrophages, as activation of the upregulated α7 is no longer capable of inhibiting the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Our results demonstrate that disruption of the cholinergic-mediated anti-inflammatory response can result from an HIV protein. Collectively, these findings suggest that HIV tampering with a natural strategy to control inflammation could contribute to a crucial, unresolved problem of HIV infection: chronic inflammation. PMID:26719799

  14. Glutamatergic contributions to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist-evoked cholinergic transients in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Vinay; Man, Kingson; Decker, Michael W; Sarter, Martin

    2008-04-02

    Because modulation of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission has been hypothesized to represent a necessary mechanism mediating the beneficial cognitive effects of nicotine and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype-selective agonists, we used choline-sensitive microelectrodes for the real-time measurement of ACh release in vivo, to characterize cholinergic transients evoked by nicotine and the alpha4beta2*-selective nAChR partial agonist 2-methyl-3-(2-(S)-pyrrolindinylmethoxy)pyridine dihydrochloride (ABT-089), a clinically effective cognition enhancer. In terms of cholinergic signal amplitudes, ABT-089 was significantly more potent than nicotine in evoking ACh cholinergic transients. Moreover, cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089 were characterized by faster signal rise time and decay rate. The nAChR antagonist mecamylamine attenuated the cholinergic signals evoked by either compound. Cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089 were more efficaciously attenuated by the relatively beta2*-selective nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine. The alpha7 antagonist methyllycaconitine did not affect choline signal amplitudes but partly attenuated the relatively slow decay rate of nicotine-evoked cholinergic signals. Furthermore, the AMPA receptor antagonist DNQX as well as the NMDA receptor antagonist APV more potently attenuated cholinergic signals evoked by ABT-089. Using glutamate-sensitive microelectrodes to measure glutamatergic transients, ABT-089 was more potent than nicotine in evoking glutamate release. Glutamatergic signals were highly sensitive to tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of voltage-regulated sodium channels. Together, the present evidence indicates that compared with nicotine, ABT-089 evokes more potent and sharper cholinergic transients in prefrontal cortex. Glutamatergic mechanisms necessarily mediate the cholinergic effects of nAChR agonists in the prefrontal cortex.

  15. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, J.R.; Marks, M.J.; Gross, S.D.; Collins, A.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-(3H)nicotine or alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin; (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by (3H)nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment.

  16. Developmental Neurotoxicity of Tobacco Smoke Directed Toward Cholinergic and Serotonergic Systems: More Than Just Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Stadler, Ashley; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-09-01

    Tobacco smoke contains thousands of compounds in addition to nicotine, a known neuroteratogen. We evaluated the developmental neurotoxicity of tobacco smoke extract (TSE) administered to pregnant rats starting preconception and continued through the second postnatal week. We simulated nicotine concentrations encountered with second-hand smoke, an order of magnitude below those seen in active smokers, and compared TSE with an equivalent dose of nicotine alone, and to a 10-fold higher nicotine dose. We conducted longitudinal evaluations in multiple brain regions, starting in adolescence (postnatal day 30) and continued to full adulthood (day 150). TSE exposure impaired presynaptic cholinergic activity, exacerbated by a decrement in nicotinic cholinergic receptor concentrations. Although both nicotine doses produced presynaptic cholinergic deficits, these were partially compensated by hyperinnervation and receptor upregulation, effects that were absent with TSE. TSE also produced deficits in serotonin receptors in females that were not seen with nicotine. Regression analysis showed a profound sex difference in the degree to which nicotine could account for overall TSE effects: whereas the 2 nicotine doses accounted for 36%-46% of TSE effects in males, it accounted for only 7%-13% in females. Our results show that the adverse effects of TSE on neurodevelopment exceed those that can be attributed to just the nicotine present in the mixture, and further, that the sensitivity extends down to levels commensurate with second-hand smoke exposure. Because nicotine itself evoked deficits at low exposures, "harm reduction" nicotine products do not eliminate the potential for neurodevelopmental damage.

  17. Reexposure to nicotine during withdrawal increases the pacemaking activity of cholinergic habenular neurons

    PubMed Central

    Görlich, Andreas; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Ables, Jessica L.; Frahm, Silke; Ślimak, Marta A.; Dougherty, Joseph D.; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of genetic variants in the cholinergic receptor nicotinic CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster associated with heavy smoking and higher relapse risk has led to the identification of the midbrain habenula–interpeduncular axis as a critical relay circuit in the control of nicotine dependence. Although clear roles for α3, β4, and α5 receptors in nicotine aversion and withdrawal have been established, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that participate in signaling nicotine use and contribute to relapse have not been identified. Here, using translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) profiling, electrophysiology, and behavior, we demonstrate that cholinergic neurons, but not peptidergic neurons, of the medial habenula (MHb) display spontaneous tonic firing of 2–10 Hz generated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) pacemaker channels and that infusion of the HCN pacemaker antagonist ZD7288 in the habenula precipitates somatic and affective signs of withdrawal. Further, we show that a strong, α3β4-dependent increase in firing frequency is observed in these pacemaker neurons upon acute exposure to nicotine. No change in the basal or nicotine-induced firing was observed in cholinergic MHb neurons from mice chronically treated with nicotine. We observe, however, that, during withdrawal, reexposure to nicotine doubles the frequency of pacemaking activity in these neurons. These findings demonstrate that the pacemaking mechanism of cholinergic MHb neurons controls withdrawal, suggesting that the heightened nicotine sensitivity of these neurons during withdrawal may contribute to smoking relapse. PMID:24082085

  18. Cholinergic transmission during nicotine withdrawal is influenced by age and pre-exposure to nicotine: Implications for teenage smoking

    PubMed Central

    Carcoba, Luis M.; Orfila, James E.; Natividad, Luis A.; Torres, Oscar V.; Pipkin, Joseph A.; Ferree, Patrick L.; Castañeda, Eddie; Moss, Donald E.; O’Dell, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a unique period of development characterized by enhanced tobacco use and long-term vulnerability to neurochemical changes produced by adolescent nicotine exposure. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms that contribute to developmental differences in tobacco use, this study compared changes in cholinergic transmission during nicotine exposure and withdrawal in naïve adult rats as compared to 1) adolescents and 2) adults that were pre-exposed to nicotine during adolescence. The first study compared extracellular levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) during nicotine exposure and precipitated withdrawal using microdialysis procedures. Adolescent (PND 28–42) and adult rats (PND 60–74) were prepared with osmotic pumps that delivered nicotine for 14 days (4.7 mg/kg/day adolescents; 3.2 mg/kg/day adults). Another group of adults was exposed to nicotine during adolescence and then again in adulthood (pre-exposed adults) using similar methods. Control rats received a sham surgery. Following 13 days of nicotine exposure, rats were implanted with microdialysis probes in the NAcc. The following day, dialysis samples were collected during baseline and following systemic administration of the nicotinic-receptor antagonist mecamylamine (1.5 mg/kg and 3.0 mg/kg, IP) to precipitate withdrawal. A second study compared various metabolic differences in cholinergic transmission using the same treatment procedures as the first study. Following 14 days of nicotine exposure, the NAcc was dissected and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was compared across groups. In order to examine potential group differences in nicotine metabolism, blood plasma levels of cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) were also compared following 14 days of nicotine exposure. The results from the first study revealed that nicotine exposure increased baseline ACh levels to a greater extent in adolescent versus adult rats. During nicotine withdrawal, ACh levels in

  19. Cholinergic transmission during nicotine withdrawal is influenced by age and pre-exposure to nicotine: implications for teenage smoking.

    PubMed

    Carcoba, Luis M; Orfila, James E; Natividad, Luis A; Torres, Oscar V; Pipkin, Joseph A; Ferree, Patrick L; Castañeda, Eddie; Moss, Donald E; O'Dell, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a unique period of development characterized by enhanced tobacco use and long-term vulnerability to neurochemical changes produced by adolescent nicotine exposure. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms that contribute to developmental differences in tobacco use, this study compared changes in cholinergic transmission during nicotine exposure and withdrawal in naïve adult rats compared to (1) adolescent rats and (2) adult rats that were pre-exposed to nicotine during adolescence. The first study compared extracellular levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) during nicotine exposure and precipitated withdrawal using microdialysis procedures. Adolescent (postnatal day, PND, 28-42) and adult rats (PND60-74) were prepared with osmotic pumps that delivered nicotine for 14 days (adolescents 4.7 mg/kg/day; adults 3.2 mg/kg/day; expressed as base). Another group of adults was exposed to nicotine during adolescence and then again in adulthood (pre-exposed adults) using similar methods. Control rats received a sham surgery. Following 13 days of nicotine exposure, the rats were implanted with microdialysis probes in the NAc. The following day, dialysis samples were collected during baseline and following systemic administration of the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to precipitate withdrawal. A second study compared various metabolic differences in cholinergic transmission using the same treatment procedures as the first study. Following 14 days of nicotine exposure, the NAc was dissected and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was compared across groups. In order to examine potential group differences in nicotine metabolism, blood plasma levels of cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) were also compared following 14 days of nicotine exposure. The results from the first study revealed that nicotine exposure increased baseline ACh levels to a greater extent in adolescent versus adult rats. During

  20. Cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes implicated in a nicotine dependence association study targeting 348 candidate genes with 3713 SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Scott F.; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Chase, Gary A.; Konvicka, Karel; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Breslau, Naomi; Johnson, Eric O.; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Pomerleau, Ovide; Swan, Gary E.; Goate, Alison M.; Rutter, Joni; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fox, Louis; Fugman, Douglas; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Wang, Jen C.; Ballinger, Dennis G.; Rice, John P.; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is one of the world’s leading causes of preventable death. To discover genetic variants that influence risk for nicotine dependence, we targeted over 300 candidate genes and analyzed 3713 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1050 cases and 879 controls. The Fagerström test for nicotine dependence (FTND) was used to assess dependence, in which cases were required to have an FTND of 4 or more. The control criterion was strict: control subjects must have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetimes and had an FTND of 0 during the heaviest period of smoking. After correcting for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate, several cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes dominated the top signals. The strongest association was from an SNP representing CHRNB3, the β3 nicotinic receptor subunit gene (P = 9.4 × 10−5). Biologically, the most compelling evidence for a risk variant came from a non-synonymous SNP in the α5 nicotinic receptor subunit gene CHRNA5 (P = 6.4 × 10−4). This SNP exhibited evidence of a recessive mode of inheritance, resulting in individuals having a 2-fold increase in risk of developing nicotine dependence once exposed to cigarette smoking. Other genes among the top signals were KCNJ6 and GABRA4. This study represents one of the most powerful and extensive studies of nicotine dependence to date and has found novel risk loci that require confirmation by replication studies. PMID:17135278

  1. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Annual report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.

    1985-05-13

    We have conducted experiments to determine if 3H acetylcholine (3Hach) nicotinic recognition sites are located presynaptically on catecholamine and/or serotonin axons. Lesions of these axons by intraventricular injections of neurotoxins resulted in marked decreases in 3Hach binding sites in the striatum and hypothalamus, but not in the cortex or thalamus. These results indicate that 3Hach nicotinic binding sites are located on catecholamine and serotonin axons in specific areas of the brain. In other experiments, we determined that repeated administration of nicotine results in enhanced behavioral responses to a subsequent injection of nicotine, and that there appears to be a correlation between the enhanced response to nicotine and increased 3Hach binding sites in cerebral cortex.

  2. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal cells and circuits

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Stuart R; Davies, Ceri H

    2005-01-01

    Septo-hippocampal cholinergic fibres ramify extensively throughout the hippocampal formation to release acetylcholine upon a diverse range of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are differentially expressed by distinct populations of neurones. The resultant modulation of cellular excitability and synaptic transmission within hippocampal circuits underlies the ability of acetylcholine to influence the dynamic properties of the hippocampal network and results in the emergence of a range of stable oscillatory network states. Recent findings suggest a multitude of actions contribute to the oscillogenic properties of acetylcholine which are principally induced by activation of muscarinic receptors but also regulated through activation of nicotinic receptor subtypes. PMID:15528238

  3. Alpha4* nicotinic receptors in preBotzinger complex mediate cholinergic/nicotinic modulation of respiratory rhythm.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuesi M; Tan, Wenbin; Xiu, Joanne; Puskar, Nyssa; Fonck, Carlos; Lester, Henry A; Feldman, Jack L

    2008-01-09

    Acetylcholine and nicotine can modulate respiratory patterns by acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC). To further explore the molecular composition of these nAChRs, we studied a knock-in mouse strain with a leucine-to-alanine mutation in the M2 pore-lining region (L9'A) of the nAChR alpha4 subunit; this mutation renders alpha4-containing receptors hypersensitive to agonists. We recorded respiratory-related rhythmic motor activity from hypoglossal nerve (XIIn) and patch-clamped preBötC inspiratory neurons in an in vitro medullary slice preparation from neonatal mice. Nicotine affected respiratory rhythm at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower in the homozygous L9'A knock-in mice compared with wild-type mice. Bath application of 5 nm nicotine increased the excitability of preBötC inspiratory neurons, increased respiratory frequency, and induced tonic/seizure-like activities in XIIn in L9'A mice, effects similar to those induced by 1 microM nicotine in wild-type mice. In L9'A mice, microinjection of low nanomolar concentrations of nicotine into the preBötC increased respiratory frequency, whereas injection into the ipsilateral hypoglossal (XII) nucleus induced tonic/seizure-like activity. The alpha4*-selective nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine produced opposite effects and blocked the nicotinic responses. These data, showing that nAChRs in the preBötC and XII nucleus in L9'A mice are hypersensitive to nicotine and endogenous ACh, suggest that functional alpha4* nAChRs are present in the preBötC. They mediate cholinergic/nicotinic modulation of the excitability of preBötC inspiratory neurons and of respiratory rhythm. Furthermore, functional alpha4* nAChRs are present in XII nucleus and mediate cholinergic/nicotinic modulation of tonic activity in XIIn.

  4. Carrageenans solubilize asymmetric acetylcholinesterase from nicotinic cholinergic synapses.

    PubMed

    von Bernhardi, R; Ayal, H; Inestrosa, N C

    1990-01-01

    1. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in both vertebrate and invertebrates organisms. 2. The asymmetric synaptic AChE is attached to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the neuromuscular junction through heparin sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). 3. It has been shown previously that heparin-like glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) can solubilize this enzyme from the cholinergic synapses. 4. The present paper describes the solubilization of asymmetric AChE by different marine macroalgal polysaccharides, called carrageenans. 5. Important differences were found among all the carrageenans tested; they released 15-50% of the total AChE activity normally solubilized by heparin. 6. Carrageenans extracted from tetrasporic stages of Iridaea ciliata and I. membranacea were always better extracting agents than those from the cystocarpic stages of these algae, suggesting that lambda-like carrageenans are involved. 7. This hypothesis was confirmed by extracting AChE with purified carrageenans.

  5. Nicotinic Cholinergic Synaptic Mechanisms in the Ventral Tegmental Area Contribute to Nicotine Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidoplichko, Volodymyr I.; Noguchi, Jun; Areola, Oluwasanmi O.; Liang, Yong; Peterson, Jayms; Zhang, Tianxiang; Dani, John A.

    2004-01-01

    Tobacco use is a major health problem that is estimated to cause 4 million deaths a year worldwide. Nicotine is the main addictive component of tobacco. It acts as an agonist to activate and desensitize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). A component of nicotine's addictive power is attributable to actions on the mesolimbic dopaminergic…

  6. Selective lesions of the cholinergic neurons within the posterior pedunculopontine do not alter operant learning or nicotine sensitization.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, Duncan A A; Wilson, David I G; Winn, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Cholinergic neurons within the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus have been implicated in a range of functions, including behavioral state control, attention, and modulation of midbrain and basal ganglia systems. Previous experiments with excitotoxic lesions have found persistent learning impairment and altered response to nicotine following lesion of the posterior component of the PPTg (pPPTg). These effects have been attributed to disrupted input to midbrain dopamine systems, particularly the ventral tegmental area. The pPPTg contains a dense collection of cholinergic neurons and also large numbers of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Because these interdigitated populations of neurons are all susceptible to excitotoxins, the effects of such lesions cannot be attributed to one neuronal population. We wished to assess whether the learning impairments and altered responses to nicotine in excitotoxic PPTg-lesioned rats were due to loss of cholinergic neurons within the pPPTg. Selective depletion of cholinergic pPPTg neurons is achievable with the fusion toxin Dtx-UII, which targets UII receptors expressed only by cholinergic neurons in this region. Rats bearing bilateral lesions of cholinergic pPPTg neurons (>90% ChAT+ neuronal loss) displayed no deficits in the learning or performance of fixed and variable ratio schedules of reinforcement for pellet reward. Separate rats with the same lesions had a normal locomotor response to nicotine and furthermore sensitized to repeated administration of nicotine at the same rate as sham controls. Previously seen changes in these behaviors following excitotoxic pPPTg lesions cannot be attributed solely to loss of cholinergic neurons. These findings indicate that non-cholinergic neurons within the pPPTg are responsible for the learning deficits and altered responses to nicotine seen after excitotoxic lesions. The functions of cholinergic neurons may be related to behavioral state control and attention rather than learning.

  7. Early postnatal nicotine exposure causes hippocampus-dependent memory impairments in adolescent mice: Association with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Malvaez, Melissa; Su, Hailing; Kleeman, Elise; Dang, Richard; Wood, Marcelo A; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2015-02-01

    Fetal nicotine exposure from smoking during pregnancy causes long-lasting cognitive impairments in offspring, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this effect. Here we demonstrate that early postnatal exposure of mouse pups to nicotine via maternal milk impairs long-term, but not short-term, hippocampus-dependent memory during adolescence. At the Schaffer collateral (SC) pathway, the most widely studied synapses for a cellular correlate of hippocampus-dependent memory, the induction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent transient long-term potentiation (LTP) and protein synthesis-dependent long-lasting LTP are not diminished by nicotine exposure, but rather unexpectedly the threshold for LTP induction becomes lower after nicotine treatment. Using voltage sensitive dye to visualize hippocampal activity, we found that early postnatal nicotine exposure also results in enhanced CA1 depolarization and hyperpolarization after SC stimulation. Furthermore, we show that postnatal nicotine exposure induces pervasive changes to the nicotinic modulation of CA1 activity: activation of nicotinic receptors no longer increases CA1 network depolarization, acute nicotine inhibits rather than facilitates the induction of LTP at the SC pathway by recruiting an additional nicotinic receptor subtype, and acute nicotine no longer blocks LTP induction at the temporoammonic pathway. These findings reflect the pervasive impact of nicotine exposure during hippocampal development, and demonstrate an association of hippocampal memory impairments with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP. The implication of our results is that nicotinic cholinergic-dependent plasticity is required for long-term memory formation and that postnatal nicotine exposure disrupts this form of plasticity.

  8. Nicotine and ethanol interact during adolescence: effects on the central cholinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Carvalho, Anderson; Lima, Carla S; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Manhães, Alex C; Abreu-Villaça, Yael

    2008-09-26

    Co-occurrence of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption during adolescence is frequent and well documented. However, little is known about the basic neurobiology of the combined exposure in the adolescent brain. Since nicotine is a cholinergic agonist and it has been shown that ethanol interferes with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the current work focused on cholinergic systems. From the 30th to the 45th postnatal day (PN), C57BL/6 male and female mice were exposed to nicotine free base (NIC) and/or ethanol (ETOH). Four groups were analyzed: 1) concomitant NIC (50 microg/ml in 2% saccharin to drink) and ETOH (25%, 2 g/kg i.p. injected every other day) exposure; 2) NIC exposure; 3) ETOH exposure; 4) vehicle. We assessed nAChR binding, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and [3H]hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding in the cerebral cortex and midbrain of mice on PN45. In the cortex, ETOH had no effect on nAChRs. In contrast, NIC produced nAChR upregulation while NIC+ETOH elicited a more pronounced effect. In the midbrain, neither ETOH nor NIC had effects on nAChRs. NIC+ETOH, however, elicited a robust nAChR upregulation. Regarding ChAT activity, treatment effects differed between males and females in the cortex. Male NIC mice presented an increase in ChAT. However, ETOH reversed this effect. In contrast, female NIC mice presented decreased ChAT activity. In the midbrain, ETOH increased ChAT. HC-3 binding was not affected. These results indicate that the central cholinergic system is a site at which nicotine and ethanol interact. This interaction might underlie the association between tobacco and alcohol consumption during adolescence.

  9. A ten fold reduction of nicotine yield in tobacco smoke does not spare the central cholinergic system in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Villaça, Yael; Correa-Santos, Monique; Dutra-Tavares, Ana C; Paes-Branco, Danielle; Nunes-Freitas, Andre; Manhães, Alex C; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Ribeiro-Carvalho, Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The tobacco industry has gradually decreased nicotine content in cigarette smoke but the impact of this reduction on health is still controversial. Since the central cholinergic system is the primary site of action of nicotine, here, we investigated the effects of exposure of adolescent mice to tobacco smoke containing either high or low levels of nicotine on the central cholinergic system and the effects associated with cessation of exposure. From postnatal day (PN) 30 to 45, male and female Swiss mice were exposed to tobacco smoke (whole body exposure, 8h/day, 7 days/week) generated from 2R1F (HighNic group: 1.74mg nicotine/cigarette) or 4A1 (LowNic group: 0.14mg nicotine/cigarette) research cigarettes, whereas control mice were exposed to ambient air. Cholinergic biomarkers were assessed in the cerebral cortex and midbrain by the end of exposure (PN45), at short- (PN50) and long-term (PN75) deprivation. In the cortex, nicotinic cholinergic receptor upregulation was observed with either type of cigarette. In the midbrain, upregulation was detected only in HighNic mice and remained significant in females at short-term deprivation. The high-affinity choline transporter was reduced in the cortex: of HighNic mice by the end of exposure; of both HighNic and LowNic females at short-term deprivation; of LowNic mice at long-term deprivation. These decrements were separable from effects on choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities, suggesting cholinergic synaptic impairment. Here, we demonstrated central cholinergic alterations in an animal model of tobacco smoke exposure during adolescence. This system was sensitive even to tobacco smoke with very low nicotine content.

  10. Nicotine inhibits potassium currents in Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    White, Sean H; Sturgeon, Raymond M; Magoski, Neil S

    2016-06-01

    Acetylcholine and the archetypal cholinergic agonist, nicotine, are typically associated with the opening of ionotropic receptors. In the bag cell neurons, which govern the reproductive behavior of the marine snail, Aplysia californica, there are two cholinergic responses: a relatively large acetylcholine-induced current and a relatively small nicotine-induced current. Both currents are readily apparent at resting membrane potential and result from the opening of distinct ionotropic receptors. We now report a separate current response elicited by applying nicotine to cultured bag cell neurons under whole cell voltage-clamp. This current was ostensibly inward, best resolved at depolarized voltages, presented a noncooperative dose-response with a half-maximal concentration near 1.5 mM, and associated with a decrease in membrane conductance. The unique nicotine-evoked response was not altered by intracellular perfusion with the G protein blocker GDPβS or exposure to classical nicotinic antagonists but was occluded by replacing intracellular K(+) with Cs(+) Consistent with an underlying mechanism of direct inhibition of one or more K(+) channels, nicotine was found to rapidly reduce the fast-inactivating A-type K(+) current as well as both components of the delayed-rectifier K(+) current. Finally, nicotine increased bag cell neuron excitability, which manifested as reduction in spike threshold, greater action potential height and width, and markedly more spiking to continuous depolarizing current injection. In contrast to conventional transient activation of nicotinic ionotropic receptors, block of K(+) channels could represent a nonstandard means for nicotine to profoundly alter the electrical properties of neurons over prolonged periods of time.

  11. Role for the nicotinic cholinergic system in movement disorders; therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Quik, Maryka; Zhang, Danhui; Perez, Xiomara A; Bordia, Tanuja

    2014-10-01

    A large body of evidence using experimental animal models shows that the nicotinic cholinergic system is involved in the control of movement under physiological conditions. This work raised the question whether dysregulation of this system may contribute to motor dysfunction and whether drugs targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) may be of therapeutic benefit in movement disorders. Accumulating preclinical studies now show that drugs acting at nAChRs improve drug-induced dyskinesias. The general nAChR agonist nicotine, as well as several nAChR agonists (varenicline, ABT-089 and ABT-894), reduces l-dopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements or dyskinesias up to 60% in parkinsonian nonhuman primates and rodents. These dyskinesias are potentially debilitating abnormal involuntary movements that arise as a complication of l-dopa therapy for Parkinson's disease. In addition, nicotine and varenicline decrease antipsychotic-induced abnormal involuntary movements in rodent models of tardive dyskinesia. Antipsychotic-induced dyskinesias frequently arise as a side effect of chronic drug treatment for schizophrenia, psychosis and other psychiatric disorders. Preclinical and clinical studies also show that the nAChR agonist varenicline improves balance and coordination in various ataxias. Lastly, nicotine has been reported to attenuate the dyskinetic symptoms of Tourette's disorder. Several nAChR subtypes appear to be involved in these beneficial effects of nicotine and nAChR drugs including α4β2*, α6β2* and α7 nAChRs (the asterisk indicates the possible presence of other subunits in the receptor). Overall, the above findings, coupled with nicotine's neuroprotective effects, suggest that nAChR drugs have potential for future drug development for movement disorders.

  12. Role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in an experimental model of epilepsy-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Carvalho, Andressa Daiane; Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; Bassi, Gabriel Shimizu; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibrahim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2004-10-01

    The blockade of GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The neurotransmission in the postictal period has been the focus of many studies, and there is evidence suggesting antinociceptive mechanisms following tonic-clonic seizures in both animals and men. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of acetylcholine in the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). Analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in eight albino Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increases in tail-flick latencies (TFLs) at least for 120 min of the postictal period. Peripheral administration of atropine (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated by peripheral administration of mecamylamine, a nicotinic cholinergic receptor blocker, at the same doses (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) used for the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist. The recruitment of the muscarinic receptor was made 10 min postconvulsions and in subsequent periods of postictal analgesia, whereas the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor was implicated only after 30 min postseizures. The cholinergic antagonists caused a minimal reduction in body temperature, but did not impair baseline TFL, spontaneous exploration or motor coordination in the rotarod test at the maximal dose of 4 mg/kg. These results indicate that acetylcholine may be involved as a neurotransmitter in postictal analgesia.

  13. Functional and laminar dissociations between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic neuromodulation in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Bießmann, Felix; Veit, Julia; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine is an important neuromodulator involved in cognitive function. The impact of cholinergic neuromodulation on computations within the cortical microcircuit is not well understood. Here we investigate the effects of layer-specific cholinergic drug application in the tree shrew primary visual cortex during visual stimulation with drifting grating stimuli of varying contrast and orientation. We describe differences between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic effects in terms of both the layer of cortex and the attribute of visual representation. Nicotinic receptor activation enhanced the contrast response in the granular input layer of the cortex, while tending to reduce neural selectivity for orientation across all cortical layers. Muscarinic activation modestly enhanced the contrast response across cortical layers, and tended to improve orientation tuning. This resulted in highest orientation selectivity in the supra- and infragranular layers, where orientation selectivity was already greatest in the absence of pharmacological stimulation. Our results indicate that laminar position plays a crucial part in functional consequences of cholinergic stimulation, consistent with the differential distribution of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors function to enhance sensory representations arriving in the cortex, whereas muscarinic receptors act to boost the cortical computation of orientation tuning. Our findings suggest close homology between cholinergic mechanisms in tree shrew and primate visual cortices.

  14. Positive modulation of the α9α10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Boffi, JC; Wedemeyer, C; Lipovsek, M; Katz, E; Calvo, DJ; Elgoyhen, AB

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The activation of α9α10 nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) present at the synapse between efferent olivocochlear fibres and cochlear hair cells can prevent acoustic trauma. Hence, pharmacological potentiators of these receptors could be useful therapeutically. In this work, we characterize ascorbic acid as a positive modulator of recombinant α9α10 nAChRs. Experimental Approach ACh-evoked responses were analysed under two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with α9 and α10 cRNAs. Key Results Ascorbic acid potentiated ACh responses in X. laevis oocytes expressing α9α10 (but not α4β2 or α7) nAChRs, in a concentration-dependent manner, with an effective concentration range of 1–30 mM. The compound did not affect the receptor's current–voltage profile nor its apparent affinity for ACh, but it significantly enhanced the maximal evoked currents (percentage of ACh maximal response, 240 ± 20%). This effect was specific for the L form of reduced ascorbic acid. Substitution of the extracellular cysteine residues present in loop C of the ACh binding site did not affect the potentiation. Ascorbic acid turned into a partial agonist of α9α10 nAChRs bearing a point mutation at the pore domain of the channel (TM2 V13′T mutant). A positive allosteric mechanism of action rather than an antioxidant effect of ascorbic acid is proposed. Conclusions and Implications The present work describes one of the few agents that activates or potentiates α9α10 nAChRs and leads to new avenues for designing drugs with potential therapeutic use in inner ear disorders. PMID:22994414

  15. Nicotinic Antagonists Enhance Process Outgrowth by Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Stuart A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Phillips, Micheal D.; Tauck, David L.; Aizenman, Elias

    1988-03-01

    Functional nicotinic cholinergic receptors are found on mammalian retinal ganglion cell neurons in culture. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can be detected in the medium of many of these retinal cultures, after release presumably from the choline acetyltransferase-positive amacrine cells. The postsynaptic effect of endogenous or applied ACh on the ganglion cells can be blocked with specific nicotinic antagonists. Here it is shown that within 24 hours of producing such a pharmacologic blockade, the retinal ganglion cells begin to sprout or regenerate neuronal processes. Thus, the growth-enhancing effect of nicotinic antagonists may be due to the removal of inhibition to growth by tonic levels of ACh present in the culture medium. Since there is a spontaneous leak of ACh in the intact retina, the effects of nicotinic cholinergic drugs on process outgrowth in culture may reflect a normal control mechanism for growth or regeneration of retinal ganglion cell processes that is exerted by ACh in vivo.

  16. Adaptations in cholinergic transmission in the ventral tegmental area associated with the affective signs of nicotine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W; Markou, Athina

    2004-09-01

    Chronic administration of nicotine induces adaptations in the brain reward circuit to counteract the acute drug effects; when nicotine administration ceases, these adaptations remain unopposed and lead to drug withdrawal. The present studies were conducted to assess the effects of chronic nicotine administration on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) shell. A discrete-trial intracranial self-stimulation procedure that provides current-intensity thresholds as measures of brain reward function was used in rats. Previous studies have shown that withdrawal from nicotine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds that are indicative of a decrease in brain reward function. We show here that injections of the nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE; 0.6-20 microg total bilateral dose) into the VTA, but not outside the VTA, resulted in significant elevations in brain reward thresholds in nicotine dependent rats (9 mg/kg/day nicotine hydrogen tartrate) while having no effect in saline-treated controls. By contrast, DHbetaE (0.6-20 microg total bilateral dose) injected into the Nacc shell had no effect on brain reward thresholds of nicotine- or saline-treated rats. The adaptations in cholinergic transmission in the VTA are likely to mediate, at least partly, the affective signs of nicotine withdrawal in humans.

  17. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in esophagus: Early alteration during carcinogenesis and prognostic value

    PubMed Central

    Chianello Nicolau, Marina; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro; Nicolau-Neto, Pedro; de Pinho, Paulo Roberto Alves; Rossini, Ana; de Almeida Simão, Tatiana; Soares Lima, Sheila Coelho

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare expression of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (CHRNs) in healthy and squamous cell carcinoma-affected esophagus and determine the prognostic value. METHODS We performed RT-qPCR to measure the expression of CHRNs in 44 esophageal samples from healthy individuals and in matched normal surrounding mucosa, and in tumors from 28 patients diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Next, we performed correlation analysis for the detected expression of these receptors with the habits and clinico-pathological characteristics of all study participants. In order to investigate the possible correlations between the expression of the different CHRN subunits in both healthy esophagus and tissues from ESCC patients, correlation matrices were generated. Subsequently, we evaluated whether the detected alterations in expression of the various CHRNs could precede histopathological modifications during the esophageal carcinogenic processes by using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Finally, we evaluated the impact of CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 expression on overall survival by using multivariate analysis. RESULTS CHRNA3, CHRNA5, CHRNA7 and CHRNB4, but not CHRNA1, CHRNA4, CHRNA9 or CHRNA10, were found to be expressed in normal (healthy) esophageal mucosa. In ESCC, CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 were overexpressed as compared with patient-matched surrounding non-tumor mucosa (ESCC-adjacent mucosa; P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0091, respectively). Positive correlations were observed between CHRNA3 and CHRNB4 expression in all samples analyzed. Additionally, CHRNB4 was found to be differentially expressed in the healthy esophagus and the normal-appearing ESCC-adjacent mucosa, allowing for distinguishment between these tissues with a sensitivity of 75.86% and a specificity of 78.95% (P = 0.0002). Finally, CHRNA5 expression was identified as an independent prognostic factor in ESCC; patients with high CHRNA5 expression showed an increased overall survival, in comparison with

  18. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Annual report No. 3, 1 May 85-30 Apr 86

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.

    1986-05-01

    We have compared the characteristics of the recognition sites for 3(H)acetylcholine and 3H(-)nicotine in rat brain and found that the pharmacology, distribution, disulfide bond requirement, and regulation by chronic administration of nicotine and soman are identical. From these studies we conclude that 3Hacetylcholine and 3H(-)nicotine recognize the same recognition site which has the characteristics expected of a nicotinic cholinergic receptor. We have also determined that 3Hacetylcholine of high specific radioactivity (80 Ci/mmol) is an excellent ligand with which to study muscarinic receptors that have high affinity for agonists. These receptors may represent a subtype of muscarinic receptors found in brain, heart, glands, an some smooth muscle. (JS)

  19. Alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect growth regulation of human mesothelioma cells: role of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Trombino, Sonya; Cesario, Alfredo; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, PierLuigi; Motta, Giovanni; Falugi, Carla; Russo, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    This study presents data suggesting that both human mesothelioma (cell lines and human mesothelioma biopsies) and human normal mesothelial cells express receptors for acetylcholine and that stimulation of these receptors by nicotine prompted cell growth via activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Thus, these data demonstrate that: (a) human mesothelioma cells and human biopsies of mesothelioma as well as of normal pleural mesothelial cells express functionally alpha-7 nicotinic acethlycholine receptors, evaluated by alpha-bungarotoxin-FITC binding, receptor binding assay, Western blot, and reverse transcription-PCR; (b) choline acetyltransferase immunostaining is present in mesothelioma cells; (c) mesothelioma cell growth is modulated by the cholinergic system in which agonists (i.e., nicotine) has a proliferative effect, and antagonists (i.e., curare) has an inhibitory effect, evaluated by cell cloning, DNA synthesis and cell cycle; (d) nicotine induces Ca(+2) influx, evaluated by [(45)Ca(2+)] uptake, and consequently activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p90(RSK) phosphorylation), evaluated by Western blot; and (e) apoptosis mechanisms in mesothelioma cells are under the control of the cholinergic system (nicotine antiapoptotic via induction of nuclear factor-kappaB complexes and phosphorylation of Bad at Ser(112); curare proapoptotic via G(0)-G(1) arrest p21(waf-1) dependent but p53 independent). The involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in mesothelioma appears reasonable and open up new therapeutic strategies.

  20. A monoclonal antibody to a synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein binds ligands of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Santucci, A; Lozzi, L; Petreni, S; Spreafico, A; Neri, P; Bracci, L; Soldani, P

    1989-09-01

    Rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins share a region of high homology (30-45 for neurotoxins and 190-203 for the glycoprotein) in the regions that are believed to be responsible for binding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Monoclonal antibodies raised to the 190-203 synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein were immobilized on a high performance affinity chromatography column and were able to bind neurotoxins. Toxins were displaced from the affinity column by elution at acidic pH and by affinity competition with acetylcholine at neutral pH. Furthermore, the affinity column proved to be useful for the purification of cholinergic ligands. Overall, these results indicate that the paratope of our monoclonal antibodies could behave as an 'internal image' of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor acetylcholine binding site.

  1. Dorsal raphe nucleus acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission modulates post-ictal antinociception: The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-01-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is a key structure of the endogenous pain inhibitory system. Although the DRN is rich in serotoninergic neurons, cholinergic neurons are also found in that nucleus. Both ictal and inter-ictal states are followed by post-ictal analgesia. The present study investigated the role of cholinergic mechanisms in postictal antinociceptive processes using microinjections of atropine and mecamylamine, muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists, respectively, in the DRN of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (at 64mg/kg) caused tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. The convulsive motor reactions were followed by an increase in pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as post-ictal analgesia. Pre-treatment of the DRN with atropine or mecamylamine at 1µg, 3µg and 5µg/0.2µL decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present results showed that the post-ictal analgesia was mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the DRN, a structure crucially involved in the neural network that organises post-ictal hypoalgesia.

  2. The quantitative evaluation of cholinergic markers in spatial memory improvement induced by nicotine-bucladesine combination in rats.

    PubMed

    Azami, Kian; Etminani, Maryam; Tabrizian, Kaveh; Salar, Fatemeh; Belaran, Maryam; Hosseini, Asieh; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2010-06-25

    We previously showed that post-training intra-hippocampal infusion of nicotine-bucladesine combination enhanced spatial memory retention in the Morris water maze. Here we investigated the role of cholinergic markers in nicotine-bucladesine combination-induced memory improvement. We assessed the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA) of the brain. Post-training bilateral infusion of a low concentration of either nicotine or bucladesine into the CA1 region of the hippocampus did not affect spatial memory significantly. Quantitative immunostaining analysis of optical density in CA1 regions and evaluation of immunopositive neurons in medial septal area of brain sections from all combination groups revealed a significant increase (P<0.001) in the ChAT and VAChT immunoreactivity. The maximum increase was observed with combination of 10-microM/side bucladesine and 0.5 microg/side nicotine and in a concentration dependent manner. Also, increase in the optical density and amount of ChAT and VAChT immunostaining correlated with the decrease in escape latency and traveled distance in rats treated with nicotine and low dose of bucladesine. Taken together, these results suggest that significant increases of ChAT and VAChT protein expressions in the CA1 region and medial septal area are the possible mechanisms of spatial memory improvement induced by nicotine-bucladesine combination.

  3. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  4. A potentially novel nicotinic receptor in Aplysia neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    White, Sean H; Carter, Christopher J; Magoski, Neil S

    2014-07-15

    Nicotinic receptors form a diverse group of ligand-gated ionotropic receptors with roles in both synaptic transmission and the control of excitability. In the bag cell neurons of Aplysia, acetylcholine activates an ionotropic receptor, which passes inward current to produce a long-lasting afterdischarge and hormone release, leading to reproduction. While testing the agonist profile of the cholinergic response, we observed a second current that appeared to be gated only by nicotine and not acetylcholine. The peak nicotine-evoked current was markedly smaller in magnitude than the acetylcholine-induced current, cooperative (Hill value of 2.7), had an EC50 near 500 μM, readily recovered from desensitization, showed Ca(2+) permeability, and was blocked by mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, or strychnine, but not by α-conotoxin ImI, methyllycaconitine, or hexamethonium. Aplysia transcriptome analysis followed by PCR yielded 20 full-length potential nicotinic receptor subunits. Sixteen of these were predicted to be cation selective, and real-time PCR suggested that 15 of the 16 subunits were expressed to varying degrees in the bag cell neurons. The acetylcholine-induced current, but not the nicotine current, was reduced by double-strand RNA treatment targeted to both subunits ApAChR-C and -E. Conversely, the nicotine-evoked current, but not the acetylcholine current, was lessened by targeting both subunits ApAChR-H and -P. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting that a nicotinic receptor is not gated by acetylcholine. Separate receptors may serve as a means to differentially trigger plasticity or safeguard propagation by assuring that only acetylcholine, the endogenous agonist, initiates large enough responses to trigger reproduction.

  5. Neural Stem Cell Transplant-Induced Effect on Neurogenesis and Cognition in Alzheimer Tg2576 Mice Is Inhibited by Concomitant Treatment with Amyloid-Lowering or Cholinergic α7 Nicotinic Receptor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Anna M; Malmsten, Linn; Röjdner, Jennie; Voytenko, Larysa; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Ögren, Sven Ove; Nordberg, Agneta; Marutle, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating regeneration in the brain has the potential to rescue neuronal networks and counteract progressive pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated whether drugs with different mechanisms of action could enhance neurogenesis and improve cognition in mice receiving human neural stem cell (hNSC) transplants. Six- to nine-month-old AD Tg2576 mice were treated for five weeks with the amyloid-modulatory and neurotrophic drug (+)-phenserine or with the partial α7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR) agonist JN403, combined with bilateral intrahippocampal hNSC transplantation. We observed improved spatial memory in hNSC-transplanted non-drug-treated Tg2576 mice but not in those receiving drugs, and this was accompanied by an increased number of Doublecortin- (DCX-) positive cells in the dentate gyrus, a surrogate marker for newly generated neurons. Treatment with (+)-phenserine did however improve graft survival in the hippocampus. An accumulation of α7 nAChR-expressing astrocytes was observed around the injection site, suggesting their involvement in repair and scarring processes. Interestingly, JN403 treatment decreased the number of α7 nAChR-expressing astrocytes, correlating with a reduction in the number of DCX-positive cells in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that transplanting hNSCs enhances endogenous neurogenesis and prevents further cognitive deterioration in Tg2576 mice, while simultaneous treatments with (+)-phenserine or JN403 result in countertherapeutic effects.

  6. Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory system by nicotine attenuates arthritis via suppression of macrophage migration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Ben; Zhou, Yaou; Zhang, Huali; Li, Tong; Zuo, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP), which relies on the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, has been reported to reduce proinflammatory cytokine levels in experimental arthritis. To gain more insight regarding the role of the CAP in the pathogenesis of arthritis, the present study focused on the modulation of macrophage infiltration. In a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), nicotine and vagotomy were used to stimulate and inhibit the CAP, respectively. Subsequently, arthritic scores were measured and histopathological assessment of joint sections was conducted. Cluster of differentiation (CD)11b-positive macrophages in the synovium were studied by immunofluorescence histochemistry. The serum levels of chemokines, including macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and MIP-2 were evaluated by ELISA. Furthermore, the expression levels of C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)2 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in the synovium were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The results indicated that treatment with nicotine significantly attenuated the clinical and histopathological changes associated with arthritis, reduced CD11b-positive macrophages in the synovium, and downregulated the serum expression levels of MIP-1α and MCP-1. Conversely, vagotomy aggravated arthritis and upregulated the expression levels of MCP-1. However, MIP-2 expression did not differ among the control, CIA, vagotomy and nicotine groups. In addition, the expression levels of CCR2 were reduced in the nicotine group; however, they were increased in the vagotomy group compared with in the untreated CIA group. The expression levels of ICAM-1 in the synovium were also influenced by activation of the CAP. Taken together, the present results indicated that nicotine-induced activation of the CAP in mice with CIA may reduce the number of macrophages in the synovium, which may serve a role in alleviating

  7. Altered nocifensive behavior in animal models of autism spectrum disorder: The role of the nicotinic cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Almeida, Luis E F; Nettleton, Margaret; Khaibullina, Alfia; Albani, Sarah; Kamimura, Sayuri; Nouraie, Mehdi; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2016-12-01

    Caretakers and clinicians alike have long recognized that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have altered sensory processing, which can contribute to its core symptoms. However, the pathobiology of sensory alterations in ASD is poorly understood. Here we examined nocifensive behavior in ASD mouse models, the BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J (BTBR) and the fragile-X mental retardation-1 knockout (Fmr1-KO) mice. We also examined the effects of nicotine on nocifensive behavior given that nicotine, a nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) agonist that has antinociceptive effects, was shown to improve social deficits and decrease repetitive behaviors in BTBR mice. Compared to respective controls, both BTBR and Fmr1-KO had hyporesponsiveness to noxious thermal stimuli and electrical stimulation of C-sensory fibers, normal responsiveness to electrical stimulation of Aβ- and Aδ-fiber, and hyperresponsiveness to visceral pain after acetic acid intraperitoneal injection. In BTBR, nicotine at lower doses increased, whereas at higher doses, it decreased hotplate latency compared to vehicle. In a significantly different effect pattern, in control mice, nicotine had antinociceptive effects to noxious heat only at the high dose. Interestingly, these nocifensive behavior alterations and differential responses to nicotine antinociceptive effects in BTBR mice were associated with significant downregulation of α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, β3, and β4 nAChR subunits in several cerebral regions both, during embryonic development and adulthood. Taken together, these findings further implicate nAChRs in behaviors alterations in the BTBR model and lend support to the hypothesis that nAChRs may be a target for treatment of behavior deficits and sensory dysfunction in ASD.

  8. Beta3 subunits promote expression and nicotine-induced up-regulation of human nicotinic alpha6* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in transfected cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tumkosit, Prem; Kuryatov, Alexander; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2006-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) containing alpha6 subunits are typically found at aminergic nerve endings where they play important roles in nicotine addiction and Parkinson's disease. alpha6* AChRs usually contain beta3 subunits. beta3 subunits are presumed to assemble only in the accessory subunit position within AChRs where they do not participate in forming acetylcholine binding sites. Assembly of subunits in the accessory position may be a critical final step in assembly of mature AChRs. Human alpha6 AChRs subtypes were permanently transfected into human tsA201 human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. alpha6beta2beta3 and alpha6beta4beta3 cell lines were found to express much larger amounts of AChRs and were more sensitive to nicotine-induced increase in the amount of AChRs than were alpha6beta2 or alpha6beta4 cell lines. The increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced up-regulation was due not to a beta3-induced increase in affinity for nicotine but probably to a direct effect on assembly of AChR subunits. HEK cells express only a small amount of mature alpha6beta2 AChRs, but many of these subunits are on the cell surface. This contrasts with Xenopus laevis oocytes, which express a large amount of incorrectly assembled alpha6beta2 subunits that bind cholinergic ligands but form large amorphous intracellular aggregates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were made to the alpha6 and beta3 subunits to aid in the characterization of these AChRs. The alpha6 mAbs bind to epitopes C-terminal of the extracellular domain. These data demonstrate that both cell type and the accessory subunit beta3 can play important roles in alpha6* AChR expression, stability, and up-regulation by nicotine.

  9. In hippocampal oriens interneurons anti-Hebbian long-term potentiation requires cholinergic signaling via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Griguoli, Marilena; Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2013-01-16

    In the hippocampus, at excitatory synapses between principal cell and oriens/alveus (O/A) interneurons, a particular form of NMDA-independent long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) has been described (Lamsa et al., 2007). This type of LTP occurs when presynaptic activation coincides with postsynaptic hyperpolarization. For this reason it has been named "anti-Hebbian" to distinguish from the classical Hebbian type of associative learning where presynaptic glutamate release coincides with postsynaptic depolarization. The different voltage dependency of LTP induction is thought to be mediated by calcium-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors that, due to polyamine-mediated rectification, favor calcium entry at hyperpolarized potentials. Here, we report that the induction of this form of LTP needs CP-α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that, like CP-AMPARs, exhibit a strong inward rectification because of polyamine block at depolarizing potentials. We found that high-frequency stimulation of afferent fibers elicits synaptic currents mediated by α7 nAChRs. Hence, LTP was prevented by α7 nAChR antagonists dihydro-β-erythroidine and methyllycaconitine (MLA) and was absent in α7(-/-) mice. In addition, in agreement with previous observations (Le Duigou and Kullmann, 2011), in a minority of O/A interneurons in MLA-treated hippocampal slices from WT animals and α7(-/-) mice, a form of LTP probably dependent on the activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors was observed. These data indicate that, in O/A interneurons, anti-Hebbian LTP critically depends on cholinergic signaling via α7 nAChR. This may influence network oscillations and information processing.

  10. Antimuscle atrophy effect of nicotine targets muscle satellite cells partly through an α7 nicotinic receptor in a murine hindlimb ischemia model.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Yoshihiko; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Okazaki, Kayo; Oikawa, Shino; Iketani, Mitsue; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Kurabayashi, Mutsumi; Furihata, Mutsuo; Sato, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    We have recently identified that donepezil, an anti-Alzheimer drug, accelerates angiogenesis in a murine hindlimb ischemia (HLI) model. However, the precise mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated, particularly whether the effects are derived from endothelial cells alone or from other nonvascular cells. Further investigation of the HLI model revealed that nicotine accelerated angiogenesis by activation of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) synthesis through nicotinic receptors in myogenic cells, that is, satellite cells, in vivo and upregulated the expression of angiogenic factors, for example, VEGF and fibroblast growth factor 2, in vitro. As a result, nicotine prevented skeletal muscle from ischemia-induced muscle atrophy and upregulated myosin heavy chain expression in vitro. The in vivo anti-atrophy effect of nicotine on muscle was also observed in galantamine, another anti-Alzheimer drug, playing as an allosteric potentiating ligand. Such effects of nicotine were attenuated in α7 nicotinic receptor knockout mice. In contrast, PNU282987, an α7 nicotinic receptor agonist, comparably salvaged skeletal muscle, which was affected by HLI. These results suggest that cholinergic signals also target myogenic cells and have inhibiting roles in muscle loss by ischemia-induced muscle atrophy.

  11. Evidence for two types of nicotinic receptors in the cat carotid body chemoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Obeso, A; Gómez-Niño, M A; Almaraz, L; Dinger, B; Fidone, S; González, C

    1997-04-18

    Current concepts on the location and functional significance of nicotinic receptors in the carotid body rest on alpha-bungarotoxin binding and autoradiographic studies. Using an in vitro preparation of the cat carotid body whose catecholamine deposits have been labeled by prior incubation with the tritiated natural precursor [3H]tyrosine, we have found that nicotine induces release of [3H]catecholamines in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 9.81 microM). We also found that mecamylamine (50 microM) completely abolished the nicotine-induced release, while alpha-bungarotoxin (100 nM; approximately 20 times its binding Kd) only reduced the release by 56%. These findings indicate that chemoreceptor cells, and perhaps other carotid body structures, contain nicotinic receptors that are not sensitive to alpha-bungarotoxin and force a revision of the current concepts on cholinergic mechanisms in the carotid body chemoreception.

  12. Nicotine-induced plasticity during development: modulation of the cholinergic system and long-term consequences for circuits involved in attention and sensory processing

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Christopher J.; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Despite a great deal of progress, more than 10% of pregnant women in the USA smoke. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated correlations between developmental tobacco smoke exposure and sensory processing deficits, as well as a number of neuropsychiatric conditions, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Significantly, data from animal models of developmental nicotine exposure have suggested that the nicotine in tobacco contributes significantly to the effects of developmental smoke exposure. Consequently, we hypothesize that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are critical for setting and refining the strength of corticothalamic-thalamocortical loops during critical periods of development and that disruption of this process by developmental nicotine exposure can result in long-lasting dysregulation of sensory processing. The ability of nAChR activation to modulate synaptic plasticity is likely to underlie the effects of both endogenous cholinergic signaling and pharmacologically-administered nicotine to alter cellular, physiological and behavioral processes during critical periods of development. PMID:18692078

  13. Artemin growth factor increases nicotinic cholinergic receptor subunit expression and activity in nociceptive sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Artemin (Artn), a member of the glial cell line-derived growth factor (GDNF) family, supports the development and function of a subpopulation of peptidergic, TRPV1-positive sensory neurons. Artn (enovin, neublastin) is elevated in inflamed tissue and its injection in skin causes transient thermal hyperalgesia. A genome wide expression analysis of trigeminal ganglia of mice that overexpress Artn in the skin (ART-OE mice) showed elevation in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits, suggesting these ion channels contribute to Artn-induced sensitivity. Here we have used gene expression, immunolabeling, patch clamp electrophysiology and behavioral testing assays to investigate the link between Artn, nicotinic subunit expression and thermal hypersensitivity. Results Reverse transcriptase-PCR validation showed increased levels of mRNAs encoding the nAChR subunits α3 (13.3-fold), β3 (4-fold) and β4 (7.7-fold) in trigeminal ganglia and α3 (4-fold) and β4 (2.8-fold) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of ART-OE mice. Sensory ganglia of ART-OE mice had increased immunoreactivity for nAChRα3 and exhibited increased overlap in labeling with GFRα3-positive neurons. Patch clamp analysis of back-labeled cutaneous afferents showed that while the majority of nicotine-evoked currents in DRG neurons had biophysical and pharmacological properties of α7-subunit containing nAChRs, the Artn-induced increase in α3 and β4 subunits resulted in functional channels. Behavioral analysis of ART-OE and wildtype mice showed that Artn-induced thermal hyperalgesia can be blocked by mecamylamine or hexamethonium. Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) inflammation of paw skin, which causes an increase in Artn in the skin, also increased the level of nAChR mRNAs in DRG. Finally, the increase in nAChRs transcription was not dependent on the Artn-induced increase in TRPV1 or TRPA1 in ART-OE mice since nAChRs were elevated in ganglia of TRPV1/TRPA1 double knockout mice. Conclusions

  14. Prenatal nicotine alters the developmental neurotoxicity of postnatal chlorpyrifos directed toward cholinergic systems: better, worse, or just "different?".

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether prenatal nicotine exposure sensitizes the developing brain to subsequent developmental neurotoxicity evoked by chlorpyrifos, a commonly-used insecticide. We gave nicotine to pregnant rats throughout gestation at a dose (3mg/kg/day) producing plasma levels typical of smokers; offspring were then given chlorpyrifos on postnatal days 1-4, at a dose (1mg/kg) that produces minimally-detectable inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity. We evaluated indices for acetylcholine (ACh) synaptic function throughout adolescence, young adulthood and later adulthood, in brain regions possessing the majority of ACh projections and cell bodies; we measured nicotinic ACh receptor binding, hemicholinium-3 binding to the presynaptic choline transporter and choline acetyltransferase activity, all known targets for the adverse developmental effects of nicotine and chlorpyrifos given individually. By itself nicotine elicited overall upregulation of the ACh markers, albeit with selective differences by sex, region and age. Likewise, chlorpyrifos alone had highly sex-selective effects. Importantly, all the effects showed temporal progression between adolescence and adulthood, pointing to ongoing synaptic changes rather than just persistence after an initial injury. Prenatal nicotine administration altered the responses to chlorpyrifos in a consistent pattern for all three markers, lowering values relative to those of the individual treatments or to those expected from simple additive effects of nicotine and chlorpyrifos. The combination produced global interference with emergence of the ACh phenotype, an effect not seen with nicotine or chlorpyrifos alone. Given that human exposures to nicotine and chlorpyrifos are widespread, our results point to the creation of a subpopulation with heightened vulnerability.

  15. Developmental cholinotoxicants: nicotine and chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, T A

    1999-01-01

    The stimulation of cholinergic receptors in target cells during a critical developmental period provides signals that influence cell replication and differentiation. Accordingly, environmental agents that promote cholinergic activity evoke neurodevelopmental damage because of the inappropriate timing or intensity of stimulation. Nicotine evokes mitotic arrest in brain cells possessing high concentrations of nicotinic cholinergic receptors. In addition, the cholinergic overstimulation programs the expression of genes that evoke apoptosis and delayed cell loss. Effects of cholinesterase inhibitors exhibit many similarities to those of nicotine. Chlorpyrifos administered to developing rats in doses that do not evoke signs of overt toxicity decreased DNA synthesis and caused shortfalls in cell numbers in brain regions enriched in cholinergic innervation. In embryo cultures, chlorpyrifos also evoked apoptosis during neurulation. However, chlorpyrifos also evokes noncholinergic disruption of cell development by interfering with cell signaling via adenylyl cyclase, leading to widespread disruption that is not limited to cholinergic systems. We have tested this hypothesis in vitro with PC12 cells, which lack the enzymes necessary to produce chlorpyrifos oxon, the metabolite that inhibits cholinesterase. Chlorpyrifos inhibited DNA synthesis in undifferentiated PC12 cells, which have relatively few cholinergic receptors. Furthermore, chlorpyrifos was more effective than nicotine and its effects were not blocked by cholinergic antagonists. When cells were allowed to differentiate in the presence of chlorpyrifos, cell replication was inhibited even more profoundly and cell acquisition was arrested. At higher concentrations, chlorpyrifos also inhibited neuritic outgrowth. Thus, chlorpyrifos elicits damage by both noncholinergic and cholinergic mechanisms extending from early stages of neural cell replication through late stages of axonogenesis and terminal differentiation

  16. Cholinergic modulation of the medial prefrontal cortex: the role of nicotinic receptors in attention and regulation of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Bernard; Poorthuis, Rogier B.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is crucial for normal cognitive performance. Despite the fact that many have studied how ACh affects neuronal processing in the mPFC and thereby influences attention behavior, there is still a lot unknown about how this occurs. Here we will review the evidence that cholinergic modulation of the mPFC plays a role in attention and we will summarize the current knowledge about the role between ACh receptors (AChRs) and behavior and how ACh receptor activation changes processing in the cortical microcircuitry. Recent evidence implicates fast phasic release of ACh in cue detection and attention. This review will focus mainly on the fast ionotropic nicotinic receptors and less on the metabotropic muscarinic receptors. Finally, we will review limitations of the existing studies and address how innovative technologies might push the field forward in order to gain understanding into the relation between ACh, neuronal activity and behavior. PMID:24653678

  17. Neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological approaches to postictal antinociception-related prosencephalic neurons: the role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Bolognesi, Luana Iacovelo; Twardowschy, André; Corrêa, Fernando Morgan Aguiar; Sibson, Nicola R; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested the involvement of the hippocampus in the elaboration of epilepsy. There is evidence that suggests the hippocampus plays an important role in the affective and motivational components of nociceptive perception. However, the exact nature of this involvement remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (dH) in the organization of postictal analgesia. In a neuroanatomical study, afferent connections were found from the somatosensory cortex, the medial septal area, the lateral septal area, the diagonal band of Broca, and the dentate gyrus to the dH; all these areas have been suggested to modulate convulsive activity. Outputs to the dH were also identified from the linear raphe nucleus, the median raphe nucleus (MdRN), the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. All these structures comprise the endogenous pain modulatory system and may be involved either in postictal pronociception or antinociception that is commonly reported by epileptic patients. dH-pretreatment with cobalt chloride (1.0 mmol/L CoCl2/0.2 μL) to transiently inhibit local synapses decreased postictal analgesia 10 min after the end of seizures. Pretreatment of the dH with either atropine or mecamylamine (1.0 μg/0.2 μL) attenuated the postictal antinociception 30 min after seizures, while the higher dose (5.0 μg/0.2 μL) decreased postictal analgesia immediately after the end of seizures. These findings suggest that the dH exerts a critical role in the organization of postictal analgesia and that muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor-mediated mechanisms in the dH are involved in the elaboration of antinociceptive processes induced by generalized tonic-clonic seizures. PMID:23785660

  18. Nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are recruited by acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission within the locus coeruleus during the organisation of post-ictal antinociception.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-10-01

    Post-ictal antinociception is characterised by an increase in the nociceptive threshold that accompanies tonic and tonic-clonic seizures (TCS). The locus coeruleus (LC) receives profuse cholinergic inputs from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Different concentrations (1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL) of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist atropine and the nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist mecamylamine were microinjected into the LC of Wistar rats to investigate the role of cholinergic mechanisms in the severity of TCS and the post-ictal antinociceptive response. Five minutes later, TCS were induced by systemic administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (64mg/kg). Seizures were recorded inside the open field apparatus for an average of 10min. Immediately after seizures, the nociceptive threshold was recorded for 130min using the tail-flick test. Pre-treatment of the LC with 1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL concentrations of both atropine and mecamylamine did not cause a significant effect on seizure severity. However, the same treatments decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. In addition, mecamylamine caused an earlier decrease in the post-ictal antinociception compared to atropine. These results suggest that muscarinic and mainly nicotinic cholinergic receptors of the LC are recruited to organise tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception.

  19. Effects of tobacco smoke on PC12 cell neurodifferentiation are distinct from those of nicotine or benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Card, Jennifer; Stadler, Ashley; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2014-01-01

    Although nicotine accounts for a great deal of the neurodevelopmental damage associated with maternal smoking or second-hand exposure, tobacco smoke contains thousands of potentially neurotoxic compounds. We used PC12 cells, a standard in vitro model of neurodifferentiation, to compare tobacco smoke extract (TSE) to nicotine, matching TSE exposure (with its inherent nicotine content) to parallel concentrations of nicotine, or to benzo[a]pyrene, a tobacco combustion product. TSE promoted the transition from cell replication to differentiation, resulting in fewer, but larger cells with greater neurite extension. TSE also biased differentiation into the dopaminergic versus the cholinergic phenotype, evidenced by an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase activity but not choline acetyltransferase. Nicotine likewise promoted differentiation at the expense of cell numbers, but its effect on growth and neurite extension was smaller than that of TSE; furthermore, nicotine did not promote the dopaminergic phenotype. Benzo[a]pyrene had effects opposite to those of TSE, retarding neurodifferentiation, which resulted in higher cell numbers, smaller cells, reduced neurite information, and impaired emergence of both dopaminergic and cholinergic phenotypes. Our studies show that the complex mixture of compounds in tobacco smoke exerts direct effects on neural cell replication and differentiation that resemble those of nicotine in some ways but not others, and most importantly, that are greater in magnitude than can be accounted for from just the nicotine content of TSE. Thus, fetal tobacco smoke exposure, including lower levels associated with second-hand smoke, could be more injurious than would be anticipated from measured levels of nicotine or its metabolites.

  20. Nicotinic receptors and functional regulation of GABA cell microcircuitry in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Benes, Francine M

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the hippocampus in postmortem brains from patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have provided evidence for a defect of GABAergic interneurons. Significant decreases in the expression of GAD67, a marker for GABA cell function, have been found repeatedly in several different brain regions that include the hippocampus. In this region, nicotinic receptors are thought to play an important role in modulating the activity of GABAergic interneurons by influences of excitatory cholinergic afferents on their activity. In bipolar disorder, this influence appears to be particularly prominent in the stratum oriens of sectors CA3/2 and CA1, two sites where these cells constitute the exclusive neuronal cell type. In sector CA3/2, this layer receives a robust excitatory projection from the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and this is thought to play a central role in regulating GABA cells at this locus. Using laser microdissection, recent studies have focused selectively on these two layers and their associated GABA cells using microarray technology. The results have provided support for the idea that nicotinic cholinergic receptors play a particularly important role in regulating the activity of GABA neurons at these loci by regulating the progression of cell cycle and the repair of damaged DNA. In bipolar disorder, there is a prominent reduction in the expression of mRNAs for several different nicotinic subunit isoforms. These decreases could reflect a diminished influence of this receptor system on these GABA cells, particularly in sector CA3/2 where a preponderance of abnormalities have been observed in postmortem studies. In patients with bipolar disorder, excitatory nicotinic cholinergic fibers from the medial septum may converge with glutamatergic fibers from the BLA on GABAergic interneurons in the stratum oriens of CA3/2 and result in disturbances of their genomic and functional integrity, ones that may induce disruptions of the integration of

  1. Cholinergic regulation of epithelial sodium channels in rat alveolar type 2 epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yoshizumi; Helms, My N; Eaton, Amity F; Self, Julie; Ramosevac, Semra; Jain, Lucky; Bao, Hui-Fang; Eaton, Douglas C

    2013-03-15

    We and others have shown that epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) in alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells are activated by β2 agonists, steroid hormones, elevated oxygen tension, and by dopamine. Although acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) have been previously described in the lung, there are few reports of whether cholinergic agonists alter sodium transport in the alveolar epithelium. Therefore, we investigated how cholinergic receptors regulate ENaC activity in primary cultures of rat AT2 cells using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings to assess ENaC activity. We found that the muscarinic agonists, carbachol (CCh) and oxotremorine, activated ENaC in a dose-dependent manner but that nicotine did not. CCh-induced activation of ENaC was blocked by atropine. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry suggested that muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors (mAChRs) but not nicotinic receptors were present in AT2 cells. Endogenous RhoA and GTP-RhoA increased in response to CCh and the increase was reduced by pretreatment with atropine. We showed that Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), abolished endogenous ENaC activity and inhibited the activation of ENaC by CCh. We also showed that ROCK signaling was necessary for ENaC stability in 2F3 cells, a model for AT2 cells. Our results showed that muscarinic agonists activated ENaC in rat AT2 cells through M2 and/or M3 mAChRs probably via a RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

  2. Nicotine interferes with purinergic signaling in smooth muscle cells isolated from urinary bladders of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jenes, Agnes; Szigeti, Gyula P; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Varga, Attila; Lorincz, Laszlo; Csernoch, Laszlo

    2013-09-01

    In patients with outlet obstruction, the contraction of the base is reduced compared to that of healthy individuals, while the contraction of the dome is not affected. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms that might be responsible for cholinergic effects blocking non-adrenergic non-cholinergic contractions in the base of the urinary bladder. Smooth muscle cells either from the base or from the dome of human urinary bladders were cultured to determine the contribution of cholinergic and purinergic mechanisms to their Ca2+ homeostasis. While ATP evoked Ca2+ transients in all the cells, nicotine and carbachol induced Ca2+ transients only in 56% and 44% of the cells, respectively. When ATP was administered together with nicotine or carbachol, the amplitudes of the Ca2+ transients recorded from cells prepared from the base of bladders were significantly smaller (42 ± 6% with nicotine and 56 ± 9% with carbachol) than those evoked by ATP alone. This inhibition was much less apparent in the dome of bladders. The inhibition between the cholinergic and purinergic signaling pathways reported in this work may decrease the strength of the contraction of the base of the urinary bladder in patients with outlet obstruction during voiding.

  3. Pb2+ via protein kinase C inhibits nicotinic cholinergic modulation of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Braga, Maria F M; Pereira, Edna F R; Mike, Arpad; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2004-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Pb(2+) on modulation of synaptic transmission by nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the rat hippocampus. To this end, inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs and EPSCs, respectively) were recorded by means of the whole-cell mode of the patch-clamp technique from rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Acetylcholine (ACh, 1 mM; 1-s pulses) triggered GABA release via activation of alpha4beta2* and alpha7* nAChRs. It also triggered glutamate release via activation of alpha7* nAChRs. Pb(2+) (0.1 and 1 microM) blocked ACh-triggered transmitter release. Blockade by Pb(2+) of ACh-triggered IPSCs was partially reversible upon washing of the neurons. In contrast, even after 30- to 60-min washing, there was no reversibility of Pb(2+)-induced blockade of ACh-triggered EPSCs. The effects of Pb(2+) on GABA release triggered by activation of alpha7* and alpha4beta2* nACRs were mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (1 microM) and blocked by the indolocarbazole Go 7874 (50 nM) and the bisindolylmaleimide Ro-31-8425 (150 nM), which are selective PKC inhibitors. After washing of fully functional neuronal networks that had been exposed for 5 min to Pb(2+), the irreversible inhibition by Pb(2+) of ACh-triggered glutamate release was partially overridden by a disinhibitory mechanism that is likely to involve alpha4beta2* nAChR activation in interneurons that synapse onto other interneurons synapsing onto pyramidal neurons. Long-lasting inhibition of alpha7* nAChR modulation of synaptic transmission may contribute to the persistent cognitive impairment that results from childhood Pb(2+) intoxication.

  4. Onset of cholinergic efferent synaptic function in sensory hair cells of the rat cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Isabelle; Wersinger, Eric; McIntosh, J. Michael; Fuchs, Paul A.; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    In the developing mammalian cochlea, the sensory hair cells receive efferent innervation originating in the superior olivary complex. This input is mediated by α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and is inhibitory due to the subsequent activation of calcium-dependent SK2 potassium channels. We examined the acquisition of this cholinergic efferent input using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from inner hair cells (IHCs) in acutely excised apical turns of the rat cochlea from embryonic day 21 to postnatal day 8 (P8). Responses to 1 mM acetylcholine (ACh) were detected from P0 on in almost every IHC. The ACh-activated current amplitude increased with age and demonstrated the same pharmacology as α9-containing nAChRs. Interestingly, at P0, the ACh response was not coupled to SK2 channels, so that the initial cholinergic response was excitatory and could trigger action potentials in IHCs. Coupling to SK current was detected earliest at P1 in a subset of IHCs and by P3 in every IHC studied. Clustered nAChRs and SK2 channels were found on IHCs from P1 on using Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated α-bungarotoxin and SK2 immunohistochemistry. The number of nAChRs clusters increased with age to 16 per IHC at P8. Cholinergic efferent synaptic currents first appeared in a subset of IHCs at P1 and by P3 in every IHC studied, contemporaneously with ACh-evoked SK currents, suggesting that SK2 channels may be necessary at onset of synaptic function. An analogous pattern of development was observed for the efferent synapses that form later (P6–P8) on outer hair cells in the basal cochlea. PMID:22016543

  5. Psychopharmacological evidences for the involvement of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors on sweet substance-induced analgesia in Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Irusta, A E; Savoldi, M; Kishi, R; Resende, G C; Freitas, R L; Carvalho, A D; Coimbra, N C

    2001-06-08

    In order to investigate the effects of sweet substance intake on pain modulation, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received either tap water or sucrose solutions (250 g/l) for 14 days as their only source of liquid. Each rat consumed an average of 15.6 g sucrose/day. Their tail withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick test (probably a spinal reflex) were measured immediately before and after this treatment. An analgesia index was calculated from the withdrawal latencies before and after treatment. The index (mean +/- SEM, N = 8) for the groups receiving sucrose solution plus saline (NaCl; 0.9%) for 14 days was 0.70 +/- 0.01. Atropine (1 and 2 mg/kg)-treated rats (N = 8) after intake of sucrose exhibited an analgesia index of 0.39 +/- 0.09 and 0.39 +/- 0.08, respectively, while mecamylamine (1 and 2 mg/kg)-treated rats (N = 10) after intake of sucrose had an index of -0.02 +/- 0.07 and 0.03 +/- 0.07, respectively. These results indicate that the effect of sucrose intake on nociceptive thresholds is controlled by neurotransmission of acetylcholine and depends on the nicotinic cholinergic receptors for its major analgesic effect, although muscarinic receptors were also involved in this antinociceptive process.

  6. Combined exposure to nicotine and ethanol in adolescent mice: effects on the central cholinergic systems during short and long term withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Carvalho, A; Lima, C S; Medeiros, A H; Siqueira, N R; Filgueiras, C C; Manhães, A C; Abreu-Villaça, Y

    2009-09-15

    Relapse to drug use is a major public health problem. In this sense, understanding the biological substrates that are affected during withdrawal may provide information to prevent relapse. Both smoking and alcoholic beverage consumption usually begin during adolescence, however, little is known about the basic neurobiology of the combined adolescent exposure, particularly during withdrawal. Since nicotine is a cholinergic agonist and it has been shown that ethanol interferes with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the current study focused on the effects of drug withdrawal on the central cholinergic system. From the 30th to the 45th postnatal day (PN), C57BL/6 male and female mice were exposed to nicotine free base (NIC) and/or ethanol (ETOH). Four groups were analyzed: (1) concomitant NIC (50 microg/ml in 2% saccharin to drink) and ETOH (25%, 2 g/kg i.p. injected every other day) exposure; (2) NIC exposure; (3) ETOH exposure; (4) vehicle. We assessed nAChR binding, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding in the cerebral cortex and midbrain of mice at short (PN50) and long term (PN75) withdrawal. NIC and NIC+ETOH promoted nAChR upregulation during a short-term withdrawal. NIC short-term withdrawal elicited an increase in ChAT activity that was reversed by ETOH withdrawal. In addition, NIC+ETOH elicited a decrease in ChAT activity at long term withdrawal. Regarding HC-3, ETOH and NIC+ETOH promoted a decrease that persisted at long-term withdrawal. The present study provides experimental evidence that nicotine and ethanol during adolescence interact resulting in cholinergic system alterations during withdrawal.

  7. Central Muscarinic Cholinergic Activation Alters Interaction between Splenic Dendritic Cell and CD4+CD25- T Cells in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Khafipour, Ehsan; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) is based on vagus nerve (VN) activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR) signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and sequential CD4+/CD25−T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis. Methods The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP)-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25−T cell co-culture were determined. Results McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25−T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy. Conclusions Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD. PMID:25295619

  8. Nicotine and serotonin in immune regulation and inflammatory processes: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2007-03-01

    Nicotine and serotonin modulate the innate and adaptive immune responses and the inflammatory states. Several nicotinic cholinergic and serotonergic receptor subtypes have been characterized in B and T lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The use of knockout mice has allowed a better characterization of nicotinic receptors and their role in anti-inflammatory processes in these cells. Cytokines play a crucial role in controlling inflammatory reactions. Nicotine and serotonin have been reported to regulate cytokine release. Cholinergic mechanisms also play an important role in inflammation through endogenous acetylcholine. Nicotine mimics this effect by activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. New concepts of reciprocal interactions between nicotine and serotonin are emerging. The role of nicotine as an anti-inflammatory agent has been established, whereas that of serotonin remains more controversial.

  9. Developmental regulation of nicotinic synapses on cochlear inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, Eleonora; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Gómez-Casati, María E; Knipper, Marlies; Vetter, Douglas E; Fuchs, Paul A; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2004-09-08

    In the mature cochlea, inner hair cells (IHCs) transduce acoustic signals into receptor potentials, communicating to the brain by synaptic contacts with afferent fibers. Before the onset of hearing, a transient efferent innervation is found on IHCs, mediated by a nicotinic cholinergic receptor that may contain both alpha9 and alpha10 subunits. Calcium influx through that receptor activates calcium-dependent (SK2-containing) potassium channels. This inhibitory synapse is thought to disappear after the onset of hearing [after postnatal day 12 (P12)]. We documented this developmental transition using whole-cell recordings from IHCs in apical turns of the rat organ of Corti. Acetylcholine elicited ionic currents in 88-100% of IHCs between P3 and P14, but in only 1 of 11 IHCs at P16-P22. Potassium depolarization of efferent terminals caused IPSCs in 67% of IHCs at P3, in 100% at P7-P9, in 93% at P10-P12, but in only 40% at P13-P14 and in none of the IHCs tested between P16 and P22. Earlier work had shown by in situ hybridization that alpha9 mRNA is expressed in adult IHCs but that alpha10 mRNA disappears after the onset of hearing. In the present study, antibodies to alpha10 and to the associated calcium-dependent (SK2) potassium channel showed a similar developmental loss. The correlated expression of these gene products with functional innervation suggests that Alpha10 and SK2, but not Alpha9, are regulated by synaptic activity. Furthermore, this developmental knock-out of alpha10, but not alpha9, supports the hypothesis that functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in hair cells are heteromers containing both these subunits.

  10. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation.

  11. Nicotinic α4 Receptor-Mediated Cholinergic Influences on Food Intake and Activity Patterns in Hypothalamic Circuits.

    PubMed

    García, Ana P; Aitta-aho, Teemu; Schaaf, Laura; Heeley, Nicholas; Heuschmid, Lena; Bai, Yunjing; Barrantes, Francisco J; Apergis-Schoute, John

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play an important role in regulating appetite and have been shown to do so by influencing neural activity in the hypothalamus. To shed light on the hypothalamic circuits governing acetylcholine's (ACh) regulation of appetite this study investigated the influence of hypothalamic nAChRs expressing the α4 subunit. We found that antagonizing the α4β2 nAChR locally in the lateral hypothalamus with di-hydro-ß-erythroidine (DHβE), an α4 nAChR antagonist with moderate affinity, caused an increase in food intake following free access to food after a 12 hour fast, compared to saline-infused animals. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that orexin/hypocretin (HO), oxytocin, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons in the A13 and A12 of the hypothalamus expressed the nAChR α4 subunit in varying amounts (34%, 42%, 50%, and 51%, respectively) whereas melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons did not, suggesting that DHβE-mediated increases in food intake may be due to a direct activation of specific hypothalamic circuits. Systemic DHβE (2 mg/kg) administration similarly increased food intake following a 12 hour fast. In these animals a subpopulation of orexin/hypocretin neurons showed elevated activity compared to control animals and MCH neuronal activity was overall lower as measured by expression of the immediate early gene marker for neuronal activity cFos. However, oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamus and TH-containing neurons in the A13 and A12 did not show differential activity patterns. These results indicate that various neurochemically distinct hypothalamic populations are under the influence of α4β2 nAChRs and that cholinergic inputs to the lateral hypothalamus can affect satiety signals through activation of local α4β2 nAChR-mediated transmission.

  12. Hippocampal α7-nicotinic cholinergic receptors modulate memory reconsolidation: a potential strategy for recovery from amnesia.

    PubMed

    Blake, M G; Boccia, M M; Krawczyk, M C; Baratti, C M

    2013-11-01

    When subjects are exposed to new learning experiences, the novel information could be acquired and eventually stored through memory consolidation process. The exposure of mice to a novel experience (a hole-board) after being trained in an inhibitory avoidance apparatus is followed by impaired performance of the avoidance memory in subsequent tests. The same impairing effect is produced when mice are exposed to the novel environment after the reactivation of the avoidance memory. This interfering effect is due to impaired consolidation or reconsolidation of the avoidance memory. The administration of the α7-nicotinic receptor agonist choline (Ch) in the dorsal hippocampus (0.8 μg/hippocampus) immediately after the inhibitory avoidance memory reactivation, allowed memory recovery. This effect of Ch was time-dependent, and retention performance was not affected in drug-treated mice that were not subjected to memory reactivation, suggesting that the effects on performance are not due to non-specific effects of the drug. The effects of Ch also depended on the age of the reactivated memory. Altogether, our results suggest that Ch exerts its effects by modulating memory reconsolidation, and that the memory impairment induced by new learning is a memory expression failure and not a storage deficit. Therefore, reconsolidation, among other functions, might serve to change whether a memory will be expressed in later tests. Summarizing, our results open new avenues about the behavioral significance and the physiological functions of memory reconsolidation, providing new strategies for recovering memories from some types of amnesia.

  13. Nicotinic activation of laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for addiction to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2009-11-01

    Identifying the neurological mechanisms underlying nicotine reinforcement is a healthcare imperative, if society is to effectively combat tobacco addiction. The majority of studies of the neurobiology of addiction have focused on dopamine (DA)-containing neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However, recent data suggest that neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nucleus, which sends cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic-containing projections to DA-containing neurons of the VTA, are critical to gating normal functioning of this nucleus. The actions of nicotine on LDT neurons are unknown. We addressed this issue by examining the effects of nicotine on identified cholinergic and non-cholinergic LDT neurons using whole-cell patch clamp and Ca(2+)-imaging methods in brain slices from mice (P12-P45). Nicotine applied by puffer pipette or bath superfusion elicited membrane depolarization that often induced firing and TTX-resistant inward currents. Nicotine also enhanced sensitivity to injected current; and, baseline changes in intracellular calcium were elicited in the dendrites of some cholinergic LDT cells. In addition, activity-dependent calcium transients were increased, suggesting that nicotine exposure sufficient to induce firing may lead to enhancement of levels of intracellular calcium. Nicotine also had strong actions on glutamate and GABA-releasing presynaptic terminals, as it greatly increased the frequency of miniature EPSCs and IPSCs to both cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons. Utilization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) subunit antagonists revealed that presynaptic, inhibitory terminals on cholinergic neurons were activated by receptors containing alpha 7, beta2, and non-alpha 7 subunits, whereas, presynaptic glutamatergic terminals were activated by nAChRs that comprised non-alpha 7 subunits. We also found that direct nicotinic actions on cholinergic LDT neurons were mediated by receptors containing alpha 7, beta2, and non

  14. Activation of Presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) Receptors Inhibits Synaptic Transmission at Mammalian Inhibitory Cholinergic Olivocochlear–Hair Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Carolina; Zorrilla de San Martín, Javier; Ballestero, Jimena; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia; Torbidoni, Ana Vanesa; Fuchs, Paul A.; Bettler, Bernhard; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    The synapse between olivocochlear (OC) neurons and cochlear mechanosensory hair cells is cholinergic, fast, and inhibitory. The inhibitory sign of this cholinergic synapse is accounted for by the activation of Ca2+-permeable postsynaptic α9α10 nicotinic receptors coupled to the opening of hyperpolarizing Ca2+-activated small-conductance type 2 (SK2)K+ channels. Acetylcholine (ACh) release at this synapse is supported by both P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Although the OC synapse is cholinergic, an abundant OC GABA innervation is present along the mammalian cochlea. The role of this neurotransmitter at the OC efferent innervation, however, is for the most part unknown. We show that GABA fails to evoke fast postsynaptic inhibitory currents in apical developing inner and outer hair cells. However, electrical stimulation of OC efferent fibers activates presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) receptors [GABAB(1a,2)Rs] that downregulate the amount of ACh released at the OC–hair cell synapse, by inhibiting P/Q-type VGCCs. We confirmed the expression of GABABRs at OC terminals contacting the hair cells by coimmunostaining for GFP and synaptophysin in transgenic mice expressing GABAB1–GFP fusion proteins. Moreover, coimmunostaining with antibodies against the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and synaptophysin support the idea that GABA is directly synthesized at OC terminals contacting the hair cells during development. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a physiological role for GABA in cochlear synaptic function. In addition, our data suggest that the GABAB1a isoform selectively inhibits release at efferent cholinergic synapses. PMID:24068816

  15. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  16. Modulation of muscarinic and micotinic cholinergic receptor mediated catecholamine secretion in guinea pig chromaffin cells by phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, J.C.; Fisher, S.K.; Horowitz, M.I.

    1986-05-01

    Isolated guinea pig chromaffin cells possess both nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic (mAChR) cholinergic receptors that are positively coupled to catecholamine (CA) release. Sixty to 70% of CA release is mediated by nAChRs and 30-40% by mAChRs. In the absence of added calcium, nAChR mediated CA release was reduced by 65% whereas the muscarinic response was unaffected. The addition of 100nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), also resulted in an increased CA release. Temporally and quantitatively, this response resembled that of mAChR activation. Addition of optimal concentrations of nicotine (50..mu..M) and TPA (100nM) induced a synergistic increase in CA release. Addition of muscarine (1mM) and TPA resulted in an additive response despite a 40-60% inhibition of mAChR mediated inositol phosphate release by TPA. Thus, in guinea pig chromaffin cells, it appears that PKC activation alone is a sufficient stimulus for CA release and that activation of both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors may further increase this enzyme's activity.

  17. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago.

  18. Extracellular calcium and cholinergic stimulation of isolated canine parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, A H

    1981-01-01

    The role of calcium gating in cholinergic stimulation of the function of parietal cells was studied using cells isolated from canine fundic mucosa by treatment with collagenase and EDTA and enriched by velocity separation in an elutriator rotor. Monitoring the accumulation of [14C[ aminopyrine as an index of parietal cell response, stimulation by carbachol, but not by histamine, was highly dependent upon the concentration of extracellular calcium. Incubation of parietal cells in 0-.1 mM calcium, rather than the usual 1.8 mM concentration, reduced the response to 100 microM carbachol by 92 +/- 2%, whereas histamine stimulation was impaired by 28 +/- 5%. A similar reduction in extracellular calcium suppressed the response to gastrin (100 nM) by 67 +/- 7%. The impairment of cholinergic stimulation found at low extracellular calcium concentrations was rapidly reversed with the readdition of calcium. Lanthanum, which blocks calcium movement across membranes, caused a similar pattern of effects on secretagogue stimulation of aminopyrine accumulation, with 100 microM lanthanum suppressing carbachol stimulation by 83 +/- 2%. This concentration of lanthanum suppressed gastrin stimulation by 40 +/- 7% and histamine stimulation by only 12 +/- 9%. Carbachol, but not histamine nor gastrin, stimulated 45Ca++ uptake. The magnitude of carbachol-stimulated calcium uptake correlated with the parietal cell content of the fractions examined (r = 0.88), and was dose responsive over carbachol concentrations from 1 microM to 1 mM. Atropine (100 nM) caused surmountable inhibition, and these effects of carbachol and atropine on calcium uptake correlated with their effects on oxygen consumption (r = 0.93) and [14C]-aminopyrine accumulation (r = 0.90). Cells preloaded with 45Ca++ lost cellular calcium in a time-dependent fashion; however, this rate of egress was not accelerated by treatment with histamine, gastrin, or carbachol, thus failing to implicate mobilization of intracellular calcium

  19. Effects of cholinergic drugs on receptive field properties of rabbit retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, M.; Daw, N. W.

    1982-01-01

    1. Retinal ganglion cells were recorded extracellularly from the rabbit's eye in situ to study the effects of cholinergic drugs on receptive field properties. Physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and nicotine increased the spontaneous activity of nearly all retinal ganglion cell types. The effectiveness of physostigmine was roughly correlated with the neurone's inherent level of spontaneous activity. Brisk cells, having high rates of spontaneous firing, showed large increases in their maintained discharge, whereas sluggish cells, with few or no spontaneous spikes, showed small and sometimes transient increases in spontaneous activity during physostigmine. 2. The sensitivity of ganglion cells to spots of optimal size and position did not change substantially during the infusion of physostigmine. However, the responsiveness to light (number of spikes per stimulus above the spontaneous level) increased. This effect occurred with sluggish and more complex cells, rarely with brisk cells. 3. Another effect of physostigmine on sluggish and more complex cells was to make these cells `on—off'. The additional response to the inappropriate change in contrast had a long latency and lacked an initial transient burst. 4. Complex receptive field properties such as orientation sensitivity, radial grating inhibition, speed tuning and size specificity were also examined. These inhibitory properties were still present during infusion of physostigmine and, in most cases, the trigger feature of each cell type remained. 5. These results are consistent with pharmacological results on ACh release from the retina. There appear to be two types of release of ACh, having their most powerful influences on separate classes of cells. One release (transient), occurs at light onset and offset and acts primarily on sluggish and more complex ganglion cells; the other release (tonic) is not light-modulated and acts primarily on brisk cells. A wiring diagram for the ACh cells is

  20. Dysfunction of the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the airways and blood cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Ignaz; Bittinger, Fernando; Kamin, Wolfgang; Zepp, Fred; Meyer, Eckhard; Schad, Arno; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2007-05-30

    The non-neuronal cholinergic system is widely expressed in human airways, skin and immune cells. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholine and nicotine/muscarine receptors are demonstrated in epithelial surface cells, submucosal glands, airway smooth muscle fibres and immune cells. Moreover, acetylcholine is involved in the regulation of cell functions like proliferation, differentiation, migration, organization of the cytoskeleton, cell-cell contact, secretion and transport of ions and water. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most frequent genetic disorder, is known to be caused by a mutation of the CF-gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). CFTR represents a regulating transport protein for ion channels and processes involving endo- and exocytosis. Despite the identification of the genetic mutation knowledge of the underlying cellular pathways is limited. In the present experiments the cholinergic system was investigated in the peripheral blood and in the lung of CF patients undergoing lung transplantation (n=7). Acetylcholine content in bronchi and lung parenchyma of CF was reduced by 70% compared to controls (tumor-free tissue obtained from patients with lung tumor; n=13). In contrast, ChAT activity was elevated to some extent (p>0.05) in CF, and esterase activity did not differ from control. Acetylcholine content extracted from peripheral leucocytes (30 ml) was also reduced by 70% in CF (n=13) compared to healthy volunteers (n=9). Double labelling experiments with anti-CF antibodies and anti-ChAT antibodies showed a co-localization in peripheral lymphocytes, giving first evidence that CFTR may be linked with the intracellular storage/transport of non-neuronal acetylcholine. It is concluded that the non-neuronal cholinergic system is involved in the pathogenesis of CF. A reduced content of non-neuronal acetylcholine could contribute to the deleterious changes of epithelial ion and water movements in CF, because acetylcholine

  1. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Streamson; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat. PMID:27611685

  2. The Role of Muscarinic and Nicotinic Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Aversive Conditioning: Comparing Pavlovian Fear Conditioning and Inhibitory Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Matthew R.; Quinn, Jennifer J.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Aversive conditioning is an ideal model for studying cholinergic effects on the processes of learning and memory for several reasons. First, deficits produced by selective lesions of the anatomical structures shown to be critical for Pavlovian fear conditioning and inhibitory avoidance (such as the amygdala and hippocampus) resemble those deficits…

  3. Muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists differentially mediate acquisition of fructose-conditioned flavor preference and quinine-conditioned flavor avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Rotella, Francis M; Olsson, Kerstin; Vig, Vishal; Yenko, Ira; Pagirsky, Jeremy; Kohen, Ilanna; Aminov, Alon; Dindyal, Trisha; Bodnar, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Rats display both conditioned flavor preference (CFP) for fructose, and conditioned flavor avoidance (CFA) following sweet adulteration with quinine. Previous pharmacological analyses revealed that fructose-CFP expression was significantly reduced by dopamine (DA) D1 or D2 antagonists, but not NMDA or opioid antagonists. Fructose-CFP acquisition was significantly reduced by DA D1, DA D2 or NMDA antagonists, but not opioid antagonists. Quinine-CFA acquisition was significantly enhanced and prolonged by DA D1, NMDA or opioid, but not DA D2 antagonists. Cholinergic interneurons and projections interact with DA systems in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Further, both muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor signaling have been implicated in sweet intake and development of food-related preferences. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic administration of muscarinic (scopolamine: SCOP) or nicotinic (mecamylamine: MEC) cholinergic receptor antagonists mediated fructose-CFP expression, fructose-CFP acquisition and quinine-CFA acquisition. For fructose-CFP expression, rats were trained over 10 sessions with a CS+ flavor in 8% fructose and 0.2% saccharin and a CS- flavor in 0.2% saccharin. Two-bottle choice tests with CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 0.2% saccharin occurred following vehicle, SCOP (0.1-10mg/kg) and MEC (1-8mg/kg). For fructose-CFP acquisition, six groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg), MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) or a limited intake vehicle control 0.5h prior to 10 CS+ and CS- training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS+ and CS- choice tests in 0.2% saccharin. For quinine-CFA acquisition, five groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg) or MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) 0.5h prior to 8 one-bottle CS- (8% fructose+0.2% saccharin: FS) and CS+ (fructose+saccharin+quinine (0.030%: FSQ) training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS- and CS+ choice tests in fructose-saccharin solutions. Fructose-CFP expression was

  4. The Nicotinic Receptor of Cochlear Hair Cells: A Possible Pharmacotherapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Katz, Eleonora; Fuchs, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells of the organ of Corti transmit information regarding sound to the central nervous system by way of peripheral afferent neurons. In return, the central nervous system provides feedback and modulates the afferent stream of information through efferent neurons. The medial olivocochlear efferent system makes direct synaptic contacts with outer hair cells and inhibits amplification brought about by the active mechanical process inherent to these cells. This feedback system offers the potential to improve the detection of signals in background noise, to selectively attend to particular signals, and to protect the periphery from damage caused by overly loud sounds. Acetylcholine released at the synapse between efferent terminals and outer hair cells activates a peculiar nicotinic cholinergic receptor subtype, the α9α10 receptor. At present no pharmacotherapeutic approaches have been designed that target this cholinergic receptor to treat pathologies of the auditory system. The potential use of α9α10 selective drugs in conditions such as noise-induced hearing loss, tinnitus and auditory processing disorders is discussed. PMID:19481062

  5. Cholinergic regulation of the vasopressin neuroendocrine system

    SciTech Connect

    Michels, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the physical and functional relationship between the cholinergic system, and the neurodocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus, a combination of experiments on receptor binding, localization and function were carried out. The putative nicotinic receptor probe (/sup 125/I)alpha bungarotoxin ((/sup 125/I)alpha BTX) bound with high affinity and specificity to the vasopressin and oxytocin magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, nucleus circularis, and paraventricular nucleus. Binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha BTX within the neural lobe was very low. In contrast, the muscarinic cholinergic receptor probe (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) did not bind to magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin cell groups. The median eminence, which contains the neurosecretory axons, and the neural lobe of the pituitary contain low levels of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. The physiological significance of these cholinergic receptors in regulation of vasopressin release was tested using an in vitro preparation of the supraoptic - neural lobe system.

  6. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Jennifer J; Lehman, Bret; Fischer, Andy J

    2008-01-01

    Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative) out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells) by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1) during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2) the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3) appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning. PMID:18254959

  7. A two-layer biophysical model of cholinergic neuromodulation in olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoshi; Cleland, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain regulate multiple olfactory bulb (OB) functions including odor discrimination, perceptual learning, and short term memory. Previous studies have shown that nicotinic cholinergic receptor activation sharpens mitral cell chemoreceptive fields, likely via intraglomerular circuitry. Muscarinic cholinergic activation is less well understood, though muscarinic receptors are implicated in olfactory learning and in the regulation of synchronized oscillatory dynamics in hippocampus and cortex. To understand the mechanisms underlying cholinergic neuromodulation in OB, we developed a biophysical model of the OB neuronal network including both glomerular layer and external plexiform layer (EPL) computations and incorporating both nicotinic and muscarinic neuromodulatory effects. Our simulations show how nicotinic activation within glomerular circuits sharpens mitral cell chemoreceptive fields, even in the absence of EPL circuitry, but does not facilitate intrinsic oscillations or spike synchronization. In contrast, muscarinic receptor activation increases mitral cell spike synchronization and field oscillatory power by potentiating granule cell excitability and lateral inhibitory interactions within the EPL, but has little effect on mitral cell firing rates and hence will not sharpen olfactory representations under a rate metric. These results are consistent with the theory that EPL interactions regulate the timing, rather than the existence, of mitral cell action potentials, and perform their computations with respect to a spike timing-based metric. This general model suggests that the roles of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in olfactory bulb are both distinct and complementary to one another, together regulating the effects of ascending cholinergic inputs on olfactory bulb transformations. PMID:23407960

  8. Cholinergic pesticides cause mushroom body neuronal inactivation in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Mary J.; Moffat, Christopher; Saranzewa, Nastja; Harvey, Jenni; Wright, Geraldine A.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides that target cholinergic neurotransmission are highly effective, but their use has been implicated in insect pollinator population decline. Honeybees are exposed to two widely used classes of cholinergic pesticide: neonicotinoids (nicotinic receptor agonists) and organophosphate miticides (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors). Although sublethal levels of neonicotinoids are known to disrupt honeybee learning and behaviour, the neurophysiological basis of these effects has not been shown. Here, using recordings from mushroom body Kenyon cells in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and clothianidin, and the organophosphate miticide coumaphos oxon, cause a depolarization-block of neuronal firing and inhibit nicotinic responses. These effects are observed at concentrations that are encountered by foraging honeybees and within the hive, and are additive with combined application. Our findings demonstrate a neuronal mechanism that may account for the cognitive impairments caused by neonicotinoids, and predict that exposure to multiple pesticides that target cholinergic signalling will cause enhanced toxicity to pollinators. PMID:23535655

  9. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation.

  10. Sox2 regulates cholinergic amacrine cell positioning and dendritic stratification in the retina.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Irene E; Keeley, Patrick W; St John, Ace J; Kautzman, Amanda G; Kay, Jeremy N; Reese, Benjamin E

    2014-07-23

    The retina contains two populations of cholinergic amacrine cells, one positioned in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and the other in the inner nuclear layer (INL), that together comprise ∼1/2 of a percent of all retinal neurons. The present study examined the genetic control of cholinergic amacrine cell number and distribution between these two layers. The total number of cholinergic amacrine cells was quantified in the C57BL/6J and A/J inbred mouse strains, and in 25 recombinant inbred strains derived from them, and variations in their number and ratio (GCL/INL) across these strains were mapped to genomic loci. The total cholinergic amacrine cell number was found to vary across the strains, from 27,000 to 40,000 cells, despite little variation within individual strains. The number of cells was always lower within the GCL relative to the INL, and the sizes of the two populations were strongly correlated, yet there was variation in their ratio between the strains. Approximately 1/3 of that variation in cell ratio was mapped to a locus on chromosome 3, where Sex determining region Y box 2 (Sox2) was identified as a candidate gene due to the presence of a 6-nucleotide insertion in the protein-coding sequence in C57BL/6J and because of robust and selective expression in cholinergic amacrine cells. Conditionally deleting Sox2 from the population of nascent cholinergic amacrine cells perturbed the normal ratio of cells situated in the GCL versus the INL and induced a bistratifying morphology, with dendrites distributed to both ON and OFF strata within the inner plexiform layer.

  11. Octopamine and Dopamine differentially modulate the nicotine-induced calcium response in Drosophila Mushroom Body Kenyon Cells.

    PubMed

    Leyton, V; Goles, N I; Fuenzalida-Uribe, N; Campusano, J M

    2014-02-07

    In Drosophila associative olfactory learning, an odor, the conditioned stimulus (CS), is paired to an unconditioned stimulus (US). The CS and US information arrive at the Mushroom Bodies (MB), a Drosophila brain region that processes the information to generate new memories. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed through cholinergic inputs that activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the MB, while the US is coded by biogenic amine (BA) systems that innervate the MB. In this regard, the MB acts as a coincidence detector. A better understanding of the properties of the responses gated by nicotinic and BA receptors is required to get insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for memory formation. In recent years, information has become available on the properties of the responses induced by nAChR activation in Kenyon Cells (KCs), the main neuronal MB population. However, very little information exists on the responses induced by aminergic systems in fly MB. Here we have evaluated some of the properties of the calcium responses gated by Dopamine (DA) and Octopamine (Oct) in identified KCs in culture. We report that exposure to BAs induces a fast but rather modest increase in intracellular calcium levels in cultured KCs. The responses to Oct and DA are fully blocked by a VGCC blocker, while they are differentially modulated by cAMP. Moreover, co-application of BAs and nicotine has different effects on intracellular calcium levels: while DA and nicotine effects are additive, Oct and nicotine induce a synergistic increase in calcium levels. These results suggest that a differential modulation of nicotine-induced calcium increase by DA and Oct could contribute to the events leading to learning and memory in flies.

  12. Cholinergic and purinergic signalling in outer hair cells of mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Heilbronn, E; Järlebark, L; Lawoko, G

    1995-01-01

    Outer (OHC) and inner (IHC) hair cells in the organ of Corti of the mammalian cochlea process sound. OHC and their efferent synapse are part of a feedback system assumed to control and modulate information carried by afferent neurons passing from IHC to the brain. Underlying mechanisms are not well understood. This paper discusses recent progress. In vivo and in vitro information is presented on structure, pharmacology, function and localization of the pre- and postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the efferent synapse. Recent data are given on a presynaptic M3 AChR subtype, probably an autoreceptor involved in transmitter release. Data from our lab on specific binding of [3H]3-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]3-QNB) to non-enzymatically isolated guinea pig OHC reveal a KD several 100 x higher than that for any known muscarinic receptor subtype, including the above-mentioned presynaptic muscarinic AChR of the OHC efferent synapse. The extremely high concentrations of [3H]3-QNB needed for any binding at all to OHC thus rule out presynaptic membrane impurities as the cause of such binding, and also the presence of a typical mAChR subtype on OHC. The number of [3H]3-QNB binding sites (approximately 10(6)/OHC) we found on OHC was 1/10th of that we found for binding of nicotinic ligands to OHC, further making it questionable that an ACh-binding site on OHC binds [3H]3-QNB. Observations may instead point to the possibility of another binding site, e.g. an (allosteric) site involved with the as yet not understood 'weak' muscarinic properties of the OHC AChR. Further new data on the OHC AChR confirm reversible alpha-bungarotoxin, nicotine and d-tubocurarine binding. [3H]alpha-Bungarotoxin and [3H]-nicotine binding sites are estimated at approximately 6.10(7) sites/OHC. Strychnine, a glycine receptor blocker suggested to interfere with cholinergic sites of the efferent OHC synapse, was found to bind to OHC (cold strychnine for unspecific binding). This binding, not

  13. Berberine relieves insulin resistance via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Fen; Zhao, Yun-bin; Wang, Ding-kun; Zou, Xin; Fang, Ke; Wang, Kai-fu

    2016-02-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from Rhizoma coptidis and has been used for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in China. The development of T2DM is often associated with insulin resistance and impaired glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. In this study, we examined whether BBR attenuated glucose uptake dysfunction through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in HepG2 cells. Cellular glucose uptake, quantified by the 2-[N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG), was inhibited by 21% after HepG2 cells were incubated with insulin (10(-6) mol/L) for 36 h. Meanwhile, the expression of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) protein was reduced without the change of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the culture supernatant, the ratio of phosphorylated I-kappa-B kinase-β (IKκβ) Ser181/IKKβ and the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein were also increased. However, the treatment with BBR enhanced the glucose uptake, increased the expression of α7nAChR protein and inhibited AChE activity. These changes were also accompanied with the decrease of the ratio of pIKKβ Ser181/IKKβ, NF-κB p65 expression and IL-6 level. Taken together, these results suggest that BBR could enhance glucose uptake, and relieve insulin resistance and inflammation in HepG2 cells. The mechanism may be related to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and the inhibition of AChE activity.

  14. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  15. Neuroligin 2 is expressed in synapses established by cholinergic cells in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Takács, Virág T; Freund, Tamás F; Nyiri, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Neuroligin 2 is a postsynaptic protein that plays a critical role in the maturation and proper function of GABAergic synapses. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of neuroligin 2 impaired GABAergic synaptic transmission, whereas its overexpression caused increased inhibition, which suggest that its presence strongly influences synaptic function. Interestingly, the overexpressing transgenic mouse line showed increased anxiety-like behavior and other behavioral phenotypes, not easily explained by an otherwise strengthened GABAergic transmission. This suggested that other, non-GABAergic synapses may also express neuroligin 2. Here, we tested the presence of neuroligin 2 at synapses established by cholinergic neurons in the mouse brain using serial electron microscopic sections double labeled for neuroligin 2 and choline acetyltransferase. We found that besides GABAergic synapses, neuroligin 2 is also present in the postsynaptic membrane of cholinergic synapses in all investigated brain areas (including dorsal hippocampus, somatosensory and medial prefrontal cortices, caudate putamen, basolateral amygdala, centrolateral thalamic nucleus, medial septum, vertical- and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca, substantia innominata and ventral pallidum). In the hippocampus, the density of neuroligin 2 labeling was similar in GABAergic and cholinergic synapses. Moreover, several cholinergic contact sites that were strongly labeled with neuroligin 2 did not resemble typical synapses, suggesting that cholinergic axons form more synaptic connections than it was recognized previously. We showed that cholinergic cells themselves also express neuroligin 2 in a subset of their input synapses. These data indicate that mutations in human neuroligin 2 gene and genetic manipulations of neuroligin 2 levels in rodents will potentially cause alterations in the cholinergic system as well, which may also have a profound effect on the functional properties of brain circuits

  16. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Annual report No. 1, 1 May 83-30 Apr 84

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.

    1984-06-02

    We have examined the molecular bond requirements of 3Hacetylcholine 3HACh nicotinic binding sites in rat brain. Reduction of disulfide bonds in vitro with the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) resulted in a decrease in the number of 3HACh binding sites that could be measured, but the affinity of the remaining sites was unaltered. The effect of DTT was concentration-dependent, and it was reversed by reoxidation of the reduced disulfide bonds, with 5,5-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid. The reversibility of the DTT effect was prevented by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, which forms thiol complexes with exposed sulfhydryl groups. The data indicate that disulfide bonds at or near the 3HACh recognition site are critical for binding of acetylcholine.

  17. Cross-Species Analysis of Nicotine-Induced Proteomic Alterations in Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Urrutia, Raul; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxic compounds in tobacco, such as nicotine, may have adversely affect pancreatic function. We aim to determine nicotine-induced protein alterations in pancreatic cells, which may reveal a link between nicotine exposure and pancreatic disease. Methods We compared the proteomic alterations induced by nicotine treatment in cultured pancreatic cells (mouse, rat and human stellate cells and human duct cells) using mass spectrometry-based techniques, specifically GeLC-MS/MS and spectral counting. Results We identified thousands of proteins in pancreatic cells, hundreds of which were identified exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated cells. Inter-species comparisons of stellate cell proteins revealed several differentially-abundant proteins (in nicotine treated versus untreated cells) common among the 3 species. Proteins appearing in all nicotine-treated stellate cells include amyloid beta (A4), procollagen type VI alpha 1, integral membrane protein 2B,and Toll interacting protein. Conclusions Proteins which were differentially expressed upon nicotine treatment across cell lines, were enriched in certain pathways, including nAChR, cytokine, and integrin signaling. At this analytical depth, we conclude that similar pathways are affected by nicotine, but alterations at the protein level among stellate cells of different species vary. Further interrogation of such pathways will lead to insights into the potential effect of nicotine on pancreatic cells at the biomolecular level and the extension of this concept to the effect of nicotine on pancreatic disease. PMID:23456891

  18. Establishment of cholinergic neuron-like cell lines with differential vulnerability to nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Personett, David A; Williams, Katrina; Baskerville, Karen A; McKinney, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Cholinergic cell lines were established by fusion of embryonic day 17 wild-type neurons from rat basal forebrain (BF) and upper brainstem (BS) with N18tg neuroblastoma cells. Isolated clones expressed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activities that were increased upon differentiation with retinoic acid. Clones from the BF expressed high levels of the tyrosine kinase type A (TrkA) receptor expression and activation of the mitogen-activated kinase ERK2 upon treatment with nerve growth factor. Like wild-type cholinergic populations, the six clones studied were variably resistant to nitric oxide (NO) excess from addition of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP). Of these, the BS2 clone exhibited resistance like in vivo BS cholinergic neurons, while the MS10 clone mimicked in vivo BF vulnerability. Apoptosis in response to NO excess was preceded by increases in mitochondrial responses bax/bcl-2 ratios, but cytochrome C was not released. Mitochondrial levels of apoptosis initiating factor (AIF) were either unchanged or increased, and only in MS clones was endonuclease G (EndoG) released. Microarray data indicated the existence of endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and caspase-4 and caspase-12 were involved in the pathway to DNA fragmentation. The array data also indicated a survival role for mdm2, and its blockade rendered vulnerable the brainstem survivor clone BS2. Akt and ERK1/2 pathways were activated in response to NO and their blockade increased DNA fragmentation. Blockade of GSK-3 alpha/beta, a downstream target of Akt, reduced SNAP toxicity and this was more prominent in basal forebrain clones. We have identified two cholinergic cell lines useful for molecular studies of cholinergic vulnerability. We hypothesize that, in cholinergic neurons, control of ER stress signaling may be a major factor in differential vulnerability.

  19. Nicotine induces mitochondrial fission through mitofusin degradation in human multipotent embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Naoya; Yamada, Shigeru; Asanagi, Miki; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2016-02-05

    Nicotine is considered to contribute to the health risks associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine exerts its cellular functions by acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and adversely affects normal embryonic development. However, nicotine toxicity has not been elucidated in human embryonic stage. In the present study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of nicotine in human multipotent embryonal carcinoma cell line NT2/D1. We found that exposure to 10 μM nicotine decreased intracellular ATP levels and inhibited proliferation of NT2/D1 cells. Because nicotine suppressed energy production, which is a critical mitochondrial function, we further assessed the effects of nicotine on mitochondrial dynamics. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that 10 μM nicotine induced mitochondrial fragmentation. The levels of the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusins 1 and 2, were also reduced in cells exposed to nicotine. These nicotine effects were blocked by treatment with mecamylamine, a nonselective nAChR antagonist. These data suggest that nicotine degrades mitofusin in NT2/D1 cells and thus induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell growth inhibition in a nAChR-dependent manner. Thus, mitochondrial function in embryonic cells could be used to assess the developmental toxicity of chemicals.

  20. Evidence for Cholinergic Synapses Between Dissociated Rat Sympathetic Neurons in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    O'Lague, P. H.; Obata, K.; Claude, P.; Furshpan, E. J.; Potter, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sympathetic principal neurons were dissociated from superior cervical ganglia of new-born rats, and grown in cell culture. In electrophysiological experiments two types of excitatory synapses were found. One, which was relatively rare, was shown to operate by electrical transmission. The other, the predominant type, had several characteristics of chemical transmission, and pharmacological evidence indicated it was cholinergic. Images PMID:4372629

  1. Transport mechanisms of nicotine across the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Atsuko; Saito, Hideyuki; Inui, Ken-Ichi

    2002-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a disease more commonly seen in nonsmokers. Because nicotine was postulated to be a beneficial component of tobacco smoke for ulcerative colitis, various formulations of nicotine have been developed to improve the local bioavailability within the gastrointestinal tissue. In the present study, to characterize the disposition of nicotine in the intestines, we investigated intestinal nicotine transport using Caco-2 cells. Nicotine was predominantly transported across Caco-2 cell monolayers in a unidirectional mode, corresponding to intestinal secretion, by pH-dependent specific transport systems. The specific uptake systems appear to be distinct from organic cation transporters and the transport system for tertiary amines, in terms of its substrate specificity and the pattern of the interaction. These transport systems could play a role in the intestinal accumulation of nicotine from plasma and could also be responsible for the topical delivery of nicotine for ulcerative colitis therapy. These findings could provide useful information for the design of effective nicotine delivery.

  2. Functional chromaffin cell plasticity in response to stress: focus on nicotinic, gap junction, and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Guérineau, Nathalie C.; Desarménien, Michel G.; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    An increase in circulating catecholamines constitutes one of the mechanisms whereby human body responds to stress. In response to chronic stressful situations, the adrenal medullary tissue exhibits crucial morphological and functional changes that are consistent with an improvement of chromaffin cell stimulus-secretion coupling efficiency. Stimulus-secretion coupling encompasses multiple intracellular (chromaffin cell excitability, Ca2+ signaling, exocytosis, endocytosis) and intercellular pathways (splanchnic nerve-mediated synaptic transmission, paracrine and endocrine communication, gap junctional coupling), each of them being potentially subjected to functional remodeling upon stress. This review focuses on three chromaffin cell incontrovertible actors, the cholinergic nicotinic receptors and the voltage-dependent T-type Ca2+ channels that are directly involved in Ca2+-dependent events controlling catecholamine secretion and electrical activity, and the gap junctional communication involved in the modulation of catecholamine secretion. We show here that these three actors react differently to various stressors, sometimes independently, sometimes in concert or in opposition. PMID:22252244

  3. Cholinergic modulation differs between basal and apical dendritic excitation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Péloquin, Pascal

    2010-08-01

    We hypothesize that endogenous cholinergic modulation of dendritic processing of hippocampal CA1 is layer specific, and it specifically enhances spike output resulting from basal as compared with the apical dendritic excitation. Laminar profiles of evoked field potentials were recorded in the CA1 area of urethane-anesthetized rats using multichannel silicon probes and analyzed as current source density. High-frequency stimulation of the pontis oralis (PnO) attenuated the midapical more than the basal or distal apical dendritic excitatory sink. Population spike (PS) and excitatory sink-PS potentiation resulting from basal dendritic excitation were facilitated, while the PS evoked by apical dendritic stimulation was attenuated by PnO stimulation. Perfusion of cholinergic agonist carbachol onto hippocampal slices in vitro also attenuated the apical more than the basal dendritic excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Excitatory sink attenuation and PS changes after PnO stimulation were blocked by systemic or local scopolamine and by intracerebroventricular (icv) M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine but not by icv M2 receptor antagonist AFDX-116 or nicotinic antagonists. However, a hippocampal theta rhythm activated by PnO stimulation was blocked by systemic but not by local scopolamine. We conclude that endogenous acetylcholine mediates a stronger presynaptic inhibition of the midapical than basal and distal apical excitation mainly through M1 receptors.

  4. Identification of cholinergic chemosensory cells in mouse tracheal and laryngeal glandular ducts.

    PubMed

    Krasteva-Christ, G; Soultanova, A; Schütz, B; Papadakis, T; Weiss, C; Deckmann, K; Chubanov, V; Gudermann, T; Voigt, A; Meyerhof, W; Boehm, U; Weihe, E; Kummer, W

    2015-11-01

    Specialized epithelial cells in the respiratory tract such as solitary chemosensory cells and brush cells sense the luminal content and initiate protective reflexes in response to the detection of potentially harmful substances. The majority of these cells are cholinergic and utilize the canonical taste signal transduction cascade to detect "bitter" substances such as bacterial quorum sensing molecules. Utilizing two different mouse strains reporting expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the synthesizing enzyme of acetylcholine (ACh), we detected cholinergic cells in the submucosal glands of the murine larynx and trachea. These cells were localized in the ciliated glandular ducts and were neither found in the collecting ducts nor in alveolar or tubular segments of the glands. ChAT expression in tracheal gland ducts was confirmed by in situ hybridization. The cholinergic duct cells expressed the brush cell marker proteins, villin and cytokeratin-18, and were immunoreactive for components of the taste signal transduction cascade (Gα-gustducin, transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel = TRPM5, phospholipase C(β2)), but not for carbonic anhydrase IV. Furthermore, these cells expressed the bitter taste receptor Tas2r131, as demonstrated utilizing an appropriate reporter mouse strain. Our study identified a previously unrecognized presumptive chemosensory cell type in the duct of the airway submucosal glands that likely utilizes ACh for paracrine signaling. We propose that these cells participate in infection-sensing mechanisms and initiate responses assisting bacterial clearance from the lower airways.

  5. Methamphetamine-seeking behavior is due to inhibition of nicotinic cholinergic transmission by activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Nawata, Yoko; Sakimura, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki

    2008-12-01

    We previously reported the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the reinstatement of methamphetamine (MAP)-seeking behavior (lever-pressing response for MAP reinforcement under saline infusion). The present study examined whether the reinstatement involves interactions between these receptors. Rats were trained to self-administer MAP with a light and tone (MAP-associated cues). Then, extinction sessions under saline infusion without cues were conducted. After that, a reinstatement tests were conducted by either presenting the cues or a MAP-priming injection. Systemic and intracranial administration of HU210, a cannabinoid CB1R agonist, into the nucleus accumbens core (NAC) and prelimbic cortex (PrC) reinstated MAP-seeking behavior. The reinstatement caused by the systemic HU210 treatment was attenuated by intracranial administration of AM251, a cannabinoid CB1R antagonist, into each region mentioned above. Meanwhile, reinstatement induced by the MAP-associated cues and MAP-priming injection was also attenuated by intracranial administration of AM251 in each region. In these regions, the attenuating effects of AM251 on the reinstatement induced by each stimulus were blocked by the intracranial administration of mecamylamine, a non-selective nAChR antagonist, but not by scopolamine, a muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR) antagonist. Furthermore, the intracranial administration of DHbetaE, an alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist, but not MLA, an alpha7 nAChR antagonist, into each region blocked the AM251-induced attenuation of the reinstatement. These findings suggest that relapses to MAP-seeking behavior may be due to two steps, first inhibition of ACh transmission by the activation of cannabinoid CB1Rs and then the inactivation of alpha4beta2 nAChRs.

  6. Auto/paracrine control of inflammatory cytokines by acetylcholine in macrophage-like U937 cells through nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Chernyavsky, Alexander I; Arredondo, Juan; Skok, Maryna; Grando, Sergei A

    2010-03-01

    Although acetylcholine (ACh) is well known for its neurotransmitter function, recent studies have indicated that it also functions as an immune cytokine that prevents macrophage activation through a 'cholinergic (nicotinic) anti-inflammatory pathway'. In this study, we used the macrophage-like U937 cells to elucidate the mechanisms of the physiologic control of cytokine production by auto/paracrine ACh through the nicotinic class of ACh receptors (nAChRs) expressed in these cells. Stimulation of cells with lipopolysaccharide up-regulated expression of alpha1, alpha4, alpha5, alpha7, alpha10, beta1 and beta3 subunits, down-regulated alpha6 and beta2 subunits, and did not alter the relative quantity of alpha9 and beta4 mRNAs. Distinct nAChR subtypes showed differential regulation of the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibition of the expression of the TNF-alpha gene was mediated predominantly by the alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive nAChRs, that of the IL-6 and IL-18 genes-by the mecamylamine-sensitive nAChRs. Both the Mec- and alphaBtx-sensitive nAChRs regulated expression of the IL-1beta gene equally efficiently. Upregulation of IL-10 production by auto/paracrine ACh was mediated predominantly through alpha7 nAChR. These findings offer a new insight on how nicotinic agonists control inflammation, thus laying a groundwork for the development of novel immunomodulatory therapies based on the nAChR subtype selectivity of nicotinic agonists.

  7. Immunodominant regions for T helper-cell sensitization on the human nicotinic receptor alpha subunit in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Protti, M P; Manfredi, A A; Straub, C; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1990-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis an autoimmune response against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) occurs. The alpha subunit of the AChR contains both the epitope(s) that dominates the antibody response (main immunogenic region) and epitopes involved in T helper cell sensitization. In this study, overlapping synthetic peptides corresponding to the complete AChR alpha-subunit sequence were used to propagate polyclonal AChR-specific T helper cell lines from four myasthenic patients of different HLA types. Response of the T helper lines to the individual peptides was studied. Four immunodominant sequence segments were identified--i.e., residues 48-67, 101-120, 304-322, and 419-437. These regions did not include residues known to form the main immunogenic region or the cholinergic binding site, and they frequently contained sequence motifs that have been proposed to be related to T-epitope formation. Images PMID:2145582

  8. Cellular basis for the olfactory response to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Bruce; Xu, Jiang; Audige, Valery; Lischka, Fritz W; Rawson, Nancy E

    2010-03-17

    Smokers regulate their smoking behavior on the basis of sensory stimuli independently of the pharmacological effects of nicotine (Rose J. E., et al. (1993) Pharmacol., Biochem. Behav.44 (4), 891-900). A better understanding of sensory mechanisms underlying smoking behavior may help to develop more effective smoking alternatives. Olfactory stimulation by nicotine makes up a considerable part of the flavor of tobacco smoke, yet our understanding of the cellular mechanisms responsible for olfactory detection of nicotine remains incomplete. We used biophysical methods to characterize the nicotine sensitivity and response mechanisms of neurons from olfactory epithelium. In view of substantial differences in the olfactory receptor repertoire between rodent and human (Mombaerts P. (1999) Annu. Rev. Neurosci.22, 487-509), we studied biopsied human olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), cultured human olfactory cells (Gomez G., et al. (2000) J. Neurosci. Res.62 (5), 737-749), and rat olfactory neurons. Rat and human OSNs responded to S(-)-nicotine with a concentration dependent influx of calcium and activation of adenylate cyclase. Some rat OSNs displayed some stereoselectivity, with neurons responding to either enantiomer alone or to both. Freshly biopsied and primary cultured human olfactory neurons were less stereoselective. Nicotinic cholinergic antagonists had no effect on the responses of rat or human OSNs to nicotine. Patch clamp recording of rat OSNs revealed a nicotine-activated, calcium-sensitive nonspecific cation channel. These results indicate that nicotine activates a canonical olfactory receptor pathway rather than nicotinic cholinergic receptors on OSNs. Further, because the nicotine-sensitive mechanisms of rodents appear generally similar to those of humans, this animal model is an appropriate one for studies of nicotine sensation.

  9. Nicotine promotes cell proliferation via {alpha}7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes-mediated pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Helen Pui Shan; Yu Le; Lam, Emily Kai Yee; Tai, Emily Kin Ki; Wu, William Ka Kei; Cho, Chi Hin . E-mail: chcho@cuhk.edu.hk

    2007-06-15

    Cigarette smoking has been implicated in colon cancer. Nicotine is a major alkaloid in cigarette smoke. In the present study, we showed that nicotine stimulated HT-29 cell proliferation and adrenaline production in a dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory action of nicotine was reversed by atenolol and ICI 118,551, a {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-selective antagonist, respectively, suggesting the role of {beta}-adrenoceptors in mediating the action. Nicotine also significantly upregulated the expression of the catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes [tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-{beta}-hydroxylase (D{beta}H) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase]. Inhibitor of TH, a rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine-biosynthesis pathway, reduced the actions of nicotine on cell proliferation and adrenaline production. Expression of {alpha}7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7-nAChR) was demonstrated in HT-29 cells. Methyllycaconitine, an {alpha}7-nAChR antagonist, reversed the stimulatory actions of nicotine on cell proliferation, TH and D{beta}H expression as well as adrenaline production. Taken together, through the action on {alpha}7-nAChR nicotine stimulates HT-29 cell proliferation via the upregulation of the catecholamine-synthesis pathway and ultimately adrenaline production and {beta}-adrenergic activation. These data reveal the contributory role {alpha}7-nAChR and {beta}-adrenoceptors in the tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and partly elucidate the carcinogenic action of cigarette smoke on colon cancer.

  10. Functional expression of nicotine influx transporter in A549 human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tega, Yuma; Yuzurihara, Chihiro; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is a potent addictive alkaloid, and is rapidly absorbed through the alveoli of the lung. However, the transport mechanism of nicotine at the human alveolar epithelial barrier has not been investigated in great detail. In the present study, the transport mechanism of nicotine across alveolar epithelium was investigated in vitro using A549 cells, a human adenocarcinoma-derived cell line with an alveolar epithelial cell like phenotype. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells exhibited time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependence with a Km of 50.4 μM. These results suggest that a carrier-mediated transport process is involved in nicotine transport in human alveolar epithelial cells. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells was insensitive to change in extracellular pH. Moreover, nicotine uptake by A549 cells could be inhibited by organic cations such as verapamil and pyrilamine, but not typical substrates of organic cation transporters and β2-agonist. These results suggest that a novel, not yet molecularly identified, organic cation transporter plays a role in nicotine transport which is unlikely to interact with β2-agonist transport. This nicotine influx transporter in human alveolar epithelium might have implications for the rapid absorption of nicotine into the systemic circulation.

  11. Cell-Specific Cholinergic Modulation of Excitability of Layer 5B Principal Neurons in Mouse Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ankur; Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    The neuromodulator acetylcholine (ACh) is crucial for several cognitive functions, such as perception, attention, and learning and memory. Whereas, in most cases, the cellular circuits or the specific neurons via which ACh exerts its cognitive effects remain unknown, it is known that auditory cortex (AC) neurons projecting from layer 5B (L5B) to the inferior colliculus, corticocollicular neurons, are required for cholinergic-mediated relearning of sound localization after occlusion of one ear. Therefore, elucidation of the effects of ACh on the excitability of corticocollicular neurons will bridge the cell-specific and cognitive properties of ACh. Because AC L5B contains another class of neurons that project to the contralateral cortex, corticocallosal neurons, to identify the cell-specific mechanisms that enable corticocollicular neurons to participate in sound localization relearning, we investigated the effects of ACh release on both L5B corticocallosal and corticocollicular neurons. Using in vitro electrophysiology and optogenetics in mouse brain slices, we found that ACh generated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR)-mediated depolarizing potentials and muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR)-mediated hyperpolarizing potentials in AC L5B corticocallosal neurons. In corticocollicular neurons, ACh release also generated nAChR-mediated depolarizing potentials. However, in contrast to the mAChR-mediated hyperpolarizing potentials in corticocallosal neurons, ACh generated prolonged mAChR-mediated depolarizing potentials in corticocollicular neurons. These prolonged depolarizing potentials generated persistent firing in corticocollicular neurons, whereas corticocallosal neurons lacking mAChR-mediated depolarizing potentials did not show persistent firing. We propose that ACh-mediated persistent firing in corticocollicular neurons may represent a critical mechanism required for learning-induced plasticity in AC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Acetylcholine (ACh) is crucial for cognitive

  12. Cholinergic Modulation of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cytokine levels and inflammation can be regulated by specifically augmenting cholinergic signaling via the efferent vagus nerve and the α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Cholinergic modalities, acting through vagus nerve- and/or α7nAChR-mediated mechanisms have been shown to suppress excessive inflammation in several experimental models of disease, including endotoxemic shock, sepsis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, hemorrhagic shock, colitis, postoperative ileus and pancreatitis. These studies have advanced the current understanding of the mechanisms regulating inflammation. They have also provided a rationale for exploring new possibilities to treat excessive, disease-underlying inflammation by applying selective cholinergic modalities in preclinical and clinical settings. An overview of this research is presented here. PMID:19079659

  13. Interactions between β-amyloid and central cholinergic neurons: implications for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Satyabrata; Slowikowski, Stephen P.M.; Westaway, David; Mount, Howard T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a progressive loss of memory and deterioration of higher cognitive functions. The brain of an individual with Alzheimer's disease exhibits extracellular plaques of aggregated β-amyloid protein (Aβ), intracellular neurofibrillary tangles that contain hyperphosphorylated tau protein and a profound loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that innervate the hippocampus and the neocortex. Aβ accumulation may trigger or contribute to the process of neurodegeneration. However, the mechanisms whereby Aβ induces basal forebrain cholinergic cell loss and cognitive impairment remain obscure. Physiologically relevant concentrations of Aβ-related peptides have acute, negative effects on multiple aspects of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and release, without inducing toxicity. These data suggest a neuromodulatory influence of the peptides on central cholinergic functions. Long-term exposure to micromolar Aβ induces cholinergic cell toxicity, possibly via hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Conversely, activation of selected cholinergic receptors has been shown to alter the processing of the amyloid precursor protein as well as phosphorylation of tau protein. A direct interaction between Aβ and nicotinic ACh receptors has also been demonstrated. This review addresses the role of Aβ-related peptides in regulating the function and survival of central cholinergic neurons and the relevance of these effects to cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the functional interrelations between Aβ peptides, cholinergic neurons and tau phosphorylation will unravel the biologic events that precede neurodegeneration and may lead to the development of more effective pharmacotherapies for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:15644984

  14. Cellular and molecular basis of cholinergic function

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdall, M.J.; Hawthorne, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 105 selections. Some of the titles are: Functional correlates of brain nicotine receptors; Muscarinic receptor subclasses; Cholinergic innervation and levels of nerve growth factor and its mRNA in the central nervous system; Developmentally regulated neurontrophic activities of Torpedo electric organ tissue; and Association of a regulatory peptide with cholinergic neurons.

  15. Increased sensitivity to cocaine by cholinergic cell ablation in nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hikida, Takatoshi; Kaneko, Satoshi; Isobe, Tomohiro; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Watanabe, Dai; Pastan, Ira; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2001-01-01

    Chronic exposure to cocaine causes long-lasting behavioral changes associated with cocaine reinforcement and addiction. An important neural substrate for cocaine addiction is the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which receives dopaminergic input from the ventral tegmental area. Although the neural circuit of the NAc is controlled by several other neurotransmitters, their involvement in cocaine addiction remains elusive. In this investigation, we ablated cholinergic interneurons from the adult NAc with immunotoxin-mediated cell targeting and examined the role of acetylcholine transmitter in adaptive behavioral changes associated with cocaine reinforcement and addiction. Acute exposure to cocaine induced abnormal rotation in unilaterally cholinergic cell-eliminated mice. This abnormal turning was enhanced by repeated exposure of cocaine. In bilaterally cholinergic cell-eliminated mice, chronic cocaine administration induced a prominent and progressive increase in locomotor activity. Moreover, these mice showed robust conditioned place preference with a lower dose of cocaine, compared with wild-type littermates. This investigation demonstrates that acetylcholine in the NAc plays a key role in both acute and chronic actions of cocaine. PMID:11606786

  16. A Cell Line Producing Recombinant Nerve Growth Factor Evokes Growth Responses in Intrinsic and Grafted Central Cholinergic Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernfors, Patrik; Ebendal, Ted; Olson, Lars; Mouton, Peter; Stromberg, Ingrid; Persson, Hakan

    1989-06-01

    The rat β nerve growth factor (NGF) gene was inserted into a mammalian expression vector and cotransfected with a plasmid conferring resistance to neomycin into mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. From this transfection a stable cell line was selected that contains several hundred copies of the rat NGF gene and produces excess levels of recombinant NGF. Such genetically modified cells were implanted into the rat brain as a probe for in vivo effects of NGF on central nervous system neurons. In a model of the cortical cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer disease, we demonstrate a marked increase in the survival of, and fiber outgrowth from, grafts of fetal basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as well as stimulation of fiber formation by intact adult intrinsic cholinergic circuits in the cerebral cortex. Adult cholinergic interneurons in intact striatum also sprout vigorously toward implanted fibroblasts. Our results suggest that this model has implications for future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Nicotine-Mediated Ca(2+)-Influx Induces IL-8 Secretion in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Kou; Tsujino, Ichiro; Koshi, Ryosuke; Sugano, Naoyuki; Sato, Shuichi; Asano, Masatake

    2016-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the most important risk factors for the development of various diseases. Nicotine is the most extensively investigated component of cigarette smoke, and a comprehensive analysis of the genes induced by nicotine stimulation revealed that interleukin-8 (IL-8) was induced in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell (OSCC). Based on this background, the signaling mechanisms of nicotine-mediated IL-8 induction in OSCC was investigated. Augmented IL-8 secretion by Ca9-22 cells was blocked by the NF-κB inhibitor L-1-4'-tosylamino-phenylethyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-specific inhibitor α-bungarotoxin (αBtx). The downstream signaling pathway was further examined by pre-incubating the cells with inhibitors against mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), protein kinase C (PKC), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMK II). Only the CaMK II inhibitor was found to exert an inhibitory effect on nicotine-mediated IL-8 secretion. Pre-treatment of the Ca9-22 cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM drastically inhibited IL-8 secretion. Although nicotine stimulation induced the phosphorylation of the NF-κB p65 subunit, pre-treatment with BAPTA-AM was found to inhibit this activity significantly. CaMK II-dependent p65 phosphorylation was confirmed by pre-incubation of the cells with CaMK II inhibitor. The results from this study indicate that the binding of nicotine to nAChR induces Ca(2+) influx, which results in the activation and phosphorylation of CaMK II and NF-κB p65, respectively. Nicotine-mediated IL-8 induction should be a trigger for the initiation of various diseases.

  18. Intricate paths of cells and networks becoming "Cholinergic" in the embryonic chicken retina.

    PubMed

    Thangaraj, Gopenath; Greif, Alexander; Bachmann, Gesine; Layer, Paul G

    2012-10-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) are the decisive enzymatic activities regulating the availability of acetylcholine (ACh) at a given synaptic or nonsynaptic locus. The only cholinergic cells of the mature inner retina are the so-called starburst amacrine cells (SACs). A type-I SAC, found at the outer border of the inner plexiform layer (IPL), forms a synaptic subband "a" within the IPL, while a type-II SAC located at the inner IPL border projects into subband "d." Applying immunohistochemistry for ChAT and AChE on sections of the chicken retina, we here have revealed intricate relationships of how retinal networks became dominated by AChE or by ChAT reactivities. AChE+ cells were first detectable in an embryonic day (E)4 retina, while ChAT appeared 1 day later in the very same cells; at this stage all are Brn3a+, a marker for ganglion cells (GCs). On either side of a faint AChE+ band, indicating the future IPL, pairs of ChAT+ /AChE- /Brn3a- cells appeared between E7/8. Type-I cells had increased ChAT and lost AChE; type-II cells presented less ChAT, but some AChE on their surfaces. Direct neighbors of SACs tended to express much AChE. Along with maturation, subband "a" presented more ChAT but less AChE; in subband "d" this pattern was reversed. In conclusion, the two retinal cholinergic networks segregate out from one cell pool, become locally opposed to each other, and become dominated by either synthesis or degradation of ACh. These "cholinergic developmental divergences" may also have significant physiologic consequences.

  19. Exposure to ethanol and nicotine induces stress responses in human placental BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Repo, Jenni K; Pesonen, Maija; Mannelli, Chiara; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Loikkanen, Jarkko

    2014-01-13

    Human placental trophoblastic cancer BeWo cells can be used as a model of placental trophoblasts. We found that combined exposure to relevant exposure concentrations of ethanol (2‰) and nicotine (15 μM) induces an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Neither ethanol or nicotine alone, nor their combination affected cell viability. However, nicotine decreased cell proliferation, both alone and combined with ethanol. Nicotine increased the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress related protein GRP78/BiP, but not another marker of ER-stress, IRE1α. We also studied the effects of nicotine and/or ethanol on phosphorylation and expression of three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), i.e. JNK, p38 and ERK1/2. Nicotine decreased the phosphorylation of JNK and also had similar effect on total amount of this protein. Phosphorylation and expression of p38 were increased 1.7- and 1.6-fold, respectively, by nicotine alone, and 1.9- and 2.1-fold by the combined treatment. Some increase (1.8-fold) was also seen in the phosphorylation of ERK2 at 48 h, in cells exposed to both ethanol and nicotine. This study shows that ethanol and nicotine, which harm the development of fetus may induce both oxidative and ER stress responses in human placental trophoblastic cells, implicating these mechanisms in their fetotoxic effects.

  20. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Linster, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function. PMID:26334007

  1. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoshi; Linster, Christiane; Cleland, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function.

  2. An update on cholinergic regulation of cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells

    PubMed Central

    Cea-del Rio, Christian A; McBain, Chris J; Pelkey, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    Information processing and transfer within cortical circuits requires precise spatiotemporal coordination of excitatory principal cell activity by a relatively small population of inhibitory interneurons that exhibit remarkable anatomical, molecular and electrophysiological diversity. One subtype of interneuron, the cholecystokinin-expressing basket cell (CCKBC), is particularly well suited to integrate and impart emotional features of an animal's physiological state to principal cell entrainment through the inhibitory network as CCKBCs are highly susceptible to neuromodulation by local and subcortically generated signals commonly associated with ‘mood’ such as cannabinoids, serotonin and acetylcholine. Here we briefly review recent studies that have elucidated the cellular mechanisms underlying cholinergic regulation of CCKBCs. PMID:22199168

  3. The distribution and morphological characteristics of cholinergic cells in the brain of monotremes as revealed by ChAT immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Manger, P R; Fahringer, H M; Pettigrew, J D; Siegel, J M

    2002-01-01

    The present study employs choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry to identify the cholinergic neuronal population in the central nervous system of the monotremes. Two of the three extant species of monotreme were studied: the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus). The distribution of cholinergic cells in the brain of these two species was virtually identical. Distinct groups of cholinergic cells were observed in the striatum, basal forebrain, habenula, pontomesencephalon, cranial nerve motor nuclei, and spinal cord. In contrast to other tetrapods studied with this technique, we failed to find evidence for cholinergic cells in the hypothalamus, the parabigeminal nucleus (or nucleus isthmus), or the cerebral cortex. The lack of hypothalamic cholinergic neurons creates a hiatus in the continuous antero-posterior aggregation of cholinergic neurons seen in other tetrapods. This hiatus might be functionally related to the phenomenology of monotreme sleep and to the ontogeny of sleep in mammals, as juvenile placental mammals exhibit a similar combination of sleep elements to that found in adult monotremes.

  4. Role of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in nicotine-induced invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin-Jie; An, Shi-Min; Wang, Hao; Xu, Lu; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) stimulates non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) which underpin the cancer metastasis. However, the receptor subtype-dependent effects of nAChRs on NSCLC cell invasion and EMT, and the signaling pathway underlying the effects remain not fully defined. We identified that nicotine induced NSCLC cell invasion, migration, and EMT; the effects were suppressed by pharmacological intervention using α7-nAChR selective antagonists or by genetic intervention using α7-nAChR knockdown via RNA inference. Meanwhile, nicotine induced activation of MEK/ERK signaling in NSCLC cells; α7-nAChR antagonism or MEK/ERK signaling pathway inhibition suppressed NSCLC cell invasion and EMT marker expression. These results indicate that nicotine induces NSCLC cell invasion, migration, and EMT; the effects are mediated by α7-nAChRs and involve MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Delineating the effect of nicotine on the NSCLC cell invasion and EMT at receptor subtype level would improve the understanding of cancer biology and offer potentials for the exploitation of selective ligands for the control of the cancer metastasis. PMID:27409670

  5. Recurrent exposure to nicotine differentiates human bronchial epithelial cells via epidermal growth factor receptor activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eva; Irigoyen, Marta; Anso, Elena; Martinez-Irujo, Juan Jose; Rouzaut, Ana

    2008-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major preventable cause of lung cancer in developed countries. Nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-pyridine) is one of the major alkaloids present in tobacco. Besides its addictive properties, its effects have been described in panoply of cell types. In fact, recent studies have shown that nicotine behaves as a tumor promoter in transformed epithelial cells. This research focuses on the effects of acute repetitive nicotine exposure on normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE cells). Here we show that treatment of NHBE cells with recurrent doses of nicotine up to 500 {mu}M triggered cell differentiation towards a neuronal-like phenotype: cells emitted filopodia and expressed neuronal markers such as neuronal cell adhesion molecule, neurofilament-M and the transcription factors neuronal N and Pax-3. We also demonstrate that nicotine treatment induced NF-kB translocation to the nucleus, phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and accumulation of heparin binding-EGF in the extracellular medium. Moreover, addition of AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, or cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that precludes ligand binding to the same receptor, prevented cell differentiation by nicotine. Lastly, we show that differentiated cells increased their adhesion to the extracellular matrix and their protease activity. Given that several lung pathologies are strongly related to tobacco consumption, these results may help to better understand the damaging consequences of nicotine exposure.

  6. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, S.; Chiao, J.; Rossi, J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h/sub 3/ at the end of which time cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, (/sup 3/H)uridine, (/sup 14/C)lysine and (/sup 35/S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins.

  7. Nicotine promotes Streptococcus mutans extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, cell aggregation and overall lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Li, M; Gregory, R L

    2015-08-01

    Several epidemiology studies have reported a positive relationship between smoking and dental caries. Nicotine, an alkaloid component of tobacco, has been demonstrated to stimulate biofilm formation and metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans, one of the most important pathogens of dental caries. The first aim of the present study was to explore the possible mechanisms leading to increased biofilm by nicotine treatment from three aspects, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) synthesis, glucosyltransferase (Gtf) synthesis and glucan-binding protein (Gbp) synthesis at the mRNA and protein levels. The second aim was to investigate how nicotine affects S. mutans virulence, particular in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Confocal laser scanning microscopy results demonstrated that both biofilm bacterial cell numbers and EPS were increased by nicotine. Gtf and GbpA protein expression of S. mutans planktonic cells were upregulated while GbpB protein expression of biofilm cells were downregulated by nicotine. The mRNA expression trends of those genes were mostly consistent with results on protein level but not statistically significant, and gtfD and gbpD of biofilm cells were inhibited. Nicotine was not directly involved in S. mutans LDH activity. However, since it increases the total number of bacterial cells in biofilm, the overall LDH activity of S. mutans biofilm is increased. In conclusion, nicotine stimulates S. mutans planktonic cell Gtf and Gbp expression. This leads to more planktonic cells attaching to the dental biofilm. Increased cell numbers within biofilm results in higher overall LDH activity. This contributes to caries development in smokers.

  8. Nicotine prevents the apoptosis induced by menadione in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tao; Lu Heng; Shang Xuan; Tian Yihao; Zheng Congyi; Wang Shiwen; Cheng Hanhua . E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia . E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

    2006-04-14

    Approximately 50% of long-term cigarette smokers die prematurely from the adverse effects of smoking, including on lung cancer and other illnesses. Nicotine is a main component in tobacco and has been implicated as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. However, the mechanism of nicotine action in the development of lung cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we designed a nicotine-apoptosis system, by pre-treatment of nicotine making lung cancer cell A549 to be in a physiological nicotine environment, and observed that nicotine promoted cell proliferation and prevented the menadione-induced apoptosis, and exerts its role of anti-apoptosis by shift of apoptotic stage induced by menadione from late apoptotic stage to early apoptotic stage, in which NF-{kappa}B was up-regulated. Interference analysis of NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells showed that knock down of NF-{kappa}B resulted in apoptosis promotion and counteracted the protective effect of nicotine. The findings suggest that nicotine has potential effect in lung cancer genesis, especially in patients with undetectable early tumor development and development of specific NF-{kappa}B inhibitors would represent a potentially exciting new pharmacotherapy for tobacco-related lung cancer.

  9. Upregulation of norepinephrine transporter function by prolonged exposure to nicotine in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideaki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Ueno, Susumu; Saeki, Satoru; Zhang, Han; Furuno, Yumi; Takahashi, Kojiro; Tsutsui, Masato; Hachisuka, Kenji; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2010-09-01

    Nicotine acts on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the adrenal medulla and brain, thereby stimulating the release of monoamines such as norepinephrine (NE). In the present study, we examined the effects of prolonged exposure to nicotine on NE transporter (NET) activity in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Treatment of adrenal medullary cells with nicotine increased [(3)H]NE uptake in both a time- (1-5 days) and concentration-dependent (0.1-10 muM) manner. Kinetic analysis showed that nicotine induced an increase in the V (max) of [(3)H]NE uptake with little change in K (m). This increase in NET activity was blocked by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of ribosomal protein synthesis, but not by actinomycin D, a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitor. [(3)H]NE uptake induced by nicotine was strongly inhibited by hexamethonium and mecamylamine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin, and was abolished by elimination of Ca(2+) from the culture medium. KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, attenuated not only nicotine-induced [(3)H]NE uptake but also (45)Ca(2+) influx in the cells. The present findings suggest that long-term exposure to nicotine increases NET activity through a Ca(2+)-dependent post-transcriptional process in the adrenal medulla.

  10. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  11. The historical significance of work with electric organs for the study of cholinergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, V P

    1989-01-01

    The historical significance of work with electric organs for the development of electrobiology and our understanding of the cholinergic synapse at the cell and molecular biological level is traced from its earliest beginning in folk medicine, through the controversy on bioelectricity between Galvani and Volta to the present day, the last decades of which have seen the sequencing of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the isolation and biochemical characterization of the cholinergic vesicle and much else. In the concluding section of the review the continued relevance and usefulness of the electromotor system as a model for future neurobiological research is emphasized.

  12. Cholinergic neuron-like cells derived from bone marrow stromal cells induced by tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate promote functional recovery and neural protection after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Shao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Bi, Jianzhong; Yang, Shaonan; Zhang, Shangli; Gao, Jiangang; Miao, Junying

    2013-01-01

    The rate of neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vivo is very low; therefore, it is necessary to elevate the number of BMSC-derived neurons to cure neurodegenerative diseases. We previously reported that tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609), an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), induced BMSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. However, the neuronal type is not clear, and it is still unknown whether these neuron-like cells possess physiological properties of functional neurons and whether they can contribute to the recovery of neuron dysfunction. To answer these questions, we investigated their characteristics by detecting neuronal function-related neurotransmitters and calcium image. The results showed that these cells exhibited functional cholinergic neurons in vitro. Transplantation of these cholinergic neuron-like cells promoted the recovery of spinal cord-injured mice, and they were more effective than BMSCs. The number of cholinergic neurons was increased after injection with BMSC-derived cholinergic neuron-like cells, indicating their high differentiation rate in vivo. Moreover, the proportion of cholinergic neurons in host cells and secretion of acetylcholine were increased, and preservation of neurofilament was also observed in the lesion of mice implanted with BMSC-derived neurons, suggesting the neuronal protection of BMSC-derived neurons. Our findings provide both a simple method to induce the differentiation of BMSCs into cholinergic neuron-like cells and a putative strategy for the therapy of spinal cord injuries.

  13. Long-term nicotine exposure induces dysfunction of mouse endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Du, Da-Yong; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Feng; Zhang, Pan; Li, Yun-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have an important role in maintaining endothelial homeostasis. Previous studies reported that smoking has detrimental effects on EPCs; however, recent studies revealed that short-term nicotine exposure may benefit EPCs. As most smokers are exposed to nicotine over an extended time period, the present study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of nicotine on EPCs. Mice were administered nicotine orally for 1, 3 or 6 months. The mice exposed to nicotine for 1 month demonstrated increased EPC counts and telomerase activity and reduced cell senescence compared with control mice, consistent with previous reports. However, long-term nicotine exposure resulted in opposing effects on EPCs, causing decreased counts, functional impairment and reduced telomerase activity. Furthermore, the effects of nicotine exposure were correlated with changes in sirtuins type 1 (SIRT1) protein expression. The current study indicated that long-term nicotine exposure induces dysfunction and senescence of EPCs, which may be associated with impairment of telomerase activity through SIRT1 downregulation. The present results emphasize the necessity of smoking cessation to prevent dysfunction of EPCs. PMID:28123473

  14. Depletion of cholinergic amacrine cells by a novel immunotoxin does not perturb the formation of segregated on and off cone bipolar cell projections.

    PubMed

    Gunhan, Emine; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Landerholm, Thomas E; Chalupa, Leo M

    2002-03-15

    Cone bipolar cells are the first retinal neurons that respond in a differential manner to light onset and offset. In the mature retina, the terminal arbors of On and Off cone bipolar cells terminate in different sublaminas of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) where they form synapses with the dendrites of On and Off retinal ganglion cells and with the stratified processes of cholinergic amacrine cells. Here we first show that cholinergic processes within the On and Off sublaminas of the IPL are present early in development, being evident in the rat on the day of birth, approximately 10 d before the formation of segregated cone bipolar cell axons. This temporal sequence, as well as our previous finding that the segregation of On and Off cone bipolar cell inputs occurs in the absence of retinal ganglion cells, suggested that cholinergic amacrine cells could provide a scaffold for the subsequent in-growth of bipolar cell axons. To test this hypothesis directly, a new cholinergic cell immunotoxin was constructed by conjugating saporin, the ribosome-inactivating protein toxin, to an antibody against the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. A single intraocular injection of the immunotoxin caused a rapid, complete, and selective loss of cholinergic amacrine cells from the developing rat retina. On and Off cone bipolar cells were visualized using an antibody against recoverin, the calcium-binding protein that labels the soma and processes of these interneurons. After complete depletion of cholinergic amacrine cells, cone bipolar cell axon terminals still formed their two characteristic strata within the IPL. These findings demonstrate that the presence of cholinergic amacrine cells is not required for the segregation of recoverin-positive On and Off cone bipolar cell projections.

  15. Production of endothelin by cultured human endothelial cells following exposure to nicotine or caffeine.

    PubMed

    Lee, W O; Wright, S M

    1999-07-01

    This study evaluated endothelin production by endothelial cells after exposure to nicotine or caffeine. Vasoconstrictive properties have been attributed to both nicotine and caffeine. The presence of endothelin, a potent vasoconstrictor itself, was determined using a radioimmunoassay. The optimal stimulatory doses for nicotine and caffeine were determined to be 1.0 micromol/L and 1.0 mmol/L, respectively. When endothelin production was evaluated over time after exposure to the optimal dose of each agent, it was determined that nicotine stimulated maximum endothelin production within 5 minutes. Caffeine failed to cause a distinct peak of endothelin production within 20 minutes. These results suggest that nicotine may have a possible acute and short-lived effect on the vasoconstrictive response associated with endothelin, while caffeine-induced endothelin release may require more long-term exposure.

  16. Inhibition of nitric oxide-induced apoptosis by nicotine in oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhijit G; Gopalakrishnan, Velliyur K; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2007-11-01

    Development of oral cancer is clearly linked to the usage of smokeless tobacco. The molecular mechanisms involved in this process are however not well understood. Toward this goal, we investigated the effect of smokeless tobacco exposure on apoptosis of oral epithelial cells. Exposure of oral epithelial cells to smokeless tobacco extract (STE) induces apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, until a threshold level of nicotine is achieved upon which apoptosis is inhibited. 1 mM of nicotine is able to inhibit apoptosis significantly induced by STE in these oral cells. Exposure of cells to nicotine alone has no effect on apoptosis, but nicotine inhibits apoptosis induced by other agents present in STE. In this study we show that, the anti-apoptotic action of nicotine is specifically associated with down-regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production. Using specific inducers of NO, we have demonstrated that inhibition of apoptosis by nicotine is through down-regulation of NO production. Further, we observed that nicotine clearly acts as a sink of NO radicals, shown using peroxynitrite generator (SIN-1) in conjunction or absence of radical scavengers. Nicotine thus causes most damage in transformed epithelial cells as depicted by accumulation of nitrotyrosine in a 3-NT ELISA assay. Inhibition of apoptosis is a hallmark in tumor progression and propels development of cancer. It may further result in functional loss of apoptotic effector mechanisms in the transformed cells. Thus, our data clearly indicates that inhibition of NO-induced apoptosis by nicotine may lead to tobacco-induced oral carcinogenesis, and implies careful development of modalities in tobacco cessation programs.

  17. Functional alpha7 nicotinic receptors are expressed on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    John, Danielle; Shelukhina, Irina; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Jim; Henderson, Zaineb

    2015-03-19

    Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, and postnatal-born granule cells migrate into the granule cell layer and extend axons to their target areas. The α7*nicotinic receptor has been implicated in neuronal maturation during development of the brain and is abundant in interneurons of the hippocampal formation of the adult brain. Signalling through these same receptors is believed also to promote maturation and integration of adult-born granule cells in the hippocampal formation. We therefore aimed to determine whether functional α7*nicotinic receptors are expressed in developing granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus. For these experiments we used 2-3 week-old Wistar rats, and 2-9 week old transgenic mice in which GABAergic interneurons were marked by expression of green fluorescent protein. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of α7*nicotinic receptor subunits around granule cells close around the subgranular zone which correlated with the distribution of developmental markers for immature granule cells. Whole-cell patch clamp recording showed that a proportion of granule cells responded to puffed ACh in the presence of atropine, and that these cells possessed electrophysiological properties found in immature granule cells. The nicotinic responses were potentiated by an allosteric α7*nicotinic receptor modulator, which were blocked by a specific α7*nicotinic receptor antagonist and were not affected by ionotropic glutamate or GABA receptor antagonists. These results suggest the presence of functional somato-dendritic α7*nicotinic receptors on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus, consistent with studies implicating α7*nicotinic receptors in dendritic maturation of dentate gyrus neurons in adult brain.

  18. Functional alpha7 nicotinic receptors are expressed on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    John, Danielle; Shelukhina, Irina; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Jim; Henderson, Zaineb

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, and postnatal-born granule cells migrate into the granule cell layer and extend axons to their target areas. The α7⁎nicotinic receptor has been implicated in neuronal maturation during development of the brain and is abundant in interneurons of the hippocampal formation of the adult brain. Signalling through these same receptors is believed also to promote maturation and integration of adult-born granule cells in the hippocampal formation. We therefore aimed to determine whether functional α7⁎nicotinic receptors are expressed in developing granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus. For these experiments we used 2–3 week-old Wistar rats, and 2–9 week old transgenic mice in which GABAergic interneurons were marked by expression of green fluorescent protein. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of α7⁎nicotinic receptor subunits around granule cells close around the subgranular zone which correlated with the distribution of developmental markers for immature granule cells. Whole-cell patch clamp recording showed that a proportion of granule cells responded to puffed ACh in the presence of atropine, and that these cells possessed electrophysiological properties found in immature granule cells. The nicotinic responses were potentiated by an allosteric α7⁎nicotinic receptor modulator, which were blocked by a specific α7⁎nicotinic receptor antagonist and were not affected by ionotropic glutamate or GABA receptor antagonists. These results suggest the presence of functional somato-dendritic α7⁎nicotinic receptors on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus, consistent with studies implicating α7⁎nicotinic receptors in dendritic maturation of dentate gyrus neurons in adult brain. PMID:25553616

  19. Novel fast adapting interneurons mediate cholinergic-induced fast GABAA inhibitory postsynaptic currents in striatal spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Faust, Thomas W; Assous, Maxime; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M; Koós, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Previous work suggests that neostriatal cholinergic interneurons control the activity of several classes of GABAergic interneurons through fast nicotinic receptor-mediated synaptic inputs. Although indirect evidence has suggested the existence of several classes of interneurons controlled by this mechanism, only one such cell type, the neuropeptide-Y-expressing neurogliaform neuron, has been identified to date. Here we tested the hypothesis that in addition to the neurogliaform neurons that elicit slow GABAergic inhibitory responses, another interneuron type exists in the striatum that receives strong nicotinic cholinergic input and elicits conventional fast GABAergic synaptic responses in projection neurons. We obtained in vitro slice recordings from double transgenic mice in which Channelrhodopsin-2 was natively expressed in cholinergic neurons and a population of serotonin receptor-3a-Cre-expressing GABAergic interneurons were visualized with tdTomato. We show that among the targeted GABAergic interneurons a novel type of interneuron, termed the fast-adapting interneuron, can be identified that is distinct from previously known interneurons based on immunocytochemical and electrophysiological criteria. We show using optogenetic activation of cholinergic inputs that fast-adapting interneurons receive a powerful supra-threshold nicotinic cholinergic input in vitro. Moreover, fast adapting neurons are densely connected to projection neurons and elicit fast, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current responses. The nicotinic receptor-mediated activation of fast-adapting interneurons may constitute an important mechanism through which cholinergic interneurons control the activity of projection neurons and perhaps the plasticity of their synaptic inputs when animals encounter reinforcing or otherwise salient stimuli.

  20. Cholinergic regulation of fear learning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marlene A; Fadel, Jim R

    2017-03-01

    Cholinergic activation regulates cognitive function, particularly long-term memory consolidation. This Review presents an overview of the anatomical, neurochemical, and pharmacological evidence supporting the cholinergic regulation of Pavlovian contextual and cue-conditioned fear learning and extinction. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons provide inputs to neocortical regions and subcortical limbic structures such as the hippocampus and amygdala. Pharmacological manipulations of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors support the role of cholinergic processes in the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex in modulating the learning and extinction of contexts or cues associated with threat. Additional evidence from lesion studies and analysis of in vivo acetylcholine release with microdialysis similarly support a critical role of cholinergic neurotransmission in corticoamygdalar or corticohippocampal circuits during acquisition of fear extinction. Although a few studies have suggested a complex role of cholinergic neurotransmission in the cellular plasticity essential for extinction learning, more work is required to elucidate the exact cholinergic mechanisms and physiological role of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in these fear circuits. Such studies are important for elucidating the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder that involve deficits in extinction learning as well as for developing novel therapeutic approaches for such disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Electronic cigarettes induce DNA strand breaks and cell death independently of nicotine in cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vicky; Rahimy, Mehran; Korrapati, Avinaash; Xuan, Yinan; Zou, Angela E.; Krishnan, Aswini R.; Tsui, Tzuhan; Aguilera, Joseph A.; Advani, Sunil; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Brumund, Kevin T.; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of short- and long-term e-cigarette vapor exposure on a panel of normal epithelial and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. Materials and Methods HaCaT, UMSCC10B, and HN30 were treated with nicotine-containing and nicotine-free vapor extract from two popular e-cigarette brands for periods ranging from 48 hours to 8 weeks. Cytotoxicity was assessed using Annexin V flow cytometric analysis, trypan blue exclusion, and clonogenic assays. Genotoxicity in the form of DNA strand breaks was quantified using the neutral comet assay and γ-H2AX immunostaining. Results E-cigarette-exposed cells showed significantly reduced cell viability and clonogenic survival, along with increased rates of apoptosis and necrosis, regardless of e-cigarette vapor nicotine content. They also exhibited significantly increased comet tail length and accumulation of γ-H2AX foci, demonstrating increased DNA strand breaks. Conclusion E-cigarette vapor, both with and without nicotine, is cytotoxic to epithelial cell lines and is a DNA strand break-inducing agent. Further assessment of the potential carcinogenic effects of e-cigarette vapor is urgently needed. PMID:26547127

  2. Expression of nicotinic receptors in normal and tumoral pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC).

    PubMed

    Sartelet, Hervé; Maouche, Kamel; Totobenazara, Jean-laurent; Petit, Jessica; Burlet, Henriette; Monteau, Michel; Tournier, Jean Marie; Birembaut, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) tumors of the lung represent a wide spectrum of phenotypically distinct entities, with differences in tumor progression and aggressiveness, which include carcinoid tumor (CT) and small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Approximately 20-40% of patients with both typical and atypical CT are non-smokers, while virtually all patients with SCLC are cigarette smokers. Cigarette smoke contains numerous molecules which have been identified as carcinogens. The real impact of nicotine in the development of tumors is not well known. Recent studies show that nicotine upregulates factors of transcription through the nicotinic receptors. The aim of our work was to study the expression of the nicotinic receptors in normal and neoplastic pulmonary NE cells. An immunohistochemical study was carried out with antibodies against NE markers and subunits alpha7 and beta2 of nicotinic receptors in 7 normal lungs, 10 CT (8 typical and 2 atypical) and 10 SCLC fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. This study was completed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) detection of alpha7-subunit nicotinic receptor mRNA expression. Our data showed that beta2-subunit of nicotinic receptors is never expressed in normal NE cells of lungs and very rarely in NE tumors. In contrast, alpha7-subunit is constantly found in NE cells in normal lungs. In tumors, its expression is significantly higher in SCLC than in CT (p=0.009). Thus, alpha7 subunit nicotinic receptor in a context of chronic nicotinic intoxication seems to be associated with an aggressive phenotype in the spectrum of the NE tumors.

  3. Nitric oxide promotes nicotine-triggered ERK signaling via redox reactions in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakai, Ryosuke; Maeda, Chiharu; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Ihara, Hideshi; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2011-10-30

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS), serves as a signaling molecule with diverse biological responses in the central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we demonstrated that nNOS expression enhances the nicotine-triggered activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in nNOS-transfected PC12 (NPC12) cells. Treatment with nicotine increased the phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the NPC12 cells as compared with that in control PC12 cells. However, nicotine treatment failed to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation when NPC12 cells were pretreated with several selective inhibitors of NOS, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, protein kinase C, Src, epidermal growth factor receptor, and MEK. The nicotine-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in PC12 cells was observed by their pretreatment with a NO donor. Moreover, the enhancement of nicotine-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the NPC12 cells was regulated by intracellular glutathione levels, but not by the soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP-protein kinase G signaling. Meanwhile, depolarization stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in both PC12 and NPC12 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that nicotine modulates NO-dependent redox condition; the resulting calcium influx, would increase ERK1/2 phosphorylation in nNOS expressing cells. Blockade of NO pathway may be selective target to reduce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via attenuation of the nicotine responses in the CNS.

  4. Cholinergic antagonists in a solitary wasp venom.

    PubMed

    Piek, T; Mantel, P

    1986-01-01

    The venom of the solitary wasp Philanthus triangulum contains a cholinergic antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog, Xenopus laevis. The venom of African P. triangulum contains two different cholinergic factors, a competitive and a non-competitive antagonist. The venom of the European P. triangulum may not contain a competitive antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of X. laevis, but only a very strong non-competitive antagonist. The possible non-synonymity of both groups of P. triangulum is discussed.

  5. Central Insulin Action Activates Kupffer Cells by Suppressing Hepatic Vagal Activation via the Nicotinic Alpha 7 Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kumi; Tanida, Mamoru; Nagata, Naoto; Inaba, Yuka; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Toshinai, Koji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, which suppresses the gene expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. The vagus nerve plays an important role in this centrally mediated hepatic response; however, the precise mechanism underlying this brain-liver interaction is unclear. Here, we present our findings that the vagus nerve suppresses hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAchR) on Kupffer cells, and that central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling by suppressing vagal activity. Indeed, central insulin-mediated hepatic IL-6/STAT3 activation and gluconeogenic gene suppression were impeded in mice with hepatic vagotomy, pharmacological cholinergic blockade, or α7-nAchR deficiency. In high-fat diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice, control of the vagus nerve by central insulin action was disturbed, inducing a persistent increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that dysregulation of the α7-nAchR-mediated control of Kupffer cells by central insulin action may affect the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic inflammation in obesity.

  6. Nicotine-mediated signals modulate cell death and survival of T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oloris, Silvia C.S.; Frazer-Abel, Ashley A.; Jubala, Cristan M.; Fosmire, Susan P.; Helm, Karen M.; Robinson, Sally R.; Korpela, Derek M.; Duckett, Megan M.; Baksh, Shairaz; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2010-02-01

    The capacity of nicotine to affect the behavior of non-neuronal cells through neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been the subject of considerable recent attention. Previously, we showed that exposure to nicotine activates the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor in lymphocytes and endothelial cells, leading to alterations in cellular growth and vascular endothelial growth factor production. Here, we extend these studies to document effects of nicotine on lymphocyte survival. The data show that nicotine induces paradoxical effects that might alternatively enforce survival or trigger apoptosis, suggesting that depending on timing and context, nicotine might act both as a survival factor or as an inducer of apoptosis in normal or transformed lymphocytes, and possibly other non-neuronal cells. In addition, our results show that, while having overlapping functions, low and high affinity nAChRs also transmit signals that promote distinct outcomes in lymphocytes. The sum of our data suggests that selective modulation of nAChRs might be useful to regulate lymphocyte activation and survival in health and disease.

  7. Attenuation of CNS inflammatory responses by nicotine involves α7 and non-α7 nicotinic receptors1,2

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Junwei; Simard, Alain R.; Turner, Gregory H.; Wu, Jie; Whiteaker, Paul; Lukas, Ronald J.; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    A considerable number of in vivo studies have demonstrated that the cholinergic system can dampen the peripheral immune response, and it is thought that the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype is a key mediator of this process. The goal of the present study was to determine if nicotine modulates immunological mechanisms known to be involved in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for CNS autoimmune disease, via α7-nAChRs. Here we show that nicotine exposure attenuates EAE severity and that this effect is largely abolished in nAChR α7 subunit knock-out mice. However, nicotine exposure partially retains the ability to reduce lymphocyte infiltration into the CNS, inhibit auto-reactive T cell proliferation and helper T cell cytokine production, down-regulate co-stimulatory protein expression on myeloid cells, and increase the differentiation and recruitment of regulatory T cells, even in the absence of α7-nAChRs. Diverse effects of nicotine on effector and regulatory T cells, as well as antigen presenting cells, may be linked to differential expression patterns of nAChR subunits across these cell types. Taken together, our data show that although α7-nAChRs indeed seem to play an important role in nicotine-conferred reduction of the CNS inflammatory response and protection against EAE, other nAChR subtypes also are involved in the anti-inflammatory properties of the cholinergic system. PMID:20932827

  8. Checks and balances on cholinergic signaling in brain and body function.

    PubMed

    Soreq, Hermona

    2015-07-01

    A century after the discovery of acetylcholine (ACh), we recognize both ACh receptors, transporters, and synthesizing and degrading enzymes and regulators of their expression as contributors to cognition, metabolism, and immunity. Recent discoveries indicate that pre- and post-transcriptional ACh signaling controllers coordinate the identity, functioning, dynamics, and brain-to-body communication of cholinergic cells. Checks and balances including epigenetic mechanisms, alternative splicing, and miRNAs may all expand or limit the diversity of these cholinergic components by consistently performing genome-related surveillance. This regulatory network enables homeostatic maintenance of brain-to-body ACh signaling as well as reactions to nicotine, Alzheimer's disease anticholinesterase therapeutics, and agricultural pesticides. Here I review recent reports on the functional implications of these controllers of cholinergic signaling in and out of the brain.

  9. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: (a) clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor–receptor associations; (b) heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional “trapping,” and (c) protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain α7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABAergic (inhibitory) synapses. An important function of the α7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain. PMID

  10. Nicotine recruits glutamate receptors to postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Jing; Lozada, Adrian F; Gou, Chen-Yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K

    2015-09-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input that the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors.

  11. Nicotine Recruits Glutamate Receptors to Postsynaptic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jing-jing; Lozada, Adrian F.; Gou, Chen-yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K.

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors. PMID:26365992

  12. Nicotine-Induced Effects on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChRs), Ca2+ and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in STC-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jie; Mummalaneni, Shobha K.; Alkahtani, Reem M.; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the T2R bitter taste receptors, neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have recently been shown to be involved in the bitter taste transduction of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol. However, at present it is not clear if nAChRs are expressed in enteroendocrine cells other than beta cells of the pancreas and enterochromaffin cells, and if they play a role in the synthesis and release of neurohumoral peptides. Accordingly, we investigated the expression and functional role of nAChRs in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. Our studies using RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical and Western blotting techniques demonstrate that STC-1 cells express several α and β nAChR subunits. Exposing STC-1 cells to nicotine acutely (24h) or chronically (4 days) induced a differential increase in the expression of nAChR subunit mRNA and protein in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Mecamylamine, a non-selective antagonist of nAChRs, inhibited the nicotine-induced increase in mRNA expression of nAChRs. Exposing STC-1 cells to nicotine increased intracellular Ca2+ in a dose-dependent manner that was inhibited in the presence of mecamylamine or dihydro-β-erythroidine, a α4β2 nAChR antagonist. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were detected in STC-1 cells using RT-PCR, specific BDNF antibody, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acute nicotine exposure (30 min) decreased the cellular content of BDNF in STC-1 cells. The nicotine-induced decrease in BDNF was inhibited in the presence of mecamylamine. We also detected α3 and β4 mRNA in intestinal mucosal cells and α3 protein expression in intestinal enteroendocrine cells. We conclude that STC-1 cells and intestinal enteroendocrine cells express nAChRs. In STC-1 cells nAChR expression is modulated by exposure to nicotine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nicotine interacts with nAChRs and inhibits BDNF expression in STC-1 cells. PMID:27846263

  13. The α4 Nicotinic Receptor Promotes CD4+ T-Cell Proliferation and a Helper T-Cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jacob C.; Muldoon, Pretal; Clark, Sarah; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is a common addiction and a leading cause of disease. Chronic nicotine exposure is known to activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in immune cells. We demonstrate a novel role for α4 nAChRs in the effect of nicotine on T-cell proliferation and immunity. Using cell-based sorting and proteomic analysis we define an α4 nAChR expressing helper T-cell population (α4+CD3+CD4+) and show that this group of cells is responsive to sustained nicotine exposure. In the circulation, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus, we find that nicotine promotes an increase in CD3+CD4+ cells via its activation of the α4 nAChR and regulation of G protein subunit o, G protein regulated–inducer of neurite outgrowth, and CDC42 signaling within T cells. In particular, nicotine is found to promote a helper T cell 2 adaptive immunologic response within T cells that is absent in α4−/− mice. We thus present a new mechanism of α4 nAChR signaling and immune regulation in T cells, possibly accounting for the effect of smoking on the immune system. PMID:24107512

  14. Nicotine mediates oxidative stress and apoptosis through cross talk between NOX1 and Bcl-2 in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Filippo; Giacomello, Marta; Donati, Yves; Carnesecchi, Stephanie; Frieden, Maud; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2014-11-01

    Nicotine contributes to the onset and progression of several pulmonary diseases. Among the various pathophysiological mechanisms triggered by nicotine, oxidative stress and cell death are reported in several cell types. We found that chronic exposure to nicotine (48h) induced NOX1-dependent oxidative stress and apoptosis in primary pulmonary cells. In murine (MLE-12) and human (BEAS-2B) lung epithelial cell lines, nicotine acted as a sensitizer to cell death and synergistically enhanced apoptosis when cells were concomitantly exposed to hyperoxia. The precise signaling pathway was investigated in MLE-12 cells in which NOX1 was abrogated by a specific inhibitor or stably silenced by shRNA. In the early phase of exposure (1h), nicotine mediated intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes and activation of protein kinase C, which in its turn activated NOX1, leading to cellular and mitochondrial oxidative stress. The latter triggered the intrinsic apoptotic machinery by modulating the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax. Overexpression of Bcl-2 completely prevented nicotine's detrimental effects, suggesting Bcl-2as a downstream key regulator in nicotine/NOX1-induced cell damage. These results suggest that NOX1 is a major contributor to the generation of intracellular oxidative stress induced by nicotine and might be an important molecule to target in nicotine-related lung pathologies.

  15. Crossed unilateral lesions of temporal lobe structures and cholinergic cell bodies impair visual conditional and object discrimination learning in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barefoot, H C; Baker, H F; Ridley, R M

    2002-02-01

    Monkeys with excitotoxic lesions of the CA1/subiculum region in the right hemisphere and with immunotoxic lesions of the cholinergic cells of the diagonal band in the left hemisphere were impaired on a visual conditional task. In this task, correct choice of one of two objects depends on which of two background fields both objects are presented against, irrespective of the spatial positions of the objects. They were not impaired on simple object or shape discrimination tasks. The pattern of impairments is the same as that seen after bilateral excitotoxic lesions of CA1/subiculum, implying that the diagonal band lesion disables the ipsilateral CA1/subiculum. It also argues that CA1/subiculum, sustained by its cholinergic input, is necessary for some forms of nonspatial conditional learning. Addition of an inferotemporal (IT) cortical ablation to the left hemisphere did not affect simple visual discrimination learning, although all the monkeys then failed to learn a new visual conditional task. This demonstrates that intact IT cortex in only one hemisphere is sufficient to sustain simple visual discrimination learning but implies that the cholinergic input and the inferotemporal cortical input to the hippocampus both contribute to visual conditional learning. The subsequent addition of an immunotoxic lesion of the basal nucleus of Meynert in the right hemisphere resulted in an additional impairment on a difficult shape discrimination. This argues that it is the cholinergic projection to the inferotemporal cortex, rather than to the rest of the cortex, which contributes to visual discrimination learning and memory.

  16. Luteolin enhances cholinergic activities in PC12 cells through ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    El Omri, Abdelfatteh; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Ben Abdrabbah, Manef; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-02-09

    Luteolin, a 3', 4', 5, 7-tetrahydroxyflavone, is an active compound in Rosmarinus officinalis (Lamiacea), and has been reported to exert several benefits in neuronal cells. However cholinergic-induced activities of luteolin still remain unknown. Neuronal differentiation encompasses an elaborate developmental program which plays a key role in the development of the nervous system. The advent of several cell lines, like PC12 cells, able to differentiate in culture proved to be the turning point for gaining and understanding of molecular neuroscience. In this work, we investigated the ability of luteolin to induce PC12 cell differentiation and its effect on cholinergic activities. Our findings showed that luteolin treatment significantly induced neurite outgrowth extension, enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, known as neuronal differentiation marker, and increased the level of total choline and acetylcholine in PC12 cells. In addition, luteolin persistently, activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt; while the addition of pharmacological MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3k/Akt inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated luteolin-induced AChE activity and neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The above findings suggest that luteolin induces neurite outgrowth and enhanced cholinergic activities, at least in part, through the activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling.

  17. Electrophysiological changes in laterodorsal tegmental neurons associated with prenatal nicotine exposure: implications for heightened susceptibility to addict to drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M H; Nielsen, M L; Kohlmeier, K A

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) is a risk factor for developing an addiction to nicotine at a later stage in life. Understanding the neurobiological changes in reward related circuitry induced by exposure to nicotine prenatally is vital if we are to combat the heightened addiction liability in these vulnerable individuals. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), which is comprised of cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, is importantly involved in reward mediation via demonstrated excitatory projections to dopamine-containing ventral tegmental neurons. PNE could lead to alterations in LDT neurons that would be expected to alter responses to later-life nicotine exposure. To examine this issue, we monitored nicotine-induced responses of LDT neurons in brain slices of PNE and drug naive mice using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Nicotine was found to induce rises in calcium in a smaller proportion of LDT cells in PNE mice aged 7-15 days and smaller rises in calcium in PNE animals from postnatal ages 11-21 days when compared with age-matched control animals. While inward currents induced by nicotine were not found to be different, nicotine did induce larger amplitude excitatory postsynaptic currents in PNE animals in the oldest age group when compared with amplitudes induced in similar-aged control animals. Immunohistochemically identified cholinergic LDT cells from PNE animals exhibited slower spike rise and decay slopes, which likely contributed to the wider action potential observed. Further, PNE was associated with a more negative action potential afterhyperpolarization in cholinergic cells. Interestingly, the changes found in these parameters in animals exposed prenatally to nicotine were age related, in that they were not apparent in animals from the oldest age group examined. Taken together, our data suggest that PNE induces changes in cholinergic LDT cells that would be expected to alter cellular excitability. As the changes are

  18. Early postnatal nicotine exposure disrupts the α2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated control of oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells during adolescence in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Nakauchi, Sakura; Su, Hailing; Tanimoto, Saki; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2016-02-01

    Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and maternal nicotine exposure in animal models are associated with cognitive impairments in offspring. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (OLM) cells expressing α2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are an important component of hippocampal circuitry, gating information flow and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region. Here we investigated whether early postnatal nicotine exposure alters the normal role of α2*-nAChR-expressing OLM cells during adolescence in rats. We found that early postnatal nicotine exposure significantly decreased not only the number of α2-mRNA-expressing interneurons in the stratum oriens/alveus, but also α2*-nAChR-mediated responses in OLM cells. These effects of nicotine were prevented by co-administration with the nonselective nAChR antagonist mecamylamine, suggesting that nicotine-induced activation, but not desensitization, of nAChRs mediates the effects. α2*-nAChR-mediated depolarization of OLM cells normally triggers action potentials, causing an increase in spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in synaptically connected pyramidal cells. However, these α2*-nAChR-mediated effects were profoundly reduced after early postnatal nicotine exposure, suggesting altered control of CA1 circuits by α2*-nAChR-expressing OLM cells. Furthermore, these effects were associated with altered excitatory neural activity and LTP as well as the loss of normal α2*-nAChR-mediated control of excitatory neural activity and LTP. These findings suggest the altered function of α2*-nAChR-expressing OLM cells as an important target of further study for identifying the mechanisms underlying the cognitive impairment induced by maternal smoking during pregnancy.

  19. Nicotine inhibits Fc epsilon RI-induced cysteinyl leukotrienes and cytokine production without affecting mast cell degranulation through alpha 7/alpha 9/alpha 10-nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Boyd, R Thomas; Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Langley, Raymond J; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Sopori, Mohan L

    2010-07-01

    Smokers are less likely to develop some inflammatory and allergic diseases. In Brown-Norway rats, nicotine inhibits several parameters of allergic asthma, including the production of Th2 cytokines and the cysteinyl leukotriene LTC(4). Cysteinyl leukotrienes are primarily produced by mast cells, and these cells play a central role in allergic asthma. Mast cells express a high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI). Following its cross-linking, cells degranulate and release preformed inflammatory mediators (early phase) and synthesize and secrete cytokines/chemokines and leukotrienes (late phase). The mechanism by which nicotine modulates mast cell activation is unclear. Using alpha-bungarotoxin binding and quantitative PCR and PCR product sequencing, we showed that the rat mast/basophil cell line RBL-2H3 expresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) alpha7, alpha9, and alpha10; exposure to exceedingly low concentrations of nicotine (nanomolar), but not the biologically inactive metabolite cotinine, for > or = 8 h suppressed the late phase (leukotriene/cytokine production) but not degranulation (histamine and hexosaminidase release). These effects were unrelated to those of nicotine on intracellular free calcium concentration but were causally associated with the inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) activity and the PI3K/ERK/NF-kappaB pathway, including phosphorylation of Akt and ERK and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. The suppressive effect of nicotine on the late-phase response was blocked by the alpha7/alpha9-nAChR antagonists methyllycaconitine and alpha-bungarotoxin, as well as by small interfering RNA knockdown of alpha7-, alpha9-, or alpha10-nAChRs, suggesting a functional interaction between alpha7-, alpha9-, and alpha10-nAChRs that might explain the response of RBL cells to nanomolar concentrations of nicotine. This "hybrid" receptor might serve as a target for novel antiallergic/antiasthmatic therapies.

  20. Differential effects of lipopolysaccharide on energy metabolism in murine microglial N9 and cholinergic SN56 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Klimaszewska-Łata, Joanna; Gul-Hinc, Sylwia; Bielarczyk, Hanna; Ronowska, Anna; Zyśk, Marlena; Grużewska, Katarzyna; Pawełczyk, Tadeusz; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    There are significant differences between acetyl-CoA and ATP levels, enzymes of acetyl-CoA metabolism, and toll-like receptor 4 contents in non-activated microglial N9 and non-differentiated cholinergic SN56 neuroblastoma cells. Exposition of N9 cells to lipopolysaccharide caused concentration-dependent several-fold increases of nitrogen oxide synthesis, accompanied by inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, aconitase, and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex activities, and by nearly proportional depletion of acetyl-CoA, but by relatively smaller losses in ATP content and cell viability (about 5%). On the contrary, SN56 cells appeared to be insensitive to direct exposition to high concentration of lipopolysaccharide. However, exogenous nitric oxide resulted in marked inhibition pyruvate dehydrogenase and aconitase activities, depletion of acetyl-CoA, along with respective loss of SN56 cells viability. These data indicate that these two common neurodegenerative signals may differentially affect energy-acetyl-CoA metabolism in microglial and cholinergic neuronal cell compartments in the brain. Moreover, microglial cells appeared to be more resistant than neuronal cells to acetyl-CoA and ATP depletion evoked by these neurodegenerative conditions. Together, these data indicate that differential susceptibility of microglia and cholinergic neuronal cells to neurotoxic signals may result from differences in densities of toll-like receptors and degree of disequilibrium between acetyl-CoA provision in mitochondria and its utilization for energy production and acetylation reactions in each particular group of cells. There are significant differences between acetyl-CoA and ATP levels and enzymes of acetyl-CoA metabolism in non-activated microglial N9 and non-differentiated cholinergic SN56 neuroblastoma cells. Pathological stimulation of microglial toll-like receptors (TLRs) triggered excessive synthesis of microglia-derived nitric oxide (NO)/NOO radicals that

  1. Isl1 directly controls a cholinergic neuronal identity in the developing forebrain and spinal cord by forming cell type-specific complexes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyong-Ho; Cargnin, Francesca; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Bora; Kwon, Ryuk-Jun; Nam, Heejin; Shen, Rongkun; Barnes, Anthony P; Lee, Jae W; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung

    2014-04-01

    The establishment of correct neurotransmitter characteristics is an essential step of neuronal fate specification in CNS development. However, very little is known about how a battery of genes involved in the determination of a specific type of chemical-driven neurotransmission is coordinately regulated during vertebrate development. Here, we investigated the gene regulatory networks that specify the cholinergic neuronal fates in the spinal cord and forebrain, specifically, spinal motor neurons (MNs) and forebrain cholinergic neurons (FCNs). Conditional inactivation of Isl1, a LIM homeodomain factor expressed in both differentiating MNs and FCNs, led to a drastic loss of cholinergic neurons in the developing spinal cord and forebrain. We found that Isl1 forms two related, but distinct types of complexes, the Isl1-Lhx3-hexamer in MNs and the Isl1-Lhx8-hexamer in FCNs. Interestingly, our genome-wide ChIP-seq analysis revealed that the Isl1-Lhx3-hexamer binds to a suite of cholinergic pathway genes encoding the core constituents of the cholinergic neurotransmission system, such as acetylcholine synthesizing enzymes and transporters. Consistently, the Isl1-Lhx3-hexamer directly coordinated upregulation of cholinergic pathways genes in embryonic spinal cord. Similarly, in the developing forebrain, the Isl1-Lhx8-hexamer was recruited to the cholinergic gene battery and promoted cholinergic gene expression. Furthermore, the expression of the Isl1-Lhx8-complex enabled the acquisition of cholinergic fate in embryonic stem cell-derived neurons. Together, our studies show a shared molecular mechanism that determines the cholinergic neuronal fate in the spinal cord and forebrain, and uncover an important gene regulatory mechanism that directs a specific neurotransmitter identity in vertebrate CNS development.

  2. Nicotine exposure induces bronchial epithelial cell apoptosis and senescence via ROS mediated autophagy-impairment.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Manish; Van Westphal, Colin; Carpenter-Thompson, Rhett; K Mohanty, Dillip; Vij, Neeraj

    2016-08-01

    Waterpipe smoking and e-cigarette vaping, the non-combustible sources of inhaled nicotine exposure are increasingly becoming popular and marketed as safer alternative to cigarette smoking. Hence, this study was designed to investigate the impact of inhaled nicotine exposure on disease causing COPD-emphysema mechanisms. For in vitro studies, human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2b) were treated with waterpipe smoke extract (WPSE, 5%), nicotine (5mM), and/or cysteamine (250μM, an autophagy inducer and anti-oxidant drug), for 6hrs. We observed significantly (p<0.05) increased ubiquitinated protein-accumulation in the insoluble protein fractions of Beas2b cells treated with WPSE or nicotine that could be rescued by cysteamine treatment, suggesting aggresome-formation and autophagy-impairment. Moreover, our data also demonstrate that both WPSE and nicotine exposure significantly (p<0.05) elevates Ub-LC3β co-localization to aggresome-bodies while inducing Ub-p62 co-expression/accumulation, verifying autophagy-impairment. We also found that WPSE and nicotine exposure impacts Beas2b cell viability by significantly (p<0.05) inducing cellular apoptosis/senescence via ROS-activation, as it could be controlled by cysteamine, which is known to have an anti-oxidant property. For murine studies, C57BL/6 mice were administered with inhaled nicotine (intranasal, 500μg/mouse/day for 5 days), as an experimental model of non-combustible nicotine exposure. The inhaled nicotine exposure mediated oxidative-stress induces autophagy-impairment in the murine lungs as seen by significant (p<0.05, n=4) increase in the expression levels of nitrotyrosine protein-adduct (oxidative-stress marker, soluble-fraction) and Ub/p62/VCP (impaired-autophagy marker, insoluble-fraction). Overall, our data shows that nicotine, a common component of WPS, e-cigarette vapor and cigarette smoke, induces bronchial epithelial cell apoptosis and senescence via ROS mediated autophagy-impairment as a potential

  3. Nicotine-stimulated release of [3H]norepinephrine from fetal rat locus coeruleus cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, K A; Leslie, F M

    1998-02-01

    Acute nicotine administration stimulated [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) release from cultured fetal locus coeruleus (LC) cells. The effect was concentration dependent, with an EC50 of 0.9 microM, and was abolished by removal of calcium from, or addition of tetrodotoxin (500 nM) to, the assay buffer. Other nicotinic receptor agonists stimulated [3H]NE release, with the rank order of potency being (+)-epibatidine > (-)-nicotine > 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP). Whereas (-)-nicotine and (+/-)-epibatidine exhibited equal maximal responses, DMPP was a partial agonist and (-)-cytisine had no agonist activity. Nicotine-stimulated release of [3H]NE was blocked by nicotinic receptor antagonists, with an order of potency of mecamylamine > lobeline > cytisine > methyllycaconitine > dihydro-beta-erythroidine. The pharmacological profile of this nicotinic receptor is largely consistent with that described previously for an alpha4beta2 subunit combination, although discrepancies in the efficacies of agonists were observed. No additivity in NMDA- and nicotine-stimulated [3H]NE release was observed, suggesting a common signal transduction mechanism. However, the pharmacological characteristics of MK-801 blockade of nicotine-induced responses were not consistent with those of an NMDA receptor. We therefore conclude that nicotine directly releases [3H]NE from LC cells and does not act indirectly via activation of glutamate release.

  4. COMPARISON OF WEEKLY EXPOSURES TO ANATOXIN-A AND NICOTINE ON THE MOTOR ACTIVITY OF RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anatoxin-a is a nicotinic cholinergic agonist that is produced by several genera of cyanobacteria, and has been implicated in several poisoning episodes of wildlife, livestock, domestic animals and people. Previous research on nicotine has obtained tolerance and sensitization ...

  5. Marrow stem cell differentiation for valvulogenesis via oscillatory flow and nicotine agonists: unusual suspects?

    PubMed

    Rath, Sasmita; Salinas, Manuel; Bhatacharjee, Smita; Ramaswamy, Sharan

    2015-01-01

    Fluid-induced oscillatory shear stress (OSS) and nicotine are known antagonists in cardiovascular disease. However, from a regenerative medicine standpoint, we hypothesized that these parameters may support the cell differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) for engineering heart valves. In this study, OSS and nicotine (10-6M) were applied individually to BMMSCs in monolayer culture. In both cases, a significantly higher expression of CD31 was detected compared to corresponding controls (p<0.05). We interpret our findings to indicate that both OSS and nicotine independently support mesenchymal to endothelial transformation; however, the underlying mechanism for this transformation in terms of the cell cytoskeletal structure was entirely different between the two stimulants. In the case of OSS, F-actin filaments exhibited a stretching response and formed a preferential alignment with each other. However, in the nicotine-treated group, a clear increase was observed in the number of actin filaments present, which led to the maximum expression of CD31 in comparison to the OSS and control groups. From our findings, we speculate that while nicotine may stimulate an increase in the differentiation of BMMSCs to endothelial cells, OSS may play a greater role in cellular distribution and the eventual creation of a tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV) endothelium.

  6. Nicotinic and muscarinic reduction of unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials in sensory cortex; dual intracellular recording in vitro.

    PubMed

    Levy, Robert B; Reyes, Alex D; Aoki, Chiye

    2006-04-01

    We studied the cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic transmission between neighboring layer 5 regular-spiking pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortical slices from young rats (P10-P26). Brief bath application of 5-10 microM carbachol, a nonspecific cholinergic agonist, decreased the amplitude of evoked unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). This effect was blocked by 1 microM atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Nicotine (10 microM), in contrast to carbachol, reduced EPSPs in nominally magnesium-free solution but not in the presence of 1 mM Mg+2, indicating the involvement of NMDA receptors. Likewise, when the postsynaptic cell was depolarized under voltage clamp to allow NMDA receptor activation in the presence of 1 mM Mg+2, synaptic currents were reduced by nicotine. Nicotinic EPSP reduction was prevented by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (50 microM) and by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (10 microM). Both carbachol and nicotine reduced short-term depression of EPSPs evoked by 10 Hz stimulation, indicating that EPSP reduction happens via reduction of presynaptic glutamate release. In the case of nicotine, several possible mechanisms for NMDAR-dependent EPSP reduction are discussed. As a result of NMDA receptor dependence, nicotinic EPSP reduction may serve to reduce the local spread of cortical excitation during heightened sensory activity.

  7. Alpha5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mediates nicotine-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiaoli; Jia, Yanfei; Zu, Shanshan; Li, Ruisheng; Jia, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Dongjie; Dang, Ningning; Wang, Yunshan

    2014-07-15

    By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. However, the mechanisms through which α5-nAChRs may influence lung carcinogenesis are far from clear. In the present study, we investigated the roles of α5-nAChR in the nicotine-induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α in 60 specimens of lung cancer and para-carcinoma tissue. The correlations between the expression levels of α5-nAChR and HIF-1α and other clinicopathological data were analyzed. In a cell line that highly expressed α5-nAChR, the loss of α5-nAChR function by siRNA was used to study whether α5-nAChR is involved in the nicotine-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF through the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Cell growth was detected using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). α5-nAChR (78.3%) and HIF-1α (88.3%) were both overexpressed in NSCLC, and their expression levels were found to be correlated with each other (P < 0.05). In the A549 cell line, α5-nAChR and HIF-1α were found to be expressed under normal conditions, and their expression levels were significantly increased in response to nicotine treatment. The silencing of α5-nAChR significantly inhibited the nicotine-induced cell proliferation compared with the control group and attenuated the nicotine-induced upregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF, and these effects required the cooperation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These results show that the α5-nAChR/HIF-1α/VEGF axis is involved in nicotine-induced tumor cell proliferation, which suggests that α5-nAChR may serve as a potential anticancer target in nicotine-associated lung cancer. - Highlights

  8. Nicotine-induced resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to treatment--possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Czyżykowski, Rafał; Połowinczak-Przybyłek, Joanna; Potemski, Piotr

    2016-03-04

    Cigarette smoking is the leading risk factor of lung cancer. Data from several clinical studies suggest that continuation of smoking during therapy of tobacco-related cancers is associated with lower response rates to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and even with decreased survival. Although nicotine--an addictive component of tobacco--is not a carcinogen, it may influence cancer development and progression or effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy. Several in vitro and in vivo trials have evaluated the influence of nicotine on lung cancer cells. The best known mechanisms by which nicotine impacts cancer biology involve suppression of apoptosis induced by certain drugs or radiation, promotion of proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and migration of cancer cells. This effect is mainly mediated by membranous nicotinic acetylcholine receptors whose stimulation leads to sustained activation of such intracellular pathways as PI3K/Akt/mTOR, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT, induction of NF-κB activity, enhanced transcription of mitogenic promoters, inhibition of the mitochondrial death pathway or stimulation of pro-angiogenic factors. We herein summarize the mechanisms underlying nicotine's influence on biology of lung cancer cells and the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy.

  9. Modes and Models of Forebrain Cholinergic Neuromodulation of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hasselmo, Michael E; Sarter, Martin

    2011-01-01

    As indicated by the profound cognitive impairments caused by cholinergic receptor antagonists, cholinergic neurotransmission has a vital role in cognitive function, specifically attention and memory encoding. Abnormally regulated cholinergic neurotransmission has been hypothesized to contribute to the cognitive symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders. Loss of cholinergic neurons enhances the severity of the symptoms of dementia. Cholinergic receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors have been investigated for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction. Evidence from experiments using new techniques for measuring rapid changes in cholinergic neurotransmission provides a novel perspective on the cholinergic regulation of cognitive processes. This evidence indicates that changes in cholinergic modulation on a timescale of seconds is triggered by sensory input cues and serves to facilitate cue detection and attentional performance. Furthermore, the evidence indicates cholinergic induction of evoked intrinsic, persistent spiking mechanisms for active maintenance of sensory input, and planned responses. Models have been developed to describe the neuronal mechanisms underlying the transient modulation of cortical target circuits by cholinergic activity. These models postulate specific locations and roles of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and that cholinergic neurotransmission is controlled in part by (cortical) target circuits. The available evidence and these models point to new principles governing the development of the next generation of cholinergic treatments for cognitive disorders. PMID:20668433

  10. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Avi; Strom, Bjorn Oddvar; Turner, Simon R.; Timperley, Christopher M.; Bird, Michael; Green, A. Christopher; Chad, John E.; Worek, Franz; Tattersall, John E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase), but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26274808

  11. Adolescent nicotine administration alters serotonin receptors and cell signaling mediated through adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Seidler, F J; Cousins, M M; Slikker, W; Slotkin, T A

    2002-10-04

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen that targets synaptic function during critical developmental stages and recent studies indicate that CNS vulnerability extends into adolescence, the age at which smoking typically commences. We administered nicotine to adolescent rats via continuous minipump infusions from PN30 to PN47.5, using 6 mg/kg/day, a dose rate that replicates the plasma nicotine levels found in smokers, and examined 5HT receptors and related cell signaling during nicotine administration (PN45) and in the post-treatment period (PN50, 60, 75). Adolescent nicotine decreased 5HT(2) receptor binding in brain regions containing 5HT projections (hippocampus and cerebral cortex), with selectivity for females in the cerebral cortex; regions containing 5HT cell bodies showed either an increase (midbrain in males) or no change (brainstem). In contrast, there were no significant changes in 5HT(1A) receptors; however, the ability of the receptors to signal through adenylyl cyclase (AC) showed a switch from stimulatory to inhibitory effects in females during the post-treatment period. There were also transient alterations in AC responses to beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation, as well as pronounced induction of the AC response to the non-receptor-mediated stimulant, forskolin. Our results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure alters the concentrations and functions of postsynaptic 5HT receptors in a manner commensurate with impaired 5HT synaptic function. The direction of change, emergence of defects after the cessation of nicotine administration, and sex-preference for effects in females, all support a relationship of impaired 5HT function to the higher incidence of depression seen in adolescent smokers.

  12. Role of nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine in mucous cell metaplasia, hyperplasia and airway mucus formation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Wilder, Julie A.; Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Langley, Raymond J.; Singh, Shashi P.; Saeed, Ali Imran; Jaramillo, Richard J.; Gott, Katherine M.; Peña-Philippides, Juan Carlos; Harrod, Kevin S.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Buch, Shilpa; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway mucus hypersecretion is a key pathophysiological feature in number of lung diseases. Cigarette smoke/nicotine and allergens are strong stimulators of airway mucus; however, the mechanism of mucus modulation is unclear. Objectives Characterize the pathway by which cigarette smoke/nicotine regulates airway mucus and identify agents that decrease airway mucus. Methods IL-13 and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are implicated in airway mucus. We examined the role of IL-13 and GABAARs in nicotine-induced mucus formation in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and A549 cells, and secondhand cigarette smoke and/or ovalbumin-induced mucus formation in vivo. Results Nicotine promotes mucus formation in NHBE cells; however, the nicotine-induced mucus formation is independent of IL-13 but sensitive to the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin (PIC). Airway epithelial cells express α7/α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and specific inhibition or knockdown of α7- but not α9/α10-nAChRs abrogates mucus formation in response to nicotine and IL-13. Moreover, addition of acetylcholine or inhibition of its degradation increases mucus in NHBE cells. Nicotinic but not muscarinic receptor antagonists block allergen or nicotine/cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus formation in NHBE cells and/or in mouse airways. Conclusions Nicotine-induced airway mucus formation is independent of IL-13 and α7-nAChRs are critical in airway mucous cell metaplasia/hyperplasia and mucus production in response to various pro-mucoid agents, including IL-13. In the absence of nicotine, acetylcholine may be the biological ligand for α7-nAChRs to trigger airway mucus formation. α7-nAChRs are downstream of IL-13 but upstream of GABAARα2 in the MUC5AC pathway. Acetylcholine and α-7-nAChRs may serve as therapeutic targets to control airway mucus. PMID:22578901

  13. Acetyl-CoA metabolism in amprolium-evoked thiamine pyrophosphate deficits in cholinergic SN56 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bizon-Zygmańska, D; Jankowska-Kulawy, A; Bielarczyk, H; Pawełczyk, T; Ronowska, A; Marszałł, M; Szutowicz, A

    2011-08-01

    Inhibition of pyruvate (PDHC) and ketoglutarate (KDHC) dehydrogenase complexes induced by thiamine pyrophosphate deficits is known cause of disturbances of cholinergic transmission in the brain, yielding clinical symptoms of cognitive, vegetative and motor deficits. However, particular alterations in distribution of key acetylcholine precursor, acetyl-CoA, in the cholinergic neuron compartment of thiamine pyrophosphate-deficient brain remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of our work was to find out how amprolium-induced thiamine pyrophosphate deficits (TD) affect distribution of acetyl-CoA in the compartment of pure cholinergic neuroblastoma SN56 cells originating from murine septum. Amprolium caused similar concentration-dependent decreases in thiamine pyrophosphate levels in nondifferentiated (NC) and differentiated (DC) cells cultured in low thiamine medium. In such conditions DC displayed significantly greater loss of viability than the NC ones, despite of lesser suppressions of PDHC activities and tetrazolium salt reduction rates in the former. On the other hand, intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA levels in DC were 73% lower than in NC, which explains their greater susceptibility to TD. Choline acetyltransferase activity and acetylcholine content in DC were two times higher than in NC. TD caused 50% decrease of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels that correlated with losses of acetylcholine pool in DC but not in NC. These data indicate that particular sensitivity of DC to TD may result from relative shortage of acetyl-CoA due to its higher utilization in acetylcholine synthesis.

  14. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cholinergic and dopaminergic amacrine cells in the rat retina and the effects of constant light rearing.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Hiroki; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates many aspects of neuronal development, including survival, axonal and dendritic growth and synapse formation. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the functional significance of BDNF in retinal development, the retinal cell types expressing BDNF remains poorly defined. The goal of the present study was to determine the localization of BDNF in the mammalian retina, with special focus on the subtypes of amacrine cells, and to characterize, at the cellular level, the effects of constant light exposure during early postnatal period on retinal expression of BDNF. Retinas from 3-week-old rats reared in a normal light cycle or constant light were subjected to double immunofluorescence staining using antibodies to BDNF and retinal cell markers. BDNF immunoreactivity was localized to ganglion cells, cholinergic amacrine cells and dopaminergic amacrine cells, but not to AII amacrine cells regardless of rearing conditions. Approximately 75% of BDNF-positive cells in the inner nuclear layer were cholinergic amacrine cells in animals reared in a normal lighting condition. While BDNF immunoreactivity in ganglion cells and cholinergic amacrine cells was significantly increased by constant light rearing, which in dopaminergic amacrine cells was apparently unaltered. The overall structure of the retina and the density of ganglion cells, cholinergic amacrine cells and AII amacrine cells were unaffected by rearing conditions, whereas the density of dopaminergic amacrine cells was significantly increased by constant light rearing. The present results indicate that cholinergic amacrine cells are the primary source of BDNF in the inner nuclear layer of the rat retina and provide the first evidence that cholinergic amacrine cells may be involved in the visual activity-dependent regulation of retinal development through the production of BDNF. The present data also suggest that the production or survival of dopaminergic amacrine

  15. [Properties of cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on type I vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Kong, Wei-Jia; Xia, Jiao; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Hua-Mao; Guo, Chang-Kai

    2008-06-25

    To confirm the existence of cholinergic receptors on type I vestibular hair cells (VHCs I) of guinea pigs and to study the properties of the cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on VHCs I, electrophysiological responses of isolated VHCs I to external ACh were examined by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. The results showed that 7.5% (21/279) VHCs I were found to be sensitive to ACh (10-1000 μmol/L). ACh generated an outward current in a steady, slow, dose-dependent [EC(50) was (63.78±2.31) μmol/L] and voltage-independent manner. In standard extracellular solution, ACh at the concentration of 100 μmol/L triggered a calcium-dependent current of (170±15) pA at holding potential of -50 mV, and the current amplitude could be depressed by extracellularly added calcium-dependent potassium channel antagonist TEA. The time interval for the next complete activation of ACh-sensitive current was no less than 1 min. The ion channels did not shut off even when they were exposed to ACh for an extended period of time (8 min). The results suggest that dose-dependent, calcium-dependent and voltage-independent cholinergic receptors were located on a few of the VHCs I investibular epithelium of guinea pigs. The cholinergic receptors did not show desensitization to ACh. This work reveals the existence of efferent neurotransmitter receptors on VHCs I and helps in understanding the function of vestibular efferent nervous system, and may provide some useful information on guiding the clinical rehabilitative treatment of vertigo.

  16. Inhibitory effects of psychotomimetic sigma ligands on nicotine-induced K+ flux from differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Sagi, N; Yamamoto, T; Goji, Y; Okuwa, M; Yoshii, M; Moroji, T

    1992-11-23

    In NGF-treated PC12 cells, nicotine-induced K+ release was measured with a K(+)-sensitive microelectrode. The K+ outflow via nicotinic ACh receptor cation channels was inhibited by various psychotomimetic sigma ligands in the sequence of PCP, dextromethorphan > DTG, MK 801, (+)SKF10047 > (+)3-PPP. The K+ release was not affected by the neuroleptic sigma ligand haloperidol nor by the calcium antagonist nifedipine. The results suggest that psychotomimetic sigma ligands inhibit nicotine-stimulated K+ flux by interacting with nicotinic, rather than via sigma 2 receptors.

  17. Nicotine stimulates adhesion molecular expression via calcium influx and mitogen-activated protein kinases in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Liming; Zhao, Yangxing; Yao, Chenjiang; Wang, Lianyun; Qiao, Zhongdong

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of nicotine on endothelium dysfunction and development of vascular diseases, we investigated the influence on adhesion molecular expression mediated by nicotine and the mechanism of this effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The result showed that nicotine could induce surface/soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and endothelial selectin (E-selectin) expression in a time-response decline manner and the peak appeared at 15 min. This action could be mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) and MAPK/p38 because their activation could be distinctly blocked by MAPK inhibitors, PD098059 or SB203580. Mecamylamine (non-selective nicotinic receptor inhibitor), alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha7 nicotinic receptor inhibitor) could block Ca2+ accumulation, and then, prevented the phosphorylation on ERK1/2 and p38. They also inhibited the surface/soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin production of HUVECs modulated by nicotine. Therefore, we concluded that: (i) nicotine obviously up-regulates VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression at 15 min in HUVECs, (ii) nicotine activates HUVECs triggered by the ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation with an involvement of intracellular calcium mobilization chiefly mediated by alpha7 nicotinic receptor, (iii) intracellular Ca2+ activates a sequential pathway from alpha7 nicotinic receptor to the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38. These elucidate that nicotine activates HUVECs through fast signal transduction pathway and arguments their capacity of adhesion molecular production. Further more nicotine may contribute its influence to the progression of vascular disease such as atherosclerotic lesion.

  18. Nicotine-induced plasticity in the retinocollicular pathway: Evidence for involvement of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R G J; Vasques, J F; Trindade, P; Serfaty, C A; Campello-Costa, P; Faria-Melibeu, A C

    2016-01-28

    During early postnatal development retinocollicular projections undergo activity-dependent synaptic refinement that results in the formation of precise topographical maps in the visual layers of the superior colliculus (SC). Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein involved in the regulation of several aspects of neural development, such as neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and plasticity. Stimulation of cholinergic system has been found to alter the expression and processing of APP in different cell lines. Herein, we investigated the effect of nicotine on the development of retinocollicular pathway and on APP metabolism in the SC of pigmented rats. Animals were submitted to intracranial Elvax implants loaded with nicotine or phosphate-buffered saline (vehicle) at postnatal day (PND) 7. The ipsilateral retinocollicular pathway of control and experimental groups was anterogradely labeled either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery (PND 14 or PND 28). Local nicotine exposure produces a transitory sprouting of uncrossed retinal axons outside their main terminal zones. Nicotine also increases APP content and its soluble neurotrophic fragment sAPPα. Furthermore, nicotine treatment upregulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 and β2 subunits. Taken together, these data indicate that nicotine disrupts the ordering and topographic mapping of axons in the retinocollicular pathway and facilitates APP processing through the nonamyloidogenic pathway, suggesting that sAPPα may act as a trophic agent that mediates nicotine-induced morphological plasticity.

  19. Prenatal nicotine exposure alters the responses to subsequent nicotine administration and withdrawal in adolescence: Serotonin receptors and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Tate, Charlotte A; Cousins, Mandy M; Seidler, Frederic J

    2006-11-01

    Offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy are themselves more likely to take up smoking in adolescence, effects that are associated with a high rate of depression and increased sensitivity to withdrawal symptoms. To evaluate the biological basis for this relationship, we assessed effects on serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) receptors and 5HT-mediated cellular responses in rats exposed to nicotine throughout prenatal development and then given nicotine in adolescence (postnatal days PN30-47.5), using regimens that reproduce plasma nicotine levels found in smokers. Evaluations were then made during the period of adolescent nicotine treatment and for up to one month after the end of treatment. Prenatal nicotine exposure, which elicits damage to 5HT projections in the cerebral cortex and striatum, produced sex-selective changes in the expression of 5HT(1A) and 5HT2 receptors, along with induction of adenylyl cyclase (AC), leading to sensitization of heterologous inputs operating through this signaling pathway. Superimposed on these effects, the AC response to 5HT was shifted toward inhibition. By itself, adolescent nicotine administration, which damages the same pathways, produced similar effects on receptors and the 5HT-mediated response, but a smaller overall induction of AC. Animals exposed to prenatal nicotine showed a reduced response to nicotine administered in adolescence, results in keeping with earlier findings of persistent desensitization. Our results indicate that prenatal nicotine exposure alters parameters of 5HT synaptic communication lasting into adolescence and changes the response to nicotine administration and withdrawal in adolescence, actions which may contribute to a subpopulation especially vulnerable to nicotine dependence.

  20. Nicotinic modulation of hippocampal cell signaling and associated effects on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    The hippocampus is a key brain structure involved in synaptic plasticity associated with long-term declarative memory formation. Importantly, nicotine and activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) can alter hippocampal plasticity and these changes may occur through modulation of hippocampal kinases and transcription factors. Hippocampal kinases such as cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1), and the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) that are activated either directly or indirectly by nicotine may modulate hippocampal plasticity and in parallel hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Evidence suggests that nicotine may alter hippocampus-dependent learning by changing the time and magnitude of activation of kinases and transcription factors normally involved in learning and by recruiting additional cell signaling molecules. Understanding how nicotine alters learning and memory will advance basic understanding of the neural substrates of learning and aid in understanding mental disorders that involve cognitive and learning deficits.

  1. Pharmacology of Nicotine: Addiction, Smoking-Induced Disease, and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Benowitz, Neal L.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine sustains tobacco addiction, a major cause of disability and premature death. Nicotine binds to nicotinic cholinergic receptors, facilitating neurotransmitter release and thereby mediating the complex actions of nicotine in tobacco users. Dopamine, glutamate, and gamma aminobutyric acid release are particularly important in the development of nicotine dependence, and corticotropin-releasing factor appears to contribute to nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine dependence is highly heritable. Genetic studies indicate roles for nicotinic receptor subtypes, as well as genes involved in neuroplasticity and learning, in development of dependence. Nicotine is primarily metabolized byCYP2A6, and variability in rate of metabolism contributes to vulnerability to tobacco dependence, response to smoking cessation treatment, and lung cancer risk. Tobacco addiction is much more common in persons with mental illness and substance abuse disorders, representing a high proportion of current smokers. Pharmacotherapeutic approaches to tobacco addiction include nicotine replacement, bupropion, and varenicline, the latter a selective nicotine receptor partial agonist. PMID:18834313

  2. Pharmacology of nicotine: addiction, smoking-induced disease, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Benowitz, Neal L

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine sustains tobacco addiction, a major cause of disability and premature death. Nicotine binds to nicotinic cholinergic receptors, facilitating neurotransmitter release and thereby mediating the complex actions of nicotine in tobacco users. Dopamine, glutamate, and gamma aminobutyric acid release are particularly important in the development of nicotine dependence, and corticotropin-releasing factor appears to contribute to nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine dependence is highly heritable. Genetic studies indicate roles for nicotinic receptor subtypes, as well as genes involved in neuroplasticity and learning, in development of dependence. Nicotine is primarily metabolized by CYP 2A6, and variability in rate of metabolism contributes to vulnerability to tobacco dependence, response to smoking cessation treatment, and lung cancer risk. Tobacco addiction is much more common in persons with mental illness and substance abuse disorders, representing a high proportion of current smokers. Pharmacotherapeutic approaches to tobacco addiction include nicotine replacement, bupropion, and varenicline, the latter a selective nicotine receptor partial agonist.

  3. Caffeine, but not nicotine, enhances visual feature binding.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Fagioli, Sabrina; Erasmus, Vicki; Hommel, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The distributed organization of the human visual cortex calls for a mechanism that integrates and binds the features of a perceived event, and neural synchronization is a prime candidate to serve that purpose. Animal studies suggest that synchronization in the visual cortex is enhanced by the muscarinic cholinergic system. Here we show that in healthy humans the binding of shape and colour, and of shape and location, of visual objects is increased by stimulating the muscarinic cholinergic system (caffeine consumption) but not by stimulating the nicotinic cholinergic system (nicotine consumption). Binding across perception and action is unaffected by either manipulation, suggesting a specific link between the visual system and the muscarinic cholinergic system.

  4. Intracerebellar behavioral interactions between nicotine, cotinine and ethanol in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, M.S.; Li, C. )

    1992-02-26

    Using ethanol-induced motor incoordination as the test response as evaluated by rotorod, possible behavioral interactions between ethanol and (-)-nicotine in the cerebellum, one of the key motor area, were investigated. (-)-Nicotine, 5, 1.25, 0.625 ng/100nL intracerebellarly significantly attenuated motor incoordination due to ethanol in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, (-)-cotinine, a major metabolite of nicotine, 5, 2.5, and 1.25 ng/100nL, significantly but less marked compared to (-)-nicotine attenuated ethanol-induced motor incoordination. The highest, 5 ng/100nL, dose of (-)-nicotine or (-)-cotinine followed by saline instead of ethanol did not alter normal motor coordination. The attenuation of ethanol-induced motor incoordination by (-)-nicotine and (-)- cotinine was blocked by intracerebellar hexamethonium 1 ug/100nL, a purported nicotinic cholinergic antagonist. The data obtained strongly suggest participation of cerebellar nicotinic cholinergic receptor in the ethanol-induced motor incoordination.

  5. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of C-11 labeled isotopomers and metabolites of GTS-21, a partial α7 nicotinic cholinergic agonist drug

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Won; Ding, Yu-Shin; Alexoff, David; Patel, Vinal; Logan, Jean; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Shea, Colleen; Muench, Lisa; Xu, Youwen; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Constanzo, Jasmine R.; Ciaccio, James A.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction GTS-21 ((3E)-3-[(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methylene]-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2,3′-bipyridine), a partial α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drug, has recently been shown to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. One of its two major demethylated metabolites, 4-OH-GTS-21, has been suggested to contribute to its therapeutic effects. Methods We labeled GTS-21 in two different positions with carbon-11 ([2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21) along with two corresponding demethylated metabolites ([2-methoxy-11C]4-OH-GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-11C]2-OH-GTS-21) for pharmacokinetic studies in baboons and mice with PET. Results Both [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 showed similar initial high rapid uptake in baboon brain, peaking from 1–3.5 min (0.027–0.038 %ID/cc) followed by rapid clearance (t1/2 <15 min), resulting in low brain retention by 30 min. However, after 30 min, [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 continued to clear while [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 plateaued, suggesting the entry of a labeled metabolite into the brain. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics of the two labeled metabolites confirmed expected higher brain uptake and retention of [4-methoxy-11C]2-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21) relative to [2-methoxy-11C]4-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21) which had negligible brain uptake. Ex vivo studies in mice showed that GTS-21 is the major chemical form in the mouse brain. Whole body dynamic PET imaging in baboon and mouse showed that the major route of excretion of C-11 is through the gallbladder. Conclusions The major findings are (1) extremely rapid uptake and clearance of [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 from the brain which may need to be considered in developing optimal dosing of GTS-21 for patients, and (2) significant brain uptake of 2-OH-GTS-21, suggesting that it might contribute to the therapeutic effects of GTS-21. This study illustrates the value of comparing

  6. Analgesic and Antineuropathic Drugs Acting Through Central Cholinergic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Alessandro; Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo Di; Ghelardini, Carla

    2011-01-01

    The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in analgesia and neuropathic pain relief is relatively unknown. This review describes how such drugs induce analgesia or alleviate neuropathic pain by acting on the central cholinergic system. Several pharmacological strategies are discussed which increase synthesis and release of acetylcholine (ACh) from cholinergic neurons. The effects of their acute and chronic administration are described. The pharmacological strategies which facilitate the physiological functions of the cholinergic system without altering the normal modulation of cholinergic signals are highlighted. It is proposed that full agonists of muscarinic or nicotinic receptors should be avoided. Their activation is too intense and un-physiological because neuronal signals are distorted when these receptors are constantly activated. Good results can be achieved by using agents that are able to a) increase ACh synthesis, b) partially inhibit cholinesterase activity c) selectively block the autoreceptor or heteroreceptor feedback mechanisms. Activation of M1 subtype muscarinic receptors induces analgesia. Chronic stimulation of nicotinic (N1) receptors has neuronal protective effects. Recent experimental results indicate a relationship between repeated cholinergic stimulation and neurotrophic activation of the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family. At least 9 patents covering novel chemicals for cholinergic system modulation and pain control are discussed. PMID:21585331

  7. The effects of erdosteine, N-acetylcysteine, and vitamin E on nicotine-induced apoptosis of hippocampal neural cells.

    PubMed

    Demiralay, Rezan; Gürsan, Nesrin; Erdem, Havva

    2008-08-01

    This study investigated the frequency of apoptosis in rat hippocampal neural cells after intraperitoneal nicotine injection, examining the roles of the inflammatory markers myeloperoxidase (MPO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in nicotine-induced brain damage and the protective effects of three known antioxidant agents, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), erdosteine, and vitamin E. Female Wistar rats were divided into seven groups, each composed of nine rats: 2 negative control groups, 2 positive control groups, one erdosteine-treated group (500 mg/kg), one NAC-treated group (500 mg/kg), and one vitamin E-treated group (500 mg/kg). Nicotine was intraperitoneally injected at a dosage of 0.6 mg/kg for 21 days. Following nicotine injection, the antioxidants were administered orally; treatment was continued until the rats were killed. Apoptosis level in hippocampal neural cells was determined by using TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick endlabeling) method. Staining of cytoplasmic TNF-alpha in hippocampal neural cells and hippocampus MPO activity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Nicotine administration had no effect on local TNF-alpha production, or hippocampal MPO activity. The treatments with erdosteine, NAC and vitamin E significantly reduced the rate of nicotine-induced hippocampal neural cell apoptosis. This findings suggest that erdosteine and NAC can be as effective as vitamin E in protecting against nicotine-induced hippocampal neural cell apoptosis.

  8. Cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor by skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Vianney, John-Mary; Spitsbergen, John M

    2011-05-16

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been identified as a potent survival factor for both central and peripheral neurons. GDNF has been shown to be a potent survival factor for motor neurons during programmed cell death and continuous treatment with GDNF maintains hyperinnervation of skeletal muscle in adulthood. However, little is known about factors regulating normal production of endogenous GDNF in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to examine the role that motor neurons play in regulating GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. A co-culture of skeletal muscle cells (C2C12) and cholinergic neurons, glioma×neuroblastoma hybrid cells (NG108-15) were used to create nerve-muscle interactions in vitro. Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on nerve-myotube co-cultures were blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX). GDNF protein content in cells and in culture medium was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and western blotting. GDNF localization was examined by immunocytochemistry. The nerve-muscle co-culture study indicated that the addition of motor neurons to skeletal muscle cells reduced the secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. The results also showed that blocking AChRs with α-BTX reversed the action of neural cells on GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. Although ELISA results showed no GDNF in differentiated NG108-15 cells grown alone, immunocytochemical analysis showed that GDNF was localized in NG108-15 cells co-cultured with C2C12 myotubes. These results suggest that motor neurons may be regulating their own supply of GDNF secreted by skeletal muscle and that activation of AChRs may be involved in this process.

  9. Elevation of cellular NAD levels by nicotinic acid and involvement of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Nobumasa; Yamada, Kazuo; Shibata, Tomoko; Osago, Harumi; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Tsuchiya, Mikako

    2007-08-24

    NAD plays critical roles in various biological processes through the function of SIRT1. Although classical studies in mammals showed that nicotinic acid (NA) is a better precursor than nicotinamide (Nam) in elevating tissue NAD levels, molecular details of NAD synthesis from NA remain largely unknown. We here identified NA phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT) in humans and provided direct evidence of tight link between NAPRT and the increase in cellular NAD levels. The enzyme was abundantly expressed in the small intestine, liver, and kidney in mice and mediated [(14)C]NAD synthesis from [(14)C]NA in human cells. In cells expressing endogenous NAPRT, the addition of NA but not Nam almost doubled cellular NAD contents and decreased cytotoxicity by H(2)O(2). Both effects were reversed by knockdown of NAPRT expression. These results indicate that NAPRT is essential for NA to increase cellular NAD levels and, thus, to prevent oxidative stress of the cells. Kinetic analyses revealed that NAPRT, but not Nam phosphoribosyltransferase (NamPRT, also known as pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor or visfatin), is insensitive to the physiological concentration of NAD. Together, we conclude that NA elevates cellular NAD levels through NAPRT function and, thus, protects the cells against stress, partly due to lack of feedback inhibition of NAPRT but not NamPRT by NAD. The ability of NA to increase cellular NAD contents may account for some of the clinically observed effects of the vitamin and further implies a novel application of the vitamin to treat diseases such as those associated with the depletion of cellular NAD pools.

  10. A cholinergic-sympathetic pathway primes immunity in hypertension and mediates brain-to-spleen communication

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, Daniela; Perrotta, Marialuisa; Pallante, Fabio; Fardella, Valentina; Iacobucci, Roberta; Fardella, Stefania; Carnevale, Lorenzo; Carnevale, Raimondo; De Lucia, Massimiliano; Cifelli, Giuseppe; Lembo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The crucial role of the immune system in hypertension is now widely recognized. We previously reported that hypertensive challenges couple the nervous drive with immune system activation, but the physiological and molecular mechanisms of this connection are unknown. Here, we show that hypertensive challenges activate splenic sympathetic nerve discharge to prime immune response. More specifically, a vagus-splenic nerve drive, mediated by nicotinic cholinergic receptors, links the brain and spleen. The sympathetic discharge induced by hypertensive stimuli was absent in both coeliac vagotomized mice and in mice lacking α7nAChR, a receptor typically expressed by peripheral ganglionic neurons. This cholinergic-sympathetic pathway is necessary for T cell activation and egression on hypertensive challenges. In addition, we show that selectively thermoablating the splenic nerve prevents T cell egression and protects against hypertension. This novel experimental procedure for selective splenic denervation suggests new clinical strategies for resistant hypertension. PMID:27676657

  11. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-06

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors.

  12. Cholinergic modulation of periaqueductal grey neurons: does it contribute to epileptogenesis after organophosphorus nerve agent intoxication?

    PubMed

    Sanada, Mitsuru; Zheng, Fang; Huth, Tobias; Alzheimer, Christian

    2007-04-20

    Previous work has shown that a single focal microinjection of the unselective cholinergic agonist, carbachol, into the periaqueductal grey (PAG) of the midbrain is sufficient to induce forebrain seizures in rats. In order to determine the cholinergic mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis at the cellular and network level of the PAG, we performed whole-cell recordings from rat PAG neurons in vitro and examined how the activation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors modulates cellular excitability and synaptic responses. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors produced either a pirenzepine-sensitive depolarization (40% of PAG neurons), or a gallamine-sensitive hyperpolarization (20%), suggesting the involvement of M1 and M2 receptors, respectively. In the remaining neurons (40%), no change was observed. Voltage-clamp recordings showed that muscarinic depolarization resulted from the inhibition of a resting K(+) current, in part accompanied by simultaneous activation of a presumed non-selective cation current. Muscarinic hyperpolarization was caused by the activation of a G protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K(+) current. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors enhanced the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), but strongly suppressed evoked IPSCs. In addition, nicotine almost doubled the frequency of miniature IPSCs. Based on our findings and the network properties of the PAG, we advance a scenario in which excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors would substantially contribute to generalized seizures after organophosphorus nerve agent poisoning.

  13. Nicotine: abused substance and therapeutic agent.

    PubMed Central

    Le Houezec, J

    1998-01-01

    Tobacco dependence is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Nicotine is the main alkaloid in tobacco and the addictive compound of tobacco. It can improve both mood and cognitive functioning; these positive effects are strong reinforcements for smokers and contribute to their addiction. Opposite results also have been reported, however, and the effects of nicotine remain controversial. Recent epidemiological and empirical studies have indicated that smoking or nicotine or both may have protective effects against certain diseases. These findings have suggested that nicotine may be used as a therapeutic agent. However, because a variety of nicotinic cholinergic receptors are present in the brain, new agonist compounds may prove to be more effective than nicotine for therapeutic purposes. Studies are reviewed and the suggestion made that nicotine may prove useful as a tool to help us understand normal and pathological brain functioning. PMID:9549250

  14. The frequency of early-activated hapten-specific B cell subsets predicts the efficacy of vaccines for nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Laudenbach, M; Tucker, AM; Runyon, SP; Carroll, FI; Pravetoni, M

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for nicotine addiction show pre-clinical efficacy. Yet, clinical evaluation of the first-generation nicotine vaccines did not meet expectations because only a subset of immunized subjects achieved effective serum antibody levels. Recent studies suggest that vaccine design affects B cell activation, and that the frequency of the hapten-specific B cell subsets contributes to vaccine efficacy against drugs of abuse. To extend this hypothesis to nicotine immunogens, we synthesized a novel hapten containing a carboxymethylureido group at the 2-position of the nicotine structure (2CMUNic) and compared its efficacy to the previously characterized 6CMUNic hapten. Haptens were conjugated to the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) carrier protein, and evaluated for efficacy against nicotine in mice using the clinically approved alum adjuvant. Using a novel fluorescent antigen-based magnetic enrichment strategy paired with multicolor flow cytometry analysis, polyclonal hapten-specific B cell subsets were measured in mice immunized with either 6CMUNic-KLH or 2CMUNic-KLH. The 6CMUNic-KLH showed significantly greater efficacy than 2CMUNic-KLH on nicotine distribution to serum and to the brain. The 6CMUNic-KLH elicited higher anti-nicotine serum antibody titers, and a greater frequency of hapten-specific B cells than 2CMUNic-KLH. Within the splenic polyclonal B cell population, a higher number of hapten-specific IgMhigh and germinal center B cells predicted greater vaccine efficacy against nicotine distribution. These early pre-clinical findings suggest that hapten structure affects activation of B cells, and that variations in the frequency of early-activated hapten-specific B cell subsets underlie individual differences in vaccine efficacy. PMID:26409811

  15. Nicotine facilitates long-term potentiation induction in oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells via Ca2+ entry through non-alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yousheng; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Nakauchi, Sakura; Ito, Ken-Ichi; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2010-02-01

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons have a central role in the control of network activity, and excitatory synapses that they receive express Hebbian and anti-Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP). Because many interneurons in the hippocampus express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), we explored whether exposure to nicotine promotes LTP induction in these interneurons. We focussed on a subset of interneurons in the stratum oriens/alveus that were continuously activated in the presence of nicotine due to the expression of non-desensitizing non-alpha7 nAChRs. We found that, in addition to alpha2 subunit mRNAs, these interneurons were consistently positive for somatostatin and neuropeptide Y mRNAs, and showed morphological characteristics of oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells. Activation of non-alpha7 nAChRs increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels at least in part via Ca(2+) entry through their channels. Presynaptic tetanic stimulation induced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-independent LTP in voltage-clamped interneurons at -70 mV when in the presence, but not absence, of nicotine. Intracellular application of a Ca(2+) chelator blocked LTP induction, suggesting the requirement of Ca(2+) signal for LTP induction. The induction of LTP was still observed in the presence of ryanodine, which inhibits Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) release from ryanodine-sensitive intracellular stores, and the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine. These results suggest that Ca(2+) entry through non-alpha7 nAChR channels is critical for LTP induction. Thus, nicotine affects hippocampal network activity by promoting LTP induction in oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells via continuous activation of non-alpha7 nAChRs.

  16. The effect of nicotine in vitro on the integrity of tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    McGilligan, V E; Wallace, J M W; Heavey, P M; Ridley, D L; Rowland, I R

    2007-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis is characterised by impairment of the epithelial barrier and tight junction alterations resulting in increased intestinal permeability. UC is less common in smokers with smoking reported to decrease paracellular permeability. The aim of this study was thus to determine the effect of nicotine, the major constituent in cigarettes and its metabolites on the integrity of tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The integrity of Caco-2 tight junctions was analysed by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and by tracing the flux of the fluorescent marker fluorescein, after treatment with various concentrations of nicotine or nicotine metabolites over 48 h. TER was significantly higher compared to the control for all concentrations of nicotine 0.01-10 microM at 48 h (p<0.001), and for 0.01 microM (p<0.001) and 0.1 microM and 10 microM nicotine (p < 0.01) at 12 and 24 h. The fluorescein flux results supported those of the TER assay. TER readings for all nicotine metabolites tested were also higher at 24 and 48 h only (p < or = 0.01). Western blot analysis demonstrated that nicotine up-regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-1 (p < or = 0.01). Overall, it appears that nicotine and its metabolites, at concentrations corresponding to those reported in the blood of smokers, can significantly improve tight junction integrity, and thus, decrease epithelial gut permeability. We have shown that in vitro, nicotine appears more potent than its metabolites in decreasing epithelial gut permeability. We speculate that this enhanced gut barrier may be the result of increased expression of claudin-1 and occludin proteins, which are associated with the formation of tight junctions. These findings may help explain the mechanism of action of nicotine treatment and indeed smoking in reducing epithelial gut permeability.

  17. Inhibitory effects of tramadol on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adrenal chromaffin cells and in Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha 7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Munehiro; Minami, Kouichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Shigematsu, Akio; Shibuya, Izumi

    2002-05-01

    1. Tramadol has been used clinically as an analgesic; however, the mechanism of its analgesic effects is still unknown. 2. We used bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to investigate effects of tramadol on catecholamine secretion, nicotine-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases and membrane current changes. We also investigated effects of tramadol on alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 3. Tramadol concentration-dependently suppressed carbachol-induced catecholamine secretion to 60% and 27% of the control at the concentration of 10 and 100 microM, respectively, whereas it had little effect on veratridine- or high K(+)-induced catecholamine secretion. 4. Tramadol also suppressed nicotine-induced ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in a concentration-dependent manner. Tramadol inhibited nicotine-induced inward currents, and the inhibition was unaffected by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. 5. Tramadol inhibited nicotinic currents carried by alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 6. Tramadol inhibited both alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic currents in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 7. In conclusion, tramadol inhibits catecholamine secretion partly by inhibiting nicotinic AChR functions in a naloxone-insensitive manner and alpha7 receptors are one of those inhibited by tramadol.

  18. Cholinergic Machinery as Relevant Target in Acute Lymphoblastic T Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Valencia-Cruz, Georgina; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar O; Liñan-Rico, Liliana; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Various types of non-neuronal cells, including tumors, are able to produce acetylcholine (ACh), which acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. T lymphocytes represent a key component of the non-neuronal cholinergic system. T cells-derived ACh is involved in a stimulation of their activation and proliferation, and acts as a regulator of immune response. The aim of the present work was to summarize the data about components of cholinergic machinery in T lymphocytes, with an emphasis on the comparison of healthy and leukemic T cells. Cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemias of T lineage (T-ALL) were found to produce a considerably higher amount of ACh than healthy T lymphocytes. Additionally, ACh produced by T-ALL is not efficiently hydrolyzed, because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is drastically decreased in these cells. Up-regulation of muscarinic ACh receptors was also demonstrated at expression and functional level, whereas nicotinic ACh receptors seem to play a less important role and not form functional channels in cells derived from T-ALL. We hypothesized that ACh over-produced in T-ALL may act as an autocrine growth factor and play an important role in leukemic clonal expansion through shaping of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. We suggest that cholinergic machinery may be attractive targets for new drugs against T-ALL. Specifically, testing of high affinity antagonists of muscarinic ACh receptors as well as antagomiRs, which interfere with miRNAs involved in the suppression of AChE expression, may be the first choice options.

  19. Cholinergic Machinery as Relevant Target in Acute Lymphoblastic T Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Valencia-Cruz, Georgina; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar O.; Liñan-Rico, Liliana; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Various types of non-neuronal cells, including tumors, are able to produce acetylcholine (ACh), which acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. T lymphocytes represent a key component of the non-neuronal cholinergic system. T cells-derived ACh is involved in a stimulation of their activation and proliferation, and acts as a regulator of immune response. The aim of the present work was to summarize the data about components of cholinergic machinery in T lymphocytes, with an emphasis on the comparison of healthy and leukemic T cells. Cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemias of T lineage (T-ALL) were found to produce a considerably higher amount of ACh than healthy T lymphocytes. Additionally, ACh produced by T-ALL is not efficiently hydrolyzed, because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is drastically decreased in these cells. Up-regulation of muscarinic ACh receptors was also demonstrated at expression and functional level, whereas nicotinic ACh receptors seem to play a less important role and not form functional channels in cells derived from T-ALL. We hypothesized that ACh over-produced in T-ALL may act as an autocrine growth factor and play an important role in leukemic clonal expansion through shaping of intracellular Ca2+ signals. We suggest that cholinergic machinery may be attractive targets for new drugs against T-ALL. Specifically, testing of high affinity antagonists of muscarinic ACh receptors as well as antagomiRs, which interfere with miRNAs involved in the suppression of AChE expression, may be the first choice options. PMID:27630569

  20. Otilonium: a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, L.; Villarroya, M.; Lara, B.; Olmos, V.; Gilabert, J. A.; López, M. G.; Martínez-Sierra, R.; Borges, R.; García, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Otilonium, a clinically useful spasmolytic, behaves as a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) as well as a mild wide-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 2. 45Ca2+ uptake into chromaffin cells stimulated with high K+ (70 mM, 1 min) was blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 7.6 microM. The drug inhibited the 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by the nicotinic AChR agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) with a 79 fold higher potency (IC50 = 0.096 microM). 3. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents (IBa) through Ca2+ channels of voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 6.4 microM, very close to that of K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake. Blockade developed in 10-20 s, almost as a single step and was rapidly and almost fully reversible. 4. Whole-cell nicotinic AChR-mediated currents (250 ms pulses of 100 microM DMPP) applied at 30 s intervals were blocked by otilonium in a concentration-dependent manner, showing an IC50 of 0.36 microM. Blockade was induced in a step-wise manner. Wash out of otilonium allowed a slow recovery of the current, also in discrete steps. 5. In experiments with recordings in the same cells of whole-cell IDMPP, Na+ currents (INa) and Ca2+ currents (ICa), 1 microM otilonium blocked 87% IDMPP, 7% INa and 13% ICa. 6. Otilonium inhibited the K(+)-evoked catecholamine secretory response of superfused bovine chromaffin cells with an IC50 of 10 microM, very close to the IC50 for blockade of K(+)-induced 45Ca2+ uptake and IBa. 7. Otilonium inhibited the secretory responses induced by 10 s pulses of 50 microM DMPP with an IC50 of 7.4 nM. Hexamethonium blocked the DMPP-evoked responses with an IC50 of 29.8 microM, 4,000 fold higher than that of otilonium. 8. In conclusion, otilonium is a potent blocker of nicotinic AChR-mediated responses. The drugs also blocked various subtypes of neuronal voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels at a considerably lower potency. Na+ channels were unaffected by

  1. Expression of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α4 and β2 Subunits on Direction-Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Ahn, Chang-Hyun; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2017-01-01

    The direction selectivity of the retina is a distinct mechanism that is critical function of eyes for survival. The direction-selective retinal ganglion cells (DS RGCs) strongly respond to a preferred direction, but rarely respond to opposite direction or null directional visual stimuli. The DS RGCs are sensitive to acetylcholine, which is secreted from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) to the DS RGCs. Here, we investigated the existence and distribution of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α4 and β2 subunits on the dendritic arbors of the DS RGCs in adult rabbit retina using immunocytochemistry. The DS RGCs were injected with Lucifer yellow to identify their dendritic morphology. The double-labeled images of dendrites and nAChR subunits were visualized for reconstruction using high-resolution confocal microscopy. Although our results revealed that the distributional pattern of the nAChR subunits on the dendritic arbors of the DS RGCs was not asymmetric in the adult rabbit retina, the distribution of nAChR α4 and β2 subunits and molecular profiles of cholinergic inputs to DS RGCs in adult rabbit retina provide anatomical evidence for direction selectivity. PMID:28386148

  2. Intracellular ion concentrations and cell volume during cholinergic stimulation of eccrine secretory coil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takemura, T.; Sato, F.; Saga, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, K. )

    1991-02-01

    Methacholine (MCh)-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of Na, K, and Cl (( Na)i, (K)i, and (Cl)i, respectively) and in cellular dry mass (a measure of cell shrinkage) were examined in isolated monkey eccrine sweat secretory coils by electron probe X-ray microanalysis using the peripheral standard method. To further confirm the occurrence of cell shrinkage during MCh stimulation, the change in cell volume of dissociated clear and dark cells were directly determined under a light microscope equipped with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. X-ray microanalysis revealed a biphasic increase in cellular dry mass in clear cells during continuous MCh stimulation; an initial increase of dry mass to 158% (of control) followed by a plateau at 140%, which correspond to the decrease in cell volume of 37 and 29%, respectively. The latter agrees with the MCh-induced cell shrinkage of 29% in dissociated clear cells. The MCh-induced increase in dry mass in myoepithelial cells was less than half that of clear cells. During the steady state of MCh stimulation, both (K+)i and (Cl)i of clear cells decreased by about 45%, whereas (Na)i increased in such a way to maintain the sum of (Na) i + (K)i constant. There was a small (12-15 mM) increase in (Na)i and a decrease in (K)i in myoepithelial cells during stimulation with MCh. Dissociated dark cells failed to significantly shrink during MCh stimulation. The decrease in (Cl)i in the face of constant (Na)i + (K)i suggests the accumulation of unknown anion(s) inside the clear cell during MCh stimulation.

  3. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signalling.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2016-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed cancer inhibiting effects of GABA will only succeed clinically if GABA inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in addition to the more differentiated cancer cells that comprise the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines. Using PCSCs isolated from two pancreatic cancer patients by cell sorting and by spheroid formation assay from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine induces the self-renewal of PCSCs. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5 and α7 were expressed and chronic exposure to nicotine increased the protein expression of these receptors. Immunoassays showed that PCSCs produced the stress neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Chronic nicotine significantly increased the production of stress neurotransmitters and sonic hedgehog (SHH) while inducing Gli1 protein and decreasing GABA. GABA treatment inhibited the induction of SHH and Gli1. Spheroid formation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays showed significant nicotine-induced increases in self renewal and cell proliferation, responses blocked by GABA. Our data suggest that nicotine increases the SHH-mediated malignant potential of PCSCs and that GABA prevents these effects.

  4. Basic and modern concepts on cholinergic receptor: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Prashant; Dwivedi, Shubhangi; Singh, Mukesh Pratap; Mishra, Rahul; Chandy, Anish

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic system is an important system and a branch of the autonomic nervous system which plays an important role in memory, digestion, control of heart beat, blood pressure, movement and many other functions. This article serves as both structural and functional sources of information regarding cholinergic receptors and provides a detailed understanding of the determinants governing specificity of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor to researchers. The study helps to give overall information about the fundamentals of the cholinergic system, its receptors and ongoing research in this field.

  5. Nicotine Lozenges

    MedlinePlus

    ... other nicotine smoking cessation aid, such as the nicotine patch, gum, inhaler, or nasal spray.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, ... non-nicotine smoking cessation aids, such as bupropion (Wellbutrin) or ...

  6. Nicotine-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses requires GABAergic interneurons in adult anti-NGF mice.

    PubMed

    Rosato-Siri, Marcelo; Cattaneo, Antonino; Cherubini, Enrico

    2006-10-15

    The hippocampus, a key structure for learning and memory processes, receives an important cholinergic innervation and is densely packed with a variety of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) localized on principal cells and interneurons. Activation of these receptors by nicotine or endogenously released acetylcholine enhances activity-dependent synaptic plasticity processes. Deficits in the cholinergic system produce impairment of cognitive functions that are particularly relevant during senescence and in age-related neurodegenerative pathologies. In particular, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a selective loss of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and nAChRs in particular regions controlling memory processes such as the cortex and the hippocampus. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were recorded in order to examine whether nicotine was able to regulate induction of long-term potentiation at CA3-CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices from adult anti-NGF transgenic mice (AD 11), a comprehensive animal model of AD, in which cholinergic deficits due to nerve growth factor depletion are accompanied by progressive Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. Both AD 11 and wild-type (WT) mice exhibited short- and long-lasting synaptic plasticity processes that were boosted by nicotine. The effects of nicotine on WT and AD 11 mice were mediated by both alpha7- and beta2-containing nAChRs. In the presence of GABA(A) receptor antagonists, nicotine failed to boost synaptic plasticity in AD 11 but not in WT mice, indicating that in anti-NGF transgenic mice GABAergic interneurons are able to compensate for the deficit in cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic transmission. This compensation may occur at different levels and may involve the reorganization of the GABAergic circuit. However, patch-clamp whole-cell recordings from principal cells failed to reveal any change in spontaneous release of GABA following pressure application of nicotine to nearby

  7. Central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit alleviates experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Rabbi, M F; Labis, B; Pavlov, V A; Tracey, K J; Ghia, J E

    2014-03-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism that regulates immune responses and cytokine production through α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) signaling. Decreased efferent vagus nerve activity is observed in inflammatory bowel disease. We determined whether central activation of this pathway alters inflammation in mice with colitis and the mediating role of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit and α7nAChR signaling. Two experimental models of colitis were used in C57BL/6 mice. Central cholinergic activation induced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine or a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatments resulted in reduced mucosal inflammation associated with decreased major histocompatibility complex II level and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by splenic CD11c⁺ cells mediated by α7nAChR signaling. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory efficacy was abolished in mice with vagotomy, splenic neurectomy, or splenectomy. In conclusion, central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit controls intestinal inflammation and this regulation can be explored to develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. Slow Cholinergic Modulation of Spike Probability in Ultra-Fast Time-Coding Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, David; Kurth, Stefanie; Rübsamen, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sensory processing in the lower auditory pathway is generally considered to be rigid and thus less subject to modulation than central processing. However, in addition to the powerful bottom-up excitation by auditory nerve fibers, the ventral cochlear nucleus also receives efferent cholinergic innervation from both auditory and nonauditory top–down sources. We thus tested the influence of cholinergic modulation on highly precise time-coding neurons in the cochlear nucleus of the Mongolian gerbil. By combining electrophysiological recordings with pharmacological application in vitro and in vivo, we found 55–72% of spherical bushy cells (SBCs) to be depolarized by carbachol on two time scales, ranging from hundreds of milliseconds to minutes. These effects were mediated by nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively. Pharmacological block of muscarinic receptors hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, suggesting a novel mechanism of setting the resting membrane potential for SBC. The cholinergic depolarization led to an increase of spike probability in SBCs without compromising the temporal precision of the SBC output in vitro. In vivo, iontophoretic application of carbachol resulted in an increase in spontaneous SBC activity. The inclusion of cholinergic modulation in an SBC model predicted an expansion of the dynamic range of sound responses and increased temporal acuity. Our results thus suggest of a top–down modulatory system mediated by acetylcholine which influences temporally precise information processing in the lower auditory pathway. PMID:27699207

  9. Chronic nicotine blunts hypoxic sensitivity in perinatal rat adrenal chromaffin cells via upregulation of KATP channels: role of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Josef; Brown, Stephen; Holloway, Alison C; Nurse, Colin A

    2009-06-03

    Fetal nicotine exposure blunts hypoxia-induced catecholamine secretion from neonatal adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs), providing a link between maternal smoking, abnormal arousal responses, and risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Here, we show that the mechanism is attributable to upregulation of K(ATP) channels via stimulation of alpha7 nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs). These K(ATP) channels open during hypoxia, thereby suppressing membrane excitability. After in utero exposure to chronic nicotine, neonatal AMCs show a blunted hypoxic sensitivity as determined by inhibition of outward K(+) current, membrane depolarization, rise in cytosolic Ca(2+), and catecholamine secretion. However, hypoxic sensitivity could be unmasked in nicotine-exposed AMCs when glibenclamide, a blocker of K(ATP) channels, was present. Both K(ATP) current density and K(ATP) channel subunit (Kir 6.2) expression were significantly enhanced in nicotine-exposed cells relative to controls. The entire sequence could be reproduced in culture by exposing neonatal rat AMCs or immortalized fetal chromaffin (MAH) cells to nicotine for approximately 1 week, and was prevented by coincubation with selective blockers of alpha7 nicotinic AChRs. Additionally, coincubation with inhibitors of protein kinase C and CaM kinase, but not protein kinase A, prevented the effects of chronic nicotine in vitro. Interestingly, chronic nicotine failed to blunt hypoxia-evoked responses in MAH cells bearing short hairpin knockdown (>90%) of the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha), suggesting involvement of the HIF pathway. The therapeutic potential of K(ATP) channel blockers was validated in experiments in which hypoxia-induced neonatal mortality in nicotine-exposed pups was significantly reduced after pretreatment with glibenclamide.

  10. Beyond Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Novel Cholinergic Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamkwalala, Asante R; Newhouse, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The major components of the cholinergic receptor system of the human brain include projections from the basal forebrain nuclei, and utilize the two types of receptors that they synapse on, nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. With the widespread cortical and subcortical projections of the basal forebrain, activity of these two receptor systems provide modulation of neurotransmitter activity underlying normal cognitive processes, such as attention, episodic memory, and working memory. Alzheimer's disease (AD) targets and damages cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain, and as these projections are lost, cognitive performance progressively declines. Currently, the most widely prescribed treatment for AD is acetylcholinesterase inhibitor medications, which work by partially blocking the degradation of acetylcholine in the synapse and enabling more of the neurotransmitter to reach and activate cholinergic receptors. However since these medications have limited effectiveness, alternate treatments that focus on augmenting the activity of the receptors themselves, independent of acetylcholinesterase inhibition, are being explored. This review will discuss: 1) the role of the cholinergic system in modulating cognition, 2) novel cholinergic treatment strategies for AD-related cognitive decline, in particular treatments intended to increase cholinergic system activity by selectively targeting muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors to improve cognitive performance, 3) risks, and additional considerations for cholinergic cognitive treatments for AD.

  11. A cholinergic basal forebrain feeding circuit modulates appetite suppression.

    PubMed

    Herman, Alexander M; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Kochukov, Mikhail; Herman, Isabella; Quast, Kathleen B; Patel, Jay M; Tepe, Burak; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Ung, Kevin; Selever, Jennifer; Tong, Qingchun; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2016-10-13

    Atypical food intake is a primary cause of obesity and other eating and metabolic disorders. Insight into the neural control of feeding has previously focused mainly on signalling mechanisms associated with the hypothalamus, the major centre in the brain that regulates body weight homeostasis. However, roles of non-canonical central nervous system signalling mechanisms in regulating feeding behaviour have been largely uncharacterized. Acetylcholine has long been proposed to influence feeding owing in part to the functional similarity between acetylcholine and nicotine, a known appetite suppressant. Nicotine is an exogenous agonist for acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that endogenous cholinergic signalling may play a part in normal physiological regulation of feeding. However, it remains unclear how cholinergic neurons in the brain regulate food intake. Here we report that cholinergic neurons of the mouse basal forebrain potently influence food intake and body weight. Impairment of cholinergic signalling increases food intake and results in severe obesity, whereas enhanced cholinergic signalling decreases food consumption. We found that cholinergic circuits modulate appetite suppression on downstream targets in the hypothalamus. Together our data reveal the cholinergic basal forebrain as a major modulatory centre underlying feeding behaviour.

  12. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. Increase in cholinergic modulation with pyridostigmine induces anti-inflammatory cell recruitment soon after acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juraci Aparecida; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; França, Cristiane Miranda; Coelho, Otávio; Alves, Gisele; Lacchini, Silvia; Kallás, Esper Georges; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M

    2016-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that an increase in the anti-inflammatory cholinergic pathway, when induced by pyridostigmine (PY), may modulate subtypes of lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, FOXP3+) and macrophages (M1/M2) soon after myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Wistar rats, randomly allocated to receive PY (40 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in drinking water or to stay without treatment, were followed for 4 days and then were subjected to ligation of the left coronary artery. The groups-denominated as the pyridostigmine-treated infarcted (IP) and infarcted control (I) groups-were submitted to euthanasia 3 days after MI; the heart was removed for immunohistochemistry, and the peripheral blood and spleen were collected for flow cytometry analysis. Noninfarcted and untreated rats were used as controls (C Group). Echocardiographic measurements were registered on the second day after MI, and heart rate variability was measured on the third day after MI. The infarcted groups had similar MI areas, degrees of systolic dysfunction, blood pressures, and heart rates. Compared with the I Group, the IP Group showed a significant higher parasympathetic modulation and a lower sympathetic modulation, which were associated with a small, but significant, increase in diastolic function. The IP Group showed a significant increase in M2 macrophages and FOXP3(+)cells in the infarcted and peri-infarcted areas, a significantly higher frequency of circulating Treg cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)), and a less extreme decrease in conventional T cells (CD25(+)FOXP3(-)) compared with the I Group. Therefore, increasing cholinergic modulation with PY induces greater anti-inflammatory cell recruitment soon after MY in rats.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Kirchgessner, Annette

    2011-08-02

    Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for a number of diseases including lung cancer and respiratory infections. Paradoxically, it also contains nicotine, an anti-inflammatory alkaloid. There is increasing evidence that smokers have a lower incidence of some inflammatory diseases, including ulcerative colitis, and the protective effect involves the activation of a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that requires the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) on immune cells. Obesity is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, which contributes to insulin resistance. Nicotine significantly improves glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in genetically obese and diet-induced obese mice, which is associated with suppressed adipose tissue inflammation. Inflammation that results in disruption of the epithelial barrier is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease, and nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis. This article summarizes current evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Selective agonists for the α7nAChR could represent a promising pharmacological strategy for the treatment of inflammation in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, we should keep in mind that the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine could be mediated via the expression of several nAChRs on a particular target cell.

  15. Nicotine inhibits collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity, but stimulates DNA synthesis in osteoblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramp, W.K.; Lenz, L.G.; Galvin, R.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Use of smokeless tobacco is associated with various oral lesions including periodontal damage and alveolar bone loss. This study was performed to test the effects of nicotine on bone-forming cells at concentrations that occur in the saliva of smokeless tobacco users. Confluent cultures of osteoblast-like cells isolated from chick embryo calvariae were incubated for 2 days with nicotine added to the culture medium (25-600 micrograms/ml). Nicotine inhibited alkaline phosphatase in the cell layer and released to the medium, whereas glycolysis (as indexed by lactate production) was unaffected or slightly elevated. The effects on medium and cell layer alkaline phosphatase were concentration dependent with maximal inhibition occurring at 600 micrograms nicotine/ml. Nicotine essentially did not affect the noncollagenous protein content of the cell layer, but did inhibit collagen synthesis (hydroxylation of ({sup 3}H)proline and collagenase-digestible protein) at 100, 300, and 600 micrograms/ml. Release of ({sup 3}H)hydroxyproline to the medium was also decreased in a dose-dependent manner, as was the collagenase-digestible protein for both the medium and cell layer. In contrast, DNA synthesis (incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine) was more than doubled by the alkaloid, whereas total DNA content was slightly inhibited at 600 micrograms/ml, suggesting stimulated cell turnover. Morphologic changes occurred in nicotine-treated cells including rounding up, detachment, and the occurrence of numerous large vacuoles. These results suggest that steps to reduce the salivary concentration of nicotine in smokeless tobacco users might diminish damaging effects of this product on alveolar bone.

  16. Nicotine induces cell proliferation in association with cyclin D1 up-regulation and inhibits cell differentiation in association with p53 regulation in a murine pre-osteoblastic cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tsuyoshi Abe, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Koshikiya, Noboru; Nojima, Junya; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Akio; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2008-12-05

    Recent studies have suggested that nicotine critically affects bone metabolism. Many studies have examined the effects of nicotine on proliferation and differentiation, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We examined cell cycle regulators involved in the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Nicotine induced cell proliferation in association with p53 down-regulation and cyclin D1 up-regulation. In differentiated cells, nicotine reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, p53 expression was sustained in nicotine-treated cells during differentiation. These findings indicate that nicotine promotes the cell cycle and inhibits differentiation in association with p53 regulation in pre-osteoblastic cells.

  17. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-mediated calcium signalling in effector T cells regulates autoimmunity of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Kawakami, Naoto; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Lodygin, Dimtri; Lühder, Fred; Breunig, Esther; Schild, Detlev; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Dornmair, Klaus; Dammermann, Werner; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate represents a newly identified second messenger in T cells involved in antigen receptor-mediated calcium signalling. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown due to the lack of biocompatible inhibitors. Using a recently developed inhibitor, we explored the role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in autoreactive effector T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that calcium signalling controlled by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate is relevant for the pathogenic potential of autoimmune effector T cells. Live two photon imaging and molecular analyses revealed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate signalling regulates T cell motility and re-activation upon arrival in the nervous tissues. Treatment with the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor significantly reduced both the number of stable arrests of effector T cells and their invasive capacity. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17 were strongly diminished. Consecutively, the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis were ameliorated. In vitro, antigen-triggered T cell proliferation and cytokine production were evenly suppressed. These inhibitory effects were reversible: after wash-out of the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate antagonist, the effector T cells fully regained their functions. The nicotinic acid derivative BZ194 induced this transient state of non-responsiveness specifically in post-activated effector T cells. Naïve and long-lived memory T cells, which express lower levels of the putative nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptor, type 1 ryanodine receptor, were not targeted. T cell priming and recall responses in vivo were not reduced. These data indicate that the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate

  18. Nicotinic and muscarinic agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors stimulate a common pathway to enhance GluN2B-NMDAR responses

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Miledi, Ricardo; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) can enhance cognitive function. However, it is unknown whether a common signaling pathway is involved in the effect. Here, we show that in vivo administration of nicotine, AChEIs, and an m1 muscarinic (m1) agonist increase glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl D-aspartate 2B (GluN2B)-containing NMDA receptor (NR2B-NMDAR) responses, a necessary component in memory formation, in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, and that coadministration of the m1 antagonist pirenzepine prevents the effect of cholinergic drugs. These observations suggest that the effect of nicotine is secondary to increased release of ACh via the activation of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) and involves m1 receptor activation through ACh. In vitro activation of m1 receptors causes the selective enhancement of NR2B-NMDAR responses in CA1 pyramidal cells, and in vivo exposure to cholinergic drugs occludes the in vitro effect. Furthermore, in vivo exposure to cholinergic drugs suppresses the potentiating effect of Src on NMDAR responses in vitro. These results suggest that exposure to cholinergic drugs maximally stimulates the m1/guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit alpha q/PKC/proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2/Src signaling pathway for the potentiation of NMDAR responses in vivo, occluding the in vitro effects of m1 activation and Src. Thus, our results indicate not only that nAChRs, ACh, and m1 receptors are on the same pathway involving Src signaling but also that NR2B-NMDARs are a point of convergence of cholinergic and glutamatergic pathways involved in learning and memory. PMID:25114227

  19. Improvement of cognitive deficits and decreased cholinergic neuronal cell loss and apoptotic cell death following neurotrophin infusion after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sinson, G; Perri, B R; Trojanowski, J Q; Flamm, E S; McIntosh, T K

    1997-03-01

    This study explores the effects of infusion of nerve growth factor (NGF) on behavioral outcome and cell death in the septal region using the clinically relevant model of fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat. Animals were subjected to fluid-percussion brain injury and 24 hours later a miniosmotic pump was implanted to infuse NGF (12 animals) or vehicle (12 animals) directly into the region of maximum injury for 2 weeks. Four weeks postinjury the animals were tested for cognitive function using a Morris Water Maze paradigm. Neurological motor function was evaluated over a 4-week postinjury period. The rats receiving NGF infusions had significantly higher memory scores than vehicle-treated animals. Examination of the cholinergic neurons in the medial septal region using choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry demonstrated significant cell loss after injury. Infusion of NGF significantly attenuated loss of these cholinergic neurons. A second group of animals was subjected to fluid-percussion brain injury alone (23 rats) or injury followed by NGF infusion (18 rats). These animals were killed between 24 hours and 2 weeks postinjury and the septal region was examined for the presence of apoptotic cells using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated-deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick-end labeling technique. Apoptotic cells were identified as early as 24 hours postinjury; their numbers peaked at 4 and 7 days, and then declined by 14 days. The NGF-treated animals had some apoptotic cells; however, even at 7 days there were significantly fewer of these cells. No significant motor differences were observed between the NGF- and vehicle-treated groups. These data indicate that NGF administration beginning 24 hours after fluid-percussion brain injury has a beneficial effect on cognition and results in sparing of cholinergic septal neurons. These improvements persist after cessation of NGF administration. The beneficial effects of NGF may be related to

  20. Increased pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis following fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine is mediated via the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bruin, Jennifer E; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Morrison, Katherine M; Holloway, Alison C

    2008-06-01

    In Canada, nicotine replacement therapy is recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, we have shown in an animal model that fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure causes increased beta-cell apoptosis and loss of beta-cell mass, which leads to the development of postnatal dysglycemia and obesity. The goal of this study was to determine whether the observed beta-cell apoptosis is mediated via the mitochondrial and/or death receptor pathway. Female Wistar rats were given saline (control) or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/day) via sc injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning (postnatal day 21). At weaning, pancreas tissue was collected for Western blotting, electron microscopy (EM), and immunohistochemistry. Key markers of each apoptotic pathway were examined in whole pancreas homogenates and mitochondrial/cytosolic pancreas fractions. In the death receptor pathway, Fas and soluble Fas ligand (FasL) protein were significantly increased in the nicotine-exposed offspring compared to control animals; there was no difference in the ratio of inactive/active caspase-8 or membrane-bound FasL expression. In the mitochondrial pathway, there was a significant increase in the ratio of Bcl2/Bax, Bax translocation to the mitochondria, cytochrome c release to the cytosol, and the ratio of active/inactive caspase-3 in nicotine-exposed offspring relative to control animals. Furthermore, increased mitochondrial swelling was observed by EM in the pancreatic beta cells of nicotine-exposed offspring. Taken together, these data suggest that beta-cell apoptosis following developmental nicotine exposure is mediated via the mitochondria.

  1. Methamphetamine, amphetamine, MDMA ('ecstasy'), MDA and mCPP modulate electrical and cholinergic input in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Hondebrink, Laura; Meulenbelt, Jan; Rietjens, Saskia J; Meijer, Marieke; Westerink, Remco H S

    2012-03-01

    Reversal of the dopamine (DA) membrane transporter is the main mechanism through which many drugs of abuse increase DA levels. However, drug-induced modulation of exocytotic DA release by electrical (depolarization) and neurochemical inputs (e.g., acetylcholine (ACh)) may also contribute. We therefore investigated effects of methamphetamine, amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) (1-1000 μM) on these inputs by measuring drug-induced changes in basal, depolarization- and ACh-evoked intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) using a dopaminergic model (PC12 cells) and Fura 2 calcium imaging. The strongest drug-induced effects were observed on cholinergic input. At 0.1mM all drugs inhibited the ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases by 40-75%, whereas ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases were nearly abolished following higher drug exposure (1mM, 80-97% inhibition). Additionally, high MDMA and mCPP concentrations increased basal [Ca(2+)](i), but only following prior stimulation with ACh. Interestingly, low concentrations of methamphetamine or amphetamine (10 μM) potentiated ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases. Depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases were also inhibited following exposure to high drug concentrations, although drugs were less potent on this endpoint. Our data demonstrate that at high drug concentrations all tested drugs reduce stimulation-evoked increases in [Ca(2+)](i), thereby probably reducing dopaminergic output through inhibition of electrical and cholinergic input. Furthermore, the increases in basal [Ca(2+)](i) at high concentrations of MDMA and mCPP likely increases dopaminergic output. Similarly, the increases in ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) upon cholinergic stimulation following exposure to low concentrations of amphetamines can contribute to drug-induced increases in DA levels observed in vivo. Finally, this study shows that mCPP, which is regularly found in

  2. Pharmacology of nicotine: addiction and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Benowitz, N L

    1996-01-01

    Nicotine maintains tobacco addiction and has therapeutic utility to aid smoking cessation and possibly to treat other medical diseases. Nicotine acts on nicotinic cholinergic receptors, which demonstrate diversity in subunit structure, function, and distribution within the nervous system, presumably mediating the complex actions of nicotine described in tobacco users. The effects of nicotine in people are influenced by the rate and route of dosing and by the development of tolerance. The metabolism of nicotine is now well characterized in humans. A few individuals with deficient C-oxidation of nicotine, unusually slow metabolism of nicotine, and little generation of cotinine have been described. Nicotine affects most organ systems in the body, although its contribution to smoking-related disease is still unclear. Nicotine as a medication is currently available as a gum, a transdermal delivery device, and a nasal spray, all of which are used for smoking cessation. Nicotine is also being investigated for therapy of ulcerative colitis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Tourette's syndrome, sleep apnea, and attention deficit disorder.

  3. Effects of nicotine on zebrafish: A comparative response between a newly established gill cell line and whole gills.

    PubMed

    Nathiga Nambi, K S; Abdul Majeed, S; Taju, G; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Sarath Babu, V; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2017-05-01

    A novel cell line, Danio rerio gill (DrG), derived from the gill tissue of zebrafish, was established and characterized. The cells were able to grow at a wide range of temperatures from 25°C to 32°C in Leibovitz's L-15 medium. The DrG cell line consists of epithelial-like cells with a diameter of 18-22μm. The cell line was characterized by mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. Acute toxicity tests were conducted on D. rerio by exposing them to nicotine for 96h under static conditions. In vitro cytotoxicity of nicotine was assessed in DrG cell line using multiple endpoints such as 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), Neutral Red assay, Alamar Blue assay and Coomassie Blue protein assay. Linear correlations between each in vitro cytotoxicity assay and the in vivo mortality data were highly significant. Nicotine induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation in DrG cell line in a concentration dependent manner. DrG cell line and zebrafish exposed to nicotine significantly increased the elevation of lipid peroxidation (LPO) while depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidise(GPx1a) was observed. In nicotine treated fish and cells a negative correlation between reduced glutathione and LPO was observed. In addition, the production of ROS and the resulting oxidative stress resulted in increased expression of apoptosis related genes p53 and cas3.Collectively, our result suggests that nicotine has the potential to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, oxidative stress and apoptosis in DrG cell line and zebrafish.

  4. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  5. Nicotinate-Curcumin Impedes Foam Cell Formation from THP-1 Cells through Restoring Autophagy Flux

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hong-Feng; Li, Hai-Zhe; Tang, Ya-Ling; Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that a novel curcumin derivate nicotinate-curcumin (NC) has beneficial effects on the prevention of atherosclerosis, but the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Given that autophagy regulates lipid metabolism, the present study was designed to investigate whether NC decreases foam cell formation through restoring autophagy flux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 cells. Our results showed that ox-LDL (100 μg/ml) was accumulated in THP-1 cells and impaired autophagy flux. Ox-LDL-induced impairment of autophagy was enhanced by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) and rescued by the autophagy inducer rapamycin. The aggregation of ox-LDL was increased by CQ, but decreased by rapamycin. In addition, colocalization of lipid droplets with LC3-II was remarkably reduced in ox-LDL group. In contrast, NC (10 μM) rescued the impaired autophagy flux by significantly increasing level of LC3-II, the number of autophagolysosomes, and the degradation of p62 in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 cells. Inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling was required for NC-rescued autophagy flux. Notably, our results showed that NC remarkably promoted the colocalization of lipid droplets with autophagolysosomes, increased efflux of cholesterol, and reduced ox-LDL accumulation in THP-1 cells. However, treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or CQ reduced the protective effects of NC on lipid accumulation. Collectively, the findings suggest that NC decreases lipid accumulation in THP-1 cells through restoring autophagy flux, and further implicate that NC may be a potential therapeutic reagent to reverse atherosclerosis. PMID:27128486

  6. Nicotine and the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Menglu; Cross, Sarah J; Loughlin, Sandra E; Leslie, Frances M

    2015-08-15

    Adolescence encompasses a sensitive developmental period of enhanced clinical vulnerability to nicotine, tobacco, and e-cigarettes. While there are sociocultural influences, data at preclinical and clinical levels indicate that this adolescent sensitivity has strong neurobiological underpinnings. Although definitions of adolescence vary, the hallmark of this period is a profound reorganization of brain regions necessary for mature cognitive and executive function, working memory, reward processing, emotional regulation, and motivated behavior. Regulating critical facets of brain maturation are nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). However, perturbations of cholinergic systems during this time with nicotine, via tobacco or e-cigarettes, have unique consequences on adolescent development. In this review, we highlight recent clinical and preclinical data examining the adolescent brain's distinct neurobiology and unique sensitivity to nicotine. First, we discuss what defines adolescence before reviewing normative structural and neurochemical alterations that persist until early adulthood, with an emphasis on dopaminergic systems. We review how acute exposure to nicotine impacts brain development and how drug responses differ from those seen in adults. Finally, we discuss the persistent alterations in neuronal signaling and cognitive function that result from chronic nicotine exposure, while highlighting a low dose, semi-chronic exposure paradigm that may better model adolescent tobacco use. We argue that nicotine exposure, increasingly occurring as a result of e-cigarette use, may induce epigenetic changes that sensitize the brain to other drugs and prime it for future substance abuse.

  7. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sean Austin O.; Kang, Un Jung; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh). Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI), which comprises only about 1–2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction. PMID:25374536

  8. Nitric oxide enhances increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) and promotes nicotine-triggered MAPK pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Aya; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Nyunoya, Mayumi; Nozaki, Naohito; Ihara, Hideshi; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) in nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Treatment with nicotine stimulated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the PC12 cells expressing nNOS (NPC12 cells) as compared with that in control PC12 cells. An inhibitor of L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel suppressed the nicotine-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. The inhibition of CaMK-kinase, the upstream activator of CaMKI and CaMKIV, did not inhibit the enhanced their phosphorylation. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated by inhibitors of p38 MAPK, PKC, and MAPK-kinase 1/2, indicating the involvement of these protein kinases upstream of ERK1/2. Furthermore, we found that nNOS expression enhances the nicotine-induced increase in the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+), using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent probe Fura2. These data suggest that NO promotes nicotine-triggered Ca(2+) transient in PC12 cells to activate possibly CaMKII, leading to sequential phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2.

  9. Nicotine-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition via Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Weifeng; Zou, Yimin; Zhao, Zhuxiang; Li, Bing; Ran, Pixin

    2013-02-15

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been proposed to be a mechanism in airway remodeling, which is a characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studies have shown that cigarette smoke and nicotine are factors that induce Wnt/β-catenin activation, which is a pathway that has also been implicated in EMT. The main aim of this study was to test whether human bronchial epithelial cells are able to undergo EMT in vitro following nicotine stimulation via the Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway. We show that nicotine activates the Wnt3a signal pathway, which leads to the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus and activation of β-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription in the human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) line. This accumulation was accompanied by an increase in smooth muscle actin, vimentin, matrix metalloproteinases-9, and type I collagen expression as well as downregulation of E-cadherin, which are typical characteristics of EMT. We also noted that the release of TGF-β(1) from these cells was stimulated by nicotine. Knockdown of Wnt3a with small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented these effects, implying that β-catenin activation in these responses is Wnt3a dependent. Furthermore, specific knockdown of TGF-β(1) with TGF-β(1) siRNA partially prevented nicotine-induced EMT, suggesting that TGF-β(1) has a role in nicotine-mediated EMT in HBECs. These results suggest that HBECs are able to undergo EMT in vitro upon nicotine stimulation via the Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  10. The effect of simultaneous exposure of HEMn-DP and HEMn-LP melanocytes to nicotine and UV-radiation on the cell viability and melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Delijewski, Marcin; Wrześniok, Dorota; Beberok, Artur; Rok, Jakub; Otręba, Michał; Buszman, Ewa

    2016-11-01

    Nicotine is a main compound of tobacco plants and may affect more than a billion people all over the world that are permanently exposed to nicotine from cigarettes, various forms of smoking cessation therapies, electronic cigarettes or second-hand smoke. It is known that nicotine forms complexes with melanin what may lead to accumulation of this alkaloid in tissues of living organisms containing the pigment. This may affect the viability of cells and process of melanin biosynthesis that takes place in melanocytes. Although UV radiation is known to be a particular inductor of melanin biosynthesis, its simultaneous effect with nicotine on this process as well as the viability of human cells containing melanin have not been assessed so far. The aim of this study was to examine the simultaneous impact of nicotine and UV radiation on viability and melanogenesis in cultured normal human melanocytes dark (HEMn-DP) and light (HEMn-LP) pigmented. Nicotine together with UV radiation induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The higher cell loss was observed in dark pigmented melanocytes in comparison to light pigmented cells. Simultaneous exposure of cells to nicotine and UV radiation also caused changes in melanization process in both tested cell lines. The data suggest that simultaneous exposure of melanocytes to nicotine and UV radiation up-regulates melanogenesis and affects cell viability. Observed processes are more pronounced in dark pigmented cells.

  11. Effects of diazinon on the lymphocytic cholinergic system of Nile tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Díaz-Resendiz, K J G; Pavón-Romero, L; Rojas-García, A E; Medina-Díaz, I M; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2016-08-01

    Fish rearing under intensive farming conditions can be easily disturbed by pesticides, substances that have immunotoxic properties and may predispose to infections. Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are widely used in agricultural activities; however, the mechanism of immunotoxicity of these substances is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diazinon pesticides (OPs) on the cholinergic system of immune cells as a possible target of OP immunotoxicity. We evaluated ACh levels and cholinergic (nicotinic and muscarinic) receptor concentration. Additionally, AChE activity was evaluated in mononuclear cells of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a freshwater fish mostly cultivated in tropical regions around the world. The obtained results indicate that acute exposure to diazinon induces an increase in ACh concentration and a decrease in nAChR and mAChR concentrations and AChE activity in fish immune cells, This suggests that the non-neuronal lymphocytic cholinergic system may be the main target in the mechanism of OP immunotoxicity. This study contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of immunotoxicity of pollutants and may help to take actions for animal health improvement.

  12. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  13. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  14. Nicotine activates YAP1 through nAChRs mediated signaling in esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xue, Liyan; Zhang, Weimin; Zhan, Qimin

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for esophageal cancers. Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), the key transcription factor of the mammalian Hippo pathway, has been reported to be an oncogenic factor for many cancers. In this study, we find nicotine administration can induce nuclear translocation and activation of YAP1 in ESCC. Consistently, we observed nuclear translocation and activation of YAP1 by knockdown of CHRNA3, which is a negative regulator of nicotine signaling in bronchial and esophageal cancer cells. Nicotine administration or CHRNA3 depletion substantially increased proliferation and migration in esophageal cancer cells. Interestingly, we find that YAP1 physically interacts with nAChRs, and nAChRs-signaling dissociates YAP1 from its negative regulatory complex composed with α-catenin, β-catenin and 14-3-3 in the cytoplasm, leading to upregulation and nuclear translocation of YAP1. This process likely requires PKC activation, as PKC specific inhibitor Enzastaurin can block nicotine induced YAP1 activation. In addition, we find nicotine signaling also inhibits the interaction of YAP1 with P63, which contributes to the inhibitory effect of nicotine on apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry analysis we observed upregulation of YAP1 in a significant portion of esophageal cancer samples. Consistently, we have found a significant association between YAP1 upregulation and cigarette smoking in the clinical esophageal cancer samples. Together, these findings suggest that the nicotine activated nAChRs signaling pathway which further activates YAP1 plays an important role in the development of esophageal cancer, and this mechanism may be of a general significance for the carcinogenesis of smoking related cancers.

  15. Sodium hydrogen sulfide inhibits nicotine and lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastic differentiation and reversed osteoblastic differentiation in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Kyung; Chung, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Sung-Chul; Auh, Q-Schick; Lee, Young-Man; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2013-05-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) stimulated or inhibited osteoclastic differentiation, little is known about the effects of H(2)S on the differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. To determine the possible bioactivities of H(2)S on bone metabolism, we investigated the in vitro effects of H(2)S on cytotoxicity, osteoblastic, and osteoclastic differentiation as well as the underlying mechanism in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and nicotine-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs). The H(2)S donor, NaHS, protected hPDLCs from nicotine and LPS-induced cytotoxicity and recovered nicotine- and LPS-downregulated osteoblastic differentiation, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mRNA expression of osteoblasts, including ALP, osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN), and mineralized nodule formation. Concomitantly, NaHS inhibited the differentiation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts in mouse bone marrow cells and blocked nicotine- and LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis regulatory molecules, such as RANKL, OPG, M-CSF, MMP-9, TRAP, and cathepsin K mRNA. NaHS blocked nicotine and LPS-induced activation of p38, ERK, MKP-1, PI3K, PKC, and PKC isoenzymes, and NF-κB. The effects of H(2)S on nicotine- and LPS-induced osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation were remarkably reversed by MKP-1 enzyme inhibitor (vanadate) and expression inhibitor (triptolide). Taken together, we report for the first time that H(2)S inhibited cytotoxicity and osteoclastic differentiation and recovered osteoblastic differentiation in a nicotine- and periodontopathogen-stimulated hPDLCs model, which has potential therapeutic value for treatment of periodontal and inflammatory bone diseases.

  16. Cadmium-induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons mediated by muscarinic M1 receptor blockade, increase in GSK-3β enzyme, β-amyloid and tau protein levels.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Gabriela; Anadón, María José; Moyano, Paula; Díaz, María Jesús; García, José Manuel; Frejo, María Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium is a neurotoxic compound which induces cognitive alterations similar to those produced by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism through which cadmium induces this effect remains unknown. In this regard, we described in a previous work that cadmium blocks cholinergic transmission and induces a more pronounced cell death on cholinergic neurons from basal forebrain which is partially mediated by AChE overexpression. Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as happens in AD, results in memory deficits attributable to the loss of cholinergic modulation of hippocampal synaptic circuits. Moreover, cadmium has been described to activate GSK-3β, induce Aβ protein production and tau filament formation, which have been related to a selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and development of AD. The present study is aimed at researching the mechanisms of cell death induced by cadmium on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. For this purpose, we evaluated, in SN56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line from basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability through muscarinic M1 receptor, AChE splice variants, GSK-3β enzyme, Aβ and tau proteins. This study proves that cadmium induces cell death on cholinergic neurons through blockade of M1 receptor, overexpression of AChE-S and GSK-3β, down-regulation of AChE-R and increase in Aβ and total and phosphorylated tau protein levels. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on cholinergic neurons and suggest that cadmium could mediate these mechanisms by M1R blockade through AChE splices altered expression.

  17. Nicotine, acetylcholine and bombesin are trophic growth factors in neuroendocrine cell lines derived from experimental hamster lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, H.M.; Nylen, E.; Park, P.; Becker, K.L. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC )

    1990-01-01

    Neuroendocrine hamster lung tumors, induced by exposure to 60% hyperoxia and subcutaneous administration of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) for 12 weeks, were placed in cell culture. By subsequent selective transfer of epithelial cells and maintenance in an atmosphere of 8% CO{sub 2}, cell lines with characteristics of neuroendocrine cells were established. The neuroendocrine markers expressed by these cell lines included electron dense neuroendocrine secretion granules as well as secretion of calcitonin and mammalian bombesin. In keeping with data previously reported for a human neuroendocrine lung tumor cell line, nicotine, acetylcholien, and mammalian bombesin (MB) acted as strongrowth factors in these neuroendocrine hamster tumor lines. The mitogenic effect of nicotine an acetylcholine was abolished by nicotinic receptor inhibition while the effects of mammalian bombesin were inhibited by an antagonist of MB receptors. Our data suggest that a receptor-mediated mitogenic effect of nicotine on neuroendocrine lung cells may be instrumental in the induction of smoking-associated small cell lung cancer.

  18. Therapeutic concentrations of varenicline in the presence of nicotine increase action potential firing in human adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Hone, Arik J; Michael McIntosh, J; Rueda-Ruzafa, Lola; Passas, Juan; de Castro-Guerín, Cristina; Blázquez, Jesús; González-Enguita, Carmen; Albillos, Almudena

    2017-01-01

    Varenicline is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist used to treat nicotine addiction, but a live debate persists concerning its mechanism of action in reducing nicotine consumption. Although initially reported as α4β2 selective, varenicline was subsequently shown to activate other nAChR subtypes implicated in nicotine addiction including α3β4. However, it remains unclear whether activation of α3β4 nAChRs by therapeutically relevant concentrations of varenicline is sufficient to affect the behavior of cells that express this subtype. We used patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the effects of varenicline on native α3β4* nAChRs (asterisk denotes the possible presence of other subunits) expressed in human adrenal chromaffin cells and compared its effects to those of nicotine. Varenicline and nicotine activated α3β4* nAChRs with EC50 values of 1.8 (1.2-2.7) μM and 19.4 (11.1-33.9) μM, respectively. Stimulation of adrenal chromaffin cells with 10 ms pulses of 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) in current-clamp mode evoked sodium channel-dependent action potentials (APs). Under these conditions, perfusion of 50 or 100 nM varenicline showed very little effect on AP firing compared to control conditions (ACh stimulation alone), but at higher concentrations (250 nM) varenicline increased the number of APs fired up to 436 ± 150%. These results demonstrate that therapeutic concentrations of varenicline are unlikely to alter AP firing in chromaffin cells. In contrast, nicotine showed no effect on AP firing at any of the concentrations tested (50, 100, 250, and 500 nM). However, perfusion of 50 nM nicotine simultaneously with 100 nM varenicline increased AP firing by 290 ± 104% indicating that exposure to varenicline and nicotine concurrently may alter cellular behavior such as excitability and neurotransmitter release.

  19. Role of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor on Efferent Inhibition in Cochlear Hair Cell

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediates efferent inhibition of hair cell function within the auditory sensory organ. Gating of the nAChRs leads to activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels to hyperpolarize the hair cell. In efferent system, main calcium providers to SK channel are nAChR and synaptic cistern, which contribution to efferent inhibition is different between avian and mammalian species. Calcium permeation is more effective in nAChRs of mammalian cochlea than avian cochlea, and mammalian calcium permeability of nAChRs is about 3 times more than avian hair cell. Thus, mammalian nAChRs is a main component of efferent inhibition in cochlear hair cell system. PMID:24653883

  20. Nicotine derived genotoxic effects in human primary parotid gland cells as assessed in vitro by comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and chromosome aberrations test.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Steussloff, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2014-08-01

    Genotoxic effects of nicotine were described in different human cells including salivary gland cells. Based on the high nicotine concentration in saliva of smokers or patients using therapeutic nicotine patches, the current study was performed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of nicotine in human salivary gland cells. Therefore, primary salivary gland cells from 10 patients undergoing parotid gland surgery were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1 μM and 1000 μM for 1 h in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The acinar phenotype was proven by immunofluorescent staining of alpha-amylase. Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the Comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue exclusion test and Caspase-3 assay. Nicotine was able to induce genotoxic effects in all three assays. The chromosome aberration test was the most sensitive and increases in numerical and structural (chromatid-type and chromosome-type) aberrations were seen at ≥1 μM, whereas increases in micronuclei frequency were detected at 10 μM and DNA damage as measured in the Comet assay was noted at >100 μM. No cytotoxic damage or influence of apoptosis could be demonstrated. Nicotine as a possible risk factor for tumor initiation in salivary glands is still discussed controversially. Our results demonstrated the potential of nicotine to induce genotoxic effects in salivary gland cells. These results were observed at saliva nicotine levels similar to those found after oral or transdermal exposure to nicotine and suggest the necessity of careful monitoring of the use of nicotine in humans.

  1. Prenatal nicotine alters vigilance states and AchR gene expression in the neonatal rat: implications for SIDS.

    PubMed

    Frank, M G; Srere, H; Ledezma, C; O'Hara, B; Heller, H C

    2001-04-01

    Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke predisposes infants to SIDS are not known. We examined the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on sleep/wake ontogenesis and central cholinergic receptor gene expression in the neonatal rat. Prenatal nicotine exposure transiently increased sleep continuity and accelerated sleep/wake ontogeny in the neonatal rat. Prenatal nicotine also upregulated nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor mRNAs in brain regions involved in regulating vigilance states. These findings suggest that the nicotine contained in cigarette smoke may predispose human infants to SIDS by interfering with the normal maturation of sleep and wake.

  2. Synaptic modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in spinal ventral horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Mine, N; Taniguchi, W; Nishio, N; Izumi, N; Miyazaki, N; Yamada, H; Nakatsuka, T; Yoshida, M

    2015-04-02

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are distributed widely in the central nervous system and play important roles in higher brain functions, including learning, memory, and recognition. However, functions of the cholinergic system in spinal motoneurons remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the actions of presynaptic and postsynaptic nAChRs in spinal ventral horn neurons by performing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings on lumbar slices from male rats. The application of nicotine or acetylcholine generated slow inward currents and increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Slow inward currents by acetylcholine or nicotine were not inhibited by tetrodotoxin (TTX) or glutamate receptor antagonists. In the presence of TTX, the frequency and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) were also increased by acetylcholine or nicotine. A selective α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide (DhβE), significantly decreased nicotine-induced inward currents without affecting the enhancement of sEPSCs and mEPSCs. In addition, a selective α7 nicotinic receptor antagonist, methyllycaconitine, did not affect either nicotine-induced inward currents or the enhancement of sEPSCs and mEPSCs. These results suggest that α4β2 AChRs are localized at postsynaptic sites in the spinal ventral horn, non-α4β2 and non-α7 nAChRs are located presynaptically, and nAChRs enhance excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal ventral horn.

  3. Rabbit forebrain cholinergic system: morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Keijser, Jan; Luiten, Paul G M; Seeger, Johannes; Brauer, Kurt; Harkany, Tibor

    2003-06-09

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective cholinergic neurons in the rabbit forebrain. The density of ChAT-immunoreactive terminals in layer V of distinct neocortical territories and in hippocampal subfields was also measured. Another cholinergic marker, the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), was also employed to identify subsets of cholinergic neurons. Double-immunofluorescence labeling of ChAT and p75(NTR), calbindin D-28k (CB), parvalbumin, calretinin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), tyrosine hydroxylase, or substance P was used to elucidate the neuroanatomical borders of cholinergic nuclei and to analyze the neurochemical complexity of cholinergic cell populations. Cholinergic projection neurons with heterogeneous densities were found in the medial septum, vertical and horizontal diagonal bands of Broca, ventral pallidum, and magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN)/substantia innominata (SI) complex; cholinergic interneurons were observed in the caudate nucleus, putamen, accumbens nucleus, and olfactory tubercule, whereas the globus pallidus was devoid of cholinergic nerve cells. Cholinergic interneurons were frequently present in the hippocampus and to a lesser extent in cerebral cortex. Cholinergic projection neurons, except those localized in SI, abundantly expressed p75(NTR), and a subset of cholinergic neurons in posterior MBN was immunoreactive for CB and nNOS. A strict laminar distribution pattern of cholinergic terminals was recorded both in the cerebral cortex and in CA1-CA3 and dentate gyrus

  4. Cannabinoid and cholinergic systems interact during performance of a short-term memory task in the rat.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Anushka V; Robinson, Lianne; Hampson, Robert E; Riedel, Gernot

    2010-10-01

    It is now well established that cannabinoid agonists such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), anandamide, and WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2) produce potent and specific deficits in working memory (WM)/short-term memory (STM) tasks in rodents. Although mediated through activation of CB1 receptors located in memory-related brain regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, these may, in part, be due to a reduction in acetylcholine release (i.e., cholinergic hypofunction). To determine the interaction between cannabinoid and cholinergic systems, we exposed rats treated with WIN-2 or cholinergic drugs to a hippocampal-dependent delayed nonmatch to sample (DNMS) task to study STM, and recorded hippocampal single-unit activity in vivo. WIN-2 induced significant deficits in DNMS performance and reduced the average firing and bursting rates of hippocampal principal cells through a CB1 receptor-mediated mechanism. Rivastigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, reversed these STM deficits and normalized hippocampal discharge rates. Effects were specific to 1 mg/kg WIN-2 as rivastigmine failed to reverse the behavioral and physiological deficits that were observed in the presence of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist. This supports the notion that cannabinoid-modulated cholinergic activity is a mechanism underlying the performance deficits in DNMS. Whether deficits are due to reduced nicotinic or muscarinic receptor activation, or both, awaits further analysis.

  5. Preferential Entry of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Hc Domain through Intestinal Crypt Cells and Targeting to Cholinergic Neurons of the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R.

    2012-01-01

    Botulism, characterized by flaccid paralysis, commonly results from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) absorption across the epithelial barrier from the digestive tract and then dissemination through the blood circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve terminals. The trafficking pathway of BoNT/A passage through the intestinal barrier is not yet fully understood. We report that intralumenal administration of purified BoNT/A into mouse ileum segment impaired spontaneous muscle contractions and abolished the smooth muscle contractions evoked by electric field stimulation. Entry of BoNT/A into the mouse upper small intestine was monitored with fluorescent HcA (half C-terminal domain of heavy chain) which interacts with cell surface receptor(s). We show that HcA preferentially recognizes a subset of neuroendocrine intestinal crypt cells, which probably represent the entry site of the toxin through the intestinal barrier, then targets specific neurons in the submucosa and later (90–120 min) in the musculosa. HcA mainly binds to certain cholinergic neurons of both submucosal and myenteric plexuses, but also recognizes, although to a lower extent, other neuronal cells including glutamatergic and serotoninergic neurons in the submucosa. Intestinal cholinergic neuron targeting by HcA could account for the inhibition of intestinal peristaltism and secretion observed in botulism, but the consequences of the targeting to non-cholinergic neurons remains to be determined. PMID:22438808

  6. Nicotine and tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    Withdrawal from nicotine; Smoking - nicotine addiction and withdrawal; Smokeless tobacco - nicotine addiction; Cigar smoking; Pipe smoking; Smokeless snuff; Tobacco use; Chewing tobacco; Nicotine addiction and tobacco

  7. The therapeutic promise of positive allosteric modulation of nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Uteshev, Victor V.

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, deficits in cholinergic neurotransmission correlate with decreased attention and cognitive impairment, while stimulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves attention, cognitive performance and neuronal resistance to injury as well as produces robust analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The rational basis for the therapeutic use of orthosteric agonists and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic receptors arises from the finding that functional nicotinic receptors are ubiquitously expressed in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues including brain regions highly vulnerable to traumatic and ischemic types of injury (e.g., cortex and hippocampus). Moreover, functional nicotinic receptors do not vanish in age-, disease- and trauma-related neuropathologies, but their expression and/or activation levels decline in a subunit- and brain region-specific manner. Therefore, augmenting the endogenous cholinergic tone by nicotinic agents is possible and may offset neurological impairments associated with cholinergic hypofunction. Importantly, because neuronal damage elevates extracellular levels of choline (a selective agonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) near the site of injury, α7-PAM-based treatments may augment pathology-activated α7-dependent auto-therapies where and when they are most needed (i.e., in the penumbra, post-injury). Thus, the nicotinic-PAM-based treatments are expected to be highly efficacious with fewer side effects as compared to a more indiscriminate action of exogenous orthosteric agonists. In this review, I will summarize the existing trends in therapeutic applications of nicotinic PAMs. PMID:24530419

  8. Distinct synaptic properties of perisomatic inhibitory cell types and their different modulation by cholinergic receptor activation in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Gergely G; Holderith, Noémi; Gulyás, Attila I; Freund, Tamás F; Hájos, Norbert

    2010-06-01

    Perisomatic inhibition originates from three types of GABAergic interneurons in cortical structures, including parvalbumin-containing fast-spiking basket cells (FSBCs) and axo-axonic cells (AACs), as well as cholecystokinin-expressing regular-spiking basket cells (RSBCs). These interneurons may have significant impact in various cognitive processes, and are subjects of cholinergic modulation. However, it is largely unknown how cholinergic receptor activation modulates the function of perisomatic inhibitory cells. Therefore, we performed paired recordings from anatomically identified perisomatic interneurons and pyramidal cells in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus. We determined the basic properties of unitary inhibitory postsynaptic currents (uIPSCs) and found that they differed among cell types, e.g. GABA released from axon endings of AACs evoked uIPSCs with the largest amplitude and with the longest decay measured at room temperature. RSBCs could also release GABA asynchronously, the magnitude of the release increasing with the discharge frequency of the presynaptic interneuron. Cholinergic receptor activation by carbachol significantly decreased the uIPSC amplitude in all three types of cell pairs, but to different extents. M2-type muscarinic receptors were responsible for the reduction in uIPSC amplitudes in FSBC- and AAC-pyramidal cell pairs, while an antagonist of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors recovered the suppression in RSBC-pyramidal cell pairs. In addition, carbachol suppressed or even eliminated the short-term depression of uIPSCs in FSBC- and AAC-pyramidal cell pairs in a frequency-dependent manner. These findings suggest that not only are the basic synaptic properties of perisomatic inhibitory cells distinct, but acetylcholine can differentially control the impact of perisomatic inhibition from different sources.

  9. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    PubMed

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  10. Nicotine facilitates memory consolidation in perceptual learning.

    PubMed

    Beer, Anton L; Vartak, Devavrat; Greenlee, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual learning is a special type of non-declarative learning that involves experience-dependent plasticity in sensory cortices. The cholinergic system is known to modulate declarative learning. In particular, reduced levels or efficacy of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine were found to facilitate declarative memory consolidation. However, little is known about the role of the cholinergic system in memory consolidation of non-declarative learning. Here we compared two groups of non-smoking men who learned a visual texture discrimination task (TDT). One group received chewing tobacco containing nicotine for 1 h directly following the TDT training. The other group received a similar tasting control substance without nicotine. Electroencephalographic recordings during substance consumption showed reduced alpha activity and P300 latencies in the nicotine group compared to the control group. When re-tested on the TDT the following day, both groups responded more accurately and more rapidly than during training. These improvements were specific to the retinal location and orientation of the texture elements of the TDT suggesting that learning involved early visual cortex. A group comparison showed that learning effects were more pronounced in the nicotine group than in the control group. These findings suggest that oral consumption of nicotine enhances the efficacy of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Our findings further suggest that enhanced efficacy of the cholinergic system facilitates memory consolidation in perceptual learning (and possibly other types of non-declarative learning). In that regard acetylcholine seems to affect consolidation processes in perceptual learning in a different manner than in declarative learning. Alternatively, our findings might reflect dose-dependent cholinergic modulation of memory consolidation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  11. Effects of nicotine administration on elemental concentrations in mouse granulosa cells, maturing oocytes and oviduct epithelium studied by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Jin, M; Nilsson, B O; Roomans, G M

    1998-10-01

    A normal maturation of the oocytes is dependent upon, among other things, normally functioning granulosa and corona radiata cells. Analyses performed during human in vitro fertilization programs have revealed that, in smokers, ovarian functions are affected and that smokers have a decreased fertilization rate. Further, animal studies have indicated that nicotine can reach the genital tractus, and that nicotine administration interferes with oocyte maturation, fertilization and early pregnancy. We applied X-ray microanalysis to monitor whether nicotine administration changed the ionic balance of cells in the reproductive tract (granulosa cells, oocytes and oviduct epithelial cells). The animals were given nicotine in the drinking water at a concentration of 108 mumol/l. After 15 days the animals were superovulated, ovaries and oviducts were frozen, and thick cryosections were prepared for energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. In the granulosa cells, the concentrations of Na and Cl increased after nicotine treatment, while the K concentrations decreased resulting in an increased Na/K ratio. The treated oocytes had a higher K concentration and a decreased Na/K ratio compared to the controls. In the epithelial cells of the oviduct, the concentrations of Na and K decreased after nicotine treatment without any changes in the Na/K ratio. Thus, heavy nicotine administration to mice causes significant changes in the ionic composition of the granulosa cells, the ovarian oocytes and the oviduct epithelium.

  12. Binding of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine to cholinergic receptors in bovine cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohama, S.; Tsukahara, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    1985-11-18

    Cholinergic receptor sites in bovine cerebral arteries were analyzed using radioligand binding techniques with the cholinergic agonist, /sup 3/H-acetylcholine (ACh), as the ligand. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-ACh to membrane preparations of bovine cerebral arteries was saturable, of two binding sites, with dissociation constant (K/sub D/) values of 0.32 and 23.7 nM, and maximum binding capacity (Bmax) values of 67 and 252 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-ACh was displaced effectively by muscarinic cholinergic agents and less effectively by nicotinic cholinergic agents. IC/sub 50/ values of cholinergic drugs for /sup 3/H-ACh binding were as follows: atropine, 38.5 nM; ACh, 59.8 nM; oxotremorine, 293 nM; scopolamine 474 nM; carbamylcholine, 990 nM. IC/sub 50/ values of nicotinic cholinergic agents such as nicotine, cytisine and ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin exceeded 50 ..mu..M. Choline acetyltransferase activity was 1.09 nmol/mg protein/hour in the cerebral arteries. These findings suggest that the cholinergic nerves innervate the bovine cerebral arteries and that there are at least two classes of ACh binding sites of different affinities on muscarinic reporters in these arteries. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Nicotinic Mechanisms Modulate Ethanol Withdrawal and Modify Time Course and Symptoms Severity of Simultaneous Withdrawal from Alcohol and Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Perez, Erika; Quijano-Cardé, Natalia; De Biasi, Mariella

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are among the top causes of preventable death in the United States. Unfortunately, people who are dependent on alcohol are more likely to smoke than individuals in the general population. Similarly, smokers are more likely to abuse alcohol. Alcohol and nicotine codependence affects health in many ways and leads to poorer treatment outcomes in subjects who want to quit. This study examined the interaction of alcohol and nicotine during withdrawal and compared abstinence symptoms during withdrawal from one of the two drugs only vs both. Our results indicate that simultaneous withdrawal from alcohol and nicotine produces physical symptoms that are more severe and last longer than those experienced during withdrawal from one of the two drugs alone. In animals experiencing withdrawal after chronic ethanol treatment, acute nicotine exposure was sufficient to prevent abstinence symptoms. Similarly, symptoms were prevented when alcohol was injected acutely in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. These experiments provide evidence for the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic system in alcohol withdrawal. Furthermore, the outcomes of intracranial microinfusions of mecamylamine, a nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist, highlight a major role for the nicotinic receptors expressed in medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus during withdrawal. Overall, the data support the notion that modulating the nicotinic cholinergic system might help to maintain long-term abstinence from alcohol.

  14. Enhancement of cancer stem-like and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation property in oral epithelial cells with long-term nicotine exposure: Reversal by targeting SNAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors in the development and further progression of tumorigenesis, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recent studies suggest that interplay cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) properties are responsible for the tumor maintenance and metastasis in OSCC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of long-term exposure with nicotine, a major component in cigarette, on CSCs and EMT characteristics. The possible reversal regulators were further explored in nicotine-induced CSCs and EMT properties in human oral epithelial (OE) cells. Long-term exposure with nicotine was demonstrated to up-regulate ALDH1 population in normal gingival and primary OSCC OE cells dose-dependently. Moreover, long-term nicotine treatment was found to enhance the self-renewal sphere-forming ability and stemness gene signatures expression and EMT regulators in OE cells. The migration/cell invasiveness/anchorage independent growth and in vivo tumor growth by nude mice xenotransplantation assay was enhanced in long-term nicotine-stimulated OE cells. Knockdown of Snail in long-term nicotine-treated OE cells was found to reduce their CSCs properties. Therapeutic delivery of Si-Snail significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of long-term nicotine-treated OSCC cells and largely significantly improved the recipient survival. The present study demonstrated that the enrichment of CSCs coupled EMT property in oral epithelial cells induced by nicotine is critical for the development of OSCC tumorigenesis. Targeting Snail might offer a new strategy for the treatment of OSCC patients with smoking habit. -- Highlights: ► Sustained nicotine treatment induced CSCs properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine treatment enhance EMT properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine exposure increased tumorigenicity of oral epithelial cells. ► Si

  15. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is required for amyloid pathology in brain endothelial cells induced by Glycoprotein 120, methamphetamine and nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liqun; Yu, Jingyi; Li, Li; Zhang, Bao; Liu, Lingjuan; Wu, Chun-Hua; Jong, Ambrose; Mao, Ding-An; Huang, Sheng-He

    2017-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) caused by HIV-1 virotoxins and drug abuse is the lack of understanding the underlying mechanisms that are commonly associated with disorders of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which mainly consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Here, we hypothesized that Glycoprotein 120 (gp120), methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine (NT) can enhance amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation in BMEC through Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR). Both in vitro (human BMEC) (HBMEC) and in vivo (mice) models of BBB were used to dissect the role of α7 nAChR in up-regulation of Aβ induced by gp120, METH and NT. Aβ release from and transport across HBMEC were significantly increased by these factors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA), an antagonist of α7 nAChR, could efficiently block these pathogenic effects. Furthermore, our animal data showed that these factors could significantly increase the levels of Aβ, Tau and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) in mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Aβ in the mouse brains. These pathogenicities were significantly reduced by MLA, suggesting that α7 nAChR may play an important role in neuropathology caused by gp120, METH and NT, which are the major pathogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of HAND. PMID:28074940

  16. Effects of Constituent Compounds of Smilax china on Nicotine-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lincha, Victor Ruberio; Zhao, Bing-Tian; Woo, Mi-Hee; Yang, In-Jun; Shin, Heung-Mook

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of compounds isolated from 70% ethanol (EtOH) extraction of Smilax china L. (SCE), a plant belonging to the family Smilacaceae on nicotine-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We isolated 10 compounds from ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of 70% EtOH extract of SCE and investigated their inhibitory effect on nicotine-induced ED in endothelial cells. Kaempferol, kaempferol 7-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, puerarin and ferulic acid showed strong inhibition of nicotine-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression while kaempferol, kaempferin, and caffeic acid attenuated intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression. Lepidoside, caffeic acid and methylsuccinic acid caused the highest up-regulated expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at the protein level with caffeic acid and ferulic acid showing strong inhibitory effects on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In addition, ferulic acid and kaempferol showed inhibition against interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression while ferulic acid and caffeic acid showed comparatively higher inhibition of ED associated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression. These results show the potential of the aforementioned compounds to reverse the toxic effects of nicotine on the endothelium.

  17. Neural Systems Governed by Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Emerging Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Julie M.; Freedman, Robert; Lester, Henry A.

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain participate in diverse functions: reward, learning and memory, mood, sensory processing, pain, and neuroprotection. Nicotinic systems also have well-known roles in drug abuse. Here, we review recent insights into nicotinic function, linking exogenous and endogenous manipulations of nAChRs to alterations in synapses, circuits, and behavior. We also discuss how these contemporary advances can motivate attempts to exploit nicotinic systems therapeutically in Parkinson’s disease, cognitive decline, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. PMID:21482353

  18. Nicotinic modulation of network and synaptic transmission in the immature hippocampus investigated with genetically modified mice

    PubMed Central

    Le Magueresse, Corentin; Safiulina, Victoria; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Cherubini, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus, a key structure in learning and memory processes, receives a powerful cholinergic innervation from the septum and contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Early in postnatal development, activation of nAChRs by nicotine or endogenous acetylcholine contributes to enhance synaptic signalling. Here, the patch-clamp technique was used to assess the contribution of α7 and β2-containing (α7* and β2*) nAChRs to nicotine-elicited modulation of GABAergic and glutamatergic activity at the network and single-cell level in the immature hippocampus of wild-type (WT), α7−/− and β2−/− mice. We found that α7* and β2* nAChRs were sufficient to modulate nicotine-induced increase in frequency of spontaneously occurring giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), which are generated at the network level by the synergistic action of glutamate and depolarizing GABA, and thought to play a crucial role in neuronal wiring. However, α7* but not β2* receptors were essential in nicotine-induced increase of interictal discharge frequency recorded after postnatal day 3 in the presence of bicuculline, when GABA shifted from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. To correlate these observations with nicotine-elicited changes in synaptic transmission, we recorded spontaneous GABAergic and glutamatergic postsynaptic currents in pyramidal cells and interneurons localized in stratum oriens, stratum pyramidale and stratum radiatum, in slices obtained from WT and knock-out animals. We found that early in postnatal life α7* and β2* nAChRs exert a fine regional modulation of GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission that underlies nicotine-elicited changes in network synchronization. PMID:16901939

  19. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  20. Cholinergic modulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels regulates synaptic strength and spine calcium in cartwheel cells of the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S; Brenowitz, Stephan D

    2014-04-09

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulatory transmitter that controls synaptic plasticity and sensory processing in many brain regions. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is an auditory brainstem nucleus that integrates auditory signals from the cochlea with multisensory inputs from several brainstem nuclei and receives prominent cholinergic projections. In the auditory periphery, cholinergic modulation serves a neuroprotective function, reducing cochlear output under high sound levels. However, the role of cholinergic signaling in the DCN is less understood. Here we examine postsynaptic mechanisms of cholinergic modulation at glutamatergic synapses formed by parallel fiber axons onto cartwheel cells (CWCs) in the apical DCN circuit from mouse brainstem slice using calcium (Ca) imaging combined with two-photon laser glutamate uncaging onto CWC spines. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) significantly increased the amplitude of both uncaging-evoked EPSPs (uEPSPs) and spine Ca transients. Our results demonstrate that mAChRs in CWC spines act by suppressing large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels, and this effect is mediated through the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. Blocking BK channels relieves voltage-dependent magnesium block of NMDA receptors, thereby enhancing uEPSPs and spine Ca transients. Finally, we demonstrate that mAChR activation inhibits L-type Ca channels and thus may contribute to the suppression of BK channels by mAChRs. In summary, we demonstrate a novel role for BK channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission and show that this mechanism is under modulatory control of mAChRs.

  1. Cholinergic Modulation of Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels Regulates Synaptic Strength and Spine Calcium in Cartwheel Cells of the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    He, Shan; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulatory transmitter that controls synaptic plasticity and sensory processing in many brain regions. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is an auditory brainstem nucleus that integrates auditory signals from the cochlea with multisensory inputs from several brainstem nuclei and receives prominent cholinergic projections. In the auditory periphery, cholinergic modulation serves a neuroprotective function, reducing cochlear output under high sound levels. However, the role of cholinergic signaling in the DCN is less understood. Here we examine postsynaptic mechanisms of cholinergic modulation at glutamatergic synapses formed by parallel fiber axons onto cartwheel cells (CWCs) in the apical DCN circuit from mouse brainstem slice using calcium (Ca) imaging combined with two-photon laser glutamate uncaging onto CWC spines. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) significantly increased the amplitude of both uncaging-evoked EPSPs (uEPSPs) and spine Ca transients. Our results demonstrate that mAChRs in CWC spines act by suppressing large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels, and this effect is mediated through the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. Blocking BK channels relieves voltage-dependent magnesium block of NMDA receptors, thereby enhancing uEPSPs and spine Ca transients. Finally, we demonstrate that mAChR activation inhibits L-type Ca channels and thus may contribute to the suppression of BK channels by mAChRs. In summary, we demonstrate a novel role for BK channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission and show that this mechanism is under modulatory control of mAChRs. PMID:24719104

  2. Interaction of nerve agent antidotes with cholinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Soukup, O; Tobin, G; Kumar, U K; Binder, J; Proska, J; Jun, D; Fusek, J; Kuca, K

    2010-01-01

    The poisoning with organophosphorus compounds represents a life threatening danger especially in the time of terroristic menace. No universal antidote has been developed yet and other therapeutic approaches not related to reactivation of acetylcholinesterase are being investigated. This review describes the main features of the cholinergic system, cholinergic receptors, cholinesterases and their inhibitors. It also focuses on the organophosphorus nerve agents, their properties, effects and a large part describes various possibilities in treatments, mainly traditional oxime therapies based on reactivation of AChE. Furthermore, non-cholinesterase coupled antidotal effects of the oximes are thoroughly discussed. These antidotal effects principally include oxime interactions with muscarinic and nicotinic receptors.

  3. Short-term plasticity and modulation of synaptic transmission at mammalian inhibitory cholinergic olivocochlear synapses

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Eleonora; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2014-01-01

    The organ of Corti, the mammalian sensory epithelium of the inner ear, has two types of mechanoreceptor cells, inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs). In this sensory epithelium, vibrations produced by sound waves are transformed into electrical signals. When depolarized by incoming sounds, IHCs release glutamate and activate auditory nerve fibers innervating them and OHCs, by virtue of their electromotile property, increase the amplification and fine tuning of sound signals. The medial olivocochlear (MOC) system, an efferent feedback system, inhibits OHC activity and thereby reduces the sensitivity and sharp tuning of cochlear afferent fibers. During neonatal development, IHCs fire Ca2+ action potentials which evoke glutamate release promoting activity in the immature auditory system in the absence of sensory stimuli. During this period, MOC fibers also innervate IHCs and are thought to modulate their firing rate. Both the MOC-OHC and the MOC-IHC synapses are cholinergic, fast and inhibitory and mediated by the α9α10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) coupled to the activation of calcium-activated potassium channels that hyperpolarize the hair cells. In this review we discuss the biophysical, functional and molecular data which demonstrate that at the synapses between MOC efferent fibers and cochlear hair cells, modulation of transmitter release as well as short term synaptic plasticity mechanisms, operating both at the presynaptic terminal and at the postsynaptic hair-cell, determine the efficacy of these synapses and shape the hair cell response pattern. PMID:25520631

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta agonist attenuates nicotine suppression effect on human mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteogenesis and involves increased expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Liu, Jiayong; Bhat, Samerna; Benedict, Gregory; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Peterson, Stephen J; Ebraheim, Nabil A; Heck, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Smoking has long been associated with osteoporosis, decreased bone mineral density, increased risk of bone fracture, and increased health costs. Nicotine, the main component of cigarette smoke, has major negative effects on bone metabolism and skeletal remodeling in vivo. Although osteoblasts and osteoblast-like cells have been used extensively to study the impact of nicotine, few studies have been performed on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In this context, we examined the impact of nicotine on (a) hMSCs proliferation, (b) osteoblastic differentiation, (c) alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and (d) expression of canonical genes during differentiation of hMSCs. MSCs isolated from human bone marrow were treated with different concentrations (0, 0.1, 1 and 10 μM) of nicotine for 7 days. Nicotine caused a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation, decreased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression (p < 0.05) and attenuated osteogenesis (p < 0.05) in hMSCs (45 % reduction at day 14). In addition, nicotine caused a dose-dependent decrease in alizarin red staining for calcium and staining for ALP. Induction of HO-1 by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta agonist (GW0742) prevented the effect of nicotine. Nicotine caused a dose-dependent reduction in the expression of BMP-2, a well-known marker for bone formation; however, this was prevented by GW0742 treatment. Therefore, induction of HO-1 prevents the deleterious effects of nicotine on osteogenesis in hMSC. This offers insight into both how nicotine affects bone remodeling and a therapeutic approach to prevent fracture and osteoporosis in smokers.

  5. The effects of erdosteine, N-acetylcysteine, and vitamin E on nicotine-induced apoptosis of pulmonary cells.

    PubMed

    Demiralay, Rezan; Gürsan, Nesrin; Erdem, Havva

    2006-02-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of apoptosis in the pulmonary epithelial cells of rats after intratraperitoneal nicotine injection, in order to examine the role of inflammatory markers [myeloperoxidase (MPO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)] in nicotine-induced lung damage, and to determine the protective effects of three known antioxidant agents [N-acetylcysteine (NAC), erdosteine, and vitamin E] on the lung toxicity of nicotine in the lungs. Female Wistar rats were divided into seven groups, each composed of nine rats: two negative control groups, two positive control groups, one erdosteine-treated group (500 mg/kg), one NAC-treated group (500 mg/kg), and one vitamin E-treated group (500 mg/kg). Nicotine was injected intraperitoneally at a dosage of 0.6 mg/kg for 21 days. Following nicotine injection, the antioxidants were administered orally, treatment was continued until the rats were killed. Lung tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) for histopathological assessments. The apoptosis level in the lung bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium was determined by using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) method. Cytoplasmic TNF-alpha in the bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells and the lung MPO activity were evaluated immunohistochemically. The protective effect of vitamin E on lung histology was stronger than that of erdosteine or NAC. Treatment with erdosteine, NAC, and vitamin E significantly reduced the rate of nicotine-induced pulmonary epithelial cell apoptosis, and there were no significant differences in apoptosis among the three antioxidants groups. Erdosteine, NAC, and vitamin E significantly reduced the increases in TNF-alpha staining and lung MPO activity. The effects of erdosteine on the increases in the local TNF-alpha level and lung MPO activity were weaker than that of NAC or vitamin E. This findings suggest that erdosteine and NAC can be as effective as

  6. The Regulatory Role of Rolipram on Inflammatory Mediators and Cholinergic/Adrenergic Stimulation-Induced Signals in Isolated Primary Mouse Submandibular Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Un; Shin, Dong Min; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces inflammatory signals in salivary glands. We investigated the regulatory role of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram on inflammatory mediators and cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation-induced intracellular Ca2+ signaling in salivary acinar and ductal cells. Submandibular gland (SMG) expressed PDE4A through 4D mRNA and PDE4 was localized in the luminal membrane of SMG. LPS induced Ca2+ signaling and ROS production in SMG. Treatment with rolipram blocked LPS-induced Ca2+ increase and ROS production. The application of histamine evoked Ca2+ signals and ROS production, which were attenuated by rolipram in SMG cells. Moreover, LPS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome and cleaved caspase-1 were inhibited by rolipram. The inhibitory role of rolipram in ROS-induced Ca2+ signaling was mainly observed in acinar cells and not in ductal cells. Rolipram also protected SMG acinar but not ductal cells from LPS-induced cell membrane damage. In the case of cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation, carbachol/isoproterenol-induced Ca2+ signals were upregulated by the treatment of rolipram in SMG. In the case of cAMP-dependent ductal bicarbonate secretion by rolipram, no effect was observed on the modulation of ductal chloride/bicarbonate exchange activity. Rolipram could suppress the inflammatory signals and could be a potential therapeutic strategy against LPS-induced inflammation to protect the salivary gland cells. PMID:27143817

  7. Purinergic and Cholinergic Drugs Mediate Hyperventilation in Zebrafish: Evidence from a Novel Chemical Screen

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Saman; Pan, Wen; Jonz, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid test to identify drugs that affect autonomic responses to hypoxia holds therapeutic and ecologic value. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a convenient animal model for investigating peripheral O2 chemoreceptors and respiratory reflexes in vertebrates; however, the neurotransmitters and receptors involved in this process are not adequately defined. The goals of the present study were to demonstrate purinergic and cholinergic control of the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia in zebrafish, and to develop a procedure for screening of neurochemicals that affect respiration. Zebrafish larvae were screened in multi-well plates for sensitivity to the cholinergic receptor agonist, nicotine, and antagonist, atropine; and to the purinergic receptor antagonists, suramin and A-317491. Nicotine increased ventilation frequency (fV) maximally at 100 μM (EC50 = 24.5 μM). Hypoxia elevated fV from 93.8 to 145.3 breaths min-1. Atropine reduced the hypoxic response only at 100 μM. Suramin and A-317491 maximally reduced fV at 50 μM (EC50 = 30.4 and 10.8 μM) and abolished the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia. Purinergic P2X3 receptors were identified in neurons and O2-chemosensory neuroepithelial cells of the gills using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. These studies suggest a role for purinergic and nicotinic receptors in O2 sensing in fish and implicate ATP and acetylcholine in excitatory neurotransmission, as in the mammalian carotid body. We demonstrate a rapid approach for screening neuroactive chemicals in zebrafish with implications for respiratory medicine and carotid body disease in humans; as well as for preservation of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27100625

  8. Megakaryocytes and platelets express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors but nicotine does not affect megakaryopoiesis or platelet function.

    PubMed

    Schedel, Angelika; Kaiser, Kerstin; Uhlig, Stefanie; Lorenz, Florian; Sarin, Anip; Starigk, Julian; Hassmann, Dennis; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In our previous investigations we have shown that platelets and their precursors express nicotinic α7 acetylcholine receptors (nAChRα7) that are involved in platelet function and in vitro differentiation of the megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01. In this study, we were interested in the expression analysis of additional nAChR and the effects of nicotine in an ex vivo model using megakaryocytic cells differentiated from cord blood derived CD34(+) cells (CBMK) and an in vivo model using blood samples from smokers. CBMK were differentiated with thrombopoietin (TPO) for up to 17 days. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to investigate nAChR expression (nAChRα7, nAChRα4, nAChRβ2) and nicotine effects. In blood samples of 15 nonsmokers and 16 smokers platelet parameters (count, mean platelet volume--MPV and platelet distribution width--PDW) were determined as indicators for changes of in vivo megakaryopoiesis. Platelet function was determined by the use of whole blood aggregometry and flow cytometry. The functional role of nAChR was evaluated using specific antagonists in aggregometry. CHRNA7, CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 gene transcripts and the corresponding proteins could be identified in CBMK during all stages of differentiation. Platelets contain nAChRα7 and nAChRβ2 but not nAChRα4. Nicotine had no effect on TPO-induced differentiation of CBMK. There was no significant difference in all platelet parameters of the smokers compared to the nonsmokers. In line with this, cholinergic gene transcripts as well as the encoded proteins were equally expressed in both the study groups. Despite our observation of nAChR expression in megakaryopoiesis and platelets, we were not able to detect effects of nicotine in our ex vivo and in vivo models. Thus, the functional role of the nAChR in these cells remains open.

  9. Amelioration strategies fail to prevent tobacco smoke effects on neurodifferentiation: Nicotinic receptor blockade, antioxidants, methyl donors.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-07-03

    Tobacco smoke exposure is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We used neuronotypic PC12 cells to evaluate the mechanisms by which tobacco smoke extract (TSE) affects neurodifferentiation. In undifferentiated cells, TSE impaired DNA synthesis and cell numbers to a much greater extent than nicotine alone; TSE also impaired cell viability to a small extent. In differentiating cells, TSE enhanced cell growth at the expense of cell numbers and promoted emergence of the dopaminergic phenotype. Nicotinic receptor blockade with mecamylamine was ineffective in preventing the adverse effects of TSE and actually enhanced the effect of TSE on the dopamine phenotype. A mixture of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, N-acetyl-l-cysteine) provided partial protection against cell loss but also promoted loss of the cholinergic phenotype in response to TSE. Notably, the antioxidants themselves altered neurodifferentiation, reducing cell numbers and promoting the cholinergic phenotype at the expense of the dopaminergic phenotype, an effect that was most prominent for N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Treatment with methyl donors (vitamin B12, folic acid, choline) had no protectant effect and actually enhanced the cell loss evoked by TSE; they did have a minor, synergistic interaction with antioxidants protecting against TSE effects on growth. Thus, components of tobacco smoke perturb neurodifferentiation through mechanisms that cannot be attributed to the individual effects of nicotine, oxidative stress or interference with one-carbon metabolism. Consequently, attempted amelioration strategies may be partially effective at best, or, as seen here, can actually aggravate injury by interfering with normal developmental signals and/or by sensitizing cells to TSE effects on neurodifferentiation.

  10. Cholinergic and non-cholinergic mesopontine tegmental neurons projecting to the subthalamic nucleus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Takako; Kita, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections from the mesopontine tegmentum. This study investigated the numbers and distributions of neurons involved in these projections in rats using Fluorogold (FG) retrograde tracing combined with immunostaining of choline acetyltransferase and a neuron-specific nuclear protein. The results suggest that a small population of cholinergic neurons mainly in the caudoventral part of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN), approximately 360 neurons (≈10% of total) in the homolateral and 80 neurons (≈2%) in the contralateral PPN, projects to the STN. In contrast, the number of non-cholinergic neurons projecting to the STN was estimated to be 9 times as much, with approximately 3300 in the homolateral side and 1300 neurons in the contralateral side. A large gathering of the FG-labeled non-cholinergic neurons was found rostrodorsomedial to the caudolateral PPN. The biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) anterograde tracing method was used to substantiate the mesopontine-STN projections. Injection of BDA into the caudoventral PPN labeled numerous thin fibers with small en-passant varicosities in the STN. Injection of BDA into the non-cholinergic neuron-rich area labeled a moderate number of thicker fibers with patches of aggregates of larger boutons. The densities of labeled fibers and the number of retrogradely labeled cells in the mesopontine tegmentum suggested that the terminal field formed in the STN by each cholinergic neuron is more extensive than that by each non-cholinergic neuron. The findings suggest that cholinergic and non-cholinergic mesopontine afferents may carry different information to the STN. PMID:21198985

  11. Hippocampal increased cell death and decreased cell density elicited by nicotine and/or ethanol during adolescence are reversed during drug withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-da-Silva, A; Manhães, A C; Cristina-Rodrigues, F; Filgueiras, C C; Abreu-Villaça, Y

    2010-04-28

    We have recently identified hippocampal cell death and reduced neuronal and glial cells densities during adolescent nicotine and ethanol exposures and outcomes reduced in severity when nicotine and ethanol are co-administered during this developmental period. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adolescent nicotine and/or ethanol withdrawal on the following regions of the hippocampus: Granular layer of the Dentate Gyrus (GrDG), Molecular layer (Mol), CA1, CA2 and CA3. From the 30th to the 45th postnatal day (PN30-PN45), C57BL/6 male and female mice were exposed to nicotine free base (NIC) and/or ethanol (ETOH). Four groups were analyzed: (1) concomitant NIC (50 microg/ml in 2% saccharin to drink) and ETOH (25%, 2 g/kg i.p. injected every other day) exposure; (2) NIC exposure; (3) ETOH exposure; (4) vehicle. We evaluated cell degeneration (TUNEL assay), neuronal and glial densities (optical Disector) and region thicknesses two (PN47) and five (PN50) days post-exposure. On PN47, there were increases in the number of TUNEL+ cells in most hippocampal regions of both ETOH and NIC groups. In the NIC+ETOH group there were less severe effects. These results were paralleled by reductions in neuronal and glial cells densities for all treatment groups. In contrast, on PN50, ethanol and/or nicotine withdrawal were associated with compensatory reductions in TUNEL+ cells in all hippocampal regions. These results were paralleled by a reversal of effects on neuronal and glial densities so that there were no longer differences between groups. There were no effects on region thicknesses. These results suggest that deleterious effects of nicotine and/or ethanol are reversed during prolonged withdrawal.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 protects renal proximal tubule cells against nicotine-induced apoptosis through induction of p66(shc)-dependent antioxidant responses.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Carter, Anthony; Hall, Samuel; Fulop, Tibor; Dixit, Mehul

    2017-02-01

    Chronic nicotine exposure (via smoking, E-cigarettes) increases oxidative stress in the kidney that sensitizes it to additional injury in experimental models and in the renal patient. The pro-apoptotic p66(shc) protein-via serine36 phosphorylation that facilitates its mitochondrial translocation and therein cytochrome c binding-generates oxidative stress that leads to injury of renal proximal tubule cells during chronic nicotine exposure. Coenzyme Q10-a clinically safe antioxidant-has been used against nicotine/smoke extract-associated oxidative stress in various non-renal cells. This study explored the anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic effect of Coenzyme Q10 on nicotine-induced oxidative stress and its impact on p66shc in cultured rat renal proximal tubule cells (NRK52E). We studied the anti-oxidant effect of 10 µM Coenzyme Q10 using various mutants of the p66shc gene and also determined the induction of selected anti-oxidant entities (antioxidant response element, promoter of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene) in reporter luciferase assay during oxidative stress induced by 200 µM nicotine. Our studies revealed that Coenzyme Q10 strongly inhibits nicotine-mediated production of reactive oxygen species and consequent apoptosis that requires serine36 phosphorylation but not mitochondrial translocation/cytochrome c binding of p66(shc). While both nicotine and Coenzyme Q10 stimulates the p66shc promoter, only nicotine exposure results in mitochondrial translocation of p66(shc). In contrast, the Coenzyme Q10-stimulated and non-mitochondrial p66(shc) activates the anti-oxidant manganese superoxide dismutase promoter via the antioxidant response elements and hence, rescues cells from nicotine-induced oxidative stress and consequent apoptosis.

  13. Comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) on human neuroblastoma and astrocytoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yongchang; Venkatraj, Jijayanagaram; Barhoumi, Rola; Pal, Ranadip; Datta, Aniruddha; Wild, James R.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn . E-mail: ecastiglioni@cvm.tamu.edu

    2007-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon, which is acutely neurotoxic, and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), which induces OPIDN, in the human neuroblastoma SY5Y and the human astrocytoma cell line CCF-STTG1. SY5Y cells have been studied extensively as a model for OP-induced neurotoxicity, but CCF cells have not previously been studied. We conducted a preliminary human gene array assay of OP-treated SY5Y cells in order to assess at the gene level whether these cells can distinguish between OP compounds that do and do not cause OPIDN. Paraoxon and DFP induced dramatically different profiles of gene expression. Two genes were upregulated and 13 downregulated by at least 2-fold in paraoxon-treated cells. In contrast, one gene was upregulated by DFP and none was downregulated at the 2-fold threshold. This finding is consistent with current and previous observations that SY5Y cells can distinguish between OPs that do or do not induce OPIDN. We also examined gene array results for possible novel target proteins or metabolic pathways for OP neurotoxicity. Protein levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) revealed that paraoxon exposure at 3 {mu}M for 24 h significantly reduced GRP78 levels by 30% in neuroblastoma cells, whereas DFP treatment had no effect. In comparison with SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, paraoxon and DFP (3 {mu}M for 24 h) each significantly increased GRP78 levels by 23-24% in CCF astrocytoma cells. As we have previously evaluated intracellular changes in Ca{sup 2+} levels in SY5Y cells, we investigated the effects of paraoxon and DFP on cellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in CCF by studying cytosolic and mitochondrial basal calcium levels. A significant decrease in the ratio of mitochondrial to cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence was detected in CCF cultures treated for either 1 or 3 days with 1, 3, 10, or 30 {mu}M paraoxon. In contrast, treatment with DFP for 1 day had no significant effect

  14. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA from cholinergic forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Arpiar; Granger, Adam J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter corelease is emerging as a common theme of central neuromodulatory systems. Though corelease of glutamate or GABA with acetylcholine has been reported within the cholinergic system, the full extent is unknown. To explore synaptic signaling of cholinergic forebrain neurons, we activated choline acetyltransferase expressing neurons using channelrhodopsin while recording post-synaptic currents (PSCs) in layer 1 interneurons. Surprisingly, we observed PSCs mediated by GABAA receptors in addition to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Based on PSC latency and pharmacological sensitivity, our results suggest monosynaptic release of both GABA and ACh. Anatomical analysis showed that forebrain cholinergic neurons express the GABA synthetic enzyme Gad2 and the vesicular GABA transporter (Slc32a1). We confirmed the direct release of GABA by knocking out Slc32a1 from cholinergic neurons. Our results identify GABA as an overlooked fast neurotransmitter utilized throughout the forebrain cholinergic system. GABA/ACh corelease may have major implications for modulation of cortical function by cholinergic neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06412.001 PMID:25723967

  15. Monkey adrenal chromaffin cells express α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vivanco, Alicia; Hone, Arik J; Scadden, Mick L; Carmona-Hidalgo, Beatriz; McIntosh, J Michael; Albillos, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that contain α6 and β4 subunits have been demonstrated functionally in human adrenal chromaffin cells, rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, and on noradrenergic terminals in the hippocampus of adolescent mice. In human adrenal chromaffin cells, α6β4* nAChRs (the asterisk denotes the possible presence of additional subunits) are the predominant subtype whereas in rodents, the predominant nAChR is the α3β4* subtype. Here we present molecular and pharmacological evidence that chromaffin cells from monkey (Macaca mulatta) also express α6β4* receptors. PCR was used to show the presence of transcripts for α6 and β4 subunits and pharmacological characterization was performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology in combination with α-conotoxins that target the α6β4* subtype. Acetylcholine-evoked currents were sensitive to inhibition by BuIA[T5A,P6O] and MII[H9A,L15A]; α-conotoxins that inhibit α6-containing nAChRs. Two additional agonists were used to probe for the expression of α7 and β2-containing nAChRs. Cells with currents evoked by acetylcholine were relatively unresponsive to the α7-selctive agonist choline but responded to the agonist 5-I-A-85380. These studies provide further insights into the properties of natively expressed α6β4* nAChRs.

  16. Nicotine and Nicotinic Receptor Drugs: Potential for Parkinson's Disease and Drug-Induced Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Quik, Maryka; Bordia, Tanuja; Zhang, Danhui; Perez, Xiomara A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, as well as nonmotor symptoms including autonomic impairments, olfactory dysfunction, sleep disturbances, depression, and dementia. Although the major neurological deficit is a loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, multiple neurotransmitters systems are compromised in Parkinson's disease. Consistent with this observation, dopamine replacement therapy dramatically improves Parkinson's disease motor symptoms. Additionally, drugs targeting the serotonergic, glutamatergic, adenosine, and other neurotransmitter systems may be beneficial. Recent evidence also indicates that nicotinic cholinergic drugs may be useful for the management of Parkinson's disease. This possibility initially arose from the results of epidemiological studies, which showed that smoking was associated with a decreased incidence of Parkinson's disease, an effect mediated in part by the nicotine in smoke. Further evidence for this idea stemmed from preclinical studies which showed that nicotine administration reduced nigrostriatal damage in parkinsonian rodents and monkeys. In addition to a potential neuroprotective role, emerging work indicates that nicotinic receptor drugs improve the abnormal involuntary movements or dyskinesias that arise as a side effect of l-dopa treatment, the gold standard therapy for Parkinson's disease. Both nicotine and nicotinic receptor drugs reduced l-dopa-induced dyskinesias by over 50% in parkinsonian rodent and monkey models. Notably, nicotine also attenuated the abnormal involuntary movements or tardive dyskinesias that arise with antipsychotic treatment. These observations, coupled with reports that nicotinic receptor drugs have procognitive and antidepressant effects, suggest that central nervous system (CNS) nicotinic receptors may represent useful targets for the treatment of movement disorders.

  17. Involvement of Cholinergic and Adrenergic Receptors in Pathogenesis and Inflammatory Response Induced by Alpha-Neurotoxin Bot III of Scorpion Venom.

    PubMed

    Nakib, Imene; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Bot III neurotoxin is the most lethal α neurotoxin purified from Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion venom. This toxin binds to the voltage-gated sodium channel of excitable cells and blocks its inactivation, inducing an increased release of neurotransmitters (acetylcholine and catecholamines). This study aims to elucidate the involvement of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in pathogenesis and inflammatory response triggered by this toxin. Injection of Bot III to animals induces an increase of peroxidase activities, an imbalance of oxidative status, tissue damages in lung parenchyma, and myocardium correlated with metabolic disorders. The pretreatment with nicotine (nicotinic receptor agonist) or atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) protected the animals from almost all disorders caused by Bot III toxin, especially the immunological alterations. Bisoprolol administration (selective β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist) was also efficient in the protection of animals, mainly on tissue damage. Propranolol (non-selective adrenergic receptor antagonist) showed less effect. These results suggest that both cholinergic and adrenergic receptors are activated in the cardiopulmonary manifestations induced by Bot III. Indeed, the muscarinic receptor appears to be more involved than the nicotinic one, and the β1 adrenergic receptor seems to dominate the β2 receptor. These results showed also that the activation of nicotinic receptor leads to a significant protection of animals against Bot III toxin effect. These findings supply a supplementary data leading to better understanding of the mechanism triggered by scorpionic neurotoxins and suggest the use of drugs targeting these receptors, especially the nicotinic one in order to counteract the inflammatory response observed in scorpion envenomation.

  18. Responses of Cholinergic and Noncholinergic Renshaw Cell Receptors After Acute and Chronic Exposure to Anticholinesterases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    1954). Organophosphates have been reported to prolong the repetitive discharge of these cells to antidromic stimulation of the ventral spinal roots...1 through L-6 were isolated and transected prior to being placed on bipolar stimulating electrodes for ortho and antidromic stimulation. After...subthreshold to suprathreshold intensity antidromic stimulation of lumbar segment L-7 ventral spinal roots, reveals that both have a sharply defined

  19. Memory-Relevant Mushroom Body Output Synapses Are Cholinergic

    PubMed Central

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Owald, David; Felsenberg, Johannes; Brain, Ruth; Moszynski, John-Paul; Talbot, Clifford B.; Perrat, Paola N.; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Summary Memories are stored in the fan-out fan-in neural architectures of the mammalian cerebellum and hippocampus and the insect mushroom bodies. However, whereas key plasticity occurs at glutamatergic synapses in mammals, the neurochemistry of the memory-storing mushroom body Kenyon cell output synapses is unknown. Here we demonstrate a role for acetylcholine (ACh) in Drosophila. Kenyon cells express the ACh-processing proteins ChAT and VAChT, and reducing their expression impairs learned olfactory-driven behavior. Local ACh application, or direct Kenyon cell activation, evokes activity in mushroom body output neurons (MBONs). MBON activation depends on VAChT expression in Kenyon cells and is blocked by ACh receptor antagonism. Furthermore, reducing nicotinic ACh receptor subunit expression in MBONs compromises odor-evoked activation and redirects odor-driven behavior. Lastly, peptidergic corelease enhances ACh-evoked responses in MBONs, suggesting an interaction between the fast- and slow-acting transmitters. Therefore, olfactory memories in Drosophila are likely stored as plasticity of cholinergic synapses. PMID:26948892

  20. Memory-Relevant Mushroom Body Output Synapses Are Cholinergic.

    PubMed

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Owald, David; Felsenberg, Johannes; Brain, Ruth; Moszynski, John-Paul; Talbot, Clifford B; Perrat, Paola N; Waddell, Scott

    2016-03-16

    Memories are stored in the fan-out fan-in neural architectures of the mammalian cerebellum and hippocampus and the insect mushroom bodies. However, whereas key plasticity occurs at glutamatergic synapses in mammals, the neurochemistry of the memory-storing mushroom body Kenyon cell output synapses is unknown. Here we demonstrate a role for acetylcholine (ACh) in Drosophila. Kenyon cells express the ACh-processing proteins ChAT and VAChT, and reducing their expression impairs learned olfactory-driven behavior. Local ACh application, or direct Kenyon cell activation, evokes activity in mushroom body output neurons (MBONs). MBON activation depends on VAChT expression in Kenyon cells and is blocked by ACh receptor antagonism. Furthermore, reducing nicotinic ACh receptor subunit expression in MBONs compromises odor-evoked activation and redirects odor-driven behavior. Lastly, peptidergic corelease enhances ACh-evoked responses in MBONs, suggesting an interaction between the fast- and slow-acting transmitters. Therefore, olfactory memories in Drosophila are likely stored as plasticity of cholinergic synapses.

  1. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates Airway Epithelium Differentiation by Controlling Basal Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Maouche, Kamel; Polette, Myriam; Jolly, Thomas; Medjber, Kahina; Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Burlet, Henriette; Terryn, Christine; Coraux, Christelle; Zahm, Jean-Marie; Birembaut, Philippe; Tournier, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Airway epithelial basal cells are known to be critical for regenerating injured epithelium and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), which is highly permeable to Ca2+, is involved in lung morphogenesis. Here, we have investigated the potential role of the α7 nAChR in the regulation of airway epithelial basal cell proliferation and the differentiation of the human airway epithelium. In vivo during fetal development and in vitro during the regeneration of the human airway epithelium, α7 nAChR expression coincides with epithelium differentiation. Inactivating α7 nAChR function in vitro increases cell proliferation during the initial steps of the epithelium regeneration, leading to epithelial alterations such as basal cell hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia, remodeling observed in many bronchopulmonary diseases. The regeneration of the airway epithelium after injury in α7−/− mice is delayed and characterized by a transient hyperplasia of basal cells. Moreover, 1-year-old α7−/− mice more frequently present basal cells hyperplasia. Modulating nAChR function or expression shows that only α7 nAChR, as opposed to heteropentameric αxβy nAChRs, controls the proliferation of human airway epithelial basal cells. These findings suggest that α7 nAChR is a key regulator of the plasticity of the human airway epithelium by controlling basal cell proliferation and differentiation pathway and is involved in airway remodeling during bronchopulmonary diseases. PMID:19808646

  2. Chronic Nicotine Exposure In Vivo and In Vitro Inhibits Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) Uptake by Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Thrower, Edwin C; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Balamurugan, A N; Subramanian, Veedamali S; Gorelick, Fred S; Said, Hamid M

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1), a member of the water-soluble family of vitamins, is essential for normal cellular functions; its deficiency results in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Pancreatic acinar cells (PAC) obtain thiamin from the circulation using a specific carrier-mediated process mediated by both thiamin transporters -1 and -2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; encoded by the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes, respectively). The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of chronic exposure of mouse PAC in vivo and human PAC in vitro to nicotine (a major component of cigarette smoke that has been implicated in pancreatic diseases) on thiamin uptake and to delineate the mechanism involved. The results showed that chronic exposure of mice to nicotine significantly inhibits thiamin uptake in murine PAC, and that this inhibition is associated with a marked decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein, mRNA and hnRNAs level. Furthermore, expression of the important thiamin-metabolizing enzyme, thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPKase), was significantly reduced in PAC of mice exposed to nicotine. Similarly, chronic exposure of cultured human PAC to nicotine (0.5 μM, 48 h) significantly inhibited thiamin uptake, which was also associated with a decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 proteins and mRNAs. This study demonstrates that chronic exposure of PAC to nicotine impairs the physiology and the molecular biology of the thiamin uptake process. Furthermore, the study suggests that the effect is, in part, mediated through transcriptional mechanism(s) affecting the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes.

  3. Generation of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Interneurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Relevant Tool for In Vitro Modeling of Neurological Disorders Pathology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ochalek, Anna; Szczesna, Karolina; Petazzi, Paolo; Kobolak, Julianna

    2016-01-01

    The cellular and molecular bases of neurological diseases have been studied for decades; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully elucidated. Compared with other disorders, diseases of the nervous system have been very difficult to study mainly due to the inaccessibility of the human brain and live neurons in vivo or in vitro and difficulties in examination of human postmortem brain tissue. Despite the availability of various genetically engineered animal models, these systems are still not adequate enough due to species variation and differences in genetic background. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) reprogrammed from patient somatic cells possess the potential to differentiate into any cell type, including neural progenitor cells and postmitotic neurons; thus, they open a new area to in vitro modeling of neurological diseases and their potential treatment. Currently, many protocols for generation of various neuronal subtypes are being developed; however, most of them still require further optimization. Here, we highlight accomplishments made in the generation of dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, the two subtypes most affected in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and indirectly affected in Huntington's disease. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of hiPSC-derived neurons in the modeling and treatment of neurological diseases related to dopaminergic and cholinergic system dysfunction. PMID:28105055

  4. Cholinergic modulation of extracellular ATP-induced cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in cochlear outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Wikström, M A; Lawoko, G; Heilbronn, E

    1998-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) of the mammalian cochlea modulate the inner hair cell (IHC) mechanoelectrical transduction of sound. They are contacted by synapsing efferent neurons from the CNS, their main efferent neurotransmitter being acetylcholine (ACh). OHC function and in particular their control of [Ca2+]i is highly important and is modulated by ACh and also by other substances including extracellular (EC) ATP. OHC carry at their efferent synapse a not yet completely identified neuronal type of ionotropic ACh receptor (AChR), with an unusual pharmacology, which is, in vivo and in vitro, reversibly blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-bgtx). The AChR mediates a fast influx of Ca2+ into OHC which, in turn, activates a closeby located outwardly-directed Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-channel, thus shortly hyperpolarizing the cell. A cloned homomeric alpha 9 nAChR mimicks the function and pharmacology of this receptor. We here report results from a study designed to observe only slower effects triggered by EC ATP and the ACh-AChR system. EC presence of ATP at OHC increases [Ca2+]i by activating both P2x and P2y purinoceptors and also by indirect activation of OHC L-type Ca(2+)-channels. The L-type channel activation is responsible for a large part of the [Ca2+]i increase. Simultaneous EC presence of ACh and ATP at OHC was found to depress ATP-induced effects on OHC [Ca2+]i, an effect that is completely blocked in the presence of alpha-bgtx. Our observations suggest that the ACh-AChR system is involved in the modulation of the observed EC ATP-triggered events; possibly the OHC AChR is able to act both in its well known rapid ionotropic way, but also, perhaps after modification in a slower, metabotropic way interfering with the EC ATP-induced [Ca2+]i increase.

  5. Involvement of the cholinergic system in conditioning and perceptual memory.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lianne; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2011-08-10

    The cholinergic systems play a pivotal role in learning and memory, and have been the centre of attention when it comes to diseases containing cognitive deficits. It is therefore not surprising, that the cholinergic transmitter system has experienced detailed examination of its role in numerous behavioural situations not least with the perspective that cognition may be rescued with appropriate cholinergic 'boosters'. Here we reviewed the literature on (i) cholinergic lesions, (ii) pharmacological intervention of muscarinic or nicotinic system, or (iii) genetic deletion of selective receptor subtypes with respect to sensory discrimination and conditioning procedures. We consider visual, auditory, olfactory and somatosensory processing first before discussing more complex tasks such as startle responses, latent inhibition, negative patterning, eye blink and fear conditioning, and passive avoidance paradigms. An overarching reoccurring theme is that lesions of the cholinergic projection neurones of the basal forebrain impact negatively on acquisition learning in these paradigms and blockade of muscarinic (and to a lesser extent nicotinic) receptors in the target structures produce similar behavioural deficits. While these pertain mainly to impairments in acquisition learning, some rare cases extend to memory consolidation. Such single case observations warranted replication and more in-depth studies. Intriguingly, receptor blockade or receptor gene knockout repeatedly produced contradictory results (for example in fear conditioning) and combined studies, in which genetically altered mice are pharmacological manipulated, are so far missing. However, they are desperately needed to clarify underlying reasons for these contradictions. Consistently, stimulation of either muscarinic (mainly M(1)) or nicotinic (predominantly α7) receptors was beneficial for learning and memory formation across all paradigms supporting the notion that research into the development and

  6. Nicotinic acid as a new co-adsorbent in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuong Tuyet; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Phan, Thu Anh Pham; Le, Tan Nhut Van; Le, Duyen My; Le, Duy Dang; Tran, Vy Anh; Huynh, Tuan Van; Lund, Torben

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of introduction a new inexpensive co-adsorbent to improve solar cell performance, the influence of nicotinic acid (NTA) used as a co-adsorbent in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) was investigated. The findings showed that low concentrations of NTA (<10 mM) increased the N719 ruthenium dye loading on the TiO2 electrode surface by 10-12%, whereas higher concentrations of NTA lowered the dye loading. The adsorption of NTA onto the TiO2 electrode surface was studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the blocking effect of NTA toward electron transfer between the electrode and 1,4-dicyanonaphthalene (redox couple electrolyte probe) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Subsequently, the performance of NTA in functional DSCs was evaluated by current-voltage (J-V) DSC characterization and compared with that of DSCs fabricated with two well-established co-adsorbents i.e., chenodeoxycholic acid (CDA) and octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA). The findings showed that under optimized co-adsorbent concentration (1 mM NTA, 0.03 mM CDA, 0.015 mM OPA), the efficiency of the corresponding solar cells increased to the same extent. Specifically, the use of NTA at optimum concentration improved the efficiency of the resulting DSC from 3.14 to 5.02%.

  7. Alzheimer's Disease: Targeting the Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Guimaraes, Isabella M.; Silva, Flavia R.; Ribeiro, Fabiola M.

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has a crucial role in the peripheral and central nervous systems. The enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is responsible for synthesizing ACh from acetyl-CoA and choline in the cytoplasm and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) uptakes the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles. Following depolarization, ACh undergoes exocytosis reaching the synaptic cleft, where it can bind its receptors, including muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. ACh present at the synaptic cleft is promptly hydrolyzed by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), forming acetate and choline, which is recycled into the presynaptic nerve terminal by the high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). Cholinergic neurons located in the basal forebrain, including the neurons that form the nucleus basalis of Meynert, are severely lost in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is the most ordinary cause of dementia affecting 25 million people worldwide. The hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, there is no real correlation between levels of cortical plaques and AD-related cognitive impairment. Nevertheless, synaptic loss is the principal correlate of disease progression and loss of cholinergic neurons contributes to memory and attention deficits. Thus, drugs that act on the cholinergic system represent a promising option to treat AD patients. PMID:26813123

  8. Evidence of Nicotine-Induced, Curare-Insensitive, Behavior in Planarians.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Oné R; Montgomery, Erica; Deats, Sean; Bach, Daniel; Baker, Debra

    2015-10-01

    Planarians are rapidly developing into very useful research subjects in pharmacology and neuroscience research. Here we report that curare, a cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist, alleviates the nicotine-induced planarian seizure-like movements (pSLM) by up to 50 % at equimolar concentrations of nicotine and curare (1 mM), while curare alone does not induce significant pSLMs. The simplest interpretation of our data is that there are nicotine induced behaviors insensitive to curare in our experimental organism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on curare-insensitive, nicotine-induced effects in any organism.

  9. Chlorpyrifos promotes colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth through the activation of EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway.

    PubMed

    Suriyo, Tawit; Tachachartvanich, Phum; Visitnonthachai, Daranee; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-12-02

    Aside from the effects on neuronal cholinergic system, epidemiological studies suggest an association between chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure and cancer risk. This in vitro study examined the effects of CPF and its toxic metabolite, chlorpyrifos oxon (CPF-O), on the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma H508, colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29, normal colon epithelial CCD841, liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and normal liver hepatocyte THLE-3 cells. The results showed that CPF (5-100 μM) concentration-dependently increased viability of H508 and CCD841 cells in serum-free conditions. This increasing trend was not found in HT-29, HepG2 and THLE-3 cells. In contrast, CPF-O (50-100 μM) reduced the viability of all cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed the induction of cells in the S phase, and EdU incorporation assay revealed the induction of DNA synthesis in CPF-treated H508 cells indicating that CPF promotes cell cycle progression. Despite the observation of acetylcholinesterase activity inhibition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, atropine (a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and N-acetylcysteine (a potent antioxidant) failed to inhibit the growth-promoting effect of CPF. CPF increased the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream effector, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2), in H508 cells. AG-1478 (a specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and U0126 (a specific MEK inhibitor) completely mitigated the growth promoting effect of CPF. Altogether, these results suggest that EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway involves in CPF-induced colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth.

  10. The molecular and cellular neurobiology of nicotine abuse in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mobascher, A; Winterer, G

    2008-09-01

    People with schizophrenia suffer from a variety of symptoms that can be categorized as positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Cognitive symptoms are not properly treated with antipsychotic medication and are the major cause of disability associated with the disorder. People with schizophrenia smoke more frequently and heavily than the general population. This observation in view of the well established role of nicotinic, cholinergic neurotransmission in cognition led to the hypothesis that people with schizophrenia may use nicotine as a self-medication to ameliorate cognitive symptoms associated with their disease. Furthermore genetic and post-mortem studies point to additional links between nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission and schizophrenia. This article provides an insight in the possible relationship between schizophrenia and smoking behavior. We focus on the effects of nicotine on individual neurons as well as on neuronal networks. With respect to single neurons the immediate electrophysiological consequences of nicotinic stimulation and the more "metabotropic" effects related to intracellular signal transduction cascades that may lead to plastic changes in the neuron are discussed. With respect to the network level, three systems are discussed: cognition, reward and stress response. The effects of nicotine on cognition may be most pertinent to the problem of schizophrenia, but schizophrenics may also smoke to regulate mood and reduce stress. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular effects of nicotine and how they are related to the pathophysiology and symptomatology of schizophrenia may help to identify new targets for the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia and of nicotine addiction in schizophrenia.

  11. Selectively driving cholinergic fibers optically in the thalamic reticular nucleus promotes sleep.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kun-Ming; Hou, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Ci-Hang; Dong, Ping; Li, Yue; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Ping; Berg, Darwin K; Duan, Shumin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-02-11

    Cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain and brainstem are thought to play important roles in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and arousal. Using transgenic mice in which channelrhdopsin-2 is selectively expressed in cholinergic neurons, we show that optical stimulation of cholinergic inputs to the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) activates local GABAergic neurons to promote sleep and protect non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It does not affect REM sleep. Instead, direct activation of cholinergic input to the TRN shortens the time to sleep onset and generates spindle oscillations that correlate with NREM sleep. It does so by evoking excitatory postsynaptic currents via α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inducing bursts of action potentials in local GABAergic neurons. These findings stand in sharp contrast to previous reports of cholinergic activity driving arousal. Our results provide new insight into the mechanisms controlling sleep.

  12. Selectively driving cholinergic fibers optically in the thalamic reticular nucleus promotes sleep

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Kun-Ming; Hou, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Ci-Hang; Dong, Ping; Li, Yue; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Ping; Berg, Darwin K; Duan, Shumin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain and brainstem are thought to play important roles in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and arousal. Using transgenic mice in which channelrhdopsin-2 is selectively expressed in cholinergic neurons, we show that optical stimulation of cholinergic inputs to the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) activates local GABAergic neurons to promote sleep and protect non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It does not affect REM sleep. Instead, direct activation of cholinergic input to the TRN shortens the time to sleep onset and generates spindle oscillations that correlate with NREM sleep. It does so by evoking excitatory postsynaptic currents via α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inducing bursts of action potentials in local GABAergic neurons. These findings stand in sharp contrast to previous reports of cholinergic activity driving arousal. Our results provide new insight into the mechanisms controlling sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10382.001 PMID:26880556

  13. Distinct roles of bulbar muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in olfactory discrimination learning.

    PubMed

    Devore, Sasha; de Almeida, Licurgo; Linster, Christiane

    2014-08-20

    The olfactory bulb (OB) and piriform cortex receive dense cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain. Cholinergic modulation within the piriform cortex has long been proposed to serve important functions in olfactory learning and memory. We here investigate how olfactory discrimination learning is regulated by cholinergic modulation of the OB inputs to the piriform cortex. We examined rats' performance on a two-alternative choice odor discrimination task following local, bilateral blockade of cholinergic nicotinic and/or muscarinic receptors in the OB. Results demonstrate that acquisition, but not recall, of novel discrimination problems is impaired following blockade of OB cholinergic receptors, although the relative contribution of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors depends on task difficulty. Blocking muscarinic receptors impairs learning for nearly all odor sets, whereas blocking nicotinic receptors only affects performance for perceptually similar odors. This pattern of behavioral effects is consistent with predictions from a model of cholinergic modulation in the OB and piriform cortex (de Almeida et al., 2013). Model simulations suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic receptors may serve complementary roles in regulating coherence and sparseness of the OB network output, which in turn differentially regulate the strength and overlap in cortical odor representations. Overall, our results suggest that muscarinic receptor blockade results in a bona fide learning impairment that may arise because cortical neurons are activated less often. Behavioral impairment following nicotinic receptor blockade may not be due to the inability of the cortex to learn, but rather arises because the cortex is unable to resolve highly overlapping input patterns.

  14. Purification of L-( sup 3 H) Nicotine eliminates low affinity binding

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, E.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. ); Lippiello, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some studies of L-({sup 3}H) nicotine binding to rodent and human brain tissue have detected two binding sites as evidenced by nonlinear Scatchard plots. Evidence presented here indicated that the low affinity binding site is not stereospecific, is not inhibited by low concentrations of cholinergic agonists and is probably due to breakdown products of nicotine since purification of the L-({sup 3}H)nicotine eliminates the low affinity site.

  15. GLUTAMATERGIC SYNAPSE FORMATION IS PROMOTED BY α7-CONTAINING NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Adrian F.; Wang, Xulong; Gounko, Natalia V.; Massey, Kerri A.; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Zhaoping; Berg, Darwin K.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory transmitter in adult brain, acting through synapses on dendritic spines and shafts. Early in development, however, when glutamatergic synapses are only beginning to form, nicotinic cholinergic excitation is already widespread; it is mediated by acetylcholine activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that generate waves of activity across brain regions. A major class of nAChRs contributing at this time is a species containing α7 subunits (α7-nAChRs). These receptors are highly permeable to calcium, influence a variety of calcium-dependent events, and are diversely distributed throughout the developing CNS. Here we show that α7-nAChRs unexpectedly promote formation of glutamatergic synapses during development. The dependence on α7-nAChRs becomes clear when comparing wild-type mice with mice constitutively lacking the α7-nAChR gene. Ultrastructural analysis, immunostaining, and patch-clamp recording all reveal synaptic deficits when α7-nAChR input is absent. Similarly, nicotinic activation of α7-nAChRs in wild-type organotypic culture, as well as cell culture, increases the number of glutamatergic synapses. RNA interference demonstrates that the α7-nAChRs must be expressed in the neuron being innervated for normal innervation to occur. Moreover the deficits persist throughout the developmental period of major de novo synapse formation and are still fully apparent in the adult. GABAergic synapses, in contrast, are undiminished in number under such conditions. As a result, mice lacking α7-nAChRs have an altered balance in the excitatory/inhibitory input they receive. This ratio represents a fundamental feature of neural networks and shows for the first time that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic signaling plays a key role in network construction. PMID:22649244

  16. Possible involvement of iNOS and TNF-α in nutritional intervention against nicotine-induced pancreatic islet cell damage.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Banerjee, Arnab; Das, Debasmita; Bose, Ananya; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Mukherjee, Sandip

    2016-12-01

    Nicotine is the more abundant and most significant components of cigarette smoke. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests an association between cigarette smoking and pancreatic injury. Although effects of smoking on endocrine pancreas are still controversial Here, we examined the impact and underlying mechanisms of action of folic acid and vitamin B12 on nicotine induced damage in pancreatic islets of rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with nicotine (3mg/kg body weight/day, intraperitonealy) with or without folic acid (36μg/kg body weight/day, orally) and vitamin B12 (0.63μg/kg body weight/day, orally) for 21days. Supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12 suppressed the nicotine induced changes in HbA1c, insulin, TNF-α, IL-6, generation of reactive oxygen species, and attenuated the changes in markers of oxidative stress. Moreover, folic acid and vitamin B12 also counteracted the increased expression of protein and mRNA contents of TNF-α and iNOS produced by nicotine. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination limits the nicotine induced changes in cell cycle and excessive apoptosis of the pancreatic β-cells and also successfully blunted the nicotine induced alteration in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, data demonstrate that folic acid and vitamin B12 may be possible nutritional intervention against cellular oxidative stress, which is a critical step in nicotine-mediated islet injury, and improves islet cell functional status by scavenging free radicals and by inhibiting the generation of pro-inflammatory mediators.

  17. Inhibition of nicotinic receptor-mediated responses in bovine chromaffin cells by diltiazem.

    PubMed

    Gandía, L; Villarroya, M; Sala, F; Reig, J A; Viniegra, S; Quintanar, J L; García, A G; Gutiérrez, L M

    1996-07-01

    1. The effects of diltiazem on various functional parameters were studied in bovine cultured adrenal chromaffin cells stimulated with the nicotinic receptor agonist dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) or with depolarizing Krebs-HEPES solutions containing high K+ concentrations. 2. The release of [3H]-noradrenaline induced by DMPP (100 microM for 5 min) was gradually and fully inhibited by increasing concentrations of diltiazem (IC50 = 1.3 microM). In contrast, the highest concentration of diltiazem used (10 microM) inhibited the response to high K+ (59 mM for 5 min) by only 25%. 3. 45Ca2+ uptake into cells stimulated with DMPP (100 microM for 1 min) was also blocked by diltiazem in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.4 microM). Again, diltiazem blocked the K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake (70 mM K+ for 1 min) only by 20%. In contrast, the N-P-Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC depressed the K+ signal by 70%. In the presence of this toxin, diltiazem exhibited an additional small inhibitory effect, indicating that the compound was acting on L-type Ca2+ channels. 4. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents through Ca2+ channels in voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were inhibited by 3-10 microM diltiazem by 20-25%. The inhibition was readily reversed upon washout of the drug. 5. The whole-cell currents elicited by 100 microM DMPP (IDMPP) were inhibited in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner by diltiazem. Maximal effects were found at 10 microM, which reduced the peak IDMPP by 70%. The area of each curve represented by total current (QDMPP) was reduced more than the peak current. At 10 microM, the inhibition amounted to 80%; the IC50 for QDMPP inhibition was 0.73 microM, a figure close to the IC50 for 45Ca2+ uptake (0.4 microM) and [3H]-noradrenaline release (1.3 microM). The blocking effects of diltiazem developed very quickly and did not exhibit use-dependence; thus the drug blocked the channel in its closed state. The blocking effects of 1 microM diltiazem on

  18. Cholinergic Stimulation Prevents the Development of Autoimmune Diabetes: Evidence for the Modulation of Th17 Effector Cells via an IFNγ-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    George, Junu A.; Bashir, Ghada; Qureshi, Mohammed M.; Mohamed, Yassir A.; Azzi, Jamil; al-Ramadi, Basel K.; Fernández-Cabezudo, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) results from T cell-mediated damage of pancreatic β-cells and loss of insulin production. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway represents a physiological link connecting the central nervous and immune systems via vagus nerve, and functions to control the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Using the multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) model to induce experimental autoimmune diabetes, we investigated the potential of regulating the development of hyperglycemia through administration of paraoxon, a highly specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI). We demonstrate that pretreatment with paraoxon prevented hyperglycemia in STZ-treated C57BL/6 mice. This correlated with a reduction in T cell infiltration into pancreatic islets and preservation of the structure and functionality of β-cells. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic tissue revealed that increased peripheral cholinergic activity prevented STZ-mediated loss of insulin production, this being associated with a reduction in IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 proinflammatory cytokines. Intracellular cytokine analysis in splenic T cells demonstrated that inhibition of AChE led to a shift in STZ-induced immune response from a predominantly disease-causing IL-17-expressing Th17 cells to IFNγ-positive Th1 cells. Consistent with this conclusion, inhibition of AChE failed to prevent STZ-induced hyperglycemia in IFNγ-deficient mice. Our results provide mechanistic evidence for the prevention of murine T1D by inhibition of AChE and suggest a promising strategy for modulating disease severity. PMID:27790217

  19. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adult Brugia malayi muscle

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A. P.; Buxton, S. K.; Martin, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a debilitating disease caused by clade III parasites like Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti. Current recommended treatment regimen for this disease relies on albendazole, ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine, none of which targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in these parasitic nematodes. Our aim therefore has been to develop adult B. malayi for electrophysiological recordings to aid in characterizing the ion channels in this parasite as anthelmintic target sites. In that regard, we recently demonstrated the amenability of adult B. malayi to patch-clamp recordings and presented results on the single-channel properties of nAChR in this nematode. We have built on this by recording whole-cell nAChR currents from adult B. malayi muscle. Acetylcholine, levamisole, pyrantel, bephenium and tribendimidine activated the receptors on B. malayi muscle, producing robust currents ranging from > 200 pA to ~1.5 nA. Levamisole completely inhibited motility of the adult B. malayi within 10 min and after 60 min, motility had recovered back to control values. PMID:23562945

  20. Muscarinic Receptors Are Responsible for the Cholinergic Modulation of Projection Neurons in the Song Production Brain Nucleus RA of Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wei; Wang, Songhua; Yao, Lihua; Zhang, Nan; Li, Dongfeng

    2017-01-01

    Songbirds are a useful model for the study of learned vocal behavior in vertebrates. The robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) is a premotor nucleus in the vocal motor pathway. It receives excitatory synaptic inputs from the anterior forebrain pathway. RA also receives cholinergic inputs from the ventral paleostriatum of the basal forebrain. Our previous study showed that carbachol, a non-selective cholinergic receptor agonist, modulates the electrophysiology of RA projection neurons (PNs), indicating that cholinergic modulation of RA may play an important role in song production. However, the receptor mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the electrophysiological properties of two acetylcholine receptors on the RA PNs of adult male zebra finches using in vitro whole-cell current clamp. Our results demonstrate that activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) simulate the effects of carbachol. Both carbachol and the mAChR agonist muscarine produced a decrease in the excitability of RA PNs and a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. The mAChR antagonist atropine blocked the effects of carbachol. Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with nAChR agonist nicotine or DMPP had no effect on the excitability of RA PNs, and the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine failed to inhibit the effects of carbachol. These results suggest that mAChRs, but not nAChRs, primarily modulate the effects of carbachol on the activity of RA PNs. Collectively, these findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of cholinergic modulation in the vocal nuclei of songbirds. PMID:28293176

  1. Acetylcholine and the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor: a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this review is to examine the evidence for a functional cholinergic system operating within the periodontium and determine the evidence for its role in periodontal immunity. Introduction Acetylcholine can influence the immune system via the ‘cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway’. This pathway is mediated by the vagus nerve which releases acetylcholine to interact with the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) on proximate immuno-regulatory cells. Activation of the α7nAChR on these cells leads to down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and thus regulates localised inflammatory responses. The role of the vagus nerve in periodontal pathophysiology is currently unknown. However, non-neuronal cells can also release acetylcholine and express the α7nAChR; these include keratinocytes, fibroblasts, T cells, B cells and macrophages. Therefore, by both autocrine and paracrine methods non-neuronal acetylcholine can also be hypothesised to modulate the localised immune response. Methods A Pubmed database search was performed for studies providing evidence for a functional cholinergic system operating in the periodontium. In addition, literature on the role of the ‘cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway’ in modulating the immune response was extrapolated to hypothesise that similar mechanisms of immune regulation occur within the periodontium. Conclusion The evidence suggests a functional nonneuronal ‘cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway’ may operate in the periodontium and that this may be targeted therapeutically to treat periodontal disease. PMID:22777144

  2. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  3. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells in the hippocampal neurogenesis involving myelin vacuolation of cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs in mice.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mizuho; Abe, Hajime; Itahashi, Megu; Kikuchihara, Yoh; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    Hexachlorophene (HCP) has been shown to induce myelin vacuolation due to intramyelinic edema of the nerve fibers in animal neural tissue. We investigated the maternal exposure effect of HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the offspring of pregnant mice supplemented with 0 (control), 33 or 100 ppm HCP in diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, offspring as examined in males exhibited decreased granule cell lineage populations expressing paired box 6, sex-determining region Y-box 2 and eomesodermin in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) accompanied by myelin vacuolation involving white matter tracts of the hippocampal fimbria at ≥ 33 ppm. However, SGZ cellular populations expressing brain lipid binding protein and doublecortin were unchanged at any dose. Transcript expression of cholinergic receptor genes, Chrna4 and Chrnb2, and glutamate receptor genes, Grm1 and Grin2d, examined at 100 ppm, decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP exposure did not alter the number of proliferating or apoptotic cells in the SGZ, or reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons in the dentate hilus, on PND 21 and PND 77. All neurogenesis-related changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77, suggesting that maternal HCP exposure at ≥ 33 ppm reversibly decreased type 2 intermediate-stage progenitor cells in the hippocampal neurogenesis. Myelin vacuolation might be responsible for changes in neurogenesis possibly by reducing nerve conduction velocity of cholinergic inputs from the septal-hippocampal pathway to granule cell lineages and/or GABAergic interneurons, and of glutamatergic inputs to granule cell lineages.

  4. Nicotine Gum

    MedlinePlus

    ... gum is used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. Nicotine chewing gum should be used together with ... by your doctor.If you smoke your first cigarette more than 30 minutes after waking up, use ...

  5. Cholinergic Modulation during Acquisition of Olfactory Fear Conditioning Alters Learning and Stimulus Generalization in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Gooch, Allison; Lee, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in olfactory fear learning. Mice receiving pairings of odor and foot shock displayed fear to the trained odor the following day. Pretraining injections of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine had no effect on subsequent freezing, while the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine significantly…

  6. Striatal dopamine release regulation by the cholinergic properties of the smokeless tobacco, gutkha.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Brian; Lauterstein, Dana; Patel, Jyoti C; Zelikoff, Judith T; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-06-17

    Tobacco products influence striatal dopamine (DA) release primarily through the actions of nicotine, an agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Gutkha is a smokeless tobacco product that contains not only nicotine, but also includes the habit-forming areca nut and other plant-based constituents that contribute muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists and other cholinergic agents. Thus, the net influence of the cholinergic agents in gutkha on striatal DA release is difficult to predict. This study investigated the influence of gutkha extract on evoked DA release in mouse striatal slices using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. The potency of a given concentration of nicotine in the gutkha extract was found to be significantly lower than that of a comparable concentration of nicotine alone. Atropine, a mAChR antagonist, increased the potency of gutkha-associated nicotine; however, other experiments suggested that this was mediated in part by direct effects of atropine at nAChRs. Overall, these results suggest that the unique constituents of gutkha work together to oppose the influence of gutkha-associated nicotine on evoked striatal DA release.

  7. Nicotine attenuates relapse to methamphetamine-seeking behavior (craving) in rats.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Anggadiredja, Kusnandar; Fujisaki, Chie; Watanabe, Shigenori; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki

    2004-10-01

    This study clarifies the modulating action of the nicotinic cholinergic system on reinstatement of methamphetamine (MAP)-seeking behavior (craving) using an intravenous, self-administration paradigm in rats. After self-administration of MAP for 10 days, replacing MAP with saline solution (MAP withdrawal) gradually decreased lever-pressing responses. On the sixth day of MAP withdrawal, MAP (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.)-priming injection significantly increased lever-pressing responses (reinstatement of MAP-seeking behavior). This MAP-seeking behavior was attenuated by repeated nicotine administration for 5 days during MAP withdrawal, and this attenuating effect was antagonized by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine. These results suggest that the appearance of MAP-seeking behavior may be due to inactivation of the nicotinic cholinergic neuron. Furthermore, it is suggested that nicotinic activating agents may be useful in preventing relapse to drug abuse.

  8. Luminal cholinergic signalling in airway lining fluid: a novel mechanism for activating chloride secretion via Ca2+-dependent Cl− and K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Lips, Katrin S; Wolff, Miriam; Wess, Jürgen; Gerbig, Stefanie; Takats, Zoltan; Kummer, Wolfgang; Fronius, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent studies detected the expression of proteins involved in cholinergic metabolism in airway epithelial cells, although the function of this non-neuronal cholinergic system is not known in detail. Thus, this study focused on the effect of luminal ACh as a regulator of transepithelial ion transport in epithelial cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH RT-PCR experiments were performed using mouse tracheal epithelial cells for ChAT and organic cation transporter (OCT) transcripts. Components of tracheal airway lining fluid were analysed with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) MS. Effects of nicotine on mouse tracheal epithelial ion transport were examined with Ussing-chamber experiments. KEY RESULTS Transcripts encoding ChAT and OCT1–3 were detected in mouse tracheal epithelial cells. The DESI experiments identified ACh in the airway lining fluid. Luminal ACh induced an immediate, dose-dependent increase in the transepithelial ion current (EC50: 23.3 µM), characterized by a transient peak and sustained plateau current. This response was not affected by the Na+-channel inhibitor amiloride. The Cl−-channel inhibitor niflumic acid or the K+-channel blocker Ba2+ attenuated the ACh effect. The calcium ionophore A23187 mimicked the ACh effect. Luminal nicotine or muscarine increased the ion current. Experiments with receptor gene-deficient animals revealed the participation of muscarinic receptor subtypes M1 and M3. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of luminal ACh and activation of transepithelial ion currents by luminal ACh receptors identifies a novel non-neuronal cholinergic pathway in the airway lining fluid. This pathway could represent a novel drug target in the airways. PMID:22300281

  9. Reductions in (/sup 3/H)nicotinic acetylcholine binding in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, P.J.; Martino, A.M.; Wagster, M.V.; Price, D.L.; Mayeux, R.; Atack, J.R.; Kellar, K.J.

    1988-05-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), dysfunction in the basal forebrain cholinergic system is accompanied by a consistent loss of presynaptic cholinergic markers in cortex, but changes in cholinergic receptor binding sites are poorly understood. In the present study, we used receptor autoradiography to map the distribution of nicotinic (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites in cortices of individuals with AD and PD and matched control subjects. In both diseases, a profound loss of nicotinic receptors occurs in all cortical layers, particularly the deepest layers.

  10. Apolipoprotein E4 allele as a predictor of cholinergic deficits and treatment outcome in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, J; Delisle, M C; Quirion, R; Aubert, I; Farlow, M; Lahiri, D; Hui, S; Bertrand, P; Nalbantoglu, J; Gilfix, B M

    1995-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is critical in the modulation of cholesterol and phospholipid transport between cells of different types. Human apoE is a polymorphic protein with three common alleles, APO epsilon 2, APO epsilon 3, and APO epsilon 4. ApoE4 is associated with sporadic and late-onset familial Alzheimer disease (AD). Gene dose was shown to have an effect on risk of developing AD, age of onset, accumulation of senile plaques in the brain, and reduction of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in the hippocampus of AD subjects. To characterize the possible impact of the apoE4 allele on cholinergic markers in AD, we examined the effect of apoE4 allele copy number on pre- and postsynaptic markers of cholinergic activity. ApoE4 allele copy number showed an inverse relationship with residual brain ChAT activity and nicotinic receptor binding sites in both the hippocampal formation and the temporal cortex of AD subjects. AD cases lacking the apoE4 allele showed ChAT activities close or within age-matched normal control values. The effect of the apoE4 allele on cholinomimetic drug responsiveness was assessed next in a group (n = 40) of AD patients who completed a double-blind, 30-week clinical trial of the cholinesterase inhibitor tacrine. Results showed that > 80% of apoE4-negative AD patients showed marked improvement after 30 weeks as measured by the AD assessment scale (ADAS), whereas 60% of apoE4 carriers had ADAS scores that were worse compared to baseline. These results strongly support the concept that apoE4 plays a crucial role in the cholinergic dysfunction associated with AD and may be a prognostic indicator of poor response to therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in AD patients. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8618881

  11. Thujone inhibits the function of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and impairs nicotine-induced memory enhancement in one-trial passive avoidance paradigm.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Ahmed; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Isaev, Dmitro; Nebrisi, Eslam El; Syed, Nurulain; Khan, Nadia; Howarth, Christopher F; Sadek, Bassem; Oz, Murat

    2017-04-07

    Effects of thujone, a major ingredient of absinthe, wormwood oil and some herbal medicines, were tested on the function of α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine (α7 nACh) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Thujone reversibly inhibited ACh (100μM)-induced currents with an IC50 value of 24.7μM. The effect of thujone was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels expressed endogenously in oocytes. Inhibition by thujone was not reversed by increasing ACh concentrations. Moreover, specific binding of [(125)I] α-bungarotoxin was not altered by thujone. Further experiments in SH-EP1 cells expressing human α7 nACh receptor indicated that thujone suppressed choline induced Ca(2+) transients in a concentration-dependent manner. In rat hippocampal CA3-dentate gyrus synapses, nicotine-induced enhancement of long-term potentiation was also inhibited by thujone. Furthermore, the results observed in in-vivo one-trial passive avoidance paradigm show that thujone (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) significantly impaired nicotine-induced enhancement of learning and memory in Wistar rats. Collectively, our results indicate that thujone inhibits the function of the α7-nACh receptor and impairs cellular and behavioral correlates of cholinergic modulation of learning and memory.

  12. Cholinergic inhibition of adrenergic neurosecretion in the rabbit iris-ciliary body

    SciTech Connect

    Jumblatt, J.E.; North, G.T.

    1988-04-01

    The prejunctional effects of cholinergic agents on release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings were investigated in the isolated, superfused rabbit iris-ciliary body. Stimulation-evoked release of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine was inhibited by the cholinergic agonists methacholine, oxotremorine, muscarine, carbamylcholine and acetylcholine (plus eserine), but was unmodified by pilocarpine or nicotine. Agonist-induced inhibition was antagonized selectively by atropine, indicating a muscarinic response. Atropine alone markedly enhanced norepinephrine release, revealing considerable tonic activation of prejunctional cholinergic receptors in this system. Prejunctional inhibition by carbamylcholine was found to completely override the facilitative action of forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP on neurotransmitter release. Cholinergic and alpha 2-adrenergic effects on neurosecretion were non-additive, suggesting that the underlying receptors coexist at neurotransmitter release sites.

  13. Cholinergic modulation of food and drug satiety and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Rada, Pedro V

    2012-06-06

    Although they comprise only a small portion of the neurons in the region, cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum appear to play an important role in the regulation of various appetitive behaviors, in part, through their interactions with mesolimbic dopamine (DA) systems. In this review, we describe studies that suggest that the activity of cholinergic interneurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and cholinergic projections to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) affect feeding behavior. In vivo microdialysis studies in rats have revealed that the cessation of a meal is associated with a rise in acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the NAc. ACh activation will suppress feeding, and this is also associated with an increase in synaptic accumulation of ACh. Further, we discuss how, in addition to their role in the ending of a meal, cholinergic interneurons in the NAc play an integral role in the cessation of drug use. Another cholinergic system involved in different aspects of appetitive behavior is the projection from the pedunculpontine nuclei directly to the VTA. Activation of this system enhances behaviors through activation of the mesolimbic DA system, and antagonism of ACh receptors in the VTA can reduce drug self-administration. Finally, we discuss the role of accumbens ACh in both drug and palatable food withdrawal. Studies reveal that accumbens ACh is increased during withdrawal from several different drugs of abuse (including cocaine, nicotine and morphine). This rise in extracellular levels of ACh, coupled with a decrease in extracellular levels of DA, is believed to contribute to an aversive state, which can manifest as behaviors associated with drug withdrawal. This theory has also been applied to studies of overeating and/or "food addiction," and the findings suggest a similar imbalance in DA/ACh levels, which is associated with behavioral indications of drug-like withdrawal. In summary, cholinergic neurons play an important role in the modulation of both

  14. Electrophysiology-Based Assays to Detect Subtype-Selective Modulation of Human Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Glenn E.; Fedorov, Nikolai B.; Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Liu, Zhiqi; Orr, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-31) gave the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the responsibility for regulating tobacco products. Nicotine is the primary addictive component of tobacco and its effects can be modulated by additional ingredients in manufactured products. Nicotine acts by mimicking the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which function as ion channels in cholinergic modulation of neurotransmission. Subtypes within the family of neuronal nAChRs are defined by their α- and β-subunit composition. The subtype-selective profiles of tobacco constituents are largely unknown, but could be essential for understanding the physiological effects of tobacco products. In this report, we report the development and validation of electrophysiology-based high-throughput screens (e-HTS) for human nicotinic subtypes, α3β4, α3β4α5, α4β2, and α7 stably expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Assessment of agonist sensitivity and acute desensitization gave results comparable to those obtained by conventional manual patch clamp electrophysiology assays. The potency of reference antagonists for inhibition of the receptor channels and selectivity of positive allosteric modulators also were very similar between e-HTS and conventional manual patch voltage clamp data. Further validation was obtained in pilot screening of a library of FDA-approved drugs that identified α7 subtype-selective positive allosteric modulation by novel compounds. These assays provide new tools for profiling of nicotinic receptor selectivity. PMID:27505073

  15. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channel activity in brain cells of adult offspring mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Busso, Dolores; Ramírez, Gigliola; Campos, Marlys; Rigotti, Attilio; Eugenín, Jaime; von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, the most important neuroteratogen of tobacco smoke, can reproduce brain and cognitive disturbances per se when administered prenatally. However, it is still unknown if paracrine signaling among brain cells participates in prenatal nicotine-induced brain impairment of adult offspring. Paracrine signaling is partly mediated by unopposed channels formed by connexins hemichannels (HCs) and pannexins serving as aqueous pores permeable to ions and small signaling molecules, allowing exchange between the intra- and extracellular milieus. Our aim was to address whether prenatal nicotine exposure changes the activity of those channels in adult mice offspring under control conditions or subjected to a second challenge during young ages: high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet. To induce prenatal exposure to nicotine, osmotic minipumps were implanted in CF1 pregnant mice at gestational day 5 to deliver nicotine bitartrate or saline (control) solutions. After weaning, offspring of nicotine-treated or untreated pregnant mice were fed ad libitum with chow or HFC diets for 8 weeks. The functional state of connexin 43 (Cx43) and pannexin 1 (Panx1) unopposed channels was evaluated by dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices from 11-week-old mice. We found that prenatal nicotine increased the opening of Cx43 HCs in astrocytes, and Panx1 channels in microglia and neurons only if offspring mice were fed with HFC diet. Blockade of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E receptor 1 (EP1), ionotropic ATP receptor type 7 (P2X7) and NMDA receptors, showed differential inhibition of prenatal nicotine-induced channel opening in glial cells and neurons. Importantly, inhibition of the above mentioned enzymes and receptors, or blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels greatly reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glutamate release from hippocampal slices of prenatally nicotine-exposed offspring. We propose that unregulated gliotransmitter

  16. Interaction between the antioxidant activity of curcumin and cholinergic system on memory retention in adult male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarlak, Zeynab; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Moghaddasi, Mehrnoush

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The cholinergic system plays an important role in learning and memory. This study investigated the effects of curcumin (turmeric extract) and the cholinergic system and their interaction on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in adult male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: At first, an injection cannula was implanted in right ventricles of the animals. One week after the surgery, the animals were trained with a shuttle box set up. Post-training, injections were performed in all experiments. Administration of curcumin increased memory retention. Also administrations of nicotine and pilocarpine, the cholinergic receptor agonists, increased memory retention, while it is decreased by succinylcholine and scopolamine, the cholinergic receptor antagonists. Then co-administration of curcumin and cholinergic drugs were performed. Intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular injections were applied for the curcumin and cholinergic drugs, respectively. Results: Co-administration of curcumin (45 mg/kg) with a low dose of nicotine (0.1 µg/rat) or pilocarpine (0.5 µg/rat) increased memory retention significantly. Effects of succinylcholine (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 µg/rat) or scopolamine (0.1, 1 and 5 µg/rat) were attenuated by curcumin markedly (45 mg/kg). Conclusion: The results suggest that curcumin has a close interaction with cholinergic system in memory retention process. PMID:26019804

  17. Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors enhances a slow calcium-dependent potassium conductance and reduces the firing of stratum oriens interneurons.

    PubMed

    Griguoli, Marilena; Scuri, Rossana; Ragozzino, Davide; Cherubini, Enrico

    2009-09-01

    A large variety of distinct locally connected GABAergic cells are present in the hippocampus. By releasing GABA into principal cells and interneurons, they exert a powerful control on neuronal excitability and are responsible for network oscillations crucial for information processing in the brain. Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings in current and voltage clamp mode were used to study the functional role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on the firing properties of stratum oriens interneurons in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in a subpopulation of GABAergic cells containing somatostatin (GIN mice). Unexpectedly, activation of nAChRs by nicotine or endogenously released acetylcholine strongly enhanced spike frequency adaptation. This effect was blocked by apamin, suggesting the involvement of small calcium-dependent potassium channels (SK channels). Nicotine-induced reduction in firing frequency was dependent on intracellular calcium rise through calcium-permeable nAChRs and voltage-dependent calcium channels activated by the depolarizing action of nicotine. Calcium imaging experiments directly showed that nicotine effects on firing rate were correlated with large increases in intracellular calcium. Furthermore, blocking ryanodine receptors with ryanodine or sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase with thapsygargin or cyclopiazonic acid fully prevented the effects of nicotine, suggesting that mobilization of calcium from the internal stores contributed to the observed effects. By regulating cell firing, cholinergic signalling through nAChRs would be instrumental for fine-tuning the output of stratum oriens interneurons and correlated activity at the network level.

  18. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  19. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research. PMID:25107282

  20. Nicotine evoked improvement in learning and memory is mediated through NPY Y1 receptors in rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rangani, Ritesh J; Upadhya, Manoj A; Nakhate, Kartik T; Kokare, Dadasaheb M; Subhedar, Nishikant K

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the role of endogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY) system in nicotine-mediated improvement of learning and memory in rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intracerebroventricular (icv) colchicine treatment induced AD-like condition in rats and showed increased escape latency (decreased learning), and amnesic condition in probe test in Morris water maze. In these rats, nicotine (0.5mg/kg, intraperitoneal), NPY (100 ng/rat, icv) or NPY Y1 receptor agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY (0.04 ng/rat, icv) decreased escape latency by 54.76%, 55.81% and 44.18%, respectively, on day 4 of the acquisition. On the other hand, selective NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBP3226 (icv) produced opposite effect (44.18%). In the probe test conducted at 24h time point, nicotine, NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY increased the time spent by 72.72%, 44.11% and 26.47%, respectively; while BIBP3226 caused reduction (8.82%). It seems that while NPY or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY potentiated, BIBP3226 attenuated the learning and memory enhancing effects of nicotine. Brains of colchicine treated rats showed significant reduction in NPY-immunoreactivity in the nucleus accumbens shell (cells 62.23% and fibers 50%), bed nucleus of stria terminalis (fibers 71.58%), central nucleus of amygdala (cells 74.33%), arcuate nucleus (cells 70.97% and fibers 69.65%) and dentate gyrus (cells 58.54%). However, in these rats nicotine treatment for 4 days restored NPY-immunoreactivity to the control level. We suggest that NPY, perhaps acting via NPY Y1 receptors, might interact with the endogenous cholinergic system and play a role in improving the learning and memory processes in the rats with AD-like condition.

  1. The interface between cholinergic pathways and the immune system and its relevance to arthritis.

    PubMed

    McAllen, Robin M; Cook, Andrew D; Khiew, Hsu Wei; Martelli, Davide; Hamilton, John A

    2015-03-31

    The nervous and immune systems are likely to be interacting in arthritis, with the possible involvement of both neural and non-neural cholinergic transmission. Centrally acting muscarinic agonists, electrical stimulation of the vagus and treatment with nicotinic receptor agonists can all act systemically to reduce inflammation, although the responsible pathways are incompletely understood. While this 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway' is widely viewed as a significant pathophysiological mechanism controlling inflammation, the evidence supporting this view is critically reviewed and considered inconclusive; an alternative pathway via sympathetic nerves is implicated. This review also discusses how cholinergic pathways, both neural and non-neural, may impact on inflammation and specifically arthritis. Nicotinic agonists have been reported to reduce the incidence and severity of murine arthritis, albeit an observation we could not confirm, and clinical studies in rheumatoid arthritis have been proposed and/or are underway. While the therapeutic potential of nicotinic agonists and vagal stimulation is clear, we suggest that the 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway' should not be uncritically embraced as a significant factor in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Actions of cholinergic drugs in the nematode Ascaris suum. Complex pharmacology of muscle and motorneurons

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The cholinergic agonists acetylcholine (ACh), nicotine, and pilocarpine produced depolarizations and contractions of muscle of the nematode Ascaris suum. Dose-dependent depolarization and contraction by ACh were suppressed by about two orders of magnitude by 100 microM d- tubocurarine (dTC), a nicotinic antagonist, but only about fivefold by 100 microM N-methyl-scopolamine (NMS), a muscarinic antagonist. NMS itself depolarized both normal and synaptically isolated muscle cells. The muscle depolarizing action of pilocarpine was not consistently antagonized by either NMS or dTC. ACh receptors were detected on motorneuron classes DE1, DE2, DI, and VI as ACh-induced reductions in input resistance. These input resistance changes were reversed by washing in drug-free saline or by application of dTC. NMS applied alone lowered input resistance in DE1, but not in DE2, DI, or VI motorneurons. In contrast to the effect of ACh, the action of NMS in DE1 was not reversed by dTC, suggesting that NMS-sensitive sites may not respond to ACh. Excitatory synaptic responses in muscle evoked by depolarizing current injections into DE1 and DE2 motorneurons were antagonized by dTC; however, NMS antagonized the synaptic output of only the DE1 and DE3 classes of motorneurons, an effect that was more likely to have been produced by motorneuron conduction failure than by pharmacological blockade of receptor. The concentration of NMS required to produce these changes in muscle polarization and contraction, ACh antagonism, input resistance reduction, and synaptic antagonism was 100 microM, or more than five orders of magnitude higher than the binding affinity for [3H]NMS in larval Ascaris homogenates and adult Caenorhabditis elegans (Segerberg, M. A. 1989. Ph.D. thesis. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI). These results describe a nicotinic- like pharmacology, but muscle and motorneurons also have unusual responses to muscarinic agents. PMID:8455017

  3. Unmasking the functions of the chromaffin cell α7 nicotinic receptor by using short pulses of acetylcholine and selective blockers

    PubMed Central

    López, Manuela G.; Montiel, Carmen; Herrero, Carlos J.; García-Palomero, Esther; Mayorgas, Inés; Hernández-Guijo, Jesús M.; Villarroya, M.; Olivares, Román; Gandía, Luis; McIntosh, J. Michael; Olivera, Baldomero M.; García, Antonio G.

    1998-01-01

    Methyllycaconitine (MLA), α-conotoxin ImI, and α-bungarotoxin inhibited the release of catecholamines triggered by brief pulses of acetylcholine (ACh) (100 μM, 5 s) applied to fast-superfused bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, with IC50s of 100 nM for MLA and 300 nM for α-conotoxin ImI and α-bungarotoxin. MLA (100 nM), α-conotoxin ImI (1 μM), and α-bungarotoxin (1 μM) halved the entry of 45Ca2+ stimulated by 5-s pulses of 300 μM ACh applied to incubated cells. These supramaximal concentrations of α7 nicotinic receptor blockers depressed by 30% (MLA), 25% (α-bungarotoxin), and 50% (α-conotoxin ImI) the inward current generated by 1-s pulses of 100 μM ACh, applied to voltage-clamped chromaffin cells. In Xenopus oocytes expressing rat brain α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor for acetylcholine nAChR, the current generated by 1-s pulses of ACh was blocked by MLA, α-conotoxin ImI, and α-bungarotoxin with IC50s of 0.1 nM, 100 nM, and 1.6 nM, respectively; the current through α3β4 nAChR was unaffected by α-conotoxin ImI and α-bungarotoxin, and weakly blocked by MLA (IC50 = 1 μM). The functions of controlling the electrical activity, the entry of Ca2+, and the ensuing exocytotic response of chromaffin cells were until now exclusively attributed to α3β4 nAChR; the present results constitute the first evidence to support a prominent role of α7 nAChR in controlling such functions, specially under the more physiological conditions used here to stimulate chromaffin cells with brief pulses of ACh. PMID:9826675

  4. cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits α7 nicotinic receptor activity in layer 1 cortical interneurons through activation of D1/D5 dopamine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Komal, Pragya; Estakhr, Jasem; Kamran, Melad; Renda, Anthony; Nashmi, Raad

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of ion channels, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), by protein kinases plays a key role in the modification of synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. α7 nAChRs are the second most prevalent nAChR subtype in the CNS following α4β2. Serine 365 in the M3–M4 cytoplasmic loop of the α7 nAChR is a phosphorylation site for protein kinase A (PKA). D1/D5 dopamine receptors signal through the adenylate cyclase–PKA pathway and play a key role in working memory and attention in the prefrontal cortex. Thus, we examined whether the dopaminergic system, mediated through PKA, functionally interacts with the α7-dependent cholinergic neurotransmission. In layer 1 interneurons of mouse prefrontal cortex, α7 nicotinic currents were decreased upon stimulation with 8-Br-cAMP, a PKA activator. In HEK 293T cells, dominant negative PKA abolished 8-Br-cAMP's effect of diminishing α7 nicotinic currents, while a constitutively active PKA catalytic subunit decreased α7 currents. In brain slices, the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 nullified 8-Br-cAMP's effect of attenuating α7 nicotinic responses, while applying a PKA catalytic subunit in the pipette solution decreased α7 currents. 8-Br-cAMP stimulation reduced surface expression of α7 nAChRs, but there was no change in single-channel conductance. The D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonist SKF 83822 similarly attenuated α7 nicotinic currents from layer 1 interneurons and this attenuation of nicotinic current was prevented by KT-5720. These results demonstrate that dopamine receptor-mediated activation of PKA negatively modulates nicotinic neurotransmission in prefrontal cortical interneurons, which may be a contributing mechanism of dopamine modulation of cognitive behaviours such as attention or working memory. PMID:25990637

  5. Ligand-binding properties of an unusual nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype on isolated outer hair cells from guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, G; Järlebark, L; Heilbronn, E

    1995-07-28

    Acetylcholine receptors on isolated guinea pig cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) were characterized by radioligand binding. Equilibrium binding of [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin revealed a KD of 62 +/- 2 nM, Bmax = 7.2 +/- 1.8 x 10(7) binding sites/OHC, and a slowly reversible dissociation rate constant, kappa-1 = 2.2 +/- 0.01 x 10(-4) min-1. L-[3H]Nicotine bound reversibly (estimated KD approximately 230 nM and Bmax approximately 5 x 10(7)) with kinetic rate constants of association kappa-1 = 6.2 +/- 0.06 x 10(4) min-1 nM-1 and dissociation kappa-1 = 0.23 +/- 0.003 min-1. [3H]Strychnine bound to OHC with a KD of 35 +/- 6 nM and Bmax = 2.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(7), and binding increased 3-4 fold after membrane depolarization with 56.2 mM [K+], suggesting additional binding sites. Binding, seen only at > nM concentrations, of [3H]3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (KD = 11.5 +/- 5 nM; Bmax = 2.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(6)) was competitively inhibited by the muscarinic antagonists atropine and 4-DAMP (IC50 of 6.1 +/- 0.5 and 6.5 +/- 0.4 nM). The OHC receptor is thus an atypical nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype with unusual pharmacological properties.

  6. How reduction of theta rhythm by medial septum inactivation may covary with disruption of entorhinal grid cell responses due to reduced cholinergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Pilly, Praveen K; Grossberg, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations in the coordinated firing of brain neurons have been proposed to play important roles in perception, cognition, attention, learning, navigation, and sensory-motor control. The network theta rhythm has been associated with properties of spatial navigation, as has the firing of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells. Two recent studies reduced the theta rhythm by inactivating the medial septum (MS) and demonstrated a correlated reduction in the characteristic hexagonal spatial firing patterns of grid cells. These results, along with properties of intrinsic membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) in slice preparations of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC), have been interpreted to support oscillatory interference models of grid cell firing. The current article shows that an alternative self-organizing map (SOM) model of grid cells can explain these data about intrinsic and network oscillations without invoking oscillatory interference. In particular, the adverse effects of MS inactivation on grid cells can be understood in terms of how the concomitant reduction in cholinergic inputs may increase the conductances of leak potassium (K(+)) and slow and medium after-hyperpolarization (sAHP and mAHP) channels. This alternative model can also explain data that are problematic for oscillatory interference models, including how knockout of the HCN1 gene in mice, which flattens the dorsoventral gradient in MPO frequency and resonance frequency, does not affect the development of the grid cell dorsoventral gradient of spatial scales, and how hexagonal grid firing fields in bats can occur even in the absence of theta band modulation. These results demonstrate how models of grid cell self-organization can provide new insights into the relationship between brain learning and oscillatory dynamics.

  7. Nicotine Dependence Reveals Distinct Responses from Neurons and Their Resident Nicotinic Receptors in Medial Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Pei-Yu; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the molecular target of nicotine. nAChRs in the medial habenula (MHb) have recently been shown to play a role in nicotine dependence, but it is not clear which nAChR subtypes or MHb neuron types are most important. To identify MHb nAChRs and/or cell types that play a role in nicotine dependence, we studied these receptors and cells with brain slice electrophysiology using both acute and chronic nicotine application. Cells in the ventroinferior (MHbVI) and ventrolateral MHb (MHbVL) subregions expressed functional nAChRs with different pharmacology. Further, application of nicotine to cells in these subregions led to different action potential firing patterns. The latter result was correlated with a differing ability of nicotine to induce nAChR desensitization. Chronic nicotine caused functional upregulation of nAChRs selectively in MHbVI cells, but did not change nAChR function in MHbVL. Importantly, firing responses were also differentially altered in these subregions following chronic nicotine. MHbVI neurons treated chronically with nicotine exhibited enhanced basal pacemaker firing but a blunted nicotine-induced firing response. MHbVL neurons did not change their firing properties in response to chronic nicotine. Together, these results suggest that acute and chronic nicotine differentially affect nAChR function and output of cells in MHb subregions. Because the MHb extensively innervates the interpeduncular nucleus, an area critical for both affective and somatic signs of withdrawal, these results could reflect some of the neurophysiological changes thought to occur in the MHb to the interpeduncular nucleus circuit in human smokers. PMID:26429939

  8. Spin labeled acetylcholine analogs: studies of cholinergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Rosen, G M; Abou-Donia, M B; Yeh, J Z; Menzel, D B

    1975-10-01

    Some spin-labeled acetylcholine analogs, in which the number of methylene groups between the quaternary nitrogen and the ether oxygen ranged between 1-5, were synthesized to study drug interacitons with acetylcholine receptors. None of the compounds tested, with the exception of the one that contained 2 methylene groups (SL-2) had any cholinergic activity. SL-2 was not capable of producing any nicotinic cholinomimetic activity. On the other hand it proved to have a very weak nicotinic cholinolytic activity on the receptors of the frog satorius muscle. This compound exhibited strong antagonism against muscarinic receptors of the isolated frog heart. The muscarinic cholinolytic action of the spin-label ACh analog is discussed in terms of the molecular perturbation theory of drug action.

  9. Inhibition of PaCaMKII-E isoform in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells of cockroach reduces nicotine- and clothianidin-induced currents.

    PubMed

    List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Taillebois, Emiliane; Juchaux, Marjorie; Heuland, Emilie; Thany, Steeve H

    2014-08-01

    Cellular responses to Ca(2+) require intermediary proteins such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), which transduces the signal into downstream effects. We recently demonstrated that the cockroach genome encodes five different CaMKII isoforms, and only PaCaMKII-E isoform is specifically expressed in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells. In the present study, using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that PaCaMKII-E isoform inhibition reduced nicotine-induced currents through α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. Specifically, PaCaMKII-E isoform is sufficient to repress nicotinic current amplitudes as a result of its depression by antisense oligonucleotides. Similar results were found using the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin, which acted as a full agonist of dorsal unpaired median neuron nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Clothianidin current amplitudes are strongly reduced under bath application of PaCaMKII-E antisense oligonucleotides but no significant results are found with α-bungarotoxin co-applied, demonstrating that CaMKII-E isoform affects nicotine currents through α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive receptor subtypes whereas clothianidin currents are reduced via α-bungarotoxin-insensitive receptors. In addition, we found that intracellular calcium increase induced by nicotine and clothianidin were reduced by PaCaMKII-E antisense oligonucleotides, demonstrating that intracellular calcium increase induced by nicotine and clothianidin are affected by PaCaMKII-E inhibition. Cellular responses to Ca(2+) require intermediary proteins such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We recently demonstrated that the cockroach genome encodes five different CaMKII isoforms and only PaCaMKII-E isoform was specifically expressed in the dorsal unpaired median neurosecretory cells. Here we show that specific inhibition of PaCaMKII-E isoform is

  10. Noradrenaline hyperpolarizes identified rat mesopontine cholinergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Reiner, P B

    1993-09-01

    Inhibition of brainstem cholinergic neurons by noradrenergic neurons of the locus ceruleus has long been suggested as a key mechanism of behavioral state control. In particular, the commonly held view is that noradrenaline (NA) plays a permissive role in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep generation by disinhibiting brainstem cholinergic neurons. While this notion has been supported by numerous investigations, the inhibition of cholinergic neurons by NA has never been directly demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of NA upon identified cholinergic neurons in the rat mesopontine tegmentum. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in slices, 175 cells were studied during bath application of 50 microM NA. Cholinergic neurons were positively identified by intracellular labeling with biocytin and subsequent staining with NADPH-diaphorase, a reliable marker for brainstem cholinergic neurons (Vincent et al., 1983). Successful intracellular labeling was obtained in 96 cells. Ninety-two percent (36 of 39) of cholinergic neurons hyperpolarized in response to NA, while noncholinergic cells (n = 57) exhibited mixed responses. Application of NA in a low-Ca2+, high-Mg2+ solution elicited the same hyperpolarizing effect as in normal solution, which indicated that the effect of NA on cholinergic neurons was direct. The noradrenergic hyperpolarization was mimicked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14,304, and was blocked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, which suggested an alpha 2-mediated response. Finally, voltage-clamp experiments revealed that NA activates the inwardly rectifying potassium current, IKG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. CHRNA5 as negative regulator of nicotine signaling in normal and cancer bronchial cells: effects on motility, migration and p63 expression.

    PubMed

    Krais, Annette M; Hautefeuille, Agnès H; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Tournier, Jean-Marie; Birembaut, Philippe; Thépot, Amélie; Paliwal, Anupam; Herceg, Zdenko; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Hainaut, Pierre L

    2011-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have linked lung cancer risk with a region of chromosome 15q25.1 containing CHRNA3, CHRNA5 and CHRNB4 encoding α3, α5 and β4 subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. One of the strongest associations was observed for a non-silent single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 398 in CHRNA5. Here, we have used pharmacological (antagonists) or genetic (RNA interference) interventions to modulate the activity of CHRNA5 in non-transformed bronchial cells and in lung cancer cell lines. In both cell types, silencing CHRNA5 or inhibiting receptors containing nAChR α5 with α-conotoxin MII exerted a nicotine-like effect, with increased motility and invasiveness in vitro and increasing calcium influx. The effects on motility were enhanced by addition of nicotine but blocked by inhibiting CHRNA7, which encodes the homopentameric receptor α7 subunit. Silencing CHRNA5 also decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules P120 and ZO-1 in lung cancer cells as well as the expression of DeltaNp63α in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. These results demonstrate a role for CHRNA5 in modulating adhesion and motility in bronchial cells, as well as in regulating p63, a potential oncogene in squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Impairment of skin barrier function via cholinergic signal transduction in a dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Dry skin has been clinically associated with visceral diseases, including liver disease, as well as for our previously reported small intestinal injury mouse model, which have abnormalities in skin barrier function. To clarify this disease-induced skin disruption, we used a dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Following treatment with DSS, damage to the colon and skin was monitored using histological and protein analysis methods as well as the detection of inflammatory mediators in the plasma. Notably, transepidermal water loss was higher, and skin hydration was lower in DSS-treated mice compared to controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 and NO2-/NO3- levels were also upregulated in the plasma, and a decrease in body weight and colon length was observed in DSS-treated mice. However, when administered TNF-α antibody or an iNOS inhibitor, no change in skin condition was observed, indicating that another signalling mechanism is utilized. Interestingly, the number of tryptase-expressing mast cells, known for their role in immune function via cholinergic signal transduction, was elevated. To evaluate the function of cholinergic signalling in this context, atropine (a muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist) or hexamethonium (a nicotinic cholinergic ganglion-blocking agent) was administered to DSS-treated mice. Our data indicate that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are the primary receptors functioning in colon-to-skin signal transduction, as DSS-induced skin disruption was suppressed by atropine. Thus, skin disruption is likely associated with DSS-induced colitis, and the activation of mast cells via mAChRs is critical to this association.

  13. Cholinergic receptor signaling modulates spontaneous firing of sinoatrial nodal cells via integrated effects on PKA-dependent Ca2+ cycling and IKACh

    PubMed Central

    Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Zahanich, Ihor; Li, Yue; Younes, Antoine; Nuss, H. Bradley; Spurgeon, Harold A.; Maltsev, Victor A.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that cholinergic receptor (ChR) activation is linked to beating rate reduction (BRR) in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANC) via 1) a Gi-coupled reduction in adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, leading to a reduction of cAMP or protein kinase A (PKA) modulation of hyperpolarization-activated current (If) or L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa,L), respectively; and 2) direct Gi-coupled activation of ACh-activated potassium current (IKACh). More recent studies, however, have indicated that Ca2+ cycling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum within SANC (referred to as a Ca2+ clock) generates rhythmic, spontaneous local Ca2+ releases (LCR) that are AC-PKA dependent. LCRs activate Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX) current, which ignites the surface membrane ion channels to effect an AP. The purpose of the present study was to determine how ChR signaling initiated by a cholinergic agonist, carbachol (CCh), affects AC, cAMP, and PKA or sarcolemmal ion channels and LCRs and how these effects become integrated to generate the net response to a given intensity of ChR stimulation in single, isolated rabbit SANC. The threshold CCh concentration ([CCh]) for BRR was ∼10 nM, half maximal inhibition (IC50) was achieved at 100 nM, and 1,000 nM stopped spontaneous beating. Gi inhibition by pertussis toxin blocked all CCh effects on BRR. Using specific ion channel blockers, we established that If blockade did not affect BRR at any [CCh] and that IKACh activation, evidenced by hyperpolarization, first became apparent at [CCh] > 30 nM. At IC50, CCh reduced cAMP and reduced PKA-dependent phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation by ∼50%. The dose response of BRR to CCh in the presence of IKACh blockade by a specific inhibitor, tertiapin Q, mirrored that of CCh to reduced PLB phosphorylation. At IC50, CCh caused a time-dependent reduction in the number and size of LCRs and a time dependent increase in LCR period that paralleled coincident BRR. The phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A reversed the effect of

  14. Characterization of nicotine binding in mouse brain and comparison with the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin and quinuclidinyl benzilate

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C.

    1982-11-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)nicotine to mouse brain has been measured and subsequently compared with the binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) and L-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). The binding of nicotine was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. The average KD and Bmax were 59 nM and 88 fmoles/mg of protein, respectively. Although the rates of association and dissociation of nicotine were temperature-dependent, the incubation temperature had no effect on either KD or Bmax. When measured at 20 degrees or 37 degrees, nicotine appeared to bind to a single class of binding sites, but a second, very low-affinity, binding site was observed at 4 degrees. Nicotine binding was unaffected by the addition of NaCl, KCl, CaCl/sub 2/, or MgSO/sub 4/ to the incubation medium. Nicotinic cholinergic agonists were potent inhibitors of nicotine binding; however, nicotinic antagonists were poor inhibitors. The regional distribution of binding was not uniform: midbrain and striatum contained the highest number of receptors, whereas cerebellum had the fewest. Differences in site densities, regional distribution, inhibitor potencies, and thermal denaturation indicated that nicotine binding was not the same as either QNB or alpha-BTX binding, and therefore that receptors for nicotine may represent a unique population of cholinergic receptors.

  15. Nicotine Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis but Not Ileitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vigna, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis but not Crohn's disease of the small intestine, but little is known about the effects of nicotine on Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced enteritis. Isolated ileal or colonic segments in anesthetized rats were pretreated with nicotine bitartrate or other pharmacological agents before intraluminal injection of toxin A. After 3 hours, the treated segments were removed and inflammation was assessed. Nicotine biphasically inhibited toxin A colitis but not ileitis. Pretreatment with the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, blocked the effects of nicotine. Pretreating the colonic segments with hexamethonium before toxin A administration resulted in more inflammation than seen with toxin A alone, suggesting that a tonic nicotinic anti-inflammatory condition exists in the colon. Nicotine also inhibited toxin A-induced increased colonic concentrations of the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) agonist, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and release of the proinflammatory neuropeptide, substance P. Pretreatment with nicotine did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by intraluminal capsaicin. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors tonically protect the colon against inflammation and nicotine inhibits toxin A colitis but not toxin A ileitis in rats in part by inhibition of toxin A-induced activation of TRPV1 by endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as LTB4. PMID:26881175

  16. Nicotine Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis but Not Ileitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis but not Crohn's disease of the small intestine, but little is known about the effects of nicotine on Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced enteritis. Isolated ileal or colonic segments in anesthetized rats were pretreated with nicotine bitartrate or other pharmacological agents before intraluminal injection of toxin A. After 3 hours, the treated segments were removed and inflammation was assessed. Nicotine biphasically inhibited toxin A colitis but not ileitis. Pretreatment with the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, blocked the effects of nicotine. Pretreating the colonic segments with hexamethonium before toxin A administration resulted in more inflammation than seen with toxin A alone, suggesting that a tonic nicotinic anti-inflammatory condition exists in the colon. Nicotine also inhibited toxin A-induced increased colonic concentrations of the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) agonist, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and release of the proinflammatory neuropeptide, substance P. Pretreatment with nicotine did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by intraluminal capsaicin. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors tonically protect the colon against inflammation and nicotine inhibits toxin A colitis but not toxin A ileitis in rats in part by inhibition of toxin A-induced activation of TRPV1 by endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as LTB4.

  17. Expression and Functional Role of α7 Nicotinic Receptor in Human Cytokine-stimulated Natural Killer (NK) Cells.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Samanta R; Ziblat, Andrea; Torres, Nicolás I; Zwirner, Norberto W; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2016-08-05

    The homomeric α7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is one of the most abundant nAChRs in the central nervous system where it contributes to cognition, attention, and working memory. α7 nAChR is also present in lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages and it is emerging as an important drug target for intervention in inflammation and sepsis. Natural killer (NK) cells display cytotoxic activity against susceptible target cells and modulate innate and adaptive immune responses through their interaction with DCs. We here show that human NK cells also express α7 nAChR. α7 nAChR mRNA is detected by RT-PCR and cell surface expression of α7 nAChR is detected by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry using α-bungarotoxin, a specific antagonist. Both mRNA and protein levels increase during NK stimulation with cytokines (IL-12, IL-18, and IL-15). Exposure of cytokine-stimulated NK cells to PNU-282987, a specific α7 nAChR agonist, increases intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) mainly released from intracellular stores, indicating that α7 nAChR is functional. Moreover, its activation by PNU-282987 plus a specific positive allosteric modulator greatly enhances the Ca(2+) responses in NK cells. Stimulation of NK cells with cytokines and PNU-282987 decreases NF-κB levels and nuclear mobilization, down-regulates NKG2D receptors, and decreases NKG2D-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production. Also, such NK cells are less efficient to trigger DC maturation. Thus, our results demonstrate the anti-inflammatory role of α7 nAChR in NK cells and suggest that modulation of its activity in these cells may constitute a novel target for regulation of the immune response.

  18. Binding, uptake, and release of nicotine by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, P.J.; Schuster, G.S.; Lubas, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of the effects of nicotine on fibroblasts have reported an altered morphology and attachment of fibroblasts to substrates and disturbances in protein synthesis and secretion. This altered functional and attachment response may be associated with changes in the cell membrane resulting from binding of the nicotine, or to disturbances in cell metabolism as a result of high intracellular levels of nicotine. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to (1) determine whether gingival fibroblasts bound nicotine and if any binding observed was specific or non-specific in nature; (2) determine whether gingival fibroblasts internalized nicotine, and if so, at what rate; (3) determine whether gingival fibroblasts also released nicotine back into the extracellular environment; and (4) if gingival fibroblasts release nicotine intact or as a metabolite. Cultures of gingival fibroblasts were prepared from gingival connective tissue biopsies. Binding was evaluated at 4{degree}C using a mixture of {sup 3}H-nicotine and unlabeled nicotine. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between {sup 3}H-nicotine bound in the presence and absence of unlabeled nicotine. The cells bound 1.44 (+/- 0.42) pmols/10(6) cells in the presence of unlabeled nicotine and 1.66 (+/- 0.55) pmols/10(6) cells in the absence of unlabeled nicotine. The difference was not significant. Uptake of nicotine was measured at 37{degree}C after treating cells with {sup 3}H-nicotine for time periods up to 4 hours. Uptake in pmols/10(6) cells was 4.90 (+/- 0.34) at 15 minutes, 8.30 (+/- 0.75) at 30 minutes, 12.28 (+/- 2.62) at 1 hour and 26.31 (+/- 1.15) at 4 hours.

  19. Cholinergic mechanisms of high-frequency stimulation in entopeduncular nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, high-frequency (>100 Hz) electrical stimulation, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) is a highly effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia. Despite some understanding of how it works acutely in PD models, there remain questions about its mechanisms of action. Several hypotheses have been proposed, such as depolarization blockade, activation of inhibitory synapses, depletion of neurotransmitters, and/or disruption/alteration of network oscillations. In this study we investigated the cellular mechanisms of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in entopeduncular nucleus (EP; rat equivalent of GPi) neurons using whole cell patch-clamp recordings. We found that HFS applied inside the EP nucleus induced a prolonged afterdepolarization that was dependent on stimulation frequency, pulse duration, and current amplitude. The high frequencies (>100 Hz) and pulse widths (>0.15 ms) used clinically for dystonia DBS could reliably induce these afterdepolarizations, which persisted under blockade of ionotropic glutamate (kynurenic acid, 2 mM), GABAA (picrotoxin, 50 μM), GABAB (CGP 55845, 1 μM), and acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (DHβE, 2 μM). However, this effect was blocked by atropine (2 μM; nonselective muscarinic antagonist) or tetrodotoxin (0.5 μM). Finally, the muscarinic-dependent afterdepolarizations were sensitive to Ca2+-sensitive nonspecific cationic (CAN) channel blockade. Hence, these data suggest that muscarinic receptor activation during HFS can lead to feedforward excitation through the opening of CAN channels. This study for the first time describes a cholinergic mechanism of HFS in EP neurons and provides new insight into the underlying mechanisms of DBS. PMID:26334006

  20. Laser photobiomodulation (830 and 660 nm) in mast cells, VEGF, FGF, and CD34 of the musculocutaneous flap in rats submitted to nicotine.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Lais Mara Siqueira; Leite, Gabriella de Paula Marcondes Ferreira; Marcolino, Alexandre Marcio; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; de Araújo, João Eduardo; Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of laser photobiomodulation (PBM) on the viability of the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap in rats subjected to the action of nicotine. We evaluated 60 albino Wistar rats, divided into six groups of ten animals. Group 1 (saline) underwent the surgical technique to obtain a TRAM flap; group 2 (laser 830 nm) underwent the surgical technique and was irradiated with a laser 830 nm; group 3 (laser 660 nm) underwent the surgical technique and was irradiated with a laser 660 nm; group 4 was treated with nicotine subcutaneously (2 mg/kg/2×/day/4 weeks) and underwent surgery; group 5 (nicotine + laser 830 nm) was exposed to nicotine, underwent the surgical technique, and was irradiated with a laser 830 nm; group 6 (nicotine + laser 660 nm) was exposed to nicotine, underwent the surgical technique, and was irradiated with a laser 660 nm. The application of PBM occurred immediately after surgery and on the two following days. The percentage of necrosis was assessed using the AxioVision® software. The number of mast cells (toluidine blue staining) was evaluated, and immunohistochemistry was performed to detect vascular endothelial growth factor expression (anti-VEGF-A), fibroblasts (anti-basic FGF), and neoformed vessels (anti-CD34). PBM with a wavelength of 830 nm increased the viability of the TRAM flap, with a smaller area of necrosis, increased number of mast cells, and higher expression of VEGF and CD34. PBM increases the viability of musculocutaneous flaps treated with to nicotine.

  1. Impact of prenatal nicotine on the structure of midbrain dopamine regions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Omelchenko, Natalia; Roy, Priya; Balcita-Pedicino, Judith Joyce; Poloyac, Samuel; Sesack, Susan R

    2016-05-01

    In utero exposure of rats to nicotine (NIC) provides a useful animal model for studying the impact of smoking during pregnancy on human offspring. Certain sequelae of prenatal NIC exposure suggest an impact on the development of the midbrain dopamine (DA) system, which receives a robust cholinergic innervation from the mesopontine tegmentum. We therefore investigated whether prenatal NIC induced structural changes in cells and synapses within the midbrain that persisted into adulthood. Osmotic minipumps delivering either sodium bitartrate (vehicle; VEH) or NIC bitartrate at 2 mg/kg/day were implanted into nine timed-pregnant dams at E4. At birth, rat pups were culled to litters of six males each, and the litters were cross-fostered. Plasma levels of NIC and cotinine from killed pups provided evidence of NIC exposure in utero. Pups separated from dams at weaning showed a trend toward reduced locomotor activity at this time point but not when tested again in adulthood. Adult rats were killed for anatomical studies. Estimates of brain size and volume did not vary with NIC treatment. Midbrain sections stained for Nissl or by immunoperoxidase for tyrosine hydroxylase and analyzed using unbiased stereology revealed no changes in volume or cell number in the substantia nigra compacta or ventral tegmental area as a result of NIC exposure. Within the ventral tegmental area, electron microscopic physical disector analysis showed no significant differences in the number of axon terminals or the number of asymmetric (putative excitatory) or symmetric (putative inhibitory) synapses. Although too infrequent to estimate by unbiased stereology, no obvious difference in the proportion of cholinergic axons was noted in NIC- versus VEH-treated animals. These data suggest that activation of nicotinic receptors during prenatal development induces no significant modifications in the structure of cells in the ventral midbrain when assessed in adulthood.

  2. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    PubMed Central

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  3. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulation of THINs in vitro. We found that the dominant effect of dopamine was a dramatic enhancement of the ability of THINs to generate long-lasting depolarizing plateau potentials (PPs). Interestingly, the same effect could also be elicited by amphetamine-induced release of endogenous dopamine suggesting that THINs may exhibit similar responses to changes in extracellular dopamine concentration in vivo. The enhancement of PPs in THINs is perhaps the most pronounced effect of dopamine on the intrinsic excitability of neostriatal neurons described to date. Further, we demonstrate that all subtypes of THINSs tested also express nicotinic cholinergic receptors. All THIS responded, albeit differentially, with depolarization, PPs and spiking to brief application of nicotinic agonists. Powerful modulation of the nonlinear integrative properties of THINs by dopamine and the direct depolarization of these neurons by acetylcholine may play important roles in mediating the effects of these neuromodulators in the neostriatum with potentially important implications for understanding the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia. PMID:25908399

  4. Cholinergic circuit control of postnatal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Asrican, Brent; Paez-Gonzalez, Patricia; Erb, Joshua; Kuo, Chay T.

    2016-01-01

    abstract New neuron addition via continued neurogenesis in the postnatal/adult mammalian brain presents a distinct form of nervous system plasticity. During embryonic development, precise temporal and spatial patterns of neurogenesis are necessary to create the nervous system architecture. Similar between embryonic and postnatal stages, neurogenic proliferation is regulated by neural stem cell (NSC)-intrinsic mechanisms layered upon cues from their local microenvironmental niche. Following developmental assembly, it remains relatively unclear what may be the key driving forces that sustain continued production of neurons in the postnatal/adult brain. Recent experimental evidence suggests that patterned activity from specific neural circuits can also directly govern postnatal/adult neurogenesis. Here, we review experimental findings that revealed cholinergic modulation, and how patterns of neuronal activity and acetylcholine release may differentially or synergistically activate downstream signaling in NSCs. Higher-order excitatory and inhibitory inputs regulating cholinergic neuron firing, and their implications in neurogenesis control are also considered. PMID:27468423

  5. Cholinergic circuits in cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Prado, Vania F; Janickova, Helena; Al-Onaizi, Mohammed A; Prado, Marco A M

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive flexibility, the ability to adjust behavior in response to new and unexpected conditions in the environment, is essential for adaptation to new challenges and survival. The cholinergic system is an important modulator of this complex behavior however, the exact cholinergic circuits involved in this modulation and the precise influence of acetylcholine (ACh) in the process is still not fully understood. Here we review the role of different cholinergic circuits in cognitive flexibility. Strong evidence indicates that cholinergic interneurons (CINs) from the dorsomedial striatum are essential for facilitating the establishment of a new selected strategy; an effect that seems to depend mainly on activation of muscarinic receptors. Cholinergic neurons from the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (nBM), which project to the prefrontal cortex, seem to modulate the initial inhibition of a previously learned strategy, however, this concept is still controversial. Additionally, some studies suggest that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons projecting to the hippocampus, basolateral amygdala, and posterior parietal cortex may also participate on the modulation of cognitive flexibility. We highlight the fact that when investigating effects of ACh on behavioral flexibility, or any other behavior, one has to keep in mind two important particularities of the cholinergic system: (1) Many cholinergic neurons in the brain co-release glutamate or GABA with ACh. Methodologies that rely on neuronal silencing or ablation lead to simultaneous elimination of both neurotransmitters, making interpretation of results complex. (2) The cholinergic gene locus has a unique organization, with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) gene present within the intron between the first and second exons of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene. Thus, behavioral studies using transgenic animals generated with ChAT bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones should be considered

  6. The Protective Effect of Alpha 7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Activation on Critical Illness and Its Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    REN, Chao; TONG, Ya-lin; LI, Jun-cong; LU, Zhong-qiu; YAO, Yong-ming

    2017-01-01

    Critical illnesses and injuries are recognized as major threats to human health, and they are usually accompanied by uncontrolled inflammation and dysfunction of immune response. The alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR), which is a primary receptor of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP), exhibits great benefits for critical ill conditions. It is composed of 5 identical α7 subunits that form a central pore with high permeability for calcium. This putative structure is closely associated with its functional states. Activated α7nAChR exhibits extensive anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory reactions, including lowered pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, decreased expressions of chemokines as well as adhesion molecules, and altered differentiation and activation of immune cells, which are important in maintaining immune homeostasis. Well understanding of the effects and mechanisms of α7nAChR will be of great value in exploring effective targets for treating critical diseases. PMID:28123345

  7. Innate Immunity and Inflammation Post-Stroke: An α7-Nicotinic Agonist Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Silke; Shields, Nicholas J.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Clarkson, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability, with limited treatment options available. Inflammation contributes to damage tissue in the central nervous system across a broad range of neuropathologies, including Alzheimer’s disease, pain, Schizophrenia, and stroke. While the immune system plays an important role in contributing to brain damage produced by ischemia, the damaged brain, in turn, can exert a powerful immune-suppressive effect that promotes infections and threatens the survival of stroke patients. Recently the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, in particular its modulation using α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) ligands, has shown potential as a strategy to dampen the inflammatory response and facilitate functional recovery in stroke patients. Here we discuss the current literature on stroke-induced inflammation and the effects of α7-nAChR modulators on innate immune cells. PMID:26690125

  8. Impact of a deletion of the full-length and short isoform of p75NTR on cholinergic innervation and the population of postmitotic doublecortin positive cells in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Poser, Robert; Dokter, Martin; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Viola; Berger, Stefan M; Busch, Ruben; Baldus, Marian; Unsicker, Klaus; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of mice carrying a deletion of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR have allowed identifying p75NTR as an important structural regulator of the hippocampus. Most of the previous analyses were done using p75NTR (ExIII) knockout mice which still express the short isoform of p75NTR. To scrutinize the role of p75NTR in the hippocampus, we analyzed adult and aged p75NTR (ExIV) knockout mice, in which both, the short and the full-length isoform are deleted. Deletion of these isoforms induced morphological alterations in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), leading to an increase in the thickness of the molecular and granular layer. Based on these observations, we next determined the morphological substrates that might contribute to this phenotype. The cholinergic innervation of the molecular and granular layer of the DG was found to be significantly increased in the knockout mice. Furthermore, adult neurogenesis in the DG was found to be significantly altered with increased numbers of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells and reduced numbers of apoptotic cells in p75NTR (ExIV) knockout mice. However, cell proliferation as measured by phosphohiston H3 (PH3) positive cell numbers was not affected. These morphological alterations (number of DCX-positive cells and increased cholinergic fiber densities) as well as reduced cell death in the DG are likely to contribute to the observed thickening of the granular layer in p75NTR (ExIV) knockout mice. In addition, Sholl-analysis of DCX-positive neurons revealed a higher dendritic complexity and could thus be a possible morphological correlate for the increased thickness of the molecular layer in p75NTR deficient animals. Our data clearly demonstrate that deletion of both, the short and the full-length isoform of p75NTR affects DG morphology, due to alterations of the cholinergic system and an imbalance between neurogenesis and programmed cell death within the subgranular zone.

  9. Cholinergic agonists reduce blood pressure in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fairley, Amber S; Mathis, Keisa W

    2017-04-01

    Increased inflammation arising from an abnormal immune response can damage healthy tissue and lead to disease progression. An important example of this is the accumulation of inflammatory mediators in the kidney, which can subsequently lead to hypertension and renal injury. The origin of this inflammation may involve neuro-immune interactions. For example, the novel vagus nerve-to-spleen mechanism known as the "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" controls inflammation upon stimulation. However, if this pathway is dysfunctional, inflammation becomes less regulated and chronic inflammatory diseases such as hypertension may develop. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with aberrant immune function, increased renal inflammation, and prevalent hypertension. We hypothesized that the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is impaired in SLE and that stimulation of this pathway would protect from the progression of hypertension in SLE mice. Female SLE (NZBWF1) and control (NZW) mice were administered nicotine or vehicle for 7 days (2 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) in order to stimulate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway at the level of the splenic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR). Blood pressure was assessed posttreatment. Nicotine-treated SLE mice did not develop hypertension and this lower blood pressure (compared to saline-treated SLE mice) coincided with lower splenic and renal cortical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data provide evidence that the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is impaired in SLE In addition, these data suggest that stimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can protect the kidney by dampening inflammation and therefore prevent the progression of hypertension in the setting of SLE.

  10. Cholinergic ventral forebrain grafts into the neocortex improve passive avoidance memory in a rat model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fine, A; Dunnett, S B; Björklund, A; Iversen, S D

    1985-01-01

    The memory dysfunction of Alzheimer disease has been associated with a cortical cholinergic deficiency and loss of cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert. This cholinergic component of Alzheimer disease can be modeled in the rat by ibotenic acid lesions of the cholinergic nucleus basalis magnocellularis. The memory impairment caused by such unilateral lesions, as reflected in passive avoidance behavior, is reversed by grafts into the deafferented neocortex of embryonic neurons of the cholinergic ventral forebrain, but not by grafts of noncholinergic hippocampal cells. Images PMID:3860857

  11. Right Cervical Vagotomy Aggravates Viral Myocarditis in Mice Via the Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li-Sha, Ge; Xing-Xing, Chen; Lian-Pin, Wu; De-Pu, Zhou; Xiao-Wei, Li; Jia-Feng, Lin; Yue-Chun, Li

    2017-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system dysfunction with increased sympathetic activity and withdrawal of vagal activity may play an important role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. The vagus nerve can modulate the immune response and control inflammation through a ‘cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway’ dependent on the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Although the role of β-adrenergic stimulation on viral myocarditis has been investigated in our pervious studies, the direct effect of vagal tone in this setting has not been yet studied. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of cervical vagotomy in a murine model of viral myocarditis. In a coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis model (Balb/c), effects of right cervical vagotomy and nAChR agonist nicotine on echocardiography, myocardial histopathology, viral RNA, and proinflammatory cytokine levels were studied. We found that right cervical vagotomy inhibited the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, aggravated myocardial lesions, up-regulated the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and worsened the impaired left ventricular function in murine viral myocarditis, and these changes were reversed by co-treatment with nicotine by activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. These results indicate that vagal nerve plays an important role in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect in viral myocarditis, and that cholinergic stimulation with nicotine also plays its peripheral anti-inflammatory role relying on α7nAChR, without requirement for the integrity of vagal nerve in the model. The findings suggest that vagus nerve stimulation mediated inhibition of the inflammatory processes likely provide important benefits in myocarditis treatment. PMID:28197102

  12. Intrinsic Cholinergic Neurons in the Hippocampus: Fact or Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Rinnofner, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) is synthesized and released exclusively from the terminals of the long-axon afferents whose cell bodies reside in the medial septum and diagonal band. The search for intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus has a long history; however evidence for the existence of these neurons has been inconsistent, with most investigators failing to detect them using in situ hybridization or immunohistochemical staining of the cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Advances in the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice expressing a reporter protein under the control of the genomic elements of the Chat gene (Chat-BAC mice) have facilitated studies of cholinergic neurons. Such mice show robust and faithful expression of the reporter proteins in all known cholinergic cell populations. The availability of the Chat-BAC mice re-ignited interest in hippocampal cholinergic interneurons, because a small number of such reporter-expressing cells is frequently observed in the hippocampus of these mice. However, to date, attempts to confirm that these neurons co-express the endogenous cholinergic marker ChAT, or release ACh, have been unsuccessful. Without such confirmatory evidence it is best to conclude that there are no cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus. Similar considerations apply to other BAC transgenic lines, whose utility as a discovery tool for cell populations heretofore not known to express the genes of interest encoded by the BACs, must be validated by methods that detect expression of the endogenous genes. PMID:27014052

  13. Cigarette smoke alters non-neuronal cholinergic system components inducing MUC5AC production in the H292 cell line.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Angela Marina; Albano, Giusy Daniela; Anzalone, Giulia; Bonanno, Anna; Riccobono, Loredana; Di Sano, Caterina; Gagliardo, Rosalia; Siena, Liboria; Pieper, Michael Paul; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Profita, Mirella

    2014-08-05

    Cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affects the expression of Choline Acetyl-Transferase (ChAT), muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and mucin production in bronchial epithelial cells. Mucin 5AC (MUC5AC), muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3, ChAT expression, acetylcholine levels and acetylcholine binding were measured in a human pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line (H292) stimulated with CSE. We performed ChAT/RNA interference experiments in H292 cells stimulated with CSE to study the role of ChAT/acetylcholine in MUC5AC production. The effects of Hemicholinium-3 (HCh-3) (50 μM) (a potent and selective choline uptake blocker) and Tiotropium bromide (Spiriva(®)) (100 nM), alone or in combination with Salmeterol (SL) and Fluticasone propionate (FP), were tested in this model. MUC5AC, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3, ChAT, acetylcholine expression and acetylcholine binding significantly increased in H292 cells stimulated with CSE (5%) compared to untreated cells. HCh-3 reduced acetylcholine binding and MUC5AC production in H292 cells stimulated with CSE. ChAT/RNA interference eliminated the effect of CSE on MUC5AC production. FP reduced ChAT and acetylcholine binding in unstimulated cells, while showing a partial effect in CSE stimulated cells. SL increased the ChAT expression and acetylcholine binding in H292 cells stimulated with or without CSE. Tiotropium, alone or together with FP and SL, reduced acetylcholine binding and MUC5AC production in H292 cells stimulated with CSE. CSE affects the ChAT/acetylcholine expression, increasing MUC5AC production in H292 cells. Pharmacological treatment with anticholinergic drugs reduces the secretion of MUC5AC generated by autocrine acetylcholine activity in airway epithelial cells.

  14. Mouse mutants for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ß2 subunit display changes in cell adhesion and neurodegeneration response genes.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Carol M; van der List, Deborah A; Ballesteros, Jose M; Goloshchapov, Andrey V; Chalupa, Leo M; Chapman, Barbara

    2011-04-25

    Mice lacking expression of the ß2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) display abnormal retinal waves and a dispersed projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons to their dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGNs). Transcriptomes of LGN tissue from two independently generated Chrnb2-/- mutants and from wildtype mice were obtained at postnatal day 4 (P4), during the normal period of segregation of eye-specific afferents to the LGN. Microarray analysis reveals reduced expression of genes located on the cell membrane or in extracellular space, and of genes active in cell adhesion and calcium signaling. In particular, mRNA for cadherin 1 (Cdh1), a known axon growth regulator, is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in the LGN of P4 mutant mice and Lypd2 mRNA is similarly suppressed. Similar analysis of retinal tissue shows increased expression of crumbs 1 (Crb1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (Ccl21) mRNAs in Chrnb2-/- mutant animals. Mutations in these genes are associated with retinal neuronal degeneration. The retinas of Chrnb2-/- mutants are normal in appearance, but the increased expression of these genes may also be involved in the abnormal projection patterns of RGC to the LGN. These data may provide the tools to distinguish the interplay between neural activity and molecular expression. Finally, comparison of the transcriptomes of the two different Chrnb2-/- mutant strains reveals the effects of genetic background upon gene expression.

  15. Alpha-9 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Rodent Vestibular Labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    Luebke, Anne E.; Maroni, Paul D.; Guth, Scott M.; Lysakowski, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular tissues (cristae ampullares, macular otolithic organs, and Scarpa’s ganglia) in chinchilla, rat, and guinea pig were examined for immunoreactivity to the α9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit. The α9 antibody was generated against a conserved peptide present in the intracellular loop of the predicted protein sequence of the guinea pig α9 nAChR subunit. In the vestibular periphery, staining was observed in calyces around type I hair cells, at the synaptic pole of type II hair cells, and in varying levels in Scarpa’s ganglion cells. Ganglion cells were also triply labeled to detect α9, calretinin, and peripherin. Calretinin labels calyx-only afferents. Peripherin labels bouton-only afferents. Dimorphic afferents, which have both calyx and bouton endings, are not labeled by calretinin or peripherin. In these experiments, α9 was expressed in both calyx and dimorphic afferents. A subpopulation of small ganglion cells did not contain the α9 nAChR but did stain for peripherin. We surmise that these are bouton-only afferents. Bouton (regularly discharging) afferents also show efferent responses, although they are qualitatively different from those in irregularly discharging (calyx and dimorphic) afferents, much slower and longer lasting. Thus, regular afferents are probably more affected via a muscarinic cholinergic or a peptidergic mechanism, with a much smaller superimposed fast nicotinic-type response. This latter response could be due to one of the other nicotinic receptors that have been described in studies from other laboratories. PMID:16217793

  16. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced /sup 155/Eu:/sup 3 +/ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor.

  17. Modified expression of peripheral blood lymphocyte muscarinic cholinergic receptors in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Emanuela; Tabbì, Luca; Scozzi, Davide; Mariotta, Salvatore; Galli, Elena; Carello, Rossella; Avitabile, Simona; Tayebati, Seyed Koshrow; Amenta, Francesco; De Vitis, Claudia; Mancini, Rita; Ricci, Alberto

    2015-07-15

    Lymphocytes possess an independent cholinergic system. We assessed the expression of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in lymphocytes from 49 asthmatic children and 10 age matched controls using Western blot. We demonstrated that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressed M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors which density were significantly increased in asthmatic children in comparison with controls. M2 and M4 receptor increase was strictly related with IgE and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurements and with impairment in objective measurements of airway obstruction. Increased lymphocyte muscarinic cholinergic receptor expression may concur with lung cholinergic dysfunction and with inflammatory molecular framework in asthma.

  18. GABAA and GABAB receptors are functionally active in the regulation of catecholamine secretion by bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Castro, E; Oset-Gasque, M J; González, M P

    1989-07-01

    GABA stimulates the basal catecholamine release from adrenal bovine chromaffin cells in a calcium-dependent manner. This release represents about 70% of that obtained by similar doses of nicotine under similar experimental conditions. This effect is mediated by GABAA receptor sites present in chromaffin cells, since it was mimicked by muscimol and reversed by bicuculline. In addition, GABA, through its GABAA receptors, increases the catecholamine release evoked by submaximal doses of nicotine, but it has no effect on nicotine-evoked secretion of catecholamines when nicotine was given at maximal doses. These results seem to indicate that both nicotine and GABA release catecholamines from the same intracellular pool. In contrast, baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, depressed both basal and nicotine-evoked catecholamine release; this result indicates that in addition to GABAA control of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells, there is a GABAB control of this function. These results support the existence of a dual regulation of catecholamine secretion by both the GABAA and GABAB receptors in a similar way as that proposed for muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

  19. Effects of histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Eidi, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem

    2003-03-28

    In the present study, the effects of the histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention in adult male rats were investigated. Post-training intracerebroventricular injections were carried out in all the experiments. Cholinoceptor agonist, acetylcholine (1-10 microg/rat) or nicotine (1-10 microg/rat), increased, while a cholinoceptor antagonist, scopolamine (5-20 microg/rat), decreased memory retention. The response to acetylcholine was attenuated by scopolamine. Administration of histamine (5-20 microg/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (10-50 microg/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (1-50 microg/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists attenuated the response to histamine. Histamine reduced the acetylcholine- or nicotine-induced enhancement. The histamine receptor antagonists enhanced the nicotine- or acetylcholine-induced response. Histamine potentiated the inhibitory effect induced by scopolamine. It is concluded that histaminergic and cholinergic systems have opposing effects on memory retention. Also, the histaminergic system elicits an interaction with the cholinergic system in memory retention.

  20. Characterization of nicotine binding in mouse brain and comparison with the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin and quinuclidinyl benzilate

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C.

    1982-11-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)nicotine to mouse brain has been measured and subsequently compared with the binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) and L-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). The binding of nicotine was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. Although the rates of association and dissociation of nicotine were temperature-dependent, the incubation temperature had no effect on either KD or Bmax. Nicotine binding was unaffected by the addition of NaCl, KCl, CaCl/sub 2/, or MgSO/sub 4/ to the incubation medium. Nicotinic cholinergic agonists were potent inhibitors of nicotine binding; however, nicotinic antagonists were poor inhibitors. The regional distribution of binding was not uniform: midbrain and striatum contained the highest number of receptors, whereas cerebellum had the fewest. Differences in site densities, regional distribution, inhibitor potencies, and thermal denaturation indicated that nicotine binding was not the same as either QNB or alpha-BTX binding, and therefore that receptors for nicotine may represent a unique population of cholinergic receptors.

  1. Maturation and maintenance of cholinergic medial septum neurons require glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Christian; Rutz, Susanne; Rothmaier, Katharina; Turiault, Marc; Zhi, Qixia; Naumann, Thomas; Frotscher, Michael; Tronche, Francois; Jackisch, Rolf; Kretz, Oliver

    2006-05-01

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to influence trophic processes in the nervous system. In particular, they seem to be important for the development of cholinergic neurons in various brain regions. Here, we applied a genetic approach to investigate the role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on the maturation and maintenance of cholinergic medial septal neurons between P15 and one year of age by using a mouse model carrying a CNS-specific conditional inactivation of the GR gene (GRNesCre). The number of choline acetyltransferase and p75NTR immuno-positive neurons in the medial septum (MS) was analyzed by stereology in controls versus mutants. In addition, cholinergic fiber density, acetylcholine release and cholinergic key enzyme activity of these neurons were determined in the hippocampus. We found that in GRNesCre animals the number of medial septal cholinergic neurons was significantly reduced during development. In addition, cholinergic cell number further decreased with aging in these mutants. The functional GR gene is therefore required for the proper maturation and maintenance of medial septal cholinergic neurons. However, the loss of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum is not accompanied by a loss of functional cholinergic parameters of these neurons in their target region, the hippocampus. This pinpoints to plasticity of the septo-hippocampal system, that seems to compensate for the septal cell loss by sprouting of the remaining neurons.

  2. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents.

  3. Acute effects of nicotine and mecamylamine on tobacco withdrawal symptoms, cigarette reward and ad lib smoking.

    PubMed

    Rose, J E; Behm, F M; Westman, E C

    2001-02-01

    Separate and combined effects of nicotine and the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine were studied in 32 healthy volunteer smokers after overnight abstinence from smoking. Subjects participated in three sessions (3 h each), during which they wore skin patches delivering either 0 mg/24 h, 21 mg/24 h or 42 mg/24 h nicotine. Thirty-two subjects were randomly assigned to two groups receiving oral mecamylamine hydrochloride (10 mg) vs. placebo capsules. Two and one-half hours after drug administration, subjects were allowed to smoke ad lib, rating the cigarettes for rewarding and aversive effects. Transdermal nicotine produced a dose-related reduction in the subjective rewarding qualities of smoking. Nicotine also reduced craving for cigarettes and this effect was attenuated, but not eliminated, by mecamylamine. Mecamylamine blocked the discriminability of high vs. low nicotine puffs of smoke, and increased nicotine intake substantially during the ad lib smoking period. Some of the psychophysiological effects of each drug (elevation in blood pressure from nicotine, sedation and decreased blood pressure from mecamylamine) were offset by the other drug. The results supported the hypothesis that nicotine replacement can alleviate tobacco withdrawal symptoms even in the presence of an antagonist such as mecamylamine. Mecamylamine did not precipitate withdrawal beyond the level associated with overnight cigarette deprivation, suggesting its effects were primarily due to offsetting the action of concurrently administered nicotine as opposed to blocking endogenous cholinergic transmission.

  4. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors.

  5. A muscarinic cholinergic mechanism underlies activation of the central pattern generator for locust flight.

    PubMed

    Buhl, Edgar; Schildberger, Klaus; Stevenson, Paul A

    2008-07-01

    A central question in behavioural control is how central pattern generators (CPGs) for locomotion are activated. This paper disputes the key role generally accredited to octopamine in activating the CPG for insect flight. In deafferented locusts, fictive flight was initiated by bath application of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, the acetylcholine analogue carbachol, and the acetylcholinesterase blocker eserine, but not by nicotine. Furthermore, in addition to octopamine, various other amines including dopamine, tyramine and histamine all induced fictive flight, but not serotonin or the amine-precursor amino acid tyrosine. However, flight initiation was not reversibly blocked by aminergic antagonists, and was still readily elicited by both natural stimulation (wind) and pilocarpine in reserpinized, amine-depleted locusts. By contrast, the muscarinic antagonists atropine and scopolamine reversibly blocked flight initiated by wind, cholinergic agonists, octopamine, and by selective stimulation of a flight-initiating interneurone (TCG). The short delay from TCG stimulation to flight onset suggests that TCG acts directly on the flight CPG, and accordingly that TCG, or its follower cell within the flight generating circuit, is cholinergic. We conclude that acetylcholine acting via muscarinic receptors is the key neurotransmitter in the mechanism underlying the natural activation of the locust flight CPG. Amines are not essential for this, but must be considered as potential neuromodulators for facilitating flight release and tuning the motor pattern. We speculate that muscarinic activation coupled to aminergic facilitation may be a general feature of behavioural control in insects for ensuring conditional recruitment of individual motor programs in accordance with momentary adaptive requirements.

  6. Symposium overview: mechanism of action of nicotine on neuronal acetylcholine receptors, from molecule to behavior.

    PubMed

    Narahashi, T; Fenster, C P; Quick, M W; Lester, R A; Marszalec, W; Aistrup, G L; Sattelle, D B; Martin, B R; Levin, E D

    2000-10-01

    Nicotine has long been known to interact with nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors since Langley used it extensively to chart sympathetic ganglia a century ago. It has also been used as an effective insecticide. However, it was not until the 1990s that the significance of nicotine was increasingly recognized from the toxicological, pharmacological, and environmental points of view. This is partly because studies of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors are rapidly emerging from orphan status, fueled by several lines of research. Since Alzheimer's disease is known to be associated with down-regulation of cholinergic activity in the brain, a variety of nicotine derivatives are being tested and developed for treatment of the disease. Public awareness of the adverse effects of nicotine has reached the highest level recently. Since insect resistance to insecticides is one of the most serious issues in the pest-control arena, it is an urgent requirement to develop new insecticides that act on target sites not shared by the existing insecticides. The neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor is one of them, and new nicotinoids are being developed. Thus, the time is ripe to discuss the mechanism of action of nicotine from a variety of angles, including the molecular, physiological, and behavioral points of view. This Symposium covered a wide area of nicotine studies: genetic, genomic, and functional aspects of nicotinic ACh receptors were studied, as related to anthelmintics and insecticides; interactions between ethanol and nicotine out the ACh receptor were analyzed, in an attempt to explain the well-known heavy drinker-heavy smoker correlation; the mechanisms that underlie the desensitization of ACh receptors were studied as related to nicotine action; selective pharmacological profiles of nicotine, and descriptions of some derivatives were described; and chronic nicotine infusion effects on memory were examined using animal models.

  7. Increased Nicotine Self-Administration Following Prenatal Exposure in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Edward D.; Lawrence, Susan; Petro, Ann; Horton, Kofi; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a significant association between maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and greater subsequent risk of smoking in female offspring. In animal models, prenatal nicotine exposure causes persistent alterations in cholinergic and monoaminergic systems, both of which are important for nicotine actions underlying tobacco addiction. Accordingly, the current study was conducted to determine if there is a cause-and-effect relationship between prenatal nicotine exposure and nicotine self-administration starting in adolescence. Pregnant rats were administered nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) by osmotic minipump infusion throughout gestation and then, beginning in adolescence and continuing into adulthood, female offspring were given access to nicotine via a standard operant IV self-administration procedure (0.03 mg/kg/infusion). Gestational nicotine exposure did not alter the initial rate of nicotine self-administration. However, when animals underwent one week of forced abstinence and then had a second opportunity to self-administer nicotine, the prenatally-exposed animals showed a significantly greater rate of self-administration than did the controls. Prenatal nicotine exposure causes increased nicotine self-administration, which is revealed only when the animals are allowed to experience a period of nicotine abstinence. This supports a cause-and-effect relationship between the higher rates of smoking in the daughters of women who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy and implicates a role for nicotine in this effect. Our results further characterize the long-term liabilities of maternal smoking but also point to the potential liabilities of nicotine-based treatments for smoking cessation during pregnancy. PMID:17196243

  8. Nicotinic excitation of rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, N L; Bocchiaro, C M; Greene, R W; Feldman, J L

    2002-01-01

    Hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs), which innervate the tongue muscles, are involved in several important physiological functions, including the maintenance of upper airway patency. The neural mechanisms that affect HMN excitability are therefore important determinants of effective breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder characterized by recurrent collapse of the upper airway that is likely due to decline of pharyngeal motoneuron activity during sleep. Because cholinergic neuronal activity is closely coupled to wake and sleep states, we tested the effects and pharmacology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation on HMNs. We made intracellular recordings from HMNs in medullary slices from neonatal rats and found that local application of the nicotinic agonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide, excited HMNs by a Ca(2+)-sensitive, and TTX-insensitive inward current that was blocked by dihydro-beta-erythroidine (IC(50): 19+/-3 nM), methyllycaconitine (IC(50): 32+/-7 nM), and mecamylamine (IC(50): 88+/-11 nM), but not by alpha-bungarotoxin (10 nM). This is consistent with responses being mediated by postsynaptic nAChRs that do not contain the alpha7 subunit. These results suggest that nAChR activation may contribute to central maintenance of upper airway patency and that the decline in firing rate of cholinergic neurons during sleep could potentially disfacilitate airway dilator muscle activity, contributing to airway obstruction.

  9. Nicotine-morphine interactions at α4β2, α7 and α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Talka, Reeta; Salminen, Outi; Whiteaker, Paul; Lukas, Ronald J; Tuominen, Raimo K

    2013-02-15

    Nicotine and opioids share several behavioral and rewarding properties. Although both opioids and nicotine have their own specific mechanism of action, there is empirical and experimental evidence of interactions between these drugs. We studied receptor-level interactions of nicotine and morphine at α4β2, α7 and α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. [(3)H]epibatidine displacement was used to determine if morphine binds competitively to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Functional interactions of morphine and nicotine were studied with calcium fluorometry and (86)Rb(+) efflux assays. Morphine displaced [(3)H]epibatidine from nicotinic agonist binding sites in all cell lines studied. The Ki values for morphine were 13.2μM in SH-EP1-hα4β2 cells, 0.16μM and 126μM in SH-SY5Y cells and 43.7μM in SH-EP1-hα7 cells. In SH-EP1-hα4β2 cells expressing α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, morphine acted as a partial agonist of (86)Rb(+) efflux comparable to cytisine (with EC50 values of 53.3μM for morphine and 5.38μM for cytisine). The effect of morphine was attenuated concentration-dependently by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine. In the SH-SY5Y cell line expressing several subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors morphine had an inhibitory effect on nicotine induced (86)Rb(+) ion efflux mediated by α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These results suggest that morphine acts as a partial agonist at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and as a weak antagonist at α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  10. Alcohol's actions on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tiffany J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that alcoholism and tobacco addiction often co-occur, relatively little information is available on the biological factors that regulate the co-use and abuse of nicotine and alcohol. In the brain, nicotine acts at several different types of receptors collectively known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Alcohol also acts on at least some of these receptors, enhancing the function of some nAChR subtypes and inhibiting the activity of others. Chronic alcohol and nicotine administration also lead to changes in the numbers of nAChRs. Natural variations (i.e., polymorphisms) in the genes encoding different nAChR subunits may be associated with individual differences in the sensitivity to some of alcohol's and nicotine's effects. Finally, at least one subtype of nAChR may help protect cells against alcohol-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. Effects of nicotine on response inhibition and interference control.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Ulrich; Faiola, Eliana; Kasparbauer, Anna-Maria; Petrovsky, Nadine; Chan, Raymond C K; Liepelt, Roman; Kumari, Veena

    2017-04-01

    Nicotine is a cholinergic agonist with known pro-cognitive effects in the domains of alerting and orienting attention. However, its effects on attentional top-down functions such as response inhibition and interference control are less well characterised. Here, we investigated the effects of 7 mg transdermal nicotine on performance on a battery of response inhibition and interference control tasks. A sample of N = 44 healthy adult non-smokers performed antisaccade, stop signal, Stroop, go/no-go, flanker, shape matching and Simon tasks, as well as the attentional network test (ANT) and a continuous performance task (CPT). Nicotine was administered in a within-subjects, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, with order of drug administration counterbalanced. Relative to placebo, nicotine led to significantly shorter reaction times on a prosaccade task and on CPT hits but did not significantly improve inhibitory or interference control performance on any task. Instead, nicotine had a negative influence in increasing the interference effect on the Simon task. Nicotine did not alter inter-individual associations between reaction times on congruent trials and error rates on incongruent trials on any task. Finally, there were effects involving order of drug administration, suggesting practice effects but also beneficial nicotine effects when the compound was administered first. Overall, our findings support previous studies showing positive effects of nicotine on basic attentional functions but do not provide direct evidence for an improvement of top-down cognitive control through acute administration of nicotine at this dose in healthy non-smokers.

  12. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  13. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Hildegard M.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the α7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the a7nAChR and caused influx of Ca2+, activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the α7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10–15% CO2 similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the α7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention. PMID:17459420

  14. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-05-30

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the alpha7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the alpha7nAChR and caused influx of Ca(2+), activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the alpha7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10-15% CO(2) similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the alpha7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention.

  15. Effect of ageing on post-lesion oestradiol treatment on mouse cholinergic neurones in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kőszegi, Z; Abrahám, I M

    2012-09-01

    A single 17β-oestradiol (E(2)) treatment reduces the loss in cholinergic fibre density in the cortex after NMDA lesion into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) of the basal forebrain (BF) in young female mice. In the present study, we examined whether age influences this protective effect of E(2) on cholinergic neurones in male and female mice. Gonad-intact young and aged animals of both sexes were treated with E(2) after unilateral NMDA lesion into the NBM. NMDA lesion elicited ipsilateral cholinergic cell loss in the NBM and ipsilateral fibre loss in the somatosensory cortex to the same extent, irrespective of age or sex. A single E(2) injection performed 1 h post-lesion did not affect the cholinergic cell loss but reduced the loss of fibres in the ipsilateral cortex in young male and female mice. By contrast, E(2) did not have an effect on the NMDA-induced cholinergic cell and fibre loss in aged male or female mice. The oestrous stage of young female mice did not alter the number of cholinergic cells/fibres or the protective effect of E(2) on cholinergic fibres after NMDA injection. Our results show that E(2) has a protective action on BF cholinergic fibres in young males and females, although the treatment potential of E(2) declines with age.

  16. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  17. The cholinergic system, circadian rhythmicity, and time memory.

    PubMed

    Hut, R A; Van der Zee, E A

    2011-08-10

    This review provides an overview of the interaction between the mammalian cholinergic system and circadian system, and its possible role in time memory. Several studies made clear that circadian (daily) fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) release, cholinergic enzyme activity and cholinergic receptor expression varies remarkably between species and even strains. Apparently, cholinergic features can be flexibly adjusted to the needs of a species or strain. Nevertheless, it can be generalized that circadian rhythmicity in the cholinergic system is characterized by high ACh release during the active phase of an individual. During the active phase, the activity of the ACh synthesizing enzyme Choline Acetyltransferase (ChAT) is enhanced, and the activity of the ACh degrading enzyme Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is reduced. The number of free, unbound and thus available muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) is highest when ACh release is lowest. The cholinergic innervation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the hypothalamic circadian master clock, arises from the cholinergic forebrain and brain stem nuclei. The density of cholinergic fibers and terminals is modest as compared to other hypothalamic nuclei. This is the case for rat, hamster and mouse, three chronobiological model rodent species studied by us. A new finding is that the rat SCN contains some local cholinergic neurons. Hamster SCN contains less cholinergic neurons, whereas the mouse SCN is devoid of such cells. ACh has an excitatory effect on SCN cells (at least in vivo), and functions in close interaction with other neurotransmitters. Originally it was thought that ACh transferred retinal light information to the SCN. This turned out to be wrong. Thereafter, the phase shifting effects of ACh prompted researches to view ACh as an agent for nocturnal clock resetting. It is still not clear, however, what the function consequence is of SCN cholinergic neurotransmission. Here, we postulate the hypothesis

  18. Nicotine replacement therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes for the patch to work. The inhaler satisfies oral urges. Most of the nicotine vapor does ... spray provides a quick dose of nicotine to satisfy a craving you are unable to ignore. Levels ...

  19. Nicotinic receptors, amyloid-beta, and synaptic failure in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Sofia; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2010-01-01

    Dysfunctional cholinergic transmission is thought to underlie, at least in part, memory impairment and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is still unclear whether this is a consequence of the loss of cholinergic neurons and elimination of nicotinic acetycholine receptors (nAChRs) in AD brain or of a direct impact of molecular interactions of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide with nAChRs, leading to dysregulation of receptor function. This review examines recent progress in our understanding of the roles of nicotinic receptors in mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, molecular interactions of Abeta with nAChRs, and how Abeta-induced dysregulation of nicotinic receptor function may underlie synaptic failure in AD.

  20. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes After Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Lewis, Alan S; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R; Volkmar, Fred R

    2015-09-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical studies show nicotine administration can reduce aggression-related behaviors. Transdermal nicotine has been used to treat agitation in neuropsychiatric conditions with cholinergic dysfunction. Here we report the use of transdermal nicotine as an adjunctive medication to treat aggression in a hospitalized adolescent with ASD. Nicotine patch was recurrently well tolerated, and reduced the need for emergency medication and restraint. These findings suggest further study of transdermal nicotine for aggression comorbid with ASD is warranted.

  1. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes After Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alan S.; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical studies show nicotine administration can reduce aggression-related behaviors. Transdermal nicotine has been used to treat agitation in neuropsychiatric conditions with cholinergic dysfunction. Here we report the use of transdermal nicotine as an adjunctive medication to treat aggression in a hospitalized adolescent with ASD. Nicotine patch was recurrently well tolerated, and reduced the need for emergency medication and restraint. These findings suggest further study of transdermal nicotine for aggression comorbid with ASD is warranted. PMID:25982311

  2. PRENATAL NICOTINE EXPOSURE SELECTIVELY AFFECTS NICOTINIC RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN PRIMARY AND ASSOCIATIVE VISUAL CORTICES OF THE FETAL BABOON

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Jhodie R.; Garland, Marianne; Stark, Raymond I.; Myers, Michael M.; Fifer, William P.; Mokler, David J.; Kinney, Hannah C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to nicotine during pregnancy via maternal cigarette smoking is associated with visual deficits in children. This is possibly due to activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the occipital cortex which are important in the development of visual mapping. Using a baboon model we explored the effects of prenatal nicotine on parameters in the primary and associated visual cortices. Pregnant baboons were infused with nicotine (0.5 mg/hr, i.v.) or saline from 86 days gestation. At 161 days gestation fetal brains were collected (n=5/group) and the occipital lobe assessed for nAChRs and markers of the serotonergic and catecholaminergic systems using tissue autoradiography and/or high performance liquid chromatography. Neuronal nAChRs and serotonergic markers were expressed in a region and subunit dependent manner. Prenatal nicotine exposure was associated with increased binding for 3H-epibatidine sensitive nAChRs in the primary visual cortex (BA 17) and BA 18, but not BA 19, of the associative visual cortex (p<0.05). Markers of the serotonergic or catecholaminergic systems were not significantly altered. Thus, prenatal nicotine exposure is associated with alterations in the cholinergic system in the occipital lobe which may aid in the explanation of the appearance of visual deficits in children from mothers who smoke during pregnancy. PMID:24903536

  3. Prenatal nicotine exposure selectively affects nicotinic receptor expression in primary and associative visual cortices of the fetal baboon.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Jhodie R; Garland, Marianne; Stark, Raymond I; Myers, Michael M; Fifer, William P; Mokler, David J; Kinney, Hannah C

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to nicotine during pregnancy via maternal cigarette smoking is associated with visual deficits in children. This is possibly due to the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the occipital cortex, which are important in the development of visual mapping. Using a baboon model, we explored the effects of prenatal nicotine on parameters in the primary and associated visual cortices. Pregnant baboons were infused with nicotine (0.5 mg/h, intravenous) or saline from 86 days gestation. At 161 days gestation, fetal brains were collected (n = 5 per group) and the occipital lobe assessed for nAChRs and markers of the serotonergic and catecholaminergic systems using tissue autoradiography and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. Neuronal nAChRs and serotonergic markers were expressed in a region- and subunit-dependent manner. Prenatal nicotine exposure was associated with increased binding for (3) H-epibatidine sensitive nAChRs in the primary visual cortex [Brodmann areas (BA) 17] and BA 18, but not BA 19, of the associative visual cortex (P < 0.05). Markers of the serotonergic or catecholaminergic systems were not significantly altered. Thus, prenatal nicotine exposure is associated with alterations in the cholinergic system in the occipital lobe, which may aid in the explanation of the appearance of visual deficits in children from mothers who smoke during pregnancy.

  4. Nicotine versus 6-hydroxy-l-nicotine against chlorisondamine induced memory impairment and oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Ionita, Radu; Motei, Diana Elena; Babii, Cornelia; Stefan, Marius; Mihasan, Marius

    2017-02-01

    6-Hydroxy-l-nicotine (6HLN), a nicotine derivative from nicotine degradation by Arthrobacter nicotinovorans pAO1 strain was found to improve behavioral deficits and to reverse oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus. Rats were given CHL (10mg/kg, i.p.) were used as an Alzheimer's disease-like model. The nicotine (0.3mg/kg) and 6HLN (0.3mg/kg) were administered alone or in combination in the CHL-treated rats. Memory-related behaviors were evaluated using Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests. The antioxidant enzymes activity and the levels of the biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured in the hippocampus. Statistical analyses were performed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test. F values for which p<0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. CHL-caused memory deficits and oxidative stress enhancing were observed. Both nicotine and 6HLN administration attenuated the cognitive deficits and recovered the antioxidant capacity in the rat hippocampus of the CHL rat model. Our results suggest that 6HLN versus nicotine confers anti-amnesic properties in the CHL-induced a rat model of memory impairment via reversing cholinergic function and decreasing brain oxidative stress, suggesting the use of this compound as an alternative agent in AD treatment.

  5. Mouse Mutants for the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor ß2 Subunit Display Changes in Cell Adhesion and Neurodegeneration Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Carol M.; van der List, Deborah A.; Ballesteros, Jose M.; Goloshchapov, Andrey V.; Chalupa, Leo M.; Chapman, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Mice lacking expression of the ß2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) display abnormal retinal waves and a dispersed projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons to their dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGNs). Transcriptomes of LGN tissue from two independently generated Chrnb2−/− mutants and from wildtype mice were obtained at postnatal day 4 (P4), during the normal period of segregation of eye-specific afferents to the LGN. Microarray analysis reveals reduced expression of genes located on the cell membrane or in extracellular space, and of genes active in cell adhesion and calcium signaling. In particular, mRNA for cadherin 1 (Cdh1), a known axon growth regulator, is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in the LGN of P4 mutant mice and Lypd2 mRNA is similarly suppressed. Similar analysis of retinal tissue shows increased expression of crumbs 1 (Crb1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (Ccl21) mRNAs in Chrnb2−/− mutant animals. Mutations in these genes are associated with retinal neuronal degeneration. The retinas of Chrnb2−/− mutants are normal in appearance, but the increased expression of these genes may also be involved in the abnormal projection patterns of RGC to the LGN. These data may provide the tools to distinguish the interplay between neural activity and molecular expression. Finally, comparison of the transcriptomes of the two different Chrnb2−/− mutant strains reveals the effects of genetic background upon gene expression. PMID:21547082

  6. Key role of striatal cholinergic interneurons in processes leading to arrest of motor stereotypies.

    PubMed

    Aliane, Verena; Pérez, Sylvie; Bohren, Yohann; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Kemel, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Motor stereotypy is a key symptom of various disorders such as Tourette's syndrome and punding. Administration of nicotine or cholinesterase inhibitors is effective in treating some of these symptoms. However, the role of cholinergic transmission in motor stereotypy remains unknown. During strong cocaine-induced motor stereotypy, we showed earlier that increased dopamine release results in decreased acetylcholine release in the territory of the dorsal striatum related to the prefrontal cortex. Here, we investigated the role of striatal cholinergic transmission in the arrest of motor stereotypy. Analysis of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-evoked release of dopamine and acetylcholine during declining intensity of motor stereotypy revealed a dissociation between dopamine and acetylcholine release. Whereas dopamine release remained increased, the inhibition of acetylcholine release decreased, mirroring the time course of motor stereotypy. Furthermore, pharmacological treatments restoring striatal acetylcholine release (raclopride, dopamine D2 antagonist; intraperitoneal or local injection in prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum) rapidly stopped motor stereotypy. In contrast, pharmacological treatments that blocked the post-synaptic effects of acetylcholine (scopolamine, muscarinic antagonist; intraperitoneal or striatal local injection) or induced degeneration of cholinergic interneurons (AF64A, cholinergic toxin) in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum robustly prolonged the duration of strong motor stereotypy. Thus, we propose that restoration of cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum plays a key role in the arrest of motor stereotypy.

  7. Layer-specific cholinergic control of human and mouse cortical synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Verhoog, Matthijs B.; Obermayer, Joshua; Kortleven, Christian A.; Wilbers, René; Wester, Jordi; Baayen, Johannes C.; De Kock, Christiaan P. J.; Meredith, Rhiannon M.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2016-01-01

    Individual cortical layers have distinct roles in information processing. All layers receive cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain (BF), which is crucial for cognition. Acetylcholinergic receptors are differentially distributed across cortical layers, and recent evidence suggests that different populations of BF cholinergic neurons may target specific prefrontal cortical (PFC) layers, raising the question of whether cholinergic control of the PFC is layer dependent. Here we address this issue and reveal dendritic mechanisms by which endogenous cholinergic modulation of synaptic plasticity is opposite in superficial and deep layers of both mouse and human neocortex. Our results show that in different cortical layers, spike timing-dependent plasticity is oppositely regulated by the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) either located on dendrites of principal neurons or on GABAergic interneurons. Thus, layer-specific nAChR expression allows functional layer-specific control of cortical processing and plasticity by the BF cholinergic system, which is evolutionarily conserved from mice to humans. PMID:27604129

  8. Persisting cholinergic erythema: a variant of cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G M; Black, A K; Greaves, M W

    1983-09-01

    A new variant of cholinergic urticaria is described. Four patients each had a similar persistent macular skin rash distributed maximally over the upper limbs and upper trunk. Though the rash was persistent, individual macules were of short duration but new macules continually appeared at adjacent sites. Exercise and hot baths exacerbated pruritus and provoked lesions in previously unaffected areas. Topically applied benzoyl scopolamine blocked the appearance of the lesions after challenge. Tests of cholinergic function were normal, apart from an exaggerated pupillary response to arecoline in one patient.

  9. Cat carotid body chemoreceptor responses before and after nicotine receptor blockade with alpha-bungarotoxin.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, E; Lahiri, S

    1987-01-01

    The nature of nicotine receptors in the carotid body was studied in anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats. Chemoreceptor discharge in single or few-fiber preparations of the carotid sinus nerve was measured during isocapnic hypoxia, hyperoxic hypercapnia and in response to nicotine injections before and after administration of alpha-bungarotoxin (10 cats) and after alpha-bungarotoxin plus mecamylamine (7 cats) which binds to neuromuscular-type nicotine cholinergic receptors. alpha-Bungarotoxin caused a slight enhancement of the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia without affecting the chemoreceptor stimulation by nicotine. Mecamylamine (1-5 mg, i.v.), a ganglionic-type nicotinic receptor blocker, had no further effect on the response to hypoxia while it completely abolished the chemoreceptor stimulation by nicotine. Thus the nicotinic receptors in the cat carotid body which elicit excitation of chemosensory fibers appear to be of the ganglionic-type. Blockade of neuromuscular and ganglionic types of nicotinic receptors in the carotid body by alpha-bungarotoxin and mecamylamine does not attenuate the chemosensory responses to either hypoxia or hypercapnia. These nicotinic receptors therefore, do not appear to play an essential role in hypoxic or hypercapnic chemoreception in the cat carotid body.

  10. Desnitro-imidacloprid activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase cascade via the nicotinic receptor and intracellular calcium mobilization in N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2002-11-01

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is the principal neonicotinoid (the only major new class of synthetic insecticides of the past three decades). The excellent safety profile of IMI is not shared with a metabolite, desnitro-IMI (DNIMI), which displays high toxicity to mammals associated with agonist action at the alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in brain. This study examines the hypothesis that IMI, DNIMI, and (-)-nicotine activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade via primary interaction with the alpha4beta2 nAChR in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. These three nicotinic agonists induce phosphorylation of ERK (p44/p42) in a concentration-dependent manner with an optimal incubation period of 30 min. DNIMI (1 microM)-induced ERK activation is blocked by nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin and muscarinic antagonist atropine. This activation is prevented by intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM but not by removal of external Ca(2+) using EGTA and Ca(2+)-free medium. 2-Aminoethoxy-diphenylborate, a blocker for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, inhibits DNIMI-induced ERK activation but a high level of ryanodine (to block ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release) does not. The inhibitor U-73122 for phospholipase C (to suppress IP(3) production) prevents ERK activation evoked by DNIMI. Inhibitors for protein kinase C (PKC) (GF109203X) and ERK kinase (PD98059) block this activation whereas an inhibitor (H-89) for cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase does not. Thus, neonicotinoids activate the ERK cascade triggered by primary action at the alpha4beta2 nAChR with an involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization possibly mediated by IP(3). It is further suggested that intracellular Ca(2+) activates a sequential pathway from PKC to ERK.

  11. Biphasic cholinergic synaptic transmission controls action potential activity in thalamic reticular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Gang; Pita-Almenar, Juan D; Wu, Chia-Shan; Renger, John J; Uebele, Victor N; Lu, Hui-Chen; Beierlein, Michael

    2013-01-30

    Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and the brainstem form extensive projections to a number of thalamic nuclei. Activation of cholinergic afferents during distinct behavioral states can regulate neuronal firing, transmitter release at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses, and synchrony in thalamic networks, thereby controlling the flow of sensory information. These effects are thought to be mediated by slow and persistent increases in extracellular ACh levels, resulting in the modulation of populations of thalamic neurons over large temporal and spatial scales. However, the synaptic mechanisms underlying cholinergic signaling in the thalamus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate highly reliable cholinergic transmission in the mouse thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a brain structure essential for sensory processing, arousal, and attention. We find that ACh release evoked by low-frequency stimulation leads to biphasic excitatory-inhibitory (E-I) postsynaptic responses, mediated by the activation of postsynaptic α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) and M2 muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs), respectively. In addition, ACh can bind to mAChRs expressed near cholinergic release sites, resulting in autoinhibition of release. We show that the activation of postsynaptic nAChRs by transmitter release from only a small number of individual axons is sufficient to trigger action potentials in TRN neurons. Furthermore, short trains of cholinergic synaptic inputs can powerfully entrain ongoing TRN neuronal activity. Our study demonstrates fast and precise synaptic E-I signaling mediated by ACh, suggesting novel computational mechanisms for the cholinergic control of neuronal activity in thalamic circuits.

  12. Analysis of motor function modulated by cholinergic neurons in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K; Kitamura, Y; Taniguchi, T; Agata, K

    2010-06-16

    Recent studies of the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica have revealed fundamental mechanisms and unique aspects of neuroscience and neuroregeneration. Here, we identified the gene for planarian choline acetyltransferase (Djchat), which is essential for acetylcholine (ACh) biosynthesis. Immunofluorescence studies using anti-Dugesia japonica ChAT (DjChAT) antibody revealed that cholinergic neurons are widely distributed in the planarian nervous system, including the brain, ventral nerve cords, optic nerves, and pharyngeal nerve plexus. In order to investigate the function of cholinergic neurons in planarians, we used both pharmacological and RNA interference (RNAi) approaches. Administration of physostigmine (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) clearly elevated the amount of ACh, and then induced sudden muscle contraction behavior in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, we found that pretreatment with tubocurarine (a muscle nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist) or atropine (a non-selective muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist), but not pretreatment with mecamylamine (a neural nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist), significantly extended the latency time for physostigmine-induced contraction behavior, suggesting that muscle nicotinic ACh receptors and muscarinic ACh receptors contribute to physostigmine-induced contraction behavior. We also confirmed that ACh biosynthesis ability and DjChAT-immunoreactivity were eliminated in Djchat(RNAi) planarians. Moreover, the decrease of the level of ACh induced by Djchat(RNAi) caused extension of the latency time for contraction behavior. Our findings support the possibility that the cholinergic functions of planarians are similar to those of vertebrates, suggesting that planarians are simple but useful model organisms for getting insight into the cholinergic nervous system in higher animals.

  13. Atypical properties of release and short-term depression at a specialized nicotinic synapse in the Mauthner cell network

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Simon; Grove, Charlotte L.; Faber, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Many synapses exhibit temporally complex forms of activity-dependent short-term synaptic plasticity. The diversity of these phenomena reflects the evolutionary specialization of synapses within networks. We examined the properties of transmission and plasticity, in vivo, at an identified, specialized axo-axonic nicotinic synapse between the goldfish Mauthner cell and one of its targets, the cranial relay neuron (CRN), using intracellular paired recordings and low frequency (0.33–2 Hz) train stimulations. Depression of successive excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), which dominates short-term plasticity, had two components. A fast component reduced the amplitude of EPSP2, to less than 50% of EPSP1. A slow component produced an additional 10–30% of amplitude reduction and developed with a time constant of tens of seconds. The latencies of the later depressed responses were ∼0.1 ms longer than that of EPSP1, suggesting a reduced release probability. The Ca2+ chelators EGTA and BAPTA, injected presynaptically, reduced all EPSPs and slowed development of the second component of depression. Interestingly, spike broadening, produced by injecting K+ channel blockers, reduced release, but accelerated the kinetics of the slow component. Finally, Ba2+ in the external medium enhanced release, and reduced the first component and slowed the development of the second component of depression. Taken together, these last two results, which are in contrast to observations at other synapses, and the two-component depression suggest atypical release properties at the output synapses of the Mauthner cell, which triggers an escape behavior. We suggest that the second component of depression provides an additional safety factor to prevent repetitive firing of the CRN. PMID:21490264

  14. Modeling Parkinson’s Disease Falls Associated With Brainstem Cholinergic Systems Decline

    PubMed Central

    Kucinski, Aaron; Sarter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the primary disease-defining symptoms, approximately half of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from postural instability, impairments in gait control and a propensity for falls. Consistent with evidence from patients, we previously demonstrated that combined striatal dopamine (DA) and basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic cell loss causes falls in rats traversing dynamic surfaces. Because evidence suggests that degeneration of brainstem cholinergic neurons arising from the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) also contributes to impaired gait and falls, here we assessed the effects of selective cholinergic PPN lesions in combination with striatal DA loss or BF cholinergic cells loss as well as losses in all 3 regions. Results indicate that all combination losses that included the BF cholinergic system slowed traversal and increased slips and falls. However, the performance of rats with losses in all 3 regions (PPN, BF, and DA) was not more severely impaired than following combined BF cholinergic and striatal DA lesions. These results confirm the hypothesis that BF cholinergic-striatal disruption of attentional-motor interactions is a primary source of falls. Additional losses of PPN cholinergic neurons may worsen posture and gait control in situations not captured by the current testing conditions. PMID:25798629

  15. Nicotine Induces Podocyte Apoptosis through Increasing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiqian; Lederman, Rivka; Eng, Judith M.; Shoshtari, Seyedeh Shadafarin Marashi; Saleem, Moin A.; Malhotra, Ashwani; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking plays an important role in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nicotine, one of the major components of cigarette smoking, has been demonstrated to increase proliferation of renal mesangial cells. In this study, we examined the effect of nicotine on podocyte injury. Methods To determine the expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR subunits) in podocytes, cDNAs and cell lysate of cultured human podocytes were used for the expression of nAChR mRNAs and proteins, respectively; and mouse renal cortical sections were subjected to immunofluorescant staining. We also studied the effect of nicotine on podocyte nephrin expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (via DCFDA loading followed by fluorometric analysis), proliferation, and apoptosis (morphologic assays). We evaluated the effect of nicotine on podocyte downstream signaling including phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 and established causal relationships by using respective inhibitors. We used nAChR antagonists to confirm the role of nicotine on podocyte injury. Results Human podocytes displayed robust mRNA and protein expression of nAChR in vitro studies. In vivo studies, mice renal cortical sections revealed co-localization of nAChRs along with synaptopodin. In vitro studies, nephrin expression in podocyte was decreased by nicotine. Nicotine stimulated podocyte ROS generation; nonetheless, antioxidants such as N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and TEMPOL (superoxide dismutase mimetic agent) inhibited this effect of nicotine. Nicotine did not modulate proliferation but promoted apoptosis in podocytes. Nicotine enhanced podocyte phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, and their specific inhibitors attenuated nicotine-induced apoptosis. nAChR antagonists significantly suppressed the effects of nicotine on podocyte. Conclusions Nicotine induces podocyte apoptosis through ROS generation and associated downstream MAPKs signaling. The present study provides

  16. Characterization of Channelrhodopsin and Archaerhodopsin in Cholinergic Neurons of Cre-Lox Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Tristan; Danskin, Bethanny; Larsen, Rylan S.; Ollerenshaw, Doug; Groblewski, Peter; Valley, Matthew; Olsen, Shawn; Waters, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The study of cholinergic signaling in the mammalian CNS has been greatly facilitated by the advent of mouse lines that permit the expression of reporter proteins, such as opsins, in cholinergic neurons. However, the expression of opsins could potentially perturb the physiology of opsin-expressing cholinergic neurons or mouse behavior. Indeed, the published literature includes examples of cellular and behavioral perturbations in preparations designed to drive expression of opsins in cholinergic neurons. Here we investigate expression of opsins, cellular physiology of cholinergic neurons and behavior in two mouse lines, in which channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and archaerhodopsin (Arch) are expressed in cholinergic neurons using the Cre-lox system. The two mouse lines were generated by crossing ChAT-Cre mice with Cre-dependent reporter lines Ai32(ChR2-YFP) and Ai35(Arch-GFP). In most mice from these crosses, we observed expression of ChR2 and Arch in only cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and in other putative cholinergic neurons in the forebrain. In small numbers of mice, off-target expression occurred, in which fluorescence did not appear limited to cholinergic neurons. Whole-cell recordings from fluorescently-labeled basal forebrain neurons revealed that both proteins were functional, driving depolarization (ChR2) or hyperpolarization (Arch) upon illumination, with little effect on passive membrane properties, spiking pattern or spike waveform. Finally, performance on a behavioral discrimination task was comparable to that of wild-type mice. Our results indicate that ChAT-Cre x reporter line crosses provide a simple, effective resource for driving indicator and opsin expression in cholinergic neurons with few adverse consequences and are therefore an valuable resource for studying the cholinergic system. PMID:27243816

  17. Astrocyte Intermediaries of Septal Cholinergic Modulation in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Milan; Braganza, Oliver; Dannenberg, Holger; Hu, Wen; Pothmann, Leonie; Rosen, Jurij; Mody, Istvan; van Loo, Karen; Deisseroth, Karl; Becker, Albert J; Schoch, Susanne; Beck, Heinz

    2016-05-18

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine, derived from the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca complex, has been accorded an important role in hippocampal learning and memory processes. However, the precise mechanisms whereby acetylcholine released from septohippocampal cholinergic neurons acts to modulate hippocampal microcircuits remain unknown. Here, we show that acetylcholine release from cholinergic septohippocampal projections causes a long-lasting GABAergic inhibition of hippocampal dentate granule cells in vivo and in vitro. This inhibition is caused by cholinergic activation of hilar astrocytes, which provide glutamatergic excitation of hilar inhibitory interneurons. These results demonstrate that acetylcholine release can cause slow inhibition of principal neuronal activity via astrocyte intermediaries.

  18. The effects of erdosteine, N-acetylcysteine and vitamin E on nicotine-induced apoptosis of cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Demiralay, Rezan; Gürsan, Nesrin; Erdem, Havva

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes after intratraperitoneal nicotine injection, in order to examine the roles of inflammatory markers [myeloperoxidase (MPO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)] in nicotine-induced cardiac damage and to determine the protective effects of three known antioxidant agents (N-acetylcysteine (NAC), erdosteine and vitamin E) on nicotine toxicity in the heart. Female Wistar rats were divided into seven groups, each composed of nine rats: two negative control groups, two positive control groups, one erdosteine-treated group (500 mg kg(-1)), one NAC-treated group (500 mg kg(-1)) and one vitamin E-treated group (500 mg kg(-1)). Nicotine was intraperitoneally injected at a dosage of 0.6 mg kg(-1) for 21 days. Following nicotine injection, the antioxidants were administered orally; treatment was continued until the rats were killed. Heart tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin for histopathological assessments. Apoptosis level in cardiomyocytes was determined by using TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick endlabelling) method. Staining of cytoplasmic TNF-alpha in cardiomyocytes and heart MPO activity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The treatments with erdosteine, NAC and vitamin E significantly reduced the rate of nicotine-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The effect of vitamin E on apoptosis regulation was weaker than the effects of erdosteine and NAC. Erdosteine, NAC and vitamin E significantly reduced the increases in the local production of TNF-alpha and heart MPO activity. This findings suggest that the effects of erdosteine and NAC on apoptosis regulation are stronger than that of vitamin E.

  19. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Orexin Neurons: Effects on Attention

    PubMed Central

    Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Monda, Vincenzo; Esposito, Maria; Precenzano, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Chieffi, Sergio; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system has an important role in attentive functions. The cholinergic system can be activated by different inputs, and in particular, by orexin neurons, whose cell bodies are located within the postero-lateral hypothalamus. Recently the orexin-producing neurons have been proved to promote arousal and attention through their projections to the BF. The aim of this review article is to summarize the evidence showing that the orexin system contributes to attentional processing by an increase in cortical acetylcholine release and in cortical neurons activity. PMID:28197081

  20. Direct action and modulating effect of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on ion channels expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Lehmann, Ramona; Thiel, Ulrike; Ziemba, Paul M; Beltrán, Leopoldo R; Sherkheli, Muhammad A; Jeanbourquin, Philippe; Hugi, Alain; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2014-04-05

    Nicotine sensory perception is generally thought to be mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. However, recent data strongly support the idea that other receptors (e.g., transient receptor potential A1 channel, TRPA1) and other pathways contribute to the detection mechanisms underlying the olfactory and trigeminal cell response to nicotine flavor. This is in accordance with the reported ability of humans to discriminate between (+)- and (-)- nicotine enantiomers. To get a more detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular basis underlying the sensory perception of nicotine, we studied the activity of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on cultured murine trigeminal sensory neurons and on a range of heterologously expressed receptors. The human TRPA1 channel is activated by (-)-nicotine. In this work, we show that (+)-nicotine is also an activator of this channel. Pharmacological experiments using nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and transient receptor potential blockers revealed that trigeminal neurons express one or more unidentified receptors that are sensitive to (+)- and/or (-)-nicotine. Results also indicate that the presence of extracellular calcium ions is required to elicit trigeminal neuron responses to (+)- and (-)-nicotine. Results also show that both (+)-nicotine and (-)-nicotine can block 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor-mediated responses in recombinant expression systems and in cultured trigeminal neurons expressing 5-HT3 receptors. Our investigations broaden the spectra of receptors that are targets for nicotine enantiomers and give new insights into the physiological role of nicotine.

  1. Schwann cells sense and control acetylcholine spillover at the neuromuscular junction by α7 nicotinic receptors and butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Konstantin A; Girard, Emmanuelle; Nikitashina, Alexandra D; Colasante, Cesare; Bernard, Véronique; Nurullin, Leniz; Leroy, Jacqueline; Samigullin, Dmitry; Colak, Omer; Nikolsky, Evgenii; Plaud, Benoit; Krejci, Eric

    2014-09-03

    Terminal Schwann cells (TSCs) are key components of the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ). How the TSCs sense the synaptic activity in physiological conditions remains unclear. We have taken advantage of the distinct localization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) at the NMJ to bring out the function of different ACh receptors (AChRs). AChE is clustered by the collagen Q in the synaptic cleft and prevents the repetitive activation of muscle nicotinic AChRs. We found that BChE is anchored at the TSC by a proline-rich membrane anchor, the small transmembrane protein anchor of brain AChE. When BChE was specifically inhibited, ACh release was significant depressed through the activation of α7 nAChRs localized on the TSC and activated by the spillover of ACh. When both AChE and BChE were inhibited, the spillover increased and induced a dramatic reduction of ACh release that compromised the muscle twitch triggered by the nerve stimulation. α7 nAChRs at the TSC may act as a sensor for spillover of ACh adjusted by BChE and may represent an extrasynaptic sensor for homeostasis at the NMJ. In myasthenic rats, selective inhibition of AChE is more effective in rescuing muscle function than the simultaneous inhibition of AChE and BChE because the concomitant inhibition of BChE counteracts the positive action of AChE inhibition. These results show that inhibition of BChE should be avoided during the treatment of myasthenia and the pharmacological reversal of residual curarization after anesthesia.

  2. Effects of nonylphenol on the calcium signal and catecholamine secretion coupled with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Shan; Liu, Ging-Hui; Chao, Wei-Liang

    2008-02-03

    Nonylphenol (NP) is the most critical metabolite of alkylphenol polyethoxylate detergents. NP is known as an endocrine disruptor with estrogenic activities and as an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. Estrogen has modulatory roles on ligand-gated ion channels, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors can modulate the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)]) and thus can affect the calcium signaling coupled with nAChRs. Therefore, NP is predicted to have complex effects on the Ca(2+) signaling and secretion coupled with nAChRs. This study investigated these effects using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. The results show that NP suppressed the Ca(2+) signaling coupled with nAChRs and voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels in a dose-dependent manner, with IC(50)s of 1 and 5.9 microM, respectively. Estradiol exhibits similar suppression but much lower inhibitory potencies. NP alone induced a transient rise in [Ca(2+)](c) in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium. Thapsigargin, an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor, partially suppressed the [Ca(2+)](c) rise induced by NP, but NP totally blocked the [Ca(2+)](c) rise induced by thapsigargin. This illustrates that NP can cause Ca(2+) release from thapsigargin-insensitive pools. Thapsigargin suppressed the Ca(2+) signaling coupled with nAChRs but increased that coupled with voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. We propose that three routes are responsible for the effects of NP on nAChRs: named receptor channels, voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Three routes are related to the characteristics of NP as steroid-like compounds and Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor.

  3. Aging causes partial loss of basal forebrain but no loss of pontine reticular cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Karen A; Kent, Caroline; Nicolle, Michelle M; Gallagher, Michela; McKinney, Michael

    2006-11-27

    Cholinergic degeneration occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate whether normal aging causes selective neurodegeneration, we compared counts of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band and pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei of the brainstem in young and aged Long-Evans rats characterized for their spatial learning ability in the Morris water maze. A subset of aged rats (aged-unimpaired) learned the spatial learning task as young rats, whereas another group (age-impaired) showed poorer learning than young animals. In the medial septum/diagonal band, there was a significant loss (-23%, P < 0.02) of cholinergic neurons in aged-impaired animals compared with young subjects. In the brainstem, there were no significant differences in cholinergic cell number in any group. This selective loss of cholinergic neurons may, in part, account for the cognitive deficits observed in aging and, considering previous findings in this model, may be related to oxidative stress.

  4. Down regulation of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor of the rat prostate following castration

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Miller, A.R.; Lepor, H.

    1985-07-01

    Prostatic secretion is dependent upon the integrity of the endocrine and autonomic nervous systems and is dramatically influenced by muscarinic cholinergic analogs. In this study, the authors have used radioligand receptor binding methods on whole tissue homogenates and slide mounted tissue sections of rat prostate to determine whether androgens regulate the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the prostate. The muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding affinities (Kd) of (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine in prostatic homogenates obtained from intact, castrate, and castrate rats receiving testosterone replacement (castrate + T) were similar (0.07 to 0.10 nM). The muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding capacity decreased 73 per cent following castration. Testosterone administration restored the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in castrate rats to intact levels. In order to ensure that the loss of receptor density was not due to a decrease in the epithelial: stromal cell ratio, the number of muscarinic cholinergic receptors per unit area of epithelium was determined in the 3 treatment groups using autoradiography on slide mounted tissue sections. The density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in a unit area of epithelium was decreased 91 per cent following castration. Testosterone administration restored the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the castrate rats to intact levels. The modulation of neurotransmitter receptors by steroid hormones may be a mechanism by which sex steroids regulate biological responsiveness of target tissues.

  5. The effects of nicotine on cognition are dependent on baseline performance.

    PubMed

    Niemegeers, Peter; Dumont, Glenn J H; Quisenaerts, Charel; Morrens, Manuel; Boonzaier, Julia; Fransen, Erik; de Bruijn, Ellen R A; Hulstijn, Wouter; Sabbe, Bernard G C

    2014-07-01

    Since cholinergic neurotrans