Science.gov

Sample records for cell noble metal

  1. Noble metals in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Markowska, Anna; Jaszczyńska-Nowinka, Karolina; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide research groups are searching for anticancer compounds, many of them are organometalic complexes having platinum group metals as their active centers. Most commonly used cytostatics from this group are cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Cisplatin was used fot the first time in 1978, from this time many platinum derivatives were created. In this review we present biological properties and probable future clinical use of platinum, gold, silver, iridium and ruthenium derivatives. Gold derivative Auranofin has been studied extensively. Action of silver nanoparticles on different cell lines was analysed. Iridium isotopes are commonly used in brachyterapy. Ruthenium compound new anti-tumour metastasis inhibitor (NAMI-A) is used in managing lung cancer metastases. Electroporation of another ruthenium based compound KP1339 was also studied. Most of described complexes have antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties. Further studies need to be made. Nevertheless noble metal based chemotherapheutics and compounds seem to be an interesting direction of research. PMID:26557773

  2. Synthesis of graphene-supported noble metal hybrid nanostructures and their applications as advanced electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-11-21

    Graphene (GN) is an emerging carbon material that may soon find practical applications. With its unusual properties, GN is an ideal platform for constructing a series of GN-based functional nanomaterials. Among them, GN/noble metal hybrids become one of the families of composite materials with extraordinary properties by combining the advantages of noble metal nanostructures and GN. The recent progress in the synthesis of GN/noble metal hybrids is presented first, such as in situ solution based methods, electrochemical deposition methods, self-assembly and other methods. Then, the applications of these novel GN/noble metal hybrids in fuel cells are summarized and discussed. Future research trends and challenges of design and synthesis of GN/noble metal hybrids are proposed.

  3. Alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells completely free from noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shanfu; Pan, Jing; Huang, Aibin; Zhuang, Lin; Lu, Juntao

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, fuel cell technology has been undergoing revolutionary developments, with fundamental progress being the replacement of electrolyte solutions with polymer electrolytes, making the device more compact in size and higher in power density. Nowadays, acidic polymer electrolytes, typically Nafion, are widely used. Despite great success, fuel cells based on acidic polyelectrolyte still depend heavily on noble metal catalysts, predominantly platinum (Pt), thus increasing the cost and hampering the widespread application of fuel cells. Here, we report a type of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) employing a hydroxide ion-conductive polymer, quaternary ammonium polysulphone, as alkaline electrolyte and nonprecious metals, chromium-decorated nickel and silver, as the catalyst for the negative and positive electrodes, respectively. In addition to the development of a high-performance alkaline polymer electrolyte particularly suitable for fuel cells, key progress has been achieved in catalyst tailoring: The surface electronic structure of nickel has been tuned to suppress selectively the surface oxidative passivation with retained activity toward hydrogen oxidation. This report of a H2–O2 PEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts in both the positive and negative electrodes represents an important advancement in the research and development of fuel cells.

  4. Environmentally Friendly Carbon-Preserving Recovery of Noble Metals From Supported Fuel Cell Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Latsuzbaia, R; Negro, E; Koper, G J M

    2015-06-08

    The dissolution of noble-metal catalysts under mild and carbon-preserving conditions offers the possibility of in situ regeneration of the catalyst nanoparticles in fuel cells or other applications. Here, we report on the complete dissolution of the fuel cell catalyst, platinum nanoparticles, under very mild conditions at room temperature in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.1 M HCl by electrochemical potential cycling between 0.5-1.1 V at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1) . Dissolution rates as high as 22.5 μg cm(-2) per cycle were achieved, which ensured a relatively short dissolution timescale of 3-5 h for a Pt loading of 0.35 mg cm(-2) on carbon. The influence of chloride ions and oxygen in the electrolyte on the dissolution was investigated, and a dissolution mechanism is proposed on the basis of the experimental observations and available literature results. During the dissolution process, the corrosion of the carbon support was minimal, as observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  5. Noble metal reforming of naphtha

    SciTech Connect

    Bonacci, J.C.; Patterson, J.R.

    1981-09-29

    Conventional noble metal reforming to upgrade the octane number of petroleum naphtha is an endothermic reaction which is carried out in a series of reactors with intermediate furnace heating of the petroleum fraction being upgraded. This specification discloses a process and apparatus configuration to increase the octane number of the reformate at a minimum liquid yield loss by cooling the first reforming stage effluent and then contacting the cooled effluent with a zsm-5 type zeolite catalyst prior to the first intermediate furnace heating.

  6. Platinum-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-04-14

    Core-shell particles encapsulated by a thin film of a catalytically active metal are described. The particles are preferably nanoparticles comprising a non-noble core with a noble metal shell which preferably do not include Pt. The non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles are encapsulated by a catalytically active metal which is preferably Pt. The core-shell nanoparticles are preferably formed by prolonged elevated-temperature annealing of nanoparticle alloys in an inert environment. This causes the noble metal component to surface segregate and form an atomically thin shell. The Pt overlayer is formed by a process involving the underpotential deposition of a monolayer of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a Pt salt. A thin Pt layer forms via the galvanic displacement of non-noble surface atoms by more noble Pt atoms in the salt. The overall process is a robust and cost-efficient method for forming Pt-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles.

  7. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, L.M.; Sanner, R.D.; Coronado, P.R.

    1998-12-22

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such as environmental remediation are disclosed. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P){sub 2}, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  8. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, Lucy M.; Sanner, Robert D.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such environmental remediation. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P).sub.2, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  9. Recovery and use of fission product noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.A.; Rohmann, C.A.; Perrigo, L.D.

    1980-06-01

    Noble metals in fission products are of strategic value. Market prices for noble metals are rising more rapidly than recovery costs. A promising concept has been developed for recovery of noble metals from fission product waste. Although the assessment was made only for the three noble metal fission products (Rh, Pd, Ru), there are other fission products and actinides which have potential value. (DLC)

  10. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  15. Noble metal superparticles and methods of preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Yugang; Hu, Yongxing

    2016-07-12

    A method comprises heating an aqueous solution of colloidal silver particles. A soluble noble metal halide salt is added to the aqueous solution which undergoes a redox reaction on a surface of the silver particles to form noble metal/silver halide SPs, noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs on the surface of the silver particles. The heat is maintained for a predetermined time to consume the silver particles and release the noble metal/silver halide SPs, the noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or the noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs into the aqueous solution. The aqueous solution is cooled. The noble metal/silver halide SPs, the noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs are separated from the aqueous solution. The method optionally includes adding a soluble halide salt to the aqueous solution.

  16. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  17. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  18. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadory, Mozhgan

    Improved methods were developed for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles. Laboratory experiments were designed for introducing of nanotechnology into the undergraduate curriculum. An optimal set of conditions for the synthesis of clear yellow colloidal silver was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by borohydride reduction of silver nitrate, a method which produces particles with average size of 12+/-2 nm, determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The plasmon absorbance is at 397 nm and the peak width at half maximum (PWHM) is 70-75 nm. The relationship between aggregation and optical properties was determined along with a method to protect the particles using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). A laboratory experiment was designed in which students synthesize yellow colloidal silver, estimate particle size using visible spectroscopy, and study aggregation effects. The synthesis of the less stable copper nanoparticles is more difficult because copper nanopaticles are easily oxidized. Four methods were used for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles, including chemical reduction with sodium borohydride, sodium borohydride with potassium iodide, isopropyl alcohol with cetyltrimethylammonium bormide (CTAB) and reducing sugars. The latter method was also the basis for an undergraduate laboratory experiment. For each reaction, the dependence of stability of the copper nanoparticles on reagent concentrations, additives, relative amounts of reactants, and temperature is explored. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM and UV-Visible Spectroscopy were used to characterize the copper nanoparticles. A laboratory experiment to produce copper nanoparticles from household chemicals was developed.

  19. Noble Metal Nanoparticles Applications in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde, João; Doria, Gonçalo; Baptista, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has prompted new and improved materials for biomedical applications with particular emphasis in therapy and diagnostics. Special interest has been directed at providing enhanced molecular therapeutics for cancer, where conventional approaches do not effectively differentiate between cancerous and normal cells; that is, they lack specificity. This normally causes systemic toxicity and severe and adverse side effects with concomitant loss of quality of life. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. This way, a variety of nanoparticles with the possibility of diversified modification with biomolecules have been investigated for biomedical applications including their use in highly sensitive imaging assays, thermal ablation, and radiotherapy enhancement as well as drug and gene delivery and silencing. Here, we review the available noble metal nanoparticles for cancer therapy, with particular focus on those already being translated into clinical settings. PMID:22007307

  20. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO₃ and MnO₂, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm⁻² has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7-3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC.

  1. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO3 and MnO2, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm−2 has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7–3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC. PMID:22880160

  2. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios) that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory. PMID:22438731

  3. The Colour of the Noble Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the physical basis for colors of noble metals (copper, silver, gold) developed from energy conservation/quantum mechanical view of free electron photoabsorption. Describes production of absorption edges produced by change in density of occupied valence electron states in the d-band, which allows stronger absorption in the visible photon…

  4. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  5. Highly Fluorescent Noble Metal Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Nicovich, Philip R.; Dickson, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Highly fluorescent, water-soluble, few-atom noble metal quantum dots have been created that behave as multi-electron artificial atoms with discrete, size-tunable electronic transitions throughout the visible and near IR. These “molecular metals” exhibit highly polarizable transitions and scale in size according to the simple relation, Efermi/N1/3, predicted by the free electron model of metallic behavior. This simple scaling indicates that fluorescence arises from intraband transitions of free electrons and that these conduction electron transitions are the low number limit of the plasmon – the collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. Providing the “missing link” between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these emissive, water-soluble Au nanoclusters open new opportunities for biological labels, energy transfer pairs, and light emitting sources in nanoscale optoelectronics. PMID:17105412

  6. Oxygen adsorption at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Electric conduction in titanium dioxide is known to be oxygen sensitive and the conductivity of a TiO2 ceramic body is determined mainly by the concentration of its naturally occurring oxygen vacancy. Recently, fabrications and electronic features of a number of noble metal/TiO2-based electronic devices, such as solar cells, UV detectors, gas sensors and memristive devices have been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the effect of oxygen adsorption at the noble metal/TiO2 junction in such devices, and show the potentials of these junctions in chemical sensor fabrication. The polycrystalline, poly-phase TiO2 layers are grown by the selective and controlled oxidation of titanium thin films vacuum deposited on silica substrates. Noble metal thin films are deposited on the oxide layers by physical vapor deposition. Current-voltage (I-V) diagrams of the fabricated devices are studied for Ag/, Au/, and Pt/TiO2 samples. The raw samples show no junction energy barrier. After a thermal annealing in air at 250° C, I-V diagrams change drastically. The annealed samples demonstrate highly non-linear I-V indicating the formation of high Schottky energy barriers at the noble metal/TiO2 junctions. The phenomenon is described based on the effect of the oxygen atoms adsorbed at the junction.

  7. Making A Noble-Metal-On-Metal-Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Irvin M.; Davis, Patricia P.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1989-01-01

    Catalyst exhibits superior performance in oxidation of CO in CO2 lasers. Two-step process developed for preparing platinum- or palladium-on-tin-oxide catalyst for recombination of CO and O2, decomposition products that occur in high-voltage discharge region of closed-cycle CO2 laser. Process also applicable to other noble-metal/metal-oxide combinations.

  8. New applications of noble metal catalysts in hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.H.G.; Bertram, R.V.; Dencker, G.D.

    1995-09-01

    The paper explores how a noble metal hydrocracking catalyst functions stably in a hydrogen sulfide and ammonia environment and, in particular, how the physical positioning of the noble metal molecules affects catalyst performance. A commercial example, HC-28 catalyst in the Unicracking unit at Marathon Oil Refinery in Robinson, Illinois, demonstrates the success of the noble metal catalyst approach for naphtha production. In addition, a new Unicracking catalyst, HC-35, which uses a noble metal component to produce high-quality middle distillates, is introduced. The paper also shows how refiners may derive increased economic and operational benefits from their catalyst investment by using the latest developments in reactor internals design.

  9. Noble Metal-Iron Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Emerging Applications.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Xuan, Shouhu

    2016-02-01

    This account provides an overview of current research activities that focus on the synthesis and applications of nanomaterials from noble metal (e.g., Au, Ag, Pd) and iron oxide (Fe3O4) hybrids. An introduction to the synthetic strategies that have been developed for generating M-Fe3O4 nanomaterials with different novel structures is presented. Surface functionalization and bioconjugation of these hybrid nanoparticles and nanocomposites are also reviewed. The utilization of the advantageous properties of both noble metals and iron oxide for a variety of applications, such as theranostics, gene delivery, biosensing, cell sorting, bioseparation, and catalysis, is discussed and highlighted. Finally, future trends and perspectives of these sophisticated nanocomposites are outlined. The fundamental requirements underpinning the effective preparation of M-Fex Oy hybrid nanomaterials shed light on the future development of heterogeneous catalysts, nanotheranostics, nanomedicines, and other chemical technologies.

  10. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  11. Detecting and destroying cancer cells in more than one way with noble metals and different confinement properties on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Dreaden, Erik C; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2012-11-20

    market for nano-enabled medical technologies is expected to grow to $70-160 billion by 2015, rivaling the current market share of biologics worldwide. In this Account, we explore the emerging applications of noble metal nanotechnologies in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics carried out by our group and by others. Many of the novel biomedical properties associated with gold and silver nanoparticles arise from confinement effects: (i) the confinement of photons within the particle which can lead to dramatic electromagnetic scattering and absorption (useful in sensing and heating applications, respectively); (ii) the confinement of molecules around the nanoparticle (useful in drug delivery); and (iii) the cellular/subcellular confinement of particles within malignant cells (such as selective, nuclear-targeted cytotoxic DNA damage by gold nanoparticles). We then describe how these confinement effects relate to specific aspects of diagnosis and treatment such as (i) laser photothermal therapy, optical scattering microscopy, and spectroscopic detection, (ii) drug targeting and delivery, and (iii) the ability of these structures to act as intrinsic therapeutic agents which can selectively perturb/inhibit cellular functions such as division. We intend to provide the reader with a unique physical and chemical perspective on both the design and application of these technologies in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. We also suggest a framework for approaching future research in the field.

  12. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases.

  13. Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Noble Metal Films for Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Jay K.

    electrochemical biosensing. We have also discovered a facile electrochemical method to synthesize novel plasmonic noble metal nanostructured films. Plasmonic noble metal nanostructures have promising applications in photovoltaic solar cells, cloaking, and molecular sensing. Here, we used plasmonic noble metal nanostructures as a transducer for biosensing using localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy, a label-free biosensing technique. The prepared nanostructured films are not only sensitive for detecting biomolecules, but are stable chemically and physically, and can be easily regenerated. We have compared the sensitivity of three different types of nanostructured films, namely; nanostructured gold film (NGF), nanostructured silver film (NSF), and NPG film, and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the prepared structures. Finally, we report carbohydrate--lectin, lectin--protein, and layer-by-layer interactions of molecules using LSPR spectroscopy. We have also performed real-time interactions and concentration dependent studies to find the equilibrium dissociation constant of the interactions. The results from these experiments could contribute to the development of cheap and sensitive biosensors that can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  14. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  15. DWPF Hydrogen Generation Study-Form of Noble Metal SRAT Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, investigate the factors that contribute to hydrogen generation to determine if current conservatism in setting the DWPF processing window can be reduced. A phased program has been undertaken to increase understanding of the factors that influence hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell, CPC. The hydrogen generation in the CPC is primarily due to noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid with a minor contribution from radiolytic processes. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Two sludge simulants were obtained, one with co-precipitated noble metals and one without noble metals. Co-precipitated noble metals were expected to better match real waste behavior than using trimmed noble metals during CPC simulations. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The two original and two heat-treated sludge simulants were then used as feeds to Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. Testing was done at relatively high acid stoichiometries, {approx}175%, and without mercury in order to ensure significant hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation rates were monitored during processing to assess the impact of the form of noble metals. The following observations were made on the data: (1) Co-precipitated noble metal simulant processed similarly to trimmed noble metal simulant in most respects, such as nitrite to nitrate conversion, formate destruction, and pH, but differently with respect to hydrogen generation: (A

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A NON-NOBLE METAL HYDROGEN PURIFICATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; Kyle Brinkman, K; Thad Adams, T; George Rawls, G

    2008-11-25

    Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focus of the reported work was to develop a scaled reactor with a VNi-Ti alloy membrane to replace a production Pd-alloy tube-type purification/diffuser system.

  17. Nonequilibrium electron dynamics in noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Fatti, N.; Voisin, C.; Achermann, M.; Tzortzakis, S.; Christofilos, D.; Vallée, F.

    2000-06-01

    Electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions in noble metals are discussed in the light of two-color femtosecond pump-probe measurements in silver films. The internal thermalization of a nonequilibrium electron distribution created by intraband absorption of a pump pulse is followed by probing the induced optical property changes in the vicinity of the frequency threshold for the d band to Fermi surface transitions. This is shown to take place with a characteristic time constant of 350 fs, significantly shorter than previously reported in gold. This difference is ascribed to a weaker screening of the electron-electron interaction by the d-band electrons in silver than in gold. These results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron relaxation dynamics using a reduced static screening of the electron-electron Coulomb interaction, and including bound electron screening. Electron-lattice thermalization has been studied using a probe frequency out of resonance with the interband transitions. In both materials, the transient nonthermal nature of the electron distribution leads to the observation of a short-time delay reduction of the energy-loss rate of the electron gas to the lattice, in very good agreement with our theoretical model.

  18. Field Enhancement using Noble Metal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Benliang

    Resonance may be one of the most fundamental rules of nature. Electromagnetic resonance at nanometer scale could produce a giant field enhancement at optical frequency, providing a way to measure and control the process of atoms and molecules at single molecule scale. For example, the giant field enhancement would provide single molecule sensitivity for Raman scattering, which provides unique tools in measuring the quantity in extremely low concentration. In addition, light-emitting diodes could have high brightness but low input power that would be revolutionary in the optoelectronic industry. Although light enhancement is promising in several key technology areas, there are several challenges remain to be tackled. In particular, since the field enhancement is so strongly geometry dependent that slight modification of the geometry can lead to large variations in the outcome, a thorough understanding in how the geometry of the structure affects the field enhancement and creating proper methods to fabricate these structures reproducibly is of most importance. This thesis is devoted to design, fabrication and characterization of field enhancement generated on the surface of noble metals such as silver or gold with 1D structure. The s-polarized field enhancement arising from one-dimensional metal gratings is designed and optimized by using Rigorous Coupling Wave Analysis (RCWA). After optimization, the strongest enhancement factor is found to be 9.7 for 514nm wavelength light. The theoretical results arc confirmed by angle-dependent reflectivity measurements and the experimental results are found to support the theory. A novel single slit structure employing surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) for enhancing the electric field is studied. SPPs are first generated on a 50 nm thick metal film using attenuated total reflection coupling, and they are subsequently coupled to the cavity mode induced by the single slit. As a result, the field enhancement is found at least 3

  19. Noble metal aerogels-synthesis, characterization, and application as electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Herrmann, Anne-Kristin; Bigall, Nadja C; Rodriguez, Paramaconi; Wen, Dan; Oezaslan, Mehtap; Schmidt, Thomas J; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Metallic and catalytically active materials with high surface area and large porosity are a long-desired goal in both industry and academia. In this Account, we summarize the strategies for making a variety of self-supported noble metal aerogels consisting of extended metal backbone nanonetworks. We discuss their outstanding physical and chemical properties, including their three-dimensional network structure, the simple control over their composition, their large specific surface area, and their hierarchical porosity. Additionally, we show some initial results on their excellent performance as electrocatalysts combining both high catalytic activity and high durability for fuel cell reactions such as ethanol oxidation and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Finally, we give some hints on the future challenges in the research area of metal aerogels. We believe that metal aerogels are a new, promising class of electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and will also open great opportunities for other electrochemical energy systems, catalysis, and sensors. The commercialization of PEFCs encounters three critical obstacles, viz., high cost, insufficient activity, and inadequate long-term durability. Besides others, the sluggish kinetics of the ORR and alcohol oxidation and insufficient catalyst stability are important reasons for these obstacles. Various approaches have been taken to overcome these obstacles, e.g., by controlling the catalyst particle size in an optimized range, forming multimetallic catalysts, controlling the surface compositions, shaping the catalysts into nanocrystals, and designing supportless catalysts with extended surfaces such as nanostructured thin films, nanotubes, and porous nanostructures. These efforts have produced plenty of excellent electrocatalysts, but the development of multisynergetic functional catalysts exhibiting low cost, high activity, and high durability still faces great challenges. In this

  20. Noble Metal Aerogels—Synthesis, Characterization, and Application as Electrocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Metallic and catalytically active materials with high surface area and large porosity are a long-desired goal in both industry and academia. In this Account, we summarize the strategies for making a variety of self-supported noble metal aerogels consisting of extended metal backbone nanonetworks. We discuss their outstanding physical and chemical properties, including their three-dimensional network structure, the simple control over their composition, their large specific surface area, and their hierarchical porosity. Additionally, we show some initial results on their excellent performance as electrocatalysts combining both high catalytic activity and high durability for fuel cell reactions such as ethanol oxidation and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Finally, we give some hints on the future challenges in the research area of metal aerogels. We believe that metal aerogels are a new, promising class of electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and will also open great opportunities for other electrochemical energy systems, catalysis, and sensors. The commercialization of PEFCs encounters three critical obstacles, viz., high cost, insufficient activity, and inadequate long-term durability. Besides others, the sluggish kinetics of the ORR and alcohol oxidation and insufficient catalyst stability are important reasons for these obstacles. Various approaches have been taken to overcome these obstacles, e.g., by controlling the catalyst particle size in an optimized range, forming multimetallic catalysts, controlling the surface compositions, shaping the catalysts into nanocrystals, and designing supportless catalysts with extended surfaces such as nanostructured thin films, nanotubes, and porous nanostructures. These efforts have produced plenty of excellent electrocatalysts, but the development of multisynergetic functional catalysts exhibiting low cost, high activity, and high durability still faces great challenges. In this

  1. Noble Metal Nanoparticle-loaded Mesoporous Oxide Microspheres for Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhao

    Noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals have attracted much attention as catalysts due to their unique characteristics, including high surface areas and well-controlled facets, which are not often possessed by their bulk counterparts. To avoid the loss of their catalytic activities brought about by their size and shape changes during catalytic reactions, noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals are usually dispersed and supported finely on solid oxide supports to prevent agglomeration, nanoparticle growth, and therefore the decrease in the total surface area. Moreover, metal oxide supports can also play important roles in catalytic reactions through the synergistic interactions with loaded metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals. In this thesis, I use ultrasonic aerosol spray to produce hybrid microspheres that are composed of noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals embedded in mesoporous metal oxide matrices. The mesoporous metal oxide structure allows for the fast diffusion of reactants and products as well as confining and supporting noble metal nanoparticles. I will first describe my studies on noble metal-loaded mesoporous oxide microspheres as catalysts. Three types of noble metals (Au, Pt, Pd) and three types of metal oxide substrates (TiO2, ZrO2, Al 2O3) were selected, because they are widely used for practical catalytic applications involved in environmental cleaning, pollution control, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical syntheses. By considering every possible combination of the noble metals and oxide substrates, nine types of catalyst samples were produced. I characterized the structures of these catalysts, including their sizes, morphologies, crystallinity, and porosities, and their catalytic performances by using a representative reduction reaction from nitrobenzene to aminobenzene. Comparison of the catalytic results reveals the effects of the different noble metals, their incorporation amounts, and oxide substrates on the catalytic abilities. For this particular

  2. Biomimetic synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chin-Yi

    At the nanometer scale, the physical and chemical properties of materials heavily depend on their sizes and shapes. This fact has triggered considerable efforts in developing controllable nanomaterial synthesis. The controlled growth of colloidal nanocrystal is a kinetic process, in which high-energy facets grow faster and then vanish, leading to a nanocrystal enclosed by low-energy facets. Identifying a surfactant that can selectively bind to a particular crystal facet and thus lower its surface energy, is critical and challenging in shape controlled synthesis of nanocrystals. Biomolecules exhibiting exquisite molecular recognition properties can be exploited to precisely engineer nanostructured materials. In the first part of my thesis, we employed the phage display technique to select a specific multifunctional peptide sequence which can bind on Pd surface and mediate Pd crystal nucleation and growth, achieving size controlled synthesis of Pd nanocrystals in aqueous solution. We further demonstrated a rational biomimetic approach to the predictable synthesis of nanocrystals enclosed by a particular facet in the case of Pt. Specifically, Pt {100} and Pt {111} facet-specific peptides were identified and used to synthesize Pt nanocubes and Pt nano-tetrahedrons, respectively. The mechanistic studies of Pt {111} facet-specific peptide had led us to study the facet-selective adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces. The discoveries had achieved the development of design strategies to select facet-selective molecules which can synthesize nanocrystals with expected shapes in both Pt and Pd system. At last, we exploited Pt facet-specific peptides and controlled the molecular interaction to produce one- and three- dimensional nanostructures composed of anisotropic nanoparticles in synthetic conditions without supramolecular pre-organization, demonstrating the full potential of biomolecules in mediating material formation process. My research on biomimetic

  3. Theoretic investigation on plasmonics of noble metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xiaohu

    In this thesis, we report our theoretic investigation on the surface plasmon polaritons of noble metallic nanoparticles and its applications. By means of numerical experiments, we studied the general far-field and near-field optical properties of the promising hollow metallic nanoparticles, the pattern of far-field extinction efficiency and the near-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We demonstrated the distribution of plasmon resonance wavelength as functions of the geometrical factor of hollow spherical gold and silver nanostructures. In addition, we utilized a novel mechanism of harnessing the mechanical strain to controllably tailor the plasmon-based optical spectra of single metallic nanospheres and the array of metallic nanoparticle of spheres and circular discs. The second goal of this thesis is to utilize a novel mechanical-strain-induced effect to enhance the light-trapping performance of plasmonic solar cells. This multi-physical scheme has the potential of considerably reducing the thickness of semiconductor layer and hence save the cost of production of the solar cells. Corresponding simulation results demonstrated this strategy is promising to decrease the fabrication budget of solar industry.

  4. Fractionation of the noble metals by physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhaus, Chris; Bockrath, Conny; Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora; Laurenz, Vera; Berndt, Jasper

    2006-12-01

    During partial melting in the earth’s mantle, the noble metals become fractionated. Os, Ir, Ru, and Rh tend to remain in the mantle residue whereas Pt, Pd, and Re behave mildly incompatible and are sequestered to the silicate melt. There is consensus that sulfide plays a role in the fractionation process; the major noble metal repository in the mantle is sulfide, and most primitive mantle melts are sulfide-saturated when they leave their mantle sources. However, with sulfide-silicate partitioning, the fractionation cannot be modeled properly. All sulfide-silicate partition coefficients are so extremely high that a silicate melt segregating from a mantle source with residual sulfide should be largely platinum-group elements free. We offer a physical alternative to sulfide-silicate chemical partitioning and provide a mechanism of generating a noble metal-rich melt from a sulfide-saturated source: Because sulfide is at least partially molten at asthenospheric temperature, it will behave physically incompatible during melt segregation, and a silicate melt segregating from a mantle residue will entrain molten residual sulfide in suspension and incorporate it in the basaltic pool melt. The noble metal abundances of a basalt then become independent of sulfide-silicate chemical partitioning. They reflect the noble metal abundances in the drained sulfide fraction as well as the total amount of sulfide entrained. Contrary to convention, we suggest that a fertile, sulfide-rich mantle source has more potential to generate a noble metal-enriched basaltic melt than a refractory mantle source depleted by previous partial melting events.

  5. NMR and structural features of noble-metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Gabuda, S.P.; Zemskov, S.V.

    1987-11-01

    NMR studies are reported on the structures of binary and other noble-metal fluorides. Revised measurements have been made on /sup 19/F chemical shifts and the anisotropy in them. A relationship is considered between the screening tensor for /sup 19/F and the electronic structure of the molecule or ion containing the noble-metal cation in the electronic configuration d/sup 6/, d/sup 8/, or d/sup 10/. The observed anomalous shifts in this class of compound are explained qualitatively in terms of paired electrons in filled d shells affecting the result within the framework of the classical theory of magnetic nuclear screening.

  6. Fluorescence-based high throughput screening for noble metal-free and platinum-poor anode catalysts for the direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Welsch, F G; Stöwe, K; Maier, W F

    2011-09-12

    We describe here the results of a high throughput screening study for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode catalysts consisting of new elemental combinations with an optical high-throughput screening method, which allows the quantitative evaluation of the electrochemical activity of catalysts. The method is based on the fluorescence of protonated quinine generated during electrooxidation of methanol. The high-throughput screening included noble-metal free binary and ternary mixed oxides of the elements Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Ta, Ti, Zn, and Zr in the oxidized form as well as after prior reduction in hydrogen. In addition 318 ternary and quaternary Pt-containing materials composed out of the mixed oxides of Bi, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, In, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Pr, Sb, Sn, Ta, Te, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr with a molar Pt-ratio of 10% and 30% were screened. Validation and long time experiments of the hits were performed by cyclovoltammetry (CV). The microstructural stability of the electrode preparations of the lead compositions was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern analysis.

  7. Noble metal alloys for metal-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Anusavice, K J

    1985-10-01

    A review of the comparative characteristics and properties of noble metal alloys used for metal-ceramic restorations has been presented. Selection of an alloy for one's practice should be based on long-term clinical data, physical properties, esthetic potential, and laboratory data on metal-ceramic bond strength and thermal compatibility with commercial dental porcelains. Although gold-based alloys, such as the Au-Pt-Pd, Au-Pd-Ag, and Au-Pd classes, may appear to be costly compared with the palladium-based alloys, they have clearly established their clinical integrity and acceptability over an extended period of time. Other than the relatively low sag resistance of the high gold-low silver content alloys and the potential thermal incompatibility with some commercial porcelain products, few clinical failures have been observed. The palladium-based alloys are less costly than the gold-based alloys. Palladium-silver alloys require extra precautions to minimize porcelain discoloration. Palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys may also cause porcelain discoloration, as copper and cobalt are used as colorants in glasses. The palladium-cobalt alloys are least susceptible to high-temperature creep compared with all classes of noble metals. Nevertheless, insufficient clinical data exist to advocate the general use of the palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys at the present time. One should base the selection and use of these alloys in part on their ability to meet the requirements of the ADA Acceptance Program. A list of acceptable or provisionally acceptable alloys is available from the American Dental Association and is published annually in the Journal of the American Dental Association. Dentists have the legal and ethical responsibility for selection of alloys used for cast restorations. This responsibility should not be delegated to the dental laboratory technician. It is advisable to discuss the criteria for selection of an alloy with the technician and the

  8. Size control of noble metal clusters and metallic heterostructures through the reduction kinetics of metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.; Herein, Daniel; Jeske, Gerald; Goia, Dan V.

    2014-07-01

    Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties.Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03045a

  9. Supported noble metals on hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube arrays as highly ordered electrodes for fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changkun; Yu, Hongmei; Li, Yongkun; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Yun; Song, Wei; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube (H-TNT) arrays serve as highly ordered nanostructured electrode supports, which are able to significantly improve the electrochemical performance and durability of fuel cells. The electrical conductivity of H-TNTs increases by approximately one order of magnitude in comparison to air-treated TNTs. The increase in the number of oxygen vacancies and hydroxyl groups on the H-TNTs help to anchor a greater number of Pt atoms during Pt electrodeposition. The H-TNTs are pretreated by using a successive ion adsorption and reaction (SIAR) method that enhances the loading and dispersion of Pt catalysts when electrodeposited. In the SIAR method a Pd activator can be used to provide uniform nucleation sites for Pt and leads to increased Pt loading on the H-TNTs. Furthermore, fabricated Pt nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.4 nm are located uniformly around the pretreated H-TNT support. The as-prepared and highly ordered electrodes exhibit excellent stability during accelerated durability tests, particularly for the H-TNT-loaded Pt catalysts that have been annealed in ultrahigh purity H2 for a second time. There is minimal decrease in the electrochemical surface area of the as-prepared electrode after 1000 cycles compared to a 68 % decrease for the commercial JM 20 % Pt/C electrode after 800 cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that after the H-TNT-loaded Pt catalysts are annealed in H2 for the second time, the strong metal-support interaction between the H-TNTs and the Pt catalysts enhances the electrochemical stability of the electrodes. Fuel-cell testing shows that the power density reaches a maximum of 500 mWcm(-2) when this highly ordered electrode is used as the anode. When used as the cathode in a fuel cell with extra-low Pt loading, the new electrode generates a specific power density of 2.68 kWg(Pt) (-1) . It is indicated that H-TNT arrays, which have highly ordered nanostructures, could be used as ordered electrode supports.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition Route To Tailor Nanoalloys of Noble and Non-noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ranjith K; Dendooven, Jolien; Filez, Matthias; Galvita, Vladimir V; Poelman, Hilde; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Fonda, Emiliano; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bras, Wim; Marin, Guy B; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-09-27

    Since their early discovery, bimetallic nanoparticles have revolutionized various fields, including nanomagnetism and optics as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Knowledge buildup in the past decades has witnessed that the nanoparticle size and composition strongly impact the nanoparticle's properties and performance. Yet, conventional synthesis strategies lack proper control over the nanoparticle morphology and composition. Recently, atomically precise synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles has been achieved by atomic layer deposition (ALD), alleviating particle size and compositional nonuniformities. However, this bimetal ALD strategy applies to noble metals only, a small niche within the extensive class of bimetallic alloys. We report an ALD-based approach for the tailored synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles containing both noble and non-noble metals, here exemplified for Pt-In. First, a Pt/In2O3 bilayer is deposited by ALD, yielding precisely defined Pt-In nanoparticles after high-temperature H2 reduction. The nanoparticles' In content can be accurately controlled over the whole compositional range, and the particle size can be tuned from micrometers down to the nanometer scale. The size and compositional flexibility provided by this ALD-approach will trigger the fabrication of fully tailored bimetallic nanomaterials, including superior nanocatalysts.

  11. Sintering and ripening resistant noble metal nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    van Swol, Frank B; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Miller, James E; Challa, Sivakumar R

    2013-09-24

    Durable porous metal nanostructures comprising thin metal nanosheets that are metastable under some conditions that commonly produce rapid reduction in surface area due to sintering and/or Ostwald ripening. The invention further comprises the method for making such durable porous metal nanostructures. Durable, high-surface area nanostructures result from the formation of persistent durable holes or pores in metal nanosheets formed from dendritic nanosheets.

  12. Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Even, Jr., William R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

  13. Noble metal alloy complex nanostructures: controllable synthesis and their electrochemical property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-ling; Nosheen, Farhat; Wang, Xun

    2015-05-21

    Noble metal nanocrystals have been extensively utilized as promising catalysts for chemical transformations and energy conversion. One of their significant applications lies in electrode materials in fuel cells (FCs) due to their superior electrocatalytic performance towards the reactions both on anode and cathode. Nowadays, tremendous efforts have been devoted to improve the catalytic performance and minimize the usage of precious metals. Constructing multicomponent noble metal nanocrystals with complex structures provides the opportunity to reach this goal due to their highly tunable compositions and morphologies, leading to the modification of the related electrochemical properties. In this review, we first highlight the recent advances in the controllable synthesis of noble metal alloy complex nanostructures including nanoframes/nanocages, branched structures, concave/convex structures, core-shell structures and ultrathin structures. Then the effects of the well-defined nanocrystals on the modified and improved electrochemical properties are outlined. Finally, we make a conclusion with the points on the challenges and perspectives of the controllable synthesis of noble metal alloy complex nanostructures and their electrocatalytic performance.

  14. Preparation and Heat-Treatment of DWPF Simulants With and Without Co-Precipitated Noble Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.:Eibling, Russel E

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Chemical Process Cell of the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Parallel preparations of two sludge simulants targeting the composition of Sludge Batch 3 were performed in order to evaluate the impact of the form of noble metals. Identical steps were used except that one simulant had dissolved palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium present during the precipitation of the insoluble solids. Noble metals were trimmed into the other stimulant prior to process tests. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The simulants were used as feeds for Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. The following conclusions were drawn from the simulant preparation work: (1) The first preparation of a waste slurry simulant with co-precipitated noble metals was successful, based on the data obtained. It appears that 99+% of the noble metals were retained in the simulant. (2) Better control of carbonate, hydroxide, and post-wash trim chemical additions is needed before the new method of simulant preparation will be as reproducible as the old method. (3) The two new

  15. Silicon nanocrystal-noble metal hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, H.; Fujii, M.; Imakita, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report a novel and facile self-limiting synthesis route of silicon nanocrystal (Si NC)-based colloidally stable semiconductor-metal (gold, silver and platinum) hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). For the formation of hybrid NPs, we employ ligand-free colloidal Si NCs with heavily boron (B) and phosphorus (P) doped shells. By simply mixing B and P codoped colloidal Si NCs with metal salts, hybrid NPs consisting of metal cores and Si NC shells are spontaneously formed. We demonstrate the synthesis of highly uniform and size controllable hybrid NPs. It is shown that codoped Si NCs act as a reducing agent for metal salts and also as a protecting layer to stop metal NP growth. The process is thus self-limiting. The development of a variety of Si NC-based hybrid NPs is a promising first step for the design of biocompatible multifunctional NPs with broad material choices for biosensing, bioimaging and solar energy conversion.We report a novel and facile self-limiting synthesis route of silicon nanocrystal (Si NC)-based colloidally stable semiconductor-metal (gold, silver and platinum) hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). For the formation of hybrid NPs, we employ ligand-free colloidal Si NCs with heavily boron (B) and phosphorus (P) doped shells. By simply mixing B and P codoped colloidal Si NCs with metal salts, hybrid NPs consisting of metal cores and Si NC shells are spontaneously formed. We demonstrate the synthesis of highly uniform and size controllable hybrid NPs. It is shown that codoped Si NCs act as a reducing agent for metal salts and also as a protecting layer to stop metal NP growth. The process is thus self-limiting. The development of a variety of Si NC-based hybrid NPs is a promising first step for the design of biocompatible multifunctional NPs with broad material choices for biosensing, bioimaging and solar energy conversion. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional TEM images and extinction spectra of Si-metal hybrid NPs are shown in Fig. S1

  16. Noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts for water splitting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-07

    Sustainable hydrogen production is an essential prerequisite of a future hydrogen economy. Water electrolysis driven by renewable resource-derived electricity and direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion based on photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting are promising pathways for sustainable hydrogen production. All these techniques require, among many things, highly active noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts to make the water splitting process more energy-efficient and economical. In this review, we highlight the recent research efforts toward the synthesis of noble metal-free electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and their catalytic properties for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We review several important kinds of heterogeneous non-precious metal electrocatalysts, including metal sulfides, metal selenides, metal carbides, metal nitrides, metal phosphides, and heteroatom-doped nanocarbons. In the discussion, emphasis is given to the synthetic methods of these HER electrocatalysts, the strategies of performance improvement, and the structure/composition-catalytic activity relationship. We also summarize some important examples showing that non-Pt HER electrocatalysts could serve as efficient cocatalysts for promoting direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion in both photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting systems, when combined with suitable semiconductor photocatalysts.

  17. Noble metal-free hydrazine fuel cell catalysts: EPOC effect in competing chemical and electrochemical reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Chinchilla, Jean; Asazawa, Koichiro; Sakamoto, Tomokazu; Yamada, Koji; Tanaka, Hirohisa; Strasser, Peter

    2011-04-13

    We report the discovery of a highly active Ni-Co alloy electrocatalyst for the oxidation of hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) and provide evidence for competing electrochemical (faradaic) and chemical (nonfaradaic) reaction pathways. The electrochemical conversion of hydrazine on catalytic surfaces in fuel cells is of great scientific and technological interest, because it offers multiple redox states, complex reaction pathways, and significantly more favorable energy and power densities compared to hydrogen fuel. Structure-reactivity relations of a Ni(60)Co(40) alloy electrocatalyst are presented with a 6-fold increase in catalytic N(2)H(4) oxidation activity over today's benchmark catalysts. We further study the mechanistic pathways of the catalytic N(2)H(4) conversion as function of the applied electrode potential using differentially pumped electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). At positive overpotentials, N(2)H(4) is electrooxidized into nitrogen consuming hydroxide ions, which is the fuel cell-relevant faradaic reaction pathway. In parallel, N(2)H(4) decomposes chemically into molecular nitrogen and hydrogen over a broad range of electrode potentials. The electroless chemical decomposition rate was controlled by the electrode potential, suggesting a rare example of a liquid-phase electrochemical promotion effect of a chemical catalytic reaction ("EPOC"). The coexisting electrocatalytic (faradaic) and heterogeneous catalytic (electroless, nonfaradaic) reaction pathways have important implications for the efficiency of hydrazine fuel cells.

  18. Catalytic reforming using group VIII noble metal high silica faujasites

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.E.; Ghosh, A.K

    1989-05-23

    A process is described for reforming a naphtha feed stock utilizing a catalytic faujasite zeolite composition, which comprises contacting the feed stock at reforming conditions and in the presence of hydrogen with the catalytic zeolite having a faujasite structure and having a SiO/sub 2//Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ratio between about 10 and 80 and containing a Group VIII noble metal dispersed therein so as to have a dispersion of hydrogen to metal of about 0.1 to 1, as measured by hydrogen chemisorption.

  19. NOBLE METAL CHEMISTRY AND HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-06-25

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell vessels were performed with the primary purpose of producing melter feeds for the beaded frit program plus obtaining samples of simulated slurries containing high concentrations of noble metals for off-site analytical studies for the hydrogen program. Eight pairs of 22-L simulations were performed of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. These sixteen simulations did not contain mercury. Six pairs were trimmed with a single noble metal (Ag, Pd, Rh, or Ru). One pair had all four noble metals, and one pair had no noble metals. One supporting 4-L simulation was completed with Ru and Hg. Several other 4-L supporting tests with mercury have not yet been performed. This report covers the calculations performed on SRNL analytical and process data related to the noble metals and hydrogen generation. It was originally envisioned as a supporting document for the off-site analytical studies. Significant new findings were made, and many previous hypotheses and findings were given additional support as summarized below. The timing of hydrogen generation events was reproduced very well within each of the eight pairs of runs, e.g. the onset of hydrogen, peak in hydrogen, etc. occurred at nearly identical times. Peak generation rates and total SRAT masses of CO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen were reproduced well. Comparable measures for hydrogen were reproduced with more variability, but still reasonably well. The extent of the reproducibility of the results validates the conclusions that were drawn from the data.

  20. Hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated carbon fiber: in situ electrochemical synthesis and use as microelectrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdurhman, Abduraouf Alamer Mohamed; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Guoan; Wang, Shuai

    2015-10-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a new type of nanohybrid microelectrode based on a hierarchical nanostructured Au/MnO2/graphene-modified carbon fiber (CF) via in situ electrochemical synthesis, which leads to better structural integration of different building blocks into the CF microelectrode. Our finding demonstrates that wrapping CF with graphene nanosheets has dramatically increased the surface area and electrical conductivity of the CF microelectrode. The subsequent template-free electrodeposition of MnO2 on graphene-wrapped CF gives rise to a porous nanonest architecture built up from twisted and intersectant MnO2 nanowires, which serves as an ideal substrate for the direct growth of Au nanoparticles. Owing to the structural merit and synergy effect between different components, the hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated CF demonstrates dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity. When used for nonenzymatic H2O2 sensing, the resultant modified microelectrode exhibits acceptable sensitivity, reproducibility, stability, and selectivity, which enable it to be used for real-time tracking H2O2 secretion in human cervical cancer cells. Graphical abstract A schematic illustration of preparation of hierarchical Au/MnO2/ERGO/CF nanohybrid electrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

  1. Measuring the Noble Metal and Iodine Composition of Extracted Noble Metal Phase from Spent Nuclear Fuel Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, R. I.; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Biegalski, Steven R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Casella, Amanda J.; Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-04-01

    Mass quantities of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA). Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and mass quantification is derived from standard gamma spectroscopy and radionuclide decay analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. Lastly, the implications of the rapid analytic speed of instrumental NAA are discussed in relation to potential nuclear forensics applications.

  2. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-07-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.

  3. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; ...

    2016-07-06

    We report that identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Furthermore, we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM basedmore » systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.« less

  4. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-07-06

    We report that identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Furthermore, we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.

  5. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations. PMID:27380719

  6. Plasmon resonances in linear noble-metal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth; Luo, Yi

    2012-11-01

    The electronic excitations of three noble-metall chains—copper, silver, and gold—have been investigated at the time-dependent density functional theory level. The reduced single-electron density matrix is propagated according to the Liouville-von Neumann equation in the real-time domain after an impulse excitation. The propagation in the real-time domain enables us to investigate the formation and size evolution of electronic excitations in these metallic chains with different number of atoms, up to a total of 26 atoms. The longitudinal oscillations at lower excitation energies are dominated by s → p transitions in these chains and have collective or central resonances, while the first peak involving d → p transitions in the longitudinal mode appears at a higher excitation energy and shows collective resonances. In the transverse oscillations, there are in most cases d → p transitions in each resonance, which can be attributed to either central or end resonances. Convergence of the oscillations, in particular those involving the collective and central resonances in the three noble-metal chains can only be observed for chains with 18 atoms or more. Different spectroscopic characteristics among these three metallic chains can be attributed to their different electronic structures, in particular the relativistic effects in the gold chains have a dramatic effect on their electronic structures and excitations.

  7. Noble Metal Arsenides and Gold Inclusions in Northwest Africa 8186

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites are a highly thermally altered group of carbonaceous chondrites, experiencing temperatures ranging between approx.576-867 C. Additionally, the mineralogy of the CK chondrites record the highest overall oxygen fugacity of all chondrites, above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. Metallic Fe-Ni is extremely rare in CK chondrites, but magnetite and Fe,Ni sulfides are commonly observed. Noble metal-rich inclusions have previously been found in some magnetite and sulfide grains. These arsenides, tellurides, and sulfides, which contain varying amounts of Pt, Ru, Os, Te, As, Ir, and S, are thought to form either by condensation from a solar gas, or by exsolution during metamorphism on the chondritic parent body. Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is a highly metamorphosed CK chondrite. This meteorite is predominately composed of NiO-rich forsteritic olivine (Fo65), with lesser amounts of plagioclase (An52), augite (Fs11Wo49), magnetite (with exsolved titanomagnetite, hercynite, and titanohematite), monosulfide solid solution (with exsolved pentlandite), and the phosphate minerals Cl-apatite and merrillite. This meteorite contains coarse-grained, homogeneous silicates, and has 120deg triple junctions between mineral phases, which indicates a high degree of thermal metamorphism. The presence of NiO-rich olivine, oxides phases all bearing Fe3+, and the absence of metal, are consistent with an oxygen fugacity above the FMQ buffer. We also observed noble metal-rich phases within sulfide grains in NWA 8186, which are the primary focus of the present study.

  8. Noble Metals and Spinel Settling in High Level Waste Glass Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Perez, Joseph M.

    2000-09-30

    In the continuing effort to support the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the noble metals issue is addressed. There is an additional concern about the amount of noble metals expected to be present in the future batches that will be considered for vitrification in the DWPF. Several laboratory, as well as melter-scale, studies have been completed by various organizations (mainly PNNL, SRTC, and WVDP in the USA). This letter report statuses the noble metals issue and focuses at the settling of noble metals in melters.

  9. Self-assembly of noble metal monolayers on transition metal carbide nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sean T; Milina, Maria; Alba-Rubio, Ana C; Hendon, Christopher H; Dumesic, James A; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrated the self-assembly of transition metal carbide nanoparticles coated with atomically thin noble metal monolayers by carburizing mixtures of noble metal salts and transition metal oxides encapsulated in removable silica templates. This approach allows for control of the final core-shell architecture, including particle size, monolayer coverage, and heterometallic composition. Carbon-supported Ti(0.1)W(0.9)C nanoparticles coated with Pt or bimetallic PtRu monolayers exhibited enhanced resistance to sintering and CO poisoning, achieving an order of magnitude increase in specific activity over commercial catalysts for methanol electrooxidation after 10,000 cycles. These core-shell materials provide a new direction to reduce the loading, enhance the activity, and increase the stability of noble metal catalysts.

  10. MOF-Derived Noble Metal Free Catalysts for Electrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zixu; Wang, Teng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zheng, Jie; Li, Xingguo

    2016-12-28

    Noble metal free electrocatalysts for water splitting are key to low-cost, sustainable hydrogen production. In this work, we demonstrate that metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be controllably converted into catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) or the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The OER catalyst is composed of FeNi alloy nanoparticles encapsulated in N-doped carbon nanotubes, which is obtained by thermal decomposition of a trimetallic (Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Ni(2+)) zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF). It reaches 10 mA cm(-2) at the overpotential of 300 mV with a low Tafel slope of 47.7 mV dec(-1). The HER catalyst consists of Ni nanoparticles coated with a thin layer of N-doped carbon. It is obtained by thermal decomposition of a Ni-MOF in NH3. It shows low overpotential of only 77 mV at 20 mA cm(-2) with low Tafel slope of 68 mV dec(-1). The above noble metal free OER and HER electrocatalysts are applied in an alkaline electrolyzer driven by a commercial polycrystalline solar cell. It achieves electrolysis efficiency of 64.4% at 65 mA cm(-2) under sun irradiation of 50 mW cm(-2). This practical application shows the promising prospect of low-cost and high-efficiency sustainable hydrogen production from combination of solar cells with high-performance noble metal free electrocatalysts.

  11. Reversibility of Noble Metal-Catalyzed Aprotic Li-O₂ Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shunchao; Wu, Yang; Wang, Jiawei; Zhang, Yelong; Zhang, Yantao; Yan, Xinxiu; Wei, Yang; Liu, Peng; Wang, Jiaping; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan; Xu, Ye; Peng, Zhangquan

    2015-12-09

    The aprotic Li-O2 battery has attracted a great deal of interest because, theoretically, it can store far more energy than today's batteries. Toward unlocking the energy capabilities of this neotype energy storage system, noble metal-catalyzed high surface area carbon materials have been widely used as the O2 cathodes, and some of them exhibit excellent electrochemical performances in terms of round-trip efficiency and cycle life. However, whether these outstanding electrochemical performances are backed by the reversible formation/decomposition of Li2O2, i.e., the desired Li-O2 electrochemistry, remains unclear due to a lack of quantitative assays for the Li-O2 cells. Here, noble metal (Ru and Pd)-catalyzed carbon nanotube (CNT) fabrics, prepared by magnetron sputtering, have been used as the O2 cathode in aprotic Li-O2 batteries. The catalyzed Li-O2 cells exhibited considerably high round-trip efficiency and prolonged cycle life, which could match or even surpass some of the best literature results. However, a combined analysis using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, revealed that these catalyzed Li-O2 cells (particularly those based on Pd-CNT cathodes) did not work according to the desired Li-O2 electrochemistry. Instead the presence of noble metal catalysts impaired the cells' reversibility, as evidenced by the decreased O2 recovery efficiency (the ratio of the amount of O2 evolved during recharge/that consumed in the preceding discharge) coupled with increased CO2 evolution during charging. The results reported here provide new insights into the O2 electrochemistry in the aprotic Li-O2 batteries containing noble metal catalysts and exemplified the importance of the quantitative assays for the Li-O2 reactions in the course of pursuing truly rechargeable Li-O2 batteries.

  12. Noble metal nanoparticles: Optical forces, electrochemical Ostwald ripening, and photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Peter

    This thesis describes three distinct aspects of the chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. The first chapter introduces the surface plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoparticles. The second chapter presents an electrodynamic model for the calculation of the attractive optical forces that arise when two dielectric particles are irradiated in a light field. These forces show resonances at dipolar plasmon wavelengths, similar to resonances in the near-field electromagnetic intensities. At MW/cm2 intensities, optical forces can be stronger than van der Waals forces. The third chapter investigates the size dependent electrochemical properties of silver nanoparticles. These thermally evaporated silver nanoparticles spontaneously evolve in size when immersed in pure water on conducting substrates. The process is understood through an electrochemical Ostwald ripening mechanism driven by the size dependence of the work function and standard electrode potential. The fourth and fifth chapters consider photo-induced surface reactivity of noble metal particles. First, in the fourth chapter, the light driven deposition of copper onto gold nanoparticle electrodes is presented. The photocurrent is a nonlinear function of laser intensity and increases sharply with cathodic voltage in the underpotential deposition region. The photoreduction is attributed to laser heating (caused by decay of the plasmon oscillation) of the Au nanoparticles, rather than "hot electron" processes. Secondly, in the fifth chapter, the photo-induced oxidation of citrate is studied on silver nanoparticle electrodes. Irradiation of the citrate coated particles is shown to cause the particles to charge negatively from the irreversible transfer of electrons from citrate to the particles. It is hypothesized that the particle plasmon oscillation decays into electron hole pair(s) that causes the photo-oxidation of the surface bound citrate. Both the gold and silver particle systems are simulated using

  13. Single-molecule chemistry of metal phthalocyanine on noble metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Li, Bin; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, Jian Guo

    2010-07-20

    To develop new functional materials and nanoscale electronics, researchers would like to accurately describe and precisely control the quantum state of a single molecule on a surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), combined with first-principles simulations, provides a powerful technique for acquiring this level of understanding. Traditionally, metal phthalocyanine (MPc) molecules, composed of a metal atom surrounded by a ligand ring, have been used as dyes and pigments. Recently, MPc molecules have shown great promise as components of light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells, and single-molecule devices. In this Account, we describe recent research on the characterization and control of adsorption and electronic states of a single MPc molecule on noble metal surfaces. In general, the electronic and magnetic properties of a MPc molecule largely depend on the type of metal ion within the phthalocyanine ligand and the type of surface on which the molecule is adsorbed. However, with the STM technique, we can use on-site molecular "surgery" to manipulate the structure and the properties of the molecule. For example, STM can induce a dehydrogenation reaction of the MPc, which allows us to control the Kondo effect, which describes the spin polarization of the molecule and its interaction with the complex environment. A specially designed STM tip can allow researchers to detect certain molecule-surface hybrid states that are not accessible by other techniques. By matching the local orbital symmetry of the STM tip and the molecule, we can generate the negative differential resistance effect in the formed molecular junction. This orbital symmetry based mechanism is extremely robust and does not critically depend on the geometry of the STM tip. In summary, this simple model system, a MPc molecule absorbed on a noble metal surface, demonstrates the power of STM for quantum characterization and manipulation of single molecules, highlighting the

  14. Photoresponse from noble metal nanoparticles-multi walled carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Scarselli, M.; Camilli, L.; Castrucci, P.; De Crescenzi, M.; Matthes, L.; Pulci, O.; Gatto, E.; Venanzi, M.

    2012-12-10

    In this Letter, we investigated the photo-response of multi wall carbon nanotube-based composites obtained from in situ thermal evaporation of noble metals (Au, Ag, and Cu) on the nanotube films. The metal deposition process produced discrete nanoparticles on the nanotube outer walls. The nanoparticle-carbon nanotube films were characterized by photo-electrochemical measurements in a standard three electrode cell. The photocurrent from the decorated carbon nanotubes remarkably increased with respect to that of bare multiwall tubes. With the aid of first-principle calculations, these results are discussed in terms of metal nanoparticle-nanotube interactions and electronic charge transfer at the interface.

  15. Noble-metal nanostructures on carburized W(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Magdalena; Memmel, Norbert; Bertel, Erminald

    2011-07-01

    Noble metal nanostructures of Au, Ag and Cu were prepared on two types of carbon-modified W(110) surfaces-R(15 × 12) and R(15 × 3)-and investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. For all deposited metals qualitatively the same behaviour is observed: On the R(15 × 12)-template always isotropic clusters are formed. In contrast, on the R(15 × 3)-substrate the anisotropy of the nanostructures can be tuned from clusters at low temperatures via thin nanowires to thicker nanobars at high deposition temperatures. At intermediate temperatures on the R(15 × 3) the anisotropic Au nanowires arrange themselves into straight lines along domain boundaries induced by deposition of the Au metal. Similarities and differences to Au nanostructures as recently reported by Varykhalov et al. [A. Varykhalov, O. Rader, W. Gudat. Physical Review B 77, 035412 (2008).] are discussed.

  16. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}, YDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}-0.15YO{sub 1.5}), and LDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}- 0.15LaO{sub 1.5}) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  17. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF[sub 2], ThO[sub 2], YDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]-0.15YO[sub 1.5]), and LDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]- 0.15LaO[sub 1.5]) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  18. Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosh, R. C.; Das, Ramprosad; Sen, Sumon C.; Bhuiyan, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals has been investigated using an expression obtained from the hard-sphere (HS) theory of liquid. The expression is developed from the Mayer's extended surface tension formula [Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 380 (2013) 42-47]. For interionic interaction in metals, Brettonet-Silbert (BS) pseudopotentials and embedded atom method (EAM) potentials have been used. The liquid structure is described by the variational modified hypernetted chain (VMHNC) theory. The essential ingredient of the expression is the temperature dependent effective HS diameter (or packing fraction), which is calculated from the aforementioned potentials together with the VMHNC theory. The obtained results for the surface entropy using the effective HS diameter are found to be good in agreement with the available experimental as well as other theoretical values.

  19. Noble Metal Arsenides and Gold Inclusions in Northwest Africa 8186

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites are a highly thermally altered group of carbonaceous chondrites, experiencing temperatures ranging between approximately 576-867 degrees Centigrade. Additionally, the mineralogy of the CK chondrites record the highest overall oxygen fugacity of all chondrites, above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. Me-tallic Fe-Ni is extremely rare in CK chondrites, but magnetite and Fe,Ni sulfides are commonly observed. Noble metal-rich inclusions have previously been found in some magnetite and sulfide grains. These arsenides, tellurides, and sulfides, which contain varying amounts of Pt, Ru, Os, Te, As, Ir, and S, are thought to form either by condensation from a solar gas, or by exsolution during metamorphism on the chondritic parent body. Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is a highly metamorphosed CK chondrite. This meteorite is predominately composed of NiO-rich forsteritic olivine (Fo65), with lesser amounts of plagioclase (An52), augite (Fs11Wo49), magnetite (with exsolved titanomagnetite, hercynite, and titanohematite), monosulfide solid solution (with exsolved pentlandite), and the phosphate minerals Cl-apatite and merrillite. This meteorite contains coarse-grained, homogeneous silicates, and has 120-degree triple junctions between mineral phases, which indicates a high degree of thermal metamorphism. The presence of NiO-rich olivine, oxides phases all bearing Fe3 plus, and the absence of metal, are consistent with an oxygen fugacity above the FMQ buffer. We also observed noble metal-rich phases within sulfide grains in NWA 8186, which are the primary focus of the present study.

  20. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  1. High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2013-04-01

    The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures.

  2. High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2013-04-07

    The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures.

  3. The Interaction of Hydrogen with Simple and Noble Metals Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprunger, Phillip T.

    The basic concepts of adsorption are illustrated by the investigation of a simple adsorbate (hydrogen) with the "simplest" metals (simple and noble metals). Theoretically tractable, these systems serve as an excellent test of our basic understanding of chemisorption. The interaction of atomic and molecular hydrogen with the surfaces of Mg(0001), Mg(1120), Li(110), K(110), Ag(110), and Ag(111) have been studied with a variety of experimental probes. In all cases, no evidence for H_2 associative or dissociative adsorption is observed at the substrate temperature investigated (>=q90 K). In the case of the simple metals below 150 K, atomic hydrogen is bound to the surfaces in a strongly chemisorbed state (hydride). For Mg and Li, the hydride is localized to the surface wherein the substrate electron density is lower than the bulk. Because of the low electron density, hydrogen is absorbed into the bulk of K at low temperatures and forms a bulk-hydride phase. However, these low-temperature phases are metastable. In the case of Mg, hydrogen moves into lower energy configuration bonding sites which are closer to or below the surface plane. However, the hydride characteristics are absent; the H atom is effectively screened because of the higher jellium density. In contrast, upon annealing, hydrogen is absorbed into the bulk of Li and K and phase separation occurs forming regions of clean metal and bulk hydride areas. The results are compared to theoretical studies; the propensity for absorption over adsorption is understood in terms of jellium-based models. In the case of silver, at 100 K, atomic hydrogen bonds in trigonal sites on both the (110) and (111) surfaces. As a function of H concentration, a sequence of lattice gas superstructures is observed; these phases are accompanied by small H-induced displacements of the substrate surface atoms. In the case of Ag(110), the low-temperature phase is metastable; upon annealing, hydrogen desorption from low energy states is

  4. Noble-metal nanostructures on carburized W(110)

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Magdalena; Memmel, Norbert; Bertel, Erminald

    2011-01-01

    Noble metal nanostructures of Au, Ag and Cu were prepared on two types of carbon-modified W(110) surfaces—R(15 × 12) and R(15 × 3)—and investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. For all deposited metals qualitatively the same behaviour is observed: On the R(15 × 12)-template always isotropic clusters are formed. In contrast, on the R(15 × 3)-substrate the anisotropy of the nanostructures can be tuned from clusters at low temperatures via thin nanowires to thicker nanobars at high deposition temperatures. At intermediate temperatures on the R(15 × 3) the anisotropic Au nanowires arrange themselves into straight lines along domain boundaries induced by deposition of the Au metal. Similarities and differences to Au nanostructures as recently reported by Varykhalov et al. [A. Varykhalov, O. Rader, W. Gudat. Physical Review B 77, 035412 (2008).] are discussed. PMID:21779133

  5. RISK REDUCTION VIA GREENER SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE METAL NANOSTRUCTURES AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aqueous preparation of nanoparticles using vitamins B2 and C which can function both as reducing and capping agents are described. Bulk and shape-controlled synthesis of noble nanostructures via microwave (MW)-assisted spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts using a-D-glucose,...

  6. Environmental pressure reduction with a new method of noble metal recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, EV

    2017-02-01

    Discoveries in the area of hydrometallurgy of noble metals can be of use in metal recovery from low-grade solutions and slurries, including liquid tailings. Efficiency of noble metal recovery and reduction in mining waste is gained owing to utilization of two forms of ion-exchange sorbent, including OH‑ for recovery of cyanic compounds of gold and cyanides, which allows abating burden on natural systems.

  7. Nonspherical noble metal nanoparticles: colloid-chemical synthesis and morphology control.

    PubMed

    Sau, Tapan K; Rogach, Andrey L

    2010-04-22

    Metal nanoparticles have been the subject of widespread research over the past two decades. In recent years, noble metals have been the focus of numerous studies involving synthesis, characterization, and applications. Synthesis of an impressive range of noble metal nanoparticles with varied morphologies has been reported. Researchers have made a great progress in learning how to engineer materials on a nanometer length scale that has led to the understanding of the fundamental size- and shape-dependent properties of matter and to devising of new applications. In this article, we review the recent progress in the colloid-chemical synthesis of nonspherical nanoparticles of a few important noble metals (mainly Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt), highlighting the factors that influence the particle morphology and discussing the mechanisms behind the nonspherical shape evolution. The article attempts to present a thorough discussion of the basic principles as well as state-of-the-art morphology control in noble metal nanoparticles.

  8. Noble metal/functionalized cellulose nanofiber composites for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Bang, Hyunsik; Yuan, Guohao; Yin, Chuan; Song, Kyung-Hun; Lee, Jung Soon; Chung, Ill Min; Karvembu, Ramasamy; Kim, Ick Soo

    2015-11-05

    In this study, cellulose acetate nanofibers (CANFs) with a mean diameter of 325 ± 2.0 nm were electrospun followed by deacetylation and functionalization to produce anionic cellulose nanofibers (f-CNFs). The noble metal nanoparticles (RuNPs and AgNPs) were successfully decorated on the f-CNFs by a simple wet reduction method using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. TEM and SEM images of the nanocomposites (RuNPs/CNFs and AgNPs/CNFs) confirmed that the very fine RuNPs or AgNPs were homogeneously dispersed on the surface of f-CNFs. The weight percentage of the Ru and Ag in the nanocomposites was found to be 13.29 wt% and 22.60 wt% respectively; as confirmed by SEM-EDS analysis. The metallic state of the Ru and Ag in the nanocomposites was confirmed by XPS and XRD analyses. The usefulness of these nanocomposites was realized from their superior catalytic activity. In the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, the RuNPs/CNFs system gave a better yield of 89% with 100% selectivity. Similarly, the AgNPs/CNFs produced an excellent yield of 99% (100% selectivity) in the aza-Michael reaction of 1-phenylpiperazine with acrylonitrile. Mechanism has been proposed for the catalytic systems.

  9. Synthesis of noble metal/graphene nanocomposites without surfactants by one-step reduction of metal salt and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Choi, Donghyeuk; Yoon, Sunyoung; Jeon, Heung Bae; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2013-01-01

    We carried out hydrazine-free, surfactant-free synthesis of noble metal/graphene nanocomposites. The reduction of the noble metals and GO was carried out simultaneously in hot water using ascorbic acid as a reductant. In the noble metal/graphene nanocomposites of Pd, Pt, Au, and Ag nanoparticles, the GO and metal salts were reduced completely by this synthetic method. In addition, the Pd/graphene nanocomposites showed good catalytic activity in the Suzuki coupling reaction and could be reused many times without loss of catalytic activity.

  10. Fate of Noble Metals during the Pyroprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    B.R. Westphal; D. Vaden; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; R.D. Mariani

    2009-09-01

    During the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by electrochemical techniques, fission products are separated as the fuel is oxidized at the anode and refined uranium is deposited at the cathode. Those fission products that are oxidized into the molten salt electrolyte are considered active metals while those that do not react are considered noble metals. The primary noble metals encountered during pyroprocessing are molybdenum, zirconium, ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, and technetium. Pyroprocessing of spent fuel to date has involved two distinctly different electrorefiner designs, in particular the anode to cathode configuration. For one electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are horizontally displaced such that uranium is transported across the electrolyte medium. As expected, the noble metal removal from the uranium during refining is very high, typically in excess of 99%. For the other electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are vertically collocated to maximize uranium throughput. This arrangement results in significantly less noble metals removal from the uranium during refining, typically no better than 20%. In addition to electrorefiner design, operating parameters can also influence the retention of noble metals, albeit at the cost of uranium recovery. Experiments performed to date have shown that as much as 100% of the noble metals can be retained by the cladding hulls while affecting the uranium recovery by only 6%. However, it is likely that commercial pyroprocessing of spent fuel will require the uranium recovery to be much closer to 100%. The above mentioned design and operational issues will likely be driven by the effects of noble metal contamination on fuel fabrication and performance. These effects will be presented in terms of thermal properties (expansion, conductivity, and fusion) and radioactivity considerations. Ultimately, the incorporation of minor amounts of noble metals from pyroprocessing into fast reactor metallic fuel

  11. Electronic, Mechanical, and Dielectric Properties of Two-Dimensional Atomic Layers of Noble Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Pooja; Kumar, Jagdish; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    We present density functional theory-based electronic, mechanical, and dielectric properties of monolayers and bilayers of noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt) taken with graphene-like hexagonal structure. The Au, Ag, and Pt bilayers stabilize in AA-stacked configuration, while the Cu bilayer favors the AB stacking pattern. The quantum ballistic conductance of the noble-metal mono- and bilayers is remarkably increased compared with their bulk counterparts. Among the studied systems, the tensile strength is found to be highest for the Pt monolayer and bilayer. The noble metals in mono- and bilayer form show distinctly different electron energy loss spectra and reflectance spectra due to the quantum confinement effect on going from bulk to the monolayer limit. Such tunability of the electronic and dielectric properties of noble metals by reducing the degrees of freedom of electrons offers promise for their use in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics applications.

  12. Physisorption mechanism in graphene/noble metal (111)/Ni(111) heterostructures: An ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaddeli, Mohammad; Salehi, Hamdollah; Amiri, Peiman

    2016-08-01

    The 3D stacking of various 2D systems is an intelligent way of aiming to overcome the limitations usually faced by 2D systems. We study the adsorption of graphene on noble metal monolayers upon Ni (111) substrate, using density functional theory. The bonding mechanism at noble metal-graphene and noble metal-Ni interfaces is found to be physisorption and chemisorption, respectively. The bonding of graphene to Cu, Ag, and Au (111) monolayers is so weak that the conical shape of the Dirac point is preserved. The doping effects of a substrate lead to a small opening gap for gr/Cu/Ni and gr/Ag/Ni systems. These predictions are in agreement with experimental results. The intercalation of a noble metal monolayer between graphene and Ni (111) substrate changes the magnetic response from Ni surface and causes the formation of a ferrimagnetic system.

  13. CO oxidation studies over supported noble metal catalysts and single crystals: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boecker, Dirk; Gonzalez, Richard D.

    1987-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of CO over noble metal catalysts is reviewed. Results obtained on supported noble metal catalysts and single crystals both at high pressures and under UHV conditions are compared. The underlying causes which result in surface instabilities and multiple steady-state oscillations are considered, in particular, the occurrence of hot spots. CO islands of reactivity, surface oxide formation and phase transformations under oscillatory conditions are discussed.

  14. Recovery of Noble Metals and Technetium from Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, J.K.; Han, Y.J.; Lee, E.H.; Jung, C.H.; Lee, B.C.

    2006-07-01

    An adsorptive separation of Pd, Rh and Tc was tested by using simulated chemical solutions. Pd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Rh(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} were used for the noble metal sources, and Re 203 after dissolving it in 0.5 M nitric acid was used for the technetium substitute, respectively. A felt type ACF (activated carbon fiber) after being pretreated with 1 M NaOH, and an EIR (extractant impregnated resin) which was prepared by impregnating Aliquat 336 onto Amberlite XAD-4 resin were evaluated on their adsorption equilibrium and kinetic performances. As the results, the ACF showed a high selectivity for the palladium ions over the rhodium and rhenium ions. On the other hand, the EIR was shown to be effective for separation of rhenium from the palladium-free two component system of rhenium and rhodium. Column tests were also performed to confirm the separation efficiency of palladium and rhenium using a jacketed glass column (diam. 11 x L 150). The ACF bed showed the complete separation of palladium from rhenium and rhodium. The breakthrough volume, when 1% of breakthrough is considered, was about 140 BV for palladium, while only a small amount of an adsorption of rhenium and rhodium were found in the column. Then the EIR column was applied to separate rhenium from rhodium and showed successful separation performance with about 122 BV of breakthrough volume. The palladium and rhenium with high purity were recovered effectively by eluting the beds with nitric acid. (authors)

  15. Viral nanoparticles, noble metal decorated viruses and their nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Capek, Ignác

    2015-08-01

    Virus-based nanotechnology has generated interest in a number of applications due to the specificity of virus interaction with inorganic and organic nanoparticles. A well-defined structure of virus due to its multifunctional proteinaceous shell (capsid) surrounding genomic material is a promising approach to obtain nanostructured materials. Viruses hold great promise in assembling and interconnecting novel nanosized components, allowing to develop organized nanoparticle assemblies. Due to their size, monodispersity, and variety of chemical groups available for modification, they make a good scaffold for molecular assembly into nanoscale devices. Virus based nanocomposites are useful as an engineering material for the construction of smart nanoobjects because of their ability to associate into desired structures including a number of morphologies. Viruses exhibit the characteristics of an ideal template for the formation of nanoconjugates with noble metal nanoparticles. These bioinspired systems form monodispersed units that are highly amenable through genetic and chemical modifications. As nanoscale assemblies, viruses have sophisticated yet highly ordered structural features, which, in many cases, have been carefully characterized by modern structural biological methods. Plant viruses are increasingly being used for nanobiotechnology purposes because of their relative structural and chemical stability, ease of production, multifunctionality and lack of toxicity and pathogenicity in animals or humans. The multifunctional viruses interact with nanoparticles and other functional additives to the generation of bioconjugates with different properties – possible antiviral and antibacterial activities.

  16. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  17. Epsilon Metal Waste Form for Immobilization of Noble Metals from Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Rohatgi, Aashish; Zumhoff, Mac R.

    2013-10-01

    Epsilon metal (ε-metal), an alloy of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, is being developed as a waste form to treat and immobilize the undissolved solids and dissolved noble metals from aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel. Epsilon metal is an attractive waste form for several reasons: increased durability relative to borosilicate glass, it can be fabricated without additives (100% waste loading), and in addition it also benefits borosilicate glass waste loading by eliminating noble metals from the glass and thus the processing problems related there insolubility in glass. This work focused on the processing aspects of the epsilon metal waste form development. Epsilon metal is comprised of refractory metals resulting in high reaction temperatures to form the alloy, expected to be 1500 - 2000°C making it a non-trivial phase to fabricate by traditional methods. Three commercially available advanced technologies were identified: spark-plasma sintering, microwave sintering, and hot isostatic pressing, and investigated as potential methods to fabricate this waste form. Results of these investigations are reported and compared in terms of bulk density, phase assemblage (X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy).

  18. Epsilon metal waste form for immobilization of noble metals from used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Strachan, Denis; Rohatgi, Aashish; Zumhoff, Mac

    2013-10-01

    Epsilon metal (ɛ-metal), an alloy of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, is being developed as a waste form to treat and immobilize the undissolved solids and dissolved noble metals from aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel. Epsilon metal is an attractive waste form for several reasons: increased durability relative to borosilicate glass, it can be fabricated without additives (100% waste loading), and in addition it also benefits borosilicate glass waste loading by eliminating noble metals from the glass, thus the processing problems related to their insolubility in glass. This work focused on the processing aspects of the epsilon metal waste form development. Epsilon metal is comprised of refractory metals resulting in high alloying temperatures, expected to be 1500-2000 °C, making it a non-trivial phase to fabricate by traditional methods. Three commercially available advanced technologies were identified: spark-plasma sintering, microwave sintering, and hot isostatic pressing, and investigated as potential methods to fabricate this waste form. Results of these investigations are reported and compared in terms of bulk density, phase assemblage (X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy).

  19. Maximum noble-metal efficiency in catalytic materials: atomically dispersed surface platinum.

    PubMed

    Bruix, Albert; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Matolínová, Iva; Neitzel, Armin; Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Nataliya; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Stetsovych, Vitalii; Ševčíková, Klára; Mysliveček, Josef; Fiala, Roman; Václavů, Michal; Prince, Kevin C; Bruyère, Stéphanie; Potin, Valérie; Illas, Francesc; Matolín, Vladimír; Libuda, Jörg; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-09-22

    Platinum is the most versatile element in catalysis, but it is rare and its high price limits large-scale applications, for example in fuel-cell technology. Still, conventional catalysts use only a small fraction of the Pt content, that is, those atoms located at the catalyst's surface. To maximize the noble-metal efficiency, the precious metal should be atomically dispersed and exclusively located within the outermost surface layer of the material. Such atomically dispersed Pt surface species can indeed be prepared with exceptionally high stability. Using DFT calculations we identify a specific structural element, a ceria "nanopocket", which binds Pt(2+) so strongly that it withstands sintering and bulk diffusion. On model catalysts we experimentally confirm the theoretically predicted stability, and on real Pt-CeO2 nanocomposites showing high Pt efficiency in fuel-cell catalysis we also identify these anchoring sites.

  20. Nanostructured elastomers: From smectic liquid crystals to noble metal nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Daniel M.

    Noble metal/polymer nanocomposites are a desirable and useful class of material due to their combination of the beneficial processibility and mechanical properties of polymers with the optical, electrical, barrier, and other engineering properties of metal nanoparticles. Potential applications of such materials include non-linear optical materials with gold nanoparticles or conductive polymer substrates with percolated silver nanoparticles. A processing approach has been developed whereby metal nanoparticles, especially silver and gold, can be infused into the surface of a thermoplastic elastomer following the melt processing operation. This reaction-diffusion approach (nanoinfusion) allows metal nanoparticles to be introduced at relatively low cost while avoiding the issues of thermal degradation, microphase separation, or agglomeration that can occur at elevated temperatures in the melt state. The nanoinfusion process involves immersion of a molded, cast, or extruded plastic article in an aqueous plasticizer solution (Bayer MaterialScience AURARTM Infusion Technology) containing a metal salt such as HAuCl4 or AgNO 3. Infusion of the metal salt into the plastic surface is achieved well below the melt-processing temperature due to plasticization of a thin surface layer of 10-500 microm. The metal salt is subsequently reduced to produce zero-valent metal nanoparticles by a second infusion of a reducing agent or a thermal or photochemical reduction process. The growth and agglomeration of the nanoparticles is arrested by the high viscosity of the polymer matrix, producing a stable nanocomposite. In order to examine how nanoparticle size distribution and concentration are affected by soak times in the salt and reducing agent solutions, combinatorial, high-throughput screening methods have been applied. Particle size distributions are characterized rapidly by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) using a "dual gradient" nanoinfusion matrix. In addition, an improved

  1. Template Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanocrystals with Unusual Crystal Structures and Their Catalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Hua

    2016-12-20

    Noble metal nanocrystals own high chemical stability, unique plasmonic and distinctive catalytic properties, making them outstanding in many applications. However, their practical applications are limited by their high cost and scarcity on the earth. One promising strategy to solve these problems is to boost their catalytic performance in order to reduce their usage amount. To realize this target, great research efforts have been devoted to the size-, composition-, shape- and/or architecture-controlled syntheses of noble metal nanocrystals during the past two decades. Impressively, recent experimental studies have revealed that the crystal structure of noble metal nanocrystals can also significantly affect their physicochemical properties, such as optical, magnetic, catalytic, mechanical, electrical and electronic properties. Therefore, besides the well-established size, composition, shape, and architecture control, the rise of crystal structure-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals will open up new opportunities to further improve their functional properties, and thus promote their potential applications in energy conversion, catalysis, biosensing, information storage, surface enhanced Raman scattering, waveguide, near-infrared photothermal therapy, controlled release, bioimaging, biomedicine, and so on. In this Account, we review the recent research progress on the crystal structure control of noble metal nanocrystals with a template synthetic approach and their crystal structure-dependent catalytic properties. We first describe the template synthetic methods, such as epitaxial growth and galvanic replacement reaction methods, in which a presynthesized noble metal nanocrystal with either new or common crystal structure is used as the template to direct the growth of unusual crystal structures of other noble metals. Significantly, the template synthetic strategy described here provides an efficient, simple and straightforward way to synthesize unusual

  2. Bio-related noble metal nanoparticle structure property relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donovan Nicholas

    Structure property relationships of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be drastically different than bulk properties of the same metals. This research study used state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy and scanned probe microscopy to determine material properties on the nanoscale of bio-related Au and Pd NPs. Recently, it has been demonstrated the self-assembly of Au NPs on functionalized silica surfaces creates a conductive surface. Determination of the aggregate morphology responsible for electron conduction was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, changes in the electrical properties of the substrates after low temperature (<350°C) annealing was also studied. It was found that coalescence and densification of the Au NP aggregates disrupted the interconnected network which subsequently created a loss of conductivity. Investigation of bio-related Au/SiO2 core-shell NPs determined why published experimental results showed the sol-gel silica shell improved, by almost an order of magnitude, the detection efficiency of a DNA detection assay. Novel 360° rotation scanning TEM (STEM) imaging allowed study of individual NP surface morphology and internal structure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum imaging determined optoelectronic properties and chemical composition of the silica shell used to encapsulate Au NPs. Results indicated the sol-gel deposited SiO2 had a band gap energy of ˜8.9eV, bulk plasmon-peak energy of ˜25.5eV and chemical composition of stoichiometric SiO2. Lastly, an attempt to elicit structure property relationships of novel RNA mediated Pd hexagon NPs was performed. Selected area electron diffraction (SAD), low voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (LV-STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were chosen for characterization of atomic ordering, chemical composition and optoelectronic properties of the novel

  3. A GREEN CHEMISTRY APPROACH TO PREPARATION OF CORE (FE OR CU)-SHELL (NOBLE METALS) NANOCOMPOSITES USING AQUEOUS ASCORBIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A greener method to fabricate novel core (Fe or Cu)-shell (noble metals) nanocomposites of transition metals such as Fe and Cu and noble metals such as Au, Pt, Pd, and Ag using aqueous ascorbic acid is described. Transition metal salts such as Cu and Fe were reduced using ascor...

  4. Designing a New Class of Electrocatalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells: Probing Size, Composition, and Structure Dependent Electrocatalytic Performance in High-Quality, One-Dimensional Noble Metal Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsmann, Christopher

    A key challenge in the practical commercialization of PEMFCs is the extremely high cost and relatively poor durability of carbon supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt NP/C) electrocatalysts utilized in both the anode and cathode half-cells. Herein, we synthesize and characterize a new class of high-quality one-dimensional noble metal nanostructures as a potentially new and promising structural paradigm for the next generation of electrocatalyst materials. Specifically, we investigate the nature of the complex interplay amongst size, chemical composition, and electrocatalytic performance in high-quality elemental and bimetallic 1D noble metal nanowire systems with an emphasis on achieving efficient and sustainable methods for catalyst preparation. In terms of nanowire dimensions and composition, an interesting and measureable size-dependent enhancement in performance emerges in the case of elemental Pt, Pd, and Pd1-xAux nanowires possessing diameters ranging from the submicron (d = ˜200 nm) to the ultrathin regime (d = ˜1 nm). In a similar context, we have considered the role of chemical composition in 1D electrocatalysts and noted significant composition-dependent enhancements in activity and durability in high-quality, bimetallic Pd1-xAux and Pd1-xPtx NWs. A key finding that is apparent from these experimental results is that widely seen behavioral trends in the composition- and size-dependent performance for 0D nanoparticle-based catalysts do not hold in the case of 1D architectures, because of the patently unique structural and electronic effects, associated with their anisotropic structures. As a culmination of our efforts to take advantage of these intrinsic structure-activity correlations, our group has developed a morphology-, size-, and composition-optimized Pd9Au NW possessing a Pt monolayer shell (PtML˜Pd9Au NWs) electrocatalyst with an ultrathin 2 nm diameter, which yielded outstanding Pt mass and platinum group metal activities of 2.56 A/mgPt and 0.64 A

  5. Solar Noble Gases from ACFER 111 Metal Etched in Vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, A.; Begemann, F.

    1992-07-01

    Regolith grains dissolved by stepwise etching release a mixture of near-surface implanted Solar Wind gases (SW) and a deeper- sited, isotopically heavier component attributed to Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) (1,2,3). In all regolith materials examined so far the elemental abundance ratios in both components are distinctly different from the canonical solar values (4). The differences are generally explained to be owing to diffusive elemental fractionation although there is no strong evidence that upon their implantation the composition of the gases was indeed solar. In contrast, the solar noble gases present in the H3-H6 chondritic regolith breccia Acfer 111 appear to be nearly unfractionated and thus offer a unique chance for more accurate analyses. A magnetic fraction of Acfer 111 matrix, consisting of approx. 80% metal and 20% silicates, was etched with a 60 g/mol aqueous solution of HNO3 in a high-vacuum extraction line similar to that in (1). The gases released were drawn off in steps and analyzed; the experiment was stopped when ~97% of the metal and ~50% of the silicates were dissolved. As etching proceeds, the isotopic composition of the released gases changes in a pattern similar to that observed previously in other regolithic materials. The isotopic composition of solar neon decreases from ^20Ne/^22Ne=13.1 in the first step to ^20Ne/^22Ne=11.6, which can be interpreted as a change of the mixing ratio of SW (^20Ne/^22Ne=13.7) and SEP (^20Ne/^22Ne=11.3) neon. The isotopic compositions of solar He, Ar, and Kr are consistent with their also being mixtures of SW and SEP having compositions reported previously (2,3), although our data are compromised to some extent by the presence of planetary gases extracted from the silicates and, in the first steps, by atmospheric contamination probably present in terrestrial weathering products (mostly rust). The elemental composition of noble gases released from Acfer 111 was distinct from previous experiments: The (^4He

  6. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Aljohi, Alanood Ahmed; Hassan, Hanan Elkefafy; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common device-related healthcare-acquired infection. CAUTI can be severe and lead to bacteremia, significant morbidity, prolonged hospital stay, and high antibiotic consumption. Patients and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the CAUTI-reducing efficacy of noble metal alloy catheters in sixty patients (thirty per group) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the King Fahad Hospital in Saudi Arabia. The study was a single-blinded, randomized, single-centered, prospective investigation that included patients using urinary catheters for 3 days. Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006). When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005). In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100%) for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24). No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use. PMID:28057985

  7. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  8. Biomimetic Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanocrystals and the Mechanism Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Lingyan

    formations of specific Pt nanostructures. We start with mechanistic investigations on S7 peptide's Pt {111} recognition property, and proceed to studying BP7A peptide's twin introducing property. With combined experimental and computational efforts, we identify the molecular origins of the biorecognition properties of these two peptides. Moreover, we extend extracted biomimetic principles to the rational design/selection of small organic molecules that deliver anticipated traits for controlled colloidal synthesis for other noble metals (Pd and Rh). Overall, we demonstrate the power of biomimetic synthesis in rationally creating nanomaterial structures with novel properties. Our mechanism studies demonstrate the rich information one can derive from biomimetic synthesis, and the broad applicability of biomimetic principles to engineering material structures for many potential applications.

  9. Metal-Free and Noble Metal-Free Heteroatom-Doped Nanostructured Carbons as Prospective Sustainable Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Asefa, Tewodros

    2016-09-20

    The large-scale deployment of many types of fuel cells and electrolyzers is currently constrained by the lack of sustainable and efficient catalysts that can replace the less earth-abundant, noble metal-based catalysts, which are commonly used in these renewable energy systems. This burgeoning issue has led to explosive research efforts worldwide to find alternative, metal-free and noble metal-free catalysts that are composed of inexpensive and earth-abundant elements. Hence, the recent discoveries that doping carbon nanomaterials with heteroatoms (such as N, S, B, etc.) can give sustainable materials with good electrocatalytic activity for reactions carried out in fuel cells and electrolyzers have been not only quite exciting but also very promising to address these challenging issues. Interestingly, even though they contain no metals or involve only the inexpensive, more earth-abundant ones, the catalytic activity of some of these materials fares well with those of the commercially used noble metal-based electrocatalysts, such as Pt/C. However, research efforts to improve the catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability of some of these materials for various reactions are still necessary and thus continuing. While some of these efforts have focused on finding synthetic methods that can tune the structures and compositions of already known materials and thereby improve their catalytic properties (activity, selectivity, stability, etc.), others have focused on developing entirely new materials that can exhibit better or superior catalytic properties. In these efforts, additional considerations are also being paid to find facile synthetic routes or renewable and inexpensive precursors that can lead to such types of catalysts in order to make the entire process highly sustainable and widely applicable. In this Account, notable heteroatom-doped carbon catalysts that have been developed for reactions in fuel cells and water electrolyzers, the various synthetic

  10. First Principle Calculations of a Family of Noble Metal Nitrides and Carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linyan

    The structural and electronic properties of selected noble metal nitrides and carbides are studied using the local density approximation and the generalized gradient approximation. The zinc-blende and rock-salt structures are employed. The nitride and carbide of palladium have high bulk modulus. From the DOS, the MX (M = Pd, Ag, Au; X = N, C) compound display metallic nature.

  11. Non-Adiabatic Atomic Transitions: Computational Cross Section Calculations of Alkali Metal-Noble Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    collisions were computationally simulated. The alkali metals were potassium, rubidium, and cesium and the noble gas partners were helium, neon, and argon...195 20. Spin-Orbit split energies of Potassium, Rubidium, and Cesium ...composed of an alkali metal typically Rubidium[26, 37] or Cesium [5, 18]. The unique character of the alkali atoms, having a single valence electron in

  12. A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase transfer protocol for the highly efficient extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; Cao, Hongbin; Yang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase-transfer protocol is developed for the extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous solution to a hydrocarbon phase, which calls for first mixing the aqueous metal ion solution with an ethanolic solution of 1-dodecanethiol, and then extracting the coordination compounds formed between noble metal ions and 1-dodecanethiol into a non-polar organic solvent. A number of characterization techniques, including inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis demonstrate that this protocol could be applied to extract a wide variety of noble metal ions from water to dichloromethane with an efficiency of >96%, and has high selectivity for the separation of the noble metal ions from other transition metals. It is therefore an attractive alternative for the extraction of noble metals from water, soil, or waste printed circuit boards.

  13. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: The first two noble metals operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Smith, M.E.; Miller, D.H.; Ritter, J.A.

    1991-06-06

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas systems. The facility is the first pilot-scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to characterize the processing of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru, and Ag) on a large scale, the IDMS will be operated batchstyle for at least nine feed preparation cycles. The first two of these operations are complete. The major observation to date occurred during the second run when significant amounts of hydrogen were evolved during the feed preparation cycle. The runs were conducted between June 7, 1990 and March 8, 1991. This time period included nearly six months of ``fix-up`` time when forced air purges were installed on the SRAT MFT and other feed preparation vessels to allow continued noble metals experimentation.

  14. Theory and computation of hot carriers generated by surface plasmon polaritons in noble metals

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Hot carriers (HC) generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in noble metals are promising for application in optoelectronics, plasmonics and renewable energy. However, existing models fail to explain key quantitative details of SPP-to-HC conversion experiments. Here we develop a quantum mechanical framework and apply first-principles calculations to study the energy distribution and scattering processes of HCs generated by SPPs in Au and Ag. We find that the relative positions of the s and d bands of noble metals regulate the energy distribution and mean free path of the HCs, and that the electron–phonon interaction controls HC energy loss and transport. Our results prescribe optimal conditions for HC generation and extraction, and invalidate previously employed free-electron-like models. Our work combines density functional theory, GW and electron–phonon calculations to provide microscopic insight into HC generation and ultrafast dynamics in noble metals. PMID:26033445

  15. Functional Application of Noble Metal Nanoparticles In Situ Synthesized on Ramie Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Yao, Ya; Li, Jingliang; Qin, Si; Zhu, Haijin; Kaur, Jasjeet; Chen, Wu; Sun, Lu; Wang, Xungai

    2015-09-01

    Different functions were imparted to ramie fibers through treatment with noble metal nanoparticles including silver and gold nanoparticles. The in situ synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles was achieved by heating in the presence of ramie fibers in the corresponding solutions of precursors. The unique optical property of synthesized noble metal nanoparticles, i.e., localized surface plasmon resonance, endowed ramie fibers with bright colors. Color strength (K/S) of fibers increased with heating temperature. Silver nanoparticles were obtained in alkaline solution, while acidic condition was conducive to gold nanoparticles. The optical properties of treated ramie fibers were investigated using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the morphologies of silver and gold nanoparticles in situ synthesized on fibers. The ramie fibers treated with noble metal nanoparticles showed remarkable catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by sodium borohydride. Moreover, the silver nanoparticle treatment showed significant antibacterial property on ramie fibers.

  16. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  17. Vitrification of noble metals containing NCAW simulant with an engineering scale melter (ESM): Campaign report

    SciTech Connect

    Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S.; Weiss, K.; Elliott, M.; Eyler, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    ESM has been designed as a 10th-scale model of the DWPF-type melter, currently the reference melter for nitrification of Hanford double shell tankwaste. ESM and related equipment have been integrated to the existing mockup vitrification plant VA-WAK at KfK. On June 2-July 10, 1992, a shakedown test using 2.61 m{sup 3} of NCAW (neutralized current acid waste) simulant without noble metals was performed. On July 11-Aug. 30, 1992, 14.23 m{sup 3} of the same simulant with nominal concentrations of Ru, Rh, and Pd were vitrified. Objective was to investigate the behavior of such a melter with respect to discharge of noble metals with routine glass pouring via glass overflow. Results indicate an accumulation of noble metals in the bottom area of the flat-bottomed ESM. About 65 wt% of the noble metals fed to the melter could be drained out, whereas 35 wt% accumulated in the melter, based on analysis of glass samples from glass pouring stream in to the canisters. After the melter was drained at the end of the campaign through a bottom drain valve, glass samples were taken from the residual bottom layer. The samples had significantly increased noble metals content (factor of 20-45 to target loading). They showed also a significant decrease of the specific electric resistance compared to bulk glass (factor of 10). A decrease of 10- 15% of the resistance between he power electrodes could be seen at the run end, but the total amount of noble metals accumulated was not yet sufficient enough to disturb the Joule heating of the glass tank severely.

  18. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising a porous support and a solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Han; Mittelsteadt, Cortney K; Norman, Timothy J; Griffith, Arthur E; LaConti, Anthony B

    2015-02-24

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a thin, rigid, dimensionally-stable, non-electrically-conducting support, the support having a plurality of cylindrical, straight-through pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores are unevenly distributed, with some or no pores located along the periphery and more pores located centrally. The pores are completely filled with a solid polymer electrolyte, the solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide. The solid polymer electrolyte may also be deposited over the top and/or bottom surfaces of the support.

  19. Noble metal-comparable SERS enhancement from semiconducting metal oxides by making oxygen vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Shan; Yuan, Yinyin; Chen, Zhigang; Hou, Junyu; Yang, Mei; Su, Yanli; Zhang, Yongyi; Li, Liang; Li, Qingwen; Geng, Fengxia; Zhao, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) represents a very powerful tool for the identification of molecular species, but unfortunately it has been essentially restricted to noble metal supports (Au, Ag and Cu). While the application of semiconductor materials as SERS substrate would enormously widen the range of uses for this technique, the detection sensitivity has been much inferior and the achievable SERS enhancement was rather limited, thereby greatly limiting the practical applications. Here we report the employment of non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanostructure, sea urchin-like W18O49 nanowire, as the substrate material, to magnify the substrate-analyte molecule interaction, leading to significant magnifications in Raman spectroscopic signature. The enrichment of surface oxygen vacancy could bring additional enhancements. The detection limit concentration was as low as 10-7 M and the maximum enhancement factor was 3.4 × 105, in the rank of the highest sensitivity, to our best knowledge, among semiconducting materials, even comparable to noble metals without `hot spots'.

  20. A new model describing the metal-support interaction in noble metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mojet, B.L.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Ramaker, D.E.

    1999-09-10

    The catalytic activity and spectroscopic properties of supported noble metal catalysts are strongly influenced by the acidity/alkalinity of the support but are relatively independent of the metal (Pd or Pt) or the type of support (zeolite LTL or SiO{sub 2}). As the alkalinity of the support increases, the TOF of the metal particles for neopentane hydrogenolysis decreases. At the same time, there is a decrease in the XPS binding energy and a shift from linear to bridge bonded CO in the IR spectra. Analysis of the shape resonance in XANES spectra indicates that in the presence of chemisorbed hydrogen the difference in energy between the Pt-H antibonding orbital and the Fermi level decreases as the alkalinity of the support increases. Based on the results from the IR, XPS, and shape resonance data a new model is proposed in which the interaction between the metal and support leads to a shift in the energy of the metal valence orbitals. The EXAFS structural analysis indicates that the small metal particles are in contact only with the oxide ions of the support. Finally, a new spectroscopic characterization, Atomic XAFS, is presented which provides new insights into the origin of the electronic changes in the metal. As the alkalinity of the support increases, there is decrease in the metal ionization potential. The primary interaction is a Coulomb attraction between metal particle and support oxygen ions, which affects the metal interatomic potential. This model for the metal-support interaction explicitly excludes the need for electron transfer, and it can account for all observed changes in the catalytic, electronic, and structural properties of the supported metal particles induced by support acidity ranging from acidic to neutral to alkaline.

  1. Non-noble metal based electro-catalyst compositions for proton exchange membrane based water electrolysis and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Kumta, Prashant N.; Kadakia, Karan Sandeep; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg

    2017-02-07

    The invention provides electro-catalyst compositions for an anode electrode of a proton exchange membrane-based water electrolysis system. The compositions include a noble metal component selected from the group consisting of iridium oxide, ruthenium oxide, rhenium oxide and mixtures thereof, and a non-noble metal component selected from the group consisting of tantalum oxide, tin oxide, niobium oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide, molybdenum oxide, yttrium oxide, scandium oxide, cooper oxide, zirconium oxide, nickel oxide and mixtures thereof. Further, the non-noble metal component can include a dopant. The dopant can be at least one element selected from Groups III, V, VI and VII of the Periodic Table. The compositions can be prepared using a surfactant approach or a sol gel approach. Further, the compositions are prepared using noble metal and non-noble metal precursors. Furthermore, a thin film containing the compositions can be deposited onto a substrate to form the anode electrode.

  2. The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-11-30

    Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program.

  3. Ligand-Assisted Co-Assembly Approach toward Mesoporous Hybrid Catalysts of Transition-Metal Oxides and Noble Metals: Photochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ben; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Chen, Jiejie; Luo, Zhu; Thanneeru, Srinivas; Li, Weikun; Song, Wenqiao; Biswas, Sourav; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2015-07-27

    A bottom-up synthetic approach was developed for the preparation of mesoporous transition-metal-oxide/noble-metal hybrid catalysts through ligand-assisted co-assembly of amphiphilic block-copolymer micelles and polymer-tethered noble-metal nanoparticles (NPs). The synthetic approach offers a general and straightforward method to precisely tune the sizes and loadings of noble-metal NPs in metal oxides. This system thus provides a solid platform to clearly understand the role of noble-metal NPs in photochemical water splitting. The presence of trace amounts of metal NPs (≈0.1 wt %) can enhance the photocatalytic activity for water splitting up to a factor of four. The findings can conceivably be applied to other semiconductors/noble-metal catalysts, which may stand out as a new methodology to build highly efficient solar energy conversion systems.

  4. Noble Metal Decoration and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Carboxymethyl Cellulose

    EPA Science Inventory

    A facile microwave (MW) method is described that accomplishes alignment and decoration of noble metals on carbon nanotubes wrapped with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as single-wall (SWNT), multi-wall (MWNT) and Buckminsterfullerene (C-60) were well ...

  5. Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali-Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    xii I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Motivation...150 xii POTENTIAL ENERGY CURVES AND ASSOCIATED LINE SHAPE OF ALKALI-METAL AND NOBLE-GAS INTERACTIONS I. Introduction 1.1 Motivation...starting point for all modern developments of a quantum picture of pressure broadening, and show how this theory reduces to the classical theory under

  6. Electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules in acid medium: enhancement of activity of noble metal nanoparticles and their alloys by supporting or modifying them with metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Kulesza, Pawel J.; Pieta, Izabela S.; Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Wadas, Anna; Marks, Diana; Klak, Karolina; Stobinski, Leszek; Cox, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Different approaches to enhancement of electrocatalytic activity of noble metal nanoparticles during oxidation of small organic molecules (namely potential fuels for low-temperature fuel cells such as methanol, ethanol and formic acid) are described. A physical approach to the increase of activity of catalytic nanoparticles (e.g. platinum or palladium) involves nanostructuring to obtain highly dispersed systems of high surface area. Recently, the feasibility of enhancing activity of noble metal systems through the formation of bimetallic (e.g. PtRu, PtSn, and PdAu) or even more complex (e.g. PtRuW, PtRuSn) alloys has been demonstrated. In addition to possible changes in the electronic properties of alloys, specific interactions between metals as well as chemical reactivity of the added components have been postulated. We address and emphasize here the possibility of utilization of noble metal and alloyed nanoparticles supported on robust but reactive high surface area metal oxides (e.g. WO3, MoO3, TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5, and CeO2) in oxidative electrocatalysis. This paper concerns the way in which certain inorganic oxides and oxo species can act effectively as supports for noble metal nanoparticles or their alloys during electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen and representative organic fuels. Among important issues are possible changes in the morphology and dispersion, as well as specific interactions leading to the improved chemisorptive and catalytic properties in addition to the feasibility of long time operation of the discussed systems. PMID:24443590

  7. Effect of electron heating on femtosecond laser-induced coherent acoustic phonons in noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jincheng; Guo, Chunlei

    2007-05-01

    We employ a surface plasmon technique to resolve the dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced coherent acoustic phonons in noble metals. Clear acoustic oscillations are observed in our experiments. We further study the dependence of the initial phase of the oscillations on pump fluence, and we find that the initial phase decreases linearly with pump fluence. Our model calculations show that hot electrons instantaneously excited by femtosecond pulses contribute to the generation of coherent acoustic phonons in metals.

  8. Core shell hybrids based on noble metal nanoparticles and conjugated polymers: synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratoddi, Ilaria; Venditti, Iole; Battocchio, Chiara; Polzonetti, Giovanni; Cametti, Cesare; Russo, Maria Vittoria

    2011-12-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes combined with conjugated functional polymers give rise to advanced core shell hybrids with interesting physical characteristics and potential applications in sensors or cancer therapy. In this paper, a versatile and facile synthesis of core shell systems based on noble metal nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, PtNPs), coated by copolymers belonging to the class of substituted polyacetylenes has been developed. The polymeric shells containing functionalities such as phenyl, ammonium, or thiol pending groups have been chosen in order to tune hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties and solubility of the target core shell hybrids. The Au, Ag, or Pt nanoparticles coated by poly(dimethylpropargylamonium chloride), or poly(phenylacetylene-co-allylmercaptan). The chemical structure of polymeric shell, size and size distribution and optical properties of hybrids have been assessed. The mean diameter of the metal core has been measured (about 10-30 nm) with polymeric shell of about 2 nm.

  9. Preliminary investigation of a technique to separate fission noble metals from fission product mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, G.B.; Jensen, G.A.

    1982-08-01

    A variation of the gold-ore fire assay technique was examined as a method for recovering Pd, Rh and Ru from fission products. The mixture of fission product oxides is combined with glass-forming chemicals, a metal oxide such as PbO (scavenging agent), and a reducing agent such as charcoal. When this mixture is melted, a metal button is formed which extracts the noble metals. The remainder cools to form a glass for nuclear waste storage. Recovery depended only on reduction of the scavenger oxide to metal. When such reduction was achieved, no difference in noble metal recovery efficiency was found among the scavengers studied (PbO, SnO, CuO, Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Sb/sub 2/O/sub 3/). Not all reducing agents studied, however, were able to reduce all scavenger oxides to metal. Only graphite would reduce SnO and CuO and allow noble metal recovery. The scavenger oxides Sb/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and PbO, however, were reduced by all of the reducing agents tested. Similar noble metal recovery was found with each. Lead oxide was found to be the most promising of the potential scavengers. It was reduced by all of the reducing agents tested, and its higher density may facilitate the separation. Use of lead oxide also appeared to have no deterimental effect on the glass quality. Charcoal was identified as the preferred reducing agent. As long as a separable metal phase was formed in the melt, noble metal recovery was not dependent on the amount of reducing agent and scavenger oxide. High glass viscosities inhibited separation of the molten scavenger, while low viscosities allowed volatile loss of RuO/sub 4/. A viscosity of approx. 20 poise at the processing temperature offered a good compromise between scavenger separation and Ru recovery. Glasses in which PbO was used as the scavenging agent were homogeneous in appearance. Resistance to leaching was close to that of certain waste glasses reported in the literature. 12 figures. 7 tables.

  10. Highly selective electrodeposition of sub-10 nm crystalline noble metallic nanorods inside vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuyang; Wang, Ranran; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhaohui; Guo, Jun; Chen, Muzi; Tang, Minghua; Cheng, Yajun; Chu, Haibin

    2016-07-08

    In this paper crystalline noble metallic nanorods including Au and Ag with sub-10 nm diameter, are encapsulated within prealigned and open-ended multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through an electrodeposition method. As the external surface of CNTs has been insulated by the epoxy the CNT channel becomes the only path for the mass transport as well as the nanoreactor for the metal deposition. Highly crystallized Au and Ag2O nanorods parallel to the radial direction of CNTs are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction spectroscopy. The Ag2O nanorods are formed by air oxidation on the Ag metals and show a single crystalline structure with (111) planes. The Au nanorods exhibit a complex crystalline structure including twin-crystal and lattice dislocation with (111) and (200) planes. These crystalline noble metallic nanostructures may have important applications for nanocatalysts for fuel cells as well as nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. This method is deemed to benefit the precise deposition of other crystalline nanostructures inside CNTs with a small diameter.

  11. Highly selective electrodeposition of sub-10 nm crystalline noble metallic nanorods inside vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuyang; Wang, Ranran; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhaohui; Guo, Jun; Chen, Muzi; Tang, Minghua; Cheng, Yajun; Chu, Haibin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper crystalline noble metallic nanorods including Au and Ag with sub-10 nm diameter, are encapsulated within prealigned and open-ended multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through an electrodeposition method. As the external surface of CNTs has been insulated by the epoxy the CNT channel becomes the only path for the mass transport as well as the nanoreactor for the metal deposition. Highly crystallized Au and Ag2O nanorods parallel to the radial direction of CNTs are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction spectroscopy. The Ag2O nanorods are formed by air oxidation on the Ag metals and show a single crystalline structure with (111) planes. The Au nanorods exhibit a complex crystalline structure including twin-crystal and lattice dislocation with (111) and (200) planes. These crystalline noble metallic nanostructures may have important applications for nanocatalysts for fuel cells as well as nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. This method is deemed to benefit the precise deposition of other crystalline nanostructures inside CNTs with a small diameter.

  12. Process for making a noble metal on tin oxide catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quantity of reagent grade tin metal or compound, chloride-free, and high-surface-area silica spheres are placed in deionized water, followed by deaerating the mixture by boiling and adding an oxidizing agent, such as nitric acid. The nitric acid oxidizes the tin to metastannic acid which coats the spheres because the acid is absorbed on the substrate. The metastannic acid becomes tin oxide upon drying and calcining. The tin-oxide coated silica spheres are then placed in water and boiled. A chloride-free precious metal compound in aqueous solution is then added to the mixture containing the spheres, and the precious metal compound is reduced to a precious metal by use of a suitable reducing agent such as formic acid. Very beneficial results were obtained using the precious metal compound tetraammine platinum(II) hydroxide.

  13. Noble metal coated single-walled carbon nanotubes for applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Chao; Cheng, Liang; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-05-02

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique optical properties are interesting nanoprobes widely explored in biomedical imaging and phototherapies. Herein, DNA-functionalized SWNTs are modified with noble metal (Ag or Au) nanoparticles via an in situ solution phase synthesis method comprised of seed attachment, seeded growth, and surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), yielding SWNT-Ag-PEG and SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposites stable in physiological environments. With gold or silver nanoparticles decorated on the surface, the SWNT-metal nanocomposites gain an excellent concentration and excitation-source dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Using a near-infrared (NIR) laser as the excitation source, targeted Raman imaging of cancer cells labeled with folic acid (FA) conjugated SWNT-Au nanocomposite (SWNT-Au-PEG-FA) is realized, with images acquired in significantly shortened periods of time as compared to that of using nonenhanced SWNT Raman probes. Owing to the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption contributed by the gold shell, the SWNTs-Au-PEG-FA nanocomposite also offers remarkably improved photothermal cancer cell killing efficacy. This work presents a facile approach to synthesize water-soluble noble metal coated SWNTs with a strong SERS effect suitable for labeling and fast Raman spectroscopic imaging of biological samples, which has been rarely realized before. The SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposite developed here may thus be an interesting optical theranostic probe for cancer imaging and therapy.

  14. A review of dry (CO2) reforming of methane over noble metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pakhare, Devendra; Spivey, James

    2014-11-21

    Dry (CO2) reforming of methane (DRM) is a well-studied reaction that is of both scientific and industrial importance. This reaction produces syngas that can be used to produce a wide range of products, such as higher alkanes and oxygenates by means of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. DRM is inevitably accompanied by deactivation due to carbon deposition. DRM is also a highly endothermic reaction and requires operating temperatures of 800-1000 °C to attain high equilibrium conversion of CH4 and CO2 to H2 and CO and to minimize the thermodynamic driving force for carbon deposition. The most widely used catalysts for DRM are based on Ni. However, many of these catalysts undergo severe deactivation due to carbon deposition. Noble metals have also been studied and are typically found to be much more resistant to carbon deposition than Ni catalysts, but are generally uneconomical. Noble metals can also be used to promote the Ni catalysts in order to increase their resistance to deactivation. In order to design catalysts that minimize deactivation, it is necessary to understand the elementary steps involved in the activation and conversion of CH4 and CO2. This review will cover DRM literature for catalysts based on Rh, Ru, Pt, and Pd metals. This includes the effect of these noble metals on the kinetics, mechanism and deactivation of these catalysts.

  15. Cálculo del esfuerzo ideal de metales nobles mediante primeros principios en la dirección <100>

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista-Hernández, A.; López-Fuentes, M.; Pacheco-Espejel, V.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.

    2005-04-01

    We present calculations of the ideal strength on the < 100 > direction for noble metals (Cu, Ag and Au), by means of first principles calculations. First, we obtain the structural parameters (cell parameters, bulk modulus) for each studied metal. We deform on the < 100 > direction calculating the total energy and the stress tensor through the Hellman-Feynman theorem, by the relaxation of the unit cell in the perpendicular directions to the deformation one. The calculated cell constants differ 1.3 % from experimental data. The maximum ideal strength are 29.6, 17 and 19 GPa for Cu, Ag and Au respectively. Meanwhile, the calculated elastic modulus are 106 (Cu), 71 (Ag), and 45 GPa (Au) and are in agreement with the experimental values for polycrystalline samples. The values of maximum strength are explained by the optimum volume values due to the atomic radius size for each element.

  16. The GaN/noble metal interface: metal induced gap states and Schottky barrier heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Silvia; Continenza, Alessandra; Satta, Guido; Massidda, Sandro; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2000-03-01

    We present ab-initio FLAPW (E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert and A.J. Freeman, Phys. Rev. B 24), 864 (1981) calculations on N-terminated [001] ordered GaN/Ag and GaN/Au interfaces. Our results show that the density of gap states is appreciable in the interface semiconductor layer; however, the gap states are efficiently screened and become negligible already in the sub-interface layer. The gap states' decay length in the semiconductor side is about 2.0 ± 0.1 Å\\: and seems to be independent of the deposited metal, therefore being, to a good approximation, a bulk GaN property. Our estimated Schottky barrier heights for the GaN/noble-metal interfaces are both smaller than that of the GaN/Al barrier, showing a large dispersion in the values - which seems to exclude the possibility of a Fermi level pinning within the gap. Finally, we investigate the role of atomic positions and of different chemical species at the interface region in determining the final value of the potential line-up.

  17. Electrochemical synthesis of elongated noble metal nanoparticles, such as nanowires and nanorods, on high-surface area carbon supports

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Blyznakov, Stoyan; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-08-04

    Elongated noble-metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. The method involves the formation of a plurality of elongated noble-metal nanoparticles by electrochemical deposition of the noble metal on a high surface area carbon support, such as carbon nanoparticles. Prior to electrochemical deposition, the carbon support may be functionalized by oxidation, thus making the manufacturing process simple and cost-effective. The generated elongated nanoparticles are covalently bound to the carbon support and can be used directly in electrocatalysis. The process provides elongated noble-metal nanoparticles with high catalytic activities and improved durability in combination with high catalyst utilization since the nanoparticles are deposited and covalently bound to the carbon support in their final position and will not change in forming an electrode assembly.

  18. Reforming with a catalyst containing a group VIII noble metal a group VIII non-noble metal and gallium on separate support particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, C. M.; Bertolacini, R. J.; Pellet, R. J.

    1984-11-13

    The catalyst comprises a physical particle-form mixture of a Componet A, a Component B, and a Component C, said Component A comprising at least one Group VIII noble metal, preferably platinum, deposed on a solid catalyst support material providing acidic catalytic sites, said Component B comprising a small amount of a non-noble metal of Group VIII selected from cobalt, nickel, and mixtures thereof, preferably cobalt, on a solid catalyst support material providing acidic catalytic sites, said Component C comprising a small amount of gallium deposed on a solid catalyst support material providing acidic catalytic sites, and said catalyst having been prepared by thoroughly and intimately blending finely-divided particles of said Component A, B, and C to provide a thoroughly-blended composite. The catalyst can be employed suitably in a hydrocarbon conversion process. In particular, the catalyst can be employed in a process for the reforming of a hydrocarbon stream, which process comprises contacting said stream in a reforming zone under reforming conditions and in the presence of hydrogen with said catalyst. The process can be used advantageously to reform a hydrocarbon stream that contains up to 80 ppm sulfur.

  19. Biphasic catalysis using amphiphilic polyphenols-chelated noble metals as highly active and selective catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hui; Yu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Liao, Xuepin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of catalysis, it is highly desired to develop novel catalysts that combine the advantages of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. Here we disclose that the use of plant pholyphenol as amphiphilic large molecule ligand/stabilizer allows for the preparation of noble metal complex and noble metal nanoparticle catalysts. These catalysts are found to be highly selective and active in aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis of cinnamaldehyde and quinoline, and can be reused at least 3 times without significant loss of activity. Moreover, the catalytic activity and reusability of the catalysts can be rationally controlled by simply adjusting the content of polyphenols in the catalysts. Our strategy may be extended to design a wide range of aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis system. PMID:23863916

  20. Two types of noble metal mineralization in the Kaalamo massif (Karelia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Ruchyev, A. M.; Golubev, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    Noble metal mineralization of the syngenetic (Southern Kaalamo) and epigenetic (Surisuo) types are defined in the Kaalamo massif. The ƩPt, Pd, Au content is as high as 0.9-1.1 g/t. Syngenetic mineralization started at the late magmatic stage (at around 800°C) gradually evolving to cease during the hydrothermal-metasomatic stage (<271°C). Epigenetic mineralization was formed at temperatures ranging from 500 to <230°C in zones of intense shear deformations and low-temperature metasomatosis during the collisional stage of the Svecofennian tectono-magmatic cycle (approximately 1.85 Ga ago). Taking into consideration the geological position of the Kaalamo massif in the Raakhe-Ladoga metallogenic zone with widely developed intense shear dislocations, the epigenetic mineralization type seems to be more promising with respect to noble metals.

  1. Comparison of the bonding between ML(+) and ML2(+) (M = metal, L = noble gas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are reported of the spectroscopic constants for the low-lying states of the molecular ions ML2(+), where M = Li, Na, Mg, V, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu, and where L is usually Ar. Comparison with existing analogous calculations on the ML(+) ions shows how the bonding and binding energy change with the addition of a second noble gas atom. The second binding energy is predicted to be essentially the same as the first for the Li, Na, Mg, and V ions, but larger for the Fe, Co, Ni and Cu ions. The binding energies of the transition metal noble gas ions are not accurately predicted at the SCF level, because correlation is required to describe their M(0)Ln(+) character. All trends can be explained in terms of promotion and hybridization on the metal ion.

  2. Nanolithography in evanescent near field by using nano-filmed noble metal layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Hu, Song; Yao, Hanmin; Cheng, Guanxiao; Yan, Wei

    2007-12-01

    Nanolithography has been investigated by using optical proximity exposure in the evanescent near field in nano-filmed noble metals. Sub-diffraction-limited feature size can be resolved by using i-line illumination exposure. Compared with the model of original superlens, we separated the superlens 100nm away from the mask, under the illumination of i-line light, the initial simulation shows that the sub-diffraction-limited feature as small as 60nm linewidth with 120nm pitch can be clearly resolved without hard contact between mask and nano-filmed noble metal. By proper design of the materials and the parameters of nano-filmed layers, better resolution can be realized.

  3. Protein-protected luminescent noble metal quantum clusters: an emerging trend in atomic cluster nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal quantum clusters (NMQCs) are the missing link between isolated noble metal atoms and nanoparticles. NMQCs are sub-nanometer core sized clusters composed of a group of atoms, most often luminescent in the visible region, and possess intriguing photo-physical and chemical properties. A trend is observed in the use of ligands, ranging from phosphines to functional proteins, for the synthesis of NMQCs in the liquid phase. In this review, we briefly overview recent advancements in the synthesis of protein protected NMQCs with special emphasis on their structural and photo-physical properties. In view of the protein protection, coupled with direct synthesis and easy functionalization, this hybrid QC-protein system is expected to have numerous optical and bioimaging applications in the future, pointers in this direction are visible in the literature.

  4. Noble Metal Catalysts for Mercury Oxidation in Utility Flue Gas: Gold, Palladium and Platinum Formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J

    2008-07-01

    The use of noble metals as catalysts for mercury oxidation in flue gas remains an area of active study. To date, field studies have focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot scale. In this article, we introduce bench-scale experimental results for gold, palladium and platinum catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Our initial results reveal some intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research into this potentially important process.

  5. Non-Noble Metal-based Carbon Composites in Hydrogen Evolution Reaction: Fundamentals to Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xu, Fan; Jin, Haiyan; Chen, Yiqing; Wang, Yong

    2017-02-24

    Hydrogen has been hailed as a clean and sustainable alternative to finite fossil fuels in many energy systems. Water splitting is an important method for hydrogen production in high purity and large quantities. To accelerate the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) rate, it is highly necessary to develop high efficiency catalysts and to select a proper electrolyte. Herein, the performances of non-noble metal-based carbon composites under various pH values (acid, alkaline and neutral media) for HER in terms of catalyst synthesis, structure and molecular design are systematically discussed. A detailed analysis of the structure-activity-pH correlations in the HER process gives an insight on the origin of the pH-dependence for HER, and provide guidance for future HER mechanism studies on non-noble metal-based carbon composites. Furthermore, this Review gives a fresh impetus to rational design of high-performance noble-metal-free composites catalysts and guide researchers to employ the established electrocatalysts in proper water electrolysis technologies.

  6. Biomimetic Synthesis of Gelatin Polypeptide-Assisted Noble-Metal Nanoparticles and Their Interaction Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoheng; Wang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Herein, the generation of gold, silver, and silver-gold (Ag-Au) bimetallic nanoparticles was carried out in collagen (gelatin) solution. It first showed that the major ingredient in gelatin polypeptide, glutamic acid, acted as reducing agent to biomimetically synthesize noble metal nanoparticles at 80°C. The size of nanoparticles can be controlled not only by the mass ratio of gelatin to gold ion but also by pH of gelatin solution. Interaction between noble-metal nanoparticles and polypeptide has been investigated by TEM, UV-visible, fluorescence spectroscopy, and HNMR. This study testified that the degradation of gelatin protein could not alter the morphology of nanoparticles, but it made nanoparticles aggregated clusters array (opposing three-dimensional α-helix folding structure) into isolated nanoparticles stabilized by gelatin residues. This is a promising merit of gelatin to apply in the synthesis of nanoparticles. Therefore, gelatin protein is an excellent template for biomimetic synthesis of noble metal/bimetallic nanoparticle growth to form nanometer-sized device.

  7. Rice straw modified by click reaction for selective extraction of noble metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Wei, Jun; Li, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Rice straw was modified by azide-alkyne click reaction in order to realize selective extraction of noble metal ions. The ability of the modified straw to adsorb Pd(2+) and Pt(4+) was assessed using a batch adsorption technique. It was found that the sorption equilibrium could be reached within 1h and the adsorption capacity increased with temperature for both Pd(2+) and Pt(4+). The maximum sorption capacities for Pd(2+) and Pt(4+) were respectively attained in 1.0 and 0.1 mol/L HCl. The modified straw showed excellent selectivity for noble metal ions in comparison to the pristine straw. In addition, the modified straw was examined as a column packing material for extraction of noble metal ions. It was indicated that 1.0 mL/min was the best flow rate for Pd(2+) and Pt(4+). The modified straw could be repeatedly used for 10 times without any significant loss in the initial binding affinity.

  8. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-03

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We have compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFTbased methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We have also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdWDF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the 2-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the 2-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments, which provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  9. Noble-metal testing results for the West Valley vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    Bowan, B.W.; Jain, V.

    1989-01-01

    At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the slurry-fed ceramic melter (SFCM) has been in test operation since December 1984 to vitrify simulated waste slurries. Over 4 yr, a moderate range of glass formulations, some containing RuO{sub 2}, have been processed. Since these noble-metal oxides not only have a limited solubility in the melt, and are also electrically conductive, their accumulation in large amounts on the floor of the SFCM poses a potential electrical hazard to the joule-heated SFCM. The design of the WVDP melter cavity and electrode configuration is specifically intended to allow modest noble-metal accumulation without compromise to melter life or performance. In this study, an attempt has been made to estimate the amount of RuO{sub 2} that has accumulated on the floor of the SFCM since initiation of the WVDP vitrification test program. The total amount of RuO{sub 2} that has been processed in the SFCM to date is shown. This preliminary study indicates that the West Valley SFCM displays a good capability for sweeping insoluble noble metals through and for tolerating the remaining fraction on the floor without compromising melter life or performance over the course of the WVDP radioactive vitrification campaign.

  10. Risk Reduction Via Greener Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanostructures and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadagouda, M. N.; Varma, R. S.

    Aqueous preparation of nanoparticles using vitamins B2 and C which can function both as reducing and capping agents are described. Bulk and shape-controlled synthesis of noble nanostructures via microwave (MW)-assisted spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts using α-D-glucose, sucrose, and maltose has been achieved. The MW method also accomplishes the cross-linking reaction of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with metallic systems such as Pt, Cu, and In; bimetallic systems, namely Pt-In, Ag-Pt, Pt-Fe, Cu-Pd, Pt-Pd and Pd-Fe; and single-walled nanotubes (SWNT), multi-walled nanotubes (MWNT), and Buckmin-sterfullerene (C-60). The strategy is extended to the formation of biodegradable carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) composite films with noble nanometals; such metal decoration and alignment of carbon nanotubes in CMC is possible using a MW approach. The MW approach also enables the shape-controlled bulk synthesis of Ag and Fe nanorods in poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG).

  11. Angstrom-resolved real-time dissection of electrochemically active noble metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Buddha R; Baimpos, Theodoros; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2014-06-24

    Electrochemical solid|liquid interfaces are critically important for technological applications and materials for energy storage, harvesting, and conversion. Yet, a real-time Angstrom-resolved visualization of dynamic processes at electrified solid|liquid interfaces has not been feasible. Here we report a unique real-time atomistic view into dynamic processes at electrochemically active metal interfaces using white light interferometry in an electrochemical surface forces apparatus. This method allows simultaneous deciphering of both sides of an electrochemical interface-the solution and the metal side-with microsecond resolution under dynamically evolving reactive conditions that are inherent to technological systems in operando. Quantitative in situ analysis of the potentiodynamic electrochemical oxidation/reduction of noble metal surfaces shows that Angstrom thick oxides formed on Au and Pt are high-ik materials; that is, they are metallic or highly defect-rich semiconductors, while Pd forms a low-ik oxide. In contrast, under potentiostatic growth conditions, all noble metal oxides exhibit a low-ik behavior. On the solution side, we reveal hitherto unknown strong electrochemical reaction forces, which are due to temporary charge imbalance in the electric double layer caused by depletion/generation of charged species. The real-time capability of our approach reveals significant time lags between electron transfer, oxide reduction/oxidation, and solution side reaction during a progressing electrode process. Comparing the kinetics of solution and metal side responses provides evidence that noble metal oxide reduction proceeds via a hydrogen adsorption and subsequent dissolution/redeposition mechanism. The presented approach may have important implications for designing emerging materials utilizing electrified interfaces and may apply to bioelectrochemical processes and signal transmission.

  12. Graphene-Based Non-Noble-Metal Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Acid

    SciTech Connect

    H Byon; J Suntivich; Y Shao-Horn

    2011-12-31

    Non-noble-metal catalysts based on Fe-N-C moieties have shown promising oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this study, we report a facile method to prepare a Fe-N-C catalyst based on modified graphene (Fe-N-rGO) from heat treatment of a mixture of Fe salt, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}), and chemically reduced graphene (rGO). The Fe-N-rGO catalyst was found to have pyridinic N-dominant heterocyclic N (40% atomic concentration among all N components) on the surface and have an average Fe coordination of {approx}3 N (Fe-N{sub 3,average}) in bulk. Rotating disk electrode measurements revealed that Fe-N-rGO had high mass activity in acid and exhibited high stability at 0.5 V at 80 C in acid over 70 h, which was correlated to low H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production shown from rotating ring disk electrode measurements.

  13. Lead-Free Halide Double Perovskites via Heterovalent Substitution of Noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Volonakis, George; Filip, Marina R; Haghighirad, Amir Abbas; Sakai, Nobuya; Wenger, Bernard; Snaith, Henry J; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-04-07

    Lead-based halide perovskites are emerging as the most promising class of materials for next-generation optoelectronics; however, despite the enormous success of lead-halide perovskite solar cells, the issues of stability and toxicity are yet to be resolved. Here we report on the computational design and the experimental synthesis of a new family of Pb-free inorganic halide double perovskites based on bismuth or antimony and noble metals. Using first-principles calculations we show that this hitherto unknown family of perovskites exhibits very promising optoelectronic properties, such as tunable band gaps in the visible range and low carrier effective masses. Furthermore, we successfully synthesize the double perovskite Cs2BiAgCl6, perform structural refinement using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and characterize its optical properties via optical absorption and photoluminescence measurements. This new perovskite belongs to the Fm3̅m space group and consists of BiCl6 and AgCl6 octahedra alternating in a rock-salt face-centered cubic structure. From UV-vis and photoluminescence measurements we obtain an indirect gap of 2.2 eV.

  14. Noble metal (Pd, Ru, Rh, Pt, Au, Ag) doped graphene hybrids for electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Marcella; Poh, Hwee Ling; Ambrosi, Adriano; Zhao, Guanjia; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šaněk, Filip; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-21

    Metal decorated graphene materials are highly important for catalysis. In this work, noble metal doped-graphene hybrids were prepared by a simple and scalable method. The thermal reductions of metal doped-graphite oxide precursors were carried out in nitrogen and hydrogen atmospheres and the effects of these atmospheres as well as the metal components on the characteristics and catalytic capabilities of the hybrid materials were studied. The hybrids exfoliated in nitrogen atmosphere contained a higher amount of oxygen-containing groups and lower density of defects on their surfaces than hybrids exfoliated in hydrogen atmosphere. The metals significantly affected the electrochemical behavior and catalysis of compounds that are important in energy production and storage and in electrochemical sensing. Research in the field of energy storage and production, electrochemical sensing and biosensing as well as biomedical devices can take advantage of the properties and catalytic capabilities of the metal doped graphene hybrids.

  15. Noble Metal Immersion Spectroscopy of Silica Alcogels and Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1998-01-01

    We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles for gas catalysis applications. By applying the concept of an average or effective dielectric constant to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to porous or heterogeneous media. Specifically, we apply the predominant effective medium theories for the determination of the average fractional composition of each component in this inhomogeneous layer. Hence, the surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction is determined. The technique is satisfactory for statistically random metal particle distributions but needs further modification for aggregated or surfactant modified systems. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  16. Noble metals: a toxicological appraisal of potential new environmental contaminants.

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, P E; Moran, J P; Bridbord, K; Hueter, F G

    1975-01-01

    The public health benefits expected by reducing known hazardous emissions from mobile sources should not be compromised by increasing levels of other potentially hazardous unregulated emissions. Catalytic converters are going to be used to meet the statutory requirements on carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions from light duty motor vehicles. Platinum and palladium metals are the catalytic materials to be used in these emission control devices. Preliminary experimental evidence and analysis of the impact of these control devices on the future use and demand for platinum indicates that this metal may appear at detectable levels in the environment by the end of this decade. At the present time, platinum and palladium are not present in the public environment and represent potentially new environmental contaminants as a consequence of use of this new abatement control technology. There is relatively little information available to adequately assess the potential health hazards that may be associated with exposure to these metals and their compounds. Analysis of the environmental problems and concerns associated with possible new environmental contaminants are discussed. Limited estimates are made on community exposure by use of a meteorological dispersion model. Biodegradation potential and attention is also given to the limited toxicological information available. PMID:50939

  17. On directly measuring relative Fermi energies of noble metals and their alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiman, G. G.; Sundaram, V. S.; Rogers, J. D.

    1981-09-01

    We present the first evidence of direct measurement of relative Fermi energies in alloys and between pure metals. From applying the "atomic" concept of core hole final state screening, the Auger energy shift of noble metal A equals EFA- EF( x). High resolution Auger shifts in P1- xtCux, AuxCu1- x and AuxAg1- x demonstrate experimental verification of this simple relation. We find E FCuE FAu ≅ - 0.2 eV, and E FPt ≅ E FCu and E FAg ≅ E FAu.

  18. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect in ternary alloys based on noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpler, Franziska; Hönemann, Albert; Tauber, Katarina; Fedorov, Dmitry V.; Gradhand, Martin; Mertig, Ingrid; Fert, Albert

    2016-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect induced by heavy-metal impurities in dilute magnetic alloys based on noble metals. The results of our first-principles calculations are shown in comparison to those obtained within a model consideration via Matthiessen's rule. Based on the transport properties of the constituent binary alloys, we reveal optimal host-impurity combinations to enhance the phenomenon. In particular, this allows us to explain experimental findings showing a strong effect in Cu-based alloys but a vanishing effect in the case of the Au host.

  19. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors II: Noble metal active centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The structure and stability of polymer-metal nanoreactors is detailed, including a complete characterization of the first successful synthesis of stable, dispersible, atomically thin gold nanosheets. Further developments in the synthesis of monodisperse, ∼2.5 nm platinum nanoclusters in aqueous solution and ambient conditions are described and pH stability of the composite material is established. The facile nanoreactor synthesis, environmentally friendly reaction conditions, and structural stability makes these biomimetic systems attractive for applications ranging from chemical detoxification to nanoelectronics.

  20. Strong and coverage-independent promotion of catalytic activity of a noble metal by subsurface vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Wolfgang; Hayek, Konrad

    2003-07-01

    While common bimetallic surfaces have a variable composition, the stable subsurface alloys of V/Rh and V/Pd are characterised by a purely noble metal-terminated surface and the second metal positioned in near-surface layers. The uniform composition of the topmost surface layer excludes conventional ensemble effects in catalysis, and the activity of the surface can be controlled by the metal loading and by the temperature of annealing. For example, the activity of a polycrystalline Rh surface in CO hydrogenation is significantly increased by promotion with subsurface vanadium. The modification of the subsurface layer with a different metal must be considered a promising approach to improve the catalytic properties of a metal surface.

  1. Adhesive bonding of noble metal alloys with a triazine dithiol derivative primer and an adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Taira, Y; Atsuta, M

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of a metal adhesive system bonded to noble metal alloys. Disc specimens were cast from type IV gold (type IV, Casting Gold M. C., metal-ceramic gold (Au-Pt-Pd, Degudent Universal, metal-ceramic palladium (Pd-Ga-Co, PTM 88 silver-indium (Ag-In-Zn, Salivan Hard and silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu, S12) alloys and pure silver (pure Ag). The specimens were air-abraded with 50 micron alumina, conditioned with a thiol-based primer designed for noble alloys (V-Primer), and then bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond Opaque Ivory). Shear bond strengths were determined after repeated thermocycling (4-60 degrees C, 1 min each, 100 000 cycles). The average bond strengths in MPa (n=8) were 30.9 for the type IV alloy, 29.0 for the Ag-Pd-Cu alloy, 28.0 for the Au-Pt-Pd alloy, 26.3 for the pure Ag, 26.0 for the Pd-Ga-Co alloy and 9.3 for the Ag-In-Zn alloy. The Ag-In-Zn alloy exhibited significantly lower bond strength than the other alloys, whereas the bond strengths of the other four alloys and pure Ag were comparable (P<0.05). It is concluded that the combined use of the thiol derivative primer and the adhesive resin is effective for bonding the noble metal alloys examined, with the exception of the Ag-In-Zn alloy.

  2. Bioactivity of noble metal nanoparticles decorated with biopolymers and their application in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-30

    The unique properties of nanomaterials can be applied to solve different problems including new ways of drug delivery. Noble metal nanoparticles are most promising because they have been used for medicinal purposes since ancient time. It is evident from the past studies that the metallic nanoparticles are much more effective against various microorganisms when compared to their conventional counterparts. However, decoration of such nanoparticles with biomaterials add more advantages to their antimicrobial activity. Decoration of metal nanoparticles with biopolymers is a quite new area of research. Studies performed hitherto shown that nanoparticles of noble metals like silver, gold and platinum demonstrated better antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities when conjugated with biopolymers. The development of such technology has potential to develop materials that are more effective in the field of health science. Considering the importance and uniqueness of this concept, the present review aims to discuss the use of biopolymer-decorated metal nanoparticles for combating various diseases caused by microbial pathogens. Moreover, the nanotoxicity aspect has also been discussed.

  3. Tuning of noble metal work function with organophosphonate nanolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanath, Ganpati Kwan, Matthew; Chow, P. K.; Quintero, Y. Cardona; Ramprasad, R.; Mutin, P. H.

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate that weak chemical interactions between untethered moieties in molecular nanolayers on metal surfaces can strongly influence the effective work function Φ{sub eff}. Electron spectroscopy shows that nanolayers of mercaptan-anchored organophosphonates on Au and Pt decrease Φ{sub eff}. The measured Φ{sub eff} shifts correlate with the chemical state of phosphonic acid moieties, and scale with molecular length. These results are contrary to predictions of ab initio calculations of monolayer-capped surfaces, but are consistent with calculations of bilayer-capped surfaces with face-to-face hydrogen-bonded phosphonic acid moieties. Our findings indicate that intra-layer bonding and layering in molecular nanolayers can be key to tailoring heterointerfacial electronic properties for applications.

  4. Thermodynamic aspects of dehydrogenation reactions on noble metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, K. L. Hammer, B.

    2014-11-07

    The reaction free energy for dehydrogenation of phenol, aniline, thiophenol, benzoic acid, and 1,4-benzenediol on the close packed copper, silver, and gold surfaces has been studied by density functional theory calculations. Dehydrogenation of thiophenol is found to be favourable on all three surfaces while aniline does not dehydrogenate on any of them. For phenol, benzenediol and benzoic acid dehydrogenation is favourable on copper and silver only, following the general trend of an increasing reaction free energy when going form gold to silver to copper. This trend can be correlated with the changes in bond lengths within the molecule upon dehydrogenation. While copper is able to replace hydrogen, leaving small changes in the bond lengths of the aromatic ring, the metal-molecule bond is weaker for silver and gold, resulting in a partial loss of aromaticity. This difference in bond strength leads to pronounced differences in adsorption geometries upon multiple dehydrogenations.

  5. Baseline milestone HWVP-87-V110202F: Preliminary evaluation of noble metal behavior in the Hanford waste vitrification plant reference glass HW-39

    SciTech Connect

    Geldart, R.W.; Bates, S.O.; Jette, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    The precipitation and aggregation of ruthenium (Ru), rhodium (RLh) and palladium (Pd) in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) low chromium reference glass HLW-39 were investigated to determine if there is a potential for formation of a noble metal sludge in the HWVP ceramic melter. Significant noble metal accumulations on the floor of the melter will result in the electrical shorting of the electrodes and premature failure of the melter. The purpose of this study was to obtain preliminary information on the characteristics of noble metals in a simulated HWVP glass. Following a preliminary literature view to obtain information concerning the noble metals behavior, a number of variability studies were initiated. The effects of glass redox conditions, melt temperature, melting time and noble metal concentration on the phase characteristics of these noble metals were examined.

  6. Defense by-products production and utilization program: noble metal recovery screening experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, R.F.; Jensen, G.A.; Raney, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Isotopes of the platinum metals (rutheium, rhodium, and palladium) are produced during uranium fuel fission in nuclear reactors. The strategic values of these noble metals warrant considering their recovery from spent fuel should the spent fuel be processed after reactor discharge. A program to evaluate methods for ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium recovery from spent fuel reprocessing liquids was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the work reported in this docuent was to evaluate several recovery processes revealed in the patent and technical literature. Beaker-scale screening tests were initiated for three potential recovery processes: precipitation during sugar denitration of nitric acid reprocessing solutions after plutonium-uranium solvent extraction, adsorption using nobe metal selective chelates on active carbon, and reduction forming solid noble metal deposits on an amine-borane reductive resin. Simulated reprocessing plant solutions representing typical nitric acid liquids from defense (PUREX) or commercial fuel reprocessing facilities were formulated and used for evaluation of the three processes. 9 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. A quantitative study of the intracellular concentration of graphene/noble metal nanoparticle composites and their cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangyan; Dorn, Marco; Vogt, Jürgen; Spemann, Daniel; Yu, Wei; Mao, Zhengwei; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Donath, Edwin; Gao, Changyou

    2014-07-01

    Noble-metal nanoparticles (NPs) especially prepared from gold and silver have been combined on the surface of graphene to obtain graphene-based nanocomposites for novel functions in enhanced performance in bio-imaging, cancer detection and therapy. However, little is known about their cellular uptake, especially the intracellular quantity which plays a critical role in determining their functions and safety. Therefore, we prepared covalently conjugated GO/Au and GO/Ag composites by immobilizing Au and Ag nanoparticles on GO sheets pre-functionalized with disulfide bonds, respectively. The cellular uptake of these composites was quantitatively studied by means of an ion beam microscope (IBM) to determine the metal content in human lung cancer cells (A549 cells) and liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 cells). The cell uptake was also studied by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which is one of the most sensitive techniques being applied to cell suspensions, for comparison. Toxicity, one of the consequences of cellular uptake of GO based composites, was studied as well. The potential toxicity mechanism was also suggested based on the results of intracellular quantification of the nanomaterials.Noble-metal nanoparticles (NPs) especially prepared from gold and silver have been combined on the surface of graphene to obtain graphene-based nanocomposites for novel functions in enhanced performance in bio-imaging, cancer detection and therapy. However, little is known about their cellular uptake, especially the intracellular quantity which plays a critical role in determining their functions and safety. Therefore, we prepared covalently conjugated GO/Au and GO/Ag composites by immobilizing Au and Ag nanoparticles on GO sheets pre-functionalized with disulfide bonds, respectively. The cellular uptake of these composites was quantitatively studied by means of an ion beam microscope (IBM) to determine the metal content in human lung cancer cells (A

  8. Exploring methods for compositional and particle size analysis of noble metal nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Krystek, Petra; Brandsma, Sicco; Leonards, Pim; de Boer, Jacob

    2016-01-15

    The identification and quantification of the bioaccumulation of noble metal engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) by aquatic organisms is of great relevance to understand the exposure and potential toxicity mechanisms of nanoscale materials. Four analytical scenarios were investigated in relation to various sized and composed noble metal (gold (Au), platinum (Pt) and silver (Ag)) ENPs during acute, short-term exposure of Daphnia (D.) magna. Next to the total elemental quantification of absorbed ENPs by D. magna, especially information on the size and particle distribution of ENPs in D. magna is of relevance. Dissolution of the exposed biological material prior to measurement by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (AF4-ICPMS) is challenging because the ENPs must stay stable regarding to particle size and composition. Next to dissolution of exposed D. magna by tetra methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH), a new enzymatic dissolution approach was explored by using trypsin. The presence of various sized and composed ENPs has been confirmed by AF4-ICPMS but the chosen dissolution medium was crucial for the results. TMAH and trypsin led to comparable results for medium-sized (50nm) noble metals ENPs in exposed D. magna. But it was also shown that the dissolution of biological materials with smaller (<5nm) ENPs led to different results in particle size and elemental concentration depending on the selected dissolution medium. A significant uptake of Au and Pt ENPs by D. magna or adsorption to particles occurred because only 1-5% of the exposed ENPs remained in the exposure medium.

  9. Recent advances in noble metal based composite nanocatalysts: colloidal synthesis, properties, and catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-06-01

    This Review article provides a report on progress in the synthesis, properties and catalytic applications of noble metal based composite nanomaterials. We begin with a brief discussion on the categories of various composite materials. We then present some important colloidal synthetic approaches to the composite nanostructures; here, major attention has been paid to bimetallic nanoparticles. We also introduce some important physiochemical properties that are beneficial from composite nanomaterials. Finally, we highlight the catalytic applications of such composite nanoparticles and conclude with remarks on prospective future directions.

  10. Method for localized deposition of noble metal catalysts with control of morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 .degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick .times.10 .mu.m wide .times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer.

  11. Noble-Metal-Free Molybdenum Disulfide Cocatalyst for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Lu, Hong-Wei; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2015-12-21

    Photocatalytic water splitting using powered semiconductors as photocatalysts represents a promising strategy for clean, low-cost, and environmentally friendly production of H2 utilizing solar energy. The loading of noble-metal cocatalysts on semiconductors can significantly enhance the solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency. However, the high cost and scarcity of noble metals counter their extensive utilization. Therefore, the use of alternative cocatalysts based on non-precious metal materials is pursued. Nanosized MoS2 cocatalysts have attracted considerable attention in the last decade as a viable alternative to improve solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency because of its superb catalytic activity, excellent stability, low cost, availability, environmental friendliness, and chemical inertness. In this perspective, the design, structures, synthesis, and application of MoS2 -based composite photocatalysts for solar H2 generation are summarized, compared, and discussed. Finally, this Review concludes with a summary and remarks on some challenges and opportunities for the future development of MoS2 -based photocatalysts.

  12. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10-5 Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  13. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-16

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10(-5) Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  14. Dithiocarbamate Self-Assembled Monolayers as Efficient Surface Modifiers for Low Work Function Noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Dominik; Schäfer, Tobias; Schulz, Philip; Jung, Sebastian; Rittich, Julia; Mokros, Daniel; Segger, Ingolf; Maercks, Franziska; Effertz, Christian; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Wuttig, Matthias

    2016-09-06

    Tuning the work function of the electrode is one of the crucial steps to improve charge extraction in organic electronic devices. Here, we show that N,N-dialkyl dithiocarbamates (DTC) can be effectively employed to produce low work function noble metal electrodes. Work functions between 3.1 and 3.5 eV are observed for all metals investigated (Cu, Ag, and Au). Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) reveals a maximum decrease in work function by 2.1 eV as compared to the bare metal surface. Electronic structure calculations elucidate how the complex interplay between intrinsic dipoles and dipoles induced by bond formation generates such large work function shifts. Subsequently, we quantify the improvement in contact resistance of organic thin film transistor devices with DTC coated source and drain electrodes. These findings demonstrate that DTC molecules can be employed as universal surface modifiers to produce stable electrodes for electron injection in high performance hybrid organic optoelectronics.

  15. Enhancement Effect of Noble Metals on Manganese Oxide for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Linsey C; Hersbach, Thomas J P; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2015-10-15

    Developing improved catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is key to the advancement of a number of renewable energy technologies, including solar fuels production and metal air batteries. In this study, we employ electrochemical methods and synchrotron techniques to systematically investigate interactions between metal oxides and noble metals that lead to enhanced OER catalysis for water oxidation. In particular, we synthesize porous MnOx films together with nanoparticles of Au, Pd, Pt, or Ag and observe significant improvement in activity for the combined catalysts. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that increased activity correlates with increased Mn oxidation states to 4+ under OER conditions compared to bare MnOx, which exhibits minimal OER current and remains in a 3+ oxidation state. Thickness studies of bare MnOx films and of MnOx films deposited on Au nanoparticles reveal trends suggesting that the enhancement in activity arises from interfacial sites between Au and MnOx.

  16. Dithiocarbamate Self-Assembled Monolayers as Efficient Surface Modifiers for Low Work Function Noble Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Dominik; Schäfer, Tobias; Schulz, Philip; Jung, Sebastian; Rittich, Julia; Mokros, Daniel; Segger, Ingolf; Maercks, Franziska; Effertz, Christian; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Wuttig, Matthias

    2016-09-06

    Tuning the work function of the electrode is one of the crucial steps to improve charge extraction in organic electronic devices. Here, we show that N,N-dialkyl dithiocarbamates (DTC) can be effectively employed to produce low work function noble metal electrodes. Work functions between 3.1 and 3.5 eV are observed for all metals investigated (Cu, Ag, and Au). Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) reveals a maximum decrease in work function by 2.1 eV as compared to the bare metal surface. Electronic structure calculations elucidate how the complex interplay between intrinsic dipoles and dipoles induced by bond formation generates such large work function shifts. Subsequently, we quantify the improvement in contact resistance of organic thin film transistor devices with DTC coated source and drain electrodes. These findings demonstrate that DTC molecules can be employed as universal surface modifiers to produce stable electrodes for electron injection in high performance hybrid organic optoelectronics.

  17. Abiological catalysis by artificial haem proteins containing noble metals in place of iron.

    PubMed

    Key, Hanna M; Dydio, Paweł; Clark, Douglas S; Hartwig, John F

    2016-06-23

    Enzymes that contain metal ions--that is, metalloenzymes--possess the reactivity of a transition metal centre and the potential of molecular evolution to modulate the reactivity and substrate-selectivity of the system. By exploiting substrate promiscuity and protein engineering, the scope of reactions catalysed by native metalloenzymes has been expanded recently to include abiological transformations. However, this strategy is limited by the inherent reactivity of metal centres in native metalloenzymes. To overcome this limitation, artificial metalloproteins have been created by incorporating complete, noble-metal complexes within proteins lacking native metal sites. The interactions of the substrate with the protein in these systems are, however, distinct from those with the native protein because the metal complex occupies the substrate binding site. At the intersection of these approaches lies a third strategy, in which the native metal of a metalloenzyme is replaced with an abiological metal with reactivity different from that of the metal in a native protein. This strategy could create artificial enzymes for abiological catalysis within the natural substrate binding site of an enzyme that can be subjected to directed evolution. Here we report the formal replacement of iron in Fe-porphyrin IX (Fe-PIX) proteins with abiological, noble metals to create enzymes that catalyse reactions not catalysed by native Fe-enzymes or other metalloenzymes. In particular, we prepared modified myoglobins containing an Ir(Me) site that catalyse the functionalization of C-H bonds to form C-C bonds by carbene insertion and add carbenes to both β-substituted vinylarenes and unactivated aliphatic α-olefins. We conducted directed evolution of the Ir(Me)-myoglobin and generated mutants that form either enantiomer of the products of C-H insertion and catalyse the enantio- and diastereoselective cyclopropanation of unactivated olefins. The presented method of preparing artificial haem

  18. CO-oxidation catalysts: Low-temperature CO oxidation over Noble-Metal Reducible Oxide (NMRO) catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of CO to CO2 is an important reaction technologically and environmentally and a complex and interesting reaction scientifically. In most cases, the reaction is carried out in order to remove CO as an environmental hazard. A major application of heterogeneous catalysts is catalytic oxidation of CO in the exhaust of combustion devices. The reaction over catalysts in exhaust gas is fast and often mass-transfer-limited since exhaust gases are hot and O2/CO ratios are high. The main challenges to catalyst designers are to control thermal sintering and chemical poisoning of the active materials. The effect of the noble metal on the oxide is discussed, followed by the effect of the oxide on the noble metal, the interaction of the noble metal and oxide to form unique catalytic sites, and the possible ways in which the CO oxidation reaction is catalyzed by the NMRO materials.

  19. Understanding the superior photocatalytic activity of noble metals modified titania under UV and visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bumajdad, Ali; Madkour, Metwally

    2014-04-28

    Although TiO2 is one of the most efficient photocatalysts, with the highest stability and the lowest cost, there are drawbacks that hinder its practical applications like its wide band gap and high recombination rate of the charge carriers. Consequently, many efforts were directed toward enhancing the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 and extending its response to the visible region. To head off these attempts, modification of TiO2 with noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) received considerable attention due to their role in accelerating the transfer of photoexcited electrons from TiO2 and also due to the surface plasmon resonance which induces the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 under visible light irradiation. This insightful perspective is devoted to the vital role of TiO2 photocatalysis and its drawbacks that urged researchers to find solutions such as modification with NMNPs. In a coherent context, we discussed here the characteristics which qualify NMNPs to possess a great enhancement effect for TiO2 photocatalysis. Also we tried to understand the reasons behind this effect by means of photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Then the mechanism of action of NMNPs upon deposition on TiO2 is presented. Finally we introduced a survey of the behaviour of these noble metal NPs on TiO2 based on the particle size and the loading amount.

  20. Noble metal nanoparticle-decorated TiO2 nanobelts for enhanced photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiyan; Yang, Ping; Jia, Changchao; Miao, Yanping; Zhao, Jie; Du, Yingying

    2014-07-01

    TiO2 nanobelts have been fabricated through a hydrothermal method and subsequently sulfuric-acid-corrosion-treated for a rough surface. Noble metal nanoparticles such as Ag and Au were deposited on the coarse surface of TiO2 nanobelts via a coprecipitation procedure. Ag-TiO2 nanobelts were prepared in ethanolic solution contained silver nitrate (AgNO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Au-TiO2 nanobelts were obtained in chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as the reductant. It is confirmed by the results of XRD patterns together with the SEM images that the composite of noble metal and TiO2 nanobelts were obtained successfully and the Ag or Au nanoparticles were well-dispersed on the TiO2 nanobelts. Moreover, the as-prepared Ag and Au nanoparticle-decorated TiO2 nanobelts represent an enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with pure TiO2 nanobelts, which is due to the fact that the Ag and Au nanoparticles on the surface of TiO2 nanobelts act as sinks for the photogenerated electrons and promote the separation of the electrons and holes.

  1. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  2. Corrosion potential behavior in high temperature water of noble metal-doped alloys coatings deposited by underwater thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Andresen, P.L.; Gray, D.M.; Lau, Y.C.; Offer, H.P.

    1995-12-31

    The electrochemical corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel coated under water by hyper-velocity oxy-fuel and plasma spray techniques using noble metal doped powders was measured to evaluate the catalytic behavior in high temperature water under various water chemistry conditions. Thermal spray coatings of noble metal doped powders exhibited catalytic behavior for the recombination of oxygen and hydrogen in high temperature water which causes the corrosion potential to decrease well below a critical value of {minus}230 mV{sub she} for the intergranular stress corrosion cracking protection in water. This was observed in water containing various amounts of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide when stoichiometric excess hydrogen was present.

  3. Anchoring noble metal nanoparticles on CeO2 modified reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and their enhanced catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhenyuan; Shen, Xiaoping; Xu, Yuling; Zhu, Guoxing; Chen, Kangmin

    2014-10-15

    The strategy of structurally integrating noble metal, metal oxide, and graphene is expected to offer prodigious opportunities toward emerging functions of graphene-based nanocomposites. In this study, we develop a facile two-step approach to disperse noble metal (Pt and Au) nanoparticles on the surface of CeO2 functionalized reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets. It is shown that Pt and Au with particle sizes of about 5 and 2nm are well dispersed on the surface of RGO/CeO2. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4 was used as a model reaction to quantitatively evaluate the catalytic properties of the as-synthesized RGO/Pt/CeO2 and RGO/Au/CeO2 ternary nanocomposites. In such triple-component catalysts, CeO2 nanocrystals provide unique and critical roles for optimizing the catalytic performance of noble metallic Pt and Au, allowing them to express enhanced catalytic activities in comparison with RGO/Pt and RGO/Au catalysts. In addition, a possible mechanism for the enhanced catalytic activities of the RGO/Pt/CeO2 and RGO/Au/CeO2 ternary catalysts in the reduction of 4-NP is proposed. It is expected that our prepared graphene-based triple-component composites, which inherit peculiar properties of graphene, metal oxide, and noble metal, are attractive candidates for catalysis and other applications.

  4. Noble metal nanoclusters and nanoparticles precede mineral formation in magmatic sulphide melts

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Hassan M.; Ballhaus, Chris; Fonseca, Raúl O.C.; Wirth, Richard; Nagel, Thorsten; Tredoux, Marian

    2013-01-01

    In low temperature aqueous solutions, it has long been recognized by in situ experiments that many minerals are preceded by crystalline nanometre-sized particles and non-crystalline nanophases. For magmatic systems, nanometre-sized precursors have not yet been demonstrated to exist, although the suggestion has been around for some time. Here we demonstrate by high temperature quench experiments that platinum and arsenic self-organize to nanoparticles, well before the melt has reached a Pt–As concentration at which discrete Pt arsenide minerals become stable phases. If all highly siderophile elements associate to nanophases in undersaturated melts, the distribution of the noble metals between silicate, sulphide and metal melts will be controlled by the surface properties of nano-associations, more so than by the chemical properties of the elements. PMID:24008992

  5. Laser ablation synthesis in solution and size manipulation of noble metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2009-05-28

    In the past years, laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) emerged as a reliable alternative to traditional chemical reduction methods for obtaining noble metal nanoparticles (NMNp). LASiS is a "green" technique for the synthesis of stable NMNp in water or in organic solvents, which does not need stabilizing molecules or other chemicals. The so obtained NMNp are highly available for further functionalization or can be used wherever unprotected metal nanoparticles are desired. Surface functionalization of NMNp can be monitored in real time by UV-visible spectroscopy of the plasmon resonance. However LASiS has some limitations in the size control of NMNp, which can be overcome by "chemical free" laser treatments of NMNp. In this paper we provide an overview of LASiS, size manipulation by laser irradiation and functionalization of NMNp, with special care in pointing out some of the main issues about this research area.

  6. Noble metals in mid-ocean ridge volcanism: A significant fractionation of gold with respect to platinum group metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocket, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrothermal precipitates, black smoker particulate, and massive sulphide dredge samples from the Explorer Ridge on the Juan de Fuca Plate and the TAG hydrothermal area on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge were analyzed for selected noble metals including Au, Ir and Pd by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The preliminary results indicate that gold contents may reach the ppm range although values in the neighborhood of 100 to 200 ppb are more typical. The platinum group elements (PGE) represented by Ir and Pd are typically less than 0.02 ppb and less than 2 ppb respectively. These abundances represent a significant enrichment of gold relative to the PGE in comparison with average noble metal abundances in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). A partial explanation of this distinctive fractionation can be found in the concepts of sulfur-saturation of basic magma in mid-ocean ridge (MOR) settings, and the origin of MOR hydrothermal fluids. Experimental and petrological data suggest that MORBs are sulfur-saturated at the time of magma generation and that an immiscible sulfide component remains in the mantle residue. Hence, MORBs are noble metal-poor, particularly with respect to PGE. Consequently, black smoker fluids can be expected to reflect the low Ir and Pd contents of the rock column. The average Au content of MORB is 1.3 ppb, and so the rock column is not significantly enriched in Au. The generation of fluids which precipitate solids with 200 ppb Au is apparently dependent on highly efficient fluid chemistry to mobilize Au from the rock column, high Au solubility in seawater hydrothermal fluids and efficient precipitation mechanisms to coprecipitate Au on Fe, Zn and Cu sulfides. Significant differences in these parameters appear to be the ultimate cause of the strong Au-PGE fractionation in the MOR setting. It does not appear from the current data base that MOR hydrothermal fluids are significant contributors to the Ir enrichment seen in Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

  7. Noble metal nanowires: from plasmon waveguides to passive and active devices.

    PubMed

    Lal, Surbhi; Hafner, Jason H; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan; Nordlander, Peter

    2012-11-20

    Using chemical synthesis, researchers can produce noble metal nanowires with highly regular, crystalline properties unachievable by alternative, top-down nanofabrication methods. Sitting at the intersection of nanochemistry and nanooptics, noble metal nanowires have generated intense and growing research interest. These nanostructures combine subwavelength transverse dimensions (50-100 nm) and longitudinal dimensions that can reach tens of micrometers or more, which makes them an ideal platform to launch surface plasmon waves by direct illumination of one end of the structure. Because of this property, researchers are using noble metal nanowires as a tool for fundamental studies of subwavelength plasmon-based optics and the properties of surface plasmon guided wave propagation in highly confined geometries below the classical optical diffraction limit. In this Account, we review some of the recent developments in plasmonic nanowire fabrication, nanowire plasmon imaging, and nanowire optical components and devices. The addition of an adjacent nanowire, substrate, or other symmetry-breaking defect can enable the direct coupling of light to and from free space to the guided waves on a nanowire structure. Such structures lead to more complex nanowire-based geometries with multiple optical inputs and outputs. Additional nanowire imaging methods are also possible: plasmon propagation on nanowires produces intense near-field diffraction, which can induce fluorescence in nearby quantum dots or photobleach adjacent molecules. When the nanowire is deposited on a dielectric substrate, the plasmon propagation along chemically synthesized nanowires exceeds 10 μm, which makes these structures useful in nonlocal applications such as remote surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing. Nanowires can be used as passive optical devices, which include, for example, polarization manipulators, linear polarization rotators, or even broadband linear-to-circular polarization

  8. Nonlinear Optics of Noble Metal Crystallites Embedded in a Dielectric Matrix.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of noble-metal nanoclusters embedded in fused silica are discussed in detail in both experimental and theoretical aspects. Experimental nonlinear optical studies of the composite material were conducted by means of z-scan and degenerate four-wave mixing. The samples were prepared by implanting Cu and Au ions into fused silica discs, and characterized by Rutherford back scattering, transmission electron microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy. The implanted noble-metal ions aggregated in the fused silica to form clusters with diameters ranging from 2 nm to 25 nm. The cluster size and size distribution were controlled by varying ion-implantation parameters. The clusters retain the geometrical structure of the bulk metal, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. However, the electronic properties are altered dramatically because the electrons are confined in a volume smaller than the mean free path in bulk metal. A theoretical calculation of dielectric confinement and quantum confinement effects is presented. The surface plasmon resonance resulting from the dielectric confinement has been investigated by both linear absorption and z-scan spectroscopy. A strong surface-plasmon enhancement effect was observed in the larger clusters. Intraband quantum confinement leads to a characteristic size-dependent third-order susceptibility of metal clusters. A new method was developed to examine and interpret the z-scan data. The method facilitates the separation of electronic and thermal contribution to the nonlinear refractive index. The electronic component of the intensity -dependent refractive index of our samples is on the order of 10^{-10} to 10 ^{-8} esu. The samples also exhibit strong two-photon absorption. The dephasing time of the excited state, determined indirectly from the nonlinear absorption measurements, is size dependent and ranges from 50 to 100 fs for Cu nanocrystallites. Time resolved measurements of the four

  9. Effect of Mercury-Noble Metal Interactions on SRAT Processing of SB3 Simulants (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.; Baich, M. A.

    2004-12-31

    Controlling hydrogen generation below the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety basis constrains the range of allowable acid additions in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell. This range is evaluated in simulant tests at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). A minimum range of allowable acid additions is needed to provide operational flexibility and to handle typical uncertainties in process and analytical measurements used to set acid additions during processing. The range of allowable acid additions is a function of the composition of the feed to DWPF. Feed changes that lead to a smaller range of allowable acid additions have the potential to impact decisions related to wash endpoint control of DWPF feed composition and to the introduction of secondary waste streams into DWPF. A limited program was initiated in SRNL in 2001 to study the issue of hydrogen generation. The program was reinitiated at the end of fiscal year 2004. The primary motivation for the study is that a real potential exists to reduce the conservatism in the range of allowable acid additions in DWPF. Increasing the allowable range of acid additions can allow decisions on the sludge wash endpoint or the introduction of secondary waste streams to DWPF to be based on other constraints such as glass properties, organic carbon in the melter off-gas, etc. The initial phase of the study consisted of a review of site reports and off-site literature related to catalytic hydrogen generation from formic acid and/or formate salts by noble metals. Many things are already known about hydrogen generation during waste processing. This phase also included the development of an experimental program to improve the understanding of hydrogen generation. This phase is being documented in WSRC-TR-2002-00034. A number of areas were identified where an improved understanding would be beneficial. A phased approach was developed for new experimental studies related to hydrogen generation. The first phase

  10. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 2} with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  11. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO[sub 3] and NaNO[sub 2] with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  12. Near field intensity enhancement and localization in noble metal nanoparticle ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, N. N.; Nikov, Ru G.; Atanasov, P. A.

    2013-03-01

    Theoretical analysis on the electromagnetic field properties in vicinity of noble metal nanostructures is presented. The study is done on the basis of numerical simulation using Finite Difference Time Domain approach. The systems under consideration are two- and three-dimensional arrays composed of gold or silver nanoparticles. The near field intensity distribution and its enhancement are calculated for structures with different characteristics - particle size, inter-particle distance, and at different conditions related to the incident irradiation - polarization, and geometry of excitation. This analysis is used for definition of some optimal parameters for such structures from the viewpoint of application in Surface Enhancement Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). It is shown that the manipulation of the geometry of excitation of the nanoparticle system could be used as a crucial parameter for improving the efficiency of the classical configuration in SERS. The predicted influences of the nanoparticle system properties on the Raman signal enhancement are confirmed experimentally.

  13. Green synthesis of nitriles using non-noble metal oxides-based nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2014-07-09

    (Hetero)aromatic and aliphatic nitriles constitute major building blocks for organic synthesis and represent a versatile motif found in numerous medicinally and biologically important compounds. In general, these nitriles are synthesized by traditional cyanation procedures using toxic cyanides. With respect to green chemistry, the development of more sustainable and cost-efficient processes for the synthesis of advanced nitriles is highly desired. Here we report an environmentally benign synthesis of all kinds of structurally diverse aryl, heterocyclic, allylic and aliphatic nitriles from easily available alcohols applying aqueous ammonia and molecular oxygen. Key to success for this synthesis is the use of nitrogen-doped graphene-layered non-noble metal oxides as stable and durable nanocatalysts. As an example a renewable synthesis of adiponitrile, an industrially important bulk chemical is presented.

  14. A simple route to diverse noble metal-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles for catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Joan M.; Zaleski, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Developing facile synthetic routes to multifunctional nanoparticles combining the magnetic properties of iron oxides with the optical and catalytic utility of noble metal particles remains an important goal in realizing the potential of hybrid nanomaterials. To this end, we have developed a single route to noble metal-decorated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-M M = Au, Pd, Ag, and PtAg) and characterized them by HRTEM and STEM/EDX imaging to reveal their nanometer size (16 nm Fe3O4 and 1-5 nm M seeds) and uniformity. This represents one of the few examples of genuine multifunctional particles on the nanoscale. We show that these hybrid structures have excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (knorm = 2 × 107 s-1 mol(Pd)-1 5 × 106 s-1 mol(Au)-1 5 × 105 s-1 mol(PtAg)-1 7 × 105 s-1 mol(Ag)-1). These rates are the highest reported for nano-sized comparables, and are competitive with mesoparticles of similar composition. Due to their magnetic response, the particles are also suitable for magnetic recovery and maintain >99% conversion for at least four cycles. Using this synthetic route, Fe3O4@SiO2-M particles show great promise for further development as a precursor to complicated anisotropic materials or for applications ranging from nanocatalysis to biomedical sensing.Developing facile synthetic routes to multifunctional nanoparticles combining the magnetic properties of iron oxides with the optical and catalytic utility of noble metal particles remains an important goal in realizing the potential of hybrid nanomaterials. To this end, we have developed a single route to noble metal-decorated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-M M = Au, Pd, Ag, and PtAg) and characterized them by HRTEM and STEM/EDX imaging to reveal their nanometer size (16 nm Fe3O4 and 1-5 nm M seeds) and uniformity. This represents one of the few examples of genuine multifunctional particles on the nanoscale. We show that these hybrid structures have excellent catalytic

  15. Universal segregation growth approach to wafer-size graphene from non-noble metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Fu, Lei; Dai, Boya; Yan, Kai; Liu, Xun; Zhao, Ruiqi; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2011-01-12

    Graphene has been attracting wide interests owing to its excellent electronic, thermal, and mechanical performances. Despite the availability of several production techniques, it is still a great challenge to achieve wafer-size graphene with acceptable uniformity and low cost, which would determine the future of graphene electronics. Here we report a universal segregation growth technique for batch production of high-quality wafer-scale graphene from non-noble metal films. Without any extraneous carbon sources, 4 in. graphene wafers have been obtained from Ni, Co, Cu-Ni alloy, and so forth via thermal annealing with over 82% being 1-3 layers and excellent reproducibility. We demonstrate the first example of monolayer and bilayer graphene wafers using Cu-Ni alloy by combining the distinct segregation behaviors of Cu and Ni. Together with the easy detachment from growth substrates, we believe this facile segregation technique will offer a great driving force for graphene research.

  16. Structure and optical properties of noble metal and oxide nanoparticles dispersed in various polysaccharide biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djoković, V.; Božanic, D. K.; Vodnik, V. V.; Krsmanović, R. M.; Trandafilovic, L. V.; Dimitrijević-Branković, S.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results on the structure and the optical properties of noble metal (Ag, Au) and oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles synthesized by various methods in different polysaccharide matrices such as chitosan, glycogen, alginate and starch. The structure of the obtained nanoparticles was studied in detail with microscopic techniques (TEM, SEM), while the XPS spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects at the nanoparticle-biomolecule interfaces. The antimicrobial activity of the nanocomposite films with Ag nanoparticles was tested against the Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans pathogens. In addition, we will present the results on the structure and optical properties of the tryptophan amino acid functionalized silver nanoparticles dispersed in water soluble polymer matrices.

  17. Effects of metal primers on bonding of adhesive resin cement to noble alloys for porcelain fusing.

    PubMed

    Okuya, Nobuhiro; Minami, Hiroyuki; Kurashige, Hisanori; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of metal primers on the bonding of adhesive resin to four pure metals (Au, Pd, Ag, Cu) and two noble alloys for porcelain fusing (high-gold and high-palladium content alloys). Bonding surface was polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and primed with one of the three metal primers (V-Primer, Metaltite, and M.L. Primer). Bonded specimens were fabricated by applying adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B) on the primed surface. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C for 2,000 cycles). The highest SBS values to each pure metal after thermocycling were 33.5 MPa for Au by M.L. Primer, 35.0 MPa for Ag by V-Primer, and 34.4 MPa for Cu by Metaltite. SBS to high-gold content alloy after thermocycling was 33.3 MPa by M.L. Primer. None of the primers was effective for pure Pd and high-palladium content alloy after thermocycling.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO nanostructures on noble-metal coated substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikovska, A. Og.; Atanasova, G. B.; Avdeev, G. V.; Nedyalkov, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, ZnO nanostructures were fabricated on noble-metal (Au, Ag and Au-Ag alloys) coated silicon substrates by applying pulsed laser deposition. The samples were prepared at a substrate temperature of 550 °C, an oxygen pressure of 5 Pa, and a laser fluence of 2 J cm-2 - process parameters usually used for deposition of smooth and dense thin films. The metal layer's role is substantial for the preparation of nanostructures. Heating of the substrate changed the morphology of the metal layer and, subsequently, nanoparticles were formed. The use of different metal particles resulted in different morphologies and properties of the ZnO nanostructures synthesized. The morphology of the ZnO nanostructures was related to the Au-Ag alloy's content of the catalyst layer. It was found that the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures evolved from nanorods to nanobelts as the ratio of Au/Ag in the alloy catalyst was varied. The use of a small quantity of Ag in the Au-Ag catalyst (Au3Ag) layer resulted predominantly in the deposition of ZnO nanorods. A higher Ag content in the catalyst alloy (AuAg2) layer resulted in the growth of a dense structure of ZnO nanobelts.

  19. Surface and Interface Engineering of Noble-Metal-Free Electrocatalysts for Efficient Energy Conversion Processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun Pei; Guo, Chunxian; Zheng, Yao; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2017-02-16

    Developing cost-effective and high-performance electrocatalysts for renewable energy conversion and storage is motivated by increasing concerns regarding global energy security and creating sustainable technologies dependent on inexpensive and abundant resources. Recent achievements in the design and synthesis of efficient non-precious-metal and even non-metal electrocatalysts make the replacement of noble metal counterparts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER), and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with earth-abundant elements, for example, C, N, Fe, Mn, and Co, a realistic possibility. It has been found that surface atomic engineering (e.g., heteroatom-doping) and interface atomic or molecular engineering (e.g., interfacial bonding) can induce novel physicochemical properties and strong synergistic effects for electrocatalysts, providing new and efficient strategies to greatly enhance the catalytic activities. In this Account, we discuss recent progress in the design and fabrication of efficient electrocatalysts based on carbon materials, graphitic carbon nitride, and transition metal oxides or hydroxides for efficient ORR, OER, and HER through surface and interfacial atomic and molecular engineering. Atomic and molecular engineering of carbon materials through heteroatom doping with one or more elements of noticeably different electronegativities can maximally tailor their electronic structures and induce a synergistic effect to increase electrochemical activity. Nonetheless, the electrocatalytic performance of chemically modified carbonaceous materials remains inferior to that of their metallic counterparts, which is mainly due to the relatively limited amount of electrocatalytic active sites induced by heteroatom doping. Accordingly, coupling carbon substrates with other active electrocatalysts to produce composite structures can impart novel physicochemical properties, thereby boosting the electroactivity even further

  20. New technique for the determination of trace noble metal content in geological and process materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitkin, V. N.; Zayakina, S. B.; Anoshin, G. N.

    2003-02-01

    A new two-step sample preparation technique is proposed for the instrumental determination of trace quantities of noble metals (NM) in refractory geological and process materials. The decomposition procedure is based on the oxidizing fluorination of samples with subsequent sulfatization (OFS) of the sample melt or cake. Fluorination of samples is accomplished using a mixture of KHF 2+KBrF 4 or KHF 2+BrF 3 depending on the ratio of sample mass to oxidizing mixture. Both cakes and melts can result using this procedure. Sulfatization of resulting fluorides is completed using concentrated sulfuric acid heated to 550 °C. Validation studies using certified geostandard reference materials (GSO VP-2, ZH-3, Matte RTP, HO-1, SARM-7) have shown that the proposed method is fast, convenient and most often produces non-hygroscopic homogeneous residues suitable for analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). Results obtained for NM concentrations in reference materials agreed with certified concentration ranges and results obtained using other methods of analysis. The OFS procedure combined with direct current plasma d.c. plasma AES achieved the following limits of detection (LOD) for the noble metals: Ag, Au, Pd, 1-2×10 -6; Pt, 5×10 -6; and Ru, Rh, Ir, Os, 1-3×10 -7 wt.%. Using graphite furnace AAS (GFAAS) combined extraction pre-concentration the following LODs for NMs were achieved: Pt, Ru, 1×10 -6; Pd, Rh, 1×10 -7; and Au, Ag, 1-2×10 -8 wt.%. The relative standard deviation for NM determinations ( Sr) was dependent on NM concentration and sample type, but commonly was in the range of 3-15% for d.c. plasma AES and 5-30% for GFAAS.

  1. One-dimensional carbon nanotube/SnO2/noble metal nanoparticle hybrid nanostructure: synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Fang, Youxing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhu, Chengzhou; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2010-08-02

    Herein we report a facile and efficient method for self-assembling noble-metal nanoparticles (NPs) to the surface of SnO(2)-coated carbon nanotubes (CNT@SnO(2)) to construct CNT@SnO(2)/noble metal NP hybrids. By using SnCl(4) as the precursor of the SnO(2) shell on the surface of CNTs, the hydrolysis speed of SnCl(4) was slowed down in ethanol containing a trace amount of urea and water. The coaxial nanostructure of CNT@SnO(2) was confirmed by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the coating layer of SnO(2) was homogeneous with the mean thickness of 8 nm. The CNT@SnO(2)/noble-metal NP hybrids were obtained by mixing noble-metal NPs with as-prepared CNT@SnO(2) coaxial nanocables by means of a self-assembly strategy. With the amino group terminated, the CNT@SnO(2) coaxial nanocable can readily adsorb the as-prepared noble-metal NPs (Au, Ag, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd NPs). The presence of an amino group at the surface of SnO(2) was proved by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, H(2)O(2) sensing by amperometric methods could serve as detection models for investigating the electrocatalytic ability of as-prepared hybrid materials. It was found that wide linear ranges and low detection limits were obtained by using the enzyme-free CNT@SnO(2)@Au-Pt modified electrode, which indicated the potential utilizations of the hybrid based on CNT@SnO(2) for electrochemical sensing.

  2. Conversion of ion-exchange resins, catalysts and sludges to glass with optional noble metal recovery using the GMODS process

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

    1996-11-01

    Chemical processing and cleanup of waste streams (air and water) typically result in products, clean air, clean water, and concentrated hazardous residues (ion exchange resins, catalysts, sludges, etc.). Typically, these streams contain significant quantities of complex organics. For disposal, it is desirable to destroy the organics and immobilize any heavy metals or radioactive components into stable waste forms. If there are noble metals in the residues, it is desirable to recover these for reuse. The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) is a new process that directly converts radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes to borosilicate glass. GMODS oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; converts halides (eg chlorides) to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium halide stream; and recovers noble metals. GMODS has been demonstrated on a small laboratory scale (hundreds of grams), and the equipment needed for larger masses has been identified.

  3. Effect of noble gases on oxygen and glucose deprived injury in human tubular kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Maleeha; Jawad, Noorulhuda; Li, Yuantao; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2010-07-01

    The noble gas xenon has been shown to be protective in preconditioning settings against renal ischemic injury. The aims of this study were to determine the protective effects of the other noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, on human tubular kidney HK2 cells in vitro. Cultured human renal tubular cells (HK2) were exposed to noble gas preconditioning (75% noble gas; 20% O(2); 5% CO(2)) for three hours or mock preconditioning. Twenty-four hours after gas exposure, cell injury was provoked with oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) culture medium for three hours. Cell viability was assessed 24 h post-OGD by a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. Other cohorts of cultured cells were incubated in the absence of OGD in 75% noble gas, 20% O(2) and 5% CO(2) and cellular signals phospho-Akt (p-Akt), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and Bcl-2 were assessed by Western blotting. OGD caused a reduction in cell viability to 0.382 +/- 0.1 from 1.0 +/- 0.15 at control (P < 0.01). Neon, argon and krypton showed no protection from injury (0.404 +/- 0.03; 0.428 +/- 0.02; 0.452 +/- 0.02; P > 0.05). Helium by comparison significantly enhanced cell injury (0.191 +/- 0.05; P < 0.01). Xenon alone exerted a protective effect (0.678 +/- 0.07; P < 0.001). In the absence of OGD, helium was also detrimental (0.909 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01). Xenon caused an increased expression of p-Akt, HIF-1alpha and Bcl-2, while the other noble gases did not modify protein expression. These results suggest that unlike other noble gases, preconditioning with the anesthetic noble gas xenon may have a role in protection against renal ischemic injury.

  4. Replacing noble metals with alternative materials in plasmonics and metamaterials: how good an idea?

    PubMed

    Khurgin, Jacob B

    2017-03-28

    Noble metals that currently dominate the fields of plasmonics and metamaterials suffer from large ohmic losses. Some of the new plasmonic materials, such as doped oxides and nitrides, have smaller material loss, and using them in place of metals carries the promise of reduced-loss plasmonic and metamaterial structures, with sharper resonances and higher field concentrations. This promise is put to a rigorous analytical test in this work, which reveals that having low material loss is not sufficient to have reduced modal loss in plasmonic structures. To reduce the modal loss, it is absolutely necessary for the plasma frequency to be significantly higher than the operational frequency. Using examples of nanoparticle plasmons and gap plasmons one comes to the conclusion that, even in the mid-infrared spectrum, metals continue to hold an advantage over alternative media when it comes to propagation distances and field enhancements. Of course, the new materials still have an application niche where high absorption loss is beneficial, e.g. in medicine and thermal photovoltaics.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  5. Plasmons in the presence of Tamm-Shockley states with Rashba splitting at noble metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, A. M.; Mishchenko, E. G.

    2008-11-01

    Au(111) or similar noble metal surfaces feature Tamm-Shockley surface states that are known to possess considerable spin-orbit splitting of the Rashba type of order Δ=0.1eV . When interacting with an electromagnetic field such states are expected to have resonances when the frequency of the field is near the energy of the spin-orbit splitting Δ . They originate from the intersubband transitions between spin-split subbands and can be observed in the frequency dependence of the surface impedance. Plasmons in thin metal films are gapless and can be strongly affected by these spin resonances, acquiring significant modification of the spectrum when it intersects the ω=Δ line. Finally, an interesting demonstration of the intersubband resonances can be achieved when metal films are coated with ionic dielectrics that have a frequency of longitudinal or transverse optical phonons above or below Δ . The dielectric function between the two optical phonon frequencies is negative which forbids propagation of conventional plasmon polaritons. However, the presence of spin-orbit-split surface states allows plasmon polaritons to exist in this otherwise forbidden range of frequencies.

  6. Plasmons in the presence of Tamm-Shockley states with Rashba splitting at noble metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, Abdel-Khalek; Mishchenko, Eugene

    2009-03-01

    Au(111) or similar noble metal surfaces feature Tamm-Shockley surface states that are known to possess considerable spin-orbit splitting of the Rashba type of order δ=0.1 eV. When interacting with an electromagnetic field such states are expected to have resonances when the frequency of the field is near the energy of the spin-orbit splitting δ. They originate from the intersubband transitions between spin-split subbands and can be observed in the frequency dependence of the surface impedance. Plasmons in thin metal films are gapless and can be strongly affected by these spin resonances, acquiring significant modification of the spectrum when it intersects the φ=δ line. Finally, an interesting demonstration of the intersubband resonances can be achieved when metal films are coated with ionic dielectrics that have a frequency of longitudinal/transverse optical phonons above/below δ. The dielectric function between the two optical phonon frequencies is negative which forbids propagation of conventional plasmon-polaritons. However, the presence of spin-orbit-split surface states allows plasmon-polaritons to exist in this otherwise forbidden range of frequencies.

  7. Unprecedented Enhancement of Noble Gas-Noble Metal Bonding in NgAu3(+) (Ng = Ar, Kr, and Xe) Ion through Hydrogen Doping.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayan; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2016-12-22

    Behavior of gold as hydrogen in certain gold compounds and a very recent experimental report on the noble gas-noble metal interaction in Ar complexes of mixed Au-Ag trimers have motivated us to investigate the effect of hydrogen doping on the Ng-Au (Ng = Ar, Kr, and Xe) bonding through various ab initio based techniques. The calculated results show considerable strengthening of the Ng-Au bond in terms of bond length, bond energy, stretching vibrational frequency, and force constant. Particularly, an exceptional enhancement of Ar-Au bonding strength has been observed in ArAuH2(+) species as compared to that in ArAu3(+) system, as revealed from the CCSD(T) calculated Ar-Au bond energy value of 32 and 72 kJ mol(-1) for ArAu3(+) and ArAuH2(+), respectively. In the calculated IR spectra, the Ar-Au stretching frequency is blue-shifted by 65% in going from ArAu3(+) to ArAuH2(+) species. Similar trends have been obtained in the case of all Ar, Kr, and Xe complexes with Ag and Cu trimers. Among all the NgM3-kHk(+) complexes (where k = 0-2), the strongest binding in NgMH2(+) complex is attributed to significant enhancement in the covalent characteristics of the Ng-M bond and considerable increase in charge-induced dipole interaction, as shown from the topological analysis.

  8. Topology dependent electronic and dielectric properties of free standing alloyed ultrathin nanowires of noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-08-01

    Structural, electronic and dielectric properties of free standing ultrathin alloyed nanowires of noble metals (AgAu, AgCu, AgPt, AuCu, AuPt and CuPt) in various topologies (linear, ladder and double zigzag) have been studied by using ab initio density functional theory. Among the different topologies of alloyed ultrathin nanowires of noble metals, double zigzag (DZZ) topology has been found to be most stable and the linear topology the least stable. Also the binding energy of alloyed nanowires of AgAu and AuCu for all the studied topologies is found to be larger than the average binding energy of the corresponding pristine nanowires, indicating a strong alloying effect for these topologies. Among electronic properties, the alloyed nanowires of different topologies containing Pt (AgPt, AuPt and AuCu) are found to be ferromagnetic in nature, a result of d charge depletion in Ag, Au and Cu sites and d charge gain at Pt sites. On the other hand, all the topologies (except ladder topology) of alloyed nanowires viz. AgAu, AgCu and AuCu are found to be semiconducting in nature. The optical properties of the studied alloyed nanowires have been found to be different from their corresponding pristine nanowires due to change in the band structure on alloying. The linear topology of AgAu, AgCu and AuCu and DZZ topologies (DZZ1, DZZ2 and DZZ3) of Ag, Au, Cu, AgAu, AgCu and AuCu are semiconducting in nature with band gap lying in the infrared region, causing absorption of photons from a visible spectrum leading to blackish appearance. Whereas, remaining topologies are found to be metallic in nature, with plasmon frequency lying in the energy range of 0.35 eV to 1.62 eV, which is in the infrared region and hence these nanowires shall appear to be transparent to the visible region.

  9. Homo-coupling of terminal alkynes on a noble metal surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Qi; Kepčija, Nenad; Kleinschrodt, Martin; Diller, Katharina; Fischer, Sybille; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Allegretti, Francesco; Björk, Jonas; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Klappenberger, Florian; Ruben, Mario; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-01-01

    The covalent linking of acetylenes presents an important route for the fabrication of novel carbon-based scaffolds and two-dimensional materials distinct from graphene. To date few attempts have been reported to implement this strategy at well-defined interfaces or monolayer templates. Here we demonstrate through real space direct visualization and manipulation in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations the Ag surface-mediated terminal alkyne C(sp)-H bond activation and concomitant homo-coupling in a process formally reminiscent of the classical Glaser-Hay type reaction. The alkyne homo-coupling takes place on the Ag(111) noble metal surface in ultrahigh vacuum under soft conditions in the absence of conventionally used transition metal catalysts and with volatile H(2) as the only by-product. With the employed multitopic ethynyl species, we demonstrate a hierarchic reaction pathway that affords discrete compounds or polymeric networks featuring a conjugated backbone. This presents a new approach towards on-surface covalent chemistry and the realization of two-dimensional carbon-rich or all-carbon polymers.

  10. Activation of noble metals on metal-carbide surfaces: novel catalysts for CO oxidation, desulfurization and hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Illas, Francesc

    2012-01-14

    This perspective article focuses on the physical and chemical properties of highly active catalysts for CO oxidation, desulfurization and hydrogenation reactions generated by depositing noble metals on metal-carbide surfaces. To rationalize structure-reactivity relationships for these novel catalysts, well-defined systems are required. High-resolution photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles periodic density-functional (DF) calculations have been used to study the interaction of metals of Groups 9, 10 and 11 with MC(001) (M = Ti, Zr, V, Mo) surfaces. DF calculations give adsorption energies that range from 2 eV (Cu, Ag, Au) to 6 eV (Co, Rh, Ir). STM images show that Au, Cu, Ni and Pt grow on the carbide substrates forming two-dimensional islands at very low coverage, and three-dimensional islands at medium and large coverages. In many systems, the results of DF calculations point to the preferential formation of admetal-C bonds with significant electronic perturbations in the admetal. TiC(001) and ZrC(001) transfer some electron density to the admetals facilitating bonding of the adatom with electron-acceptor molecules (CO, O(2), C(2)H(4), SO(2), thiophene, etc.). For example, the Cu/TiC(001) and Au/TiC(001) systems are able to cleave both S-O bonds of SO(2) at a temperature as low as 150 K, displaying a reactivity much larger than that of TiC(001) or extended surfaces of bulk copper and gold. At temperatures below 200 K, Au/TiC is able to dissociate O(2) and perform the 2CO + O(2)→ 2CO(2) reaction. Furthermore, in spite of the very poor hydrodesulfurization performance of TiC(001) or Au(111), a Au/TiC(001) surface displays an activity for the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene higher than that of conventional Ni/MoS(x) catalysts. In general, the Au/TiC system is more chemically active than systems generated by depositing Au nanoparticles on oxide surfaces. Thus, metal carbides are excellent supports for enhancing the chemical

  11. Solar wind noble gases and nitrogen in metal from lunar soil 68501

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    Noble gases and N were analyzed in handpicked metal separates from lunar soil 68501 by a combination of step-wise combustions and pyrolyses. Helium and Ne were found to be unfractionated with respect to one another when normalized to solar abundances, for both the bulk sample and for all but the highest temperature steps. However, they are depleted relative to Ar, Kr and Xe by at least a factor of 5. The heavier gases exhibit mass-dependent fractionation relative to solar system abundance ratios but appear unfractionated, both in the bulk metal and in early temperature steps, when compared to relative abundances derived from lunar ilmenite 71501 by chemical etching, recently put forward as representing the abundance ratios in solar wind. Estimates of the contribution of solar energetic particles (SEP) to the originally implanted solar gases, derived from a basic interpretation of He and Ne isotopes, yield values of about 10%. Analysis of the Ar isotopes requires a minimum of 20% SEP, and Kr isotopes, using our preferred composition for solar wind Kr, yield a result that overlaps both these values. It is possible to reconcile the data from these gases if significant loss of solar wind Ar, Kr and presumably Xe has occurred relative to the SEP component, most likely by erosive processes that are mass independent, although mass-dependent losses (Ar greater than Kr greater than Xe) cannot be excluded. If such losses did occur, the SEP contribution to the solar implanted gases must have been no more than a few percent. Nitrogen is a mixture of indigenous meteoritic N, whose isotopic composition is inferred to be relatively light, and implanted solar N, which has probably undergone diffusive redistribution and fractionation. If the heavy noble gases have not undergone diffusive loss, then N/Ar in the solar wind can be inferred to be at least several times the accepted solar ratio. The solar wind N appears, even after correction for fractionation effects, to have a minimum

  12. Solar wind noble gases and nitrogen in metal from lunar soil 68501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1994-09-01

    Noble gases and N were analyzed in handpicked metal separates from lunar soil 68501 by a combination of step-wise combustions and pyrolyses. Helium and Ne were found to be unfractionated with respect to one another when normalized to solar abundances, for both the bulk sample and for all but the highest temperature steps. However, they are depleted relative to Ar, Kr and Xe by at least a factor of 5. The heavier gases exhibit mass-dependent fractionation relative to solar system abundance ratios but appear unfractionated, both in the bulk metal and in early temperature steps, when compared to relative abundances derived from lunar ilmenite 71501 by chemical etching, recently put forward as representing the abundance ratios in solar wind. Estimates of the contribution of solar energetic particles (SEP) to the originally implanted solar gases, derived from a basic interpretation of He and Ne isotopes, yield values of about 10%. Analysis of the Ar isotopes requires a minimum of 20% SEP, and Kr isotopes, using our preferred composition for solar wind Kr, yield a result that overlaps both these values. It is possible to reconcile the data from these gases if significant loss of solar wind Ar, Kr and presumably Xe has occurred relative to the SEP component, most likely by erosive processes that are mass independent, although mass-dependent losses (Ar greater than Kr greater than Xe) cannot be excluded. If such losses did occur, the SEP contribution to the solar implanted gases must have been no more than a few percent. Nitrogen is a mixture of indigenous meteoritic N, whose isotopic composition is inferred to be relatively light, and implanted solar N, which has probably undergone diffusive redistribution and fractionation. If the heavy noble gases have not undergone diffusive loss, then N/Ar in the solar wind can be inferred to be at least several times the accepted solar ratio. The solar wind N appears, even after correction for fractionation effects, to have a minimum

  13. Understanding the degradation pathway of the pesticide, chlorpyrifos by noble metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bootharaju, M S; Pradeep, T

    2012-02-07

    Application of nanoparticles (NPs) in environmental remediation such as water purification requires a detailed understanding of the mechanistic aspects of the interaction between the species involved. Here, an attempt was made to understand the chemistry of noble metal nanoparticle-pesticide interaction, as these nanosystems are being used extensively for water purification. Our model pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CP), belonging to the organophosphorothioate group, is shown to decompose to 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethyl thiophosphate at room temperature over Ag and Au NPs, in supported and unsupported forms. The degradation products were characterized by absorption spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). These were further confirmed by ESI tandem mass spectrometry. The interaction of CP with NP surfaces was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis of X-rays, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS reveals no change in the oxidation state of silver after the degradation of CP. It is proposed that the degradation of CP proceeds through the formation of AgNP-S surface complex, which is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. In this complex, the P-O bond cleaves to yield a stable aromatic species, TCP. The rate of degradation of CP increases with increase of temperature and pH. Complete degradation of 10 mL of 2 ppm CP solution is achieved in 3 h using 100 mg of supported Ag@citrate NPs on neutral alumina at room temperature at a loading of ∼0.5 wt %. The effect of alumina and monolayer protection of NPs on the degradation of CP is also investigated. The rate of degradation of CP by Ag NPs is greater than that of Au NPs. The results have implications to the application of noble metal NPs for drinking water purification, as pesticide contamination is prevalent in many parts of the world. Study shows that supported Ag and Au NPs may be employed in sustainable

  14. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid in nitrite-containing simulated nuclear waste media

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1994-08-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}-, and NO{sub 2}- were used as media to evaluate the stability of formic acid towards hydrogen evolution by the reaction HCO{sub 2}H {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Small scale experiments using 40-50 mL of feed simulant in closed glass reactors (250-550 mL total volume) at 80-100{degree}C were used to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate ion on the catalytic activities of the noble metals for formic acid decomposition. Reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O in the gas phase as a function of time. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O, was found to be the most active catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid above {approx}80{degree}C in the presence of nitrite ion in accord with earlier observations. The inherent homogeneous nature of the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed formic acid decomposition is suggested by the approximate pseudo first-order dependence of the hydrogen production rate on Rh concentration. Titration of the typical feed simulants containing carbonate and nitrite with formic acid in the presence of rhodium at the reaction temperature ({approx}90{degree}C) indicates that the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid occurs only after formic acid has reacted with all of the carbonate and nitrite present to form CO{sub 2} and NO/N{sub 2}O, respectively. The catalytic activities of Ru and Pd towards hydrogen generation from formic acid are quite different than those of Rh in that they are inhibited rather than promoted by the presence of nitrite ion.

  15. Effect of residual gases in high vacuum on the energy-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-10-31

    The energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces has traditionally been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). However, since most devices are fabricated in high vacuum (HV), these studies do not accurately reflect the interfaces in real devices. We demonstrate, using UPS measurements of samples prepared in HV and UHV and current-voltage measurements of devices prepared in HV, that the small amounts of residual gases that are adsorbed on the surface of clean Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., the noble metals) in HV can significantly alter the energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces.

  16. First data on the concentrations and distribution of noble metals in Riphean magmatic complexes of the Bashkir meganticlinorium and eastern margin of the East European Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, S. G.; Puchkov, V. N.; Vysotsky, S. I.; Kovalev, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    The noble metal (PGE and Au) geochemical specialization of igneous rocks of the Bashkir meganticlinorium and adjacent areas of the East European Platform is characterized for the first time. The identical plots of normalized PGE and Au concentrations of igneous rocks in these regions indicate similar conditions and mechanisms of the formation of the noble metal geochemical specialization during the emplacement of magmatic bodies. It is established that a specific feature of noble metal geochemical specialization (the "rhodium anomaly") in magmatic complexes of the Bashkir meganticlinorium and eastern areas of the East European Platform is determined by the concentrations of noble metals in sulfide minerals (pentlandite); i.e., it is "primary" in origin.

  17. Contrasting behavior of noble-metal elements during magmatic differentiation in basalts from the Cook Islands, Polynesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Oguri, Kiwamu; Shimoda, Gen; Kogiso, Tetsu; Barsczus, Hans G.

    2000-02-01

    Concentrations of noble metals (Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, and Au) in ocean-island basalts from the Cook Islands, Polynesia, were determined by improved fire-assay and tellurium coprecipitation techniques with an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometer. Isotope, major element, and trace element compositions of these basalts indicate that the present samples include distinctive HIMU (high μ = high 238U/204Pb) and normal non-HIMU basalts. Examination based on Ni-Mg-Fe partitioning between olivine and liquid suggests an only minor effect of accumulation of phenocrysts in governing the compositional variations of the present samples. The fractionation trends obtained show monotonic decrease and increase in noble-metal elements with decreasing MgO content in HIMU and non-HIMU basalts, respectively. These characteristic trends indicate that HIMU magmas are differentiated by fractional crystallization and have higher sulfide/silicate ratios than non-HIMU basalts.

  18. Magnetic and noble metallic nanoparticles deposited on silica spheres via silanization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feifei; Shi, Ruixia; Yang, Ping

    2014-07-01

    A sol-gel technique has been developed to deposit various nanoparticles (NPs) on silica spheres. The silanization of the silica spheres using 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) with mercapto groups (-SH) plays an important role for the deposition. After being functionalized by MPS, the deposition of magnetic and noble metallic NPs was performed by the reduction of Au3+ and Ag+ ions in-situ using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) or the co-precipitation reaction of Fe2+/Fe3+ ions and ammonia (NH3 H2O) at low reactant concentrations at room temperature. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of samples exhibited the homogeneous deposition of Ag, Au, and Fe3O4 NPs on the silica spheres, in which the average size of Au and Ag NPs is 5 nm in diameter while the ones of Fe3O4 NPs is about 10 nm. In the case of without the silanization of silica spheres, the nucleation and growth of the NPs in solutions occur instead of the homogenous deposition. The results demonstrates that MPS containing the -SH metal-chelating functionality, can grow a layer in an ethanol solution on the silica spheres, thus improving the performance of the silica surface by grafting -SH groups. These hybrids offer a high absorption capacity for metal ions, all kinds of NPs can be deposited on the surface by co-precipitation channel on the basis of such property. The results presented hear may open up a novel and simple approach for the preparation of composite NPs.

  19. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Noble and Base Metal Alloys with Different Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Raeisosadat, Farkhondeh; Ghavam, Maryam; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Arami, Sakineh; Sedaghati, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen. Materials and Method: Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to “Degubond 4” (Au Pd) and “Verabond” (Ni Cr) alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021) and Verabond (P< 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291) and Verabond (P=0.899). Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003). The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011). The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59). RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035). Conclusion: The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2. PMID:25628687

  20. Noble metal based plasmonic nanomaterials and their application for bio-imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dewei

    During the past two decades, researchers have gained more and more insight into the manipulation of nanomaterials to create useful technologies. Numerous classes of nanomaterials have been produced and studied based upon their intriguing chemical and physical properties and their potential applications in diverse fields, ranging from electronics to renewable energy and biomedicine. In this dissertation, we describe the synthesis and potential biomedical applications of several types of noble metal-based nanomaterials in which we control size, shape, and coupling to other materials to tune their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) interaction with light. We demonstrate the application of these novel nanostructures as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging and as photosensitizers for photothermal therapy. Chapter one first presents protocols for producing monodisperse spherical nanoparticles of gold and silver. The diameter of the nanospheres can be adjusted from less than 2 nm to greater than 10 nm by controlling the reaction conditions, including ligands that cap the nanosphere surfaces, reaction time, and reaction temperature. Next, we describe the synthesis of multi-branched Au nanocrystals with predominantly tripodal, tetrapodal and star-shaped morphologies. We demonstrate tuning of the LSPR energy in these materials by changing the branch length. In the third part of this chapter, we present a novel method for coupling heavily-doped p-type copper selenide (Cu2-xSe) NPs with Au NPs by seeded nanocrystal growth to form a new type of semiconductor-metal heterogeneous nanostructure. This new class of plasmonic nanomaterials can simultaneously exhibit two types of LSPR in a single system, producing a broad optical absorbance that is nearly flat across the near infrared (NIR) spectral region (750-1150nm), along with a small shoulder at 566 nm that originates from the Au NP. We conclude this first chapter by demonstrating the use of self-doped copper sulfide

  1. Noble metal-titania hybrid nanoparticle clusters and the interaction to proteins for photo-catalysis in aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tung-Yu; Wang, Hong-Li; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chang; Chang, Je-Wei; Lu, Shih-Yuan; Tsai, De-Hao

    2017-03-15

    We report a systematic study of the controlled synthesis of new hybrid spherical TiO2 nanoparticle cluster (TiO2-NPC) homogeneously decorated with noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) by gas-phase evaporation-induced self-assembly. Silver NP (AgNP) was used as the representative noble metal NP. The degradation of methyl blue (MB) in the aqueous solution was chosen as the representative system for the study of photocatalysis, which were tested and evaluated with respect to irradiation conditions and the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results show that particle size and chemical composition of the hybrid nanostructure were tunable by choosing the suitable concentration of precursors. The photocatalytic activity of AgNP-decorated TiO2-NPC was strongly affected by the light irradiation and the ligand-nanoparticle interfacial interaction. The presence of BSA influenced molecular conjugation to the surface of the hybrid nanostructure. Under conditions of simultaneous competitive adsorption of MB and BSA, the combination of AgNPs improved the photocatalytic activity of the TiO2-NPC-based catalysts. Our work describes a prototype methodology to fabricate TiO2-NPC homogeneously decorated with noble metal NPs with well-controlled material properties. The mechanistic understanding developed in this study can be useful for the future optimization of material properties of hybrid nanostructures versus interfacial interactions with the surrounding molecules.

  2. Ab initio study of the trapping of polonium on noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijpstra, Kim; Van Yperen-De Deyne, Andy; Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Jörg; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    In the future MYRRHA reactor, lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) will be used both as coolant and as spallation target. Due to the high neutron flux a small fraction of the bismuth will transmute to radiotoxic 210Po. Part of this radiotoxic element will evaporate into the gas above the coolant. Extracting it from the gas phase is necessary to ensure a safe handling of the reactor. An issue in the development of suitable filters is the lack of accurate knowledge on the chemical interaction between a candidate filter material and either elemental polonium or polonium containing molecules. Experimental work on this topic is complicated by the high radiotoxicity of polonium. Therefore, we present in this paper a first-principles study on the adsorption of polonium on noble metals as filter materials. The adsorption of monoatomic Po is considered on the candidate filter materials palladium, platinum, silver and gold. The case of the gold filter is looked upon in more detail by examining how bismuth pollution affects its capability to capture polonium and by studying the adsorption of the heavy diatomic molecules Po2, PoBi and PoPb on this gold filter.

  3. Efficient noble metal nanocatalysts supported on HfC(001) for O2 dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyan; Zhang, Xilin; Zhang, Yanxing; Mao, Jianjun; Yang, Zongxian

    2017-03-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of O2 on the M4 (M=Au, Pd, Pt) clusters supported on HfC(001) (Hafnium Carbide) are investigated using ab initio density functional theory calculations. The geometric and electronic structures are analyzed in detail. It is found that the dissociation barriers of O2 on Au4/HfC(001) (0.26 eV), Pd4/HfC(001) (0.49 eV) and Pt4/HfC(001) (0.09 eV) are much smaller than those on the clean surfaces of HfC(001) (1.60 eV), Au(111) (1.37 eV), Pd(111) (1.0 and 0.91 eV) and Pt(111) (0.27-0.7 eV), respectively. The low dissociation barriers imply that the Pt4/HfC(001) exhibits the highest catalytic activity for O2 dissociation, and the Au4/HfC(001) and Pd4/HfC(001) may also be possible substitutes with lower cost for the current Pt/C catalyst for O2 dissociation. The present study is conductive to designing new efficient noble metal catalyst using HfC support for efficiently promoting O2 dissociation.

  4. Behavior of noble metals upon fractional crystallization of copper-rich sulfide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distler, V. V.; Sinyakova, E. F.; Kosyakov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    Joint behavior of Pt, Pd, Au, As, Bi, Te, and Sn upon fractional crystallization was studied in a melt of cubanite composition with the following admixtures (mol %): Fe, 33.20; Cu, 16.55; S, 50.03; Pt, 0.03; Pd, 0.02; Au, 0.02; As, 0.02; Bi, 0.03; Te, 0.02; Sn, 0.08. The crystallized sample consisted of three zones: (I) a pyrrhotite solid solution POSS; (II) an isocubanite ICB; (III) a multiphase mixture. The behavior of admixtures was studied in the first and second zones. It was shown that pyrrhotite did not contain admixtures of noble metals and accessory elements, whereas Sn was dissolved in cubanite. Other admixtures occurred in the second zone as multiphase inclusions. PdBi x Te1- x , PtBiS3-δ, CuPtBiS3, Bi2S3- x , Au, Pt(As,S)2, (Pt,Pd)S, (Pt,Pd)(Bi,Te)2- x , and PdBi2 were the most abundant phases.

  5. Optical pump wavelength dependence in visible-pump visible-probe spectroscopy of noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahota, Derek G.; Lobo, Calvin; Duch, Konrad; Dodge, J. Steven

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a femtosecond visible-pump visible-probe reflectometer with individually tunable pump and probe photon energies. The spectrometer has been used to study optically thick films of the noble metals Au and Cu over a wide variety of pump fluences and photon energies. Through comparison between experimental measurements and two-temperature model (TTM) simulations, we estimate an electron-phonon coupling constant, g, of 2.37 ±0.11 x10^16 Wm-3K-1 for Au and 1.19 ±0.13 x10^17 Wm-3K-1 for Cu, consistent with previous studies. The variation of the optical pump parameters allows a more accurate determination of the electron-phonon coupling constant. The relaxation rate, τ, of the thermally excited electrons is shown to be strongly dependent on the peak electron temperature of the excited sample, and only weakly dependent on the pump photon energy. The static dielectric constant is found to significantly underestimate the dependence of the differential reflectivity on the pump photon energy.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of noble metal borides: RuB{sub x}(x > 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhifang; Zheng, Dafang; Ding, Zhanhui; Li, Yongfeng; Yao, Bin; Li, Yongsheng; Zhao, Xudong; Yu, Guichuan; Tang, Yang; Zheng, Weitao; Liu, Xiaoyang

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Hexagonal RuB{sub 1.1} were synthesized using ruthenium and boron powders as raw materials during ball milling process. • Orthorhombic RuB{sub 2} were synthesized under high pressure (5 GPa) and high temperature (1000 °C) conditions. • Hexagonal Ru{sub 2}B{sub 3} have been synthesized under 5 GPa and 1200 °C. - Abstract: Noble metal borides RuB{sub 1.1}, RuB{sub 2} and Ru{sub 2}B{sub 3} have been synthesized by mechanical alloying and high pressure sintering methods using ruthenium (Ru) and boron (B) powders as raw materials. The crystal structures of borides were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results shown that only RuB{sub 1.1} with hexagonal crystal structure was synthesized during the ball milling process, the orthorhombic RuB{sub 2} was synthesized under high pressure (5 GPa) and high temperature (1000 °C) conditions, while the hexagonal Ru{sub 2}B{sub 3} can be synthesized under 5 GPa and 1200 °C. The mechanism of synthesis for the ruthenium borides (RuB{sub x}) are discussed in details.

  7. Noble-metal-free bimetallic alloy nanoparticle-catalytic gasification of phenol in supercritical water

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Lijuan; Yu, Jiangdong; Chen, Yuan; ...

    2017-02-27

    The exploration of non-noble-metal catalysts for high efficiency gasification of biomass in supercritical water (SCW) is of great significance for the sustainable development. A series of Ni–M (M = Co or Zn) bimetallic nanoparticles supported on graphitized carbon black were synthesized and examined as catalysts for gasification of phenol in SCW. We found that a nearly complete gasification of phenol can be achieved even at a low temperature of 450 °C with the bimetallic nanoparticles catalysts. Kinetic study indicated the activation energy for phenol gasification were 20.4 ± 2.6 and 43.6 ± 2.6 kJ/mol for Ni20Zn15 and Ni20Co15 catalyst, respectively.more » Furthermore, XRD, XPS and TEM were performed to characterize the catalysts and the results showed the formation of NiCo and NiZn alloy phase. Catalyst recycling experiments were also conducted to evaluate the stability of the catalysts. The characterization of used catalysts suggest that the severe agglomeration of nanoparticles leads to the decrease in catalytic activity.« less

  8. Recent Advances in the Field of Bionanotechnology: An Insight into Optoelectric Bacteriorhodopsin, Quantum Dots, and Noble Metal Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Christopher; Griep, Mark; Friedrich, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Molecular sensors and molecular electronics are a major component of a recent research area known as bionanotechnology, which merges biology with nanotechnology. This new class of biosensors and bioelectronics has been a subject of intense research over the past decade and has found application in a wide variety of fields. The unique characteristics of these biomolecular transduction systems has been utilized in applications ranging from solar cells and single-electron transistors (SETs) to fluorescent sensors capable of sensitive and selective detection of a wide variety of targets, both organic and inorganic. This review will discuss three major systems in the area of molecular sensors and electronics and their application in unique technological innovations. Firstly, the synthesis of optoelectric bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and its application in the field of molecular sensors and electronics will be discussed. Next, this article will discuss recent advances in the synthesis and application of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Finally, this article will conclude with a review of the new and exciting field of noble metal nanoclusters and their application in the creation of a new class of fluorescent sensors. PMID:25340449

  9. Rational design of binder-free noble metal/metal oxide arrays with nanocauliflower structure for wide linear range nonenzymatic glucose detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenzhen; Xin, Yanmei; Zhang, Zhonghai; Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional nanocomposites of metal-oxide and noble metal were expected to present superior performance for nonenzymatic glucose detection due to its good conductivity and high catalytic activity inherited from noble metal and metal oxide respectively. As a proof of concept, we synthesized gold and copper oxide (Au/CuO) composite with unique one-dimensional nanocauliflowers structure. Due to the nature of the synthesis method, no any foreign binder was needed in keeping either Au or CuO in place. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt in combining metal oxide and noble metal in a binder-free style for fabricating nonenzymatic glucose sensor. The Au/CuO nanocauliflowers with large electrochemical active surface and high electrolyte contact area would promise a wide linear range and high sensitive detection of glucose with good stability and reproducibility due to its good electrical conductivity of Au and high electrocatalytic activity of CuO. PMID:26068705

  10. First Principles Studies of Electronic and Optical Excitations in Noble Metal and Titania Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baishya, Kopinjol

    Clusters are metastable structures that form a bridge between the atomic and the bulk phase. Due to their small size, quantum confinement effects are very important in clusters. They also have large surface to volume ratio, and as such, surface effects are also important. Due to these effects the properties of clusters are quite different from those of the bulk. When the size of a cluster is increased, its properties change from atomic to bulk values usually in nontrivial ways, often displaying interesting effects. By studying the evolution of cluster properties as a function of size one can try to understand the evolution and origin of bulk properties. This thesis concentrates on two main topics, noble-metal clusters of Ag and Cu, and TiO2 nanocrystals. I present my study of the optical properties of these systems calculated using first principles methods. Noble metal clusters have intriguing physical and chemical properties due to their electronic structure that contains a fully filled and localized d orbital energetically and spatially very close to the half filled s orbital. In Chapters 3 and 4 of this thesis, I present a detailed study of the role of d electrons on the optical properties of Ag and Cu clusters. I also show that the optical spectra of these clusters can be explained remarkably well by the classical Mie-Gans theory which uses the bulk dielectric constant of the material to predict their optical absorption spectra. The fact that the concept of the bulk dielectric constant survives up to the sub-nanometer size range is one of the main findings of this thesis. TiO2 is arguably the most studied single-crystalline material in the field of surface science of metal oxides. In chapter 5 of this thesis I present results and analyses on the electronic and optical excitations in rutile TiO2 nanocrystals. The motivation for this study stems from the following observation: In modeling optical prooperties of DSSC configurations with various organic molecules

  11. Specificity of noble metals dynamic sorption preconcentration on reversed-phase sorbents.

    PubMed

    Fedyunina, N N; Seregina, I F; Ossipov, K; Dubenskiy, A S; Tsysin, G I; Bolshov, M A

    2013-10-10

    The reversible sorption preconcentration of noble metals (NMs) using different schemes "sorbent-reagent-eluent" was investigated. The extraction of Au, Pd, Pt, Ir, Rh and Ru chlorocomplexes from hydrochloric acid solutions on hyper-crosslinked polysterene MN-200 in the form of ion associates with tributylamine (TBA) and 4-(n-octyl)diethylenetriamine (ODETA) was investigated. It was found that Pd, Pt and Au were quantitatively and reversibly extracted using TBA on hyper-crosslinked polysterene; the appropriate eluent for desorption was 1M solution of HCl in ethanol. Ir, Rh and Ru under these conditions were not sorbed quantitatively. It was found that sorbent hydrophobicity is not the main characteristic that defines the efficiency of sorption of a particular NM ion associate. Different efficiencies of hyper-crosslinked polysterene MN-200 for sorption of square-planar chlorcomplexes of Pt, Pd and Au and octahedral complexes of Ir, Rh and Ru were found. For the first time, the sorbents with their own N-atoms - StrataX and StrataX-AW - were used for the sorption of Ir, Rh and Ru. Using these sorbents, the sorption of Ir was increased up to 95%, and the sorption of Ru and Rh was increased to about 40%. We can explain these results by nonspecific interaction of chlorcomplexes of Ir, Rh and Ru with ethylenediamine groups of the sorbent. Weak bases with large anions may be applied for desorption of Ir, Rh and Ru. Two schemes of dynamic sorption preconcentration of NMs from hydrochloric acid solutions were proposed - hyper-crosslinked polysterene MN-200 for the determination of Au, Pd, Pt, and StrataX-AW for Ir, Rh and Ru.

  12. Mitigation of hydrogen by oxidation using nitrous oxide and noble metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-19

    This test studied the ability of a blend of nuclear-grade, noble-metal catalysts to catalyze a hydrogen/nitrous oxide reaction in an effort to mitigate a potential hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas buildup in the Hanford Site Grout Disposal Facility. For gases having H{sub 2} and a stoichiometric excess of either nitrous oxide or oxygen, the catalyst blend can effectively catalyze the H{sub 2} oxidation reaction at a rate exceeding 380 {mu}moles of H{sub 2} per hour per gram of catalyst ({mu}mol/h/g) and leave the gas with less than a 0.15 residual H{sub 2} Concentration. This holds true in gases with up to 2.25% water vapor and 0.1% methane. This should also hold true for gases with up to 0.1% carbon monoxide (CO) but only until the catalyst is exposed to enough CO to block the catalytic sites and stop the reaction. Gases with ammonia up to 1% may be slightly inhibited but can have reaction rates greater than 250 {mu}mol/h/g with less than a 0.20% residual H{sub 2} concentration. The mechanism for CO poisoning of the catalyst is the chemisorption of CO to the active catalyst sites. The CO sorption capacity (SC) of the catalyst is the total amount of CO that the catalyst will chemisorb. The average SC for virgin catalyst was determined to be 19.3 {plus_minus} 2.0 {mu}moles of CO chemisorbed to each gram of catalyst ({mu}mol/g). The average SC for catalyst regenerated with air was 17.3 {plus_minus} 1.9 {mu}mol/g.

  13. Enantioselectivity of (321) chiral noble metal surfaces: A density functional theory study of lactate adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2013-12-14

    The adsorption of the chiral molecule lactate on the intrinsically chiral noble metal surfaces Pt(321), Au(321), and Ag(321) is studied by density functional theory calculations. We use the oPBE-vdW functional which includes van der Waals forces on an ab initio level. It is shown that the molecule binds via its carboxyl and the hydroxyl oxygen atoms to the surface. The binding energy is larger on Pt(321) and Ag(321) than on Au(321). An analysis of the contributions to the binding energy of the different molecular functional groups reveals that the deprotonated carboxyl group contributes most to the binding energy, with a much smaller contribution of the hydroxyl group. The Pt(321) surface shows considerable enantioselectivity of 0.06 eV. On Au(321) and Ag(321) it is much smaller if not vanishing. The chiral selectivity of the Pt(321) surface can be explained by two factors. First, it derives from the difference in van der Waals attraction of L- and D-lactate to the surface that we trace to differences in the binding energy of the methyl group. Second, the multi-point binding pattern for lactate on the Pt(321) surface is sterically more sensitive to surface chirality and also leads to large binding energy contributions of the hydroxyl group. We also calculate the charge transfer to the molecule and the work function to gauge changes in electronic structure of the adsorbed molecule. The work function is lowered by 0.8 eV on Pt(321) with much smaller changes on Au(321) and Ag(321)

  14. Strategies and applications of combinatorial methods and high throughput screening to the discovery of non-noble metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Maureen L.; Sachtler, J. W. Adriaan; Gillespie, Ralph D.; McGonegal, Charles P.; Vega, Honorio; Bem, Dave S.; Holmgren, Jennifer S.

    2004-02-01

    The integrated End-to-End™ combinatorial process for catalyst preparation and screening, with emphasis on its capability to vary both process and compositional parameters will be demonstrated. Additionally, each step of the combinatorial screening process has been validated against results from traditional screening methods. The greatest challenge of all has been the adherence to the core concepts of the combinatorial approach. Catalyst libraries have been made and tested for naphthalene dehydrogenation chemistry. The preparation of these libraries has included the application of high throughput techniques for: metal impregnation; catalyst finishing; catalyst screening. The catalyst screening system has been used to find a non-noble metal catalyst system that can replace Pt in dehydrogenation applications in the petroleum industry. A proprietary catalytic composition was developed for the dehydrogenation of methylcyclohexane (MCH) to toluene starting with four non-noble metals of different proportions and four different supports (alumina, titania, zirconia and silica) prepared in different ways and applying a statistical design of experiments. These data demonstrate that all steps of catalyst preparation and screening are performed in a rapid, useful, high throughput manner. Data will be presented from the catalyst screening efforts will demonstrate that optimized metal composition is dependent on the support type.

  15. Ice-templated synthesis of multifunctional three dimensional graphene/noble metal nanocomposites and their mechanical, electrical, catalytic, and electromagnetic shielding properties

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, P. K.; Aepuru, Radhamanohar; Panda, Himanshu Sekhar; Bahadur, D.

    2015-01-01

    In-situ homogeneous dispersion of noble metals in three-dimensional graphene sheets is a key tactic for producing macroscopic architecture, which is desirable for practical applications, such as electromagnetic interference shielding and catalyst. We report a one-step greener approach for developing porous architecture of 3D-graphene/noble metal (Pt and Ag) nanocomposite monoliths. The resulting graphene/noble metal nanocomposites exhibit a combination of ultralow density, excellent elasticity, and good electrical conductivity. Moreover, in order to illuminate the advantages of the 3D-graphene/noble metal nanocomposites, their electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and electrocatalytic performance are further investigated. The as-synthesized 3D-graphene/noble metal nanocomposites exhibit excellent EMI shielding effectiveness when compared to bare graphene; the effectiveness has an average of 28 dB in the 8.2–12.4 GHz X-band range. In the electro-oxidation of methanol, the 3D-graphene/Pt nanocomposite also exhibits significantly enhanced electrocatalytic performance and stability than compared to reduced graphene oxide/Pt and commercial Pt/C. PMID:26638827

  16. One-step facile synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals with tunable morphology in a nematic liquid crystalline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Kaustabh; Satpati, Biswarup; Datta, Alokmay

    2016-05-01

    The present study describes in-situ synthesis of noble metal nano structures (MNCs) (Au and Ag) within a nematic liquid crystalline medium MBBA [N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline] without using any seed mediated growth protocol or without using any external stabilizing or reducing agent. Detailed Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) study indicates that apart from Kinetic based mechanism, the thermodynamical parameters also influence greatly the morphological evolution of these MNCs. The MNCs are of diverse shapes including nano prisms, hexagons, urchins, cubes, and rods which depend on the time of reaction and the choice of nanoparticle precursor.

  17. Expeditious synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles using Vitamin B12 under microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A greener synthesis protocol for noble nanometals is developed using vitamin B12 as a reducing and capping agent in conjunction with the use of microwaves. Successful assembly of nanoparticles or microparticles with varied shapes and sizes have been demonstrated. The synthesized ...

  18. Reaction pathways of biomass-derived oxygenates on noble metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Jesse R.

    As the global demand for energy continues to rise, the environmental concerns associated with increased fossil fuel consumption have motivated the use of biomass as an alternative, carbon-renewable energy feedstock. Controlling reactive chemistry of the sugars that comprise biomass through the use of catalysis becomes essential in effectively producing green fuels and value-added chemicals. Recent work on biomass conversion catalysts have demonstrated the efficacy of noble metal catalyst systems for the reforming of biomass to hydrogen fuel, and the hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived compounds to value-added chemicals. In particular, Pt and Pd surfaces have shown considerable promise as reforming catalysts in preliminary aqueous phase reforming studies. It becomes important to understand the mechanisms by which these molecules react on the catalyst surfaces in order to determine structure-activity relationships and bond scission energetics as to provide a framework for engineering more active and selective catalysts. Fundamental surface science techniques provide the tools to do this; however, work in this field has been so far limited to simple model molecules like ethanol and ethylene glycol. Herein, temperature programmed desorption and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy are utilized in an ultra-high vacuum surface science study of the biomass-derived sugar glucose on Pt and Pd single crystal catalysts. Overall, it was determined that the aldehyde function of a ring-open glucose molecule plays an integral part in the initial bonding and reforming reaction pathway, pointing to the use of aldoses glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde as the most appropriate model compounds for future studies. Furthermore, the addition of adatom Zn to a Pt(111) surface was found to significantly decrease the C-H and C-C bond scission activity in aldehyde containing compounds, resulting in a preferred deoxygenation pathway in opposition to the decarbonylation pathway

  19. Catalytic pyrolysis of wheat bran for hydrocarbons production in the presence of zeolites and noble-metals by using TGA-FTIR method.

    PubMed

    Lazdovica, K; Liepina, L; Kampars, V

    2016-05-01

    Pyrolysis of wheat bran with or without catalysts was investigated using TGA-FTIR method in order to determine the influence of zeolite and noble metal catalysts on the evolution profile and relative yield of the volatile compounds. The addition of all catalysts decreased the volatile matter of wheat bran from 76.3% to 75.9%, 73.9%, 73.5%, 69.7% and increased the solid residue from 18.0% to 18.4%, 20.4%, 20.8%, 24.6% under the catalyst of ZSM-5, 5% Pd/C, MCM-41, and 5% Pt/C. Noble-metal catalysts had higher activity for deoxygenation of compounds containing carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups than zeolites. Degradation of nitrogen containing compounds atom proceeded better in presence of zeolites. Noble-metal catalysts promoted formation of aromatics and changed the profiles of evolved compounds whereas zeolites advanced formation of aliphatics and olefins.

  20. Incorporation of Fines and Noble Metals into HLW Borosilicate Glass: Industrial Responses to a Challenging Issue - 13056

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, E.; Chouard, N.; Prod'homme, A.; Boudot, E.; Gruber, Ph.; Pinet, O.; Grosman, R.

    2013-07-01

    During the early stages of spent fuel reprocessing, the fuel rods are cut and dissolved to separate the solid metallic parts of the rods (cladding and end pieces) from the radioactive nitric acid solution containing uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and fission products (FP). This solution contains small, solid particles produced during the shearing process. These small particles, known as 'fines', are then separated from the liquid by centrifugation. At the La Hague plant in France, the fines solution is transferred to the vitrification facilities to be incorporated into borosilicate glass along with the highly radioactive FP solution. These fines are also composed of Zr, Mo and other noble metals (i.e. Ru, Pd, Rh, etc.) that are added before vitrification to the the FP solution that already contained noble metals. As noble metals has the potential to modify the glass properties (including viscosity, electrical conductivity, etc.) and to be affected by sedimentation inside the melter, their behavior in borosilicate glass has been studied in depth over the years by the AREVA and CEA teams which are now working together in the Joint Vitrification Laboratory (LCV). At La Hague, the R7 vitrification facility started operation in 1989 using induction-heated metallic melter technology and was quickly followed by the T7 vitrification facility in 1992. Incorporating the fines into glass has been a challenge since operation began, and has given rise to several R and D studies resulting in a number of technological enhancements to improve the mixing capability of the melters (multiple bubbling technology and mechanical stirring in the mid-90's). Nowadays, the incorporation of fines into R7T7 glass is well understood and process adaptations are deployed in the La Hague facilities to increase the operating flexibility of the melters. The paper will briefly describe the fines production mechanisms, give details of the resulting fines characteristics, explain how the metallic

  1. Synthesis and characterization of fluorescence-labelled silica core-shell and noble metal-decorated ceria nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rennhak, Markus; Reller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The present review article covers work done in the cluster NPBIOMEM in the DFG priority programme SPP 1313 and focuses on synthesis and characterization of fluorescent silica and ceria nanoparticles. Synthetic methods for labelling of silica and polyorganosiloxane/silica core–shell nanoparticles with perylenediimide derivatives are described, as well as the modification of the shell with thiol groups. Photometric methods for the determination of the number of thiol groups and an estimate for the number of fluorescent molecules per nanoparticles, including a scattering correction, have been developed. Ceria nanoparticles decorated with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) are models for the decomposition products of automobile catalytic converters which appear in the exhaust gases and finally interact with biological systems including humans. The control of the degree of agglomeration of small ceria nanoparticles is the basis for their synthesis. Almost monodisperse agglomerates (40 ± 4–260 ± 40 nm diameter) can be prepared and decorated with noble metal nanoparticles (2–5 nm diameter). Fluorescence labelling with ATTO 647N gave the model particles which are now under biophysical investigation. PMID:25671137

  2. Effect of noble metal adhesive systems on bonding between an indirect composite material and a gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kiyoshi; Tanoue, Naomi; Atsuta, Mitsuru; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the bond strength between an indirect composite and a gold alloy was determined for the purpose of evaluating noble metal bonding systems. A single liquid primer designed for conditioning noble metal alloys (Infis Opaque Primer) and tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resins (Super-Bond C & B), with or without the powder component, were assessed. Cast gold alloy disks (Casting Gold type IV) were air-abraded with alumina, followed by six surface preparations, and were then bonded with a light-activated composite material (New Metacolor Infis). Shear testing was performed both before and after thermocycling for evaluation of bond durability. The results showed that three primed groups improved post-thermocycling bond strengths compared to each of the corresponding unprimed groups (P < 0.01). The bond strength was reduced for all six groups by the application of thermocycling (P < 0.01). After thermocycling, the group primed with the Infis Opaque Primer material and bonded with the Super-Bond C & B resin exhibited the greatest bond strength (23.4 MPa). The Infis Opaque Primer and Super-Bond bonding system increased the post-thermocycling bond strength of the control group by a factor of approximately ten. This simple technique is applicable in the fabrication of composite veneered restorations and cone-telescope dentures.

  3. Effectiveness of non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts on particle number emissions from diesel and biodiesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pravesh Chandra; Gupta, Tarun; Labhasetwar, Nitin Kumar; Khobaragade, Rohini; Gupta, Neeraj K; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Two new formulations of non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts based on CoCe based mixed oxide (DOC2) and perovskite catalysts (DOC3) were prepared and retrofitted in a 4-cylinder diesel engine fueled by diesel and Karanja biodiesel blend (KB20). In this study, their effectiveness in reducing raw exhaust particulate emissions vis-à-vis a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC1) was evaluated. Emission characteristics such as particle number-size distribution, mass-size distribution, and surface area-size distribution, total particle number concentration and count mean diameter as a function of engine load at constant engine speed were evaluated. Variations in total particle number concentration as a function of engine speed were also determined. The prepared DOCs and the commercial DOC showed varying degrees of performance as a function of engine operating conditions. Overall, effectiveness of the prepared DOC's appeared to be more fuel specific. For diesel exhaust, overall performance of DOC1 was more effective compared to both prepared DOCs, with DOC2 being superior to DOC3. In case of KB20 exhaust, the overall performance of DOC2 was either more effective or nearly comparable to DOC1, while DOC3 being not so effective. This showed that the DOCs based on CoCe based mixed oxide catalysts have potential to replace commercial noble metal based DOC's, especially in engines fueled by biodiesel.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of fluorescence-labelled silica core-shell and noble metal-decorated ceria nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Rudolf; Rennhak, Markus; Reller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The present review article covers work done in the cluster NPBIOMEM in the DFG priority programme SPP 1313 and focuses on synthesis and characterization of fluorescent silica and ceria nanoparticles. Synthetic methods for labelling of silica and polyorganosiloxane/silica core-shell nanoparticles with perylenediimide derivatives are described, as well as the modification of the shell with thiol groups. Photometric methods for the determination of the number of thiol groups and an estimate for the number of fluorescent molecules per nanoparticles, including a scattering correction, have been developed. Ceria nanoparticles decorated with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) are models for the decomposition products of automobile catalytic converters which appear in the exhaust gases and finally interact with biological systems including humans. The control of the degree of agglomeration of small ceria nanoparticles is the basis for their synthesis. Almost monodisperse agglomerates (40 ± 4-260 ± 40 nm diameter) can be prepared and decorated with noble metal nanoparticles (2-5 nm diameter). Fluorescence labelling with ATTO 647N gave the model particles which are now under biophysical investigation.

  5. Noble metal-based bimetallic nanoparticles: the effect of the structure on the optical, catalytic and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana; Marchelek, Martyna; Diak, Magdalena; Grabowska, Ewelina

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles composed of two different metal elements show novel electronic, optical, catalytic or photocatalytic properties from monometallic nanoparticles. Bimetallic nanoparticles could show not only the combination of the properties related to the presence of two individual metals, but also new properties due to a synergy between two metals. The structure of bimetallic nanoparticles can be oriented in random alloy, alloy with an intermetallic compound, cluster-in-cluster or core-shell structures and is strictly dependent on the relative strengths of metal-metal bond, surface energies of bulk elements, relative atomic sizes, preparation method and conditions, etc. In this review, selected properties, such as structure, optical, catalytic and photocatalytic of noble metals-based bimetallic nanoparticles, are discussed together with preparation routes. The effects of preparation method conditions as well as metal properties on the final structure of bimetallic nanoparticles (from alloy to core-shell structure) are followed. The role of bimetallic nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis are discussed. Furthermore, structure and optical characteristics of bimetallic nanoparticles are described in relation to the some features of monometallic NPs. Such a complex approach allows to systematize knowledge and to identify the future direction of research.

  6. IMPACT OF NOBLE METALS AND MERCURY ON HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING HIGH LEVEL WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T; David Koopman, D

    2009-03-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are added to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing was used to identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge

  7. A highly efficient noble metal free photocatalytic hydrogen evolution system containing MoP and CdS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shengming; Han, Jianyu; Zou, Yinjun; Zhou, Tianhua; Xu, Rong

    2016-07-01

    We report the construction of a highly efficient noble metal free photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) evolution system using CdS quantum dots as the light absorber and metallic MoP as the cocatalyst. MoP can be prepared by a facile temperature programmed reduction method and small clusters of MoP nanoparticles sized 10-30 nm were obtained by probe ultrasonication. The effect of synthesis conditions on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic H2 evolution activity of MoP was investigated. The highest H2 evolution rate of 1100 μmol h-1 can be achieved by the optimized system under visible light (λ >= 420 nm), which is comparable to that when Pt was used as the cocatalyst. A high quantum efficiency of 45% is obtained at 460 nm irradiation.We report the construction of a highly efficient noble metal free photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) evolution system using CdS quantum dots as the light absorber and metallic MoP as the cocatalyst. MoP can be prepared by a facile temperature programmed reduction method and small clusters of MoP nanoparticles sized 10-30 nm were obtained by probe ultrasonication. The effect of synthesis conditions on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic H2 evolution activity of MoP was investigated. The highest H2 evolution rate of 1100 μmol h-1 can be achieved by the optimized system under visible light (λ >= 420 nm), which is comparable to that when Pt was used as the cocatalyst. A high quantum efficiency of 45% is obtained at 460 nm irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM image with EDS, XPS survey spectrum, XRD and TEM images of MoP samples prepared under different conditions; XRD, TEM, UV-vis and photoluminescence spectra of CdS QDs; H2 evolution activity comparison for different MoP/CdS samples; the effect of pH value on H2 evolution activity of a MoP/CdS system; the XPS spectrum of MoP/CdS after photoreaction; table of literature studies on H2 evolution activity by different noble metal free photocatalytic systems

  8. A Simple Model for Fine Structure Transitions in Alkali-Metal Noble-Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    fine- structure transition rates of the alkali atoms . The integration of this integral is primarily performed nu- merically, using an adaptive Romberg...Previous work on the fine structure transitions of alkali atoms as they collide with noble gas atoms includes a full quantum mechanical calculation of...adiabaticity in alkali atom fine structure mixing”. SPIE LASE, 896207–896207. International Society for Optics and Photonics, 2014. 4. Griffiths, David J

  9. Alumina-supported noble metal catalysts for destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in effluent from a softwood kraft pulp mill

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Chuang, K.T.

    1998-08-01

    The effectiveness of alumina-supported noble metal catalysts for the destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in effluent from a softwood kraft pulp mill was evaluated in a slurry reactor at 463 K and an oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa. The effects of catalyst preparation procedures, such as metal loading, calcination, or reduction treatment on the catalytic activities, were also tested. Alumina-supported palladium catalysts were found to be more effective than supported manganese, iron, or platinum catalysts. The rate of oxidation over Pd/alumina catalyst was significantly higher than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. Adding Ce on the alumina support was found to promote the activity of alumina-supported Pt catalyst but inhibit the activity of alumina-supported Pd catalyst. The reaction mechanisms for the catalytic wet oxidation process and the roles of Ce on catalytic activity for destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in wastewater are discussed.

  10. Composition of solar wind noble gases released by surface oxidation of a metal separate from the Weston meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports on a set of experiments intended to test the feasibility of determining elemental and isotopic ratios of the noble gases and nitrogen in the solar wind in metal separates from gas-rich ordinary chondrites. Helium, neon, and argon show clear evidence of a solar wind signature, while no solar component could be identified for xenon and nitrogen. Helium, neon, and argon elemental isotopic ratios appear to depend on depth within the metal grains. The ratios derived indicate that the Weston meteorite did not acquire its solar wind gases from a recent exposure to solar wind, but more probably at a time in the past similar to or even earlier than the exposure time of Apollo 17 breccias. The Ar-36/Ar-38 ratio, in tandem with other recent determinations of this value, indicates that the solar and terrestrial values can no longer be assumed to be equivalent.

  11. The geochemical behavior of refractory noble metals and lithophile trace elements in refractory inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Kornacki, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Recent models of Ca, Al-rich (CAI) inclusion petrogenesis, and the recent availability of thermodynamic data have led to the reexamination of the geochemical behavior of the refractory noble metals (RNM) and several lithophile refractory trace elements in CAI's in the context of distillation models. Here, pertinent chemical and mineralogical properties of the various classes of refractory inclusions are reviewed, and calculations of the stability of LRTE-RNM alloys and several LRTE oxides under nebular conditions are presented. The calculations, observations and experimental results are applied to a new model of the origin of refractory metal nuggets, and a specific mechanism is identified for producing Group II chemical patterns in a cold star nebula by fractionating interstellar dust at low temperature on the basis of physical differences between different populations of pre-solar grains.

  12. Experimental partitioning of Zr, Ti, and Nb between silicate liquid and a complex noble metal alloy and the partitioning of Ti between perovskite and platinum metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, Stephen R.; Jones, John H.

    1993-01-01

    El Goresy et al.'s observation of Nb, Zr, and Ta in refractory platinum metal nuggets (RPMN's) from Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI's) in the Allende meteorite led them to propose that these lithophile elements alloyed in the metallic state with noble metals in the early solar nebula. However, Grossman pointed out that the thermodynamic stability of Zr in the oxide phase is vastly greater than metallic Zr at estimated solar nebula conditions. Jones and Burnett suggested this discrepancy may be explained by the very non-ideal behavior of some lithophile transition elements in noble metal solutions and/or intermetallic compounds. Subsequently, Fegley and Kornacki used thermodynamic data taken from the literature to predict the stability of several of these intermetallic compounds at estimated solar nebula conditions. Palme and Schmitt and Treiman et al. conducted experiments to quantify the partitioning behavior of certain lithophile elements between silicate liquid and Pt-metal. Although their results were somewhat variable, they did suggest that Zr partition coefficients were too small to explain the observed 'percent' levels in some RPMN's. Palme and Schmitt also observed large partition coefficients for Nb and Ta. No intermetallic phases were identified. Following the work of Treiman et al., Jurewicz and Jones performed experiments to examine Zr, Nb, and Ti partitioning near solar nebula conditions. Their results showed that Zr, Nb, and Ti all have an affinity for the platinum metal, with Nb and Ti having a very strong preference for the metal. The intermetallic phases (Zr,Fe)Pt3, (Nb,Fe)Pt3, and (Ti,Fe)Pt3 were identified. Curiously, although both experiments and calculations indicate that Ti should partition strongly into Pt-metal (possibly as TiPt3), no Ti has ever been observed in any RPMN's. Fegley and Kornacki also noticed this discrepancy and hypothesized that the Ti was stabilized in perovskite which is a common phase in Allende CAI's.

  13. Non-Noble-Metal Nanoparticle Supported on Metal-Organic Framework as an Efficient and Durable Catalyst for Promoting H2 Production from Ammonia Borane under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Meicheng; Cui, Yiwen; Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Mori, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-08-24

    In this work, we propose a straightforward method to enhance the catalytic activity of AB dehydrogenation by using non-noble-metal nanoparticle supported on chromium-based metal-organic framework (MIL-101). It was demonstrated to be effective for hydrogen generation from ammonia borane under assistance of visible light irradiation as a noble-metal-free catalyst. The catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles supported on MIL-101 under visible light irradiation is remarkably higher than that without light irradiation. The TOFs of Cu/MIL-101, Co/MIL-101, and Ni/MIL-101 are 1693, 1571, and 3238 h(-1), respectively. The enhanced activity of catalysts can be primarily attributed to the cooperative promoting effects from both non-noble-metal nanoparticles and photoactive metal-organic framework in activating the ammonia borane molecule and strong ability in the photocatalytic production of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions, and electron-rich non-noble-metal nanoparticle. This work sheds light on the exploration of active non-noble metals supported on photoactive porous materials for achieving high catalytic activity of various redox reactions under visible light irradiation.

  14. Noble-metal-based catalysts supported on zeolites and macro-mesoporous metal oxide supports for the total oxidation of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Tarek; Rooke, Joanna C; Tidahy, Haingomalala Lucette; Hosseini, Mahsa; Cousin, Renaud; Lamonier, Jean-François; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; De Weireld, Guy; Su, Bao-Lian; Siffert, Stéphane

    2011-10-17

    The use of porous materials to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has proven very effective towards achieving sustainability and environmental protection goals. The activity of zeolites and macro-mesoporous metal-oxide supports in the total oxidation of VOCs has been investigated, with and without noble-metal deposition, to develop highly active catalyst systems where the formation of by-products was minimal. The first catalysts employed were zeolites, which offered a good activity in the oxidation of VOCs, but were rapidly deactivated by coke deposition. The effects of the acido-basicity and ionic exchange of these zeolites showed that a higher basicity was related to exchanged ions with lower electronegativities, resulting in better catalytic performances in the elimination of VOCs. Following on from this work, noble metals were deposited onto macro-mesoporous metal-oxide supports to form mono and bimetallic catalysts. These were then tested in the oxidation of toluene to study their catalytic performance and their deactivation process. PdAu/TiO(2) and PdAu/TiO(2) -ZrO(2) 80/20 catalysts demonstrated the best activity and life span in the oxidation of toluene and propene and offered the lowest temperatures for a 50 % conversion of VOCs and the lowest coke content after catalytic testing. Different characterization techniques were employed to explain the changes occurring in catalyst structure during the oxidation of toluene and propene.

  15. Jingle-bell-shaped ferrite hollow sphere with a noble metal core: Simple synthesis and their magnetic and antibacterial properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li Siheng; Wang Enbo Tian Chungui; Mao Baodong; Kang Zhenhui; Li Qiuyu; Sun Guoying

    2008-07-15

    In this paper, a simple strategy is developed for rational fabrication of a class of jingle-bell-shaped hollow structured nanomaterials marked as Ag(MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) (M=Ni, Co, Mg, Zn), consisting of ferrite hollow shells and metal nanoparticle cores, using highly uniform colloidal Ag(C) microspheres as template. The final composites were obtained by direct adsorption of metal cations Fe{sup 3+} and M{sup 2+} on the surface of the Ag(C) spheres followed by calcination process to remove the middle carbon shell and transform the metal ions into pure phase ferrites. The as-prepared composites were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometer. The results showed that the composites possess the magnetic property of the ferrite shell and the optical together with antibacterial property of the Ag core. - Graphical abstract: MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Ni, Co, Mg, Zn) hollow spheres with a noble metal nanoparticle core were successfully prepared by using colloidal metal(C) core-shell spheres as templates with no need of surface modification. The shell thickness and magnetic properties of the ferrite hollow spheres could be controlled by varying the synthetic parameters.

  16. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Encapsulated MoS2 Quantum Dots: The Case of Noble Metal Nanoparticle Dopants.

    PubMed

    Loh, Guan Chee

    2016-04-18

    With the rise of 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, as viable materials for numerous experimental applications, it becomes more necessary to maintain fine control of their properties. One expedient and efficacious technique to regulate their properties is surface functionalization. In this study, DFT calculations are performed on triangular MoS2 quantum dots (QDs) either partially or completely doped with nanoparticles (NPs) of the noble metals Au, Ag, and Pt. The effects of these dopants on the geometry, electronic properties, magnetic properties, and chemical bonding of the QDs are investigated. The calculations show that the structural stability of the QDs is reduced by Au or Ag dopants, whereas Pt dopants have a contrasting effect. The NPs diminish the metallicity of the QD, the extent of which is contingent on the number of NPs adsorbed on the QD. However, these NPs exert distinctly disparate charge transfer effects-Ag NPs n-dope the QDs, whereas Au and Pt NPs either n- or p-dope. The molecular electrostatic potential maps of the occupied states show that metallic states are removed from the doping sites. Notwithstanding the decrease of magnetization in all three types of hybrid QD, the distribution of spin density in the Pt-doped QD is inherently different from that in the other QDs. Bond analyses using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and the crystal orbital Hamilton population suggest that bonds between the Pt NPs and the QDs are the most covalent and the strongest, followed by the Au-QD bonds, and then Ag-QD bonds. The versatility of these hybrid QDs is further examined by applying an external electric field in the three orthogonal orientations, and comparing their properties with those in the absence of the electric field. There are two primary observations: 1) dopants at the tail, head and tail, and in the fully encased configuration are most effective in modifying the distribution of metallic states if the

  17. The effect of dielectric constants on noble metal/semiconductor SERS enhancement: FDTD simulation and experiment validation of Ag/Ge and Ag/Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Zhaoshun; Liao, Fan; Cai, Qian; Li, Yanqing; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang

    2014-02-11

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method was employed to simulate the electric field distribution for noble metal (Au or Ag)/semiconductor (Ge or Si) substrates. The simulation showed that noble metal/Ge had stronger SERS enhancement than noble metal/Si, which was mainly attributed to the different dielectric constants of semiconductors. In order to verify the simulation, Ag nanoparticles with the diameter of ca. 40 nm were grown on Ge or Si wafer (Ag/Ge or Ag/Si) and employed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates to detect analytes in solution. The experiment demonstrated that both the two substrates exhibited excellent performance in the low concentration detection of Rhodamine 6G. Besides, the enhancement factor (1.3 × 10(9)) and relative standard deviation values (less than 11%) of Ag/Ge substrate were both better than those of Ag/Si (2.9 × 10(7) and less than 15%, respectively), which was consistent with the FDTD simulation. Moreover, Ag nanoparticles were grown in-situ on Ge substrate, which kept the nanoparticles from aggregation in the detection. To data, Ag/Ge substrates showed the best performance for their sensitivity and uniformity among the noble metal/semiconductor ones.

  18. Evaluation of HWVP feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- Fiscal year 1993: Effect of noble metals concentration on offgas generation and ammonia formation

    SciTech Connect

    Patello, G.K.; Wiemers, K.D.; Bell, R.D.; Smith, H.D.; Williford, R.E.; Clemmer, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    The High-Level Waste Vitrification Program is developing technology for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic wastes as glass for permanent disposal. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting laboratory-scale melter feed preparation studies using a HWVP simulated waste slurry, Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW). A FY 1993 laboratory-scale study focused on the effects of noble metals (Pd, Rh, and Ru) on feed preparation offgas generation and NH{sub 3} production. The noble metals catalyze H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} production, which leads to safety concerns. The information gained from this study is intended to be used for technology development in pilot scale testing and design of the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility. Six laboratory-scale feed preparation tests were performed as part of the FY 1993 testing activities using nonradioactive NCAW simulant. Tests were performed with 10%, 25%, 50% of nominal noble metals content. Also tested were 25% of the nominal Rh and a repeat of 25% nominal noble metals. The results of the test activities are described. 6 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Electrocatalysis of anodic, oxygen-transfer reactions at noble metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Vitt, J.E.

    1992-06-09

    Voltammetry at rotated disk and rotated ring-disk electrodes was applied to the study of several aspects of anodic, oxygen-transfer reactions at noble electrodes. Anodic reactions which involve the transfer of oxygen from H{sub 2}O to the oxidation products generally exhibit a voltammetric response characterized by severe kinetic limitations. Mechanistic studies were performed at noble electrodes in order to contrive strategies for improving the kinetics of these reactions. Competitive adsorption studies were used to devise an adsorption hierarchy for Au rotated disk electrodes. It was concluded that adsorption was a prerequisite for oxidations involving the transfer of oxygen present on the electrodes surface as adsorbed hydroxyl radicals. The electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of luminol was studied at Au, Pt, Pd, glassy carbon, PbO{sub 2}, and Bi-doped PbO{sub 2} electrodes. The ECL intensity was determined to be inversely related to electrochemical activity for the oxidation of luminol. It was concluded that the oxygen-transfer oxidation of luminol to 3-aminophthalate ( n = 4 eq mol{sup {minus}1}) corresponded to the dark reaction, whereas the electron-transfer oxidation of luminol with n = 1 eq mol{sup {minus}1} initiated the chemiluminescent reaction in solution.

  20. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  1. A sensitive localized surface plasmon resonance sensor for determining mercury(II) ion using noble metal nanoparticles as probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ning; Chen, Yanhua; Qi, Haibo; Zheng, Xia; Chen, Yang; Liao, Xue; Zhang, Hanqi; Tian, Yuan

    2012-09-01

    The noble metal nanoparticles (NPs), including gold nanorods (AuNRs), gold nanospheres (AuNSs) and silver nanoplates (AgNPTs), were synthesized and Tween 20 stabilized NPs (Tween 20-NPs) were used as the probes for determining Hg2+. Hg2+ was determined based on the strong affinity between Au (Ag) and Hg. Hg2+ was reduced to Hg in the presence of sodium borohydride. Hg interacts with the NPs and the diameter of the NPs decreases with the increase of Hg2+ concentration, which causes the shift in absorption peak of Tween 20-NPs. The peak shifts are linearly related to Hg2+ concentrations. Compared with AuNSs and AgNPTs, when the AuNRs was used, the sensitivity for determining Hg2+ was higher. The developed method shows a good selectivity for Hg2+ and can be applied to the determination of Hg2+ in water samples.

  2. Noble metal catalyzed aqueous phase hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived pyrolysis oil and related model compounds.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wei; Ben, Haoxi; Du, Xiaotang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Fan; Liu, Wei; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin pyrolysis oil and related model compounds were investigated using four noble metals supported on activated carbon. The hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol has three major reaction pathways and the demethylation reaction, mainly catalyzed by Pd, Pt and Rh, produces catechol as the products. The presence of catechol and guaiacol in the reaction is responsible for the coke formation and the catalysts deactivation. As expected, there was a significant decrease in the specific surface area of Pd, Pt and Rh catalysts during the catalytic reaction because of the coke deposition. In contrast, no catechol was produced from guaiacol when Ru was used so a completely hydrogenation was accomplished. The lignin pyrolysis oil upgrading with Pt and Ru catalysts further validated the reaction mechanism deduced from model compounds. Fully hydrogenated bio-oil was produced with Ru catalyst.

  3. Fano effect in the angle-integrated valence band photoemission of the noble metals Cu, Ag, and Au

    SciTech Connect

    De Nadaie, C.; Brookes, N.B.; Minar, J.; Ebert, H.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Tagliaferri, A.

    2004-10-01

    Results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation on the Fano-effect in the angle-integrated valence band photoemission of the noble metals are presented. In line with the fact that the Fano-effect is caused by the spin-orbit-coupling, the observed spin polarization of the photocurrent was found to be the more pronounced the higher the atomic number of the element investigated. The ratio of the normalized spin difference curves, however, agreed only for Cu and Ag with the ratio of the corresponding spin-orbit coupling strength parameters. The deviation from this expected behavior in the case of Au could be explained by the properties of individual d-p- and d-f-contributions to the total spin difference curves, that were found to be quite different for Au compared to Cu and Ag.

  4. Comparative study of the structural and electrochemical properties of noble metal inclusions in a UO2 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, S.; Petersmann, T.; Seibert, A.; Gouder, T.; Huber, F.; Brendebach, B.; Denecke, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    The intention of the presented study is to elucidate the influence of noble metal inclusions (fission products) on the structure as well as on the electrochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). To this aim, thin UO2 films doped with metal inclusions such as Pd, Mo and Au are prepared by sputter deposition. The films are characterized by spectroscopic (XPS, EXAFS, XRD) as well as by microscopic (AFM, SEM) methods. In a next step the electrochemical properties of these model systems are comparatively investigated by cyclo voltammetry (CV). The sputter technique in combination with the heating treatment of the films allows the formation of a crystalline UO2 matrix as it is found in SNF. The co-deposition with Au results in the dispersion of the pure metal in the oxide matrix. Pd as well as Mo are oxidized due to the deposition at RT. Heating the films involves a further oxidation of MoO2 to MoO3. By contrast Pd agglomerates and forms metallic -phases as it is found in SNF. Electrochemical investigations of the UO2-Pd samples indicate an inhibiting influence of Pd on the oxidative dissolution of UO2. When it comes to the formation of secondary phases under reducing conditions such influence is passivated. The precipitates finally dominate the overall redox behaviour of the model system.

  5. Application of potassium tetrafluorobromate to the rapid decomposition and determination of noble metals in chromites and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitkin, V. N.; Zayakina, S. B.; Tsimbalist, V. G.; Galizky, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    Described is an effective new procedure for the preparation of chromites and other geological materials for the determination of the noble metals (NM). The procedure is based on the use of a mixture of KBrF 4 and KHF 2 obtained in situ by adding liquid BrF 3 to a mixture of KHF 2 and sample powder. South African Geostandards SARM-7 platinum ore from the Merensky Reef and SARM-65, a platinum-bearing chromite ore, were used for method development. Following fluorinative decomposition of samples, a homogeneous product is obtained which is suitable for instrumental analysis using either atomic absorption or emission spectrometry techniques. Sulfatization of fusion product using H 2SO 4 produces a non-hygroscopic material, which can be easily powdered and sampled directly into the argon plasma. Solution-based analytical techniques can be applied directly after fluorinative decomposition and conversion of resulting fluorides into chlorides by HCl treatment. The proposed new method, combined with spectrometric emission analysis of powders using a double-jet plasmatron dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry (AES) instrument achieved the following limits of detection (LOD) for the noble metals: Ag, Au and Pd: 1-2×10 -2 g/ton; Pt: 5×10 -2 g/ton; Ru, Rh, Ir and Os: 1-3×10 -3 g/ton. Graphic furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) with preliminary extraction, LODs for NMs were: Pt and Ru: 1×10 -2; Pd and Rh: 1×10 -3; Au and Ag: 1-2×10 -4 g/ton. The relative standard deviation of NM determinations was dependent on concentration and sample type but commonly was in the range of 3-15% dc plasma AES and 5-30% for extraction GFAAS.

  6. Type I collagen-mediated synthesis of noble metallic nanoparticles networks and the applications in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sun, Lanlan; Zhang, Baohua; Xu, Fugang; Liu, Zhelin; Guo, Cunlan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhuang

    2009-08-15

    In this paper, we demonstrated an effective environmentally friendly synthesis route to prepare noble metallic (Au, Ag, Pt and Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) networks mediated by type I collagen in the absence of any seeds or surfactants. In the reactions, type I collagen served as stabilizing agent and assembly template for the synthesized metallic NPs. The hydrophobic interaction between collagen and mica interface as well as the hydrogen bonds between inter- and intra-collagen molecules play important roles in the formation of collagen-metallic NPs networks. The noble metallic NPs networks have many advantages in the applications of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and electrochemistry detection. Typically, the as-prepared Ag NPs networks reveal great Raman enhancement activity for 4-ATP, and can even be used to detect low concentration of DNA base, adenine, without any label step. Furthermore, the cyclic voltammograms showed Pt NPs networks have good electrocatalytic ability for the reduction of O(2).

  7. Noble-metal minerals in ores of the black-shale type in the Voronezh Crystalline Massif, central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshov, N. M.

    2009-12-01

    High-carbonaceous stratified formations and related metasomatic rocks of global abundance are among highly promising sources of gold and platinum-group metals (PGMs) in the 21st century. The Au-PGM mineralization of the black-shale type hosted in the Early Karelian Kursk and Oskol groups in central Russia is characterized by complex multicomponent and polymineralic composition (more than 60 ore minerals, including more than 20 Au and PGM phases) and diverse speciation of noble metals in form of (1) native elements (gold, palladium, platinum, osmium, silver); (2) metallic solid solutions and intermetallic compounds (Pt-bearing palladium, Fe-bearing platinum, gold-platinum-palladium, osmiridium, rutheniridosmin, platiridosmin, platosmiridium, Hg-Te-Ag-bearing gold, gold-silver amalgam, arquerite, palladium stannide (unnamed mineral), platinum-palladium-gold-silver-tin); (3) PGM, Au, and Ag sulfoarsenides, tellurides, antimonides, selenides, and sulfosalts (sperrylite, irarsite, hessite, Pd and Pt selenide (unnamed mineral)), testibiopalladinite, Pd antimonide (unnamed mineral), etc.; and (4) impurities in ore-forming sulfides, sulfoarsenides, tellurides, antimonides, and selenides. The chemical analyses of PGM and Au minerals are presented, and their morphology and microstructure are considered.

  8. From single atoms to self-assembled quantum single-atomic nanowires: noble metal atoms on black phosphorene monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X J; Shan, Wen-Wen; He, Hao; Xue, Xinlian; Guo, Z X; Li, S F

    2017-03-15

    Transition metal (TM) nanostructures, such as one dimensional (1D) nanowires with/without substrates, usually possess drastically different properties from their bulk counterparts, due to their distinct stacking and electronic confinement. Correspondingly, it is of great importance to establish the dominant driving force in forming 1D single-metal-atom-wires (SMAWs). Here, with first-principles calculations, taking the black phosphorene (BP) monolayer as a prototype 2D substrate, we investigate the energetic and kinetic properties of all the 5d-TM atoms on the 2D substrate to reveal the mechanism of formation of SMAWs. In contrast to other 5d- and 4d-TMs, noble metal elements Pd and Pt are found to prefer to grow along the trough in an atom-by-atom manner, self-assembling into SMAWs with a significant magic growth behavior. This is due to distinct binding energies and diffusion barriers along the trough, i.e., zig-zag direction, as compared to other directions of the BP. The present findings are valuable in the fabrication and modulation of 1D nanostructures which can be anticipated to possess desirable functionalities for potential applications such as in nanocatalysis, nanosensors, and related areas.

  9. Noble Hybrid Nanostructures as Efficient Anti-Proliferative Platforms for Human Breast Cancer Cell.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Premnath, Priyatha; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2016-04-27

    Nanomaterials have proven to possess great potential in biomaterials research. Recently, they have suggested considerable promise in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Among others, silicon (Si) nanomaterials have been extensively employed for various biomedical applications; however, the utilization of Si for cancer therapy has been limited to nanoparticles, and its potential as anticancer substrates has not been fully explored. Noble nanoparticles have also received considerable attention owing to unique anticancer properties to improve the efficiency of biomaterials for numerous biological applications. Nevertheless, immobilization and control over delivery of the nanoparticles have been challenge. Here, we develop hybrid nanoplatforms to efficiently hamper breast cancer cell adhesion and proliferation. Platforms are synthesized by femtosecond laser processing of Si into multiphase nanostructures, followed by sputter-coating with gold (Au)/gold-palladium (Au-Pd) nanoparticles. The performance of the developed platforms was then examined by exploring the response of normal fibroblast and metastatic breast cancer cells. Our results from the quantitative and qualitative analyses show a dramatic decrease in the number of breast cancer cells on the hybrid platform compared to untreated substrates. Whereas, fibroblast cells form stable adhesion with stretched and elongated cytoskeleton and actin filaments. The hybrid platforms perform as dual-acting cytophobic/cytostatic stages where Si nanostructures depress breast cancer cell adhesion while immobilized Au/Au-Pd nanoparticles are gradually released to affect any surviving cell on the nanostructures. The nanoparticles are believed to be taken up by breast cancer cells via endocytosis, which subsequently alter the cell nucleus and may cause cell death. The findings suggest that the density of nanostructures and concentration of coated nanoparticles play critical roles on cytophobic/cytostatic properties of the platforms on

  10. Modification of N-doped TiO2 photocatalysts using noble metals (Pt, Pd) - a combined XPS and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Batalović, K; Bundaleski, N; Radaković, J; Abazović, N; Mitrić, M; Silva, R A; Savić, M; Belošević-Čavor, J; Rakočević, Z; Rangel, C M

    2017-03-08

    Nitrogen-doped TiO2 (N-TiO2) is considered as one of the most promising materials for various photocatalytic applications, while noble metals Pd and Pt are known as good catalysts for hydrogen evolution. This work focuses on the determination of structural and electronic modifications of N-TiO2, achieved by noble metal deposition at the surface, as a starting indicator for potential applications. We focus on the properties of easily synthesized nanocrystalline nitrogen-doped anatase TiO2, modified by depositing small amounts of Pd (0.05 wt%) and Pt (0.10 wt%), aiming to demonstrate efficient enhancement of optical properties. The chemical states of dopants are studied in detail, using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, to address the potential of N-TiO2 to act as a support for metallic nanoparticles. DFT calculations are used to resolve substitutional from interstitial nitrogen doping of anatase TiO2, as well as to study the combined effect of nitrogen doping and oxygen vacancy formation. Based on the binding energies calculated using Slater's transition state theory, dominant contribution to the N 1s binding energy at 399.8 eV is ascribed to interstitially doped nitrogen in anatase TiO2. Given that both structure and photocatalytic properties depend greatly on the synthesis procedure, this work contributes further to establishing correlation between the structure and optical properties of the noble metal modified N-TiO2 system.

  11. Development of new generation of perovskite based noble metal/semiconductor photocatalysts for visible-light-driven hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Peichuan

    described in this dissertation. Noble metal nanoparticles have been proved to be effective co-catalysts due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Au and Pt nanoparticles with different sizes were synthesized and deposited on CdS. Sub-nanometer Au and Pt were found to be promising co-catalysts for photocatalytic hydrogen production reaction. Specifically, sub-nm Au and sub-nm Pt nanoparticles were found to enhance the photocatalytic activity in hydrogen production of CdS by 35 and 15 times respectively. Other noble metal co-catalysts, such as Ru, Pd and Rh were also deposited on CdS and their photocatalytic activities were investigated. Additionally, a novel chamber for photocatalytic reactions was developed as a part of this dissertation. The reaction chamber has several unique features allowing different reactions and measurements. The reactor was proved to be suitable for future projects in photocatalysis such as photocatalytic CO2 conversion into hydrocarbons.

  12. Study on the Catalytic Activity of Noble Metal Nanoparticles on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Oxygen Evolution Reactions in Lithium-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Jung, Hun-Gi; Kim, Jooho; Luo, Xiangyi; Lu, Jun; Curtiss, Larry; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Lee, Yun Jung

    2015-07-08

    Among many challenges present in Li-air batteries, one of the main reasons of low efficiency is the high charge overpotential due to the slow oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, we present systematic evaluation of Pt, Pd, and Ru nanoparticles supported on rGO as OER electrocatalysts in Li-air cell cathodes with LiCF3SO3-tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME) salt-electrolyte system. All of the noble metals explored could lower the charge overpotentials, and among them, Ru-rGO hybrids exhibited the most stable cycling performance and the lowest charge overpotentials. Role of Ru nanoparticles in boosting oxidation kinetics of the discharge products were investigated. Apparent behavior of Ru nanoparticles was different from the conventional electrocatalysts that lower activation barrier through electron transfer, because the major contribution of Ru nanoparticles in lowering charge overpotential is to control the nature of the discharge products. Ru nanoparticles facilitated thin film-like or nanoparticulate Li2O2 formation during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which decomposes at lower potentials during charge, although the conventional role as electrocatalysts during OER cannot be ruled out. Pt-and Pd-rGO hybrids showed fluctuating potential profiles during the cycling. Although Pt- and Pd-rGO decomposed the electrolyte after electrochemical cycling, no electrolyte instability was observed with Ru-rGO hybrids. This study provides the possibility of screening selective electrocatalysts for Li-air cells while maintaining electrolyte stability.

  13. New investigation in PVP-mediated synthesis of noble metallic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijia; Rosano-Ortega, Genoveva; Hu, Ye; Bai, Litao; Qin, Lidong

    2012-03-01

    As one of the most heavily used starting materials in metallic nanostructure syntheses, PVP has made a series of revolutionary successes. However, the true role of PVP still has not been fully understood. Herein, designed reactions and NMR analyses have been done to prove the redox reaction in PVP-mediated synthesis of metallic nanomaterials. As metal ions are reduced, alpha-pyrrolidone rings of PVP are partially oxidized and form poly(vinyl(pyrrolidone)x-(succinimide)y), which has a crucial surface modification capability for nanocrystals. This new finding provides insight into how PVP manipulates the structures and morphologies by modifying the reaction rate and stabilizing the nanocrystals.

  14. Release of Implanted Noble Gases from Metallic Glass Vitreloy During Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Vitreloy, a metallic vitreous glass, was examined as a potential target material for the Genesis Mission solar wind collector. Stepped pyrolysis revealed that He and Ne implanted in Vitreloy were efficiently re-trapped during phase transitions.

  15. GREENER PRODUCTION OF NOBLE METAL NANOSTRUCTURES AND NANOCOMPOSITES: RISK REDUCTION AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis of nanometal/nano metal oxide/nanostructured polymer and their stabilization (through dispersant, biodegradable polymer) involves the use of natural renewable resources such plant material extract, biodegradable polymers, sugars, vitamins and finally efficient and s...

  16. Praparation and Characterisation of TiO2 Nanotubular Arrays for Electro-Oxidation of Organic Compounds: Effect of Immobilization of the Noble Metal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mirghasem; Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen

    The morphology, composition and the electrochemical behavior of the anodic nanoporous layer, prepared by the galvanostatic anodisation of titanium, followed by galvanostatic deposition of noble metal particles have been investigated. The morphology and surface characteristics of result electrodes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively. The results indicated that noble metal particles were homogeneously deposited on the surface of TiO2 nanotubes. The nanotubular TiO2 layers consist of individual tubes of about 40-80 nm diameters. The electrocatalytic behavior of result electrodes for electro-oxidation of organic compounds (glucose, dopamine, ascorbic acid and hydrazine) was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The results showed that the result electrodes possess catalytic activity toward the oxidation organic compounds.

  17. Three dimensional nano-assemblies of noble metal nanoparticle-infinite coordination polymers as specific oxidase mimetics for degradation of methylene blue without adding any cosubstrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihua; Zeng, Yi; Shen, Aiguo; Zhou, Xiaodong; Hu, Jiming

    2015-02-07

    Novel three-dimensional (3D) nano-assemblies of noble metal nanoparticle (NP)-infinite coordination polymers (ICPs) are conveniently fabricated through the infiltration of HAuCl4 into hollow Au@Ag@ICPs core-shell nanostructures and its replacement reaction with Au@Ag NPs. The present 3D nano-assemblies exhibit highly efficient and specific intrinsic oxidase-like activity even without adding any cosubstrate.

  18. "Elastic" property of mesoporous silica shell: for dynamic surface enhanced Raman scattering ability monitoring of growing noble metal nanostructures via a simplified spatially confined growth method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Wang, Yunqing; Sun, Xiuyan; Wang, Wenhai; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-04-15

    The Raman enhancing ability of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is an important factor for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate screening, which is generally evaluated by simply mixing as-prepared NPs with Raman reporters for Raman signal measurements. This method usually leads to incredible results because of the NP surface coverage nonuniformity and reporter-induced NP aggregation. Moreover, it cannot realize in situ, continuous SERS characterization. Herein, we proposed a dynamic SERS monitoring strategy for NPs with precisely tuned structures based on a simplified spatially confined NP growth method. Gold nanorod (AuNR) seed NPs were coated with a mesoporous silica (mSiO2) shell. The permeability of mSiO2 for both reactive species and Raman reporters rendered the silver overcoating reaction and SERS indication of NP growth. Additionally, the mSiO2 coating ensured monodisperse NP growth in a Raman reporter-rich reaction system. Moreover, "elastic" features of mSiO2 were observed for the first time, which is crucial for holding the growing NP without breakage. This feature makes the mSiO2 coating adhere to metal NPs throughout the growing process, providing a stable Raman reporter distribution microenvironment near the NPs and ensuring that the substrate's SERS ability comparison is accurate. Three types of NPs, i.e., core-shell Au@AgNR@mSiO2, Au@AuNR@mSiO2, and yolk-shell Au@void@AuNR@mSiO2 NPs, were synthesized via core-shell overgrowth and galvanic replacement methods, showing the versatility of the approach. The living cell SERS labeling ability of Au@AgNR@mSiO2-based tags was also demonstrated. This strategy addresses the problems of multiple batch NP preparation, aggregation, and surface adsorption differentiation, which is a breakthrough for the dynamic comparison of SERS ability of metal NPs with precisely tuned structures and optical properties.

  19. Self-Supported Cu-Based Nanowire Arrays as Noble-Metal-Free Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chun-Chao; Fu, Wen-Fu; Chen, Yong

    2016-08-23

    Crystalline Cu-based nanowire arrays (NWAs) including Cu(OH)2 , CuO, Cu2 O, and CuOx are facilely grown on Cu foil and are found to act as highly efficient, low-cost, and robust electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Impressively, this noble-metal-free 3 D Cu(OH)2 -NWAs/Cu foil electrode shows the highest catalytic activity with a Tafel slope of 86 mV dec(-1) , an overpotential (η) of about 530 mV at ∼10 mA cm(-2) (controlled-potential electrolysis method without iR correction) and almost 100 % Faradic efficiency, paralleling the performance of the state-of-the-art RuO2 OER catalyst in 0.1 m NaOH solution (pH 12.8). To the best of our knowledge, this work represents one of the best results ever reported on Cu-based OER systems.

  20. Theoretical predictions of properties of group-2 elements including element 120 and their adsorption on noble metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Anton, J

    2012-04-07

    Trends in properties of group-2 elements Ca through element 120 and their M(2) and MAu dimers were determined on the basis of atomic and molecular relativistic density functional theory calculations. The relativistic contraction and stabilization of the ns AO with increasing atomic number were shown to result in the inversion of trends both in atomic and molecular properties in group 2 beyond Ba, so that element 120 should be chemically similar to Sr. Due to the same reason, bonding in (120)(2) and 120Au should be the weakest among the considered here M(2) and MAu. Using calculated dissociation energies of M(2), the sublimation enthalpy, ΔH(sub), of element 120 of 150 kJ/mol was estimated via a correlation between these quantities in group 2. Using the M-Au binding energies, the adsorption enthalpies, ΔH(ads), of element 120 of 172 kJ/mol on gold, 127 kJ/mol on platinum, and 50 kJ/mol on silver were estimated via a correlation with known ΔH(ads) in the group. These moderate values of ΔH(ads) are indicative of a possibility of chromatography adsorption studies of element 120 on these noble metal surfaces.

  1. Striving toward noble-metal-free photocatalytic water splitting: The hydrogenated-graphene-TiO2 prototype

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen-Phan, Thuy -Duong; Luo, Si; Liu, Zongyuan; ...

    2015-08-20

    Graphane, graphone and hydrogenated graphene (HG) have been extensively studied in recent years due to their interesting properties and potential use in commercial and industrial applications. The present study reports investigation of hydrogenated graphene/TiO2-x (HGT) nanocomposites as photocatalysts for H2 and O2 production from water without the assistance of a noble metal co-catalyst. By combination of several techniques, the morphologies, bulk/atomic structure and electronic properties of all the powders were exhaustively interrogated. Hydrogenation treatment efficiently reduces TiO2 nanoparticles, while the graphene oxide sheets undergo the topotactic transformation from a graphene-like structure to a mixture of graphitic and turbostratic carbon (amorphous/disordered)more » upon altering the calcination atmosphere from a mildly reducing to a H2-abundant environment. Remarkably, the hydrogenated graphene-TiO2-x composite that results upon H2-rich reduction exhibits the highest photocatalytic H2 evolution performance equivalent to low loading of Pt (~0.12 wt%), whereas the addition of HG suppresses the O2 production. As a result, we propose that such an enhancement can be attributed to a combination of factors including the introduction of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ states, retarding the recombination of charge carriers and thus, facilitating the charge transfer from TiO2-x to the carbonaceous sheet.« less

  2. Pulsed laser deposited indium tin oxides as alternatives to noble metals in the near-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu; Mak, C L; Zhang, Shiyu; Wang, Zhewei; Yuan, Wenjia; Ye, Hui

    2016-06-08

    Transparent conductive indium tin oxide thin films with thickness around 200 nm were deposited on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition technology. The microstructure and the electrical and optical properties of the ITO films deposited under different oxygen pressures and substrate temperatures were systematically investigated. Distinct different x-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the crystallinity of ITO films was highly influenced by deposition conditions. The highest carrier concentration of the ITO films was obtained as 1.34  ×  10(21) cm(-3) with the lowest corresponding resistivity of 2.41  ×  10(-4) Ω cm. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was applied to retrieve the dielectric permittivity of the ITO films to estimate their potential as plasmonic materials in the near-infrared region. The crossover wavelength (the wavelength where the real part of the permittivity changes from positive to negative) of the ITO films exhibited high dependence on the deposition conditions and was optimized to as low as 1270 nm. Compared with noble metals (silver or gold etc), the lower imaginary part of the permittivity (<3) of ITO films suggests the potential application of ITO in the near-infrared range.

  3. Morphological Evolution of Noble Metal Nanoparticles in Chloroform: Mechanism of Switching on/off by Protic Species

    PubMed Central

    Douglas-Gallardo, O. A.; Gomez, C. G.; Macchione, M. A.; Cometto, F. P.; Coronado, E. A.; Macagno, V. A.; Pérez, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The morphological stability/morphological reshaping of noble metal nanoparticles are studied experimentally in order to unravel the chemical mechanisms lying beneath. Gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs and AgNPs, respectively) formed in chloroformic environment are used, as model synthetic systems, to study phenomena of morphological change. The morphological evolution of NPs that follows their formation, is characterized by spectroscopy (UV-Visible, Raman and FTIR) and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy). The change of NP morphology involves the increase of the average NP size and the broadening of size distribution, in a close resemblance with the effect characteristically obtained from the Ostwald ripening. The effect of the poor solvating properties of chloroform in stabilizing small charged species (H+, Ag+, Au+) as well as the principle of electroneutrality of matter are analyzed in order to formulate a feasible reaction scheme consisting of a three-step processes: the generation of soluble intermediary species by corrosion of nanoparticles, the diffusion of intermediary species from one nanoparticle to another, and the re-deposition process involving the reduction of intermediary species. This basic reaction scheme is used as hypothesis to plan and perform experiments, which reveal that molecular oxygen dissolved in the dispersive medium can drive NP corrosion, however, protic species are also required as co-reactant. The polarity of the hydrogen bond and the ligand properties of the anions produced by deprotonation are feature of the protic species that enable/disable the corrosion and, in turn, the NP morphological evolution. PMID:26889378

  4. Intriguing structures and magic sizes of heavy noble metal nanoclusters around size 55 governed by relativistic effect and covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X J; Xue, X L; Guo, Z X; Jia, Yu; Li, S F; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gao, Y F

    2015-11-07

    Nanoclusters usually display exotic physical and chemical properties due to their intriguing geometric structures in contrast to their bulk counterparts. By means of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we find that heavy noble metal PtN nanoclusters around the size N = 55 begin to prefer an open configuration, rather than previously reported close-packed icosahedron or core-shell structures. Particularly, for PtN, the widely supposed icosahedronal magic cluster is changed to a three-atomic-layered structure with D6h symmetry, which can be well addressed by our recently established generalized Wulff construction principle (GWCP). However, the magic number of PtN clusters around 55 is shifted to a new odd number of 57. The high symmetric three-layered Pt57 motif is mainly stabilized by the enhanced covalent bonding contributed by both spin-orbital coupling effect and the open d orbital (5d(9)6s(1)) of Pt, which result in a delicate balance between the enhanced Pt-Pt covalent bonding of the interlayers and negligible d dangling bonds on the cluster edges. These findings about PtN clusters are also applicable to IrN clusters, but qualitatively different from their earlier neighboring element Os and their later neighboring element Au. The magic numbers for Os and Au are even, being 56 and 58, respectively. The findings of the new odd magic number 57 are the important supplementary of the recently established GWCP.

  5. Development of a general non-noble metal catalyst for the benign amination of alcohols with amines and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinjiang; Dai, Xingchao; Deng, Youquan; Shi, Feng

    2013-03-11

    The N-alkylation of amines or ammonia with alcohols is a valuable route for the synthesis of N-alkyl amines. However, as a potentially clean and economic choice for N-alkyl amine synthesis, non-noble metal catalysts with high activity and good selectivity are rarely reported. Normally, they are severely limited due to low activity and poor generality. Herein, a simple NiCuFeOx catalyst was designed and prepared for the N-alkylation of ammonia or amines with alcohol or primary amines. N-alkyl amines with various structures were successfully synthesized in moderate to excellent yields in the absence of organic ligands and bases. Typically, primary amines could be efficiently transformed into secondary amines and N-heterocyclic compounds, and secondary amines could be N-alkylated to synthesize tertiary amines. Note that primary and secondary amines could be produced through a one-pot reaction of ammonia and alcohols. In addition to excellent catalytic performance, the catalyst itself possesses outstanding superiority, that is, it is air and moisture stable. Moreover, the magnetic property of this catalyst makes it easily separable from the reaction mixture and it could be recovered and reused for several runs without obvious deactivation.

  6. Analysis of Bonding between Conjugated Organic Molecules and Noble Metal Surfaces Using Orbital Overlap Populations.

    PubMed

    Rangger, Gerold M; Romaner, Lorenz; Hofmann, Oliver T; Heimel, Georg; Ramsey, Michael G; Zojer, Egbert

    2010-11-09

    The electronic structure of metal-organic interfaces is of paramount importance for the properties of organic electronic and single-molecule devices. Here, we use so-called orbital overlap populations derived from slab-type band-structure calculations to analyze the covalent contribution to the bonding between an adsorbate layer and a metal. Using two prototypical molecules, the strong acceptor 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) on Ag(111) and the strong donor 1H,1'H-[4,4']bipyridinylidene (HV0) on Au(111), we present overlap populations as particularly versatile tools for describing the metal-organic interaction. Going beyond traditional approaches, in which overlap populations are represented in an atomic orbital basis, we also explore the use of a molecular orbital basis to gain significant additional insight. On the basis of the derived quantities, it is possible to identify the parts of the molecules responsible for the bonding and to analyze which of the molecular orbitals and metal bands most strongly contribute to the interaction and where on the energy scale they interact in bonding or antibonding fashion.

  7. Hemoglobin-carbon nanotube derived noble-metal-free Fe5C2-based catalyst for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Vij, Varun; Tiwari, Jitendra N; Lee, Wang-Geun; Yoon, Taeseung; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-02-03

    High performance non-precious cathodic catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are vital for the development of energy materials and devices. Here, we report an noble metal free, Fe5C2 nanoparticles-studded sp(2) carbon supported mesoporous material (CNTHb-700) as cathodic catalyst for ORR, which was prepared by pyrolizing the hybrid adduct of single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) and lyophilized hemoglobin (Hb) at 700 °C. The catalyst shows onset potentials of 0.92 V in 0.1 M HClO4 and in 0.1 M KOH which are as good as commercial Pt/C catalyst, giving very high current density of 6.34 and 6.69 mA cm(-2) at 0.55 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively. This catalyst has been confirmed to follow 4-electron mechanism for ORR and shows high electrochemical stability in both acidic and basic media. Catalyst CNTHb-700 possesses much higher tolerance towards methanol than the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Highly efficient catalytic properties of CNTHb-700 could lead to fundamental understanding of utilization of biomolecules in ORR and materialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for clean energy production.

  8. Hemoglobin-carbon nanotube derived noble-metal-free Fe5C2-based catalyst for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Varun; Tiwari, Jitendra N.; Lee, Wang-Geun; Yoon, Taeseung; Kim, Kwang S.

    2016-01-01

    High performance non-precious cathodic catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are vital for the development of energy materials and devices. Here, we report an noble metal free, Fe5C2 nanoparticles-studded sp2 carbon supported mesoporous material (CNTHb-700) as cathodic catalyst for ORR, which was prepared by pyrolizing the hybrid adduct of single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) and lyophilized hemoglobin (Hb) at 700 °C. The catalyst shows onset potentials of 0.92 V in 0.1 M HClO4 and in 0.1 M KOH which are as good as commercial Pt/C catalyst, giving very high current density of 6.34 and 6.69 mA cm−2 at 0.55 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively. This catalyst has been confirmed to follow 4-electron mechanism for ORR and shows high electrochemical stability in both acidic and basic media. Catalyst CNTHb-700 possesses much higher tolerance towards methanol than the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Highly efficient catalytic properties of CNTHb-700 could lead to fundamental understanding of utilization of biomolecules in ORR and materialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for clean energy production. PMID:26839148

  9. Hierarchical hybrid of Ni3N/N-doped reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as a noble metal free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Li, Yingjun; Li, Yetong; Huang, Keke; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Novel nickel nitride (Ni3N) nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (N-RGOs) are synthesized via a facile strategy including hydrothermal and subsequent calcination methods, in which the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (RGOs) are simultaneously doped with nitrogen species. By varying the content of the RGOs, a series of Ni3N/N-RGO nanocomposites are obtained. The Ni3N/N-RGO-30% hybrid nanocomposite exhibits superior catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) under alkaline condition (0.1 M KOH). Furthermore, this hybrid catalyst also demonstrates high tolerance to methanol poisoning. The RGO containing rich N confers the nanocomposite with large specific surface area and high electronic conduction ability, which can enhance the catalytic efficiency of Ni3N nanoparticles. The enhanced catalytic activity can be attributed to the synergistic effect between Ni3N and nitrogen doped reduced graphene oxide. In addition, the sufficient contact between Ni3N nanoparticles and the N-RGO nanosheets simultaneously promotes good nanoparticle dispersion and provides a consecutive activity sites to accelerate electron transport continuously, which further enhance the ORR performance. The Ni3N/N-RGO may be further an ideal candidate as efficient and inexpensive noble metal-free ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells.

  10. Hemoglobin-carbon nanotube derived noble-metal-free Fe5C2-based catalyst for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vij, Varun; Tiwari, Jitendra N.; Lee, Wang-Geun; Yoon, Taeseung; Kim, Kwang S.

    2016-02-01

    High performance non-precious cathodic catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are vital for the development of energy materials and devices. Here, we report an noble metal free, Fe5C2 nanoparticles-studded sp2 carbon supported mesoporous material (CNTHb-700) as cathodic catalyst for ORR, which was prepared by pyrolizing the hybrid adduct of single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) and lyophilized hemoglobin (Hb) at 700 °C. The catalyst shows onset potentials of 0.92 V in 0.1 M HClO4 and in 0.1 M KOH which are as good as commercial Pt/C catalyst, giving very high current density of 6.34 and 6.69 mA cm‑2 at 0.55 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively. This catalyst has been confirmed to follow 4-electron mechanism for ORR and shows high electrochemical stability in both acidic and basic media. Catalyst CNTHb-700 possesses much higher tolerance towards methanol than the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Highly efficient catalytic properties of CNTHb-700 could lead to fundamental understanding of utilization of biomolecules in ORR and materialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for clean energy production.

  11. Temperature-dependence of phonons, solid state properties and liquid structure of noble metals: A comparison of pair-potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszko, A.; Bose, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    Two groups of effective pair-potentials are studied from the viewpoint of their suitability in being able to describe solid state properties and liquid state structure of noble metals Cu, Ag and Au over a wide temperature range. Since the effective pair-potentials are usually empirical in nature, with parameters obtained by fitting to some reference state properties, the objective of the present study is to determine whether a particular parametrization scheme has any definite advantage over another. We consider Morse potentials with parameters determined by equilibrium lattice parameter, cohesive/sublimation energies as well as bulk modulus values of the solid at low/room temperatures. The other group of potentials considered is Erkoç potentials, where the parameters were determined first by studying dimers and further modified using bulk stability condition and bulk cohesive energy values. The potentials were then used to study the energetics of microclusters containing 3-7 atoms. Quasiharmonic results for the solid obtained at different temperatures and Monte Carlo simulation for the liquid state show that phonon spectra, thermal expansion, temperature-dependence of specific heats and liquid structure are much better described by the latter group. The first group of potentials may have an advantage in reproducing the temperature-dependence of elastic constants and bulk moduli, since they are based on room temperature values of these properties, which show only weak temperature-dependence in general for all metals. It is argued that potentials based on parameters fitted to the properties at a single volume are less versatile in capturing the temperature-dependence of various thermodynamic properties over a wide range. Potentials capable of reproducing the energetics of clusters of different co-ordination numbers and volumes per atom may fare better in this regard.

  12. Organic phase synthesis of noble metal-zinc chalcogenide core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Diab, Mahmud; Flomin, Kobi; Rukenstein, Pazit; Mokari, Taleb

    2016-10-15

    Multi-component nanostructures have been attracting tremendous attention due to their ability to form novel materials with unique chemical, optical and physical properties. Development of hybrid nanostructures that are composed of metal-semiconductor components using a simple approach is of interest. Herein, we report a robust and general organic phase synthesis of metal (Au or Ag)-Zinc chalcogenide (ZnS or ZnSe) core-shell nanostructures. This synthetic protocol also enabled the growth of more compositionally complex nanostructures of Au-ZnSxSe1-x alloys and Au-ZnS-ZnSe core-shell-shell. The optical and structural properties of these hybrid nanostructures are also presented.

  13. Method and electrochemical cell for synthesis and treatment of metal monolayer electrocatalysts metal, carbon, and oxide nanoparticles ion batch, or in continuous fashion

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2015-04-28

    An apparatus and method for synthesis and treatment of electrocatalyst particles in batch or continuous fashion is provided. In one embodiment, the apparatus comprises a sonication bath and a two-compartment chamber submerged in the sonication bath. The upper and lower compartments are separated by a microporous material surface. The upper compartment comprises a cover and a working electrode (WE) connected to a Pt foil contact, with the foil contact connected to the microporous material. The upper chamber further comprises reference counter electrodes. The lower compartment comprises an electrochemical cell containing a solution of metal ions. In one embodiment, the method for synthesis of electrocatalysts comprises introducing a plurality of particles into the apparatus and applying sonication and an electrical potential to the microporous material connected to the WE. After the non-noble metal ions are deposited onto the particles, the non-noble metal ions are displaced by noble-metal ions by galvanic displacement.

  14. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  15. Rajkonkoski gold-telluride ore occurrence: A new high prospective type of complex noble metal mineralization in the Karelian Proterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Sundblad, K.; Toritsin, A. N.; Golubev, A. I.; Lavrov, O. B.

    2008-11-01

    (tellurides of gold, silver and other metals, fluorite, roscoelite, vanadium-containing sulfides) associations. Taking into consideration that many of the xenothermal and epithermal A-type gold and silver deposits are large commercial objects, the prospects of the Rajkonkoski ore occurrence and the region of the Karelian craton and Svecofennian folded belt conjugation seem to be significant for noble metal mineralization.

  16. Supported noble metal catalysts in the catalytic wet air oxidation of industrial wastewaters and sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Besson, M; Descorme, C; Bernardi, M; Gallezot, P; di Gregorio, F; Grosjean, N; Minh, D Pham; Pintar, A

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews some catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) investigations of industrial wastewaters over platinum and ruthenium catalysts supported on TiO2 and ZrO2 formulated to be active and resistant to leaching, with particular focus on the stability of the catalyst. Catalyst recycling experiments were performed in batch reactors and long-term stability tests were conducted in trickle-bed reactors. The catalyst did not leach upon treatment of Kraft bleaching plant and olive oil mill effluents, and could be either recycled or used for long periods of time in continuous reactors. Conversely, these catalysts were rapidly leached when used to treat effluents from the production of polymeric membranes containing N,N-dimethylformamide. The intermediate formation of amines, such as dimethylamine and methylamine with a high complexing capacity for the metal, was shown to be responsible for the metal leaching. These heterogeneous catalysts also deactivated upon CWAO of sewage sludges due to the adsorption of the solid organic matter. Pre-sonication of the sludge to disintegrate the flocs and improve solubility was inefficient.

  17. Plasmon‐Mediated Solar Energy Conversion via Photocatalysis in Noble Metal/Semiconductor Composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengye; Ye, Meidan; Iocozzia, James

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics has remained a prominent and growing field over the past several decades. The coupling of various chemical and photo phenomenon has sparked considerable interest in plasmon‐mediated photocatalysis. Given plasmonic photocatalysis has only been developed for a relatively short period, considerable progress has been made in improving the absorption across the full solar spectrum and the efficiency of photo‐generated charge carrier separation. With recent advances in fundamental (i.e., mechanisms) and experimental studies (i.e., the influence of size, geometry, surrounding dielectric field, etc.) on plasmon‐mediated photocatalysis, the rational design and synthesis of metal/semiconductor hybrid nanostructure photocatalysts has been realized. This review seeks to highlight the recent impressive developments in plasmon‐mediated photocatalytic mechanisms (i.e., Schottky junction, direct electron transfer, enhanced local electric field, plasmon resonant energy transfer, and scattering and heating effects), summarize a set of factors (i.e., size, geometry, dielectric environment, loading amount and composition of plasmonic metal, and nanostructure and properties of semiconductors) that largely affect plasmonic photocatalysis, and finally conclude with a perspective on future directions within this rich field of research. PMID:27818901

  18. Plasmon-Mediated Solar Energy Conversion via Photocatalysis in Noble Metal/Semiconductor Composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengye; Ye, Meidan; Iocozzia, James; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonics has remained a prominent and growing field over the past several decades. The coupling of various chemical and photo phenomenon has sparked considerable interest in plasmon-mediated photocatalysis. Given plasmonic photocatalysis has only been developed for a relatively short period, considerable progress has been made in improving the absorption across the full solar spectrum and the efficiency of photo-generated charge carrier separation. With recent advances in fundamental (i.e., mechanisms) and experimental studies (i.e., the influence of size, geometry, surrounding dielectric field, etc.) on plasmon-mediated photocatalysis, the rational design and synthesis of metal/semiconductor hybrid nanostructure photocatalysts has been realized. This review seeks to highlight the recent impressive developments in plasmon-mediated photocatalytic mechanisms (i.e., Schottky junction, direct electron transfer, enhanced local electric field, plasmon resonant energy transfer, and scattering and heating effects), summarize a set of factors (i.e., size, geometry, dielectric environment, loading amount and composition of plasmonic metal, and nanostructure and properties of semiconductors) that largely affect plasmonic photocatalysis, and finally conclude with a perspective on future directions within this rich field of research.

  19. Enabling Overall Water Splitting on Photocatalysts by CO-Covered Noble Metal Co-catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Berto, Tobias F.; Sanwald, Kai E.; Byers, J. Paige; Browning, Nigel D.; Gutiérrez, Oliver Y.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-10-17

    Photocatalytic overall water splitting requires co-catalysts that efficiently promote the generation of H-2 but do not catalyze its reverse oxidation. We demonstrate that CO chemisorbed on metal co-catalysts (Rh, Pt, Pd) suppresses the back reaction while maintaining the rate of H-2 evolution. On Rh/GaN:ZnO, the highest H-2 production rates were obtained with 4-40 mbar of CO, the back reaction remaining suppressed below 7 mbar of O-2. The O-2 and H-2 evolution rates compete with CO oxidation and the back reaction. The rates of all reactions increased with increasing photon absorption. However, due to different dependencies on the rate of charge carrier generation, the selectivities for O-2 and H-2 formation increased in comparison to CO oxidation and the back reaction with increasing photon flux and/or quantum efficiency. Under optimum conditions, the impact of CO to prevent the back reaction is identical to that of a Cr2O3 layer covering the active metal particle.

  20. Non-noble metal vanadium phosphites with broad absorption for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun-Ling; Zhang, Jian-Han; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2016-05-15

    We reported the synthesis and crystal structures of alkali metal and alkali-earth metal phosphite, namely, CsV{sub 2}(H{sub 3}O)(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4} (1), and Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2). Both compounds were prepared by hydrothermal reactions and feature unique new structures. They both exhibit 3D complicated frameworks based on VO{sub 6} octahedra which are connected by HPO{sub 3} tetrahedra via corner-sharing. Alkali or alkali earth metal cations are filled in the different channels of the frameworks. Topological analysis shows that the framework of CsV{sub 2}(H{sub 3}O) (HPO{sub 3}){sub 4} (1) is a new 3,3,3,4,5-connected network with the Schläfli symbol of {4.6"2}{sub 2}{4"2.6"6.8"2}{6"3}{6"5.8}. The investigations of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and magnetic measurement on CsV{sub 2}(H{sub 3}O)(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4} suggest a +3 oxidation state of the vanadium ions in compound 1. Photocatalytic performance was evaluated by photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution and degradation of methylene blue, which shows that both compounds exhibit activity under visible-light irradiation. IR spectrum, UV–vis-NIR spectrum and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of compounds were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Metal vanadium phosphites with broad absorption for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and the degradation of methylene blue aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Two new vanadium phosphites, CsV{sub 2}(H{sub 3}O)(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 6}, are reported. • CsV{sub 2}(H{sub 3}O)(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 6} feature complicated 3D framework structures with different channels. • CsV{sub 2}(H{sub 3}O)(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 6} exhibit strong and broad absorptions in the visible and Near IR region. • Photocatalytic properties of CsV{sub 2}(H{sub 3}O)(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 6} are investigated. • The magnetic

  1. Striving toward noble-metal-free photocatalytic water splitting: The hydrogenated-graphene-TiO2 prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen-Phan, Thuy -Duong; Luo, Si; Liu, Zongyuan; Gamalski, Andrew D.; Tao, Jing; Xu, Wenqian; Stach, Eric A.; Polyansky, Dmitry E.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Fujita, Etsuko; Rodriguez, Jose A.

    2015-08-20

    Graphane, graphone and hydrogenated graphene (HG) have been extensively studied in recent years due to their interesting properties and potential use in commercial and industrial applications. The present study reports investigation of hydrogenated graphene/TiO2-x (HGT) nanocomposites as photocatalysts for H2 and O2 production from water without the assistance of a noble metal co-catalyst. By combination of several techniques, the morphologies, bulk/atomic structure and electronic properties of all the powders were exhaustively interrogated. Hydrogenation treatment efficiently reduces TiO2 nanoparticles, while the graphene oxide sheets undergo the topotactic transformation from a graphene-like structure to a mixture of graphitic and turbostratic carbon (amorphous/disordered) upon altering the calcination atmosphere from a mildly reducing to a H2-abundant environment. Remarkably, the hydrogenated graphene-TiO2-x composite that results upon H2-rich reduction exhibits the highest photocatalytic H2 evolution performance equivalent to low loading of Pt (~0.12 wt%), whereas the addition of HG suppresses the O2 production. As a result, we propose that such an enhancement can be attributed to a combination of factors including the introduction of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ states, retarding the recombination of charge carriers and thus, facilitating the charge transfer from TiO2-x to the carbonaceous sheet.

  2. Intriguing structures and magic sizes of heavy noble metal nanoclusters around size 55 governed by relativistic effect and covalent bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X. J.; Xue, X. L.; Jia, Yu; Guo, Z. X.; Li, S. F.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gao, Y. F.

    2015-11-07

    Nanoclusters usually display exotic physical and chemical properties due to their intriguing geometric structures in contrast to their bulk counterparts. By means of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we find that heavy noble metal Pt{sub N} nanoclusters around the size N = 55 begin to prefer an open configuration, rather than previously reported close-packed icosahedron or core-shell structures. Particularly, for Pt{sub N}, the widely supposed icosahedronal magic cluster is changed to a three-atomic-layered structure with D{sub 6h} symmetry, which can be well addressed by our recently established generalized Wulff construction principle (GWCP). However, the magic number of Pt{sub N} clusters around 55 is shifted to a new odd number of 57. The high symmetric three-layered Pt{sub 57} motif is mainly stabilized by the enhanced covalent bonding contributed by both spin-orbital coupling effect and the open d orbital (5d{sup 9}6s{sup 1}) of Pt, which result in a delicate balance between the enhanced Pt–Pt covalent bonding of the interlayers and negligible d dangling bonds on the cluster edges. These findings about Pt{sub N} clusters are also applicable to Ir{sub N} clusters, but qualitatively different from their earlier neighboring element Os and their later neighboring element Au. The magic numbers for Os and Au are even, being 56 and 58, respectively. The findings of the new odd magic number 57 are the important supplementary of the recently established GWCP.

  3. Intriguing structures and magic sizes of heavy noble metal nanoclusters around size 55 governed by relativistic effect and covalent bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X. J.; Xue, X. L.; Guo, Z. X.; Jia, Yu; Li, S. F.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gao, Y. F.

    2015-11-02

    Nanoclusters usually display exotic physical and chemical properties due to their intriguing geometric structures in contrast to their bulk counterparts. By means of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we find that heavy noble metal PtN nanoclusters around the size N = 55 begin to prefer an open configuration, rather than previously reported close-packed icosahedron or core-shell structures. Particularly, for PtN, the widely supposed icosahedronal magic cluster is changed to a three-atomic-layered structure with D6h symmetry, which can be well addressed by our recently established generalized Wulff construction principle (GWCP). But, the magic number of PtN clusters around 55 is shifted to a new odd number of 57. The high symmetric three-layered Pt-57 motif is mainly stabilized by the enhanced covalent bonding contributed by both spin-orbital coupling effect and the open d orbital (5d96s1) of Pt, which result in a delicate balance between the enhanced Pt-Pt covalent bonding of the interlayers and negligible d dangling bonds on the cluster edges. Our findings about PtN clusters are also applicable to IrN clusters, but qualitatively different from their earlier neighboring element Os and their later neighboring element Au. The magic numbers for Os and Au are even, being 56 and 58, respectively. Finally, the findings of the new odd magic number 57 are the important supplementary of the recently established GWCP.

  4. Intriguing structures and magic sizes of heavy noble metal nanoclusters around size 55 governed by relativistic effect and covalent bonding

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, X. J.; Xue, X. L.; Guo, Z. X.; ...

    2015-11-02

    Nanoclusters usually display exotic physical and chemical properties due to their intriguing geometric structures in contrast to their bulk counterparts. By means of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we find that heavy noble metal PtN nanoclusters around the size N = 55 begin to prefer an open configuration, rather than previously reported close-packed icosahedron or core-shell structures. Particularly, for PtN, the widely supposed icosahedronal magic cluster is changed to a three-atomic-layered structure with D6h symmetry, which can be well addressed by our recently established generalized Wulff construction principle (GWCP). But, the magic number of PtN clusters around 55 ismore » shifted to a new odd number of 57. The high symmetric three-layered Pt-57 motif is mainly stabilized by the enhanced covalent bonding contributed by both spin-orbital coupling effect and the open d orbital (5d96s1) of Pt, which result in a delicate balance between the enhanced Pt-Pt covalent bonding of the interlayers and negligible d dangling bonds on the cluster edges. Our findings about PtN clusters are also applicable to IrN clusters, but qualitatively different from their earlier neighboring element Os and their later neighboring element Au. The magic numbers for Os and Au are even, being 56 and 58, respectively. Finally, the findings of the new odd magic number 57 are the important supplementary of the recently established GWCP.« less

  5. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger

  6. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by macroscopic galvanic cell-driven metal catalyzed electroless etching in aerated HF solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Peng, Kui-Qing; Hu, Ya; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-03-05

    Macroscopic galvanic cell-driven metal catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE) of silicon in aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution is devised to fabricate silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with dissolved oxygen acting as the one and only oxidizing agent. The key aspect of this strategy is the use of a graphite or other noble metal electrode that is electrically coupled with silicon substrate.

  7. The energy barrier at noble metal/TiO{sub 2} junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein-Babaei, F. E-mail: fhbabaei@yahoo.com; Lajvardi, Mehdi M. Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2015-02-23

    Nobel metal/TiO{sub 2} structures are used as catalysts in chemical reactors, active components in TiO{sub 2}-based electronic devices, and connections between such devices and the outside circuitry. Here, we investigate the energy barrier at the junctions between vacuum-deposited Ag, Au, and Pt thin films and TiO{sub 2} layers by recording their electrical current vs. voltage diagrams and spectra of optical responses. Deposited Au/, Pt/, and Ag/TiO{sub 2} behave like contacts with zero junction energy barriers, but the thermal annealing of the reverse-biased devices for an hour at 523 K in air converts them to Schottky diodes with high junction energy barriers, decreasing their reverse electric currents up to 10{sup 6} times. Similar thermal processing in vacuum or pure argon proved ineffective. The highest energy barrier and the lowest reverse current among the devices examined belong to the annealed Ag/TiO{sub 2} contacts. The observed electronic features are described based on the physicochemical parameters of the constituting materials. The formation of higher junction barriers with rutile than with anatase is demonstrated.

  8. Thermal metamorphism of mantle chromites and the stability of noble-metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jiménez, José M.; Reich, Martin; Camprubí, Antoni; Gervilla, Fernando; Griffin, William L.; Colás, Vanessa; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Proenza, Joaquín A.; Pearson, Norman J.; Centeno-García, Elena

    2015-08-01

    The Loma Baya complex in south-western Mexico is a volume of chromitite-bearing oceanic mantle that records a complex metamorphic history, defined by a first stage of hydrous metamorphism overprinted by a short-lived thermal event associated with an Eocene granite intrusion. During the hydrous metamorphism, the primary magmatic chromite-olivine assemblage was replaced by a secondary, porous intergrowth of Fe2+-rich chromite and chlorite. The heat supplied by an Eocene-age granite intrusion reversed the hydration reaction, producing chromite rims with perfectly developed crystal faces. This third-generation chromite is in equilibrium with highly magnesian (neoformed) olivine and defines a chemical trend analogous to the original magmatic one. The preservation of both reactions in the Loma Baya chromitite provides compelling evidence that the hydration of chromite can be reversed by either prograde metamorphism or any heating event, confirming previous thermodynamic predictions. Understanding these complex features is of particular interest due to the fact that changes in temperature and variable degrees of fluid/rock interaction during metamorphism and intrusion have also significantly affected the chromite-hosted IPGE carrier phases. Here, we propose that the metamorphic fluids involved in the hydrous metamorphism have caused the desulphurization of laurite RuS2, releasing minute particles of Ru-Os-Ir alloys <50 nm in diameter. The following short-lived thermal event that promoted dehydration in the chromitite had the opposite effect on nanoparticle stability, producing a significant coarsening of metal nanoparticles to dimensions larger than a micron. Based on such observations, we argue that IPGE nanoparticles can be exsolved and grown (or coarsen) from sulphide matrices during prograde metamorphism or heating and not exclusively upon cooling under magmatic conditions as it has been previously suggested. These results provide new insights on the relevant role of

  9. Laser synthesis, structure and chemical properties of colloidal nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles for the substitution of noble metals in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Marzun, Galina; Levish, Alexander; Mackert, Viktor; Kallio, Tanja; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    Platinum and iridium are rare and expensive noble metals that are used as catalysts for different sectors including in heterogeneous chemical automotive emission catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion. Nickel and its alloys are promising materials to substitute noble metals. Nickel based materials are cost-effective with good availability and show comparable catalytic performances. The nickel-molybdenum system is a very interesting alternative to platinum in water electrolysis. We produced ligand-free nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles by laser ablation in water and acetone. Our results show that segregated particles were formed in water due to the oxidation of the metals. X-ray diffraction shows a significant change in the lattice parameter due to a diffusion of molybdenum atoms into the nickel lattice with increasing activity in the electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction. Even though the solubility of molecular oxygen in acetone is higher than in water, there were no oxides and a more homogeneous metal distribution in the particles in acetone as seen by TEM-EDX. This showed that dissolved molecular oxygen does not control oxide formation. Overall, the laser ablation of pressed micro particulate mixtures in liquids offers a combinational synthesis approach that allows the screening of alloy nanoparticles for catalytic testing and can convert micro-mixtures into nano-alloys.

  10. Noble metal-catalyzed homogeneous and heterogeneous processes in treating simulated nuclear waste media with formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-09-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO{sub 3}{sup 2}-, NO{sub 3}-, and NO{sub 2}- were used to study reactions of formic acid at 90{degrees}C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O in the gas phase and a microammonia electrode to analyze the NH{sub 4}+/NH{sub 3} in the liquid phase as a function of time. The following reactions have been studied in these systems since they are undesirable side reactions in nuclear waste processing: (1) Decomposition of formic acid to CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2} is undesirable because of the potential fire and explosion hazard of H{sub 2}. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl{sub 3}-3H{sub 2}O, was found to be the most active catalyst for H{sub 2} generation from formic acid above {approximately} 80{degrees}C in the presence of nitrite ion. The H{sub 2} production rate has an approximate pseudo first-order dependence on the Rh concentration, (2) Generation of NH{sub 3} from the formic acid reduction of nitrate and/or nitrite is undesirable because of a possible explosion hazard from NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} accumulation in a waste processing plant off-gas system. The Rh-catalyzed reduction of nitrogen-oxygen compounds to ammonia by formic acid was found to exhibit the following features: (a) Nitrate rather than nitrite is the principal source of NH{sub 3}. (b) Ammonia production occurs at the expense of hydrogen production. (c) Supported rhodium metal catalysts are more active than rhodium in any other form, suggesting that ammonia production involves heterogeneous rather than homogeneous catalysis.

  11. Quantum mechanical origin of the plasmonic properties of noble metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidez, Emilie Brigitte

    Small silver and gold clusters (less than 2 nm) display a discrete absorption spectrum characteristic of molecular systems whereas larger particles display a strong, broad absorption band in the visible. The latter feature is due to the surface plasmon resonance, which is commonly explained by the collective dipolar motion of free electrons across the particle, creating charged surface states. The evolution between molecular properties and plasmon is investigated. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations are performed to study the absorption spectrum of cluster-size silver and gold nanorods. The absorption spectrum of these silver nanorods exhibits high-intensity longitudinal and transverse modes (along the long and short axis of the nanorod respectively), similar to the plasmons observed experimentally for larger nanoparticles. These plasmon modes result from a constructive addition of the dipole moments of nearly degenerate single-particle excitations. The number of single-particle transitions involved increases with increasing system size, due to the growing density of states available. Gold nanorods exhibit a broader absorption spectrum than their silver counterpart due to enhanced relativistic effects, affecting the onset of the longitudinal plasmon mode. The high-energy, high-intensity beta-peak of acenes also results from a constructive addition of single-particle transitions and I show that it can be assigned to a plasmon. I also show that the plasmon modes of both acenes and metallic nanoparticles can be described with a simple configuration interaction (CI) interpretation. The evolution between molecular absorption spectrum and plasmon is also investigated by computing the density of states of spherical thiolate-protected gold clusters using a charge-perturbed particle-in-a-sphere model. The electronic structure obtained with this model gives good qualitative agreement with DFT calculations at a fraction of the cost. The progressive

  12. From hydrogenases to noble metal-free catalytic nanomaterials for H2 production and uptake.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Alan; Artero, Vincent; Jousselme, Bruno; Tran, Phong Dinh; Guillet, Nicolas; Métayé, Romain; Fihri, Aziz; Palacin, Serge; Fontecave, Marc

    2009-12-04

    Interconversion of water and hydrogen in unitized regenerative fuel cells is a promising energy storage framework for smoothing out the temporal fluctuations of solar and wind power. However, replacement of presently available platinum catalysts by lower-cost and more abundant materials is a requisite for this technology to become economically viable. Here, we show that the covalent attachment of a nickel bisdiphosphine-based mimic of the active site of hydrogenase enzymes onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes results in a high-surface area cathode material with high catalytic activity under the strongly acidic conditions required in proton exchange membrane technology. Hydrogen evolves from aqueous sulfuric acid solution with very low overvoltages (20 millivolts), and the catalyst exhibits exceptional stability (more than 100,000 turnovers). The same catalyst is also very efficient for hydrogen oxidation in this environment, exhibiting current densities similar to those observed for hydrogenase-based materials.

  13. Closed cell metal foam method

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Foamed metals and metal alloys which have a closed cellular structure are prepared by heating a metal body containing entrapped inert gas uniformly distributed throughout to a temperature above the melting point of the metal and maintaining the body at this temperature a period of time sufficient to permit the entrapped gas to expand, forming individual cells within the molten metal, thus expanding and foaming the molten metal. After cell formation has reached the desired amount, the foamed molten metal body is cooled to below the melting temperature of the metal. The void area or density of the foamed metal is controlled by predetermining the amount of inert gas entrapped in the metal body and by the period of time the metal body is maintained in the molten state. This method is useful for preparing foamed metals and metal alloys from any metal or other material of which a body containing entrapped inert gas can be prepared.

  14. Dose-dependent surface endothelialization and biocompatibility of polyurethane noble metal nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christian; Schwenke, Andreas; Wagener, Philipp; Franzka, Steffen; Laszlo Sajti, Csaba; Pflaum, Michael; Wiegmann, Bettina; Haverich, Axel; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Surface pre-endothelialization is a promising approach to improve the hemocompatibility of implants, medical devices, and artificial organs. To promote the adhesive property of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) for endothelial cells (ECs), up to 1 wt % of gold (Au) or platinum (Pt) nanoparticles, fabricated by pulsed laser ablation in polymer solution, were embedded into the polymer matrix. The analysis of these nanocomposites showed a homogenous dispersion of the nanoparticles, with average diameters of 7 nm for Au or 9 nm for Pt. A dose-dependent effect was found when ECs were seeded onto nanocomposites comprising different nanoparticle concentrations, resulting in a fivefold improvement of proliferation at 0.1 wt % nanoparticle load. This effect was associated with a nanoparticle concentration-dependent hydrophilicity and negative charge of the nanocomposite. In dynamic flow tests, nanocomposites containing 0.1 wt % Au or Pt nanoparticles allowed for the generation of a confluent and resistant EC layer. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification of specific markers for EC activation indicated that ECs cultivated on nanocomposites remain in an inactivated, nonthrombogenic and noninflammatory state; however, maintain the ability to trigger an inflammatory response upon stimulation. These findings were confirmed by a platelet and leukocyte adhesion assay. The results of this study suggest the possible applicability of TPU nanocomposites, containing 0.1 wt % Au or Pt nanoparticles, for the generation of pre-endothelialized surfaces of medical devices.

  15. In Situ Studies of Surface Mobility on Noble Metal Model Catalysts Using STM and XPS at Ambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Derek Robert

    2010-06-01

    High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (HP-STM) and Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used to study the structural properties and catalytic behavior of noble metal surfaces at high pressure. HP-STM was used to study the structural rearrangement of the top most atomic surface layer of the metal surfaces in response to changes in gas pressure and reactive conditions. AP-XPS was applied to single crystal and nanoparticle systems to monitor changes in the chemical composition of the surface layer in response to changing gas conditions. STM studies on the Pt(100) crystal face showed the lifting of the Pt(100)-hex surface reconstruction in the presence of CO, H2, and Benzene. The gas adsorption and subsequent charge transfer relieves the surface strain caused by the low coordination number of the (100) surface atoms allowing the formation of a (1 x 1) surface structure commensurate with the bulk terminated crystal structure. The surface phase change causes a transformation of the surface layer from hexagonal packing geometry to a four-fold symmetric surface which is rich in atomic defects. Lifting the hex reconstruction at room temperature resulted in a surface structure decorated with 2-3 nm Pt adatom islands with a high density of step edge sites. Annealing the surface at a modest temperature (150 C) in the presence of a high pressure of CO or H2 increased the surface diffusion of the Pt atoms causing the adatom islands to aggregate reducing the surface concentration of low coordination defect sites. Ethylene hydrogenation was studied on the Pt(100) surface using HP-STM. At low pressure, the lifting of the hex reconstruction was observed in the STM images. Increasing the ethylene pressure to 1 Torr, was found to regenerate the hexagonally symmetric reconstructed phase. At room temperature ethylene undergoes a structural rearrangement to form ethylidyne. Ethylidyne preferentially binds at the three-fold hollow sites, which

  16. A coupled-cluster study on the noble gas binding ability of metal cyanides versus metal halides (metal = Cu, Ag, Au).

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Gupta, Ashutosh; Saha, Ranajit; Merino, Gabriel; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-11-05

    A coupled-cluster study is carried out to investigate the efficacy of metal(I) cyanide (MCN; M = Cu, Ag, Au) compounds to bind with noble gas (Ng) atoms. The M-Ng bond dissociation energy, enthalpy change, and Gibbs free energy change for the dissociation processes producing Ng and MCN are computed to assess the stability of NgMCN compounds. The Ng binding ability of MCN is then compared with the experimentally detected NgMX (X = F, Cl, Br) compounds. While CuCN and AgCN have larger Ng binding ability than those of MCl and MBr (M = Cu, Ag), AuCN shows larger efficacy toward bond formation with Ng than that of AuBr. Natural bond orbital analysis, energy decomposition analysis in conjunction with the natural orbital for chemical valence theory, and the topological analysis of the electron density are performed to understand the nature of interaction occurring in between Ng and MCN. The Ng-M bonds in NgMCN are found comprise an almost equal contribution from covalent and electrostatic types of interactions. The different electron density descriptors also reveal the partial covalent character in the concerned bonds.

  17. Synergizing the multiple plasmon resonance coupling and quantum effects to obtain enhanced SERS and PEC performance simultaneously on a noble metal-semiconductor substrate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Wenna; Li, Lidong; Chen, Junhong; Hou, Xinmei; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2017-02-09

    Aiming to achieve the synergistic enhancement of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) performance on a noble metal-semiconductor, such as Au nanoparticles (NPs)-TiO2 nanotube arrays (TiO2 NTAs@hybrid Au NPs), theoretical calculation and experiments are performed. Theoretical calculation indicates that both the SERS and PEC performance can be enhanced by coupling different sized Au NPs on TiO2 NTAs based on synergizing the multiple plasmon resonance coupling and quantum effects. To further verify this mechanism, TiO2 NTAs@hybrid Au NPs are assembled via synthesis of TiO2 NTAs through the anodic oxidation process, followed by the deposition of different sized Au NPs onto the TiO2 surface simultaneously using physical vapor deposition (PVD) in this work. Such substrates exhibit excellent detection sensitivity towards organic dyes including Rhodamine B (RhB), the organic herbicide dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and the organophosphate pesticide methyl-parathion (MP) with high reproducibility, stability and reusability. Meanwhile the PEC performance based on this substrate remains efficient compared with the reported results in the literature. The efficient PEC performance mainly originates from both the quantum effect of Au nanoparticles and the formation of a metal-semiconductor heterojunction. It is proposed that other noble metal-semiconductor complex nanomaterials can also obtain both enhanced SERS and PEC performance based on the above mechanism.

  18. Effect of promoter and noble metals and suspension pH on catalytic nitrate reduction by bimetallic nanoscale Fe(0) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sungjun; Hamid, Shanawar; Jung, Junyoung; Sihn, Youngho; Lee, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of experimental factors (types of promotor and noble metals, H2 injection, and suspension pH) on catalytic nitrate reduction by bimetallic catalysts supported by nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI). NZVI without H2 injection showed 71% of nitrate reduction in 1 h. Cu/NZVI showed the almost complete nitrate reduction (96%) in 1 h, while 67% of nitrate was reduced by Ni/NZVI. The presence of noble metals (Pd and Pt) on Cu/NZVI without H2 injection resulted in the decrease of removal efficiency to 89% and 84%, respectively, due probably to the electron loss of NZVI for formation of metallic Pd and Pt. H2 injection into Cu-Pd/NZVI suspension significantly improved both catalytic nitrate reduction (>97% in 30 min) and N2 selectivity (18%), indicating that adsorbed H on active Pd sites played an important role for the enhanced nitrate reduction and N2 selectivity. The rapid passivation of NZVI surface resulted in a dramatic decrease in nitrate reduction (79-28%) with an increase in N2 selectivity (8-66%) as the suspension pH increased from 8 to 10.

  19. Decoration of Micro-/Nanoscale Noble Metal Particles on 3D Porous Nickel Using Electrodeposition Technique as Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Hang, Tao; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Li, Ming

    2015-07-29

    Micro-/nanoscale noble metal (Ag, Au, and Pt) particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte are fabricated via galvanostatic electrodeposition technique. The developed electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements including Tafel polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is clearly shown that the enlarged real surface area caused by 3D highly porous dendritic structure has greatly reinforced the electrocatalytic activity toward HER. Comparative analysis of electrodeposited Ag, Au, and Pt particle-decorated porous nickel electrodes for HER indicates that both intrinsic property and size of the noble metal particles can lead to distinct catalytic activities. Both nanoscale Au and Pt particles have further reinforcement effect toward HER, whereas microscale Ag particles exhibit the reverse effect. As an effective 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, the nanoscale Pt-particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrode demonstrates the highest catalytic activity with an extremely low overpotential of -0.045 V for hydrogen production, a considerable exchange current density of 9.47 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C, and high durability in long-term electrolysis, all of which are attributed to the intrinsic catalytic property and the extremely small size of Pt particles.

  20. a Chirped Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Cp-Ftmw Spectrometer with Laser Ablation Source to Search for Actinide-Containing Molecules and Noble Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank E.; Gillcrist, David Joseph; Persinger, Thomas D.; Moon, Nicole; Grubbs, G. S., II

    2016-06-01

    Microwave spectroscopic techniques have traditionally been part of the foundation of molecular structure and this conference. Instrumental developments by Brooks Pate and sourcing developments by Steve Cooke on these instruments have allowed for the dawning of a new era in modern microwave spectroscopic techniques. With these advances and the growth of powerful computational approaches, microwave spectroscopists can now search for molecules and/or cluster systems of actinide and noble metal-containing species with increasing certainty in molecular assignment even with the difficulties presented with spin-orbit coupling and relativistic effects. Spectrometer and ablation design will be presented along with any preliminary results on actinide-containing molecules or noble metal clusters or interactions. G. G. Brown, B. C. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman, B. H. Pate, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 (2008) 053103-1 - 053103-13 G. S. Grubbs II, C. T. Dewberry, K. C. Etchison, K. E. Kerr, S. A. Cooke, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 096106-1 - 096106-3

  1. A general approach to fabricate diverse noble-metal (Au, Pt, Ag, Pt/Au)/Fe2O3 hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Guo, Xianzhi; Wu, Shihua; Wang, Shurong

    2010-07-19

    A novel, facile, and general one-pot strategy is explored for the synthesis of diverse noble-metal (Au, Pt, Ag, or Pt/Au)/Fe(2)O(3) hybrid nanoparticles with the assistance of lysine (which is a nontoxic, user friendly amino acid that is compatible with organisms) and without using any other functionalization reagents. Control experiments show that lysine, which contains both amino and carboxylic groups, plays dual and crucial roles as both linker and capping agents in attaching noble metals with a small size and uniform distribution onto an Fe(2)O(3) support. Considering the perfect compatibility of lysine with organism, this approach may find potentials in biochemistry and biological applications. Furthermore, this novel route is also an attractive alternative and supplement to the current methods using a silane coupling agent or polyelectrolyte for preparing hybrid nanomaterials. To demonstrate the usage of such hybrid nanomaterials, a chemical gas sensor has been fabricated from the as-synthesized Au/Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles and investigated for ethanol detection. Results show that the hybrid sensor exhibits significantly improved sensor performances in terms of high sensitivity, low detection limit, better selectivity, and good reproducibility in comparison with pristine Fe(2)O(3). Most importantly, this general approach can be further employed to fabricate other hybrid nanomaterials based on different support materials.

  2. Mono- and bimetallic Rh and Pt NSR-catalysts prepared by controlled deposition of noble metals on support or storage component

    PubMed Central

    Büchel, Robert; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Baiker, Alfons

    2013-01-01

    Mono- and bimetallic Rh and Pt based NOx storage-reduction (NSR) catalysts, where the noble metals were deposited on the Al2O3 support or BaCO3 storage component, have been prepared using a twin flame spray pyrolysis setup. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, CO chemisorption combined with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The NSR performance of the catalysts was investigated by fuel lean/rich cycling in the absence and presence of SO2 (25 ppm) as well as after H2 desulfation at 750 °C. The performance increased when Rh was located on BaCO3 enabling good catalyst regeneration during the fuel rich phase. Best performance was observed for bimetallic catalysts where the noble metals were separated, with Pt on Al2O3 and Rh on BaCO3. The Rh-containing catalysts generally showed much higher tolerance to SO2 during fuel rich conditions and lost only little activity during thermal aging at 750 °C. PMID:23741085

  3. Noble-Metal-Free Janus-like Structures by Cation Exchange for Z-Scheme Photocatalytic Water Splitting under Broadband Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qichen; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Ye, Wei; Ju, Huanxin; Shi, Lei; Long, Ran; Zhu, Junfa; Xiong, Yujie

    2017-03-15

    Z-scheme water splitting is a promising approach based on high-performance photocatalysis by harvesting broadband solar energy. Its efficiency depends on the well-defined interfaces between two semiconductors for the charge kinetics and their exposed surfaces for chemical reactions. Herein, we report a facile cation-exchange approach to obtain compounds with both properties without the need for noble metals by forming Janus-like structures consisting of γ-MnS and Cu7 S4 with high-quality interfaces. The Janus-like γ-MnS/Cu7 S4 structures displayed dramatically enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production rates of up to 718 μmol g(-1)  h(-1) under full-spectrum irradiation. Upon further integration with an MnOx oxygen-evolution cocatalyst, overall water splitting was accomplished with the Janus structures. This work provides insight into the surface and interface design of hybrid photocatalysts, and offers a noble-metal-free approach to broadband photocatalytic hydrogen production.

  4. Noble metal free photocatalytic H2 generation on black TiO2: On the influence of crystal facets vs. crystal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Steinrück, Hans-Georg; Osvet, Andres; Yang, Yuyun; Schmuki, Patrik

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigate noble metal free photocatalytic water splitting on natural anatase single crystal facets and on wafer slices of the [001] plane before and after these surfaces have been modified by high pressure hydrogenation and hydrogen ion-implantation. We find that on the natural, intact low index planes, photocatalytic H2 evolution (in the absence of a noble metal co-catalyst) can only be achieved when the hydrogenation treatment is accompanied by the introduction of crystal damage, such as simple scratching and miscut in the crystal, or by implantation damage. X-ray reflectivity, Raman, and optical reflection measurements show that plain hydrogenation leads to a ≈ 1 nm thick black titania surface layer without activity, while a colorless, density modified, and ≈7 nm thick layer with broken crystal symmetry is present on the ion implanted surface. These results demonstrate that (i) the H-treatment of an intact anatase surface needs to be combined with defect formation for catalytic activation and (ii) activation does not necessarily coincide with the presence of black color.

  5. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of noble metal-modified TiO2 nanosheets with exposed {0 0 1} facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diak, Magdalena; Grabowska, Ewelina; Zaleska, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    Pt, Pd, Ag and Au nanoparticles were photodeposited on the {0 0 1} crystal facets of the TiO2 anatase nanosheets. Morphological and surface characterization of the samples as well as photocatalytic activity were studied. The influence of metal precursor concentration used during photodeposition (0.05-0.5%) on size of formed metal nanoparticles together with UV and vis-mediated activity of Pt, Pd, Ag or Au-TiO2 was investigated. Generally, samples obtained by photodeposition of noble metal nanoparticles using their 0.2% precursor solutions revealed highest activity in phenol degradation reaction under visible light (λ > 420 nm). The photoactivity of the as-prepared samples with respect to the modified metal species was ordered Ag≅Pd > Au > Pt. TEM analysis showed that photodeposited metal nanoparticles appeared only on {0 0 1} facets of TiO2. The average degradation rate of phenol in the presence of Pd and Ag-TiO2 was 0.5 μmol dm-3 min-1 after 60 min of irradiation under visible light, and was five times higher than that of pure TiO2 nanosheets.

  7. Demonstration of neutron detection utilizing open cell foam and noble gas scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, C. M. Miller, E. C.; Coplan, M.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Yue, A. T.; Kowler, A. L.; Koeth, T.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Clark, Charles W.

    2015-03-02

    We present results demonstrating neutron detection via a closely spaced converter structure coupled to low pressure noble gas scintillation instrumented by a single photo-multiplier tube (PMT). The converter is dispersed throughout the gas volume using a reticulated vitreous carbon foam coated with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C). A calibrated cold neutron beam is used to measure the neutron detection properties, using a thin film of enriched {sup 10}B as a reference standard. Monte Carlo computations of the ion energy deposition are discussed, including treatment of the foam random network. Results from this study indicate that the foam shadows a significant portion of the scintillation light from the PMT. The high scintillation yield of Xe appears to overcome the light loss, facilitating neutron detection and presenting interesting opportunities for neutron detector design.

  8. Genesis Noble Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    The original thrust of our Genesis funding was to extend and refine the noble gas analytical capabilities of this laboratory to improve the precision and accuracy of noble gas measurements in order to optimize the scientific return from the Genesis Mission. This process involved both instrumental improvement (supplemented by a SRLIDAP instrument grant) and refinement of technique. The Genesis landing mishap shifted our emphasis to the irregular aluminum heat shield material from the flat collector wafers. This has required redesign of our laser extraction cells to accommodate the longer focal lengths required for laser extraction from non-flat surfaces. Extraction of noble gases from solid aluminum surfaces, rather than thin coatings on transparent substrates has required refinement of controlled-depth laser ablation techniques. Both of these bring new problems, both with potentially higher blanks form larger laser cells and the larger quantities of evaporated aluminum which can coat the sapphire entrance ports. This is mainly a problem for the heavy noble gases where larger extraction areas are required, necessitating the new aluminum vapor containment techniques described below. With the Genesis Mission came three new multiple multiplier noble gas mass spectrometers to this laboratory, one built solely by us (Supergnome-M), one built in collaboration with Nu-Instruments (Noblesse), and one built in collaboration with GVI (Helix). All of these have multiple multiplier detection sections with the Nu-Instruments using a pair of electrostatic quad lenses for isotope spacing and the other two using mechanically adjustable positions for the electron multipliers. The Supergnome-M and Noblesse are installed and running. The GVI instrument was delivered a year late (in March 2005) and is yet to be installed by GVI. As with all new instruments there were some initial development issues, some of which are still outstanding. The most serious of these are performance issues

  9. Surface Functionalization of g-C3 N4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin; Lin, Bin; Yu, Weili; Yang, Yong; Bashir, Shahid M; Wang, Hong; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Idriss, Hicham; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-13

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3 N4 . This catalyst family (with less than 0.1 wt % of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3 wt % platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24 h.

  10. Structural changes of noble metal catalysts during ignition and extinction of the partial oxidation of methane studied by advanced QEXAFS techniques.

    PubMed

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Beier, Matthias; Kimmerle, Bertram; Baiker, Alfons; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Griesebock, Bernd; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Stötzel, Jan; Frahm, Ronald

    2009-10-21

    The dynamics of the ignition and extinction of the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane to hydrogen and carbon monoxide over Pt-Rh/Al(2)O(3) and Pt/Al(2)O(3) were studied in the subsecond timescale using quick-EXAFS with a novel cam-driven X-ray monochromator employing Si(111) and Si(311) crystals. The experiments were performed under reaction conditions in a small fixed-bed capillary reactor. For the first time XAS data were taken with this QEXAFS technique with a Si(311) crystal that opens the energy range up to 35 keV. In addition, both XANES and EXAFS data are shown at the Pt L(3)-edge, allowing to discuss the potential and limitation of this technique in catalysis and related areas. With respect to the noble metal catalysed partial oxidation of methane, several interesting observations were made: structural changes during ignition were-independent of the chosen reaction conditions-significantly faster than during the extinction of the reaction. The dynamic behavior of the catalysts was dependent on the flow conditions and the respective noble metal component(s). Higher reaction gas flow led to a faster ignition process. While the ignition over Pt-Rh/Al(2)O(3) occurred at lower temperature than over Pt/Al(2)O(3), the structural changes during ignition were significantly faster in the latter case. The rate of reduction of the catalyst during ignition was also dependent on the axial position in the fixed-bed. The spectroscopic results provide important insight into the ignition and extinction behavior of the CPO of methane and are complementing results from time-resolved infrared thermography and full field X-ray microscopy studies.

  11. NiCo2O4 spinel/ordered mesoporous carbons as noble-metal free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction and the influence of structure of catalyst support on the electrochemical activity of NiCo2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Li, Mian; Nsabimana, Anaclet; Guo, Liping

    2015-08-01

    Three ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) with different structures are used as catalyst supports for growth of NiCo2O4 spinel. The high surface area of OMCs provides more active sites to adsorb metal precursors. The porous structure confines the growth of NiCo2O4 and supplies more efficient transport passage for reactant molecules to access the active sites. Due to the structural characteristics of OMCs and catalytic properties of NiCo2O4, NiCo2O4/OMCs composites are highly active, cheap, and selective noble metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution. The electrochemical activity of NiCo2O4 supported on three OMCs with different structures, surface areas, pore sizes, pore volumes, and defective sites is studied. NiCo2O4/OMCs composites may be further used as efficient and inexpensive noble metal-free ORR catalysts in alkaline solution.

  12. A Comparison between Shear Bond Strength of VMK Master Porcelain with Three Base-metal Alloys (Ni-cr-T3, VeraBond, Super Cast) and One Noble Alloy (X-33) in Metal-ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Neshati, A; Mousavi, N; Epakchi, S; Dabaghi Tabriz, F; Sarbazi, AH

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The increase in the use of metal-ceramic restorations and a high prevalence of porcelain chipping entails introducing an alloy which is more compatible with porcelain and causes a stronger bond between the two. This study is to compare shear bond strength of three base-metal alloys and one noble alloy with the commonly used VMK Master Porcelain. Materials and Method: Three different groups of base-metal alloys (Ni-cr-T3, Super Cast, and VeraBond) and one group of noble alloy (X-33) were selected. Each group consisted of 15 alloy samples. All groups went through the casting process and change from wax pattern into metal disks. The VMK Master Porcelain was then fired on each group. All the specimens were put in the UTM; a shear force was loaded until a fracture occurred and the fracture force was consequently recorded. The data were analyzed by SPSS Version 16 and One-Way ANOVA was run to compare the shear strength between the groups. Furthermore, the groups were compared two-by-two by adopting Tukey test. Results: The findings of this study revealed shear bond strength of Ni-Cr-T3 alloy was higher than the three other alloys (94 MPa or 330 N). Super Cast alloy had the second greatest shear bond strength (80. 87Mpa or 283.87 N). Both VeraBond (69.66 MPa or 245 N) and x-33 alloys (66.53 MPa or 234 N) took the third place. Conclusion: Ni-Cr-T3 with VMK Master Porcelain has the greatest shear bond strength. Therefore, employment of this low-cost alloy is recommended in metal-ceramic restorations. PMID:24724144

  13. Cobalt nanoparticles/nitrogen-doped graphene with high nitrogen doping efficiency as noble metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jingwen; Hassan, Mehboob; Zhu, Dongsheng; Guo, Liping; Bo, Xiangjie

    2017-03-15

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (N/GR) has been considered as active metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the nitrogen (N) doping efficiency is very low and only few N atoms are doped into the framework of GR. To boost the N doping efficiency, in this work, a confined pyrolysis method with high N doping efficiency is used for the preparation of cobalt nanoparticles/nitrogen-doped GR (Co/N/GR). Under the protection of SiO2, the inorganic ligand NH3 in cobalt amine complex ([Co(NH3)6](3+)) is trapped in the confined space and then can be effectively doped into the framework of GR without the introduction of any carbon residues. Meanwhile, due to the redox reaction between the cobalt ions and carbon atoms of GR, Co nanoparticles are supported into the framework of N/GR. Due to prevention of GR layer aggregation with SiO2, the Co/N/GR with high dispersion provides sufficient surface area and maximum opportunity for the exposure of Co nanoparticles and active sites of N dopant. By combination of enhanced N doping efficiency, Co nanoparticles and high dispersion of GR sheets, the Co/N/GR is remarkably active, cheap and selective noble-metal free catalysts for ORR.

  14. Adsorption of water and ethanol on noble and transition-metal substrates: a density functional investigation within van der Waals corrections.

    PubMed

    Freire, Rafael L H; Kiejna, Adam; Da Silva, Juarez L F

    2016-10-26

    We report the results of extensive computational investigation of the adsorption properties of water and ethanol on several Cu-, Pt-, and Au-based substrates, including the close-packed unreconstructed Cu(111), Pt(111), and Au(111) surfaces, defected metal substrates with on-surface low-coordinated sites generated by the intermixing of Pt-Cu and Pt-Au in the topmost surface layers and strained on-surface and sub-surface Pt-layers at Cu(111) and Au(111) substrates. The calculations are based on the density functional theory (DFT) within the van der Waals (vdW) correction. For all the substrates, we found that water and ethanol bind via the anionic O atom to the cationic one-fold coordinated on-top metal sites, which enhances the adsorbate-substrate Coulomb interactions. For water, both DFT and DFT + vdW calculations predict a flat geometry. For ethanol, the DFT and DFT + vdW results are in contrast, namely, DFT yields a perpendicular orientation of the C-C bond with respect to the surface, while we obtained a parallel orientation of the C-C bond using DFT + vdW, which maximizes the adsorption energies. Despite expected deviations due to the nature of the weak adsorbate-substrate interactions, we found that the adsorption energy of water and ethanol shows a linear dependence as a function of the position of the center of gravity of the occupied d-band, and hence, the magnitude of the adsorption energy increases as the d-band center position shifts towards the Fermi energy. Thus, it indicates hybridization between the O p- and metal d-states, which determines the magnitude of the adsorption energy of water and ethanol on clean, low-coordinated, and strained noble and transition-metal substrates.

  15. Phenolic Fractions from Muscadine Grape "Noble" Pomace can Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell MDA-MB-231 Better than those from European Grape "Cabernet Sauvignon" and Induce S-Phase Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianming; Wei, Zheng; Zhang, Shengyu; Peng, Xichun; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2017-03-22

    Tons of grape pomace which still contained a rich amount of plant polyphenols, is discarded after winemaking. Plant polyphenols have multi-functional activities for human body. In this study, polyphenols of pomaces from Muscadinia rotundifolia "Noble" and Vitis vinifera "Cabernet Sauvignon" were extracted and fractionated, and then they were analyzed with LC-MS and the inhibitory effects on breast cancer cells were compared. The inhibition on MDA-MB-231 cells of fractions from "Noble" was further evaluated. The results showed that polyphenols from 2 grape pomaces could be separated into 3 fractions, and ellagic acid and/or ellagitannins were only detected in fractions from "Noble" pomace. All 3 fractions from "Noble" pomace inhibited MDA-MB-231 better than MCF-7. But fraction 2 from "Cabernet Sauvignon" inhibited MCF-7 better while fraction 1 and fraction 3 inhibited both 2 cells similarly. Moreover, the fractions from "Noble" pomace rather than "Cabernet Sauvignon" can inhibit MDA-MB-231 better. Finally, fractions from "Noble" pomace can induce S-phase arrest and apoptosis on MDA-MB-231. These findings suggested the extracts from grape pomace especially those from "Noble," are potential to be utilized as health beneficial products or even anti-breast cancer agents.

  16. Laser-ablation-induced synthesis of SiO2-capped noble metal nanoparticles in a single step.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Ernesto; Abderrafi, Kamal; Abargues, Rafael; Valdés, José L; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2010-05-18

    Here we describe a simple, powerful technique based on the laser ablation of a target immersed in a water solution of a metal salt. With this method, nanoparticles of different metals and alloys can be processed very quickly. Both the target and the salt solution can be chosen to produce metal nanoparticles of different sizes, surface-oxidized nanoparticles (silica-silver, for example), or even more complex structures to be defined by the researcher on one or more steps because the technique combines the advantages of both physical and chemical methods. We have applied this technique to the fabrication of inert silica-metal (silver, gold, and silver-gold) nanoparticles with a strong surface plasmon resonance all together in a single step. The advantage of the simultaneous production of silica during laser ablation is the stabilization of the metal nanoparticle colloid but also the possibility to reduce the toxicity of these nanoparticles.

  17. Experimental observations on noble metal nanonuggets and Fe-Ti oxides, and the transport of platinum group elements in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenburg, Michael; Mavrogenes, John A.

    2016-11-01

    Platinum group element (PGE) nanonuggets are a nuisance in experimental studies designed to measure solubility or partitioning of noble metals in silicate melts. Instead of treating nanonuggets as experimental artifacts, we studied their behaviour motivated by recent discoveries of PGE nanonuggets in a variety of natural settings. We used an experimental setup consisting of AgPd, Pt or AuPd capsules and Fe(-Ti) oxide-saturated hydrous peralkaline silicate melts to maximise nanonugget production. TABS (Te, As, Bi, Sb, Sn) commonly occur in PGM (platinum group minerals), prompting addition of Bi to our experiments to investigate its properties as well. Three-dimensional optical examination by 100× objective and immersion oil reveals variable colour which correlates with nanonugget size and shape due to plasmon resonance effects. We observe two textural types: (1) intermediate-sized nanonuggets dispersed in the glass and adhering to oxides, and (2) abundant fine nanonuggets dispersed in the glass with coarse euhedral crystals in contact with oxides. Slow cooling removes dispersed nanonuggets and greatly coarsens existing oxide-associated metal crystals. Nanonugget-free halos are commonly observed around oxide grains. All metal phases are composed of major (Ag, Pd) and trace (Pt, Ir, Au) capsule material. Our results show reduction processes, imposed by growing oxides, causing local metal saturation in the oxide rich zones with preferential nucleation on smaller oxide grains. The redox gradient then blocks additional metals from diffusing into oxide rich zones, forming halos. As the entire experimental charge is reduced throughout the run, nanonuggets form in the distal glass. Bismuth contents of metal phases do not depend on Bi2O3 amounts dissolved in the melt. Further PGM crystallisation consumes nanonuggets as feedstock. We conclude that the appearance of metallic PGE phases happens in two stages: first as nanonuggets and then as larger PGM. Once formed

  18. Mixing does the magic: a rapid synthesis of high surface area noble metal nanosponges showing broadband nonlinear optical response.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Sandeep, C S Suchand; Philip, Reji; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2010-05-25

    Here we report an instantaneous formation of high surface area metal nanosponges through a one-step inexpensive method in a completely green solvent, water. Merely by optimizing the concentration of the precursors and the reducing agent, we were able to generate a three-dimensional porous structure made up of nanowire networks. This is a general process, involves a simple, room temperature reduction of metal salts with sodium borohydride, and is therefore scalable to any amount. Further, these nanoporous metals because of their network structures show optical limiting behavior of a true broadband nature that would find applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

  19. Synthesis, morphological control, dispersion stabilization and in situ self-assembly of noble metal nanostructures using multidentate resorcinarene surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sangbum

    In this dissertation, a detailed investigation on the influence of various macrocyclic resorcinarene surfactants in determining the morphology, stabilization and self-assembly of mono- and bi- metallic nanoparticles was undertaken. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  20. The noble gas argon modifies extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling in neurons and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, Astrid V; Rossaint, Rolf; Haase, Hajo; Al Kassam, Hussam; Ryang, Yu-Mi; Beyer, Cordian; Coburn, Mark

    2012-01-15

    Recently, the noble gas argon has been identified as a potent neuroprotective agent, but little is known about its cellular effects. In this in vitro study, we investigated argon's influence on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, a ubiquitous enzyme with numerous functions in cell proliferation and survival. Primary neuronal and astroglial cell cultures and the microglial cell line BV-2 were exposed to 50 vol.% argon. Further possible effects were studied following stimulation of microglia with 50 ng/ml LPS. ERK 1/2 activation was assessed by phosphorylation state-specific western blotting, cytokine levels by real-time PCR and western blotting. Total phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity was examined with p-nitrophenylphosphate. After 30 min exposure, argon significantly activated ERK 1/2 signaling in microglia. Enhanced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 was also found in astrocytes and neurons following argon exposure, but it lacked statistical significance. In microglia, argon did not substantially interfere with LPS-induced ERK1/2 activation and inflammatory cytokine induction. Addition of the MEK-Inhibitor U0126 abolished the induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Cellular phosphatase activity and the inactivation of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 were not altered by argon. In conclusion, argon enhanced ERK 1/2 activity in microglia via the upstream kinase MEK, probably through a direct mode of activation. ERK 1/2 signaling in astrocytes and neurons in vitro was also influenced, although not with statistical significance. Whether ERK 1/2 activation by argon affects cellular functions like differentiation and survival in the brain in vivo will have to be determined in future experiments.

  1. Adsorption of inert gases including element 118 on noble metal and inert surfaces from ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic calculations.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Eliav, E; Kaldor, U

    2008-10-14

    The interaction of the inert gases Rn and element 118 with various surfaces has been studied on the basis of fully relativistic ab initio Dirac-Coulomb CCSD(T) calculations of atomic properties. The calculated polarizability of element 118, 46.3 a.u., is the largest in group 18, the ionization potential is the lowest at 8.91 eV, and the estimated atomic radius is the largest, 4.55 a.u. These extreme values reflect, in addition to the general trends in the Periodic Table, the relativistic expansion and destabilization of the outer valence 7p(3/2) orbital. Van der Waals coefficients C(3) and adsorption enthalpies DeltaH(ads) of Ne through element 118 on noble metals and inert surfaces, such as quartz, ice, Teflon, and graphite, were calculated in a physisorption model using the atomic properties obtained. The C(3) coefficients were shown to steadily increase in group 18, while the increase in DeltaH(ads) from Ne to Rn does not continue to element 118: The large atomic radius of the latter element is responsible for a decrease in the interaction energy. We therefore predict that experimental distinction between Rn and 118 by adsorption on these types of surfaces will not be feasible. A possible candidate for separating the two elements is charcoal; further study is needed to test this possibility.

  2. Down-conversion phosphors as noble-metal-free co-catalyst in ZnO for efficient visible light photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Haipeng; Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Jiaqing; Lei, Wenyan; Li, Jinliang; Wu, Tianyang; Li, Ping; Li, Huili; Pan, Likun

    2017-01-01

    Exploring novel visible light responsive photocatalysts is one of greatly significant issues from the viewpoint of using solar energy. Here we report the yellow-orange emitting α-Si3N4-doped Lu3Al5O12:Ce3+ (Lu3Al5-xSixO12-xNx:Ce3+) phosphors as a noble-metal-free co-catalyst for enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity of ZnO. The results show that ZnO-Lu3Al5-xSixO12-xNx:Ce3+ hybrid photocatalysts using a fast microwave-assisted approach exhibits a 91% methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation at 240 min, which evidence the synergistic effect of ZnO and Lu3Al5-xSixO12-xNx:Ce3+ that suppress the rate of charge recombination and increase the self-sensitized degradation of MB. ZnO-down conversion phosphors can be envisaged as potential candidate in environmental engineering and solar energy applications.

  3. Barrierless growth of precursor-free, ultrafast laser-fragmented noble metal nanoparticles by colloidal atom clusters - A kinetic in situ study.

    PubMed

    Jendrzej, Sandra; Gökce, Bilal; Amendola, Vincenzo; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Unintended post-synthesis growth of noble metal colloids caused by excess amounts of reactants or highly reactive atom clusters represents a fundamental problem in colloidal chemistry, affecting product stability or purity. Hence, quantified kinetics could allow defining nanoparticle size determination in dependence of the time. Here, we investigate in situ the growth kinetics of ps pulsed laser-fragmented platinum nanoparticles in presence of naked atom clusters in water without any influence of reducing agents or surfactants. The nanoparticle growth is investigated for platinum covering a time scale of minutes to 50days after nanoparticle generation, it is also supplemented by results obtained from gold and palladium. Since a minimum atom cluster concentration is exceeded, a significant growth is determined by time resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy, analytical disc centrifugation, zeta potential measurement and transmission electron microscopy. We suggest a decrease of atom cluster concentration over time, since nanoparticles grow at the expense of atom clusters. The growth mechanism during early phase (<1day) of laser-synthesized colloid is kinetically modeled by rapid barrierless coalescence. The prolonged slow nanoparticle growth is kinetically modeled by a combination of coalescence and Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner kinetic for Ostwald ripening, validated experimentally by the temperature dependence of Pt nanoparticle size and growth quenching by Iodide anions.

  4. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Study of Thermodynamics of Liquid Noble-Metals Alloys Through a Pseudopotential Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2010-09-01

    The Gibbs-Bogoliubov (GB) inequality is applied to investigate the thermodynamic properties of some equiatomic noble metal alloys in liquid phase such as Au-Cu, Ag-Cu, and Ag-Au using well recognized pseudopotential formalism. For description of the structure, well known Percus-Yevick (PY) hard sphere model is used as a reference system. By applying a variation method the best hard core diameters have been found which correspond to minimum free energy. With this procedure the thermodynamic properties such as entropy and heat of mixing have been computed. The influence of local field correction function viz; Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F), and Sarkar et al. (S) is also investigated. The computed results of the excess entropy compares favourably in the case of liquid alloys while the agreement with experiment is poor in the case of heats of mixing. This may be due to the sensitivity of the heats of mixing with the potential parameters and the dielectric function.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON): a high brightness detection platform based on a dye-doped silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shibsekhar; Dixit, Chandra K; Woolley, Robert; O'Kennedy, Richard; McDonagh, Colette

    2012-05-29

    A highly bright and photostable, fluorescent nanohybrid particle is presented which consists of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) embedded in dye-doped silica in a core-shell configuration. The dye used is the near-infrared emitting 4,5-benzo-5'-(iodoacetaminomethyl)-1',3,3,3',3'-pentamethyl-1-(4-sulfobutyl) indodicarbo cyanine. The nanohybrid architecture comprises a GNP core which is separated from a layer of dye molecules by a 15 nm buffer layer and has an outer protective, undoped silica shell. Using this architecture, a brightness factor of 550 has been achieved compared to the free dye. This hybrid system, referred to as Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON) in this paper, is the first nanohybrid construct to our knowledge which demonstrates such tunable fluorescence property. NEON has enhanced photostability compared to the free dye and compared to a control particle without GNPs. Furthermore, the NEON particle, when used as a fluorescent label in a model bioassay, shows improved performance over assays using a conventional single dye molecule label.

  6. Free MoS2 Nanoflowers Grown on Graphene by Microwave-Assisted Synthesis as Highly Efficient Non-Noble-Metal Electrocatalysts for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jiamu; Zhang, Xuelin; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yinuo; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Advanced approaches to preparing non-noble-metal electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are considered to be a significant breakthrough in promoting the exploration of renewable resources. In this work, a hybrid material of MoS2 nanoflowers (NFs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was synthesized as a HER catalyst via an environmentally friendly, efficient approach that is also suitable for mass production. Small-sized MoS2 NFs with a diameter of ca. 190 nm and an abundance of exposed edges were prepared by a hydrothermal method and were subsequently supported on rGO by microwave-assisted synthesis. The results show that MoS2 NFs were distributed uniformly on the remarkably reduced GO and preserved the outstanding original structural features perfectly. Electrochemical tests show that the as-prepared hybrid material exhibited excellent HER activity, with a small Tafel slope of 80 mV/decade and a low overpotential of 170 mV. PMID:27556402

  7. Predictions and confirmations of electron-phonon coupling in noble-metal boro-carbides and boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Singh, David J.; Mehl, Michael J.

    2002-03-01

    The rigid muffin tin theory (RMT) of Gaspari and Gyorffy has provided a quantitative tool to determine electron-phonon coupling in the transition metals and many transition metal carbides, nitrides and A15 compounds. The recent discovery of superconductivity in MgB2 has revived the interest in the electron-phonon interaction as the main mechanism. We have examined superconductivity in terms of Mcmillan theory and the RMT and found that, after a scaling adjustment of the Hopfield parameter η in MgB_2, we can proceed to make predictions for higher transition temperatures in Cu-B-C, Ag-B-C and Au-B-C with or without Mg. In addition we have generated RMT results for pure Boron where superconductivity under high pressures was recently reported. These results seem to fully support an electron-phonon picture.

  8. On the role of surface diffusion in determining the shape or morphology of noble-metal nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaohu; Xie, Shuifen; Liu, Maochang; Peng, Hsin-Chieh; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J.; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the shape or morphology of metal nanocrystals is central to the realization of their many applications in catalysis, plasmonics, and electronics. In one of the approaches, the metal nanocrystals are grown from seeds of certain crystallinity through the addition of atomic species. In this case, manipulating the rates at which the atomic species are added onto different crystallographic planes of a seed has been actively explored to control the growth pattern of a seed and thereby the shape or morphology taken by the final product. Upon deposition, however, the adsorbed atoms (adatoms) may not stay at the same sites where the depositions occur. Instead, they can migrate to other sites on the seed owing to the involvement of surface diffusion, and this could lead to unexpected deviations from a desired growth pathway. Herein, we demonstrated that the growth pathway of a seed is indeed determined by the ratio between the rates for atom deposition and surface diffusion. Our result suggests that surface diffusion needs to be taken into account when controlling the shape or morphology of metal nanocrystals. PMID:23569268

  9. Non-noble catalysts and catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Tungsten carbide, which is known to be active for hydrogen oxidation and CO tolerant has a hexagonal structure. Titanium carbide is inactive and has a cubic structure. Four different samples of the cubic alloys Wx-1TixC were prepared and found to be active and CO tolerant. These alloys are of interest as possible phosphoric acid fuel cell catalysts. They also are of interest as opportunities to study the activity of W in a different crystalline environment and to correlate the activities of the surface sites with surface composition.

  10. Non-noble catalysts and catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Four different samples of the cubic alloys W sub x-1 Ti sub x C sub 1-y were prepared and found to be active and CO tolerant. When the activities of these cubic alloys were weighted by the reciprocal of the square of the W exchange, they displayed magnitudes and dependence on bulk C deficiency comparable to those of highly active forms of WC. It is concluded that they may offer important insight into the nature of the active sites on, and means for improving the performance of, W-C anode catalysts for use in phosphoric acid fuel cells.

  11. Non-noble catalysts and catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Tungsten carbide, which is active for hydrogen oxidation, is CO tolerant and has a hexagonal structure is discussed. Titanium carbide is inactive and has a cubic structure. Four different samples of the cubic alloys W sub x-1Ti sub XC sub 1-y were found to be active and CO tolerant. When the activities of these cubic alloys are weighted by the reciprocal of the square to those of highly forms of WC. They offer important insight into the nature of the active sites on W-C anode catalysts for use in phosphoric acid fuel cells.

  12. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  13. Production of mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles of noble metals by pyrolysis of organic extracts on silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serga, V.; Kulikova, L.; Cvetkov, A.; Krumina, A.; Kodols, M.; Chornaja, S.; Dubencovs, K.; Sproge, E.

    2013-12-01

    In the present work the influence of the tri-n-octylammonium (Oct3NH+) salt anion (PtCl62-, PdCl42-, AuCl4-) nature on the phase composition and mean size of crystallites of the extract pyrolysis products on the SiO2 nanopowder has been studied. The XRD phase analysis of the composites (metal loading 2.4 wt.%) made under the same conditions, at the pyrolysis of Pt- and Au-containing extracts has shown the formation of nanoparticles of Pt (dPt = 15 nm) and Au (dAu = 33 nm), respectively. The end-product of the pyrolysis of the Pd-containing extract has an admixture phase of PdO along with the main metal phase (dPd = 21 nm). At the preparation of bimetallic particles (Pt-Pd, Pt-Au, Pd-Au) on the SiO2 nanopowder it has been found that the nanoparticles of the PtPd alloy, Pt and Au or Pd and Au nanoparticles are the products of the thermal decomposition of two-component mixtures of extracts. The investigation of catalytic properties of the produced composites in the reaction of glycerol oxidation by molecular oxygen in alkaline aqueous solutions has shown that all bimetallic composites exhibit catalytic activity in contrast to monometallic ones.

  14. A versatile self-assembly strategy for the synthesis of shape-selected colloidal noble metal nanoparticle heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Syrenova, Svetlana; Westerlund, Fredrik; Langhammer, Christoph; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2014-03-25

    The self-assembly of individual nanoparticles into dimers-so-called heterodimers-is relevant for a broad range of applications, in particular in the vibrant field of nanoplasmonics and nanooptics. In this paper we report the synthesis and characterization of material- and shape-selected nanoparticle heterodimers assembled from individual particles via electrostatic interaction. The versatility of the synthetic strategy is shown by assembling combinations of metal particles of different shapes, sizes, and metal compositions like a gold sphere (90 nm) with either a gold cube (35 nm), gold rhombic dodecahedron (50 nm), palladium truncated cube (120 nm), palladium rhombic dodecahedron (110 nm), palladium octahedron (130 nm), or palladium cubes (25 and 70 nm) as well as a silver sphere (90 nm) with palladium cubes (25 and 70 nm). The obtained heterodimer combinations are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta-potential measurements. We describe the optimal experimental conditions to achieve the highest yield of heterodimers compared to other aggregates. The experimental results have been rationalized using theoretical modeling. A proof-of-principle experiment where individual Au-Pd heterodimers are exploited for indirect plasmonic sensing of hydrogen finally illustrates the potential of these structures to probe catalytic processes at the single particle level.

  15. Quasi-phase-matched high-harmonic generation in composites of metal nanoparticles and a noble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husakou, A.; Herrmann, J.

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically study high-harmonic generation (HHG) in a composite which consists of ellipsoidal silver nanoparticles in argon. The significant field enhancement in argon in the vicinity of metal nanoparticles allows us to use much lower incident intensities than in typical HHG experiments. A periodic modulation of the nanoparticle concentration provides quasi-phase matching, which mitigates the negative effect of the significant phase mismatch. First, we study the linear optical properties of such a composite and the field enhancement and consider the technological possibilities of creating such a composite. Then the generation of high harmonics is simulated using a propagation equation which includes field enhancement, phase mismatch, absorption of the pump beam and harmonics, and other relevant effects. Generation of harmonics with an efficiency above 10-7 is predicted.

  16. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T.

    2013-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution.Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster

  17. The Thermochemical Stability of Ionic Noble Gas Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents calculations that suggest stoichiometric, ionic, and noble gas-metal compounds may be stable. Bases calculations on estimated values of electron affinity, anionic radius for the noble gases and for the Born exponents of resulting crystals. Suggests the desirability of experiments designed to prepare compounds containing anionic,…

  18. Theoretical Study on Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectra of Water Adsorbed on Noble Metal Cathodes of Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, De-Yin; Pang, Ran; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-06-01

    The observed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of water adsorbed on metal film electrodes of silver, gold, and platinum nanoparticles were used to infer interfacial water structures. The basis is the change of the electrochemical vibrational Stark tuning rates and the relative Raman intensity of the stretching and bending modes. How it is not completely understood the reason why the relative Raman intensity ratio of the bending and stretching vibrations of interfacial water increases at the very negative potential region. Density functional theory calculations provide the conceptual model. The specific enhancement effect for the bending mode was closely associated with the water adsorption structure in a hydrogen bonded configuration through its H-end binding to surface sites with large polarizability due to strong cathodic polarization. The present theoretical results allow us to propose that interfacial water molecules exist on these metal cathodes with different hydrogen bonding interactions, the HO-H…Ag(Au) for silver and gold. In acidic solution, a surface electron-hydronium ion-pair was proposed as an adsorption configuration of interfacial water structures on silver and gold cathodes based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The EHIP is in the configuration of H3O+(H2O)ne-, where the hydronium H3O+ and the surface electron is separated by water layers. The electron bound in the EHIP can first be excited under light irradiation, subsequently inducing a structural relaxation into a hydrated hydrogen atom. Thus, Raman intensities of the interfacial water in the EHIP species are signifcantly enhanced due to the cathodic polarization on silver and gold electrodes.

  19. Investigation of the new sorption preconcentration systems for determination of noble metals in rocks by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dubenskiy, A S; Seregina, I F; Blinnikova, Z K; Tsyurupa, M P; Pavlova, L A; Davankov, V A; Bolshov, M A

    2016-06-01

    The reversible sorption preconcentration of noble metals (NMs) prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was investigated. Six new hypercrosslinked polystyrene sorbents were tested. The dependence of the degree of NMs sorption on the average degree of polymer network crosslinking and pore diameters was investigated. It was found that sorbents HP-100/6, HP-300/6 and HP-500/6 have low efficiency of NMs chlorocomplexes extraction. Among Stirosorb sorbents (Stirosorb-2, Stirosorb-514 and Stirosorb-584) the highest efficiency of the extraction of NMs' chlorocomplexes has Stirosorb-514. Tributylamine (TBA), N-methylbenzylamine (MBA), N,N-dimethylbenzylamine (DMBA), N,N-dibenzylmetylamine (DBMA) were studied as the reagents for extraction of Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Au chlorocomplexes from hydrochloric acid solutions in the form of ion associates by reversed-phase mechanism. The reversible quantitative extraction of Ru, Pd, Pt and Au in system Stirosorb-514 - TBA - 1M HCl in ethanol as eluent was achieved. It was found that resulting eluates do not contain matrix components which may cause spectral interferences on the stage of NMs determination by ICP-MS. The found scheme of NMs reversible sorption was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials of basic and ultrabasic rocks GPt-5, GPt-6 and SARM-7. Good agreement between the measured NMs concentrations and the certified values was demonstrated. The achieved limits of detection for Ru, Pd, Pt and Au vary within 10(-8)-10(-7)wt% range.

  20. Toward control of the metal-organic interfacial electronic structure in molecular electronics: a first-principles study on self-assembled monolayers of pi-conjugated molecules on noble metals.

    PubMed

    Heimel, Georg; Romaner, Lorenz; Zojer, Egbert; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2007-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organic molecules provide an important tool to tune the work function of electrodes in plastic electronics and significantly improve device performance. Also, the energetic alignment of the frontier molecular orbitals in the SAM with the Fermi energy of a metal electrode dominates charge transport in single-molecule devices. On the basis of first-principles calculations on SAMs of pi-conjugated molecules on noble metals, we provide a detailed description of the mechanisms that give rise to and intrinsically link these interfacial phenomena at the atomic level. The docking chemistry on the metal side of the SAM determines the level alignment, while chemical modifications on the far side provide an additional, independent handle to modify the substrate work function; both aspects can be tuned over several eV. The comprehensive picture established in this work provides valuable guidelines for controlling charge-carrier injection in organic electronics and current-voltage characteristics in single-molecule devices.

  1. Bifunctional non-noble metal oxide nanoparticle electrocatalysts through lithium-induced conversion for overall water splitting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haotian; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Deng, Yong; Lu, Zhiyi; Hsu, Po-Chun; Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Developing earth-abundant, active and stable electrocatalysts which operate in the same electrolyte for water splitting, including oxygen evolution reaction and hydrogen evolution reaction, is important for many renewable energy conversion processes. Here we demonstrate the improvement of catalytic activity when transition metal oxide (iron, cobalt, nickel oxides and their mixed oxides) nanoparticles (∼20 nm) are electrochemically transformed into ultra-small diameter (2–5 nm) nanoparticles through lithium-induced conversion reactions. Different from most traditional chemical syntheses, this method maintains excellent electrical interconnection among nanoparticles and results in large surface areas and many catalytically active sites. We demonstrate that lithium-induced ultra-small NiFeOx nanoparticles are active bifunctional catalysts exhibiting high activity and stability for overall water splitting in base. We achieve 10 mA cm−2 water-splitting current at only 1.51 V for over 200 h without degradation in a two-electrode configuration and 1 M KOH, better than the combination of iridium and platinum as benchmark catalysts. PMID:26099250

  2. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ω{sub P}   and the damping constant γ{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ω{sub p} (0.5%–1.6%) and for γ{sub free} (3%–8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  3. Utilizing platforms for the observation of chemical transformations to surface-bound noble metal nanoparticles in environmentally relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Richard David

    Nanoparticles are increasingly incorporated into consumer products because of their unique, size-dependent properties. Although these properties are commercially appealing, data are lacking regarding the fate and reactivity of nanoparticles once incorporated into materials. This information gap prevents accurate assessment of hazards that these materials potentially present to consumers and the environment. To address this concern, new research is needed to investigate the reactivity and transformations of nanoparticles. This dissertation describes the use of an electron transparent characterization platform to observe nanoparticle transformations. Nanoparticles were tethered to the surface of an analysis platform, exposed to a variety of conditions, and evaluated for reactivity and response. The characterization of silver nanoparticles revealed the generation of new daughter nanoparticles on surfaces in ambient humid conditions. Our observations showed that the transport of material is highly dependent on relative humidity and that pH equilibria drives the deposition of new particles and degradation. We discovered, by applying these findings to macro-silver objects, that bulk silver generates new nanoparticles on surfaces. This illuminated the possibility of other, yet undiscovered, naturally occurring nanoparticles. In the second model system, 1.5 nm gold nanoparticles were tethered by a robust metal oxide bond from the terminal group of the stabilizing ligand. This strategy facilitated precise control over thiol ligand removal using a dilute ozone oxidation. Tracking particle oxidation over time allowed us to gain unprecedented control over core exposure, size maintenance, and surface tethering. This platform was also utilized as a proof-of-concept for direct observation of transformations in complex media. Ligand and core transformations were monitored in a variety of biologically relevant conditions using tethered nanoparticles. Morphological and chemical

  4. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE NANOSTRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-assisted (MW) spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts, silver (Ag), gold (Au), platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) is reported using sugar solutions such as -D glucose, sucrose and maltose, etc. to generate nanomaterials. These MW-assisted reactions, conducted in aqueo...

  5. Metal-gas fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1984-10-16

    A metal-gas fuel cell comprising an anode chamber filled with a base anolyte solution, a metallic anode plate immersed in the anolyte; an ion exchange chamber filled with a base ionolyte solution adjacent the anode chamber; a cationic membrane between the anode and ion exchange chambers separating the anolyte and ionolyte; a cathode plate adjacent the ion exchange chamber remote from the cationic membrane with one surface in contact with the ionolyte and another surface in contact with a cathode fuel gas. The cathode plate is a laminated structure including a layer of hydrophyllic material in contact with the ionolyte, a layer of gas permeable hydrophobic material in contact with the gas and a gas and liquid permeable current collector of inert material with catalytic surfaces within the layer of hydrophyllic material. The anode and cathode plates are connected with an external electric circuit which effects the flow of electrons from the anode plate to the cathode plate.

  6. Colloidal nickel/gallium nanoalloys obtained from organometallic precursors in conventional organic solvents and in ionic liquids: noble-metal-free alkyne semihydrogenation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Kai; Doddi, Adinarayana; Kroll, Clarissa; Meyer, Hajo; Wiktor, Christian; Gemel, Christian; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Fischer, Roland A.; Janiak, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to replace noble-metal catalysts by low-cost alternatives are of constant interest. The organometallic, non-aqueous wet-chemical synthesis of various hitherto unknown nanocrystalline Ni/Ga intermetallic materials and the use of NiGa for the selective semihydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes are reported. Thermal co-hydrogenolysis of the all-hydrocarbon precursors [Ni(COD)2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) and GaCp* (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) in high-boiling organic solvents mesitylene and n-decane in molar ratios of 1 : 1, 2 : 3 and 3 : 1 yields the nano-crystalline powder materials of the over-all compositions NiGa, Ni2Ga3 and Ni3Ga, respectively. Microwave induced co-pyrolysis of the same precursors without additional hydrogen in the ionic liquid [BMIm][BF4] (BMIm = 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium) selectively yields the intermetallic phases NiGa and Ni3Ga from the respective 1 : 1 and 3 : 1 molar ratios of the precursors. The obtained materials are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), IR, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The single-source precursor [Ni(GaCp*)(PMe3)3] with a fixed Ni : Ga stoichiometry of 1 : 1 was employed as well. In comparison with the co-hydrogenolytic dual precursor source approach it turned out to be less practical due to inefficient nickel incorporation caused by the parasitic formation of stable [Ni(PMe3)4]. The use of ionic liquid [BMIm][BF4] as a non-conventional solvent to control the reaction and stabilize the nanoparticles proved to be particularly advantageous and stable colloids of the nanoalloys NiGa and Ni3Ga were obtained. A phase-selective Ni/Ga colloid synthesis in conventional solvents and in the presence of surfactants such as hexadecylamine (HDA) was not feasible due to the undesired reactivity of HDA with GaCp* leading to inefficient gallium incorporation. Recyclable NiGa nanoparticles selectively

  7. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are investigated. The tasks comprising these investigations are summarized. Metal deposition experiments are carried out utilizing laser assisted pyrolysis of a variety of metal bearing polymer films and metalloorganic inks spun onto silicon substrates. Laser decomposition of spun on silver neodecanoate ink yields very promising results. Solar cell comb metallization patterns are written using this technique.

  8. Design principles for oxygen-reduction activity on perovskite oxide catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntivich, Jin; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Goodenough, John B.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-07-01

    The prohibitive cost and scarcity of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalysing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells and metal-air batteries limit the commercialization of these clean-energy technologies. Identifying a catalyst design principle that links material properties to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant transition-metal-oxide catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we demonstrate that the ORR activity for oxide catalysts primarily correlates to σ*-orbital (eg) occupation and the extent of B-site transition-metal-oxygen covalency, which serves as a secondary activity descriptor. Our findings reflect the critical influences of the σ* orbital and metal-oxygen covalency on the competition between O22-/OH- displacement and OH- regeneration on surface transition-metal ions as the rate-limiting steps of the ORR, and thus highlight the importance of electronic structure in controlling oxide catalytic activity.

  9. Design principles for oxygen-reduction activity on perovskite oxide catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Jin; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Goodenough, John B; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-06-12

    The prohibitive cost and scarcity of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalysing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells and metal-air batteries limit the commercialization of these clean-energy technologies. Identifying a catalyst design principle that links material properties to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant transition-metal-oxide catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we demonstrate that the ORR activity for oxide catalysts primarily correlates to σ-orbital (e(g)) occupation and the extent of B-site transition-metal-oxygen covalency, which serves as a secondary activity descriptor. Our findings reflect the critical influences of the σ orbital and metal-oxygen covalency on the competition between O(2)(2-)/OH(-) displacement and OH(-) regeneration on surface transition-metal ions as the rate-limiting steps of the ORR, and thus highlight the importance of electronic structure in controlling oxide catalytic activity.

  10. Consent Decree for Noble Energy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Noble Energy, Inc. (Noble) that comprehensively identifies and addresses issues with vapor control systems at Noble’s condensate storage tank batteries in the Denver-area 8-hour ozone marginal nonattainment area (nonattainment area).

  11. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Gupta, S.; Mcmullin, P. G.; Palaschak, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques for producing high-quality solar cell metallization patterns are being investigated, developed, and characterized. The tasks comprising these investigations are outlined.

  12. Three-Electrode Metal Oxide Reduction Cell

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.; Ackerman, John P.

    2005-06-28

    A method of electrochemically reducing a metal oxide to the metal in an electrochemical cell is disclosed along with the cell. Each of the anode and cathode operate at their respective maximum reaction rates. An electrolyte and an anode at which oxygen can be evolved, and a cathode including a metal oxide to be reduced are included as is a third electrode with independent power supplies connecting the anode and the third electrode and the cathode and the third electrode.

  13. Three-electrode metal oxide reduction cell

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.; Ackerman, John P.

    2008-08-12

    A method of electrochemically reducing a metal oxide to the metal in an electrochemical cell is disclosed along with the cell. Each of the anode and cathode operate at their respective maximum reaction rates. An electrolyte and an anode at which oxygen can be evolved, and a cathode including a metal oxide to be reduced are included as is a third electrode with independent power supplies connecting the anode and the third electrode and the cathode and the third electrode.

  14. Self-supported spinel FeCo2O4 nanowire array: an efficient non-noble-metal catalyst for the hydrolysis of NaBH4 toward on-demand hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shuai; Yang, Libin; Cui, Liang; Lu, Wenbo; Yang, Yingchun; Sun, Xuping; Asiri, Abdullah M.

    2016-11-01

    NaBH4 has been considered as one of the most advantageous candidates for chemical hydrogen storage, but it is still a huge challenge to design efficient non-noble-metal catalysts for on-demand hydrogen generation from NaBH4 hydrolysis. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time that a spinel FeCo2O4 nanowire array supported on carbon cloth (FeCo2O4 NA/CC) behaves as an efficient earth-abundant catalyst toward NaBH4 hydrolysis in alkaline solutions with an activation energy of 44.98 kJ mol-1. Such FeCo2O4 NA/CC offers a hydrogen generation rate of 2551 ml min-1 g-1 under ambient conditions, with good stability and reusability. Its use as an ON/OFF switch for on-demand hydrogen generation is also demonstrated successfully.

  15. Testosterone-mediated increase in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content, nuclear androgen receptor levels, and cell division in an androgen-independent prostate carcinoma of Noble rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, S M; Leav, I; Damassa, D; Kwan, P W; Merk, F B; Seto, H S

    1988-02-01

    An androgen-independent, transplantable prostate carcinoma line (AIT), originally derived from the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) of Noble rat, was implanted into orchiectomized Noble rats and its response to androgen stimulation was studied and compared to that of the regenerating DLP tissue in sexually ablated rats. AIT tumors carried in castrated hosts displayed a high basal level of proliferative activity (mitotic index (MI), 15.0 +/- 0.5) while DLP tissue in untreated castrates exhibited no proliferative activity. Following androgen stimulation by testosterone capsule implantation into host rats, the AIT responded with a marked increase in cell proliferation; MI values doubled to 30.0 +/- 2.9 on Day 5 following androgen stimulation. This androgen-induced increase in MI values was coincident with elevations in nuclear androgen receptor (20-fold increase) and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content (3-fold increase) in the tumor. However, by Day 10 following androgen treatment, indices of cell proliferation in the AIT declined to pre-androgen-stimulated levels (MI, 14.8 +/- 1.9) despite the continued elevations in nuclear androgen receptor and tissue 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone contents. Parallel changes in MI were also observed in the normal regenerating DLP following androgen stimulation. MI values in this tissue increased from nondetectable levels to 38.1 +/- 4.7 on Day 5 but declined to relatively low levels (4.5 +/- 0.9) by Day 10 following androgen replacement. Taken together these findings led us to conclude that the AIT carried in castrates is capable of responding to testosterone in a manner similar to that observed for androgen-stimulated DLP of sexually ablated rats. Thus, in both the neoplastic and regenerating tissues, the initial response to androgen is characterized by a marked enhancement of cell proliferation which was correlated with an increase in androgen receptor and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content. However, like its tissue of origin, the AIT

  16. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical basis for reconstructing paleotemperatures from the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases produced in minerals at Earth's surface. Experimentally-determined diffusion kinetics predicts diffusive loss of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at ambient temperatures; incomplete retention has also been observed empirically in field studies. We show that the theory of simultaneous production and diffusion that applies to radiogenic noble gases in minerals-the basis of thermochronology-can also be applied to cosmogenic noble gases to reconstruct past surface temperatures on Earth. We use published diffusion kinetics and production rates for 3He in quartz and 21Ne in orthoclase to demonstrate the resolving power of cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry with respect to exposure duration, temperature, and diffusion domain size. Calculations indicate that, when paired with a quantitatively retained cosmogenic nuclide such as 21Ne or 10Be, observations of cosmogenic 3He in quartz can constrain temperatures during surface exposure in polar and high altitude environments. Likewise, 21Ne retention in feldspars is sensitive to temperatures at lower latitudes and elevations, expanding the potential geographic applicability of this technique to most latitudes. As an example, we present paired measurements of 3He and 10Be in quartz from a suite of Antarctic sandstone erratics to test whether the abundances of cosmogenic 3He agree with what is predicted from first principles and laboratory-determined diffusion kinetics. We find that the amounts of cosmogenic 3He present in these samples are consistent with the known mean annual temperature (MAT) for this region of Antarctica between -25 and -30 °C. These results demonstrate the method's ability to record paleotemperatures through geologic time.

  17. Mechanisms of kidney cell injury from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, B.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The most environmentally abundant toxic metals/metalloids (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) are each known to produce cell injury in the kidney but the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are now being elucidated. It is clear that the nephrotoxicity of these agents is due, in part, to the fact that urinary elimination is a major route of excretion from the body. The role(s) of molecular factors such as metal-binding proteins, inclusion bodies, and cell-specific receptorlike proteins that appear to influence renal tubule cell expression, have attracted increased interest as determinants that modulate cell populations as special risk for toxicity and renal cancer. The future of mechanistic toxicology studies with regard to how and why only certain renal cell populations become targets for toxicity from these metals/metalloids and other less common inorganic nephrotoxicants must focus on the molecular handling of these agents by target cell populations. 90 refs.

  18. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are examined. Two basic techniques for metal deposition are investigated; (1) photochemical decomposition of liquid or gas phase organometallic compounds utilizing either a focused, CW ultraviolet laser (System 1) or a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, such as that provided by a repetitively pulsed, defocused excimer laser (System 2), for pattern definition, and (2) thermal deposition of metals from organometallic solutions or vapors utilizing a focused, CW laser beam as a local heat source to draw the metallization pattern.

  19. Surface Plasmon Polaritons in Metallic Nanostructures: Fundamentals and Their Application to Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockstuhl, Carsten; Fahr, Stephan; Lederer, Falk

    A surface plasmon polariton is a hybrid excitation where the electromagnetic field is resonantly coupled to a free carrier oscillation in noble metals. Once excited, a large enhancement of the local electromagnetic field and the amount of scattered light can be observed. Since both properties are beneficial for the purpose ofphoton management, in the past several years an increasing share of research was devoted to exploit such effects in solar cells. In this contribution, we review the fundamentals of surface plasmon polaritons and outline different approaches how to incorporate metallic nanostructures into solar cells. We detail to which extent they are useful to enhance the solar cell efficiency and describe different schemes for their experimental implementation. Emphasis is put on thin-film solar cells, since in this class of solar cells metallic nanostructures may have the largest impact. This chapter is written with the intention to make researchers from either the field of plasmonics or the field of photovoltaics familiar with their respective counterpart to foster research in this applied domain.

  20. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation at fuel cell anodes

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Kowal, Andrzej [Cracow, PL

    2011-11-02

    In some embodiments a ternary electrocatalyst is provided. The electrocatalyst can be used in an anode for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst may include a noble metal particle having a surface decorated with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh. The noble metal particles may include platinum, palladium, ruthenium, iridium, gold, and combinations thereof. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst includes SnO.sub.2 particles having a surface decorated with clusters of a noble metal and Rh. Some ternary electrocatalysts include noble metal particles with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh at their surfaces. In some embodiments the electrocatalyst particle cores are nanoparticles. Some embodiments of the invention provide a fuel cell including an anode incorporating the ternary electrocatalyst. In some aspects a method of using ternary electrocatalysts of Pt, Rh, and SnO.sub.2 to oxidize an alcohol in a fuel cell is described.

  1. Metallic foil-assisted laser cell printing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2011-02-01

    Laser direct-write technology such as modified laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is emerging as a revolutionary technology for biological construct fabrication. While many modified LIFT-based cell direct writing successes have been achieved, possible process-induced cell injury and death is still a big hurdle for modified LIFT-based cell direct writing to be a viable technology. The objective of this study is to propose metallic foil-assisted LIFT using a four-layer structure to achieve better droplet size control and increase cell viability in direct writing of human colon cancer cells (HT-29). The proposed four layers include a quartz disk, a sacrificial and adhesive layer, a metallic foil, and a cell suspension layer. The bubble formation-induced stress wave is responsible for droplet formation. It is found that the proposed metallic foil-assisted LIFT approach is an effective cell direct-write technology and provides better printing resolution and high post-transfer cell viability when compared with other conventional modified LIFT technologies such as matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write; at the same time, the possible contamination from the laser energy absorbing material is minimized using a metallic foil.

  2. Platinum-ruthenium-palladium alloys for use as a fuel cell catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    A noble metal alloy composition for a fuel cell catalyst, a ternary alloy composition containing platinum, ruthenium and palladium. The alloy shows increased activity as compared to well-known catalysts.

  3. PD/MG BIMETALLIC CORROSION CELLS FOR DECHLORINATING PCBS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two dissimilar metals immersed in a conducting solution develop different corrosion potentials forming a bimetallic corrosion cell. Enhanced corrosion of an active metal like Mg combined with catalytic hydrogenation properties of a noble metal like Pd in such bimetallic cells can...

  4. Fuel cells and the theory of metals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocciarelli, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    Metal theory is used to study the role of metal catalysts in electrocatalysis, with particular reference to alkaline hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. Use is made of a simple model, analogous to that used to interpret field emission in vacuum. Theoretical values for all the quantities in the Tafel equation are obtained in terms of bulk properties of the metal catalysts (such as free electron densities and Fermi level). The reasons why some processes are reversible (H-electrodes) and some irreversible (O-electrodes) are identified. Selection rules for desirable properties of catalytic materials are established.

  5. 77 FR 70159 - Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark, LLC, Noble...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark..., Marble River, LLC (Marble River or Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Noble Clinton Windpark I... pay Marble River for headroom created by common system upgrade facilities that benefit Noble and...

  6. Apparatus for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    Improved electrolytic cells for producing metals by the electrolytic reduction of a compound dissolved in a molten electrolyte are disclosed. In the improved cells, at least one electrode includes a protective layer comprising an oxide of the cell product metal formed upon an alloy of the cell product metal and a more noble metal. In the case of an aluminum reduction cell, the electrode can comprise an alloy of aluminum with copper, nickel, iron, or combinations thereof, upon which is formed an aluminum oxide protective layer.

  7. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  8. A noble and single source precursor for the synthesis of metal-rich sulphides embedded in an N-doped carbon framework for highly active OER electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Barman, Barun Kumar; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2016-04-21

    Here, we demonstrate a green and environment-friendly pyrolysis route for the synthesis of metal-rich sulphide embedded in an N-doped carbon (NC) framework in the absence of sulphide ions (S(2-)). The metal-chelate complex (tris(ethylenediamine) metal(ii) sulfate) serves as a new and single source precursor for the synthesis of earth abundant and non-precious hybrid structures such as metal-rich sulphides Co9S8@NC and Ni3S2@NC when M(II) = Co(2+) and Ni(2+) and counter sulphate (SO4(2-)) ions are the source of S. Both the hybrids show superior OER activity as compared to commercial RuO2.

  9. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  10. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  11. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  12. Anticancer metal drugs and immunogenic cell death.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, Alessio; Pirker, Christine; Keppler, Bernhard K; Berger, Walter

    2016-12-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics, but also innovative precision anticancer compounds, are commonly perceived to target primarily the cancer cell compartment. However, recently it was discovered that some of these compounds can also exert immunomodulatory activities which might be exploited to synergistically enhance their anticancer effects. One specific phenomenon of the interplay between chemotherapy and the anticancer immune response is the so-called "immunogenic cell death" (ICD). ICD was discovered based on a vaccination effect exerted by cancer cells dying from pretreatment with certain chemotherapeutics, termed ICD inducers, in syngeneic transplantation mouse models. Interestingly, only a minority of drugs is able to trigger ICD without a clear-cut relation to chemical structures or their primary modes-of-action. Nevertheless, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are clearly linked to ICD. With regard to metal drugs, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin is considered a bona fide ICD inducer. Taken into account that several experimental metal compounds are efficient ROS and ER stress mediators, presence of potent ICD inducers within the plethora of novel metal complexes seems feasible and has occasionally been reported. In the light of recent successes in cancer immunotherapy, here we review existing literature regarding anticancer metal drugs and ICD induction. We recommend a more profound investigation of the immunogenic features of experimental anticancer metal drugs.

  13. Excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production over CdS nanorods via using noble metal-free copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sangyeob; Kumar, D. Praveen; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Choi, Jiha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Charge carrier recombination and durability issues are major problems in photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) evolution processes. Thus, there is a very important necessitate to extend an efficient photocatalyst to control charge-carrier dynamics in the photocatalytic system. We have developed copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts with CdS nanorods for controlling charge carriers without recombination for use in photocatalytic H2 evolution under simulated solar light irradiation. Effective control and utilization of charge carriers are possible by loading Cu2MoS4 nanosheets onto the CdS nanorods. The loading compensates for the restrictions of CdS, and stimulated synergistic effects, such as efficient photoexcited charge separation, lead to an improvement in photostability because of the layered structure of the Cu2MoS4nanosheets. These layered Cu2MoS4 nanosheets have emerged as novel and active replacements for precious noble metal co-catalysts in photocatalytic H2 production by water splitting. We have obtained superior H2 production rates by using Cu2MoS4 loaded CdS nanorods. The physicochemical properties of the composites are analyzed by diverse characterization techniques.

  14. Fe3 N-Co2 N Nanowires Array: A Non-Noble-Metal Bifunctional Catalyst Electrode for High-Performance Glucose Oxidation and H2 O2 Reduction toward Non-Enzymatic Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Cao, Xiaoqin; Wang, Zao; Hao, Shuai; Hou, Xiandeng; Qu, Fengli; Du, Gu; Asiri, Abdullah M; Zheng, Chengbin; Sun, Xuping

    2017-03-06

    Among reported electrode materials, a nanoarray is an attractive architecture for molecular detection because of its large specific surface area and easy accessibility for target molecules. Here, a new Fe3 N-Co2 N nanowires array grown on carbon cloth (Fe3 N-Co2 N/CC) is reported as a non-noble-metal bifunctional catalyst electrode for high-performance glucose oxidation and H2 O2 reduction. As an electrochemical non-enzymatic sensor for glucose detection, Fe3 N-Co2 N/CC shows a fast response time of 8 s, a low detection limit (LOD) of 77 nm (signal/noise=3), and a high sensitivity of 4333.7 μA mm(-1)  cm(-2) . As an H2 O2 sensor, it shows a LOD of 59 nm (signal/noise=3) and a sensitivity of 2273.8 μA mm(-1)  cm(-2) with a response time of 2 s. In addition, the proposed sensor is stable with high selectivity, specificity, and reproducibility, and its application for real sample analysis has been successfully demonstrated.

  15. Third-order nonlinear optical responses in derivatives of phenylhydrazone by Z-scan and optical limiting studies-influence of noble metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheesh, P.; Siji Narendran, N. K.; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2013-12-01

    Here we report a study on the third-order nonlinear optical properties of a new class of phenylhydrazones and the influence of silver and gold metal nanoparticles on their nonlinear response. Metal nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation method. Single beam Z-scan technique with a 7 ns, 10 Hz Nd: YAG laser pulses at 532 nm were employed for the measurements. The compounds exhibit well optical limiting properties. Hence, these compounds are a promising class of materials for the optical device applications.

  16. Static impedance behavior of programmable metallization cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, S.; Saremi, M.; Barnaby, H. J.; Edwards, A.; Kozicki, M. N.; Mitkova, M.; Mahalanabis, D.; Gonzalez-Velo, Y.; Mahmud, A.

    2015-04-01

    Programmable metallization cell (PMC) devices work by growing and dissolving a conducting metallic bridge across a chalcogenide glass (ChG) solid electrolyte, which changes the resistance of the cell. PMC operation relies on the incorporation of metal ions in the ChG films via photo-doping to lower the off-state resistance and stabilize resistive switching, and subsequent transport of these ions by electric fields induced from an externally applied bias. In this paper, the static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film with active Ag and inert Ni electrodes is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities.

  17. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  18. Understanding the adsorption of CuPc and ZnPc on noble metal surfaces by combining quantum-mechanical modelling and photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu Li; Wruss, Elisabeth; Egger, David A; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Saidi, Wissam A; Bucko, Tomas; Wee, Andrew T S; Zojer, Egbert

    2014-03-07

    Phthalocyanines are an important class of organic semiconductors and, thus, their interfaces with metals are both of fundamental and practical relevance. In the present contribution we provide a combined theoretical and experimental study, in which we show that state-of-the-art quantum-mechanical simulations are nowadays capable of treating most properties of such interfaces in a quantitatively reliable manner. This is shown for Cu-phthalocyanine (CuPc) and Zn-phthalocyanine (ZnPc) on Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. Using a recently developed approach for efficiently treating van der Waals (vdW) interactions at metal/organic interfaces, we calculate adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiments. With these geometries available, we are then able to accurately describe the interfacial electronic structure arising from molecular adsorption. We find that bonding is dominated by vdW forces for all studied interfaces. Concomitantly, charge rearrangements on Au(111) are exclusively due to Pauli pushback. On Ag(111), we additionally observe charge transfer from the metal to one of the spin-channels associated with the lowest unoccupied π-states of the molecules. Comparing the interfacial density of states with our ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) experiments, we find that the use of a hybrid functionals is necessary to obtain the correct order of the electronic states.

  19. Review: gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grandinetti, Felice

    2011-01-01

    This review article surveys recent experimental and theoretical advances in the gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases. Covered issues include the interaction of the noble gases with metal and non-metal cations, the conceivable existence of covalent noble-gas anions, the occurrence of ion-molecule reactions involving singly-charged xenon cations, and the occurrence of bond-forming reactions involving doubly-charged cations. Research themes are also highlighted, that are expected to attract further interest in the future.

  20. Spectroscopic enhancement from noble mettalic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shu-Ju

    2011-12-01

    Resonant coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in noble metallic nanostructures to incident radiation and the related subject of localized behavior of electromagnetic waves are currently of great interest due to their potential application to sensors, biochemical assays, optical transmission, and photovoltaic devices. My thesis research is made up of two related parts. In part one I examined enhanced fluorescence in dye molecules in proximity to Ag nanostructures. In part two I studied the effect of Au nanostructure arrays on the performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) : [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). Nanostructures were fabricated by two different methods: e-beam lithography (top down) and spray pyrolysis (bottom up). Using e-beam lithography, we produced arrays of nanostructures with well defined shapes, sizes, and spacings. By systematically varying these topographical parameters, we measured their effect on nanometer-sized metallic structure-enhanced fluorescence (nMEF) and on absorption and external quantum efficiency (EQE) in OSC devices as a function of optical wavelength. In analyzing experimental results, we carried out numerical simulations of the local electric field under incident light, across plasmonic resonances. The comparison between the calculated local field squared and measured fluorescence/EQE provides physical insight on the configuration-dependence of these two processes. Our results indicate that local field enhancement near nanostructures is dominant in nMEF, and that the local field is strongly affected by the substrate and device architectures. For the OSCs, both measurements and calculations show that absorbance within the active layer is enhanced only in a narrow band of wavelengths (˜640-720 nm) where the active layer is not very absorbing for our prototype nanopillar-patterned devices. The peak enhancement for 180 nm wide Au

  1. Fabrication of noble-metal nanoparticle-doped SiO2-B2O3-P2O5 waveguide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hunhyeong; Kang, Minkyung; Nichols, William T.; Shin, Dongwook

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we report the fabrication and the characterization of Pt/SiO2-B2O3-P2O5 and Au/SiO2-B2O3-P2O5 composite thin films suitable for planar lightwave circuits (PLCs). The host material was prepared by using flame hydrolysis deposition (FHD). Platinum was doped from colloidal solutions with concentrations of 500, 1000, and 2000 ppm. Gold was doped by sputtering with various deposition times. The samples displayed absorption peaks originating from the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the dopant metal particles. With increasing dopant particle size, the absorption peak shifted toward longer wavelength, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the absorption band broadened. The Maxwell-Garnett theory was used to explain the size dependence of the plasmon peaks. The dopant metal particles were found to order as a monolayer within the silica matrix, opening the possibility for surface-plasmon-resonance-based waveguiding in optical devices.

  2. Non-noble metal Bi deposition by utilizing Bi2WO6 as the self-sacrificing template for enhancing visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shixin; Zhang, Yihe; Li, Min; Du, Xin; Huang, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    Bi metal deposited on Bi2WO6 composite photocatalysts have been successfully synthesized via a simple in-situ reduction method at room temperature with using Bi2WO6 as self-sacrificing template and NaBH4 as reducing agent. The reduction extent can be easily modulated by controlling the concentration of NaBH4 solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and photoelectrochemical measurements were carried out to analyze the phase, morphology, optical property and photoelectrochemical property of the as-prepared samples. The photocatalytic activity is surveyed by degradation of phenol under visible light (λ > 420 nm), which showed that the BWO-0.2 photocatalyst exhibited the highest efficiency, which was over 3 times as high as pure Bi2WO6. The enhanced photocatalytic activity should be attributed to strengthened photoabsorption and charge separation efficiency derived from the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Bi metal.

  3. Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ

    2012-02-28

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

  4. On the mechanisms of cation injection in conducting bridge memories: The case of HfO2 in contact with noble metal anodes (Au, Cu, Ag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, M.; Gonon, P.; Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Grampeix, H.; Jalaguier, E.; Jomni, F.; Bsiesy, A.

    2016-03-01

    Resistance switching is studied in HfO2 as a function of the anode metal (Au, Cu, and Ag) in view of its application to resistive memories (resistive random access memories, RRAM). Current-voltage (I-V) and current-time (I-t) characteristics are presented. For Au anodes, resistance transition is controlled by oxygen vacancies (oxygen-based resistive random access memory, OxRRAM). For Ag anodes, resistance switching is governed by cation injection (Conducting Bridge random access memory, CBRAM). Cu anodes lead to an intermediate case. I-t experiments are shown to be a valuable tool to distinguish between OxRRAM and CBRAM behaviors. A model is proposed to explain the high-to-low resistance transition in CBRAMs. The model is based on the theory of low-temperature oxidation of metals (Cabrera-Mott theory). Upon electron injection, oxygen vacancies and oxygen ions are generated in the oxide. Oxygen ions are drifted to the anode, and an interfacial oxide is formed at the HfO2/anode interface. If oxygen ion mobility is low in the interfacial oxide, a negative space charge builds-up at the HfO2/oxide interface. This negative space charge is the source of a strong electric field across the interfacial oxide thickness, which pulls out cations from the anode (CBRAM case). Inversely, if oxygen ions migration through the interfacial oxide is important (or if the anode does not oxidize such as Au), bulk oxygen vacancies govern resistance transition (OxRRAM case).

  5. Pure Rotational Spectra of the Reaction Products of Laser Ablated Thorium Metal and Oxygen Molecules Entrained Within Supersonic Expansions of Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Cooke, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Thorium metal has been laser ablated in the presence of pure oxygen entrained in high pressure argon. The products of the ablation event have been supersonically expanded into the Fabry-Pérot cavity of a time-domain microwave spectrometer. New measurements have been performed on thorium monoxide, where the J = 1 ← 0 transition has been recorded in the v = 8, 9, and 10 vibrational levels. Further to this, a thorium-dependent spectral transition has been observed at 19251.8740(10) MHz. The carrier of this signal is to be determined, however, it requires an oxygen concentration of 0.1 % which is significantly higher than the optimal oxygen concentration required for observation of the thorium monoxide transitions. It is postulated that the presently unidentified thorium-containing compound is ThO_2 which has C_2v symmetry. Progress on the measurement of this spectra, together with other thorium experiments and supporting quantum chemical calculations, will be presented.

  6. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  7. Theoretical study of structural and optical properties of noble metal cluster-dipeptide hybrids at defect centers of MgO.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2012-07-14

    We present the theoretical investigation of structural and optical properties of silver and gold cluster-dipeptide hybrids bound to the F(S) defect of the MgO (100) surface. We use DFT and its TDDFT variant combined with the polarizable embedded cluster model for the description of the extended MgO environment. As model peptide we have chosen CysTrp since the cysteine residue interacts strongly with metal particles through the sulfur atom and tryptophan is the most important chromophoric amino acid. Our results show that in the case of CysTrp bound to the supported Ag(4) cluster an intense optical signal arises at 400 nm. In contrast, in the case of gold no strongly localized absorption is present since the optical response of supported gold-peptide hybrids is dominated by a large number of low intensity d-electron excitations spread over a broad energy range. Such a localized optical signal which is present in supported silver hybrids can be exploited for the optical detection of peptides and thus can serve as basis for the development of biosensing materials.

  8. Ultrathin metallic interlayers in vacuum deposited MoOx/metal/MoOx electrodes for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travkin, V. V.; Luk'yanov, A. Yu.; Drozdov, M. N.; Vopilkin, E. A.; Yunin, P. A.; Pakhomov, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    Eight types of practically important metals were tested as interlayers in MoOx/Metal/MoOx composite electrodes. Ultrathin semitransparent electrodes with a fixed thickness were deposited on glass, using thermal vacuum evaporation, and characterized by various microscopic and X-ray techniques and by mass spectrometry profiling. The optical transmission and sheet resistance of the electrodes were compared as key parameters for photovoltaic applications. We attempted to find correlations between the chemical properties of embedded metals and the structural/conducting properties of composite electrodes. In general, the electrodes with noble metal interlayers feature a better conductivity, whereas their average transparency in the visible and near infrared range is similar to that of electrodes with reactive metals. Diffusion and oxidation processes in composite electrodes were examined by the SIMS depth profiling technique.

  9. The Fundamental Role of Nano-Scale Oxide Films in the Oxidation of Hydrogen and the Reduction of Oxygen on Noble Metal Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Digby Macdonald

    2005-04-15

    The derivation of successful fuel cell technologies requires the development of more effective, cheaper, and poison-resistant electrocatalysts for both the anode (H{sub 2} oxidation in the presence of small amounts of CO from the reforming of carbonaceous fuels) and the cathode (reduction of oxygen in the presence of carried-over fuel). The proposed work is tightly focused on one specific aspect of electrocatalysis; the fundamental role(s) played by nanoscale (1-2 nm thick) oxide (''passive'') films that form on the electrocatalyst surfaces above substrate-dependent, critical potentials, on charge transfer reactions, particularly at elevated temperatures (25 C < T < 200 C). Once the role(s) of these films is (are) adequately understood, we will then use this information to specify, at the molecular level, optimal properties of the passive layer for the efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction.

  10. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing is described. Metallo-organic silver films were spun-on by argon ion laser beam pyrolysis. The metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) film was spun-on an evaporated Ti/Pd film to produce tood adhesion. In a maskless process, the argon ion laser writes the contact pattern. The film is then built up to obtain the required conductivity using conventional silverplating process. The Ti/Pd film in the field is chemically etched using the plated silver film as the mask. The width of the contact pattern is determined by the power of the laser. Widths as thin as 20 microns were obtained using 0.66 W of laser power. Cells fabricated with the 50 micron line widths of 4 ohm-cm floating zone (Fz) silicon-produced efficiencies of 16.6% (no passivation) which were equivalent to the best cells using conventional metallization/lithography and no passivation.

  11. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, R Stewart; Dalton, D Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-06-30

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000-15,000 K and pressures of 15-52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn.

  12. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, R. Stewart; Dalton, D. Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000–15,000 K and pressures of 15–52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn. PMID:26080401

  13. Noble Gas Polarimetry Using Rb EPR Frequency Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. L.; Jeong, K.; Houghtby, E.; Paskvan, T.; Limes, M. E.; Saam, B.

    2014-05-01

    EPR frequency shifts of optically polarized alkali-metal atoms can be exploited for polarimetry of noble-gas nuclei polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping. Our group recently measured the enhancement factor κ0 = 493 for Rb-129Xe, which characterizes the electron wave-function overlap during collisions and is crucial to the calibration of the frequency-shift for 129Xe polarimetry. This type of polarimetry is useful in several applications involving optically polarized 129Xe; our particular motivation is an in situ measurement of absolute 129Xe polarization within the optical pumping cell of a flow-through 129Xe polarizer. This application has some particular challenges, and we have initially observed some unexpected shifts in the 87Rb EPR frequency measurement on board the polarizer. In effort to disentangle these apparent systematic effects, we have constructed a separate experiment to characterize Rb EPR shifts for both 3He and 129Xe in sealed cells. We present results and analysis of these experiments and discuss implications for using this method in flow-through polarizers. NSF PHY-0855482

  14. Precious Metal Recovery from Fuel Cell MEA's

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, Lawrence

    2004-04-27

    In 2003, Engelhard Corporation received a DOE award to develop a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach to recover Pt from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEA’s). The most important precious metal used in fuel cells is platinum, but ruthenium is also added to the anode electrocatalyst if CO is present in the hydrogen stream. As part of the project, a large number of measurements of Pt and Ru need to be made. A low-cost approach to measuring Pt is using the industry standard spectrophotometric measurement of Pt complexed with stannous chloride. The interference of Ru can be eliminated by reading the Pt absorbance at 450 nm. Spectrophotometric methods for measuring Ru, while reported in the literature, are not as robust. These slides will discuss the options for measuring Pt and Ru using the method of UV-VIS spectrophotometry

  15. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  16. Low-field MRI of laser polarized noble gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Pomeroy, V. R.; Mair, R. W.; Hinton, D. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Stoner, R. E.; Hersman, F. W.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    NMR images of laser polarized 3He gas were obtained at 21 G using a simple, homebuilt instrument. At such low fields magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of thermally polarized samples (e.g., water) is not practical. Low-field noble gas MRI has novel scientific, engineering, and medical applications. Examples include portable systems for diagnosis of lung disease, as well as imaging of voids in porous media and within metallic systems.

  17. Testing Metal Chlorides For Use In Sodium-Cell Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of transition-metal wires in molten NaAlCl4 electrolyte used to eliminate suitability of transition metals as cathodes in sodium cells. Cyclic voltammetry used in conjunction with measurement of galvanostatic polarization curves determines whether given metal chloride suitable as cathode material in such cell. Cells useful in such high-energy-density and high-power-density applications as leveling loads on electric-power plants, supplying power to electric ground vehicles, and aerospace applications.

  18. MOCVD of multimetal and noble metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endle, James Patrick

    2000-11-01

    Carbon content in TiN films produced with tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium (TDMAT) and methylhydrazine or dimethylhydrazine can be controlled at or below 10% with a N/Ti ratio of ˜1.3 at growth temperatures between 573 and 723 K. Post-dosing either hydrazine on a CVD TiN film results in additional N-Ti bonds, indicating a surface reaction between the two precursors occurs. Co-dosing hydrazine-like compounds with larger alkyl ligands than methyl resulted in additional carbon incorporation in the TiN film. A growth system, consisting of a load lock and growth chamber, and a precursor pyrolysis system were designed and built to study metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Addition of a bubbler and a direct liquid injection system allowed for the vaporization of solid and liquid precursors and solutions of multiple precursors. A precursor pyrolysis system was designed for high and low vapor pressure precursors and high carrier gas flow rates. The systems were used to study (Al,Ti)N and Ir film growth. (Al,Ti)N was used as a template to study the incorporation of elements into a multimetal chemical vapor deposited film using NH3 and a DLI solution of TDMAT and the tris(dimethylarnino)alane dimer (TDMAA) in toluene-NH 3 significantly decreases the decomposition temperature of both precursors. Carbon was reduced by increasing the NH3 partial pressure, and the Al incorporation was increased by increasing the TDMAA/TDMAT ratio in the DLI solution. Exposure to ambient resulted in significant oxygen incorporation and the removal of carbon and nitrogen from the (AI,Ti)N film. Conformal (AI,Ti)N films were produced at 450 K in the presence of NH3 and at 550 K without NH3. The role of O2 in Ir film growth was studied with the newly designed equipment. O2 significantly decreases the decomposition temperature of (MeCp)Ir(COD) below 425 K by preventing a carbonaceous build-up on the iridium film. By decreasing the oxygen partial pressure, the island nucleation and coalescence times were significantly increased, and step coverage and roughness were improved. The iridium crystal orientation was nearly random on the SiO2 substrate and strongly (111) oriented on the TiN(111) substrate. Conformal films (step coverage ≈ 1) were produced at 550 K on both substrates.

  19. PROCESS FOR REMOVING NOBLE METALS FROM URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.

    1961-01-31

    A pyrometallurgical method is given for purifying uranium containing ruthenium and palladium. The uranium is disintegrated and oxidized by exposure to air and then the ruthenium and palladium are extracted from the uranium with molten zinc.

  20. Programmable Metallization Cell Devices for Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliga, Sunil

    Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology is based on an electrochemical phenomenon in which a metallic electrodeposit can be grown or dissolved between two electrodes depending on the voltage applied between them. Devices based on this phenomenon exhibit a unique, self-healing property, as a broken metallic structure can be healed by applying an appropriate voltage between the two broken ends. This work explores methods of fabricating interconnects and switches based on PMC technology on flexible substrates. The objective was the evaluation of the feasibility of using this technology in flexible electronics applications in which reliability is a primary concern. The re-healable property of the interconnect is characterized for the silver doped germanium selenide (Ag-Ge-Se) solid electrolyte system. This property was evaluated by measuring the resistances of the healed interconnect structures and comparing these to the resistances of the unbroken structures. The reliability of the interconnects in both unbroken and healed states is studied by investigating the resistances of the structures to DC voltages, AC voltages and different temperatures as a function of time. This work also explores replacing silver with copper for these interconnects to enhance their reliability. A model for PMC-based switches on flexible substrates is proposed and compared to the observed device behavior with the objective of developing a formal design methodology for these devices. The switches were subjected to voltage sweeps and their resistance was investigated as a function of sweep voltage. The resistance of the switches as a function of voltage pulse magnitude when placed in series with a resistance was also investigated. A model was then developed to explain the behavior of these devices. All observations were based on statistical measurements to account for random errors. The results of this work demonstrate that solid electrolyte based interconnects display self

  1. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Livingstone, David M; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  2. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  3. A new method of metallization for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, M.

    1979-01-01

    The new metallization process based on Mo-Sn system was studied. The reaction mechanism of MoO3 and its mixture with Sn was examined. The basic ink composition was modified in order to obtain a low ohmic contact to the cell. The electrical characteristics of the cells were comparable with the existing metallization processes. However, in comparison with the standard processes using silver as the contacting metal, the saving obtained by the use of the new process was substantial.

  4. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  5. A metal-organic framework-derived bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Bao Yu; Yan, Ya; Li, Nan; Wu, Hao Bin; Lou, Xiong Wen (David); Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen electrocatalysis is of great importance for many energy storage and conversion technologies, including fuel cells, metal-air batteries and water electrolysis. Replacing noble metal-based electrocatalysts with highly efficient and inexpensive non-noble metal-based oxygen electrocatalysts is critical for the practical applications of these technologies. Here we report a general approach for the synthesis of hollow frameworks of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes derived from metal-organic frameworks, which exhibit higher electrocatalytic activity and stability for oxygen reduction and evolution than commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts. The remarkable electrochemical properties are mainly attributed to the synergistic effect from chemical compositions and the robust hollow structure composed of interconnected crystalline nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes. The presented strategy for controlled design and synthesis of metal-organic framework-derived functional nanomaterials offers prospects in developing highly active electrocatalysts in electrochemical energy devices.

  6. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-04-04

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications.

  7. Molybdenum-tin as a solar cell metallization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Radics, C.

    1981-01-01

    The operations of solar cell manufacture are briefly examined. The formation of reliable, ohmic, low-loss, and low-cost metal contacts on solar cells is a critical process step in cell manufacturing. In a commonly used process, low-cost metallization is achieved by screen printing a metal powder-glass frit ink on the surface of the Si surface and the conductive metal powder. A technique utilizing a molybdenum-tin alloy for the metal contacts appears to lower the cost of materials and to reduce process complexity. The ink used in this system is formulated from MoO3 with Sn powder and a trace amount of titanium resonate. Resistive losses of the resulting contacts are low because the ink contains no frit. The MoO3 is finally melted and reduced in forming gas (N2+H2) to Mo metal. The resulting Mo is highly reactive which facilitates the Mo-Si bonding.

  8. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed.

  9. A novel microstructured metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-González, R.; Hernández, E.; Savvin, S.; Núñez, P.; Makradi, A.; Sabaté, N.; Esquivel, J. P.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    An innovative design, alternative to the conventional metal supported fuel cells (MSC) is proposed. This new design of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC), comprises a 200 μm layer of a honeycomb-metallic framework with hexagonal cells which supports a 250 μm layer of electrolyte. Each hexagonal cell is further functionalized with a thin 5-10 μm of Ni-YSZ anode. This new design allows a reduction of ∼65% of the metallic supporting material, rendering performances over 300 mW cm-2 under pure hydrogen at 850 °C, with an OCV of ∼1.1 V.

  10. Development of an all-metal thick film cost affective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1981-01-01

    An economical thick film solar cell contact for high volume production of low cost silicon solar array modules was investigated. All metal screenable pastes using base metals were studied. Solar cells with junction depths varying by a factor of 3.3, with and without a deposited oxide coating were used. Cells were screened and fired by a two step firing process. Adhesion and metallurgical results are unsatisfactory. No electrical information is obtained due to inadequate contact adhesion.

  11. Electrocatalyst advances for hydrogen oxidation in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.

    1984-01-01

    The important considerations that presently exist for achieving commercial acceptance of fuel cells are centered on cost (which translates to efficiency) and lifetime. This paper addresses the questions of electrocatalyst utilization within porous electrode structures and the preparation of low-cost noble metal electrocatalyst combinations with extreme dispersions of the metal. Now that electrocatalyst particles can be prepared with dimensions of 10 A, either singly or in alloy combinations, a very large percentage of the noble metal atoms in a crystallite are available for reaction. The cost savings for such electrocatalysts in the present commercially driven environment are considerable.

  12. A base-metal conductor system for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, M. G.; Pryor, R. A.; Sparks, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    Solder, copper, and silver are evaluated as conductor layer metals for silicon solar cell metallization on the basis of metal price stability and reliability under operating conditions. Due to its properties and cost, copper becomes an attractive candidate for the conductor layer. It is shown that nickel operates as an excellent diffusion barrier between copper and silicon while simultaneously serving as an electrical contact and mechanical contact to silicon. The nickel-copper system may be applied to the silicon by plating techniques utilizing a variety of plating bath compositions. Solar cells having excellent current-voltage characteristics are fabricated to demonstrate the nickel-copper metallization system.

  13. Absence of Structural Impact of Noble Nanoparticles on P3HT:PCBM Blends for Plasmon-Enhanced Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells Probed by Synchrotron GI-XRD

    PubMed Central

    Lilliu, Samuele; Alsari, Mejd; Bikondoa, Oier; Emyr Macdonald, J.; Dahlem, Marcus S.

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of noble metal nanoparticles, displaying localized surface plasmon resonance, in the active area of donor-acceptor bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices is an industrially compatible light trapping strategy, able to guarantee better absorption of the incident photons and give an efficiency improvement between 12% and 38%. In the present work, we investigate the effect of Au and Ag nanoparticles blended with P3HT: PCBM on the P3HT crystallization dynamics by synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. We conclude that the presence of (1) 80 nm Au, (2) mix of 5 nm, 50 nm, 80 nm Au, (3) 40 nm Ag, and (4) 10 nm, 40 nm, 60 nm Ag colloidal nanoparticles, at different concentrations below 0.3 wt% for Au and below 0.1% for Ag in P3HT: PCBM blends, does not affect the behaviour of the blends themselves. PMID:26030351

  14. Development of an all-metal thick film cost effective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Parker, J.

    1983-01-01

    Improved thick film solar cell contacts for the high volume production of low cost silicon solar arrays are needed. All metal screenable pastes made from economical base metals and suitable for application to low to high conductivity silicon were examined. Silver fluoride containing copper pastes and fluorocarbon containing copper pastes were discussed. The effect of hydrogen on the adhesion of metals to silicon was investigated. A cost analysis of various paste materials is provided.

  15. Development of an all-metal thick film cost effective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, B.; Parker, J.

    1983-12-01

    Improved thick film solar cell contacts for the high volume production of low cost silicon solar arrays are needed. All metal screenable pastes made from economical base metals and suitable for application to low to high conductivity silicon were examined. Silver fluoride containing copper pastes and fluorocarbon containing copper pastes were discussed. The effect of hydrogen on the adhesion of metals to silicon was investigated. A cost analysis of various paste materials is provided.

  16. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  17. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    1998-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  18. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  19. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

    1998-08-25

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

  20. Iron-copper metallization for flexible solar/cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavendel, H. W.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of a copper-base metallization for shallow-junction cells applied in flexible solar arrays in space is discussed. This type of metallization will reduce usage of precious metals (such as silver), increase case of bonding (by welding or by soldering) and eliminate heavy high Z interconnects (such as molybdenum). The main points of concern are stability against thermally induced diffusion of copper into silicon which causes degradation of shallow cell junctions, and low series resistance of the contact with semiconductor which promotes cell efficiency.

  1. Novel fuel cell stack with coupled metal hydride containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Yan; Bu, Qingyuan; Guzy, Christopher J.; Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Air-cooled, self-humidifying hydrogen fuel cells are often used for backup and portable power sources, with a metal hydride used as the hydrogen storage material. To provide a stable hydrogen flow to the fuel cell stack, heat must be provided to the metal hydride. Conventionally, the heat released from the exothermic reaction of hydrogen and oxygen in the fuel cell stack to the exhaust air is used to heat a separate metal hydride container. In this case, the heat is only partially used instead of being more closely coupled because of the heat transfer resistances in the system. To achieve better heat integration, a novel scheme is proposed whereby hydrogen storage and single fuel cells are more closely coupled. Based on this idea, metal hydride containers in the form of cooling plates were assembled between each pair of cells in the stack so that the heat could be directly transferred to a metal hydride container of much larger surface-to-volume ratio than conventional separate containers. A heat coupled fuel cell portable power source with 10 cells and 11 metal hydride containers was constructed and the experimental results show that this scheme is beneficial for the heat management of fuel cell stack.

  2. Back contact to film silicon on metal for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.; Teplin, Charles; Stradins, Pauls

    2013-06-18

    A crystal oriented metal back contact for solar cells is disclosed herein. In one embodiment, a photovoltaic device and methods for making the photovoltaic device are disclosed. The photovoltaic device includes a metal substrate with a crystalline orientation and a heteroepitaxial crystal silicon layer having the same crystal orientation of the metal substrate. A heteroepitaxial buffer layer having the crystal orientation of the metal substrate is positioned between the substrate and the crystal silicon layer to reduce diffusion of metal from the metal foil into the crystal silicon layer and provide chemical compatibility with the heteroepitaxial crystal silicon layer. Additionally, the buffer layer includes one or more electrically conductive pathways to electrically couple the crystal silicon layer and the metal substrate.

  3. Stabilizing metal components in electrodes of electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, Charles J.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of reducing the removal or transfer into a gas phase of a current carrying metal in an apparatus, such as an electrochemical cell 2 having a porous fuel electrode 6 containing metal particles 11, where the metal is subject to removal or transfer into a gaseous phase, the method characterized in that (1) a metal organic compound that decomposes to form an electronically conducting oxide coating when heated is applied to the metal and porous electrode, and (2) the compound on the metal is then heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose the compound into an oxide coating 13 by increasing the temperature at a rate that is longer than 1 hour between room temperature and 600.degree. C., resulting in at least one continuous layer 13, 14 of the oxide coating on the metal.

  4. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.

    2001-01-01

    Binary and ternary electrocatalysts are provided for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. The binary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate selected from the group consisting of NiWO.sub.4 or CoWO.sub.4 or a combination thereof, and 2) Group VIII noble metal catalyst supported on the substrate. The ternary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate as described above, and 2) a catalyst comprising Group VIII noble metal, and ruthenium oxide or molybdenum oxide or a combination thereof, said catalyst being supported on said substrate.

  5. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Tiwari, Prabhat

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  6. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  7. Nobel metal alloyed thin-films with optical properties on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chen; Leite, Marina S.

    Metallic materials with tunable optical responses can enable the unprecedented control of optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices with enhanced performance, such as thin-film solar cells, metamaterials and metasurfaces for tunable absorbers and optical filters, among others. Here we present the alloying of noble metals, Ag, Au and Cu, to develop a novel class of material with optical response not achieved by pure metals. We fabricate binary mixtures with controlled chemical composition by co-sputtering. Ellipsometry and surface plasmon polariton coupling angle measurements are in excellent agreement when determining the real part of the dielectric function (ɛ1). Surprisingly, in some cases, a mixture provides a material with higher surface plasmon polariton quality factor than the corresponding pure metals. Our approach paves the way to implement metallic nanostructures with tunable absorption/transmission, overcoming the current limitation of the dielectric function of noble metals.

  8. Environmental tests of metallization systems for terrestrial photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, P., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Seven different solar cell metallization systems were subjected to temperature cycling tests and humidity tests. Temperature cycling excursions were -50 deg C to 150 deg C per cycle. Humidity conditions were 70 deg C at 98% relative humidity. The seven metallization systems were: Ti/Ag, Ti/Pd/Ag, Ti/Pd/Cu, Ni/Cu, Pd/Ni/Solder, Cr/Pd/Ag, and thick film Ag. All metallization systems showed a slight to moderate decrease in cell efficiencies after subjection to 1000 temperature cycles. Six of the seven metallization systems also evidenced slight increases in cell efficiencies after moderate numbers of cycles, generally less than 100 cycles. The copper based systems showed the largest decrease in cell efficiencies after temperature cycling. All metallization systems showed moderate to large decreases in cell efficiencies after 123 days of humidity exposure. The copper based systems again showed the largest decrease in cell efficiencies after humidity exposure. Graphs of the environmental exposures versus cell efficiencies are presented for each metallization system, as well as environmental exposures versus fill factors or series resistance.

  9. Metal-air cell with ion exchange material

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2015-08-25

    Embodiments of the invention are related to anion exchange membranes used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the membranes function as the electrolyte material, or are used in conjunction with electrolytes such as ionic liquid electrolytes.

  10. Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells

    DOEpatents

    Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

    1982-09-27

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  11. Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells

    DOEpatents

    Shimotake, Hiroshi; Bartholme, Louis G.

    1984-01-01

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  12. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst for Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will bring industrial catalyst experience to fuel cell research. Specifically, industrial catalysts, such as those used in platforming, utilize precious metal platinum as an active component in a finely dispersed form.

  13. Elastomers bonded to metal surfaces seal electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    A leakproof seal secondary cell containing alkaline electrolytes was developed by bonding an alkali-resistant elastomer, such as neoprene, to metal contact surfaces. Test results of several different elastomers strongly indicate the feasibility of this sealing method.

  14. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  15. Heavy metals in the cell nucleus - role in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sas-Nowosielska, Hanna; Pawlas, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    People are exposed to heavy metals both in an occupational and natural environment. The most pronounced effects of heavy metals result from their interaction with cellular genetic material packed in form of chromatin. Heavy metals influence chromatin, mimicking and substituting natural microelements in various processes taking place in the cell, or interacting chemically with nuclear components: nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. This paper is a review of current knowledge on the effects of heavy metals on chromatin, exerted at the level of various nuclear components.

  16. Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B. III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-24

    Sonoluminescence spectra were collected from Cr(CO){sub 6} solutions in octanol and dodecane saturated with various noble gases. The emission from excited-state metal atoms serves as an internal thermometer of cavitation. The intensity and temperature of sonoluminescence increases from He to Xe. The intensity of the underlying continuum, however, grows faster with increasing temperature than the line emission. Dissociation of solvent molecules within the bubble consumes a significant fraction of the energy generated by the collapsing bubble, which can limit the final temperature inside the bubble. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Solubility of noble gases in serpentine - Implications for meteoritic noble gas abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaikowski, A.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the solubilities of the noble gases from synthesis and solubility studies of the sheet silicate mineral serpentine in carbonaceous chondrites is presented. Hydrothermal synthesis and exchange experiments were made at 340C and 1 kbar with noble gas partial pressures from 2 times 10 to the -8th power to 0.1 atm. The measured distribution coefficients for noble gases are not sufficiently high to account for the trapped noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites by exchange in solar nebula if meteoritic minerals have comparable distribution coefficients. Also, serpentine gains and loses noble gases to approach equilibrium values with the terrestrial atmosphere, indicating that this exposure may have influenced the noble gas abundances in phyllosilicate minerals of these chondrites. The dispersion of K-Ar ages of carbonaceous chondrites could be the result of phyllosilicates approaching equilibrium solubility of atmospheric Ar-40.

  18. Recycled Cell Phones - A Treasure Trove of Valuable Metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Daniel E.

    2006-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fact Sheet examines the potential value of recycling the metals found in obsolete cell phones. Cell phones seem ubiquitous in the United States and commonplace throughout most of the world. There were approximately 1 billion cell phones in use worldwide in 2002. In the United States, the number of cell phone subscribers increased from 340,000 in 1985 to 180 million in 2004. Worldwide, cell phone sales have increased from slightly more than 100 million units per year in 1997 to an estimated 779 million units per year in 2005. Cell phone sales are projected to exceed 1 billion units per year in 2009, with an estimated 2.6 billion cell phones in use by the end of that year. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimated that, by 2005, as many as 130 million cell phones would be retired annually in the United States. The nonprofit organization INFORM, Inc., anticipated that, by 2005, a total of 500 million obsolete cell phones would have accumulated in consumers' desk drawers, store rooms, or other storage, awaiting disposal. Typically, cell phones are used for only 1 1/2 years before being replaced. Less than 1 percent of the millions of cell phones retired and discarded annually are recycled. When large numbers of cell phones become obsolete, large quantities of valuable metals end up either in storage or in landfills. The amount of metals potentially recoverable would make a significant addition to total metals recovered from recycling in the United States and would supplement virgin metals derived from mining.

  19. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SHAPE-CONTROLLED BULK SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE NANOCRYSTALS AND THEIR CATALYTIC PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bulk and shape-controlled synthesis of gold (Au) nanostructures with various shapes such as prisms, cubes and hexagons is described that occurs via microwave-assisted spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts using an aqueous solution of α-D-glucose, sucrose and maltose. The exp...

  20. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE NANOSTRUCTURES USING BIODEGRADABLE POLYMER CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-assisted (MW) synthesis of noble metals such as Au, Pt and Pd is reported using biodegradable polymer carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) at 100°C within few seconds. The possible reduction entails the coupling of polar hydroxyl units in beta-glucopyranose units with micr...

  1. Nitrogen-doped carbon onions encapsulating metal alloys as efficient and stable catalysts for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chongyang; Xu, Feng; Chen, Jing; Min, Huihua; Dong, Hui; Tong, Ling; Qasim, Khan; Li, Shengli; Sun, Litao

    2016-01-01

    Designing a new class of non-noble metal catalysts with triiodide reduction activity and stability comparable to those of conventional Pt is extremely significant for the application of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we demonstrate newly designed counter electrode (CE) materials of onion-like nitrogen-doped carbon encapsulating metal alloys (ONC@MAs) such as FeNi3 (ONC@FeNi3) or FeCo (ONC@FeCo), by a facile and scalable pyrolysis method. The resulting composite catalysts show superior catalytic activities towards the triiodide reduction and exhibit low charge transfer resistance between the electrode surfaces and electrolytes. As a result, the DSSCs based on ONC@FeCo and ONC@FeNi3 achieve outstanding power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 8.26% and 8.87%, respectively, which can rival the 8.28% of Pt-based DSSC. Moreover, the excellent electrochemical stabilities for both the two catalysts also have been corroborated by electrochemical impendence spectra and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Noticeably, TEM investigation further reveals that the N-doped graphitic carbon onions exhibit the high structural stability in iodine-containing medium even subject to hundreds of CV scanning. These results make ONC@MAs the promising candidates to supersede costly Pt as efficient and stable CEs for DSSCs.

  2. On a cryogenic noble gas ion catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.

    2006-03-01

    In situ purification of the gas used as stopping medium in a noble gas ion catcher by operating the device at low temperatures of 60-150 K was investigated. Alpha-decay recoil ions from a 223Ra source served as energetic probes. The combined ion survival and transport efficiencies for 219Rn ions saturated below about 90 K, reaching 28.7(17)% in helium, 22.1(13)% in neon, and 17.0(10)% in argon. These values may well reflect the charge exchange and stripping cross-sections during the slowing down of the ions, and thus represent a fundamental upper limit for the efficiency of noble gas ion catcher devices. We suggest the cryogenic noble gas ion catcher as a technically simpler alternative to the ultra-high purity noble gas ion catcher operating at room temperature.

  3. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  4. Preparation and evaluation of advanced catalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.; Baris, J.; Hockmuth, J.; Pagliaro, P.

    1984-01-01

    The platinum electrocatalysts were characterized for their crystallite sizes and the degree of dispersion on the carbon supports. One application of these electrocatalysts was for anodic oxidation of hydrogen in hot phosphoric acid fuel cells, coupled with the influence of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the fuel gas stream. In a similar way, these platinum on carbon electrocatalysts were evaluated for oxygen reduction in hot phosphoric acid. Binary noble metal alloys were prepared for anodic oxidation of hydrogen and noble metal-refractory metal mixtures were prepared for oxygen reduction. An exemplar alloy of platinum and palladium (50/50 atom %) was discovered for anodic oxidation of hydrogen in the presence of carbon monoxide, and patent disclosures were submitted. For the cathode, platinum-vanadium alloys were prepared showing improved performance over pure platinum. Preliminary experiments on electrocatalyst utilization in electrode structures showed low utilization of the noble metal when the electrocatalyst loading exceeded one weight percent on the carbon.

  5. Noble gas sputtering calculations using TRIM

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Nemanich, J.; Thomas, G.E.; Schiel, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    In conjunction with our experimental work on saddle field ion sputtering, we have attempted to apply the Monte Carlo program TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) to calculate the sputter yields for a variety of noble gas sputtering applications. Comparison with experiments are shown. Information extracted from these analyses have proved useful in optimizing the experimental sputtering parameters. Calculated sputter yields obtained utilizing TRIM are presented for noble gas sputtering of a variety of materials common to nuclear target production.

  6. Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1988-01-01

    In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

  7. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  8. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  9. Type of cell death induced by seven metals in cultured mouse osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Contreras, René García; Vilchis, José Rogelio Scougall; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yuko; Nakamura, Yukio; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The use of dental metal alloys in the daily clinic makes it necessary to evaluate the cytotoxicity of eluted metal components against oral cells. However, the cytotoxic mechanism and the type of cell death induced by dental metals in osteoblasts have not been well characterized. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of seven metals against the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. alpha-MEM was used as a culture medium, since this medium provided much superior proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells over DMEM. Ag (NH(3))(2)F was the most cytotoxic, followed by CuCl>CuCl(2) >CoCl(2), NiCl(2)>FeCl(3) and FeCl(2) (least toxic). None of the metals showed any apparent growth stimulating effect (so-called 'hormesis') at lower concentrations. A time course study demonstrated that two hours of contact between oral cells and Ag (NH(3))(2)F, CuCl, CoCl(2) or NiCl(2) induced irreversible cell death. Contact with these metals induced a smear pattern of DNA fragmentation without activation of caspase-3. Preincubation of MC3T3-E1 cells with either a caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) or autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin) failed to rescue them from metal cytotoxicity. These data suggest the induction of necrotic cell death rather than apoptosis and autophagy by metals in this osteoblastic cell line.

  10. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Nanowire Network Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Oener, Sebastian Z; van de Groep, Jorik; Macco, Bart; Bronsveld, Paula C P; Kessels, W M M; Polman, Albert; Garnett, Erik C

    2016-06-08

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) junctions provide the charge separating properties of Schottky junctions while circumventing the direct and detrimental contact of the metal with the semiconductor. A passivating and tunnel dielectric is used as a separation layer to reduce carrier recombination and remove Fermi level pinning. When applied to solar cells, these junctions result in two main advantages over traditional p-n-junction solar cells: a highly simplified fabrication process and excellent passivation properties and hence high open-circuit voltages. However, one major drawback of metal-insulator-semiconductor solar cells is that a continuous metal layer is needed to form a junction at the surface of the silicon, which decreases the optical transmittance and hence short-circuit current density. The decrease of transmittance with increasing metal coverage, however, can be overcome by nanoscale structures. Nanowire networks exhibit precisely the properties that are required for MIS solar cells: closely spaced and conductive metal wires to induce an inversion layer for homogeneous charge carrier extraction and simultaneously a high optical transparency. We experimentally demonstrate the nanowire MIS concept by using it to make silicon solar cells with a measured energy conversion efficiency of 7% (∼11% after correction), an effective open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 560 mV and estimated short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 33 mA/cm(2). Furthermore, we show that the metal nanowire network can serve additionally as an etch mask to pattern inverted nanopyramids, decreasing the reflectivity substantially from 36% to ∼4%. Our extensive analysis points out a path toward nanowire based MIS solar cells that exhibit both high Voc and Jsc values.

  11. Parasitic corrosion-resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O/sub 2/ cells

    DOEpatents

    Joy, R.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1982-09-20

    A consumable metal anode is described which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

  12. Parasitic corrosion resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O.sub.2 cells

    DOEpatents

    Joy, Richard W.; Smith, David F.

    1983-01-01

    A consumable metal anode which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

  13. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  14. Combined toxicity of heavy metal mixtures in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xialu; Gu, Yuanliang; Zhou, Qi; Mao, Guochuan; Zou, Baobo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2016-09-01

    With rapid industrialization, China is now facing great challenges in heavy metal contamination in the environment. Human exposure to heavy metals through air, water and food commonly involves a mixture consisting of multiple heavy metals. In this study, eight common heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni) that cause environmental contamination were selected to investigate the combined toxicity of different heavy metal mixtures in HL7702 cells. Toxicity (24 h LC50 ) of each individual metal on the cells ranked Hg > Cr = Cd > Cu > Zn > Ni > Mn > Pb; toxicity of the different mixtures ranked: M5 > M3PbHgCd > M5+Mn > M5+Cu > M2CdNi > M4A > M8-Mn > M8 > M5+Zn > M4B > M8-Cr > M8-Zn > M8-Cu > M8-Pb > M8-Cd > M8-Hg > M8-Ni > M3PbHgNi > M3CuZnMn. The cytotoxicity data of individual metals were successfully used to build the additive models of two- to eight-component metal mixtures. The comparison between additive model and combination model or partly additive model was useful to evaluate the combined effects in mixture. Synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects of the toxicity were observed in different mixtures. These results suggest that the combined effects should be considered in the risk assessment of heavy metal co-exposure, and more comprehensive investigations on the combined effects of different heavy metal mixtures are needed in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Admit One: How Essential and Nonessential Metals Gain Entrance into the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Fretham, Stephanie; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals can have a number of detrimental or beneficial effects in the cell, but first they must get in. Organisms have evolved transport mechanisms to get metals that are required, or essential into the cell. Nonessential metals often enter the cell through use of the machinery provided for essential metals. Much work has been done to advance our understanding of how these metals are transported across the plasma and organelle membranes. This review provides an overview of these metal transport processes. PMID:22337135

  16. Metal bipolar plates for PEM fuel cell-A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, H.; Hung, Y.; Mahajan, D.

    The polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) based fuel cells are clean alternative energy systems that hold excellent potential for cost effectiveness, durability, and relatively high overall efficiency. PEM fuel cell is recognized by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the main candidate to replace the internal combustion engine in transportation applications. Metallic bipolar plates and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) are two crucial components of a PEM power stack and their durability and fabrication cost must be optimized to allow fuel cells to penetrate the commercial market and compete with other energy sources. The bipolar plates perform as the current conductors between cells, provide conduits for reactant gases flow, and constitute the backbone of a power stack. They are commonly made of graphite composite for high corrosion resistance and good surface contact resistance; however their manufacturability, permeability, and durability for shock and vibration are unfavorable in comparison to metals. On the other hand, various methods and techniques must be developed to combat metallic corrosion and eliminate the passive layer that causes unacceptable reduction in contact resistance and possible fouling of the catalyst and the ionomer. Thus recently metallic bipolar plates have received considerable attention in the research community. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the research work conducted on metal bipolar plates to prevent corrosion while maintaining a low contact resistance.

  17. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  18. Observations of solar-cell metallization corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Engineering Sciences Area of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Flat-Plate Solar Array Project is performing long term environmental tests on photovoltaic modules at Wyle Laboratories in Huntsville, Alabama. Some modules have been exposed to 85 C/85% RH and 40 C/93% RH for up to 280 days. Other modules undergoing temperature-only exposures ( 3% RH) at 85 C and 100 C have been tested for more than 180 days. At least two modules of each design type are exposed to each environment - one with, and the other without a 100-mA forward bias. Degradation is both visually observed and electrically monitored. Visual observations of changes in appearance are recorded at each inspection time. Significant visual observations relating to metallization corrosion (and/or metallization-induced corrosion) include discoloration (yellowing and browning) of grid lines, migration of grid line material into the encapsulation (blossoming), the appearance of rainbow-like diffraction patterns on the grid lines, and brown spots on collectors and grid lines. All of these observations were recorded for electrically biased modules in the 280-day tests with humidity.

  19. Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Conghua

    2013-05-30

    Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

  20. METAL COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1959-02-01

    Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

  1. Cell metal interactions: A comparison of natural uranium to other common metals in renal cells and bone osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgram, S.; Carrière, M.; Thiebault, C.; Berger, P.; Khodja, H.; Gouget, B.

    2007-07-01

    Uranium acute intoxication has been documented to induce nephrotoxicity. Kidneys are the main target organs after short term exposures to high concentrations of the toxic, while chronic exposures lead to its accumulation in the skeleton. In this paper, chemical toxicity of uranium is investigated for rat osteoblastic bone cells and compared to results previously obtained on renal cells. We show that bone cells are less sensitive to uranium than renal cells. The influence of the chemical form on U cytotoxicity is demonstrated. For both cell types, a comparison of uranium toxicity with other metals or metalloids toxicities (Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Se and Cd) permits classification of Cd, Zn, Se IV and Cu as the most toxic and Ni, Se VI, Mn and U as the least toxic. Chemical toxicity of natural uranium proves to be far less than that of cadmium. To try to explain the differences in sensitivities observed between metals and different cell types, cellular accumulations in cell monolayers are quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), function of time or function of dose: lethal doses which simulate acute intoxications and sub-lethal doses which are more realistic with regard to environmentally metals concentrations. In addition to being more resistant, bone cells accumulated much more uranium than did renal cells. Moreover, for both cell models, Mn, U-citrate and U-bicarbonate are strongly accumulated whereas Cu, Zn and Ni are weakly accumulated. On the other hand, a strong difference in Cd behaviour between the two cell types is shown: whereas Cd is very weakly accumulated in bone cells, it is very strongly accumulated in renal cells. Finally, elemental distribution of the toxics is determined on a cellular scale using nuclear microprobe analysis. For both renal and osteoblastic cells, uranium was accumulated in as intracellular precipitates similar to those observed previously by SEM/EDS.

  2. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  3. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-13

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  4. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  5. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  6. Laser-assisted solar-cell metallization processing

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Mcmullin, P.G.

    1984-03-01

    Laser assisted solar cell metallization processing which is a one step process is examined. The potential advantages of laser disposition techniques for photovoltaic systems are: a high resolution, no photolithography, clean and contamination free, in-situ sintering, and low contact resistance.

  7. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  8. Coated metal sintering carriers for fuel cell electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Donelson, Richard; Bryson, E. S.

    1998-01-01

    A carrier for conveying components of a fuel cell to be sintered through a sintering furnace. The carrier comprises a metal sheet coated with a water-based carbon paint, the water-based carbon paint comprising water, powdered graphite, an organic binder, a wetting agent, a dispersing agent and a defoaming agent.

  9. Coated metal sintering carriers for fuel cell electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Donelson, R.; Bryson, E.S.

    1998-11-10

    A carrier is described for conveying components of a fuel cell to be sintered through a sintering furnace. The carrier comprises a metal sheet coated with a water-based carbon paint, the water-based carbon paint comprising water, powdered graphite, an organic binder, a wetting agent, a dispersing agent and a defoaming agent.

  10. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  11. A precious-metal free micro fuel cell accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretthauer, C.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, integrated fuel cell (FC) type primary and secondary batteries attracted a great deal of attention as integrated on-chip power sources due to their high theoretical power densities. Unfortunately, the costs of these devices have been rather high. This is partially due to the involved clean-room processes, but also due to the fact that these devices generally rely on expensive precious-metals such as Pd and Pt. Therefore we developed a novel integrated FC type accumulator that is based on non-precious-metals only. The key component of the presented accumulator is its alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane that allows not only the usage of a low-cost AB5 type hydrogen storage electrode, but also the usage of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 as a precious-metal free bifunctional catalyst for the air-breathing electrode. Additionally the presented design requires only comparatively few cleanroom processes which further reduces the overall production costs. Although abdicating precious-metals, the presented accumulator shows an open circuit voltage of 0.81 V and a maximum power density of 0.66 mW cm-2 which is comparable or even superior to former precious-metal based cells.

  12. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  13. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    DOEpatents

    Beck, Theodore R.; Brown, Craig W.

    2002-07-16

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  14. Using 220Rn to calibrate liquid noble gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Yamashita, M.; Takeda, A.; Kishimoto, K.; Moriyama, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe 220Rn calibration source that was developed for liquid noble gas detectors. The key advantage of this source is that it can provide 212Bi-212 Po consecutive events, which enables us to evaluate the vertex resolution of a detector at low energy by comparing low-energy events of 212Bi and corresponding higher-energy α-rays from 212Po. Since 220Rn is a noble gas, a hot metal getter can be used when introduced using xenon as the carrier gas. In addition, no long-life radioactive isotopes are left behind in the detector after the calibration is complete; this has clear advantage over the use of 222Rn which leaves longlife radioactivity, i.e., 210Pb. Using a small liquid xenon test chamber, we developed a system to introduce 220Rn via the xenon carrier gas; we demonstrated the successful introduction of 6 × 102 220Rn atoms in our test environment.

  15. Incorporating metal into polarized 3He target cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katugampola, Sumudu K.; Matyas, Daniel J.; Wang, Yunxiao; Tobias, William A.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Cates, Gordon D.

    2017-01-01

    An upcoming measurement at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) of the electric form factor of the neutron will utilize a polarized 3He target at high luminosity. While polarized 3He targets at JLab have previously been made entirely of glass, we describe progress toward incorporating metal windows for the electron beam. Under the conditions of our targets, very few studies have been done on the spin-relaxation of nuclear-polarized 3He on metal surfaces. We have found good performance by using Oxygen Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper substrates electroplated with gold. The glass-to-metal transitions within our test cells were based on Housekeeper seals. We have further established that Uranium glass (Canary glass) has excellent spin-relaxation properties, and can serve as a transition glass from Pyrex to Aluminosilicate glass (GE180). Another finding was that spin-relaxation properties were sensitive to the manner in which cells were annealed, an important issue because of constraints when annealing cells containing both metal and glass.

  16. A New Method of Metallization for Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, M.

    1979-01-01

    A low cost ohmic contact on silicon solar cells based on molybdenum-tin metal systems was developed. The approach is based on the formulation of a screenable ink composed from molybdenum oxide and tin mixture. The reduction of Mo03 into Mo and the establishment of Mo 03:Sn ratio is studied. Both tasks were done in an experimental station constructed for this purpose. The results show that molybdenum was formed from its oxide at 800 C. and improved in bonding to silicon at 900 C. A 20% Mo03-80%Sn mixture was converted into metallic coating within this temperature range.

  17. (abstract) Alkali Metal Diffusion Through Porous Metal Electrodes in AMTEC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of mass transport of an alkali metal through porous metal electrodes in alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter AMTEC cells is important in optimizing these high current density devices, but also affords the opportunity to investigate a variety of simple mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes. Quantitative investigations of Na transport through WPt(sub 3.5) via surface or grain boundary diffusion, and K transport through porous Mo electrodes by free molecular flow, over large ranges of temperature have been performed. WPt(sub 3.5) has especially low transport impedance over the 950 to 1200K temperature range. New results are the Na through porous WPt(sub 3.5) and K through porous Mo diffusion rates and mechanisms.

  18. Burp Charging Nickel Metal Hydride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Pollard, Richard

    1997-01-01

    The SKYNET 4 constellation consists of three spacecraft which were launched between December 1988 and August 1990. The spacecraft are three-axis stabilized geostationary earth-orbiting military communications satellites with a design life of seven years on station. With the mission objective achieved all the batteries continue to give excellent performance. This paper presents a review of the history of the six batteries from cell procurement to the end of their design life and beyond. Differences in operational strategies are discussed and the lifetime trends in performance are analyzed. The combination of procurement acceptance criteria and the on-station battery management strategy utilized are presented as the prime factors in achieving completely successful battery performance throughout the mission.

  19. A Grounded Theory of the Development of Noble Youth Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronk, Kendall Cotton

    2012-01-01

    Having a noble purpose in life is an important component of positive youth development; however, little is known about how noble purposes develop over time. Therefore, using three waves of interviews over a 5-year period with 9 adolescents (N = 9) who demonstrated intense commitments to various noble purposes, the present study developed a…

  20. Evaluation of metal biouptake from the analysis of bulk metal depletion kinetics at various cell concentrations: theory and application.

    PubMed

    Rotureau, Elise; Billard, Patrick; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2015-01-20

    Bioavailability of trace metals is a key parameter for assessment of toxicity on living organisms. Proper evaluation of metal bioavailability requires monitoring the various interfacial processes that control metal partitioning dynamics at the biointerface, which includes metal transport from solution to cell membrane, adsorption at the biosurface, internalization, and possible excretion. In this work, a methodology is proposed to quantitatively describe the dynamics of Cd(II) uptake by Pseudomonas putida. The analysis is based on the kinetic measurement of Cd(II) depletion from bulk solution at various initial cell concentrations using electroanalytical probes. On the basis of a recent formalism on the dynamics of metal uptake by complex biointerphases, the cell concentration-dependent depletion time scales and plateau values reached by metal concentrations at long exposure times (>3 h) are successfully rationalized in terms of limiting metal uptake flux, rate of excretion, and metal affinity to internalization sites. The analysis shows the limits of approximate depletion models valid in the extremes of high and weak metal affinities. The contribution of conductive diffusion transfer of metals from the solution to the cell membrane in governing the rate of Cd(II) uptake is further discussed on the basis of estimated resistances for metal membrane transfer and extracellular mass transport.