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Sample records for cell nucleus division

  1. The bacterium endosymbiont of Crithidia deanei undergoes coordinated division with the host cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Catta-Preta, Carolina Moura Costa; Schenkman, Sergio; de Azevedo Martins, Allan Cezar; Miranda, Kildare; de Souza, Wanderley; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2010-08-26

    In trypanosomatids, cell division involves morphological changes and requires coordinated replication and segregation of the nucleus, kinetoplast and flagellum. In endosymbiont-containing trypanosomatids, like Crithidia deanei, this process is more complex, as each daughter cell contains only a single symbiotic bacterium, indicating that the prokaryote must replicate synchronically with the host protozoan. In this study, we used light and electron microscopy combined with three-dimensional reconstruction approaches to observe the endosymbiont shape and division during C. deanei cell cycle. We found that the bacterium replicates before the basal body and kinetoplast segregations and that the nucleus is the last organelle to divide, before cytokinesis. In addition, the endosymbiont is usually found close to the host cell nucleus, presenting different shapes during the protozoan cell cycle. Considering that the endosymbiosis in trypanosomatids is a mutualistic relationship, which resembles organelle acquisition during evolution, these findings establish an excellent model for the understanding of mechanisms related with the establishment of organelles in eukaryotic cells.

  2. The Bacterium Endosymbiont of Crithidia deanei Undergoes Coordinated Division with the Host Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Catta-Preta, Carolina Moura Costa; Schenkman, Sergio; de Azevedo Martins, Allan Cezar; Miranda, Kildare; de Souza, Wanderley; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2010-01-01

    In trypanosomatids, cell division involves morphological changes and requires coordinated replication and segregation of the nucleus, kinetoplast and flagellum. In endosymbiont-containing trypanosomatids, like Crithidia deanei, this process is more complex, as each daughter cell contains only a single symbiotic bacterium, indicating that the prokaryote must replicate synchronically with the host protozoan. In this study, we used light and electron microscopy combined with three-dimensional reconstruction approaches to observe the endosymbiont shape and division during C. deanei cell cycle. We found that the bacterium replicates before the basal body and kinetoplast segregations and that the nucleus is the last organelle to divide, before cytokinesis. In addition, the endosymbiont is usually found close to the host cell nucleus, presenting different shapes during the protozoan cell cycle. Considering that the endosymbiosis in trypanosomatids is a mutualistic relationship, which resembles organelle acquisition during evolution, these findings establish an excellent model for the understanding of mechanisms related with the establishment of organelles in eukaryotic cells. PMID:20865129

  3. Cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of a herpesvirus tegument protein during cell division.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G; O'Hare, P

    2000-03-01

    We have previously shown that the herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP22 localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm of expressing cells. We have also shown that VP22 has the unusual property of intercellular spread, which involves the movement of VP22 from the cytoplasm of these expressing cells into the nuclei of nonexpressing cells. Thus, VP22 can localize in two distinct subcellular patterns. By utilizing time-lapse confocal microscopy of live cells expressing a green fluorescent protein-tagged protein, we now report in detail the intracellular trafficking properties of VP22 in expressing cells, as opposed to the intercellular trafficking of VP22 between expressing and nonexpressing cells. Our results show that during interphase VP22 appears to be targeted exclusively to the cytoplasm of the expressing cell. However, at the early stages of mitosis VP22 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it immediately binds to the condensing cellular chromatin and remains bound there through all stages of mitosis and chromatin decondensation into the G(1) stage of the next cycle. Hence, in VP22-expressing cells the subcellular localization of the protein is regulated by the cell cycle such that initially cytoplasmic protein becomes nuclear during cell division, resulting in a gradual increase over time in the number of nuclear VP22-expressing cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that this process is a feature not only of VP22 expressed in isolation but also of VP22 expressed during virus infection. Thus, VP22 utilizes an unusual pathway for nuclear targeting in cells expressing the protein which differs from the nuclear targeting pathway used during intercellular trafficking.

  4. [Analysis of the Effect of Non-phacoemulsification Cataract Operation on Corneal Endothelial Cell Nucleus Division].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zufeng; Miao, Xiaoqing

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effect of non-phacoemulsification cataract operation in two different patterns of nucleus delivery on the quantity and morphology of corneal endothelial cells and postoperative visual acuity. Forty patients diagnosed with cataract underwent cataract surgery and were assigned into the direct nuclear delivery and semi-nuclear delivery groups. Lens density was measured and divided into the hard and soft lenses according to Emery-little lens nucleus grading system. Non-phacoemulsification cataract operation was performed. At 3 d after surgery, the quantity and morphology of corneal endothelium were counted and observed under corneal endothelial microscope. During 3-month postoperative follow-up, the endothelial cell loss rate, morphological changes and visual acuity were compared among four groups. Corneal endothelial cell loss rate in the direct delivery of hard nucleus group significantly differed from those in the other three groups before and 3 months after operation (P < 0.01), whereas no statistical significance was found among the direct delivery of soft nucleus, semi-delivery of hard nucleus and semi-delivery soft nucleus groups (all P > 0.05). Preoperative and postoperative 2-d visual acuity did not differ between the semi-delivery of hard nucleus and direct delivery of soft nucleus groups (P = 0.49), significantly differed from those in the semi-delivery of soft nucleus (P = 0.03) and direct delivery of hard nucleus groups (P = 0.14). Visual acuity at postoperative four months did not differ among four groups (P = 0.067). During non-phacoemulsification cataract surgery, direct delivery of hard nucleus caused severe injury to corneal endothelium and semi-delivery of soft nucleus yielded mild corneal endothelial injury. Slight corneal endothelial injury exerted no apparent effect upon visual acuity and corneal endothelial morphology at three months after surgery.

  5. Cell death in the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus of male and female lamb fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Radhika C.; Scheldrup, Melissa; Meaker, Mary; Stormshak, Fred; Estill, Charles T.; Roselli, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    The medial preoptic area of the adult sheep contains an ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN) that is larger and has more neurons in males than in females. In the lamb fetus, the nascent oSDN occupies the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus (MPNc) and consists of a cluster of cells that is organized by the action of testosterone during gestational days 60 to 90 of a 147 day term pregnancy. The current study sought to determine whether programmed cell death contributes to the emergence of the oSDN. Male and female lamb fetuses were euthanized at different ages spanning the period during which the oSDN is organized. The expression of the pro- and anti-apoptotic genes bcl-2 and bax, respectively, was measured by quantitative RT-PCR to assess possible sex differences in neuron vulnerability to programmed cell death. The appearance of DNA-fragmentation was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and used to estimate the occurrence of apoptotic cell death. We found that bcl-2 and bax mRNA expression in the medial preoptic area of the developing lamb fetus decreased during the last half of the 147-day gestation. The ratio of bcl-2/bax gene expression was highest at gestational day 85 but was equivalent between males and females. TUNEL staining in the MPNc was very low and although it decreased significantly with age, it was not significantly different between sexes. These results using two different methods to assess cell death indicate that a sex difference in the incidence of cell death is not a primary mechanism leading to sexual differentiation of the oSDN. PMID:24491631

  6. Cell death in the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus of male and female lamb fetuses.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Radhika C; Scheldrup, Melissa; Meaker, Mary; Stormshak, Fred; Estill, Charles T; Roselli, Charles E

    2014-03-20

    The medial preoptic area of the adult sheep contains an ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN) that is larger and has more neurons in males than in females. In the lamb fetus, the nascent oSDN occupies the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus (MPNc) and consists of a cluster of cells that is organized by the action of testosterone during gestational days 60-90 of a 147 day term pregnancy. The current study sought to determine whether programmed cell death contributes to the emergence of the oSDN. Male and female lamb fetuses were euthanized at different ages spanning the period during which the oSDN is organized. The expression of the pro- and anti-apoptotic genes bcl-2 and bax, respectively, was measured by quantitative RT-PCR to assess possible sex differences in neuron vulnerability to programmed cell death. The appearance of DNA-fragmentation was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and used to estimate the occurrence of apoptotic cell death. We found that bcl-2 and bax mRNA expression in the medial preoptic area of the developing lamb fetus decreased during the last half of the 147-day gestation. The ratio of bcl-2/bax gene expression was highest at gestational day 85 but was equivalent between males and females. TUNEL staining in the MPNc was very low and although it decreased significantly with age, it was not significantly different between sexes. These results using two different methods to assess cell death indicate that a sex difference in the incidence of cell death is not a primary mechanism leading to sexual differentiation of the oSDN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell division

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the first 12 hours after conception, the fertilized egg cell remains a single cell. After approximately 30 ... at the end of 3 days, the fertilized egg cell has become a berry-like structure made ...

  8. [Cortical cytoskeletal ring in prophase II leads to correction of abnormalities of the first meiotic division and to meiotic restitution of pollen mother cell nucleus].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V; Zaporozhchenko, I A; Maksiutova, Iu R; Shatskaia, O A

    2007-01-01

    The deviation of prophase cytoskeletal ring formation was determined during meiotic division in 50% of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in maize haploid No 1498 (Zea mays). At prophase in both meiotic divisions the cytoskeletal ring is formed in cortical region of cytoplasm instead of perinuclear. Sometimes formation of both perinuclear and cortical rings is observed in the same cell. It has been shown that in multinucleate PMCs the cortical ring leads to the consolidation of chromosomes into common spindle and to meiotic restitution.

  9. Optical micromanipulation inside the cell: a focus in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, Leonardo; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva M.; Stringari, Chiara; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2006-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proper position of the mitotic spindle and the division plane is necessary for successful cell division and development. In this work the nature of forces governing the positioning and elongation of the mitotic spindle and the spatio-temporal regulation of the division plane positioning in fission yeast was studied. By using a mechanical perturbations induced by laser dissection of the spindle and astral microtubules, we found that astral microtubules push on the spindle poles. Further, laser dissection of the spindle midzone induced spindle collapse inward. This suggests that the spindle is driven by the sliding apart of antiparallel microtubules in the spindle midzone. Exploiting a combination of non-linear microscopy and optical trapping, we performed an optical manipulation procedure designed to displace the cell nucleus away from its normal position in the center of the cell. After the laser-induced displacement, the nucleus typically returned towards the cell center, in a manner correlated with the extension of a microtubule from the nucleus to the closer tip of the cell. This observation suggests that the centering of the nucleus is provided by microtubule pushing force. Moreover the cells in which the nucleus was displaced during interphase displayed asymmetric division, whereas when the nucleus was displaced during late prophase or metaphase, the division plane formed at the cell center as in non-manipulated cells. This result suggests that in fission yeast the division plane is selected before pro-metaphase and that the signal is not provided by the mitotic spindle.

  10. Mitotic chromosome condensation in the sperm nucleus during post fertilization maturation division in urechis eggs

    PubMed Central

    Das, NK; Barker, C

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the sperm nucleus in the egg cytoplasm are mong the immediate events in nucleocytoplasmic interactions during early embryogenesis. Soon after its entrance into the egg cytoplasm, the sperm nucleus of various organisms increases in size with the transformation of condensed chromatin to a diffuse state, resembling the chromatin of an interphase nucleus (2, 13, 15, 16). This is followed by a close association or fusion of male and female pronuclei (2, 13, 15, 16). Cytoplasmic influences on nuclear morphology have also been demonstrated clearly in nuclear transplantation and cell fusion studies (10, 11). Reactivation of the nucleus, such as the transplanted brain nucleus in Xenopus egg cytoplasm or the hen erythrocyte nucleus in interphase cytoplasm of HeLa cells, is accompanied by nuclear enlargement and chromatin dispersion (10, 11). However, premature mitotic-like chromosome condensation takes place in the nuclei of sperm or interphase cells fused with mitotic cells (9, 12). Thus, chromosome dispersion and condensation seem to depend on the state of the cytoplasm in which the nucleus is present. These observations imply that the initial morphological changes in the sperm nucleus after fertilization may very well be dependent on the state of maturation of eggs at the time of sperm entry. Unfertilized eggs of Urechis caupo, a marine echiuroid worm, are stored at the diakinesis stage. These eggs complete maturation division after insemination and this is followed by fusion of male and female pronuclei (5, 8). Therefore, Urechis caupo is a suitable organism in which to study the response of the sperm nucleus to the changing state of the egg cytoplasm during and after postfertilization maturation division. PMID:54357

  11. Cell division in Corynebacterineae

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Bramkamp, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cells must coordinate a number of events during the cell cycle. Spatio-temporal regulation of bacterial cytokinesis is indispensable for the production of viable, genetically identical offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, precise midcell assembly of the division machinery relies on inhibitory systems such as Min and Noc. In rod-shaped Actinobacteria, for example Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the divisome assembles in the proximity of the midcell region, however more spatial flexibility is observed compared to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Actinobacteria represent a group of bacteria that spatially regulate cytokinesis in the absence of recognizable Min and Noc homologs. The key cell division steps in E. coli and B. subtilis have been subject to intensive study and are well-understood. In comparison, only a minimal set of positive and negative regulators of cytokinesis are known in Actinobacteria. Nonetheless, the timing of cytokinesis and the placement of the division septum is coordinated with growth as well as initiation of chromosome replication and segregation. We summarize here the current knowledge on cytokinesis and division site selection in the Actinobacteria suborder Corynebacterineae. PMID:24782835

  12. Artificial cell division.

    PubMed

    Mange, Daniel; Stauffer, André; Petraglio, Enrico; Tempesti, Gianluca

    2004-01-01

    After a survey of the theory and some realizations of self-replicating machines, this paper presents a novel self-replicating loop endowed with universal construction and computation properties. Based on the hardware implementation of the so-called Tom Thumb algorithm, the design of this loop leads to a new kind of cellular automaton made of a processing and a control units. The self-replication of the Swiss flag serves as an artificial cell division example of the loop which, according to autopoietic evaluation criteria, corresponds to a cell showing the phenomenology of a living system.

  13. Group Shot - Nucleus - 1960 Flight Operations Division - Houston, TX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-07-08

    Group shot of the nucleus of the 1960 Flight Operations Division for the Mercury Program. Image taken at the Houston Petroleum Center (HPC) in Houston, TX, prior to their move to the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). This photo was published in the Space News Roundup, 07/08/1964. The women are (L-R): Doris Folkes, Cathy Osgood, Shirley Hunt and Mary Shep Burton. The men are (L-R): Dick Koos, Paul Brumberg, John O'Loughlin, Emil Schiesser, Jim Dalby, Morris Jenkins, Carl Huss, John Mayer, Bill Tindall, Hal Beck, Charlie Allen, Ted Skopinski, Jack Hartung, Glynn Lunney, John Shoosmith, Bill Reini, Lyn Dunseith, Jerry Engel, Harold Miller and Clay Hicks. ( 26644 ); Houston, TX

  14. TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE9 and 10 Are Essential for Maintaining Mitochondrial Function during Early Embryo Cell and Endosperm Free Nucleus Divisions in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yingtian; Zou, Wenxuan; Li, Gang; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    In the life cycle of flowering plants, the sporophytic generation takes up most of the time and plays a dominant role in influencing plant growth and development. The embryo cell and endosperm free nucleus divisions establish the critical initiation phase of early sporophyte development, which forms mature seeds through a series of cell growth and differentiation events. Here, we report on the biological functions of two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mitochondrial proteins, TRANSLOCASE OF THE INNER MEMBRANE9 (TIM9) and TIM10. We found that dysfunction of either AtTIM9 or AtTIM10 led to an early sporophyte-lethal phenotype; the embryo and endosperm both arrest division when the embryo proper developed to 16 to 32 cells. The abortion of tim9-1 and tim10 embryos at the 16/32-cell stage was caused by the loss of cell viability and the cessation of division in the embryo proper region, and this inactivation was due to the collapse of the mitochondrial structure and activity. Our characterization of tim9-1 and tim10 showed that mitochondrial membrane permeability increased and that cytochrome c was released from mitochondria into the cytoplasm in the 16/32-cell embryo proper, indicating that mitochondrial dysfunction occurred in the early sporophytic cells, and thus caused the initiation of a necrosis-like programmed cell death, which was further proved by the evidence of reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation tests. Consequently, we verified that AtTIM9 and AtTIM10 are nonredundantly essential for maintaining the mitochondrial function of early embryo proper cells and endosperm-free nuclei; these proteins play critically important roles during sporophyte initiation and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:25104724

  15. Cell Shape and Cell Division in Fission Yeast Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Matthieu; Tran, Phong T.

    2010-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has served as an important model organism for investigating cellular morphogenesis. This unicellular rod-shaped fission yeast grows by tip extension and divides by medial fission. In particular, microtubules appear to define sites of polarized cell growth by delivering cell polarity factors to the cell tips. Microtubules also position the cell nucleus at the cell middle, marking sites of cell division. Here, we review the microtubule-dependent mechanisms that regulate cell shape and cell division in fission yeast. PMID:19906584

  16. INFLUENCE OF CELL GEOMETRY ON DIVISION PLANE POSITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Minc, Nicolas; Burgess, David; Chang, Fred

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The spatial organization of cells depends on their ability to sense their own shape and size. Here, we investigate how cell shape affects the positioning of the nucleus, spindle and subsequent cell division plane. To manipulate geometrical parameters in a systematic manner, we place individual sea urchin eggs into micro-fabricated PDMS chambers of defined geometry (e.g. triangles, rectangles and ellipses). In each shape, the nucleus is positioned at the center of mass and is stretched by microtubules along an axis maintained through mitosis and predictive of the future division plane. We develop a simple computational model that posits that microtubules sense cell geometry by probing cellular space and orient the nucleus by exerting pulling forces that scale to microtubule length. This model quantitatively predicts division axis orientation probability for a wide variety of cell shapes, even in multi-cellular contexts, and provides scaling exponents for length dependent microtubule forces. PMID:21295701

  17. Division rules for polygonal cells.

    PubMed

    Cowan, R; Morris, V B

    1988-03-07

    A number of fascinating mathematical problems concerning the division of two-dimensional space are formulated from questions about the planes of cell division in embryonic epithelia. Their solution aids in the quantitative description of cellular arrangement in epithelia. Cells, considered as polygons, site their division line according to stochastic rules, eventually forming a tessellation of the plane. The equilibrium distributions for the resulting mix of polygonal types are explored for a range of stochastic rules. We find surprising links with some classical distributions from the theory of probability.

  18. MODE OF FISSION OF BENZENE NUCLEUS IN THE MICRO-ORGANISMS AND REGULATION OF CELL GROWTH AND DIVISION BY BENZENE DERIVATIVES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    as an amino donor in this microbial system. The conversion D-tryptophan to L-tryptophan in a cell-free system can be demonstrated when an electron acceptor, such as phenazine methosulfate, is present. (Author)

  19. Imaging Asymmetric T Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Mirren; Russell, Sarah M

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) controls cell fate decisions in model organisms such as Drosophila and C. elegans and has recently emerged as a mediator of T cell fate and hematopoiesis. The most appropriate methods for assessing ACD in T cells are still evolving. Here we describe the methods currently applied to monitor and measure ACD of developing and activated T cells. We provide an overview of approaches for capturing cells in the process of cytokinesis in vivo, ex vivo, or during in vitro culture. We provide methods for in vitro fixed immunofluorescent staining and for time-lapse analysis. We provide an overview of the different approaches for quantification of ACD of lymphocytes, discuss the pitfalls and concerns in interpretation of these analyses, and provide detailed methods for the quantification of ACD in our group.

  20. Light and electron microscopic study of an avian pretectal nucleus, the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon, magnocellular division.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, M D; McKenna, O C

    1986-06-01

    Using several light microscopic methods we have identified the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon, magnocellular division, by its position in the pretectum, its cellular composition, and its complement of retinal afferents and have distinguished it from neighboring structures. At the light microscopic level large neurons (approximately 30 X 21 microns) and small neurons (approximately 13 X 9 microns), which are more numerous, are seen interspersed among myelinated axons. The large neurons are generally ovoid and contain an eccentrically located nucleus and large clumps of Nissl-stained material. In the electron microscope the most notable feature of these neurons is the presence of ribosome rosettes and many parallel arrays of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). On the basis of cytological and ultrastructural features, we conclude that only one class of large neuron is present. Although in the light microscope the small neurons appear to be similar, at the ultrastructural level three neuron types have been distinguished: (1) ovoid shape with cytoplasm densely packed with organelles especially RER, (2) round shape with very little cytoplasm with few organelles, and (3) triangular shape with a pale cytoplasmic matrix with some RER. Subsurface membrane configurations are often seen in the somata of all neuron types. In addition, axon terminals, some containing flat vesicles, and other less frequent ones containing round vesicles are seen terminating on the somata of all neuronal cell types. In the neuropil, three types of presynaptic profiles can be identified. Two of these profiles are axodendritic and the third is dendrodendritic. The type R profile, which is often as large as 4 micron 2, is the most numerous, contains large round synaptic vesicles, and is often seen synapsing on several dendritic profiles. The type F profile contains flat vesicles and a relatively dense cytoplasm, and is smaller in area than type R. The third profile, which contains small

  1. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    PubMed Central

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  2. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  3. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2014-01-21

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells.

  4. The size of the nucleus increases as yeast cells grow.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Paul; Edgington, Nicholas P; Schneider, Brandt L; Rupes, Ivan; Tyers, Mike; Futcher, Bruce

    2007-09-01

    It is not known how the volume of the cell nucleus is set, nor how the ratio of nuclear volume to cell volume (N/C) is determined. Here, we have measured the size of the nucleus in growing cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of mutant yeast strains spanning a range of cell sizes revealed that the ratio of average nuclear volume to average cell volume was quite consistent, with nuclear volume being approximately 7% that of cell volume. At the single cell level, nuclear and cell size were strongly correlated in growing wild-type cells, as determined by three different microscopic approaches. Even in G1-phase, nuclear volume grew, although it did not grow quite as fast as overall cell volume. DNA content did not appear to have any immediate, direct influence on nuclear size, in that nuclear size did not increase sharply during S-phase. The maintenance of nuclear size did not require continuous growth or ribosome biogenesis, as starvation and rapamycin treatment had little immediate impact on nuclear size. Blocking the nuclear export of new ribosomal subunits, among other proteins and RNAs, with leptomycin B also had no obvious effect on nuclear size. Nuclear expansion must now be factored into conceptual and mathematical models of budding yeast growth and division. These results raise questions as to the unknown force(s) that expand the nucleus as yeast cells grow.

  5. The physiology of bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Egan, Alexander J F; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cell division is facilitated by the divisome, a dynamic multiprotein assembly localizing at mid-cell to synthesize the stress-bearing peptidoglycan and to constrict all cell envelope layers. Divisome assembly occurs in two steps and involves multiple interactions between more than 20 essential and accessory cell division proteins. Well before constriction and while the cell is still elongating, the tubulin-like FtsZ and early cell division proteins form a ring-like structure at mid-cell. Cell division starts once certain peptidoglycan enzymes and their activators have moved to the FtsZ-ring. Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli simultaneously synthesize and cleave the septum peptidoglycan during division leading to a constriction. The outer membrane constricts together with the peptidoglycan layer with the help of the transenvelope spanning Tol-Pal system.

  6. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P.; Belland, Robert J.; Cox, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  7. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  8. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  9. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  10. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  11. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  12. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  13. Nanoengineering: Super symmetry in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial cells can be sculpted into different shapes using nanofabricated chambers and then used to explore the spatial adaptation of protein oscillations that play an important role in cell division.

  14. Cell Biology of the Caenorhabditis elegans Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Fix, Orna; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the Caenorhabditis elegans nucleus have provided fascinating insight to the organization and activities of eukaryotic cells. Being the organelle that holds the genetic blueprint of the cell, the nucleus is critical for basically every aspect of cell biology. The stereotypical development of C. elegans from a one cell-stage embryo to a fertile hermaphrodite with 959 somatic nuclei has allowed the identification of mutants with specific alterations in gene expression programs, nuclear morphology, or nuclear positioning. Moreover, the early C. elegans embryo is an excellent model to dissect the mitotic processes of nuclear disassembly and reformation with high spatiotemporal resolution. We review here several features of the C. elegans nucleus, including its composition, structure, and dynamics. We also discuss the spatial organization of chromatin and regulation of gene expression and how this depends on tight control of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Finally, the extensive connections of the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and their implications during development are described. Most processes of the C. elegans nucleus are evolutionarily conserved, highlighting the relevance of this powerful and versatile model organism to human biology. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. The centrosome and asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric stem cell division is a mechanism widely employed by the cell to maintain tissue homeostasis, resulting in the production of one stem cell and one differentiating cell. However, asymmetric cell division is not limited to stem cells and is widely observed even in unicellular organisms as well as in cells that make up highly complex tissues. In asymmetric cell division, cells must organize their intracellular components along the axis of asymmetry (sometimes in the context of extracellular architecture). Recent studies have described cell asymmetry in many cell types and in many cases such asymmetry involves the centrosome (or spindle pole body in yeast) as the center of cytoskeleton organization. In this review, I summarize recent discoveries in cellular polarity that lead to an asymmetric outcome, with a focus on centrosome function. PMID:19458491

  16. The dynamic landscape of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Bellini, Michel

    2010-01-01

    While the cell nucleus was described for the first time almost two centuries ago, our modern view of the nuclear architecture is primarily based on studies from the last two decades. This surprising late start coincides with the development of new, powerful strategies to probe for the spatial organization of nuclear activities in both fixed and live cells. As a result, three major principles have emerged: first, the nucleus is not just a bag filled with nucleic acids and proteins. Rather, many distinct functional domains, including the chromosomes, resides within the confines of the nuclear envelope. Second, all these nuclear domains are highly dynamic, with molecules exchanging rapidly between them and the surrounding nucleoplasm. Finally, the motion of molecules within the nucleoplasm appears to be mostly driven by random diffusion. Here, the emerging roles of several subnuclear domains are discussed in the context of the dynamic functions of the cell nucleus.

  17. The fencing problem and Coleochaete cell division.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuandi; Dou, Mingya; Zhou, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    The findings in this study suggest that the solution of a boundary value problem for differential equation system can be used to discuss the fencing problem in mathematics and Coleochaete, a green algae, cell division. This differential equation model in parametric expression is used to simulate the two kinds of cell division process, one is for the usual case and the case with a "dead" daughter cell.

  18. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons. PMID:21738832

  19. Signaling Pathways that Regulate Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Rhind, Nicholas; Russell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Cell division requires careful orchestration of three major events: entry into mitosis, chromosomal segregation, and cytokinesis. Signaling within and between the molecules that control these events allows for their coordination via checkpoints, a specific class of signaling pathways that ensure the dependency of cell-cycle events on the successful completion of preceding events. Multiple positive- and negative-feedback loops ensure that a cell is fully committed to division and that the events occur in the proper order. Unlike other signaling pathways, which integrate external inputs to decide whether to execute a given process, signaling at cell division is largely dedicated to completing a decision made in G1 phase—to initiate and complete a round of mitotic cell division. Instead of deciding if the events of cell division will take place, these signaling pathways entrain these events to the activation of the cell-cycle kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and provide the opportunity for checkpoint proteins to arrest cell division if things go wrong. PMID:23028116

  20. Mechanics and Dynamics of Plant Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumais, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    The division of eukaryotic cells involves the assembly of complex cytoskeletal structures to exert the forces required for chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. In plants, tensional forces within the cytoskeleton constrain cells to divide according to a small number of area minimizing configurations. We have shown that the probability of observing a particular division configuration increases inversely with its relative area according to an exponential probability distribution known as the Gibbs measure. The distribution is universal up to experimental accuracy with a unique constant that applies for all plants studied irrespective of the shape and size of their cells. Using a maximum entropy formulation, we were able to demonstrate that the empirically observed division rule is predicted by the dynamics of the tense cytoskeletal elements controlling the positioning of the division plane. Finally, by framing this division rule as a dynamical system, we identified a broad class of attractors that are predictive of cell patterns observed in plants. Plant cell division thus offers a remarkable example of how interactions at the molecular level can lead to strikingly complex behaviors at the cellular and multicellular levels.

  1. Cell Division and Evolution of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivier, Nicolas; Arcenegui-Siemens, Xavier; Schliecker, Gudrun

    A tissue is a geometrical, space-filling, random cellular network; it remains in this steady state while individual cells divide. Cell division (fragmentation) is a local, elementary topological transformation which establishes statistical equilibrium of the structure. Statistical equilibrium is characterized by observable relations (Lewis, Aboav) between cell shapes, sizes and those of their neighbours, obtained through maximum entropy and topological correlation extending to nearest neighbours only, i.e. maximal randomness. For a two-dimensional tissue (epithelium), the distribution of cell shapes and that of mother and daughter cells can be obtained from elementary geometrical and physical arguments, except for an exponential factor favouring division of larger cells, and exponential and combinatorial factors encouraging a most symmetric division. The resulting distributions are very narrow, and stationarity severely restricts the range of an adjustable structural parameter

  2. Lipid Microdomains in Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cascianelli, Giacomo; Villani, Maristella; Tosti, Marcello; Marini, Francesca; Bartoccini, Elisa; Viola Magni, Mariapia

    2008-01-01

    It is known that nuclear lipids play a role in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic process. Cellular nuclei contain high levels of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, which are partially linked with cholesterol and proteins to form lipid–protein complexes. These lipids are also associated with transcription factors and newly synthesized RNA but, up to date, their organization is still unknown. The aim of the present work was to study if these specific lipid–protein interactions could be nuclear membrane microdomains and to evaluate their possible role. The results obtained demonstrate for the first time the existence of nuclear microdomains characterized by a specific lipid composition similar to that of intranuclear lipid–protein complexes previously described. Nuclear microdomain lipid composition changes during cell proliferation when the content of newly synthesized RNA increases. Because previous data show a correlation between nuclear lipids and transcription process, the role of nuclear microdomains in cellular functions is discussed. PMID:18923143

  3. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Andreu, José M; Monasterio, Octavio

    2014-08-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of proteins and the availability of crystal structures has increased our knowledge on bacterial cell division considerably in this century. Consequently, bacterial cell division proteins are more and more recognized as potential new antibiotic targets. An international effort to find small molecules that inhibit the cell division initiating protein FtsZ has yielded many compounds of which some are promising as leads for preclinical use. The essential transglycosylase activity of peptidoglycan synthases has recently become accessible to inhibitor screening. Enzymatic assays for and structural information on essential integral membrane proteins such as MraY and FtsW involved in lipid II (the peptidoglycan building block precursor) biosynthesis have put these proteins on the list of potential new targets. This review summarises and discusses the results and approaches to the development of lead compounds that inhibit bacterial cell division.

  4. Cytoskeleton assembly in Toxoplasma gondii cell division

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-White, Brooke; Beck, Josh R.; Chen, Chun-Ti; Meissner, Markus; Bradley, Peter J.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cell division across members of the protozoan parasite phylum Apicomplexa displays a surprising diversity between different species as well as between different life stages of the same parasite. In most cases, infection of a host cell by a single parasite results in the formation of a polyploid cell from which individual daughters bud in a process dependent on a final round of mitosis. Unlike other apicomplexans, Toxoplasma gondii divides by a binary process consisting of internal budding that results in only two daughter cells per round of division. Since T. gondii is experimentally accessible and displays the simplest division mode, it has manifested itself as a model for apicomplexan daughter formation. Here we review newly emerging insights in the prominent role that assembly of the cortical cytoskeletal scaffold plays in the process of daughter parasite formation. PMID:22878103

  5. Rab24 is required for normal cell division.

    PubMed

    Militello, Rodrigo D; Munafó, Daniela B; Berón, Walter; López, Luis A; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Colombo, María I

    2013-05-01

    Rab24 is an atypical member of the Rab GTPase family whose distribution in interphase cells has been characterized; however, its function remains largely unknown. In this study, we have analyzed the distribution of Rab24 throughout cell division. We have observed that Rab24 was located at the mitotic spindle in metaphase, at the midbody during telophase and in the furrow during cytokinesis. We have also observed partial co-localization of Rab24 and tubulin and demonstrated its association to microtubules. Interestingly, more than 90% of transiently transfected HeLa cells with Rab24 presented abnormal nuclear connections (i.e., chromatin bridges). Furthermore, in CHO cells stably transfected with GFP-Rab24wt, we observed a large percentage of binucleated and multinucleated cells. In addition, these cells presented an extremely large size and multiple failures in mitosis, as aberrant spindle formation (metaphase), delayed chromosomes (telophase) and multiple cytokinesis. A marked increase in binucleated, multinucleated and multilobulated nucleus formation was observed in HeLa cells depleted of Rab24. We also present evidence that a fraction of Rab24 associates with microtubules. In addition, Rab24 knock down resulted in misalignment of chromosomes and abnormal spindle formation in metaphase leading to the appearance of delayed chromosomes during late telophase and failures in cytokinesis. Our findings suggest that an adequate level of Rab24 is necessary for normal cell division. In summary, Rab24 modulates several mitotic events, including chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, perhaps through the interaction with microtubules.

  6. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division.

    PubMed

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I

    2013-09-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells.

  7. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I.

    2013-01-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells. PMID:24265858

  8. [The perichromatin compartment of the cell nucleus].

    PubMed

    Bogoliubov, D S

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the data on the structure and composition of the perichromatin compartment, a special border area between the condensed chromatin and the interchromatin space of the cell nucleus, are discussed in the light of the concept of nuclear functions in complex nuclear architectonics. Morphological features, molecular composition and functions of main extrachromosomal structures of the perichromatin compartment, perichromatin fibrils (PFs) and perichromatin granules (PGs) including nuclear stress-bodies (nSBs) that are derivates of the PGs under heat shock, are presented. A special attention was paid to the features of the molecular compositions of PFs and PGs in different cell types and at different physiological conditions.

  9. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  10. Bacterial cell division and the septal ring.

    PubMed

    Weiss, David S

    2004-11-01

    Cell division in bacteria is mediated by the septal ring, a collection of about a dozen (known) proteins that localize to the division site, where they direct assembly of the division septum. The foundation of the septal ring is a polymer of the tubulin-like protein FtsZ. Recently, experiments using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching have revealed that the Z ring is extremely dynamic. FtsZ subunits exchange in and out of the ring on a time scale of seconds even while the overall morphology of the ring appears static. These findings, together with in vitro studies of purified FtsZ, suggest that the rate-limiting step in turnover of FtsZ polymers is GTP hydrolysis. Another component of the septal ring, FtsK, is involved in coordinating chromosome segregation with cell division. Recent studies have revealed that FtsK is a DNA translocase that facilitates decatenation of sister chromosomes by TopIV and resolution of chromosome dimers by the XerCD recombinase. Finally, two murein hydrolases, AmiC and EnvC, have been shown to localize to the septal ring of Escherichia coli, where they play an important role in separation of daughter cells.

  11. Collective dynamics during cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapperi, Stefano; Bertalan, Zsolt; Budrikis, Zoe; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    In order to correctly divide, cells have to move all their chromosomes at the center, a process known as congression. This task is performed by the combined action of molecular motors and randomly growing and shrinking microtubules. Chromosomes are captured by growing microtubules and transported by motors using the same microtubules as tracks. Coherent motion occurs as a result of a large collection of random and deterministic dynamical events. Understanding this process is important since a failure in chromosome segregation can lead to chromosomal instability one of the hallmarks of cancer. We describe this complex process in a three dimensional computational model involving thousands of microtubules. The results show that coherent and robust chromosome congression can only happen if the total number of microtubules is neither too small, nor too large. Our results allow for a coherent interpretation a variety of biological factors already associated in the past with chromosomal instability and related pathological conditions.

  12. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  13. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  14. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants. PMID:27475487

  16. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Finan, John D.; Chalut, Kevin J.; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Summary In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van’t Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically-sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically-induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology. PMID:19107599

  17. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Finan, John D; Chalut, Kevin J; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-03-01

    In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van't Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo. Furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology.

  18. Mechanics of cell division in fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fred

    2012-02-01

    Cytokinesis is the stage of cell division in which a cell divides into two. A paradigm of cytokinesis in animal cells is that the actomyosin contractile ring provides the primary force to squeeze the cell into two. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytokinesis also requires a actomyosin ring, which has been generally assumed to provide the force for cleavage. However, in contrast to animal cells, yeast cells assemble a cell wall septum concomitant with ring contraction and possess large (MPa) internal turgor pressure. Here, we show that the inward force generated by the division apparatus opposes turgor pressure; a decrease in effective turgor pressure leads to an increase in cleavage rate. We show that the ring cannot be the primary force generator. Scaling arguments indicate that the contractile ring can only provide a tiny fraction of the mechanical stress required to overcome turgor. Further, we show that cleavage can occur even in the absence of the contractile ring. Instead of the contractile ring, scaling arguments and modeling suggest that the large forces for cytokinesis are produced by the assembly of cell wall polymers in the growing septum.

  19. Formative cell divisions: principal determinants of plant morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smolarkiewicz, Michalina; Dhonukshe, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Formative cell divisions utilizing precise rotations of cell division planes generate and spatially place asymmetric daughters to produce different cell layers. Therefore, by shaping tissues and organs, formative cell divisions dictate multicellular morphogenesis. In animal formative cell divisions, the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division planes relies on intrinsic and extrinsic cortical polarity cues. Plants lack known key players from animals, and cell division planes are determined prior to the mitotic spindle stage. Therefore, it appears that plants have evolved specialized mechanisms to execute formative cell divisions. Despite their profound influence on plant architecture, molecular players and cellular mechanisms regulating formative divisions in plants are not well understood. This is because formative cell divisions in plants have been difficult to track owing to their submerged positions and imprecise timings of occurrence. However, by identifying a spatiotemporally inducible cell division plane switch system applicable for advanced microscopy techniques, recent studies have begun to uncover molecular modules and mechanisms for formative cell divisions. The identified molecular modules comprise developmentally triggered transcriptional cascades feeding onto microtubule regulators that now allow dissection of the hierarchy of the events at better spatiotemporal resolutions. Here, we survey the current advances in understanding of formative cell divisions in plants in the context of embryogenesis, stem cell functionality and post-embryonic organ formation.

  20. Cell contacts orient some cell division axes in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cells of the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo divide in an invariant pattern. Here I show that the division axes of some early cells (EMS and E) are controlled by specific cell-cell contacts (EMS-P2 or E-P3 contact). Altering the orientation of contact between these cells alters the axis along which the mitotic spindle is established, and hence the orientation of cell division. Contact-dependent mitotic spindle orientation appears to work by establishing a site of the type described by Hyman and White (1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2123-2135) in the cortex of the responding cell: one centrosome moves toward the site of cell-cell contact during centrosome rotation in both intact embryos and reoriented cell pairs. The effect is especially apparent when two donor cells are placed on one side of the responding cell: both centrosomes are "captured," pulling the nucleus to one side of the cell. No centrosome rotation occurs in the absence of cell-cell contact, nor in nocodazole-treated cell pairs. The results suggest that some of the cortical sites described by Hyman and White are established cell autonomously (in P1, P2, and P3), and some are established by cell-cell contact (in EMS and E). Additional evidence presented here suggests that in the EMS cell, contact-dependent spindle orientation ensures a cleavage plane that will partition developmental information, received by induction, to one of EMS's daughter cells. PMID:7744956

  1. Division Planes Alternate in Spherical Cells of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Begg, K. J.; Donachie, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    In the spherical cells of Escherichia coli rodA mutants, division is initiated at a single point, from which a furrow extends progressively around the cell. Using “giant” rodA ftsA cells, we confirmed that each new division furrow is initiated at the midpoint of the previous division plane and runs perpendicular to it. PMID:9573213

  2. Cell division, differentiation and dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1994-08-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled nonlinear system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, providing a simple interpretation of the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of “open chaos” is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.

  3. Cell Division Drives Epithelial Cell Rearrangements during Gastrulation in Chick.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Joao; Rocancourt, Didier; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Moreau, Chloe; Gros, Jerome

    2016-02-08

    During early embryonic development, cells are organized as cohesive epithelial sheets that are continuously growing and remodeled without losing their integrity, giving rise to a wide array of tissue shapes. Here, using live imaging in chick embryo, we investigate how epithelial cells rearrange during gastrulation. We find that cell division is a major rearrangement driver that powers dramatic epithelial cell intercalation events. We show that these cell division-mediated intercalations, which represent the majority of epithelial rearrangements within the early embryo, are absolutely necessary for the spatial patterning of gastrulation movements. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these intercalation events result from overall low cortical actomyosin accumulation within the epithelial cells of the embryo, which enables dividing cells to remodel junctions in their vicinity. These findings uncover a role for cell division as coordinator of epithelial growth and remodeling that might underlie various developmental, homeostatic, or pathological processes in amniotes.

  4. Cell biological regulation of division fate in vertebrate neuroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Willardsen, Minde I; Link, Brian A

    2011-08-01

    The developing nervous system derives from neuroepithelial progenitor cells that divide to generate all of the mature neuronal types. For the proper complement of cell types to form, the progenitors must produce postmitotic cells, yet also replenish the progenitor pool. Progenitor divisions can be classified into three general types: symmetric proliferative (producing two progenitors), asymmetric neurogenic (producing one progenitor and one postmitotic cell), and symmetric neurogenic (producing two postmitotic cells). The appropriate ratios for these modes of cell division require intrinsic polarity, which is one of the characteristics that define neuroepithelial progenitor cells. The type of division an individual progenitor undergoes can be influenced by cellular features, or behaviors, which are heterogeneous within the population of progenitors. Here we review three key cellular parameters, asymmetric inheritance, cell cycle kinetics, and interkinetic nuclear migration, and the possible mechanisms for how these features influence progenitor fates.

  5. Effects of Polyhydroxybutyrate Production on Cell Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kathleen; Rahman, Asif; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological engineering can be utilized to aide the advancement of improved long-term space flight. The potential to use synthetic biology as a platform to biomanufacture desired equipment on demand using the three dimensional (3D) printer on the International Space Station (ISS) gives long-term NASA missions the flexibility to produce materials as needed on site. Polyhydroxybutyrates (PHBs) are biodegradable, have properties similar to plastics, and can be produced in Escherichia coli using genetic engineering. Using PHBs during space flight could assist mission success by providing a valuable source of biomaterials that can have many potential applications, particularly through 3D printing. It is well documented that during PHB production E. coli cells can become significantly elongated. The elongation of cells reduces the ability of the cells to divide and thus to produce PHB. I aim to better understand cell division during PHB production, through the design, building, and testing of synthetic biological circuits, and identify how to potentially increase yields of PHB with FtsZ overexpression, the gene responsible for cell division. Ultimately, an increase in the yield will allow more products to be created using the 3D printer on the ISS and beyond, thus aiding astronauts in their missions.

  6. Onset of cell division in maize germination: action of auxins

    SciTech Connect

    de Jimenez, E.S.; Baiza, A.; Aguilar, R.

    1987-04-01

    Seed germination implies metabolic reactivation, synthesis of macromolecules and onset of cell division. During maize germination, meristematic tissues of embryos re-initiate cell division asynchronically. Since auxins are known to stimulate cell division, they asked how auxins might regulate cell cycle re-initiation. Embryonic tissues were incubated with and without auxins. A pulse of either /sup 3/H-thymidine or /sup 32/P-ortophosphate was given to the tissues. Mitotic indexes were determined and % of labeled mitotic cells recorded. Results indicated that meristematic cells re-initiate cell division either from G/sub 1/ or G/sub 2/ phases. Auxin stimulated differentially the cell division process of these cells. /sup 32/P incorporation into cytoplasmic or nucleic histones was measured. Auxins stimulated this incorporation. Active turnover of histone phosphorylation occurred simultaneously to the cell division process. It is suggested that auxins might regulate the cell cycle by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of histones.

  7. INORGANIC CATIONS IN THE CELL NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Tres, Laura L.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.; Tandler, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Earlier reports indicated the presence of significant amounts of inorganic salts in the nucleus. In the present study the possibility that this might be related to the transcription process was tested on seminiferous epithelium of the adult mouse, using potassium pyroantimonate as a fixative. The results indicated that a correlation exists between the inorganic cations comprising the pyroantimonate-precipitable fraction and the RNA synthetic activity. During meiotic prophase an accumulation of cation-antimonate precipitates occurs dispersed through the middle pachytene nuclei, the stage in which RNA synthesis reaches a maximum. At other stages (zygotene to diplotene), where RNA synthesis falls to a low level, that pattern is not seen; cation-antimonate deposits are restricted to a few masses in areas apparently free of chromatin. The condensed sex chromosomes, the heterochromatin of the "basal knobs," the axial elements, and the synaptonemal complexes are devoid of antimonate deposits during the meiotic prophase. The Sertoli cells, active in RNA synthesis in both nucleoplasm and nucleolus, show cation-antimonate deposits at these sites. In the nucleoplasm some "patches" of precipitates appear coincident with clusters of interchromatin granules; in the nucleolus the inorganic cations are mainly located in the fibrillar and/or amorphous areas, whereas relatively few are shown by the granular component. The condensed chromatin bodies associated with the nucleolus were always free of antimonate precipitates. It is suggested that the observed sites of inorganic cation accumulation within the nucleus may at least partially indicate the presence of RNA polymerases, the activity of which is dependent on divalent cations. PMID:4112542

  8. Plant asymmetric cell division, vive la différence!

    PubMed

    Menke, Frank L H; Scheres, Ben

    2009-06-26

    Although little is known about how asymmetric cell division in plants is regulated, recent discoveries provide a starting point for exploring the mechanisms underlying this process. These studies reveal parallels with asymmetric division in yeast and animals, but also point to regulated cell expansion as a new mechanism of asymmetric division in plants.

  9. Asymmetric Cell Divisions in the Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Poulson, Nicholas D.; Lechler, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Generation of three-dimensional tissue with distinct cell types is required for the development of all organs. On its own, mitotic spindle orientation allows tissues to change in length or shape. In combination with intrinsic or extrinsic cues this can also be coupled to the generation of diverse cell fates - a process known as asymmetric cell division (ACD). Understanding ACD’s has been greatly aided by studies in invertebrate model systems, where genetics and live imaging have provided the basis for much of what we know. ACD’s also drive the development and differentiation of the epidermis in mammals. While similar to the invertebrate models, the epidermis is distinct in balancing symmetric and asymmetric divisions to yield a tissue of the correct surface area and thickness. Here we review the roles of spindle orientation in driving both morphogenesis and cell fate decisions. We highlight the epidermis as a unique model system to study not only basic mechanisms of ACD, but also to study their regulation during development. PMID:22449491

  10. Structural characterization of the cell division cycle in Strigomonas culicis, an endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatid.

    PubMed

    Brum, Felipe Lopes; Catta-Preta, Carolina Moura Costa; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Elias, Maria Carolina; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado

    2014-02-01

    Strigomonas culicis (previously referred to as Blastocrithidia culicis) is a monoxenic trypanosomatid harboring a symbiotic bacterium, which maintains an obligatory relationship with the host protozoan. Investigations of the cell cycle in symbiont harboring trypanosomatids suggest that the bacterium divides in coordination with other host cell structures, particularly the nucleus. In this study we used light and electron microscopy followed by three-dimensional reconstruction to characterize the symbiont division during the cell cycle of S. culicis. We observed that during this process, the symbiotic bacterium presents different forms and is found at different positions in relationship to the host cell structures. At the G1/S phase of the protozoan cell cycle, the endosymbiont exhibits a constricted form that appears to elongate, resulting in the bacterium division, which occurs before kinetoplast and nucleus segregation. During cytokinesis, the symbionts are positioned close to each nucleus to ensure that each daughter cell will inherit a single copy of the bacterium. These observations indicated that the association of the bacterium with the protozoan nucleus coordinates the cell cycle in both organisms.

  11. Cytoplasmic connection of sperm cells to the pollen vegetative cell nucleus: potential roles of the male germ unit revisited.

    PubMed

    McCue, Andrea D; Cresti, Mauro; Feijó, José A; Slotkin, R Keith

    2011-03-01

    The male germ cells of angiosperm plants are neither free-living nor flagellated and therefore are dependent on the unique structure of the pollen grain for fertilization. During angiosperm male gametogenesis, an asymmetric mitotic division produces the generative cell, which is completely enclosed within the cytoplasm of the larger pollen grain vegetative cell. Mitotic division of the generative cell generates two sperm cells that remain connected by a common extracellular matrix with potential intercellular connections. In addition, one sperm cell has a cytoplasmic projection in contact with the vegetative cell nucleus. The shared extracellular matrix of the two sperm cells and the physical association of one sperm cell to the vegetative cell nucleus forms a linkage of all the genetic material in the pollen grain, termed the male germ unit. Found in species representing both the monocot and eudicot lineages, the cytoplasmic projection is formed by vesicle formation and microtubule elongation shortly after the formation of the generative cell and tethers the male germ unit until just prior to fertilization. The cytoplasmic projection plays a structural role in linking the male germ unit, but potentially plays other important roles. Recently, it has been speculated that the cytoplasmic projection and the male germ unit may facilitate communication between the somatic vegetative cell nucleus and the germinal sperm cells, via RNA and/or protein transport. This review focuses on the nature of the sperm cell cytoplasmic projection and the potential communicative function of the male germ unit.

  12. Determination of symmetric and asymmetric division planes in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Carolyn G; Humphries, John A; Smith, Laurie G

    2011-01-01

    The cellular organization of plant tissues is determined by patterns of cell division and growth coupled with cellular differentiation. Cells proliferate mainly via symmetric division, whereas asymmetric divisions are associated with initiation of new developmental patterns and cell types. Division planes in both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells are established through the action of a cortical preprophase band (PPB) of cytoskeletal filaments, which is disassembled upon transition to metaphase, leaving behind a cortical division site (CDS) to which the cytokinetic phragmoplast is later guided to position the cell plate. Recent progress has been made in understanding PPB formation and function as well as the nature and function of the CDS. In asymmetrically dividing cells, division plane establishment is governed by cell polarity. Recent work is beginning to shed light on polarization mechanisms in asymmetrically dividing cells, with receptor-like proteins and potential downstream effectors emerging as important players in this process.

  13. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  14. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Hawkins, Edwin D; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O; Gu, Min; Russell, Sarah M

    2015-09-14

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. © 2015 Pham et al.

  15. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  16. Cell division modulates prion accumulation in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Perkins, Beth; Ullman, Julie; May, Barnaby C H; Cohen, Fred E; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-11-13

    The phenotypic effect of prions on host cells is influenced by the physical properties of the prion strain and its level of accumulation. In mammalian cell cultures, prion accumulation is determined by the interplay between de novo prion formation, catabolism, cell division, and horizontal cell-to-cell transmission. Understanding this dynamic enables the analytical modeling of protein-based heritability and infectivity. Here, we quantitatively measured these competing effects in a subline of neuroblastoma (N2a) cells and propose a concordant reaction mechanism to explain the kinetics of prion propagation. Our results show that cell division leads to a predictable reduction in steady-state prion levels but not to complete clearance. Scrapie-infected N2a cells were capable of accumulating different steady-state levels of prions, dictated partly by the rate of cell division. We also show that prions in this subline of N2a cells are transmitted primarily from mother to daughter cells, rather than horizontal cell-to-cell transmission. We quantitatively modeled our kinetic results based on a mechanism that assumes a subpopulation of prions is capable of self-catalysis, and the levels of this subpopulation reach saturation in fully infected cells. Our results suggest that the apparent effectiveness of antiprion compounds in culture may be strongly influenced by the growth phase of the target cells.

  17. (1) The Relationship of Protein Expression and Cell Division, (2) 3D Imaging of Cells Using Digital Holography, and (3) General Chemistry Enrollment at University of Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matz, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 1: The role of cell division in protein expression is important to understand in order to guide the development of better nonviral gene delivery materials that can transport DNA to the nucleus with high efficiency for a variety of cell types, particularly when nondividing cells are targets of gene therapy. We evaluated the relationship…

  18. (1) The Relationship of Protein Expression and Cell Division, (2) 3D Imaging of Cells Using Digital Holography, and (3) General Chemistry Enrollment at University of Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matz, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 1: The role of cell division in protein expression is important to understand in order to guide the development of better nonviral gene delivery materials that can transport DNA to the nucleus with high efficiency for a variety of cell types, particularly when nondividing cells are targets of gene therapy. We evaluated the relationship…

  19. Neuronal composition of the magnocellular division of the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN mag) is sex specific in the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Richendrfer, Holly A; Swann, Jennifer M

    2010-09-10

    The magnocellular division of the medial Preoptic nucleus (MPN mag) plays a critical role in the regulation of male sexual behavior in the hamster. Results from previous studies indicated that the number of neurons in the MPN mag is greater in males than females but failed to find significant differences in the volume of the nucleus suggesting that other elements in the nucleus may be greater in the female. The results of the present study, using NeuN to identify neurons, are in line with this hypothesis. The data show that (1) neurons in the MPN mag display two distinct phenotypes, those with a single nucleolus and those with multiple nucleoli; (2) the percentage of each phenotype is sex specific, differing over the course of development and (3) there is no sex difference in the number of glial cells at any age. Sex differences in the numbers of each type are correlated with developmental milestones and suggest that morphological changes are influenced by changes in circulating gonadal steroids during development.

  20. Translational Control of Cell Division by Elongator

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Fanelie; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Candiracci, Julie; Dieu, Marc; Scheliga, Judith; Wolf, Dieter A.; Yoshida, Minoru; Hermand, Damien

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Elongator is required for the synthesis of the mcm5s2 modification found on tRNAs recognizing AA-ending codons. In order to obtain a global picture of the role of Elongator in translation, we used reverse protein arrays to screen the fission yeast proteome for translation defects. Unexpectedly, this revealed that Elongator inactivation mainly affected three specific functional groups including proteins implicated in cell division. The absence of Elongator results in a delay in mitosis onset and cytokinesis defects. We demonstrate that the kinase Cdr2, which is a central regulator of mitosis and cytokinesis, is under translational control by Elongator due to the Lysine codon usage bias of the cdr2 coding sequence. These findings uncover a mechanism by which the codon usage, coupled to tRNA modifications, fundamentally contributes to gene expression and cellular functions. PMID:22768388

  1. EFFECTS OF RADIATIONS ON CELL DIVISION AND CHROMOSOMES IN ANIMALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CELL DIVISION, RADIATION EFFECTS, MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), CHROMOSOMES, JAPAN, INVERTEBRATES, RADIOPROTECTIVE AGENTS, MAMMALS, HUMANS, MICE, EMBRYOS, SENSITIVITY, DROSOPHILA, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY), PARAMECIUM .

  2. Asymmetric cell divisions: a view from plant development.

    PubMed

    Abrash, Emily B; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2009-06-01

    All complex multicellular organisms must solve the problem of generating diverse and appropriately patterned cell types. Asymmetric division, in which a single mother cell gives rise to daughters with distinct identities, is instrumental in the generation of cellular diversity and higher-level patterns. In animal systems, there exists considerable evidence for conserved mechanisms of polarization and asymmetric division. Here, we consider asymmetric cell divisions in plants, highlighting the unique aspects of plant cell biology and organismal development that constrain the process, but also emphasizing conceptual and mechanistic similarities with animal asymmetric divisions.

  3. Determination of cell division axes in the early embryogenesis of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The establishment of cell division axes was examined in the early embryonic divisions of Caenorhabditis elegans. It has been shown previously that there are two different patterns of cleavage during early embryogenesis. In one set of cells, which undergo predominantly determinative divisions, the division axes are established successively in the same orientation, while division axes in the other set, which divide mainly proliferatively, have an orthogonal pattern of division. We have investigated the establishment of these axes by following the movement of the centrosomes. Centrosome separation follows a reproducible pattern in all cells, and this pattern by itself results in an orthogonal pattern of cleavage. In those cells that divide on the same axis, there is an additional directed rotation of pairs of centrosomes together with the nucleus through well-defined angles. Intact microtubules are required for rotation; rotation is prevented by inhibitors of polymerization and depolymerization of microtubules. We have examined the distribution of microtubules in fixed embryos during rotation. From these and other data we infer that microtubules running from the centrosome to the cortex have a central role in aligning the centrosome-nuclear complex. PMID:3680373

  4. Quantifying cell division with deuterated water and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Guillermier, Christelle; Wang, Mei; Lechene, Claude P

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is commonly quantified by the administration of nucleotide labels that are incorporated by the nucleotide salvage pathway. A new approach uses precursors of the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway, such as labeled water or glucose. Because such precursors are not specific for DNA synthesis, studies utilizing this approach have analyzed isolated genomic DNA to exclude nonspecific background labeling. We hypothesized that pulse-chase administration of stable isotope labeled water would result in sufficient nuclear labeling to enable discrimination of recently divided cells by quantitative ion microscopy. We administered deuterated (D)-water and (15)N-thymidine to mice concurrently, guided by the rationale that (15)N-thymidine incorporation would serve as a "gold standard" to identify dividing cells. We show both qualitatively and quantitatively that dividing cells in the small intestine ((15)N-labeled) demonstrate a discernable D-signal in the nucleus not observed in undivided cells ((15)N-unlabled). Correlation with (31)P(-) and (12)C(15)N(-):(12)C(14)N(-) images demonstrate preferential localization of (2)H labeling in regions of the nucleus with high DNA content as expected of labeling being incorporated during DNA synthesis and cell division. These data support the concept that stable isotope tagged precursors of the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway can be used in concert with NanoSIMS to study cell division in vivo. A major implication of this study then is the possibility of using stable isotope tagged water and MIMS to study human cell turnover.

  5. Polarized cells, polarized views: asymmetric cell division in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kim; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Russell, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that alterations in cell shape and polarity play important roles in coordinating lymphocyte functions. In the last decade, a new aspect of lymphocyte polarity has attracted much attention, termed asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD has previously been shown to dictate or influence many aspects of development in model organisms such as the worm and the fly, and to be disrupted in disease. Recent observations that ACD also occurs in lymphocytes led to exciting speculations that ACD might influence lymphocyte differentiation and function, and leukemia. Dissecting the role that ACD might play in these activities has not been straightforward, and the evidence to date for a functional role in lymphocyte fate determination has been controversial. In this review, we discuss the evidence to date for ACD in lymphocytes, and how it might influence lymphocyte fate. We also discuss current gaps in our knowledge, and suggest approaches to definitively test the physiological role of ACD in lymphocytes.

  6. Polarized Cells, Polarized Views: Asymmetric Cell Division in Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Kim; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Russell, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that alterations in cell shape and polarity play important roles in coordinating lymphocyte functions. In the last decade, a new aspect of lymphocyte polarity has attracted much attention, termed asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD has previously been shown to dictate or influence many aspects of development in model organisms such as the worm and the fly, and to be disrupted in disease. Recent observations that ACD also occurs in lymphocytes led to exciting speculations that ACD might influence lymphocyte differentiation and function, and leukemia. Dissecting the role that ACD might play in these activities has not been straightforward, and the evidence to date for a functional role in lymphocyte fate determination has been controversial. In this review, we discuss the evidence to date for ACD in lymphocytes, and how it might influence lymphocyte fate. We also discuss current gaps in our knowledge, and suggest approaches to definitively test the physiological role of ACD in lymphocytes. PMID:24550912

  7. Kinetochore-microtubule interactions during cell division.

    PubMed

    Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E

    2004-01-01

    Proper segregation of chromosomes during cell division is essential for the maintenance of genetic stability. During this process chromosomes must establish stable functional interactions with microtubules through the kinetochore, a specialized protein structure located on the surface of the centromeric heterochromatin. Stable attachment of kinetochores to a number of microtubules results in the formation of a kinetochore fibre that mediates chromosome movement. How the kinetochore fibre is formed and how chromosome motion is produced and regulated remain major questions in cell biology. Here we look at some of the history of research devoted to the study of kinetochore-microtubule interaction and attempt to identify significant advances in the knowledge of the basic processes. Ultrastructural work has provided substantial insights into the structure of the kinetochore and associated microtubules during different stages of mitosis. Also, recent in-vivo studies have probed deep into the dynamics of kinetochore-attached microtubules suggesting possible models for the way in which kinetochores harness the capacity of microtubules to do work and turn it into chromosome motion. Much of the research in recent years suggests that indeed multiple mechanisms are involved in both formation of the k-fibre and chromosome motion. Thus, rather than moving to a unified theory, it has become apparent that most cell types have the capacity to build the spindle using multiple and probably redundant mechanisms.

  8. Asymmetric division coordinates collective cell migration in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Guilherme; Harrington, Kyle I; Lovegrove, Holly E; Page, Donna J; Chakravartula, Shilpa; Bentley, Katie; Herbert, Shane P

    2016-12-01

    The asymmetric division of stem or progenitor cells generates daughters with distinct fates and regulates cell diversity during tissue morphogenesis. However, roles for asymmetric division in other more dynamic morphogenetic processes, such as cell migration, have not previously been described. Here we combine zebrafish in vivo experimental and computational approaches to reveal that heterogeneity introduced by asymmetric division generates multicellular polarity that drives coordinated collective cell migration in angiogenesis. We find that asymmetric positioning of the mitotic spindle during endothelial tip cell division generates daughters of distinct size with discrete 'tip' or 'stalk' thresholds of pro-migratory Vegfr signalling. Consequently, post-mitotic Vegfr asymmetry drives Dll4/Notch-independent self-organization of daughters into leading tip or trailing stalk cells, and disruption of asymmetry randomizes daughter tip/stalk selection. Thus, asymmetric division seamlessly integrates cell proliferation with collective migration, and, as such, may facilitate growth of other collectively migrating tissues during development, regeneration and cancer invasion.

  9. Bacterial cell division: the mechanism and its precison.

    PubMed

    Harry, Elizabeth; Monahan, Leigh; Thompson, Lyndal

    2006-01-01

    The recent development of cell biology techniques for bacteria to allow visualization of fundamental processes in time and space, and their use in synchronous populations of cells, has resulted in a dramatic increase in our understanding of cell division and its regulation in these tiny cells. The first stage of cell division is the formation of a Z ring, composed of a polymerized tubulin-like protein, FtsZ, at the division site precisely at midcell. Several membrane-associated division proteins are then recruited to this ring to form a complex, the divisome, which causes invagination of the cell envelope layers to form a division septum. The Z ring marks the future division site, and the timing of assembly and positioning of this structure are important in determining where and when division will take place in the cell. Z ring assembly is controlled by many factors including negative regulatory mechanisms such as Min and nucleoid occlusion that influence Z ring positioning and FtsZ accessory proteins that bind to FtsZ directly and modulate its polymerization behavior. The replication status of the cell also influences the positioning of the Z ring, which may allow the tight coordination between DNA replication and cell division required to produce two identical newborn cells.

  10. Mechanical stretch triggers rapid epithelial cell division through Piezo1.

    PubMed

    Gudipaty, S A; Lindblom, J; Loftus, P D; Redd, M J; Edes, K; Davey, C F; Krishnegowda, V; Rosenblatt, J

    2017-03-02

    Despite acting as a barrier for the organs they encase, epithelial cells turn over at some of the fastest rates in the body. However, epithelial cell division must be tightly linked to cell death to preserve barrier function and prevent tumour formation. How does the number of dying cells match those dividing to maintain constant numbers? When epithelial cells become too crowded, they activate the stretch-activated channel Piezo1 to trigger extrusion of cells that later die. However, it is unclear how epithelial cell division is controlled to balance cell death at the steady state. Here we show that mammalian epithelial cell division occurs in regions of low cell density where cells are stretched. By experimentally stretching epithelia, we find that mechanical stretch itself rapidly stimulates cell division through activation of the Piezo1 channel. To stimulate cell division, stretch triggers cells that are paused in early G2 phase to activate calcium-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, thereby activating the cyclin B transcription that is necessary to drive cells into mitosis. Although both epithelial cell division and cell extrusion require Piezo1 at the steady state, the type of mechanical force controls the outcome: stretch induces cell division, whereas crowding induces extrusion. How Piezo1-dependent calcium transients activate two opposing processes may depend on where and how Piezo1 is activated, as it accumulates in different subcellular sites with increasing cell density. In sparse epithelial regions in which cells divide, Piezo1 localizes to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm, whereas in dense regions in which cells extrude, it forms large cytoplasmic aggregates. Because Piezo1 senses both mechanical crowding and stretch, it may act as a homeostatic sensor to control epithelial cell numbers, triggering extrusion and apoptosis in crowded regions and cell division in sparse regions.

  11. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line.

  12. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  13. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-01-01

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation. PMID:26689549

  14. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-12-22

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation.

  15. ASYMMETRIC CELL DIVISION: IMPLICATIONS FOR GLIOMA DEVELOPMENT AND TREATMENT.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Petritsch, Claudia

    2013-12-01

    Glioma is a heterogeneous disease process with differential histology and treatment response. It was previously thought that the histological features of glial tumors indicated their cell of origin. However, the discovery of continuous neuro-gliogenesis in the normal adult brain and the identification of brain tumor stem cells within glioma have led to the hypothesis that these brain tumors originate from multipotent neural stem or progenitor cells, which primarily divide asymmetrically during the postnatal period. Asymmetric cell division allows these cell types to concurrently self-renew whilst also producing cells for the differentiation pathway. It has recently been shown that increased symmetrical cell division, favoring the self-renewal pathway, leads to oligodendroglioma formation from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In contrast, there is some evidence that asymmetric cell division maintenance in tumor stem-like cells within astrocytoma may lead to acquisition of treatment resistance. Therefore cell division mode in normal brain stem and progenitor cells may play a role in setting tumorigenic potential and the type of tumor formed. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor cell populations and their respective cell division mode may confer differential sensitivity to therapy. This review aims to shed light on the controllers of cell division mode which may be therapeutically targeted to prevent glioma formation and improve treatment response.

  16. ASYMMETRIC CELL DIVISION: IMPLICATIONS FOR GLIOMA DEVELOPMENT AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Petritsch, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is a heterogeneous disease process with differential histology and treatment response. It was previously thought that the histological features of glial tumors indicated their cell of origin. However, the discovery of continuous neuro-gliogenesis in the normal adult brain and the identification of brain tumor stem cells within glioma have led to the hypothesis that these brain tumors originate from multipotent neural stem or progenitor cells, which primarily divide asymmetrically during the postnatal period. Asymmetric cell division allows these cell types to concurrently self-renew whilst also producing cells for the differentiation pathway. It has recently been shown that increased symmetrical cell division, favoring the self-renewal pathway, leads to oligodendroglioma formation from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In contrast, there is some evidence that asymmetric cell division maintenance in tumor stem-like cells within astrocytoma may lead to acquisition of treatment resistance. Therefore cell division mode in normal brain stem and progenitor cells may play a role in setting tumorigenic potential and the type of tumor formed. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor cell populations and their respective cell division mode may confer differential sensitivity to therapy. This review aims to shed light on the controllers of cell division mode which may be therapeutically targeted to prevent glioma formation and improve treatment response. PMID:25530875

  17. Mitochondrial fusion and division: Regulation and role in cell viability.

    PubMed

    Benard, Giovanni; Karbowski, Mariusz

    2009-05-01

    Discovery of various molecular components regulating dynamics and organization of the mitochondria in cells, together with novel insights into the role of mitochondrial fusion and division in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, have provided some of the most exciting breakthroughs in the last decade of mitochondrial research. The focus of this review is on the regulation of mitochondrial fusion and division machineries. The newly identified factors associated with mitofusin/OPA1-dependent mitochondrial fusion, and Drp1-dependent mitochondrial division are discussed. Furthermore, the most recent findings on the role of mitochondrial fusion and division in the maintenance of cell function are also reviewed here in some detail.

  18. Are There Really Animals Like That? No Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwelder, R. E.; Garoian, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    Provides examples of animals in which growth occurs without cell division. Indicates that this phenomenon (called cell constancy or eutely) is an oddity of development that has arisen independently in several animal groups. (JN)

  19. Are There Really Animals Like That? No Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwelder, R. E.; Garoian, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    Provides examples of animals in which growth occurs without cell division. Indicates that this phenomenon (called cell constancy or eutely) is an oddity of development that has arisen independently in several animal groups. (JN)

  20. Balance between cell division and differentiation during plant development.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2005-01-01

    The processes which make possible that a cell gives rise to two daughter cells define the cell division cycle. In individual cells, this is strictly controlled both in time and space. In multicellular organisms extra layers of regulation impinge on the balance between cell proliferation and cell differentiation within particular ontogenic programs. In contrast to animals, organogenesis in plants is a post-embryonic process that requires developmentally programmed reversion of sets of cells from different differentiated states to a pluripotent state followed by regulated proliferation and progression through distinct differentiation patterns. This implies a fine coupling of cell division control, cell cycle arrest and reactivation, endoreplication and differentiation. The emerging view is that cell cycle regulators, in addition to controlling cell division, also function as targets for maintaining cell homeostasis during development. The mechanisms and cross talk among different cell cycle regulatory pathways are discussed here in the context of a developing plant.

  1. Epithelial cell division in the Xenopus laevis embryo during gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Hatte, Guillaume; Tramier, Marc; Prigent, Claude; Tassan, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    How vertebrate epithelial cells divide in vivo and how the cellular environment influences cell division is currently poorly understood. A sine qua non condition to study cell division in situ is the ease of observation of cell division. This is fulfilled in the Xenopus embryo at the gastrula stage where polarized epithelial cells divide with a high frequency at the surface of the organism. Recently, using this model system, we have shown that epithelial cells divide by asymmetric furrowing and that the mode of cell division is regulated during development. Here, we further characterize epithelial cell division in situ. To this end, we used confocal microscopy to study epithelial cell division in the ectoderm of the Xenopus laevis gastrula. Cell division was followed either by indirect immunofluorescence in fixed embryos or by live imaging of embryos transiently expressing diverse fluorescent proteins. Here, we show that during cytokinesis, the plasma membranes of the two daughter cells are usually separated by a gap. For most divisions, daughter cells make contacts basally at a distance from the furrow tip which creates an inverted teardrop-like shaped volume tightly associated with the furrow. At the end of cytokinesis, the inverted teardrop is resorbed; thus it is a transient structure. Several proteins involved in cytokinesis are localized at the tip of the inverted teardrop suggesting that the formation of the gap could be an active process. We also show that intercalation of neighboring cells between daughter cells occasionally occurs during cytokinesis. Our results reveal an additional level of complexity in the relationship between dividing cells and also with their neighboring cells during cytokinesis in the Xenopus embryo epithelium.

  2. Connecting cancer to the asymmetric division of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wodarz, Andreas; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2006-03-24

    Two studies, one in this issue of Cell and the other in Developmental Cell show that the cell-fate determinant Brain Tumor (Brat) suppresses self-renewal in one of the daughter cells that arise from the asymmetric division of a neural stem cell. This work suggests a mechanism by which loss of polarity in stem cells may lead to tumorigenesis.

  3. Cell division ring, a new cell division protein and vertical inheritance of a bacterial organelle in anammox planctomycetes.

    PubMed

    van Niftrik, Laura; Geerts, Willie J C; van Donselaar, Elly G; Humbel, Bruno M; Webb, Richard I; Harhangi, Harry R; Camp, Huub J M Op den; Fuerst, John A; Verkleij, Arie J; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Anammox bacteria are members of the phylum Planctomycetes that oxidize ammonium anaerobically and produce a significant part of the atmosphere's dinitrogen gas. They contain a unique bacterial organelle, the anammoxosome, which is the locus of anammox catabolism. While studying anammox cell and anammoxosome division with transmission electron microscopy including electron tomography, we observed a cell division ring in the outermost compartment of dividing anammox cells. In most Bacteria, GTP hydrolysis drives the tubulin-analogue FtsZ to assemble into a ring-like structure at the cell division site where it functions as a scaffold for the molecular machinery that performs cell division. However, the genome of the anammox bacterium 'Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis' does not encode ftsZ. Genomic analysis of open reading frames with potential GTPase activity indicated a possible novel cell division ring gene: kustd1438, which was unrelated to ftsZ. Immunogold localization specifically localized kustd1438 to the cell division ring. Genomic analyses of other members of the phyla Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae revealed no putative functional homologues of kustd1438, suggesting that it is specific to anammox bacteria. Electron tomography also revealed that the bacterial organelle was elongated along with the rest of the cell and divided equally among daughter cells during the cell division process.

  4. Cell Fate Decision Making through Oriented Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to dictate cell fate decisions is critical during animal development. Moreover, faithful execution of this process ensures proper tissue homeostasis throughout adulthood, whereas defects in the molecular machinery involved may contribute to disease. Evolutionarily conserved protein complexes control cell fate decisions across diverse tissues. Maintaining proper daughter cell inheritance patterns of these determinants during mitosis is therefore a fundamental step of the cell fate decision-making process. In this review, we will discuss two key aspects of this fate determinant segregation activity, cortical cell polarity and mitotic spindle orientation, and how they operate together to produce oriented cell divisions that ultimately influence daughter cell fate. Our focus will be directed at the principal underlying molecular mechanisms and the specific cell fate decisions they have been shown to control. PMID:26844213

  5. Estimated Radiation on Mars, Hits per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This global map of Mars shows estimates for amounts of high-energy-particle cosmic radiation reaching the surface, a serious health concern for any future human exploration of the planet.

    The estimates are based on cosmic-radiation measurements made on the way to Mars by the Mars radiation environment experiment, an instrument on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, plus information about Mars' surface elevations from the laser altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. The areas of Mars expected to have least radiation are where elevation is lowest, because those areas have more atmosphere above them to block out some of the radiation. Earth's thick atmosphere shields us from most cosmic radiation, but Mars has a much thinner atmosphere than Earth does.

    Colors in the map refer to the estimated average number of times per year each cell nucleus in a human there would be hit by a high-energy cosmic ray particle. The range is generally from two hits (color-coded green), a moderate risk level, to eight hits (coded red), a high risk level.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor missions for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. The Mars radiation environment experiment was developed by NASA's Johnson Space Center. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for Odyssey, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Estimated Radiation on Mars, Hits per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This global map of Mars shows estimates for amounts of high-energy-particle cosmic radiation reaching the surface, a serious health concern for any future human exploration of the planet.

    The estimates are based on cosmic-radiation measurements made on the way to Mars by the Mars radiation environment experiment, an instrument on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, plus information about Mars' surface elevations from the laser altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. The areas of Mars expected to have least radiation are where elevation is lowest, because those areas have more atmosphere above them to block out some of the radiation. Earth's thick atmosphere shields us from most cosmic radiation, but Mars has a much thinner atmosphere than Earth does.

    Colors in the map refer to the estimated average number of times per year each cell nucleus in a human there would be hit by a high-energy cosmic ray particle. The range is generally from two hits (color-coded green), a moderate risk level, to eight hits (coded red), a high risk level.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor missions for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. The Mars radiation environment experiment was developed by NASA's Johnson Space Center. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for Odyssey, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Streptomyces: a screening tool for bacterial cell division inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jani, Charul; Tocheva, Elitza I; McAuley, Scott; Craney, Arryn; Jensen, Grant J; Nodwell, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Cell division is essential for spore formation but not for viability in the filamentous streptomycetes bacteria. Failure to complete cell division instead blocks spore formation, a phenotype that can be visualized by the absence of gray (in Streptomyces coelicolor) and green (in Streptomyces venezuelae) spore-associated pigmentation. Despite the lack of essentiality, the streptomycetes divisome is similar to that of other prokaryotes. Therefore, the chemical inhibitors of sporulation in model streptomycetes may interfere with the cell division in rod-shaped bacteria as well. To test this, we investigated 196 compounds that inhibit sporulation in S. coelicolor. We show that 19 of these compounds cause filamentous growth in Bacillus subtilis, consistent with impaired cell division. One of the compounds is a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits cell division by activating the SOS response. The remaining 18 act independently of known stress responses and may therefore act on the divisome or on divisome positioning and stability. Three of the compounds (Fil-1, Fil-2, and Fil-3) confer distinct cell division defects on B. subtilis. They also block B. subtilis sporulation, which is mechanistically unrelated to the sporulation pathway of streptomycetes but is also dependent on the divisome. We discuss ways in which these differing phenotypes can be used in screens for cell division inhibitors.

  8. Cell division and endoreduplication: doubtful engines of vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    John, Peter C L; Qi, Ruhu

    2008-03-01

    Currently, there is little information to indicate whether plant cell division and development is the collective effect of individual cell programming (cell-based) or is determined by organ-wide growth (organismal). Modulation of cell division does not confirm cell autonomous programming of cell expansion; instead, final cell size seems to be determined by the balance between cells formed and subsequent tissue growth. Control of growth in regions of the plant therefore has great importance in determining cell, organ and plant development. Here, we question the view that formation of new cells and their programmed expansion is the driving force of growth. We believe there is evidence that division does not drive, but requires, cell growth and a similar requirement for growth is detected in the modified cycle termed endoreduplication.

  9. Towards a Minimal System for Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwille, Petra

    We have entered the "omics" era of the life sciences, meaning that our general knowledge about biological systems has become vast, complex, and almost impossible to fully comprehend. Consequently, the challenge for quantitative biology and biophysics is to identify appropriate procedures and protocols that allow the researcher to strip down the complexity of a biological system to a level that can be reliably modeled but still retains the essential features of its "real" counterpart. The virtue of physics has always been the reductionist approach, which allowed scientists to identify the underlying basic principles of seemingly complex phenomena, and subject them to rigorous mathematical treatment. Biological systems are obviously among the most complex phenomena we can think of, and it is fair to state that our rapidly increasing knowledge does not make it easier to identify a small set of fundamental principles of the big concept of "life" that can be defined and quantitatively understood. Nevertheless, it is becoming evident that only by tight cooperation and interdisciplinary exchange between the life sciences and quantitative sciences, and by applying intelligent reductionist approaches also to biology, will we be able to meet the intellectual challenges of the twenty-first century. These include not only the collection and proper categorization of the data, but also their true understanding and harnessing such that we can solve important practical problems imposed by medicine or the worldwide need for new energy sources. Many of these approaches are reflected by the modern buzz word "synthetic biology", therefore I briefly discuss this term in the first section. Further, I outline some endeavors of our and other groups to model minimal biological systems, with particular focus on the possibility of generating a minimal system for cell division.

  10. Ploidy-Dependent Unreductional Meiotic Cell Division in Polyploid Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Meiosis includes one round of DNA replication and two successive nuclear divisions, i.e. meiosis I (reductional) and meiosis II (equational). This specialized cell division reduces chromosomes in half and generates haploid gametes in sexual reproduction of eukaryotes. It ensures faithful transmiss...

  11. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Song, Guanbin

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration.

  12. Cell division cycle 45 promotes papillary thyroid cancer progression via regulating cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Run; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan; Bu, Hemei; Ma, Xianghua

    2017-05-01

    Cell division cycle 45 was reported to be overexpressed in some cancer-derived cell lines and was predicted to be a candidate oncogene in cervical cancer. However, the clinical and biological significance of cell division cycle 45 in papillary thyroid cancer has never been investigated. We determined the expression level and clinical significance of cell division cycle 45 using The Cancer Genome Atlas, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. A great upregulation of cell division cycle 45 was observed in papillary thyroid cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of cell division cycle 45 positively correlates with more advanced clinical characteristics. Silence of cell division cycle 45 suppressed proliferation of papillary thyroid cancer cells via G1-phase arrest and inducing apoptosis. The oncogenic activity of cell division cycle 45 was also confirmed in vivo. In conclusion, cell division cycle 45 may serve as a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for papillary thyroid cancer.

  13. Asymmetric cell divisions in flowering plants - one mother, "two-many" daughters.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, R M

    2005-09-01

    Plant development shows a fascinating range of asymmetric cell divisions. Over the years, however, cellular differentiation has been interpreted mostly in terms of a mother cell dividing mitotically to produce two daughter cells of different fates. This popular view has masked the significance of an entirely different cell fate specification pathway, where the mother cell first becomes a coenocyte and then cellularizes to simultaneously produce more than two specialized daughter cells. The "one mother - two different daughters" pathways rely on spindle-assisted mechanisms, such as translocation of the nucleus/spindle to a specific cellular site and orientation of the spindle, which are coordinated with cell-specific allocation of cell fate determinants and cytokinesis. By contrast, during "coenocyte-cellularization" pathways, the spindle-assisted mechanisms are irrelevant since cell fate specification emerges only after the nuclear divisions are complete, and the number of specialized daughter cells produced depends on the developmental context. The key events, such as the formation of a coenocyte and migration of the nuclei to specific cellular locations, are coordinated with cellularization by unique types of cell wall formation. Both one mother - two different daughters and the coenocyte-cellularization pathways are used by higher plants in precise spatial and time windows during development. In both the pathways, epigenetic regulation of gene expression is crucial not only for cell fate specification but also for its maintenance through cell lineage. In this review, the focus is on the coenocyte-cellularization pathways in the context of our current understanding of the asymmetric cell divisions. Instances where cell differentiation does not involve an asymmetric division are also discussed to provide a comprehensive account of cell differentiation.

  14. Analysis of cell differentiation by division tracking cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kap-Hyoun; Odell, Ross; Nordon, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    We propose a quantitative method to characterize growth and differentiation dynamics of multipotent cells from time series carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE) division tracking data. The dynamics of cell proliferation and differentiation was measured by combining (CFDA-SE) division tracking with phenotypic analysis. We define division tracking population statistics such as precursor cell frequency, generation time and renewal rate that characterize growth of various phenotypes in a heterogeneous culture system. This method is illustrated by study of the divisional recruitment of cord blood CD34(+) cells by hematopoietic growth factors. The technical issue of assigning the correct generation number to cells was addressed by employing high-resolution division tracking methodology and daily histogram analysis. We also quantified division-tracking artifacts such as CFDA-SE degeneration and cellular auto-fluorescence. Mitotic activation of cord blood CD34(+) cells by cytokines commenced after 2 days of cytokine stimulation. Mean generation number increased linearly thereafter, and it was conclusively shown that CD34(+) cells cycle slower than CD34(-) cells. Generation times for CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells were 24.7 +/- 0.8 h and 15.1 +/- 0.9 h (+/-SD, n = 5), respectively. The 20-fold increase in CD34(+) cell numbers at Day 6 could be attributed to a high CD34(+) cell renewal rate (91% +/- 2% per division). Although cultures were initiated with highly purified CD34(+) cells (approximately 96%), CD34(-) numbers had expanded rapidly by Day 6. This rapid expansion could be explained by their short generation time as well as a small fraction of CD34(+) cells (approximately 5%) that differentiated into CD34(-) cells. Multitype division tracking provides a detailed analysis of multipotent cell differentiation dynamics.

  15. Entrainment of cell division in phytoplankton with dynamic energy budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Erik B.; Ananthasubramaniam, Bharath; Klanjšček, Tin; Nisbet, Roger M.

    2011-11-01

    We explore the entrainment behavior of cell division in phytoplankton in the context of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory. In particular, we explore the range of DEB and environmental parameter values within which a cell divides at regular intervals in a periodic light environment with abundant nutrients and investigate the impact of parameter values on the phase of cell division. We consider three types of cells that differ in the evolution of surface area to volume ratio during the cell cycle: cells with a constant shape (isomorphs), cells with a constant surface area (V0-morphs) and cells with a constant surface area to volume ratio (V1-morphs), the latter being the default choice in studies on the population dynamics of unicellular organisms because of its desirable mathematical implications. Only in isomorphs and V0-morphs, however, cell division can be entrained to a periodic light. Regular cell division in V1 is purely coincidental, as it depends on exact choices for parameter values. We attribute this to the fact that V1-morphs lack the negative feedback of size on the dynamics of reserves in V0-morphs and isomorphs. Because entrained isomorphs and V0-morphs divide during the dark hours in our simulations, these two shapes can represent the division behavior of phytoplankton species that complete the cell cycle during the night, such as dinoflagellates and coccolithophores. A description of the division behavior of species completing the cell cycle during the day, such as silicon dependent diatoms and cyanobacteria, requires a more complex model than used in this paper. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of our findings by randomizing model parameters and introducing unevenness in biomass separation between daughter cells during cell division. We conclude that especially the entrainment in V0-morphs is relatively insensitive to perturbations.

  16. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  17. Oriented cell division shapes carnivorous pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fujita, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2015-03-16

    Complex morphology is an evolutionary outcome of phenotypic diversification. In some carnivorous plants, the ancestral planar leaf has been modified to form a pitcher shape. However, how leaf development was altered during evolution remains unknown. Here we show that the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea develop through cell division patterns of adaxial tissues that are distinct from those in bifacial and peltate leaves, subsequent to standard expression of adaxial and abaxial marker genes. Differences in the orientation of cell divisions in the adaxial domain cause bifacial growth in the distal region and adaxial ridge protrusion in the middle region. These different growth patterns establish pitcher morphology. A computer simulation suggests that the cell division plane is critical for the pitcher morphogenesis. Our results imply that tissue-specific changes in the orientation of cell division underlie the development of a morphologically complex leaf.

  18. Oriented cell division shapes carnivorous pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fujita, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    Complex morphology is an evolutionary outcome of phenotypic diversification. In some carnivorous plants, the ancestral planar leaf has been modified to form a pitcher shape. However, how leaf development was altered during evolution remains unknown. Here we show that the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea develop through cell division patterns of adaxial tissues that are distinct from those in bifacial and peltate leaves, subsequent to standard expression of adaxial and abaxial marker genes. Differences in the orientation of cell divisions in the adaxial domain cause bifacial growth in the distal region and adaxial ridge protrusion in the middle region. These different growth patterns establish pitcher morphology. A computer simulation suggests that the cell division plane is critical for the pitcher morphogenesis. Our results imply that tissue-specific changes in the orientation of cell division underlie the development of a morphologically complex leaf. PMID:25774486

  19. Fluidization of tissues by cell division and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ranft, Jonas; Basan, Markus; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Prost, Jacques; Jülicher, Frank

    2010-12-07

    During the formation of tissues, cells organize collectively by cell division and apoptosis. The multicellular dynamics of such systems is influenced by mechanical conditions and can give rise to cell rearrangements and movements. We develop a continuum description of tissue dynamics, which describes the stress distribution and the cell flow field on large scales. In the absence of division and apoptosis, we consider the tissue to behave as an elastic solid. Cell division and apoptosis introduce stress sources that, in general, are anisotropic. By combining cell number balance with dynamic equations for the stress source, we show that the tissue effectively behaves as a viscoelastic fluid with a relaxation time set by the rates of division and apoptosis. If the system is confined in a fixed volume, it reaches a homeostatic state in which division and apoptosis balance. In this state, cells undergo a diffusive random motion driven by the stochasticity of division and apoptosis. We calculate the expression for the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of the tissue parameters and compare our results concerning both diffusion and viscosity to simulations of multicellular systems using dissipative particle dynamics.

  20. Synchronization of chromosome dynamics and cell division in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial cells have evolved a variety of regulatory circuits that tightly synchronize their chromosome replication and cell division cycles, thereby ensuring faithful transmission of genetic information to their offspring. Complex multicomponent signaling cascades are used to monitor the progress of cytokinesis and couple replication initiation to the separation of the two daughter cells. Moreover, the cell-division apparatus actively participates in chromosome partitioning and, particularly, in the resolution of topological problems that impede the segregation process, thus coordinating chromosome dynamics with cell constriction. Finally, bacteria have developed mechanisms that harness the cell-cycle-dependent positioning of individual chromosomal loci or the nucleoid to define the cell-division site and control the timing of divisome assembly. Each of these systems manages to integrate a complex set of spatial and temporal cues to regulate and execute critical steps in the bacterial cell cycle.

  1. ESCRT-dependent control of membrane remodelling during cell division.

    PubMed

    Stoten, Caroline Louise; Carlton, Jeremy Graham

    2017-08-24

    The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) proteins form an evolutionarily conserved membrane remodelling machinery. Identified originally for their role in cargo sorting and remodelling of endosomal membranes during yeast vacuolar sorting, an extensive body of work now implicates a sub-complex of this machinery (ESCRT-III), as a transplantable membrane fission machinery that is dispatched to various cellular locations to achieve a topologically unique membrane separation. Surprisingly, several ESCRT-III-regulated processes occur during cell division, when cells undergo a dramatic and co-ordinated remodelling of their membranes to allow the physical processes of division to occur. The ESCRT machinery functions in regeneration of the nuclear envelope during open mitosis and in the abscission phase of cytokinesis, where daughter cells are separated from each other in the last act of division. Roles for the ESCRT machinery in cell division are conserved as far back as Archaea, suggesting that the ancestral role of these proteins was as a membrane remodelling machinery that facilitated division and that was co-opted throughout evolution to perform a variety of other cell biological functions. Here, we will explore the function and regulation of the ESCRT machinery in cell division. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. A New Essential Cell Division Protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Aurora; Camarena, Laura; Cevallos, Miguel Angel; Poggio, Sebastian

    2017-04-15

    Bacterial cell division is a complex process that relies on a multiprotein complex composed of a core of widely conserved and generally essential proteins and on accessory proteins that vary in number and identity in different bacteria. The assembly of this complex and, particularly, the initiation of constriction are regulated processes that have come under intensive study. In this work, we characterize the function of DipI, a protein conserved in Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria that is essential in Caulobacter crescentus Our results show that DipI is a periplasmic protein that is recruited late to the division site and that it is required for the initiation of constriction. The recruitment of the conserved cell division proteins is not affected by the absence of DipI, but localization of DipI to the division site occurs only after a mature divisome has formed. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that DipI strongly interacts with the FtsQLB complex, which has been recently implicated in regulating constriction initiation. A possible role of DipI in this process is discussed.IMPORTANCE Bacterial cell division is a complex process for which most bacterial cells assemble a multiprotein complex that consists of conserved proteins and of accessory proteins that differ among bacterial groups. In this work, we describe a new cell division protein (DipI) present only in a group of bacteria but essential in Caulobacter crescentus Cells devoid of DipI cannot constrict. Although a mature divisome is required for DipI recruitment, DipI is not needed for recruiting other division proteins. These results, together with the interaction of DipI with a protein complex that has been suggested to regulate cell wall synthesis during division, suggest that DipI may be part of the regulatory mechanism that controls constriction initiation.

  3. Towards a bottom-up reconstitution of bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Martos, Ariadna; Jiménez, Mercedes; Rivas, Germán; Schwille, Petra

    2012-12-01

    The components of the bacterial division machinery assemble to form a dynamic ring at mid-cell that drives cytokinesis. The nature of most division proteins and their assembly pathway is known. Our knowledge about the biochemical activities and protein interactions of some key division elements, including those responsible for correct ring positioning, has progressed considerably during the past decade. These developments, together with new imaging and membrane reconstitution technologies, have triggered the 'bottom-up' synthetic approach aiming at reconstructing bacterial division in the test tube, which is required to support conclusions derived from cellular and molecular analysis. Here, we describe recent advances in reconstituting Escherichia coli minimal systems able to reproduce essential functions, such as the initial steps of division (proto-ring assembly) and one of the main positioning mechanisms (Min oscillating system), and discuss future perspectives and experimental challenges.

  4. Coordination between chromosome replication and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M S; Helmstetter, C E

    1980-01-01

    Cell division properties of Escherichia coli B/r containing either a dnaC or a dnaI mutation were examined. Incubation at nonpermissive temperature resulted in the eventual production of cells of approximately normal size, or slightly smaller, which lacked chromosomal DNA. The cell division patterns in cultures which were grown at permissive temperature and then shifted to nonpermissive temperature were consistent with: first, division and equipartition of chromosomes by cells which were in the C and D periods at the time of the shift; second, an apparent delay in cell division; and third, commencement of the formation of chromosomeless cells. In glucose-grown cultures of the dnaI mutant, production of chromosomeless cells continued for at least 120 min, whereas in the dnaC mutant chromosomeless cells were formed during a single interval between 110 and 130 min after the temperature shift. The results are discussed in light of the hypothesis that replication of a specific chromosomal region is not an obligatory requirement for the initiation and completion of the processes leading to division in a cell which contains at least one functioning chromosome. PMID:6988405

  5. Asymmetric cell division in polyploid giant cancer cells and low eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Yijia; Zhang, Shiwu

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is critical for generating cell diversity in low eukaryotic organisms. We previously have reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) induced by cobalt chloride demonstrate the ability to use an evolutionarily conserved process for renewal and fast reproduction, which is normally confined to simpler organisms. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which reproduces by asymmetric cell division, has long been a model for asymmetric cell division studies. PGCCs produce daughter cells asymmetrically in a manner similar to yeast, in that both use budding for cell polarization and cytokinesis. Here, we review the results of recent studies and discuss the similarities in the budding process between yeast and PGCCs.

  6. A Model for Cell Population Size Control Using Asymmetric Division

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Mani; Emberly, Eldon

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms one can find examples where a growing tissue divides up until some final fixed cell number. Asymmetric division plays a prevalent feature in tissue differentiation in these organisms, where the daughters of each asymmetric division inherit unequal amounts of a fate determining molecule and as a result follow different developmental fates. In some tissues the accumulation or decrease of cell cycle regulators acts as an intrinsic timing mechanism governing proliferation. Here we present a minimal model based on asymmetric division and dilution of a cell-cycle regulator that can generate any final population size that might be needed. We show that within the model there are a variety of growth mechanisms from linear to non-linear that can lead to the same final cell count. Interestingly, when we include noise at division we find that there are special final cell population sizes that can be generated with high confidence that are flanked by population sizes that are less robust to division noise. When we include further perturbations in the division process we find that these special populations can remain relatively stable and in some cases even improve in their fidelity. PMID:24040230

  7. M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions activate satellite cell division.

    PubMed

    Marti, Merce; Montserrat, Núria; Pardo, Cristina; Mulero, Lola; Miquel-Serra, Laia; Rodrigues, Alexandre Miguel Cavaco; Andrés Vaquero, José; Kuebler, Bernd; Morera, Cristina; Barrero, María José; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-11-15

    Adult muscle stem cells and their committed myogenic precursors, commonly referred to as the satellite cell population, are involved in both muscle growth after birth and regeneration after damage. It has been previously proposed that, under these circumstances, satellite cells first become activated, divide and differentiate, and only later fuse to the existing myofiber through M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions. Our data show that satellite cells fuse with the myofiber concomitantly to cell division, and only when the nuclei of the daughter cells are inside the myofiber, do they complete the process of differentiation. Here we demonstrate that M-cadherin plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition and fusion, and is crucial for cell division activation. Treatment of satellite cells with M-cadherin in vitro stimulates cell division, whereas addition of anti-M-cadherin antibodies reduces the cell division rate. Our results suggest an alternative model for the contribution of satellite cells to muscle development, which might be useful in understanding muscle regeneration, as well as muscle-related dystrophies.

  8. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:24567781

  9. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  10. Instructive simulation of the bacterial cell division cycle.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Wang, Ping; Vischer, Norbert O E

    2011-07-01

    The coupling between chromosome replication and cell division includes temporal and spatial elements. In bacteria, these have globally been resolved during the last 40 years, but their full details and action mechanisms are still under intensive study. The physiology of growth and the cell cycle are reviewed in the light of an established dogma that has formed a framework for development of new ideas, as exemplified here, using the Cell Cycle Simulation (CCSim) program. CCSim, described here in detail for the first time, employs four parameters related to time (replication, division and inter-division) and size (cell mass at replication initiation) that together are sufficient to describe bacterial cells under various conditions and states, which can be manipulated environmentally and genetically. Testing the predictions of CCSim by analysis of time-lapse micrographs of Escherichia coli during designed manipulations of the rate of DNA replication identified aspects of both coupling elements. Enhanced frequencies of cell division were observed following an interval of reduced DNA replication rate, consistent with the prediction of a minimum possible distance between successive replisomes (an eclipse). As a corollary, the notion that cell poles are not always inert was confirmed by observed placement of division planes at perpendicular planes in monstrous and cuboidal cells containing multiple, segregating nucleoids.

  11. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  12. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh. RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh. We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB’s function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  13. Nuclisome--targeting the tumor cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gedda, Lars; Edwards, Katarina

    2012-06-01

    The Nuclisome concept builds on a novel two-step targeting strategy with the aim to deliver short-range Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides to nuclear DNA of tumor cells. The concept is based on the use of Nuclisome-particles, i.e., tumor-targeted PEG-stabilized liposomes loaded with a unique DNA-intercalating compound that enables specific and effective delivery of radionuclides to DNA. The specific and potent two-step targeting leads to eradication of tumor cells while toxicity to normal organs is reduced to a minimum. Results of in vitro and in vivo studies point towards the Nuclisome concept as a promising strategy for the treatment of small tumor masses and, in particular, for the elimination of spread single cells and micrometastases.

  14. Ultrastructure and Membrane Traffic During Cell Division in the Marine Pennate Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsuko; De Martino, Alessandra; Amato, Alberto; Montsant, Anton; Mathieu, Benjamin; Rostaing, Philippe; Tirichine, Leila; Bowler, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The marine pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has become a model for diatom biology, due to its ease of culture and accessibility to reverse genetics approaches. While several features underlying the molecular mechanisms of cell division have been described, morphological analyses are less advanced than they are in other diatoms. We therefore examined cell ultrastructure changes prior to and during cytokinesis. Following chloroplast division, cleavage furrows are formed at both longitudinal ends of the cell and are accompanied by significant vesicle transport. Although neither spindle nor microtubules were observed, the nucleus appeared to be split by the furrow after duplication of the Golgi apparatus. Finally, centripetal cytokinesis was completed by fusion of the furrows. Additionally, F-actin formed a ring structure and its diameter became smaller, accompanying the ingrowing furrows. To further analyse vesicular transport during cytokinesis, we generated transgenic cells expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusions with putative diatom orthologs of small GTPase Sec4 and t-SNARE protein SyntaxinA. Time-lapse observations revealed that SyntaxinA-YFP localization expands from both cell tips toward the center, whereas Sec4-YFP was found in the Golgi and subsequently relocalizes to the future division plane. This work provides fundamental new information about cell replication processes in P. tricornutum.

  15. The Nuclear Option: Evidence Implicating the Cell Nucleus in Mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Mauck, Robert L

    2017-02-01

    Biophysical stimuli presented to cells via microenvironmental properties (e.g., alignment and stiffness) or external forces have a significant impact on cell function and behavior. Recently, the cell nucleus has been identified as a mechanosensitive organelle that contributes to the perception and response to mechanical stimuli. However, the specific mechanotransduction mechanisms that mediate these effects have not been clearly established. Here, we offer a comprehensive review of the evidence supporting (and refuting) three hypothetical nuclear mechanotransduction mechanisms: physical reorganization of chromatin, signaling at the nuclear envelope, and altered cytoskeletal structure/tension due to nuclear remodeling. Our goal is to provide a reference detailing the progress that has been made and the areas that still require investigation regarding the role of nuclear mechanotransduction in cell biology. Additionally, we will briefly discuss the role that mathematical models of cell mechanics can play in testing these hypotheses and in elucidating how biophysical stimulation of the nucleus drives changes in cell behavior. While force-induced alterations in signaling pathways involving lamina-associated polypeptides (LAPs) (e.g., emerin and histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)) and transcription factors (TFs) located at the nuclear envelope currently appear to be the most clearly supported mechanism of nuclear mechanotransduction, additional work is required to examine this process in detail and to more fully test alternative mechanisms. The combination of sophisticated experimental techniques and advanced mathematical models is necessary to enhance our understanding of the role of the nucleus in the mechanotransduction processes driving numerous critical cell functions.

  16. Volume regulation and shape bifurcation in the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Li, Bo; Si, Fangwei; Phillip, Jude M.; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alterations in nuclear morphology are closely associated with essential cell functions, such as cell motility and polarization, and correlate with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and progeria. However, the mechanics and forces that shape the nucleus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that when an adherent cell is detached from its substratum, the nucleus undergoes a large volumetric reduction accompanied by a morphological transition from an almost smooth to a heavily folded surface. We develop a mathematical model that systematically analyzes the evolution of nuclear shape and volume. The analysis suggests that the pressure difference across the nuclear envelope, which is influenced by changes in cell volume and regulated by microtubules and actin filaments, is a major factor determining nuclear morphology. Our results show that physical and chemical properties of the extracellular microenvironment directly influence nuclear morphology and suggest that there is a direct link between the environment and gene regulation. PMID:26243474

  17. Control of cell nucleus shapes via micropillar patterns.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhen; Yan, Ce; Peng, Rong; Zhao, Yingchun; He, Yao; Ding, Jiandong

    2012-02-01

    We herein report a material technique to control the shapes of cell nuclei by the design of the microtopography of substrates to which the cells adhere. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) micropillars or micropits of a series of height or depth were fabricated, and some surprising self deformation of the nuclei of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was found in the case of micropillars with a sufficient height. Despite severe nucleus deformation, BMSCs kept the ability of proliferation and differentiation. We further demonstrated that the shapes of cell nuclei could be regulated by the appropriate micropillar patterns. Besides circular and elliptoid shapes, some unusual nucleus shapes of BMSCs have been achieved, such as square, cross, dumbbell, and asymmetric sphere-protrusion.

  18. Volume regulation and shape bifurcation in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Li, Bo; Si, Fangwei; Phillip, Jude M; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2015-09-15

    Alterations in nuclear morphology are closely associated with essential cell functions, such as cell motility and polarization, and correlate with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and progeria. However, the mechanics and forces that shape the nucleus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that when an adherent cell is detached from its substratum, the nucleus undergoes a large volumetric reduction accompanied by a morphological transition from an almost smooth to a heavily folded surface. We develop a mathematical model that systematically analyzes the evolution of nuclear shape and volume. The analysis suggests that the pressure difference across the nuclear envelope, which is influenced by changes in cell volume and regulated by microtubules and actin filaments, is a major factor determining nuclear morphology. Our results show that physical and chemical properties of the extracellular microenvironment directly influence nuclear morphology and suggest that there is a direct link between the environment and gene regulation.

  19. On the chronology and topography of bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Palacios, P; Dopazo, A; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Aldea, M

    1991-01-01

    Gene products that play a role in the formation of cell septum should be expected to be endowed with a set of specific properties. In principle, septal proteins should be located at the cell envelope. The expression of division genes should ensure the synthesis of septal proteins at levels commensurate with the needs of cell division at different rates of cell duplication. We have results indicating that some fts genes located within the 2.5-min cluster in the Escherichia coli chromosome conform to these predictions.

  20. An Arabidopsis Homolog of the Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitor SulA Is Involved in Plastid DivisionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Raynaud, Cécile; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Perennes, Claudette; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Plastids have evolved from an endosymbiosis between a cyanobacterial symbiont and a eukaryotic host cell. Their division is mediated both by proteins of the host cell and conserved bacterial division proteins. Here, we identified a new component of the plastid division machinery, Arabidopsis thaliana SulA. Disruption of its cyanobacterial homolog (SSulA) in Synechocystis and overexpression of an AtSulA-green fluorescent protein fusion in Arabidopsis demonstrate that these genes are involved in cell and plastid division, respectively. Overexpression of AtSulA inhibits plastid division in planta but rescues plastid division defects caused by overexpression of AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1, demonstrating that its role in plastid division may involve an interaction with AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1. PMID:15208387

  1. Asymmetric cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its unique features.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nagaraja, Mukkayyan; Sebastian, Jees; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-03-01

    Recently, several reports showed that about 80 % of mid-log phase Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells divide symmetrically with 5-10 % deviation in the septum position from the median. However, the mode of cell division of the pathogenic mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy of septum- and nucleoid-stained live and fixed cells, and live cell time-lapse imaging, we show the occurrence of asymmetric cell division with unusually deviated septum/constriction in 20 % of the 15 % septating M. tuberculosis cells in the mid-log phase population. The remaining 80 % of the 15 % septating cells divided symmetrically but with 2-5 % deviation in the septum/constriction position, as reported for M. smegmatis, M. marinum, and M. bovis BCG cells. Both the long and the short portions of the asymmetrically dividing M. tuberculosis cells with unusually deviated septum contained nucleoids, thereby generating viable short and long cells from each asymmetric division. M. tuberculosis short cells were acid fast positive and, like the long cells, further readily underwent growth and division to generate micro-colony, thereby showing that they were neither mini cells, spores nor dormant forms of mycobacteria. The freshly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients' sputum samples, which are known for the prevalence of oxidative stress conditions, also contained short cells at the same proportion as that in the mid-log phase population. The probable physiological significance of the generation of the short cells through unusually deviated asymmetric cell division is discussed.

  2. Stationary Size Distributions of Growing Cells with Binary and Multiple Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rading, M. M.; Engel, T. A.; Lipowsky, R.; Valleriani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Populations of unicellular organisms that grow under constant environmental conditions are considered theoretically. The size distribution of these cells is calculated analytically, both for the usual process of binary division, in which one mother cell produces always two daughter cells, and for the more complex process of multiple division, in which one mother cell can produce 2 n daughter cells with n=1,2,3,… . The latter mode of division is inspired by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uniform response of the whole population to different environmental conditions is encoded in the individual rates of growth and division of the cells. The analytical treatment of the problem is based on size-dependent rules for cell growth and stochastic transition processes for cell division. The comparison between binary and multiple division shows that these different division processes lead to qualitatively different results for the size distribution and the population growth rates.

  3. Method for Accurate Unsupervised Cell Nucleus Segmentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    development of a cervical cancer screening ma- chine despite projects being initiated in the 1950’s is perhaps a good indication of the magnitude of the...classi- fication processes can only become more robust. REFERENCES [1] P. Bamford. The Segmentation of Cell Images with Applica- tion to Cervical Cancer Screening... Cervical Cancer : Algorithms and Implementation. PhD thesis, Uppsala University, 1989.

  4. Physical association between a novel plasma-membrane structure and centrosome orients cell division

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    In the last mitotic division of the epidermal lineage in the ascidian embryo, the cells divide stereotypically along the anterior-posterior axis. During interphase, we found that a unique membrane structure invaginates from the posterior to the centre of the cell, in a microtubule-dependent manner. The invagination projects toward centrioles on the apical side of the nucleus and associates with one of them. Further, a cilium forms on the posterior side of the cell and its basal body remains associated with the invagination. A laser ablation experiment suggests that the invagination is under tensile force and promotes the posterior positioning of the centrosome. Finally, we showed that the orientation of the invaginations is coupled with the polarized dynamics of centrosome movements and the orientation of cell division. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby this novel membrane structure orchestrates centrosome positioning and thus the orientation of cell division axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16550.001 PMID:27502556

  5. Direct Observation of Nanoparticle-Cancer Cell Nucleus Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M.; Lee, Jung Heon; Sisco, Patrick N.; Co, Dick T.; Zhang, Ming; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Odom, Teri W.

    2012-01-01

    We report the direct visualization of interactions between drug-loaded nanoparticles and the cancer cell nucleus. Nanoconstructs composed of nucleolin-specific aptamers and gold nanostars were actively transported to the nucleus and induced major changes to the nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations near the site of the construct. The number of local deformations could be increased by ultra-fast, light-triggered release of the aptamers from the surface of the gold nanostars. Cancer cells with more nuclear envelope folding showed increased caspase 3 and 7 activity (apoptosis) as well as decreased cell viability. This newly revealed correlation between drug-induced changes in nuclear phenotype and increased therapeutic efficacy could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:22424173

  6. Direct observation of nanoparticle-cancer cell nucleus interactions.

    PubMed

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Lee, Jung Heon; Sisco, Patrick N; Co, Dick T; Zhang, Ming; Wasielewski, Michael R; Odom, Teri W

    2012-04-24

    We report the direct visualization of interactions between drug-loaded nanoparticles and the cancer cell nucleus. Nanoconstructs composed of nucleolin-specific aptamers and gold nanostars were actively transported to the nucleus and induced major changes to the nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations near the site of the construct. The number of local deformations could be increased by ultrafast, light-triggered release of the aptamers from the surface of the gold nanostars. Cancer cells with more nuclear envelope folding showed increased caspase 3 and 7 activity (apoptosis) as well as decreased cell viability. This newly revealed correlation between drug-induced changes in nuclear phenotype and increased therapeutic efficacy could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy.

  7. Asymmetric Cell Division of T Cells Upon Antigen Presentation Utilizes Multiple Conserved Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oliaro, Jane; Van Ham, Vanessa; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Pasam, Anupama; Bomzon, Ze’ev; Pham, Kim; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Waterhouse, Nigel J.; Bots, Michael; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Watt, Sally V.; Cluse, Leonie A.; Clarke, Chris J.P.; Izon, David J.; Chang, John T.; Thompson, Natalie; Gu, Min; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Smyth, Mark J.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Reiner, Steven L.; Russell, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a potential means by which cell fate choices during an immune response are orchestrated. Defining the molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric division of T cells is paramount for determining the role of this process in the generation of effector and memory T cell subsets. In other cell types, asymmetric cell division is regulated by conserved polarity protein complexes that control the localization of cell fate determinants and spindle orientation during division. We have developed a tractable, in vitro model of naïve CD8+ T cells undergoing initial division while attached to dendritic cells during antigen presentation to investigate whether similar mechanisms might regulate asymmetric division of T cells. Using this system, we show that direct interactions with antigen presenting cells provide the cue for polarization of T cells. Interestingly, the immunological synapse disseminates before division even though the T cells retain contact with the antigen presenting cell. The cue from the antigen presenting cell is translated into polarization of cell fate determinants via the polarity network of the Par3 and Scribble complexes and orientation of the mitotic spindle during division is orchestrated by the Pins/G protein complex. These findings suggest that T cells have selectively adapted a number of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to generate diversity through asymmetric cell division. PMID:20530266

  8. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Constriction and septation during cell division in caulobacters.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, J S; Hagenzieker, J G

    1981-07-01

    Morphogenesis of the division site in caulobacters had been described as constrictive in Caulobacter spp. and septate in Asticcacaulis excentricus. However, subsequent studies of other gram-negative genera had implied that constrictive division was an artefact resulting from inadequate preservation of septa; exploration of alternatives to osmium fixation, particularly with aldehydes, was recommended. In this study, the appearance of sectioned division sites was reinvestigated in caulobacter cells prepared by 20 different procedures varying with respect to fixation agents, media, schedules, and temperatures, to dehydrating agents, and to embedding resins. Three types of division site morphogenesis were observed: constriction in C. bacteroides and C. crescentus, partial septation in C. leidyi, and complete, undivided septation in A. excentricus and A. biprosthecum. The anatomy of the division site depended on the bacterial strain, not on the method of preparation of the cells for sectioning. These studies confirm the earlier observations on osmium-fixed caulobacter cells and lead to the general conclusion that gram-negative bacteria with tapered poles probably divide by constriction, whereas septation results in blunt cell poles. A pattern of spiral, rather than circular, insertion of new envelope subunits at the cell equator is proposed as a basic developmental difference between constrictive and septate fission in gram-negative bacteria. Since caulobacter prosthecae can develop as extensions of tapered poles formed by constriction, whereas subpolar or lateral prosthecae occur in species with blunt poles resulting from septation, the site of formation of a thick septum appears unsuitable as a site of subsequent envelope outgrowth.

  10. Coordination of Chromosome Segregation and Cell Division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Amy L; Liew, Andrew T F; Kusuma, Kennardy D; Peterson, Elizabeth; Seidel, Lisa; Foster, Simon J; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Productive bacterial cell division and survival of progeny requires tight coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division to ensure equal partitioning of DNA. Unlike rod-shaped bacteria that undergo division in one plane, the coccoid human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus divides in three successive orthogonal planes, which requires a different spatial control compared to rod-shaped cells. To gain a better understanding of how this coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division is regulated in S. aureus, we investigated proteins that associate with FtsZ and the divisome. We found that DnaK, a well-known chaperone, interacts with FtsZ, EzrA and DivIVA, and is required for DivIVA stability. Unlike in several rod shaped organisms, DivIVA in S. aureus associates with several components of the divisome, as well as the chromosome segregation protein, SMC. This data, combined with phenotypic analysis of mutants, suggests a novel role for S. aureus DivIVA in ensuring cell division and chromosome segregation are coordinated.

  11. Coordination of Chromosome Segregation and Cell Division in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Amy L.; Liew, Andrew T. F.; Kusuma, Kennardy D.; Peterson, Elizabeth; Seidel, Lisa; Foster, Simon J.; Harry, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Productive bacterial cell division and survival of progeny requires tight coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division to ensure equal partitioning of DNA. Unlike rod-shaped bacteria that undergo division in one plane, the coccoid human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus divides in three successive orthogonal planes, which requires a different spatial control compared to rod-shaped cells. To gain a better understanding of how this coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division is regulated in S. aureus, we investigated proteins that associate with FtsZ and the divisome. We found that DnaK, a well-known chaperone, interacts with FtsZ, EzrA and DivIVA, and is required for DivIVA stability. Unlike in several rod shaped organisms, DivIVA in S. aureus associates with several components of the divisome, as well as the chromosome segregation protein, SMC. This data, combined with phenotypic analysis of mutants, suggests a novel role for S. aureus DivIVA in ensuring cell division and chromosome segregation are coordinated. PMID:28878745

  12. The basal position of nuclei is one pre-requisite for asymmetric cell divisions in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Ajduk, Anna; Biswas Shivhare, Sourima; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2014-08-15

    The early mouse embryo undertakes two types of cell division: symmetric that gives rise to the trophectoderm and then placenta or asymmetric that gives rise to inner cells that generate the embryo proper. Although cell division orientation is important, the mechanism regulating it has remained unclear. Here, we identify the relationship between the plane of cell division and the position of the nucleus and go towards identifying the mechanism behind it. We first find that as the 8-cell embryo progresses through the cell cycle, the nuclei of most - but not all - cells move from apical to more basal positions, in a microtubule- and kinesin-dependent manner. We then find that all asymmetric divisions happen when nuclei are located basally and, in contrast, all cells, in which nuclei remain apical, divide symmetrically. To understand the potential mechanism behind this, we determine the effects of modulating expression of Cdx2, a transcription factor key for trophectoderm formation and cell polarity. We find that increased expression of Cdx2 leads to an increase in a number of apical nuclei, whereas down-regulation of Cdx2 leads to more nuclei moving basally, which explains a previously identified relationship between Cdx2 and cell division orientation. Finally, we show that down-regulation of aPKC, involved in cell polarity, decreases the number of apical nuclei and doubles the number of asymmetric divisions. These results suggest a model in which the mutual interdependence of Cdx2 and cell polarity affects the cytoskeleton-dependent positioning of nuclei and, in consequence, the plane of cell division in the early mouse embryo.

  13. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Jacopo; Osella, Matteo; Kennard, Andrew S.; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2017-03-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different models were used to propose specific mechanisms, but the links between them are poorly explored. The lack of comparative studies makes it difficult to appreciate how well any particular mechanism is supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with simple physical analogues. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or interdivision time), we show how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well as the constant added size mechanism recently found to capture several aspects of the cell division behavior of different bacteria. As we show by analytical estimates and numerical simulations, the available data are described precisely by the first-order approximation of this expansion, i.e., by a "linear response" regime for the correction of size fluctuations. Hence, a single dimensionless parameter defines the strength and action of the division control against cell-to-cell variability (quantified by a single "noise" parameter). However, the same strength of linear response may emerge from several mechanisms, which are distinguished only by higher-order terms in the perturbative expansion. Our analytical estimate of the sample size needed to distinguish between second-order effects shows that this value is close to but larger than the values of the current datasets. These results provide a unified framework for future studies and clarify the relevant parameters at play in the control of

  14. Cell division orientation is coupled to cell–cell adhesion by the E-cadherin/LGN complex

    PubMed Central

    Gloerich, Martijn; Bianchini, Julie M.; Siemers, Kathleen A.; Cohen, Daniel J.; Nelson, W. James

    2017-01-01

    Both cell–cell adhesion and oriented cell division play prominent roles in establishing tissue architecture, but it is unclear how they might be coordinated. Here, we demonstrate that the cell–cell adhesion protein E-cadherin functions as an instructive cue for cell division orientation. This is mediated by the evolutionarily conserved LGN/NuMA complex, which regulates cortical attachments of astral spindle microtubules. We show that LGN, which adopts a three-dimensional structure similar to cadherin-bound catenins, binds directly to the E-cadherin cytosolic tail and thereby localizes at cell–cell adhesions. On mitotic entry, NuMA is released from the nucleus and competes LGN from E-cadherin to locally form the LGN/NuMA complex. This mediates the stabilization of cortical associations of astral microtubules at cell–cell adhesions to orient the mitotic spindle. Our results show how E-cadherin instructs the assembly of the LGN/NuMA complex at cell–cell contacts, and define a mechanism that couples cell division orientation to intercellular adhesion. PMID:28045117

  15. Regulation of Asymmetric Cell Division in Mammalian Neural Stem and Cancer Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Daynac, Mathieu; Petritsch, Claudia K

    Stem and progenitor cells are characterized by their abilities to self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is achieved through control of cell division mode, which can be either asymmetric or symmetric. Failure to properly control cell division mode may result in premature depletion of the stem/progenitor cell pool or abnormal growth and impaired differentiation. In many tissues, including the brain, stem cells and progenitor cells undergo asymmetric cell division through the establishment of cell polarity. Cell polarity proteins are therefore potentially critical regulators of asymmetric cell division. Decrease or loss of asymmetric cell division can be associated with reduced differentiation common during aging or impaired remyelination as seen in demyelinating diseases. Progenitor-like glioma precursor cells show decreased asymmetric cell division rates and increased symmetric divisions, which suggests that asymmetric cell division suppresses brain tumor formation. Cancer stem cells, on the other hand, still undergo low rates of asymmetric cell division, which may provide them with a survival advantage during therapy. These findings led to the hypotheses that asymmetric cell divisions are not always tumor suppressive but can also be utilized to maintain a cancer stem cell population. Proper control of cell division mode is therefore not only deemed necessary to generate cellular diversity during development and to maintain adult tissue homeostasis but may also prevent disease and determine disease progression. Since brain cancer is most common in the adult and aging population, we review here the current knowledge on molecular mechanisms that regulate asymmetric cell divisions in the neural and oligodendroglial lineage during development and in the adult brain.

  16. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    PubMed

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  17. Centrosome misorientation reduces stem cell division during aging

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; Türkel, Nezaket; Hemati, Nahid; Fuller, Margaret T.; Hunt, Alan J.; Yamashita, Yukiko M.

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric division of adult stem cells generates one self-renewing stem cell and one differentiating cell, thereby maintaining tissue homeostasis. A decline in stem cell function has been proposed to contribute to tissue aging, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that changes in the stem cell orientation with respect to the niche during aging contribute to the decline in spermatogenesis in Drosophila male germ line. Throughout the cell cycle, centrosomes in germ line stem cells (GSCs) are oriented within their niche and ensures asymmetric division. We found that GSCs containing misoriented centrosomes accumulate with age and that these GSCs are arrested or delayed in the cell cycle. The cell cycle arrest is transient, and GSCs appear to re-enter cell cycle upon correction of centrosome orientation. Based on these findings, we propose that cell cycle arrest associated with centrosome misorientation functions as a mechanism to ensure asymmetric stem cell division, and that the inability of stem cells to maintain correct orientation during aging contributes to the decline in spermatogenesis. We further show that some of misoriented GSCs likely originate from dedifferentiation of spermatogonia. PMID:18923395

  18. Process for control of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, C. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method of controlling mitosis of biological cells was developed, which involved inducing a change in the intracellular ionic hierarchy accompanying the cellular electrical transmembrane potential difference (Esubm) of the cells. The ionic hierarchy may be varied by imposing changes on the relative concentrations of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-), or by directly imposing changes in the physical Esubm level across the cell surface.

  19. Leishmania amazonensis Promastigotes Present Two Distinct Modes of Nucleus and Kinetoplast Segregation during Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcelo Santos; Monteiro, Jomar Patrício; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Vasconcelos, Elton José; Perez, Arina Marina; Freitas-Júnior, Lúcio de Holanda; Elias, Maria Carolina; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Here, we show the morphological events associated with organelle segregation and their timing in the cell cycle of a reference strain of Leishmania (L.) amazonensis promastigotes, the main causative agent of Tegumentary leishmaniasis in the Americas. We show evidences that during the cell cycle, L. amazonensis promastigotes present two distinct modes of nucleus and kinetoplast segregation, which occur in different temporal order in different proportions of cells. We used DAPI-staining and EdU-labeling to monitor the segregation of DNA-containing organelles and DNA replication in wild-type parasites. The emergence of a new flagellum was observed using a specific monoclonal antibody. The results show that L. amazonensis cell cycle division is peculiar, with 65% of the dividing cells duplicating the kinetoplast before the nucleus, and the remaining 35% doing the opposite or duplicating both organelles concomitantly. In both cases, the new flagellum appeared during S to G2 phase in 1N1K cells and thus before the segregation of both DNA-containing organelles; however, we could not determine the exact timing of flagellar synthesis. Most of these results were confirmed by the synchronization of parasites using hydroxyurea. Altogether, our data show that during the cell cycle of L. amazonensis promastigotes, similarly to L. donovani, the segregation of nucleus and kinetoplast do not follow a specific order, especially when compared to other trypanosomatids, reinforcing the idea that this characteristic seems to be species-specific and may represent differences in cellular biology among members of the Leishmania genus. PMID:24278433

  20. A novel cell division factor from tobacco 2B-13 cells that induced cell division in auxin-starved tobacco BY-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Eguchi, Kentaro; Nishida, Ikuo; Laukens, Kris; Witters, Erwin; van Onckelen, Harry; Nagata, Toshiyuki

    2006-06-01

    Effects of auxin as plant hormones are widespread; in fact in almost all aspects of plant growth and development auxin plays a pivotal role. Although auxin is required for propagating cell division in plant cells, its effect upon cell division is least understood. If auxin is depleted from the culture medium, cultured cells cease to divide. It has been demonstrated in this context that the addition of auxin to auxin-starved nondividing tobacco BY-2 cells induced semisynchronous cell division. On the other hand, there are some cell lines, named habituated cells, that can grow without auxin. The cause and reason for the habituated cells have not been clarified. A habituated cell line named 2B-13 is derived from the tobacco BY-2 cell line, which has been most intensively studied among plant cell lines. When we tried to find the difference between two cell lines of BY-2 and 2B-13 cells, we found that the addition of culture filtrated from the auxin-habituated 2B-13 cells induced semisynchronous cell division in auxin-starved BY-2 cells. The cell division factor (CDF) that is responsible for inducing cell division in auxin-starved BY-2 cells was purified to near-homogeneity by sequential passage through a hydroxyapatite column, a ConA Sepharose column and a Sephadex gel filtration column. The resulting purified fraction appeared as a single band of high molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels by silver staining and was able to induce cell division in auxin-starved BY-2 cells. Identification of the protein by MALD-TOF-MS/MS revealed that it is structurally related to P-glycoprotein from Gossypioides kirkii, which belongs to ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporters. The significance of CDF as a possible ABC-transporter is discussed in relationship to auxin-autotrophic growth and auxin-signaling pathway.

  1. Asymmetric cell division of T cells upon antigen presentation uses multiple conserved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Oliaro, Jane; Van Ham, Vanessa; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Pasam, Anupama; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Pham, Kim; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Waterhouse, Nigel J; Bots, Michael; Hawkins, Edwin D; Watt, Sally V; Cluse, Leonie A; Clarke, Chris J P; Izon, David J; Chang, John T; Thompson, Natalie; Gu, Min; Johnstone, Ricky W; Smyth, Mark J; Humbert, Patrick O; Reiner, Steven L; Russell, Sarah M

    2010-07-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a potential means by which cell fate choices during an immune response are orchestrated. Defining the molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric division of T cells is paramount for determining the role of this process in the generation of effector and memory T cell subsets. In other cell types, asymmetric cell division is regulated by conserved polarity protein complexes that control the localization of cell fate determinants and spindle orientation during division. We have developed a tractable, in vitro model of naive CD8(+) T cells undergoing initial division while attached to dendritic cells during Ag presentation to investigate whether similar mechanisms might regulate asymmetric division of T cells. Using this system, we show that direct interactions with APCs provide the cue for polarization of T cells. Interestingly, the immunological synapse disseminates before division even though the T cells retain contact with the APC. The cue from the APC is translated into polarization of cell fate determinants via the polarity network of the Par3 and Scribble complexes, and orientation of the mitotic spindle during division is orchestrated by the partner of inscuteable/G protein complex. These findings suggest that T cells have selectively adapted a number of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to generate diversity through asymmetric cell division.

  2. Cell Autonomy and Synchrony of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Circadian Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Mohawk, Jennifer A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals. The individual cells of the SCN are capable of functioning independently from one another and therefore must form a cohesive circadian network through intercellular coupling. The network properties of the SCN lead to coordination of circadian rhythms among its neurons and neuronal subpopulations. There is increasing evidence for multiple interconnected oscillators within the SCN, and in this Review, we will highlight recent advances in our understanding of the complex organization and function of the cellular and network-level SCN clock. Understanding the way in which synchrony is achieved between cells in the SCN will provide insight into the means by which this important nucleus orchestrates circadian rhythms throughout the organism. PMID:21665298

  3. Defect driven shapes in nematic droplets: analogies with cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoni, Marco; Manyuhina, Oksana V.; Bowick, Mark J.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Building on the striking similarity between the structure of the spindle during mitosis in living cells and nematic textures in confined liquid crystals, we use a continuum model of two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal droplets, to examine the physical aspects of cell division. The model investigates the interplay between bulk elasticity of the microtubule assembly, described as a nematic liquid crystal, and surface elasticity of the cell cortex, modelled as a bounding flexible membrane, in controlling cell shape and division. The centrosomes at the spindle poles correspond to the cores of the topological defects required to accommodate nematic order in a closed geometry. We map out the progression of both healthy bipolar and faulty multi-polar division as a function of an effective parameter that incorporates active processes and controls centrosome separation. A robust prediction, independent of energetic considerations, is that the transition from a single cell to daughters cells occurs at critical value of this parameter. Our model additionally suggests that microtubule anchoring at the cell cortex may play an important role for successful bipolar division. This can be tested experimentally by regulating microtubule anchoring.

  4. Dynamics of Traction Stress Field during Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Sano, Masaki

    2012-12-01

    We report a quantitative measurement of traction stress exerted by dividing eukaryotic cells. The stress field was highly dynamic and sequentially changed as follows: (1) strong and localized as two spots, (2) weak and broadly distributed, and (3) strong and localized as four spots. At the final stage of cytokinesis, the dividing cells exerted strong tensile force on the intercellular bridge. The asymmetry of the traction stress and the orientation of the division axis matched throughout the division process, suggesting the possible role of the mechanical force as a “store” of the orientational information.

  5. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-08

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell's behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues.

  6. Natural synchronisation for the study of cell division in the green unicellular alga Ostreococcus tauri.

    PubMed

    Farinas, Benoît; Mary, Camille; de O Manes, Carmem-Lara; Bhaud, Yvonne; Peaucellier, Gérard; Moreau, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Ostreococcus tauri (Prasinophyceae) is a marine unicellular green alga which diverged early in the green lineage. The interest of O. tauri as a potential model to study plant cell division is based on its key phylogenetic position, its simple binary division, a very simple cellular organisation and now the availability of the full genome sequence. In addition O. tauri has a minimal yet complete set of cell cycle control genes. Here we show that division can be naturally synchronised by light/dark cycles and that organelles divide before the nucleus. This natural synchronisation, although being only partial, enables the study of the expression of CDKs throughout the cell cycle. The expression patterns of OtCDKA and OtCDKB were determined both at the mRNA and protein levels. The single OtCDKA gene is constantly expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas OtCDKB is highly regulated and expressed only in S/G2/M phases. More surprisingly, OtCDKA is not phosphorylated at the tyrosine residue, in contrast to OtCDKB which is strongly phosphorylated during cell division. OtCDKA kinase activity appears before the S phase, indicating a possible role of this protein in the G1/S transition. OtCDKB kinase activity occurs later than OtCDKA, and its tyrosine phosphorylation is correlated to G2/M, suggesting a possible control of the mitotic activity. To our knowledge this is the first organism in the green lineage which showed CDKB tyrosine phosphorylation during cell cycle progression.

  7. Determining cell division symmetry through the dissection of dividing cells using single-cell expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Jasnos, Lukasz; Sawado, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Symmetric cell divisions give rise to two sister cells that are identical to each other, whereas asymmetric divisions produce two sister cells with distinctive phenotypes. Although cell division symmetry is usually determined on the basis of a few markers or biological functions, the overall similarity between sister cells has not been thoroughly examined at a molecular level. Here we provide a protocol to separate sister embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and to conduct multiplexed gene expression analyses at the single-cell level by using 48 ESC genes. The procedure includes the dissection of dividing, paired sister cells by micromanipulation, followed by cell lysis, reverse transcription, gene-specific cDNA amplification and multiplexed quantitative PCR analyses. This protocol can be completed in 10 d, and it can be readily adapted to other cell types that are able to grow in suspension culture.

  8. Cytoskeleton dynamics control the first asymmetric cell division in Arabidopsis zygote

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Yusuke; Higaki, Takumi; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Yamada, Tomomi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Berger, Frederic; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric cell division of the zygote is the initial and crucial developmental step in most multicellular organisms. In flowering plants, whether zygote polarity is inherited from the preexisting organization in the egg cell or reestablished after fertilization has remained elusive. How dynamically the intracellular organization is generated during zygote polarization is also unknown. Here, we used a live-cell imaging system with Arabidopsis zygotes to visualize the dynamics of the major elements of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs), and actin filaments (F-actins), during the entire process of zygote polarization. By combining image analysis and pharmacological experiments using specific inhibitors of the cytoskeleton, we found features related to zygote polarization. The preexisting alignment of MTs and F-actin in the egg cell is lost on fertilization. Then, MTs organize into a transverse ring defining the zygote subapical region and driving cell outgrowth in the apical direction. F-actin forms an apical cap and longitudinal arrays and is required to position the nucleus to the apical region of the zygote, setting the plane of the first asymmetrical division. Our findings show that, in flowering plants, the preexisting cytoskeletal patterns in the egg cell are lost on fertilization and that the zygote reorients the cytoskeletons to perform directional cell elongation and polar nuclear migration. PMID:27911812

  9. Cytoskeleton dynamics control the first asymmetric cell division in Arabidopsis zygote.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yusuke; Higaki, Takumi; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Yamada, Tomomi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Berger, Frederic; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Ueda, Minako

    2016-12-06

    The asymmetric cell division of the zygote is the initial and crucial developmental step in most multicellular organisms. In flowering plants, whether zygote polarity is inherited from the preexisting organization in the egg cell or reestablished after fertilization has remained elusive. How dynamically the intracellular organization is generated during zygote polarization is also unknown. Here, we used a live-cell imaging system with Arabidopsis zygotes to visualize the dynamics of the major elements of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs), and actin filaments (F-actins), during the entire process of zygote polarization. By combining image analysis and pharmacological experiments using specific inhibitors of the cytoskeleton, we found features related to zygote polarization. The preexisting alignment of MTs and F-actin in the egg cell is lost on fertilization. Then, MTs organize into a transverse ring defining the zygote subapical region and driving cell outgrowth in the apical direction. F-actin forms an apical cap and longitudinal arrays and is required to position the nucleus to the apical region of the zygote, setting the plane of the first asymmetrical division. Our findings show that, in flowering plants, the preexisting cytoskeletal patterns in the egg cell are lost on fertilization and that the zygote reorients the cytoskeletons to perform directional cell elongation and polar nuclear migration.

  10. Action at a Distance in the Cell's Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondev, Jane

    Various functions performed by chromosomes involve long-range communication between DNA sequences that are tens of thousands of bases apart along the genome, and microns apart in the nucleus. In this talk I will discuss experiments and theory relating to two distinct modes of long-range communication in the nucleus, chromosome looping and protein hopping along the chromosome, both in the context of DNA-break repair in yeast. Yeast is an excellent model system for studies that link chromosome conformations to their function as there is ample experimental evidence that yeast chromosome conformations are well described by a simple, random-walk polymer model. Using a combination of polymer physics theory and experiments on yeast cells, I will demonstrate that loss of polymer entropy due to chromosome looping is the driving force for homology search during repair of broken DNA by homologous recombination. I will also discuss the spread of histone modifications along the chromosome and away from the DNA break point in the context of simple physics models based on chromosome looping and kinase hopping, and show how combining physics theory and cell-biology experiment can be used to dissect the molecular mechanism of the spreading process. These examples demonstrate how combined theoretical and experimental studies can reveal physical principles of long-range communication in the nucleus, which play important roles in regulation of gene expression, DNA recombination, and chromatin modification. This work was supported by the NSF DMR-1206146.

  11. Lineage tracing quantification reveals symmetric stem cell division in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Viktoria; Inaba, Mayu; Cheng, Jun; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2013-12-01

    In the homeostatic state, adult stem cells divide either symmetrically to increase the stem cell number to compensate stem cell loss, or asymmetrically to maintain the population while producing differentiated cells. We have investigated the mode of stem cell division in the testes of Drosophila melanogaster by lineage tracing and confirm the presence of symmetric stem cell division in this system. We found that the rate of symmetric division is limited to 1-2% of total germline stem cell (GSC) divisions, but it increases with expression of a cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, or a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, Moesin, which may modulate adhesiveness of germ cells to the stem cell niche. Our results indicate that the decision regarding asymmetric vs. symmetric division is a dynamically regulated process that contributes to tissue homeostasis, responding to the needs of the tissue.

  12. Mechanical influences in bacterial morphogenesis and cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sean

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells utilize a ring-like organelle (the Z-ring) to accomplish cell division. The Z-ring actively generates a contractile force and influences cell wall growth. We will discuss a general model of bacterial morphogenesis where mechanical forces are coupled to the growth dynamics of the cell wall. The model suggests a physical mechanism that determines the shapes of bacteria cells. The roles of several bacterial cytoskeletal proteins and the Z-ring are discussed. We will also explore molecular mechanisms of force generation by the Z-ring and how cells can generate mechanical forces without molecular motors.

  13. Mitochondrial dynamics and inheritance during cell division, development and disease.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant; Chan, David C

    2014-10-01

    During cell division, it is critical to properly partition functional sets of organelles to each daughter cell. The partitioning of mitochondria shares some common features with that of other organelles, particularly in the use of interactions with cytoskeletal elements to facilitate delivery to the daughter cells. However, mitochondria have unique features - including their own genome and a maternal mode of germline transmission - that place additional demands on this process. Consequently, mechanisms have evolved to regulate mitochondrial segregation during cell division, oogenesis, fertilization and tissue development, as well as to ensure the integrity of these organelles and their DNA, including fusion-fission dynamics, organelle transport, mitophagy and genetic selection of functional genomes. Defects in these processes can lead to cell and tissue pathologies.

  14. Harnessing Single Cell Sorting to Identify Cell Division Genes and Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Catherine; Liu, Michael; Britton, Warwick; Triccas, James A.; Thomas, Torsten; Smith, Adrian L.; Allen, Steven; Salomon, Robert; Harry, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development. PMID:23565292

  15. Harnessing single cell sorting to identify cell division genes and regulators in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Burke, Catherine; Liu, Michael; Britton, Warwick; Triccas, James A; Thomas, Torsten; Smith, Adrian L; Allen, Steven; Salomon, Robert; Harry, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development.

  16. How to Foster an Understanding of Growth and Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Dirk; Fleige, Jennifer; Riemeier, Tanja

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the frequencies of students' conceptions of growth and cell division before and after one hour of instruction. The investigation supplements qualitative results by directing attention to those conceptions which might occur most frequently to students: teachers can then concentrate their preparation on practical requirements. A…

  17. How to Foster an Understanding of Growth and Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Dirk; Fleige, Jennifer; Riemeier, Tanja

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the frequencies of students' conceptions of growth and cell division before and after one hour of instruction. The investigation supplements qualitative results by directing attention to those conceptions which might occur most frequently to students: teachers can then concentrate their preparation on practical requirements. A…

  18. A crucial step in cell division identified | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    When cell division doesn’t go according to plan, the resulting daughter cells can become unstable or even cancerous. A team of CCR investigators has now discovered a crucial step required for normal cell division to occur. Read more...

  19. Polyalkoxyflavonoids as inhibitors of cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. V.; Semenova, M. N.

    2015-02-01

    Being structural analogues of natural microtubule-destabilizing cytostatics, polyalkoxyflavonoids represent a promising class of compounds for anticancer drug design. The review covers synthetic routes to various polyalkoxyflavonoids and the results of biological assays in vitro on human cancer cells and in vivo using sea urchin embryos as a model. Mechanisms of action and structure-relationship activity for polyalkoxyflavonoids are discussed. The bibliography includes 151 references.

  20. Characteristics of near response cells projecting to the oculomotor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Mays, L E; Gamlin, P D

    1992-04-01

    1. Previous work has shown neurons just dorsal and lateral to the oculomotor nucleus that increase their firing rate with increases in the angle of ocular convergence. It has been suggested that the output of these midbrain near response cells might provide the vergence command needed by the medial rectus motoneurons. However, lens accommodation ordinarily accompanies convergence, and a subsequent study showed that only about one-half of these midbrain near response cells carried a signal related exclusively to vergence. One hypothesis suggested by this finding is that this subgroup of neurons might have a unique role in providing a "pure" vergence signal to the medial rectus motoneurons. 2. In the present study extracellular recordings were made from midbrain near response cells in monkeys while eye position and lens accommodation were measured. The monkeys viewed targets through an optical system that allowed the accommodative and ocular vergence demands to be manipulated independently. This approach was used to produce a partial dissociation of accommodative and vergence responses, so that an accommodative and vergence coefficient could be determined for each cell, by the use of the following equation FR = R0 + kda x AR + kdv x CR where FR is the firing rate of the near response cell, R0 is the predicted firing rate for a distant target, kda is the (dissociated) accommodation coefficient, AR is the accommodative response, kdv is the (dissociated) vergence coefficient, and CR is the convergence response. 3. The vergence and accommodation coefficients were determined for a large number of midbrain near response cells, including a subset that could be antidromically activated from the medial rectus subdivisions of the oculomotor nucleus. Some near response neurons were found with signals related exclusively to convergence (i.e., kdv greater than 0 and kda = 0), whereas several others had signals related exclusively to lens accommodation (i.e., kda greater than 0

  1. Cerebellar granule cells are predominantly generated by terminal symmetric divisions of granule cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kie; Umeshima, Hiroki; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-06-01

    Neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) are generated by symmetric and asymmetric cell division of neural stem cells and their derivative progenitor cells. Cerebellar granule cells are the most abundant neurons in the CNS, and are generated by intensive cell division of granule cell precursors (GCPs) during postnatal development. Dysregulation of GCP cell cycle is causal for some subtypes of medulloblastoma. However, the details and mechanisms underlying neurogenesis from GCPs are not well understood. Using long-term live-cell imaging of proliferating GCPs transfected with a fluorescent newborn-granule cell marker, we found that GCPs underwent predominantly symmetric divisions, generating two GCPs or two neurons, while asymmetric divisions generating a GCP and a neuron were only occasionally observed, in both dissociated culture and within tissues of isolated cerebellar lobules. We found no significant difference in cell cycle length between proliferative and neurogenic divisions, or any consistent changes in cell cycle length during repeated proliferative division. Unlike neural stem cells in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, which generate many neurons by repeated asymmetric division, cerebellar GCPs produce neurons predominantly by terminal symmetric division. These results indicate diverse mechanisms of neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  3. Mechanism of positioning the cell nucleus in vertebrate photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Omori, Yoshihiro; Biyanwila, Janisha; Malicki, Jarema

    2007-01-01

    Organelles are frequently distributed in a nonrandom manner in a cell's cytoplasm. A particular distribution pattern often facilitates a specific function of a cell, whereas its aberrations can lead to cell death. We show that a mutation in the zebrafish mikre oko (mok) locus, which encodes dynactin 1 subunit of the dynactin complex, produces a severe displacement of the photoreceptor cell nucleus toward the synaptic terminus. Interference with the function of other dynein complex constituents, including p50/dynamitin, the Lis1 polypeptide, and the disruption of a nuclear envelope component of the syne gene family in vertebrate photoreceptors also result in the mispositioning of nuclei. Although the overall photoreceptor polarity is not affected, this phenotype is accompanied by a misdistribution of the Bardet–Biedl syndrome 4 polypeptide and a decreased photoreceptor survival. These findings reveal an important mechanism that regulates nuclear position in vertebrate neurons. PMID:17785424

  4. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  5. Plant cell division is specifically affected by nitrotyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Aleksandra M.; Durst, Steffen; Nick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all eukaryotic α-tubulins harbour a C-terminal tyrosine that can be reversibly removed and religated, catalysed by a specific tubulin–tyrosine carboxypeptidase (TTC) and a specific tubulin–tyrosine ligase (TTL), respectively. The biological function of this post-translational modification has remained enigmatic. 3-nitro-L-tyrosine (nitrotyrosine, NO2Tyr), can be incorporated into detyrosinated α-tubulin instead of tyrosine, producing irreversibly nitrotyrosinated α-tubulin. To gain insight into the possible function of detyrosination, the effect of NO2Tyr has been assessed in two plant model organisms (rice and tobacco). NO2Tyr causes a specific, sensitive, and dose-dependent inhibition of cell division that becomes detectable from 1 h after treatment and which is not observed with non-nitrosylated tyrosine. These effects are most pronounced in cycling tobacco BY-2 cells, where the inhibition of cell division is accompanied by a stimulation of cell length, and a misorientation of cross walls. NO2Tyr reduces the abundance of the detyrosinated form of α-tubulin whereas the tyrosinated α-tubulin is not affected. These findings are discussed with respect to a model where NO2Tyr is accepted as substrate by TTL and subsequently blocks TTC activity. The irreversibly tyrosinated α-tubulin impairs microtubular functions that are relevant to cell division in general, and cell wall deposition in particular. PMID:20018903

  6. The Role of Symmetric Stem Cell Divisions in Tissue Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jienian; Plikus, Maksim V.; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-01-01

    Successful maintenance of cellular lineages critically depends on the fate decision dynamics of stem cells (SCs) upon division. There are three possible strategies with respect to SC fate decision symmetry: (a) asymmetric mode, when each and every SC division produces one SC and one non-SC progeny; (b) symmetric mode, when 50% of all divisions produce two SCs and another 50%—two non-SC progeny; (c) mixed mode, when both the asymmetric and two types of symmetric SC divisions co-exist and are partitioned so that long-term net balance of the lineage output stays constant. Theoretically, either of these strategies can achieve lineage homeostasis. However, it remains unclear which strategy(s) are more advantageous and under what specific circumstances, and what minimal control mechanisms are required to operate them. Here we used stochastic modeling to analyze and quantify the ability of different types of divisions to maintain long-term lineage homeostasis, in the context of different control networks. Using the example of a two-component lineage, consisting of SCs and one type of non-SC progeny, we show that its tight homeostatic control is not necessarily associated with purely asymmetric divisions. Through stochastic analysis and simulations we show that asymmetric divisions can either stabilize or destabilize the lineage system, depending on the underlying control network. We further apply our computational model to biological observations in the context of a two-component lineage of mouse epidermis, where autonomous lineage control has been proposed and notable regional differences, in terms of symmetric division ratio, have been noted—higher in thickened epidermis of the paw skin as compared to ear and tail skin. By using our model we propose a possible explanation for the regional differences in epidermal lineage control strategies. We demonstrate how symmetric divisions can work to stabilize paw epidermis lineage, which experiences high level of micro

  7. Modelling cell division and endoreduplication in tomato fruit pericarp.

    PubMed

    Apri, Mochamad; Kromdijk, Johannes; de Visser, Pieter H B; de Gee, Maarten; Molenaar, Jaap

    2014-05-21

    In many developing plant tissues and organs, differentiating cells switch from the classical cell cycle to an alternative partial cycle. This partial cycle bypasses mitosis and allows for multiple rounds of genome duplication without cell division, giving rise to cells with high ploidy numbers. This partial cycle is referred to as endoreduplication. Cell division and endoreduplication are important processes for biomass allocation and yield in tomato. Quantitative trait loci for tomato fruit size or weight are frequently associated with variations in the pericarp cell number, and due to the tight connection between endoreduplication and cell expansion and the prevalence of polyploidy in storage tissues, a functional correlation between nuclear ploidy number and cell growth has also been implicated (karyoplasmic ratio theory). In this paper, we assess the applicability of putative mechanisms for the onset of endoreduplication in tomato pericarp cells via development of a mathematical model for the cell cycle gene regulatory network. We focus on targets for regulation of the transition to endoreduplication by the phytohormone auxin, which is known to play a vital role in the onset of cell expansion and differentiation in developing tomato fruit. We show that several putative mechanisms are capable of inducing the onset of endoreduplication. This redundancy in explanatory mechanisms is explained by analysing system behaviour as a function of their combined action. Namely, when all these routes to endoreduplication are used in a combined fashion, robustness of the regulation of the transition to endoreduplication is greatly improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Asymmetric cell division of stem cells in the lung and other systems.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Elgayyar, Marwa E; El-Hashash, Ahmed H K

    2014-01-01

    New insights have been added to identification, behavior and cellular properties of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells over the last few years. The modes of stem cell division, asymmetric vs. symmetric, are tightly regulated during development and regeneration. The proper choice of a stem cell to divide asymmetrically or symmetrically has great consequences for development and disease because inappropriate asymmetric division disrupts organ morphogenesis, whereas uncontrolled symmetric division induces tumorigenesis. Therefore, understanding the behavior of lung stem cells could identify innovative solutions for restoring normal morphogenesis and/or regeneration of different organs. In this concise review, we describe recent studies in our laboratory about the mode of division of lung epithelial stem cells. We also compare asymmetric cell division (ACD) in the lung stem cells with other tissues in different organisms.

  9. Asymmetric cell division of stem cells in the lung and other systems

    PubMed Central

    Berika, Mohamed; Elgayyar, Marwa E.; El-Hashash, Ahmed H. K.

    2014-01-01

    New insights have been added to identification, behavior and cellular properties of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells over the last few years. The modes of stem cell division, asymmetric vs. symmetric, are tightly regulated during development and regeneration. The proper choice of a stem cell to divide asymmetrically or symmetrically has great consequences for development and disease because inappropriate asymmetric division disrupts organ morphogenesis, whereas uncontrolled symmetric division induces tumorigenesis. Therefore, understanding the behavior of lung stem cells could identify innovative solutions for restoring normal morphogenesis and/or regeneration of different organs. In this concise review, we describe recent studies in our laboratory about the mode of division of lung epithelial stem cells. We also compare asymmetric cell division (ACD) in the lung stem cells with other tissues in different organisms. PMID:25364740

  10. Bacterial cell division as a target for new antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sass, Peter; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial resistance to currently applied antibiotics complicates the treatment of infections and demands the evaluation of new strategies to counteract multidrug-resistant bacteria. In recent years, the inhibition of the bacterial divisome, mainly by targeting the central cell division mediator FtsZ, has been recognized as a promising strategy for antibiotic attack. New antibiotics were shown to either interfere with the natural dynamics and functions of FtsZ during the cell cycle or to activate a bacterial protease to degrade FtsZ and thus bring about bacterial death in a suicidal manner. Their efficacy in animal models of infection together with resistance-breaking properties prove the potential of such drugs and validate the inhibition of bacterial cell division as an attractive approach for antibiotic intervention.

  11. The Significance of Microspore Division and Division Symmetry for Vegetative Cell-Specific Transcription and Generative Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Eady, C.; Lindsey, K.; Twell, D.

    1995-01-01

    The significance of the onset and symmetry of pollen mitosis I (PMI) for the subsequent differentiation of the vegetative and generative cells was investigated by the in vitro maturation of isolated microspores of transgenic tobacco. Free uninucleate microspores of transgenic plants harboring the vegetative cell (VC)-specific late anther tomato lat52 promoter fused to the [beta]-glucuronidase (gus) gene showed normal asymmetric cell division at PMI and activated the lat52 promoter specifically in the nascent VC during in vitro maturation. In vitro maturation in the presence of high levels of colchicine effectively blocked PMI, resulting in the formation of uninucleate pollen grains in which the lat52 promoter was activated. Furthermore, matured uninucleate pollen grains were capable of germination and pollen tube growth despite the absence of a functional generative cell (GC). Lower levels of colchicine induced symmetric division at PMI, producing two similar daughter cells in which typical GC chromatin condensation was prevented. Similar cultures of transgenic microspores harboring the lat52 promoter driving the expression of a nuclear-targeted GUS fusion protein showed that lat52 promoter activation occurred in both symmetric daughter cells. These results directly demonstrate that division asymmetry at PMI is essential for correct GC differentiation and that activation of VC-specific transcription and functional VC maturation may be uncoupled from cytokinesis at PMI. These results are discussed in relation to models proposed to account for the role and distribution of factors controlling the differing fates of the vegetative and generative cells. PMID:12242352

  12. Nucleus pulposus cell-matrix interactions with laminins.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, C L; Francisco, A T; Plopper, G E; Chen, J; Setton, L A

    2011-06-20

    The cells of the nucleus pulposus (NP) region of the intervertebral disc play a critical role in this tissue's generation and maintenance, and alterations in NP cell viability, metabolism, and phenotype with aging may be key contributors to progressive disc degeneration. Relatively little is understood about the phenotype of NP cells, including their cell-matrix interactions which may modulate phenotype and survival. Our previous work has identified strong and region-specific expression of laminins and laminin cell-surface receptors in immature NP tissues, suggesting laminin cell-matrix interactions are uniquely important to the biology of NP cells. Whether these observed tissue-level laminin expression patterns reflect functional adhesion behaviors for these cells is not known. In this study, we examined NP cell-matrix interactions with specific matrix ligands, including various laminin isoforms, using quantitative assays of cell attachment, spreading, and adhesion strength. NP cells were found to attach in higher numbers and exhibited rapid cell spreading and higher resistance to detachment force on two laminin isoforms (LM-511,LM-332) identified to be uniquely expressed in the NP region, as compared to another laminin isoform (LM-111) and several other matrix ligands (collagen, fibronectin). Additionally, NP cells were found to attach in higher numbers to laminins as compared to cells isolated from the disc's annulus fibrosus region. These findings confirm that laminin and laminin receptor expression documented in NP tissues translates into unique functional NP cell adhesion behaviors that may be useful tools for in vitro cell culture and biomaterials that support NP cells.

  13. Microenvironmental modulation of asymmetric cell division in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pine, Sharon R; Ryan, Bríd M; Varticovski, Lyuba; Robles, Ana I; Harris, Curtis C

    2010-02-02

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained through asymmetric cell divisions that produce daughter cells with differing self-renewal and differentiation potentials. Certain tumor cell subfractions can self-renew and repopulate the heterogeneous tumor bulk, suggestive of asymmetric cell division, but an equally plausible explanation is that daughter cells of a symmetric division subsequently adopt differing cell fates. Cosegregation of template DNA during mitosis is one mechanism by which cellular components are segregated asymmetrically during cell division in fibroblast, muscle, mammary, intestinal, and neural cells. Asymmetric cell division of template DNA in tumor cells has remained elusive, however. Through pulse-chase experiments with halogenated thymidine analogs, we determined that a small population of cells within human lung cancer cell lines and primary tumor cell cultures asymmetrically divided their template DNA, which could be visualized in single cells and in real time. Template DNA cosegregation was enhanced by cell-cell contact. Its frequency was density-dependent and modulated by environmental changes, including serum deprivation and hypoxia. In addition, we found that isolated CD133(+) lung cancer cells were capable of tumor cell repopulation. Strikingly, during cell division, CD133 cosegregated with the template DNA, whereas the differentiation markers prosurfactant protein-C and pan-cytokeratins were passed to the opposing daughter cell, demonstrating that segregation of template DNA correlates with lung cancer cell fate. Our results demonstrate that human lung tumor cell fate decisions may be regulated during the cell division process. The characterization and modulation of asymmetric cell division in lung cancer can provide insight into tumor initiation, growth, and maintenance.

  14. Cell shape and Wnt signaling redundantly control the division axis of C. elegans epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wildwater, Marjolein; Sander, Nicholas; de Vreede, Geert; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2011-10-01

    Tissue-specific stem cells combine proliferative and asymmetric divisions to balance self-renewal with differentiation. Tight regulation of the orientation and plane of cell division is crucial in this process. Here, we study the reproducible pattern of anterior-posterior-oriented stem cell-like divisions in the Caenorhabditis elegans seam epithelium. In a genetic screen, we identified an alg-1 Argonaute mutant with additional and abnormally oriented seam cell divisions. ALG-1 is the main subunit of the microRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and was previously shown to regulate the timing of postembryonic development. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of developing larvae revealed that reduced alg-1 function successively interferes with Wnt signaling, cell adhesion, cell shape and the orientation and timing of seam cell division. We found that Wnt inactivation, through mig-14 Wntless mutation, disrupts tissue polarity but not anterior-posterior division. However, combined Wnt inhibition and cell shape alteration resulted in disordered orientation of seam cell division, similar to the alg-1 mutant. Our findings reveal additional alg-1-regulated processes, uncover a previously unknown function of Wnt ligands in seam tissue polarity, and show that Wnt signaling and geometric cues redundantly control the seam cell division axis.

  15. Automated cell tracking identifies mechanically oriented cell divisions during Drosophila axis elongation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael F Z; Hunter, Miranda V; Wang, Gang; McFaul, Christopher; Yip, Christopher M; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2017-04-01

    Embryos extend their anterior-posterior (AP) axis in a conserved process known as axis elongation. Drosophila axis elongation occurs in an epithelial monolayer, the germband, and is driven by cell intercalation, cell shape changes, and oriented cell divisions at the posterior germband. Anterior germband cells also divide during axis elongation. We developed image analysis and pattern-recognition methods to track dividing cells from confocal microscopy movies in a generally applicable approach. Mesectoderm cells, forming the ventral midline, divided parallel to the AP axis, while lateral cells displayed a uniform distribution of division orientations. Mesectoderm cells did not intercalate and sustained increased AP strain before cell division. After division, mesectoderm cell density increased along the AP axis, thus relieving strain. We used laser ablation to isolate mesectoderm cells from the influence of other tissues. Uncoupling the mesectoderm from intercalating cells did not affect cell division orientation. Conversely, separating the mesectoderm from the anterior and posterior poles of the embryo resulted in uniformly oriented divisions. Our data suggest that mesectoderm cells align their division angle to reduce strain caused by mechanical forces along the AP axis of the embryo.

  16. Tools for visualization of phosphoinositides in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kalasova, Ilona; Fáberová, Veronika; Kalendová, Alžběta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Uličná, Lívia; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are glycerol-based phospholipids containing hydrophilic inositol ring. The inositol ring is mono-, bis-, or tris-phosphorylated yielding seven PIs members. Ample evidence shows that PIs localize both to the cytoplasm and to the nucleus. However, tools for direct visualization of nuclear PIs are limited and many studies thus employ indirect approaches, such as staining of their metabolic enzymes. Since localization and mobility of PIs differ from their metabolic enzymes, these approaches may result in incomplete data. In this paper, we tested commercially available PIs antibodies by light microscopy on fixed cells, tested their specificity using protein-lipid overlay assay and blocking assay, and compared their staining patterns. Additionally, we prepared recombinant PIs-binding domains and tested them on both fixed and live cells by light microscopy. The results provide a useful overview of usability of the tools tested and stress that the selection of adequate tools is critical. Knowing the localization of individual PIs in various functional compartments should enable us to better understand the roles of PIs in the cell nucleus.

  17. The Asymmetric Cell Division Regulators Par3, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 Are Not Essential for Erythroid Development or Enucleation.

    PubMed

    Wölwer, Christina B; Gödde, Nathan; Pase, Luke B; Elsum, Imogen A; Lim, Krystle Y B; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Walkley, Carl R; Ellis, Sarah; Ohno, Shigeo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Russell, Sarah M; Humbert, Patrick O

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid enucleation is the process by which the future red blood cell disposes of its nucleus prior to entering the blood stream. This key event during red blood cell development has been likened to an asymmetric cell division (ACD), by which the enucleating erythroblast divides into two very different daughter cells of alternate molecular composition, a nucleated cell that will be removed by associated macrophages, and the reticulocyte that will mature to the definitive erythrocyte. Here we investigated gene expression of members of the Par, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 asymmetric cell division complexes in erythroid cells, and functionally tested their role in erythroid enucleation in vivo and ex vivo. Despite their roles in regulating ACD in other contexts, we found that these polarity regulators are not essential for erythroid enucleation, nor for erythroid development in vivo. Together our results put into question a role for cell polarity and asymmetric cell division in erythroid enucleation.

  18. The Asymmetric Cell Division Regulators Par3, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 Are Not Essential for Erythroid Development or Enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Wölwer, Christina B.; Gödde, Nathan; Pase, Luke B.; Elsum, Imogen A.; Lim, Krystle Y. B.; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Walkley, Carl R.; Ellis, Sarah; Ohno, Shigeo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Russell, Sarah M.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid enucleation is the process by which the future red blood cell disposes of its nucleus prior to entering the blood stream. This key event during red blood cell development has been likened to an asymmetric cell division (ACD), by which the enucleating erythroblast divides into two very different daughter cells of alternate molecular composition, a nucleated cell that will be removed by associated macrophages, and the reticulocyte that will mature to the definitive erythrocyte. Here we investigated gene expression of members of the Par, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 asymmetric cell division complexes in erythroid cells, and functionally tested their role in erythroid enucleation in vivo and ex vivo. Despite their roles in regulating ACD in other contexts, we found that these polarity regulators are not essential for erythroid enucleation, nor for erythroid development in vivo. Together our results put into question a role for cell polarity and asymmetric cell division in erythroid enucleation. PMID:28095473

  19. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as “The Central Dogma in Bacteriology,” is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called “nucleoid complexity,” is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell’s center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  20. Formation of a cylindrical bridge in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citron, Daniel; Schmidt, Laura E.; Reichl, Elizabeth; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2007-11-01

    In nature, the shape transition associated with the division of a mother cell into two daughter cells proceeds via a variety of routes. In the cylinder-thinning route, which has been observed in Dictyostelium and most animal cells, the mother cell first forms a broad bridge-like region, also known as a furrow, between two daughter cells. The furrow then rapidly evolves into a cylindrical bridge, which thins and eventually severs the mother cell into two. The fundamental mechanism underlying this division route is not understood. Recent experiments on Dictyostelium found that, while the cylinder-thinning route persists even when key actin cross-linking proteins are missing, it is disrupted by the removal of force-generating myosin-II proteins. Other measurements revealed that mutant cells lacking myosin-II have a much more uniform tension over the cell surface than wild-type cells. This suggests that tension variation may be important. Here we use a fluid model, previously shown to reproduce the thinning dynamics [Zhang & Robinson, PNAS 102, 7186 (2005)], to test this idea. Consistent with the experiments, the model shows that the cylinder formation process occurs regardless of the exact viscoelastic properties of the cell. In contrast to the experiments, a tension variation in the model hinders, rather then expedites, the cylinder formation.

  1. Actomyosin Pulls to Advance the Nucleus in a Migrating Tissue Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Kent, Ian A.; Shekhar, Nandini; Chancellor, T.J.; Mendonca, Agnes; Dickinson, Richard B.; Lele, Tanmay P.

    2014-01-01

    The cytoskeletal forces involved in translocating the nucleus in a migrating tissue cell remain unresolved. Previous studies have variously implicated actomyosin-generated pushing or pulling forces on the nucleus, as well as pulling by nucleus-bound microtubule motors. We found that the nucleus in an isolated migrating cell can move forward without any trailing-edge detachment. When a new lamellipodium was triggered with photoactivation of Rac1, the nucleus moved toward the new lamellipodium. This forward motion required both nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages and myosin activity. Apical or basal actomyosin bundles were found not to translate with the nucleus. Although microtubules dampen fluctuations in nuclear position, they are not required for forward translocation of the nucleus during cell migration. Trailing-edge detachment and pulling with a microneedle produced motion and deformation of the nucleus suggestive of a mechanical coupling between the nucleus and the trailing edge. Significantly, decoupling the nucleus from the cytoskeleton with KASH overexpression greatly decreased the frequency of trailing-edge detachment. Collectively, these results explain how the nucleus is moved in a crawling fibroblast and raise the possibility that forces could be transmitted from the front to the back of the cell through the nucleus. PMID:24411232

  2. Actomyosin pulls to advance the nucleus in a migrating tissue cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Kent, Ian A; Shekhar, Nandini; Chancellor, T J; Mendonca, Agnes; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2014-01-07

    The cytoskeletal forces involved in translocating the nucleus in a migrating tissue cell remain unresolved. Previous studies have variously implicated actomyosin-generated pushing or pulling forces on the nucleus, as well as pulling by nucleus-bound microtubule motors. We found that the nucleus in an isolated migrating cell can move forward without any trailing-edge detachment. When a new lamellipodium was triggered with photoactivation of Rac1, the nucleus moved toward the new lamellipodium. This forward motion required both nuclear-cytoskeletal linkages and myosin activity. Apical or basal actomyosin bundles were found not to translate with the nucleus. Although microtubules dampen fluctuations in nuclear position, they are not required for forward translocation of the nucleus during cell migration. Trailing-edge detachment and pulling with a microneedle produced motion and deformation of the nucleus suggestive of a mechanical coupling between the nucleus and the trailing edge. Significantly, decoupling the nucleus from the cytoskeleton with KASH overexpression greatly decreased the frequency of trailing-edge detachment. Collectively, these results explain how the nucleus is moved in a crawling fibroblast and raise the possibility that forces could be transmitted from the front to the back of the cell through the nucleus.

  3. Size-independent symmetric division in extraordinarily long cells

    PubMed Central

    Pende, Nika; Leisch, Nikolaus; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R.; Heindl, Niels R.; Ott, Jörg; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Two long-standing paradigms in biology are that cells belonging to the same population exhibit little deviation from their average size and that symmetric cell division is size limited. Here, ultrastructural, morphometric and immunocytochemical analyses reveal that two Gammaproteobacteria attached to the cuticle of the marine nematodes Eubostrichus fertilis and E. dianeae reproduce by constricting a single FtsZ ring at midcell despite being 45 μm and 120 μm long, respectively. In the crescent-shaped bacteria coating E. fertilis, symmetric FtsZ-based fission occurs in cells with lengths spanning one order of magnitude. In the E. dianeae symbiont, formation of a single functional FtsZ ring makes this the longest unicellular organism in which symmetric division has ever been observed. In conclusion, the reproduction modes of two extraordinarily long bacterial cells indicate that size is not the primary trigger of division and that yet unknown mechanisms time the localization of both DNA and the septum. PMID:25221974

  4. Reliability of nucleus-to-cell and nucleus-to-cytoplasm calculations for conjunctival impression cytology specimens.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    To assess the outcome of two different nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio calculations in relation to the number of cells measured from conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) images. CIC from the exposed nasal bulbar conjunctiva surface was undertaken on 40 young adults using a Millcell(®)-CM filter; the filters were stained with Giemsa, colour images taken of the cells in a monolayer at 200 X magnification, graded by the Nelson scale and then a projection overlay method used to outline the cell and nucleus borders. Nucleo-cytoplasmic ratios were calculated based on literal interpretation of the term (i.e. N/CYT = nucleus area/[cell area - nucleus area]) as well as based on cell area (i.e. N/CELL = nucleus area/cell area). A range of N/CYT or N/CELL values are expected for all cells, regardless of squamous metaplasia grade, with slightly greater heterogeneity expected from N/CYT calculations. The difference between the two calculations gets progressively less as the squamous metaplasia grade increases. For all grades of cells, these ratios could be determined to within approximately ±1% if adequate numbers of cells were measured (i.e. 75, 65, 50 and 35 for grade 0 to grade 3 cells respectively). If fewer cells are measured, then the variability in N/CELL or N/CYT calculations can be expected to increase. In assessments of nucleo-cytoplasmic ratios, it is important that the calculation used be specified and that the numbers of cells measured be provided.

  5. Using Live-Cell Markers in Maize to Analyze Cell Division Orientation and Timing.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Carolyn G

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed live-cell markers provide an opportunity to explore the dynamics and localization of proteins in maize, an important crop and model for monocot development. A step-by-step method is outlined for observing and analyzing the process of division in maize cells. The steps include plant growth conditions, sample preparation, time-lapse setup, and calculation of division rates.

  6. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-07

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells.

  7. Cell division control by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Waal, Maike S. van der; Hengeveld, Rutger C.C.; Horst, Armando van der; Lens, Susanne M.A.

    2012-07-15

    The Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) consisting of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin and Borealin, is essential for genomic stability by controlling multiple processes during both nuclear and cytoplasmic division. In mitosis it ensures accurate segregation of the duplicated chromosomes by regulating the mitotic checkpoint, destabilizing incorrectly attached spindle microtubules and by promoting the axial shortening of chromosomal arms in anaphase. During cytokinesis the CPC most likely prevents chromosome damage by imposing an abscission delay when a chromosome bridge connects the two daughter cells. Moreover, by controlling proper cytoplasmic division, the CPC averts tetraploidization. This review describes recent insights on how the CPC is capable of conducting its various functions in the dividing cell to ensure chromosomal stability.

  8. Protein kinase C epsilon in cell division: control of abscission.

    PubMed

    Saurin, Adrian T; Brownlow, Nicola; Parker, Peter J

    2009-02-15

    Cell division requires the separation and partitioning of sister chromatids to opposite ends of the cell before an actomyosin ring contracts the membrane in between during cytokinesis. The final irreversible step occurs during abscission when the ring breaks down and the membrane is sealed in its place. The physical mechanics of contraction depend on RhoA, which is stimulated by a centralspindlin complex around the cell equator. However exactly how these events are reversed to allow actomyosin breakdown and abscission were not well understood. Here we will discuss new findings that implicate Protein Kinase C epsilon (PKCepsilon) as a regulator of RhoA signalling required for abscission.

  9. Bacterial cell division: experimental and theoretical approaches to the divisome.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Claire E; Roper, David I; Van Den Berg, Hugo A; Rodger, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is a key event in the bacterial life cycle. It involves constriction at the midcell, so that one cell can give rise to two daughter cells. This constriction is mediated by a ring composed offibrous multimers of the protein FtsZ. However a host of additional factors is involved in the formation and dynamics of this "Z-ring" and this complicated apparatus is collectively known as the "divisome". We review the literature, with an emphasis on mathematical modelling, and show how such theoretical efforts have helped experimentalists to make sense of the at times bewildering data, and plan further experiments.

  10. Benzodioxane-benzamides as new bacterial cell division inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chiodini, Giuseppe; Pallavicini, Marco; Zanotto, Carlo; Bissa, Massimiliano; Radaelli, Antonia; Straniero, Valentina; Bolchi, Cristiano; Fumagalli, Laura; Ruggeri, Paola; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Valoti, Ermanno

    2015-01-07

    A SAR study was performed on 3-substituted 2,6-difluorobenzamides, known inhibitors of the essential bacterial cell division protein FtsZ, through a series of modifications first of 2,6-difluoro-3-nonyloxybenzamide and then of its 3-pyridothiazolylmethoxy analogue PC190723. The study led to the identification of chiral 2,6-difluorobenzamides bearing 1,4-benzodioxane-2-methyl residue at the 3-position as potent antistaphylococcal compounds.

  11. An Improved Model of Nonuniform Coleochaete Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuandi; Cong, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Cell division is a key biological process in which cells divide forming new daughter cells. In the present study, we investigate continuously how a Coleochaete cell divides by introducing a modified differential equation model in parametric equation form. We discuss both the influence of "dead" cells and the effects of various end-points on the formation of the new cells' boundaries. We find that the boundary condition on the free end-point is different from that on the fixed end-point; the former has a direction perpendicular to the surface. It is also shown that the outer boundaries of new cells are arc-shaped. The numerical experiments and theoretical analyses for this model to construct the outer boundary are given.

  12. Microtubules contribute to maintain nucleus shape in epithelial cell monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Dominique; Andrzejewski, Lukasz; Pelling, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tissue strains can result in significant nuclear deformations and may regulate gene expression. However, the precise role of the cytoskeleton in regulating nuclear mechanics remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the nuclear deformability of Madin-Darky canine kidney cells (MDCK) under various stretching conditions to clarify the role of the microtubules and actin network on the mechanical behavior of the nucleus. METHODS: A custom-built cell-stretching device allowing for real time imaging of MDCK nuclei was used. Cells were seeded on a silicone membrane coated with rat-tail collagen I. A nuclear stain, Hoechst-33342, was used to image nuclei during stretching. We exposed cells to a compressive and non-compressive stretching strain field of 25%. Nocodazole and cytochalasin-D were used to depolymerize the microtubules and actin network. RESULTS: Nuclei in control cells stretched more along their minor axis than major axis with a deformation of 5% and 2% respectively. This anisotropy vanished completely in microtubule-deprived cells and these cells showed a very high nuclear deformability along the minor axis when exposed to a compressive stretching strain field. CONCLUSIONS: The microtubules drive the anisotropic deformability of MDCK nuclei in a monolayer and maintain nuclear shape when exposed to compressive strain. Such intrinsic mechanical behavior indicates that microtubules are essential to maintain nuclear shape and may prevent down regulation of gene expression.

  13. Au nanoinjectors for electrotriggered gene delivery into the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mijeong; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of exogenous materials is an essential technique required for many fundamental biological researches and medical treatments. As our understanding of cell structure and function has been improved and diverse therapeutic agents with a subcellular site of action have been continuously developed, there is a demand to enhance the performance of delivering devices. Ideal intracellular delivery devices should convey various kinds of exogenous materials without deteriorating cell viability regardless of cell type and, furthermore, precisely control the location and the timing of delivery as well as the amount of delivered materials for advanced researches.In this chapter the development of a new intracellular delivery device, a nanoinjector made of a Au (gold) nanowire (a Au nanoinjector) is described in which delivery is triggered by external application of an electric pulse. As a model study, a gene was delivered directly into the nucleus of a neuroblastoma cell, and successful delivery without cell damage was confirmed by the expression of the delivered gene. The insertion of a Au nanoinjector directly into a cell can be generally applied to any kind of cell, and a high degree of surface modification of Au allows attachment of diverse materials such as proteins, small molecules, or nanoparticles as well as genes on Au nanoinjectors. This expands their applicability, and it is expected that they will provide important information on the effects of delivered exogenous materials and consequently contribute to the development of related therapeutic or clinical technologies.

  14. Interaction of GABA and norepinephrine in the lateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminals in anesthetized rat, correlating single-unit and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Fahimeh; Nasimi, Ali; Hatam, Masoumeh

    2017-07-25

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) consists of multiple anatomically distinct nuclei. The lateral division, which receives dense noradrenergic innervation, has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation and modulation of responses to stress. This study is performed to identify the cardiovascular and single-unit responses of the lateral BST to norepinephrine (NE), involved adrenoceptors, and possible interaction with GABAergic system of the BST in urethane-anesthetized rats. NE, adrenoreceptor antagonists, and GABAA antagonist were microinjected into the lateral division of BST, while arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and single-unit responses were simultaneously recorded. NE microinjected into the lateral division of BST produced depressor and bradycardic responses. The decrease in AP and HR to NE was blocked by prazosin, an α1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, but not by yohimbine, an α2 antagonist. Furthermore, injections of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (BMI), into the lateral BST abolished the NE-induced depressor and bradycardic responses. We also observed single-unit responses consisting of excitatory and inhibitory responses correlated with cardiovascular function to the microinjection of NE. In conclusion, these data provide the first evidence that microinjection of NE in the lateral division of BST produces depressor and bradycardic responses in urethane-anesthetized rat. The depressor and bradycardiac response are mediated by local α1- but not α2-adrenoceptors. α1-AR activates the GABAergic system within the BST, which in turn produces depressor and bradycardic responses. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Asymmetric centrosome behavior and the mechanisms of stem cell division

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of dividing cells to produce daughters with different fates is an important developmental mechanism conserved from bacteria to fungi, plants, and metazoan animals. Asymmetric outcomes of a cell division can be specified by two general mechanisms: asymmetric segregation of intrinsic fate determinants or asymmetric placement of daughter cells into microenvironments that provide extrinsic signals that direct cells to different states. For both, spindle orientation must be coordinated with the localization of intrinsic determinants or source of extrinsic signals to achieve the proper asymmetric outcome. Recent work on spindle orientation in Drosophila melanogaster male germline stem cells and neuroblasts has brought into sharp focus the key role of differential centrosome behavior in developmentally programmed asymmetric division (for reviews see Cabernard, C., and C.Q. Doe. 2007. Curr. Biol. 17:R465–R467; Gonzalez, C. 2007. Nat. Rev. Genet. 8:462–472). These findings provide new insights and suggest intriguing new models for how cells coordinate spindle orientation with their cellular microenvironment to regulate and direct cell fate decisions within tissues. PMID:18209101

  16. Bestatin inhibits cell growth, cell division, and spore cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Poloz, Yekaterina; Catalano, Andrew; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-04-01

    Bestatin methyl ester (BME) is an inhibitor of Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. We have used Dictyostelium as a model organism to study the effects of BME. Only two Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases have been identified in Dictyostelium to date, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase A and B (PsaA and PsaB). PSA from other organisms is known to regulate cell division and differentiation. Here we show that PsaA is differentially expressed throughout growth and development of Dictyostelium, and its expression is regulated by developmental morphogens. We present evidence that BME specifically interacts with PsaA and inhibits its aminopeptidase activity. Treatment of cells with BME inhibited the rate of cell growth and the frequency of cell division in growing cells and inhibited spore cell differentiation during late development. Overexpression of PsaA-GFP (where GFP is green fluorescent protein) also inhibited spore cell differentiation but did not affect growth. Using chimeras, we have identified that nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of PsaA affects the choice between stalk or spore cell differentiation pathway. Cells that overexpressed PsaA-GFP (primarily nuclear) differentiated into stalk cells, while cells that overexpressed PsaAΔNLS2-GFP (cytoplasmic) differentiated into spores. In conclusion, we have identified that BME inhibits cell growth, division, and differentiation in Dictyostelium likely through inhibition of PsaA.

  17. Contour Detection of Leukocyte Cell Nucleus Using Morphological Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriyanti, R.; Satrio, G. P.; Ramadhani, Y.; Siswandari, W.

    2017-04-01

    Leukocytes are blood cells that do not contain color pigments. Leukocyte function to the tool body’s defenses. Abnormal forms of leukocytes can be a sign of serious diseases such example is leukemia. Most laboratories still use cell morphology examination to assist the diagnosis of illness associated with white blood cells such example is leukemia because of limited resources, both infrastructure, and human resources as happens in developing nations, such as Indonesia. This examination is less expensive and quicker process. However, morphological review requires the expertise of a specialist clinical pathology were limited. This process is sometimes less valid cause in some cases trying to differentiate morphology blast cells into the type of myoblasts, lymphoblast, monoblast, or erythroblast thus potentially misdiagnosis. The goal of this research is to develop a detection device types of blood cells automatically as lower-priced, easy to use and accurate so that the tool can be distributed across all units in existing health services throughout Indonesia and in particular for remote areas. However, because the variables used in the identification of abnormal leukocytes are very complex, in this paper, we emphasize on the contour detection of leukocyte cell nucleus using the morphological image. The results show that this method is promising for further development.

  18. On the origin of shape fluctuations of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fang-Yi; Haley, Shannon C; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2017-09-26

    The nuclear envelope (NE) presents a physical boundary between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm, sandwiched in between two highly active systems inside the cell: cytoskeleton and chromatin. NE defines the shape and size of the cell nucleus, which increases during the cell cycle, accommodating for chromosome decondensation followed by genome duplication. In this work, we study nuclear shape fluctuations at short time scales of seconds in human cells. Using spinning disk confocal microscopy, we observe fast fluctuations of the NE, visualized by fluorescently labeled lamin A, and of the chromatin globule surface (CGS) underneath the NE, visualized by fluorescently labeled histone H2B. Our findings reveal that fluctuation amplitudes of both CGS and NE monotonously decrease during the cell cycle, serving as a reliable cell cycle stage indicator. Remarkably, we find that, while CGS and NE typically fluctuate in phase, they do exhibit localized regions of out-of-phase motion, which lead to separation of NE and CGS. To explore the mechanism behind these shape fluctuations, we use biochemical perturbations. We find the shape fluctuations of CGS and NE to be both thermally and actively driven, the latter caused by forces from chromatin and cytoskeleton. Such undulations might affect gene regulation as well as contribute to the anomalously high rates of nuclear transport by, e.g., stirring of molecules next to NE, or increasing flux of molecules through the nuclear pores.

  19. Oriented cell motility and division underlie early limb bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wyngaarden, Laurie A; Vogeli, Kevin M; Ciruna, Brian G; Wells, Mathew; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Hopyan, Sevan

    2010-08-01

    The vertebrate limb bud arises from lateral plate mesoderm and its overlying ectoderm. Despite progress regarding the genetic requirements for limb development, morphogenetic mechanisms that generate early outgrowth remain relatively undefined. We show by live imaging and lineage tracing in different vertebrate models that the lateral plate contributes mesoderm to the early limb bud through directional cell movement. The direction of cell motion, longitudinal cell axes and bias in cell division planes lie largely parallel to one another along the rostrocaudal (head-tail) axis in lateral plate mesoderm. Transition of these parameters from a rostrocaudal to a mediolateral (outward from the body wall) orientation accompanies early limb bud outgrowth. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Wnt5a acts as a chemoattractant in the emerging limb bud where it contributes to the establishment of cell polarity that is likely to underlie the oriented cell behaviours.

  20. Sara endosomes and the asymmetric division of intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Chrystelle; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    Tissue homeostasis is maintained by adult stem cells, which self-renew and give rise to differentiating cells. The generation of daughter cells with different fates is mediated by signalling molecules coming from an external niche or being asymmetrically dispatched between the two daughters upon stem cell mitosis. In the adult Drosophila midgut, the intestinal stem cell (ISC) divides to generate a new ISC and an enteroblast (EB) differentiating daughter. Notch signalling activity restricted to the EB regulates intestinal cell fate decision. Here, we show that ISCs divide asymmetrically, and Sara endosomes in ISCs are specifically dispatched to the presumptive EB. During ISC mitosis, Notch and Delta traffic through Sara endosomes, thereby contributing to Notch signalling bias, as revealed in Sara mutants: Sara itself contributes to the control of the ISC asymmetric division. Our data uncover an intrinsic endosomal mechanism during ISC mitosis, which participates in the maintenance of the adult intestinal lineage.

  1. Derivation and experimental comparison of cell-division probability densities.

    PubMed

    Leander, R; Allen, E J; Garbett, S P; Tyson, D R; Quaranta, V

    2014-10-21

    Experiments have shown that, even in a homogeneous population of cells, the distribution of division times is highly variable. In addition, a homogeneous population of cells will exhibit a heterogeneous response to drug therapy. We present a simple stochastic model of the cell cycle as a multistep stochastic process. The model, which is based on our conception of the cell cycle checkpoint, is used to derive an analytical expression for the distribution of cell cycle times. We demonstrate that this distribution provides an accurate representation of cell cycle time variability and show how the model relates drug-induced changes in basic biological parameters to variability in response to drug treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cochlear nucleus whole mount explants promote the differentiation of neuronal stem cells from the cochlear nucleus in co-culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Jürgens, Lukas; Völker, Christine; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Jablonka, Sibylle; Mlynski, Robert; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf

    2015-08-07

    The cochlear nucleus is the first brainstem nucleus to receive sensory input from the cochlea. Depriving this nucleus of auditory input leads to cellular and molecular disorganization which may potentially be counteracted by the activation or application of stem cells. Neuronal stem cells (NSCs) have recently been identified in the neonatal cochlear nucleus and a persistent neurogenic niche was demonstrated in this brainstem nucleus until adulthood. The present work investigates whether the neurogenic environment of the cochlear nucleus can promote the survival of engrafted NSCs and whether cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs can differentiate into neurons and glia in brain tissue. Therefore, cochlear nucleus whole-mount explants were co-cultured with NSCs extracted from either the cochlear nucleus or the hippocampus and compared to a second environment using whole-mount explants from the hippocampus. Factors that are known to induce neuronal differentiation were also investigated in these NSC-explant experiments. NSCs derived from the cochlear nucleus engrafted in the brain tissue and differentiated into all cells of the neuronal lineage. Hippocampal NSCs also immigrated in cochlear nucleus explants and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Laminin expression was up-regulated in the cochlear nucleus whole-mounts and regulated the in vitro differentiation of NSCs from the cochlear nucleus. These experiments confirm a neurogenic environment in the cochlear nucleus and the capacity of cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs to differentiate into neurons and glia. Consequently, the presented results provide a first step for the possible application of stem cells to repair the disorganization of the cochlear nucleus, which occurs after hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A model of the cell nucleus for DNA damage calculations.

    PubMed

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Girard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Development of a computer model of genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the human cell nucleus for DNA damage and repair calculations. The model comprises the human genomic DNA, chromosomal domains, and loops attached to factories. A model of canonical B-DNA was used to build the nucleosomes and the 30-nanometer solenoidal chromatin. In turn the chromatin was used to form the loops of factories in chromosome domains. The entire human genome was placed in a spherical nucleus of 10 micrometers diameter. To test the new target model, tracks of protons and alpha-particles were generated using Monte Carlo track structure codes PITS99 (Positive Ion Track Structure) and KURBUC. Damage sites induced in the genome were located and classified according to type and complexity. The three-dimensional structure of the genome starting with a canonical B-DNA model, nucleosomes, and chromatin loops in chromosomal domains are presented. The model was used to obtain frequencies of DNA damage induced by protons and alpha-particles by direct energy deposition, including single- and double-strand breaks, base damage, and clustered lesions. This three-dimensional model of the genome is the first such model using the full human genome for the next generation of more comprehensive modelling of DNA damage and repair. The model combines simple geometrical structures at the level of domains and factories with potentially full detail at the level of atoms in particular genes, allowing damage patterns in the latter to be simulated.

  4. Asymmetries in Cell Division, Cell Size, and Furrowing in the Xenopus laevis Embryo.

    PubMed

    Tassan, Jean-Pierre; Wühr, Martin; Hatte, Guillaume; Kubiak, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell divisions produce two daughter cells with distinct fate. During embryogenesis, this mechanism is fundamental to build tissues and organs because it generates cell diversity. In adults, it remains crucial to maintain stem cells. The enthusiasm for asymmetric cell division is not only motivated by the beauty of the mechanism and the fundamental questions it raises, but has also very pragmatic reasons. Indeed, misregulation of asymmetric cell divisions is believed to have dramatic consequences potentially leading to pathogenesis such as cancers. In diverse model organisms, asymmetric cell divisions result in two daughter cells, which differ not only by their fate but also in size. This is the case for the early Xenopus laevis embryo, in which the two first embryonic divisions are perpendicular to each other and generate two pairs of blastomeres, which usually differ in size: one pair of blastomeres is smaller than the other. Small blastomeres will produce embryonic dorsal structures, whereas the larger pair will evolve into ventral structures. Here, we present a speculative model on the origin of the asymmetry of this cell division in the Xenopus embryo. We also discuss the apparently coincident asymmetric distribution of cell fate determinants and cell-size asymmetry of the 4-cell stage embryo. Finally, we discuss the asymmetric furrowing during epithelial cell cytokinesis occurring later during Xenopus laevis embryo development.

  5. Replicating vesicles as models of primitive cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Szostak, Jack W

    2004-12-01

    Primitive cells, lacking the complex bio-machinery present in modern cells, would have had to rely on the self-organizing properties of their components and on interactions with their environment to achieve basic cellular functions such as growth and division. Many bilayer-membrane vesicles, depending on their composition and environment, can exhibit complex morphological changes such as growth, fusion, fission, budding, internal vesicle assembly and vesicle-surface interactions. The rich dynamic properties of these vesicles provide interesting models of how primitive cellular replication might have occurred in response to purely physical and chemical forces.

  6. A new Escherichia coli cell division gene, ftsK.

    PubMed Central

    Begg, K J; Dewar, S J; Donachie, W D

    1995-01-01

    A mutation in a newly discovered Escherichia coli cell division gene, ftsK, causes a temperature-sensitive late-stage block in division but does not affect chromosome replication or segregation. This defect is specifically suppressed by deletion of dacA, coding for the peptidoglycan DD-carboxypeptidase, PBP 5. FtsK is a large polypeptide (147 kDa) consisting of an N-terminal domain with several predicted membrane-spanning regions, a proline-glutamine-rich domain, and a C-terminal domain with a nucleotide-binding consensus sequence. FtsK has extensive sequence identity with a family of proteins from a wide variety of prokaryotes and plasmids. The plasmid proteins are required for intercellular DNA transfer, and one of the bacterial proteins (the SpoIIIE protein of Bacillus subtilis) has also been implicated in intracellular chromosomal DNA transfer. PMID:7592387

  7. Oriented cell division: new roles in guiding skin wound repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaowei; Ma, Kui; Geng, Zhijun; Sun, Xiaoyan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-11-18

    Tissue morphogenesis depends on precise regulation and timely co-ordination of cell division and also on the control of the direction of cell division. Establishment of polarity division axis, correct alignment of the mitotic spindle, segregation of fate determinants equally or unequally between daughter cells, are essential for the realization of oriented cell division. Furthermore, oriented cell division is regulated by intrinsic cues, extrinsic cues and other cues, such as cell geometry and polarity. However, dysregulation of cell division orientation could lead to abnormal tissue development and function. In the present study, we review recent studies on the molecular mechanism of cell division orientation and explain their new roles in skin repair and regeneration.

  8. Oriented cell division: new roles in guiding skin wound repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaowei; Ma, Kui; Geng, Zhijun; Sun, Xiaoyan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis depends on precise regulation and timely co-ordination of cell division and also on the control of the direction of cell division. Establishment of polarity division axis, correct alignment of the mitotic spindle, segregation of fate determinants equally or unequally between daughter cells, are essential for the realization of oriented cell division. Furthermore, oriented cell division is regulated by intrinsic cues, extrinsic cues and other cues, such as cell geometry and polarity. However, dysregulation of cell division orientation could lead to abnormal tissue development and function. In the present study, we review recent studies on the molecular mechanism of cell division orientation and explain their new roles in skin repair and regeneration. PMID:26582817

  9. Models of chromatin spatial organisation in the cell nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicodemi, Mario

    2014-03-01

    In the cell nucleus chromosomes have a complex architecture serving vital functional purposes. Recent experiments have started unveiling the interaction map of DNA sites genome-wide, revealing different levels of organisation at different scales. The principles, though, which orchestrate such a complex 3D structure remain still mysterious. I will overview the scenario emerging from some classical polymer physics models of the general aspect of chromatin spatial organisation. The available experimental data, which can be rationalised in a single framework, support a picture where chromatin is a complex mixture of differently folded regions, self-organised across spatial scales according to basic physical mechanisms. I will also discuss applications to specific DNA loci, e.g. the HoxB locus, where models informed with biological details, and tested against targeted experiments, can help identifying the determinants of folding.

  10. Asymmetric damage segregation at cell division via protein aggregate fusion and attachment to organelles.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Miguel; Tolić, Iva M

    2015-07-01

    The segregation of damaged components at cell division determines the survival and aging of cells. In cells that divide asymmetrically, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aggregated proteins are retained by the mother cell. Yet, where and how aggregation occurs is not known. Recent work by Zhou and collaborators shows that the birth of protein aggregates, under specific stress conditions, requires active translation, and occurs mainly at the endoplasmic reticulum. Later, aggregates move to the mitochondrial surface through fis1-dependent association. During replicative aging, aggregate association with the mother-cell mitochondria contributes to the asymmetric segregation of aggregates, because mitochondria in the daughter cell do not carry aggregates. With increasing age of mother cells, aggregates lose their connection to the mitochondria, and segregation is less asymmetric. Relating these findings to other mechanisms of aggregate segregation in different organisms, we postulate that fusion between aggregates and their tethering to organelles such as the vacuole, nucleus, ER, or mitochondria are common principles that establish asymmetric segregation during stress resistance and aging. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Correcting improper chromosome-spindle attachments during cell division.

    PubMed

    Lampson, Michael A; Renduchitala, Kishore; Khodjakov, Alexey; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2004-03-01

    For accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division, microtubule fibres must attach sister kinetochores to opposite poles of the mitotic spindle (bi-orientation). Aurora kinases are linked to oncogenesis and have been implicated in the regulation of chromosome-microtubule attachments. Although loss of Aurora kinase activity causes an accumulation of mal-orientated chromosomes in dividing cells, it is not known how the active kinase corrects improper chromosome attachments. The use of reversible small-molecule inhibitors allows activation of protein function in living vertebrate cells with temporal control. Here we show that by removal of small-molecule inhibitors, controlled activation of Aurora kinase during mitosis can correct chromosome attachment errors by selective disassembly of kinetochore-microtubule fibres, rather than by alternative mechanisms involving initial release of microtubules from either kinetochores or spindle poles. Observation of chromosomes and microtubule dynamics with real-time high-resolution microscopy showed that mal-orientated, but not bi-orientated, chromosomes move to the spindle pole as both kinetochore-microtubule fibres shorten, followed by alignment at the metaphase plate. Our results provide direct evidence for a mechanism required for the maintenance of genome integrity during cell division.

  12. Desipramine and citalopram attenuate pretest swim-induced increases in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun Hye; Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2014-10-01

    Dynorphin in the nucleus accumbens shell plays an important role in antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST), but it is unclear whether desipramine and citalopram treatments alter prodynorphin levels in other brain areas. To explore this possibility, we injected mice with desipramine and citalopram 0.5, 19, and 23 h after a 15-min pretest swim and observed changes in prodynorphin expression before the test swim, which was conducted 24 h after the pretest swim. The pretest swim increased prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST) and lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeL). This increase in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dBNST and CeL was blocked by desipramine and citalopram treatments. Similar changes in prodynorphin mRNA levels were observed in the dBNST and CeL, but these changes did not reach significance. To understand the underlying mechanism, we assessed changes in phosphorylated CREB at Ser(133) (pCREB) immunoreactivity in the dBNST and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Treatment with citalopram but not desipramine after the pretest swim significantly increased pCREB immunoreactivity only in the dBNST. These results suggest that regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeL before the test swim may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine and citalopram in the FST and suggest that changes in pCREB immunoreactivity in these areas may not play an important role in the regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeA.

  13. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review.

  14. Asymmetric cell division in T lymphocyte fate diversification

    PubMed Central

    Arsenio, Janilyn; Metz, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological protection against microbial pathogens is dependent on robust generation of functionally diverse T lymphocyte subsets. Upon microbial infection, naïve CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocytes can give rise to effector- and memory-fated progeny that together mediate a potent immune response. Recent advances in single-cell immunological and genomic profiling technologies have helped elucidate early and late diversification mechanisms that enable the generation of heterogeneity from single T lymphocytes. We discuss these findings here and argue that one such mechanism, asymmetric cell division, creates an early divergence in T lymphocyte fates by giving rise to daughter cells with a propensity towards the terminally differentiated effector or self-renewing memory lineages, with cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic cues from the microenvironment driving the final maturation steps. PMID:26474675

  15. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells

    PubMed Central

    Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M.; Fleisch, Markus C.; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J.; Maxwell, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny. PMID:28427147

  16. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengcheng; Kannan, Nagarajan; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2017-05-16

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny.

  17. SET-related cell division autoantigen-1 (CDA1) arrests cell growth.

    PubMed

    Chai, Z; Sarcevic, B; Mawson, A; Toh, B H

    2001-09-07

    We used an autoimmune serum from a patient with discoid lupus erythematosus to clone a cDNA of 2808 base pairs. Its open reading frame of 2079 base pairs encodes a predicted polypeptide of 693 amino acids named CDA1 (cell division autoantigen-1). CDA1 has a predicted molecular mass of 79,430 Daltons and a pI of 4.26. The size of the cDNA is consistent with its estimated mRNA size. CDA1 comprises an N-terminal proline-rich domain, a central basic domain, and a C-terminal bipartite acidic domain. It has four putative nuclear localization signals and potential sites for phosphorylation by cAMP and cGMP-dependent kinases, protein kinase C, thymidine kinase, casein kinase II, and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). CDA1 is phosphorylated in HeLa cells and by cyclin D1/CDK4, cyclin A/CDK2, and cyclin B/CDK1 in vitro. Its basic and acidic domains contain regions homologous to almost the entire human leukemia-associated SET protein. The same basic region is also homologous to nucleosome assembly proteins, testis TSPY protein, and an uncharacterized brain protein. CDA1 is present in the nuclear fraction of HeLa cells and localizes to the nucleus and nucleolus in HeLa cells transfected with CDA1 or its N terminus containing all four nuclear localization signals. Its acidic C terminus localizes mainly to the cytoplasm. CDA1 levels are low in serum-starved cells, increasing dramatically with serum stimulation. Expression of the CDA1 transgene, but not its N terminus, arrests HeLa cell growth, colony numbers, cell density, and bromodeoxyuridine uptake in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of CDA1 to arrest cell growth is abolished by mutation of the two CDK consensus phosphorylation sites. We propose that CDA1 is a negative regulator of cell growth and that its activity is regulated by its expression level and phosphorylation.

  18. Asymmetric cell division in plants: mechanisms of symmetry breaking and cell fate determination.

    PubMed

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Guo, Xiaoyu; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a fundamental mechanism that generates cell diversity while maintaining self-renewing stem cell populations in multicellular organisms. Both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms underpin symmetry breaking and differential daughter cell fate determination in animals and plants. The emerging picture suggests that plants deal with the problem of symmetry breaking using unique cell polarity proteins, mobile transcription factors, and cell wall components to influence asymmetric divisions and cell fate. There is a clear role for altered auxin distribution and signaling in distinguishing two daughter cells and an emerging role for epigenetic modifications through chromatin remodelers and DNA methylation in plant cell differentiation. The importance of asymmetric cell division in determining final plant form provides the impetus for its study in the areas of both basic and applied science.

  19. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  20. Cyclic AMP and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    D'Ari, R; Jaffé, A; Bouloc, P; Robin, A

    1988-01-01

    We examined several aspects of cell division regulation in Escherichia coli which have been thought to be controlled by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and its receptor protein (CAP). Mutants lacking adenyl cyclase (cya) or CAP (crp) were rod shaped, not spherical, during exponential growth in LB broth or glucose-Casamino Acids medium, and lateral wall elongation was normal; in broth, stationary-phase cells became ovoid. Cell mass was smaller for the mutants than for the wild type, but it remained appropriate for their slower growth rate and thus probably does not reflect early (uncontrolled) septation. The slow growth did not seem to reflect a gross metabolic disorder, since the mutants gave a normal yield on limiting glucose; surprisingly, however, the cya mutant (unlike crp) was unable to grow anaerobically on glucose, suggesting a role for cAMP (but not for CAP) in the expression of some fermentation enzyme. Both cya and crp mutants are known to be resistant to mecillinam, an antibiotic which inhibits penicillin-binding protein 2 (involved in lateral wall elongation) and also affects septation. This resistance does not reflect a lack of PBP2. Furthermore, it was not simply the result of slow growth and small cell mass, since small wild-type cells growing in acetate remained sensitive. The cAMP-CAP complex may regulate the synthesis of some link between PBP2 and the septation apparatus. The ftsZ gene, coding for a cell division protein, was expressed at a higher level in the absence of cAMP, as measured with an ftsZ::lacZ fusion, but the amount of protein per cell, shown by others to be invariable over a 10-fold range of cell mass, was independent of cAMP, suggesting that ftsZ expression is not regulated by the cAMP-CAP complex. Images PMID:2826407

  1. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  2. Origin of the cell nucleus, mitosis and sex: roles of intracellular coevolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes was the most radical change in cell organisation since life began, with the largest ever burst of gene duplication and novelty. According to the coevolutionary theory of eukaryote origins, the fundamental innovations were the concerted origins of the endomembrane system and cytoskeleton, subsequently recruited to form the cell nucleus and coevolving mitotic apparatus, with numerous genetic eukaryotic novelties inevitable consequences of this compartmentation and novel DNA segregation mechanism. Physical and mutational mechanisms of origin of the nucleus are seldom considered beyond the long-standing assumption that it involved wrapping pre-existing endomembranes around chromatin. Discussions on the origin of sex typically overlook its association with protozoan entry into dormant walled cysts and the likely simultaneous coevolutionary, not sequential, origin of mitosis and meiosis. Results I elucidate nuclear and mitotic coevolution, explaining the origins of dicer and small centromeric RNAs for positionally controlling centromeric heterochromatin, and how 27 major features of the cell nucleus evolved in four logical stages, making both mechanisms and selective advantages explicit: two initial stages (origin of 30 nm chromatin fibres, enabling DNA compaction; and firmer attachment of endomembranes to heterochromatin) protected DNA and nascent RNA from shearing by novel molecular motors mediating vesicle transport, division, and cytoplasmic motility. Then octagonal nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) arguably evolved from COPII coated vesicle proteins trapped in clumps by Ran GTPase-mediated cisternal fusion that generated the fenestrated nuclear envelope, preventing lethal complete cisternal fusion, and allowing passive protein and RNA exchange. Finally, plugging NPC lumens by an FG-nucleoporin meshwork and adopting karyopherins for nucleocytoplasmic exchange conferred compartmentation advantages. These successive

  3. Origin of the cell nucleus, mitosis and sex: roles of intracellular coevolution.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2010-02-04

    The transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes was the most radical change in cell organisation since life began, with the largest ever burst of gene duplication and novelty. According to the coevolutionary theory of eukaryote origins, the fundamental innovations were the concerted origins of the endomembrane system and cytoskeleton, subsequently recruited to form the cell nucleus and coevolving mitotic apparatus, with numerous genetic eukaryotic novelties inevitable consequences of this compartmentation and novel DNA segregation mechanism. Physical and mutational mechanisms of origin of the nucleus are seldom considered beyond the long-standing assumption that it involved wrapping pre-existing endomembranes around chromatin. Discussions on the origin of sex typically overlook its association with protozoan entry into dormant walled cysts and the likely simultaneous coevolutionary, not sequential, origin of mitosis and meiosis. I elucidate nuclear and mitotic coevolution, explaining the origins of dicer and small centromeric RNAs for positionally controlling centromeric heterochromatin, and how 27 major features of the cell nucleus evolved in four logical stages, making both mechanisms and selective advantages explicit: two initial stages (origin of 30 nm chromatin fibres, enabling DNA compaction; and firmer attachment of endomembranes to heterochromatin) protected DNA and nascent RNA from shearing by novel molecular motors mediating vesicle transport, division, and cytoplasmic motility. Then octagonal nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) arguably evolved from COPII coated vesicle proteins trapped in clumps by Ran GTPase-mediated cisternal fusion that generated the fenestrated nuclear envelope, preventing lethal complete cisternal fusion, and allowing passive protein and RNA exchange. Finally, plugging NPC lumens by an FG-nucleoporin meshwork and adopting karyopherins for nucleocytoplasmic exchange conferred compartmentation advantages. These successive changes took place

  4. Determination of T-cell fate by dendritic cells: a new role for asymmetric cell division?

    PubMed

    Russell, Sarah M

    2008-07-01

    The production, from a single naive T cell, of the many different activated T cell types required for an effective immune response has fascinated immunologists for decades. This process underpins the development of vaccines, immunosuppressive regimes in transplant patients, and immunotherapy in cancer among other things. Despite the enormous advances in detailing the mechanisms and influencing factors in the differentiation of each T-cell subtype, it is still not clear how the different T-cell progeny are produced in proportions that are appropriate for each situation. This review discusses the notion that asymmetric cell division might allow for the regulated generation of different cell populations.

  5. Connecting the dots of the bacterial cell cycle: Coordinating chromosome replication and segregation with cell division.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, Isabella V; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    Proper division site selection is crucial for the survival of all organisms. What still eludes us is how bacteria position their division site with high precision, and in tight coordination with chromosome replication and segregation. Until recently, the general belief, at least in the model organisms Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, was that spatial regulation of division comes about by the combined negative regulatory mechanisms of the Min system and nucleoid occlusion. However, as we review here, these two systems cannot be solely responsible for division site selection and we highlight additional regulatory mechanisms that are at play. In this review, we put forward evidence of how chromosome replication and segregation may have direct links with cell division in these bacteria and the benefit of recent advances in chromosome conformation capture techniques in providing important information about how these three processes mechanistically work together to achieve accurate generation of progenitor cells.

  6. Cell surface charge and cell division in Escherichia coli after x irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, C.; Kojima, K.; Nishizawa, K.; Hirota, Y.

    1981-09-01

    Simultaneous detection of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) and morphology of individual irradiated Escherichia coli cells under the phase microscope revealed a concurrent decrease in EPM and arrest of cell division. EPM decreased with time and reached a minimum 15 min after irradiation with doses ranging from 100 R to 80 kR. Cells elongating due to the division block retained the minimum EPM. After a recovery phase, separated small-sized daughter cells and some long filamentous cells, which had a few cleavages at the termini, returned to the normal EPM. This finding indicates that recovery in EPM, which represents recovery in the surface architecture, precedes or coincides with the resumption of cell division. Nuclear staining of the recovering cells leads to the suggestion that the cleavage of the cell takes place whenever the EPM has recovered, irrespective of the segregation of DNA, which gives rise to anuclear cells having normal EPM.

  7. Mathematical model of the cell division cycle of fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Bela; Pataki, Zsuzsa; Ciliberto, Andrea; Tyson, John J.

    2001-03-01

    Much is known about the genes and proteins controlling the cell cycle of fission yeast. Can these molecular components be spun together into a consistent mechanism that accounts for the observed behavior of growth and division in fission yeast cells? To answer this question, we propose a mechanism for the control system, convert it into a set of 14 differential and algebraic equations, study these equations by numerical simulation and bifurcation theory, and compare our results to the physiology of wild-type and mutant cells. In wild-type cells, progress through the cell cycle (G1→S→G2→M) is related to cyclic progression around a hysteresis loop, driven by cell growth and chromosome alignment on the metaphase plate. However, the control system operates much differently in double-mutant cells, wee1- cdc25Δ, which are defective in progress through the latter half of the cell cycle (G2 and M phases). These cells exhibit "quantized" cycles (interdivision times clustering around 90, 160, and 230 min). We show that these quantized cycles are associated with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the mechanism, when the wee1 and cdc25 genes are disabled.

  8. Dynamics of gene regulatory networks with cell division cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luonan; Wang, Ruiqi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-07-01

    This paper focuses on modeling and analyzing the nonlinear dynamics of gene regulatory networks with the consideration of a cell division cycle with duplication process of DNA , in particular for switches and oscillators of synthetic networks. We derive two models that may correspond to the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, respectively. A biologically plausible three-gene model ( lac,tetR , and cI ) and a repressilator as switch and oscillator examples are used to illustrate our theoretical results. We show that the cell cycle may play a significant role in gene regulation due to the nonlinear dynamics of a gene regulatory network although gene expressions are usually tightly controlled by transcriptional factors.

  9. Dido3 PHD Modulates Cell Differentiation and Division

    PubMed Central

    Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Fütterer, Agnes; Rothbart, Scott B.; Tong, Qiong; Rincon-Arano, Hector; de Diego, Ainhoa Sánchez; Groudine, Mark; Strahl, Brian D.; Martínez-A, Carlos; van Wely, Karel H.M.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Death Inducer Obliterator 3 (Dido3) is implicated in the maintenance of stem cell genomic stability and tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Dido3 regulates the expression of stemness genes in embryonic stem cells through its plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. Binding of Dido3 PHD to histone H3K4me3 is disrupted by threonine phosphorylation that triggers Dido3 translocation from chromatin to the mitotic spindle. The crystal structure of Dido3 PHD in complex with H3K4me3 reveals an atypical aromatic-cage-like binding site that contains a histidine residue. Biochemical, structural, and mutational analyses of the binding mechanism identified the determinants of specificity and affinity and explained the inability of homologous PHF3 to bind H3K4me3. Together, our findings reveal a link between the transcriptional control in embryonic development and regulation of cell division. PMID:23831028

  10. Common mechanisms regulating cell cortex properties during cell division and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Roubinet, Chantal; Tran, Phong T; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-11-01

    Single cell morphogenesis results from a balance of forces involving internal pressure (also called turgor pressure in plants and fungi) and the plastic and dynamic outer shell of the cell. Dominated by the cell wall in plants and fungi, mechanical properties of the outer shell of animal cells arise from the cell cortex, which is mostly composed of the plasma membrane (and membrane proteins) and the underlying meshwork of actin filaments and myosin motors (and associated proteins). In this review, following Bray and White [1988; Science 239:883-889], we draw a parallel between the regulation of the cell cortex during cell division and cell migration in animal cells. Starting from the similarities in shape changes and underlying mechanical properties, we further propose that the analogy between cell division and cell migration might run deeper, down to the basic molecular mechanisms driving cell cortex remodeling. We focus our attention on how an heterogeneous and dynamic cortex can be generated to allow cell shape changes while preserving cell integrity.

  11. The Cell Birth Marker BrdU Does Not Affect Recruitment of Subsequent Cell Divisions in the Adult Avian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cattan, Anat

    2015-01-01

    BrdU is commonly used to quantify neurogenesis but also causes mutation and has mitogenic, transcriptional, and translational effects. In mammalian studies, attention had been given to its dosage, but in birds such examination was not conducted. Our previous study suggested that BrdU might affect subsequent cell divisions and neuronal recruitment in the brain. Furthermore, this effect seemed to increase with time from treatment. Accordingly, we examined whether BrdU might alter neurogenesis in the adult avian brain. We compared recruitment of [3H]-thymidine+ neurons in brains of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) when no BrdU was involved and when BrdU was given 1 or 3 months prior to [3H]-thymidine. In nidopallium caudale, HVC, and hippocampus, no differences were found between groups in densities and percentages of [3H]-thymidine+ neurons. The number of silver grains per [3H]-thymidine+ neuronal nucleus and their distribution were similar across groups. Additionally, time did not affect the results. The results indicate that the commonly used dosage of BrdU in birds has no long-term effects on subsequent cell divisions and neuronal recruitment. This conclusion is also important in neuronal replacement experiments, where BrdU and another cell birth marker are given, with relatively long intervals between them. PMID:25759813

  12. Single-cell dynamics of the chromosome replication and cell division cycles in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Santi, Isabella; Dhar, Neeraj; Bousbaine, Djenet; Wakamoto, Yuichi; McKinney, John D

    2013-01-01

    During the bacterial cell cycle, chromosome replication and cell division must be coordinated with overall cell growth in order to maintain the correct ploidy and cell size. The spatial and temporal coordination of these processes in mycobacteria is not understood. Here we use microfluidics and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to measure the dynamics of cell growth, division and chromosome replication in single cells of Mycobacterium smegmatis. We find that single-cell growth is size-dependent (large cells grow faster than small cells), which implicates a size-control mechanism in cell-size homoeostasis. Asymmetric division of mother cells gives rise to unequally sized sibling cells that grow at different velocities but show no differential sensitivity to antibiotics. Individual cells are restricted to one round of chromosome replication per cell division cycle, although replication usually initiates in the mother cell before cytokinesis and terminates in the daughter cells after cytokinesis. These studies reveal important differences between cell cycle organization in mycobacteria compared with better-studied model organisms.

  13. Asymmetric cell division of stem and progenitor cells during homeostasis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez-López, Sandra; Lerner, Robin G; Petritsch, Claudia

    2014-02-01

    Stem and progenitor cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. A fine balance between these processes is achieved through controlled asymmetric divisions and is necessary to generate cellular diversity during development and to maintain adult tissue homeostasis. Disruption of this balance may result in premature depletion of the stem/progenitor cell pool, or abnormal growth. In many tissues, including the brain, dysregulated asymmetric divisions are associated with cancer. Whether there is a causal relationship between asymmetric cell division defects and cancer initiation is as yet not known. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate asymmetric cell divisions in the neural lineage and discuss the potential connections between this regulatory machinery and cancer.

  14. The Par complex and integrins direct asymmetric cell division in adult intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Spyros; Conder, Ryan; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2012-10-05

    The adult Drosophila midgut is maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that generate both self-renewing and differentiating daughter cells. How this asymmetry is generated is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that asymmetric ISC division is established by a unique combination of extracellular and intracellular polarity mechanisms. We show that Integrin-dependent adhesion to the basement membrane induces cell-intrinsic polarity and results in the asymmetric segregation of the Par proteins Par-3, Par-6, and aPKC into the apical daughter cell. Cell-specific knockdown and overexpression experiments suggest that increased activity of aPKC enhances Delta/Notch signaling in one of the two daughter cells to induce terminal differentiation. Perturbing this mechanism or altering the orientation of ISC division results in the formation of intestinal tumors. Our data indicate that mechanisms for intrinsically asymmetric cell division can be adapted to allow for the flexibility in lineage decisions that is required in adult stem cells.

  15. AN ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY OF VEGETATIVE CELL DIVISION IN OEDOGONIUM BORISIANUM(1) (2).

    PubMed

    Hill, G J; Machlis, L

    1968-12-01

    Vegetative cell division in Oedogonium borisianum is initiated by the formation of a 3-layered ring adjacent to the wall in the upper portion of the cell. This structure enlarges by the coalescence of vesicles. When the ring is fully developed, the parent wall splits adjacent to the ring, and the ring expands into a cylinder, which becomes the cuticle of the upper daughter cell. The lateral wall then forms between this cuticle and the plasmalemma of the cell. Concurrent with ring development and expansion, the nucleus migrates to a position in the center of the cell and karyokinesis occurs. Commencing with late telophase, evidence of transverse wall formation becomes apparent. The zone between the daughter nuclei contains a layer of microtubules in a plane parallel to the plane in which the transverse wall will develop. Subsequently a random coalescence of vesicles occurs along this plane. During the latter stages of this process, the ring expands and the plane of the transverse wall moves upward to the base of the ring cylinder. The completed transverse wall then fuses at is periphery with the newly formed lateral wall.

  16. Evidence for equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis in a marine green alga Monostroma angicava

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Tatsuya; Horinouchi, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hironobu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In cell divisions, relative size of daughter cells should play fundamental roles in gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Differences in gamete size between the two mating types underlie sexual selection. Size of daughter cells is a key factor to regulate cell divisions during cleavage. In cleavage, the form of cell divisions (equal/unequal in size) determines the developmental fate of each blastomere. However, strict validation of the form of cell divisions is rarely demonstrated. We cannot distinguish between equal and unequal cell divisions by analysing only the mean size of daughter cells, because their means can be the same. In contrast, the dispersion of daughter cell size depends on the forms of cell divisions. Based on this, we show that gametogenesis in the marine green alga, Monostroma angicava, exhibits equal size cell divisions. The variance and the mean of gamete size (volume) of each mating type measured agree closely with the prediction from synchronized equal size cell divisions. Gamete size actually takes only discrete values here. This is a key theoretical assumption made to explain the diversified evolution of isogamy and anisogamy in marine green algae. Our results suggest that germ cells adopt equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis. PMID:26333414

  17. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  18. Cell division resets polarity and motility for the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Cameron W; Madukoma, Chinedu S; Mahserejian, Shant; Alber, Mark S; Shrout, Joshua D

    2014-11-01

    Links between cell division and other cellular processes are poorly understood. It is difficult to simultaneously examine division and function in most cell types. Most of the research probing aspects of cell division has experimented with stationary or immobilized cells or distinctly asymmetrical cells. Here we took an alternative approach by examining cell division events within motile groups of cells growing on solid medium by time-lapse microscopy. A total of 558 cell divisions were identified among approximately 12,000 cells. We found an interconnection of division, motility, and polarity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. For every division event, motile cells stop moving to divide. Progeny cells of binary fission subsequently move in opposing directions. This behavior involves M. xanthus Frz proteins that regulate M. xanthus motility reversals but is independent of type IV pilus "S motility." The inheritance of opposing polarity is correlated with the distribution of the G protein RomR within these dividing cells. The constriction at the point of division limits the intracellular distribution of RomR. Thus, the asymmetric distribution of RomR at the parent cell poles becomes mirrored at new poles initiated at the site of division.

  19. Circadian Clock, Cell Division, and Cancer: From Molecules to Organism

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Anton

    2017-01-01

    As a response to environmental changes driven by the Earth’s axial rotation, most organisms evolved an internal biological timer—the so called circadian clock—which regulates physiology and behavior in a rhythmic fashion. Emerging evidence suggests an intimate interplay between the circadian clock and another fundamental rhythmic process, the cell cycle. However, the precise mechanisms of this connection are not fully understood. Disruption of circadian rhythms has a profound impact on cell division and cancer development and, vice versa, malignant transformation causes disturbances of the circadian clock. Conventional knowledge attributes tumor suppressor properties to the circadian clock. However, this implication might be context-dependent, since, under certain conditions, the clock can also promote tumorigenesis. Therefore, a better understanding of the molecular links regulating the physiological balance between the two cycles will have potential significance for the treatment of cancer and associated disorders. PMID:28425940

  20. Circadian Clock, Cell Division, and Cancer: From Molecules to Organism.

    PubMed

    Shostak, Anton

    2017-04-20

    As a response to environmental changes driven by the Earth's axial rotation, most organisms evolved an internal biological timer-the so called circadian clock-which regulates physiology and behavior in a rhythmic fashion. Emerging evidence suggests an intimate interplay between the circadian clock and another fundamental rhythmic process, the cell cycle. However, the precise mechanisms of this connection are not fully understood. Disruption of circadian rhythms has a profound impact on cell division and cancer development and, vice versa, malignant transformation causes disturbances of the circadian clock. Conventional knowledge attributes tumor suppressor properties to the circadian clock. However, this implication might be context-dependent, since, under certain conditions, the clock can also promote tumorigenesis. Therefore, a better understanding of the molecular links regulating the physiological balance between the two cycles will have potential significance for the treatment of cancer and associated disorders.

  1. Neurochemical properties of the synapses between the parabrachial nucleus-derived CGRP-positive axonal terminals and the GABAergic neurons in the lateral capsular division of central nucleus of amygdala.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya-Cheng; Chen, Yan-Zhou; Wei, Yan-Yan; He, Xiao-Tao; Li, Xia; Hu, Wei; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Wang, Wen; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Dong, Yu-Lin

    2015-02-01

    The lateral capsular division of central nucleus of amygdala (CeC) contains neurons using γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as the predominant neurotransmitter and expresses abundant calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive terminals. However, the relationship between them has not been revealed yet. Using GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mouse, we investigated the neurochemical features of synapses between CGRP-positive terminals and GABAergic neurons within CeC and the potential involvement of CGRP1 receptor by combining fluorescent in situ hybridization for CGRP1 receptor mRNA with immunofluorescent histochemistry for GFP and CGRP. The ultrastructures of these synapses were investigated with pre-embedding electron microscopy for GFP and CGRP. We found that some GABAergic neurons in the CeC received parabrachial nucleus (PBN) derived CGRP innervations and some of these GABAergic neurons can be activated by subcutaneous injection of formalin. Moreover, more than 90 % GABAergic neurons innervated by CGRP-positive terminal also express CGRP1 receptor mRNA. The CGRP-positive fibers made symmetric synapses onto the GABAergic somata, and asymmetric synapses onto the GABA-LI dendritic shafts and spines. This study provides direct ultrastructural evidences for the synaptic contacts between CGRP-positive terminals and GABAergic neurons within the CeC, which may underlie the pain-related neural pathway from PBN to CeC and be involved in the chronic pain modulation.

  2. Identification of Salmonella functions critical for bacterial cell division within eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Henry, T; García-Del Portillo, F; Gorvel, J P

    2005-04-01

    Salmonella typhimurium multiplication inside eukaryotic host cells is critical for virulence. Salmonella typhimurium strain SL1344 appears as filaments upon growth in macrophages and MelJuSo cells, a human melanoma cell line, indicating a specific blockage in the bacterial cell division process. Several studies have investigated the host cell response impairing bacterial division. However, none looked at the bacterial factors involved in inhibition of Salmonella division inside eukaryotic cells. We show here that blockage in the bacterial division process is sulA-independent and takes place after FtsZ-ring assembly. Salmonella typhimurium genes in which mutations lead to filamentous growth within host cells were identified by a large scale mutagenesis approach on strain 12023, revealing bacterial functions crucial for cell division within eukaryotic cells. We finally demonstrate that SL1344 filamentation is a result of hisG mutation, requires the activity of an enzyme of the histidine biosynthetic pathway HisFH and is specific for the vacuolar environment.

  3. Effect of Ethylene on Cell Division and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Pisum sativum1

    PubMed Central

    Apelbaum, Akiva; Burg, Stanley P.

    1972-01-01

    Ethylene and supraoptimal levels of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid inhibit the growth of the apical hook region of etiolated Pisum sativum (var. Alaska) seedlings by stopping almost all cell divisions. Cells are prevented from entering prophase. The hormones also retard cell division in intact root tips and completely stop the process in lateral buds. The latter inhibition is reversed partially by benzyl adenine. In root tips and the stem plumular and subhook regions, ethylene inhibits DNA synthesis. The magnitude of this inhibition is correlated with the degree of repression of cell division in meristematic tissue, suggesting that the effect on cell division results from a lack of DNA synthesis. Ethylene inhibits cell division within a few hours with a dose-response curve similar to that for most other actions of the gas. Experiments with seedlings grown under hypobaric conditions suggest that the gas naturally controls plumular expansion and cell division in the apical region. Images PMID:16658105

  4. Difference in Energy Metabolism of Annulus Fibrosus and Nucleus Pulposus Cells of the Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Jessica Czamanski; Yuan, Tai Yi; Fernando, Hanan; Castillo, Andre; Gu, Wei Yong; Cheung, Herman S.; Huant, C.-Y. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with intervertebral disc degeneration. One of the main signs of degeneration is the inability to maintain extracellular matrix integrity. Extracellular matrix synthesis is closely related to production of adenosine triphosphate (i.e. energy) of the cells. The intervertebral disc is composed of two major anatomical regions: annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, which are structurally and compositionally different, indicating that their cellular metabolisms may also be distinct. The objective of this study was to investigate energy metabolism of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus cells with and without dynamic compression, and examine differences between the two cell types. Porcine annulus and nucleus tissues were harvested and enzymatically digested. Cells were isolated and embedded into agarose constructs. Dynamically loaded samples were subjected to a sinusoidal displacement at 2 Hz and 15% strain for 4 h. Energy metabolism of cells was analyzed by measuring adenosine triphosphate content and release, glucose consumption, and lactate/nitric oxide production. A comparison of those measurements between annulus and nucleus cells was conducted. Annulus and nucleus cells exhibited different metabolic pathways. Nucleus cells had higher adenosine triphosphate content with and without dynamic loading, while annulus cells had higher lactate production and glucose consumption. Compression increased adenosine triphosphate release from both cell types and increased energy production of annulus cells. Dynamic loading affected energy metabolism of intervertebral disc cells, with the effect being greater in annulus cells. PMID:21625336

  5. Bradykinin promotes neuron-generating division of neural progenitor cells through ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Pillat, Micheli M; Lameu, Claudiana; Trujillo, Cleber A; Glaser, Talita; Cappellari, Angélica R; Negraes, Priscilla D; Battastini, Ana M O; Schwindt, Telma T; Muotri, Alysson R; Ulrich, Henning

    2016-09-15

    During brain development, cells proliferate, migrate and differentiate in highly accurate patterns. In this context, published results indicate that bradykinin functions in neural fate determination, favoring neurogenesis and migration. However, mechanisms underlying bradykinin function are yet to be explored. Our findings indicate a previously unidentified role for bradykinin action in inducing neuron-generating division in vitro and in vivo, given that bradykinin lengthened the G1-phase of the neural progenitor cells (NPC) cycle and increased TIS21 (also known as PC3 and BTG2) expression in hippocampus from newborn mice. This role, triggered by activation of the kinin-B2 receptor, was conditioned by ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analysis of hippocampal dentate gyrus showed that the percentage of Ki67(+) cells markedly increased in bradykinin-treated mice, and ERK1/2 inhibition affected this neurogenic response. The progress of neurogenesis depended on sustained ERK phosphorylation and resulted in ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus in NPCs and PC12 cells, changing expression of genes such as Hes1 and Ngn2 (also known as Neurog2). In agreement with the function of ERK in integrating signaling pathways, effects of bradykinin in stimulating neurogenesis were reversed following removal of protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated sustained phosphorylation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. A bushy cell network in the rat ventral cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Nieto, Ricardo; Rubio, Maria E.

    2010-01-01

    Geometry of the dendritic tree and synaptic organization of afferent inputs are essential factors in determining how synaptic input is integrated by neurons. This information remains elusive for one of the first brainstem neurons involved in processing of the primary auditory signal from the ear, the bushy cells (BCs) of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). Here, we labeled the BC dendritic trees with retrograde tracing techniques to analyze their geometry and synaptic organization after immunofluorescence for excitatory and inhibitory synaptic markers, electron microscopy, morphometry, double tract-tracing methods, and 3-D reconstructions. Our study revealed that BC dendrites provide space for a large number of compartmentalized excitatory and inhibitory synaptic interactions. The dendritic inputs on BCs are of cochlear and non-cochlear origin, and their proportion and distribution are dependent on the branching pattern and orientation of the dendritic tree in the VCN. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed that BC dendrites branch and cluster with those of other BCs in the core of the VCN. Within the cluster, incoming synaptic inputs establish divergent multiple-contact synapses (dyads and triads) between BCs. Furthermore, neuron-neuron connections including puncta adherentia, sarcoplasmic junctions and gap junctions are common between BCs, which suggests that these neurons are electrically coupled. Together, our study demonstrates the existence of a BC network in the rat VCN. This network may establish the neuroanatomical basis for acoustic information processing by individual BCs, as well as for enhanced synchronization of the output signal of the VCN. PMID:19634178

  7. Modeling diffusional transport in the interphase cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wedemeier, Annika; Merlitz, Holger; Wu, Chen-Xu; Langowski, Jörg

    2007-07-28

    In this paper a lattice model for the diffusional transport of particles in the interphase cell nucleus is proposed. Dense networks of chromatin fibers are created by three different methods: Randomly distributed, noninterconnected obstacles, a random walk chain model, and a self-avoiding random walk chain model with persistence length. By comparing a discrete and a continuous version of the random walk chain model, we demonstrate that lattice discretization does not alter particle diffusion. The influence of the three dimensional geometry of the fiber network on the particle diffusion is investigated in detail while varying the occupation volume, chain length, persistence length, and walker size. It is shown that adjacency of the monomers, the excluded volume effect incorporated in the self-avoiding random walk model, and, to a lesser extent, the persistence length affect particle diffusion. It is demonstrated how the introduction of the effective chain occupancy, which is a convolution of the geometric chain volume with the walker size, eliminates the conformational effects of the network on the diffusion, i.e., when plotting the diffusion coefficient as a function of the effective chain volume, the data fall onto a master curve.

  8. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  9. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria. PMID:27066186

  10. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  11. Evidence of asymmetric cell division and centrosome inheritance in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2012-10-30

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is believed to be a physiological event that occurs during development and tissue homeostasis in a large variety of organisms. ACD produces two unequal daughter cells, one of which resembles a multipotent stem and/or progenitor cell, whereas the other has potential for differentiation. Although recent studies have shown that the balance between self-renewal and differentiation potentials is precisely controlled and that alterations in the balance may lead to tumorigenesis in Drosophila neuroblasts, it is largely unknown whether human cancer cells directly show ACD in an evolutionarily conserved manner. Here, we show that the conserved polarity/spindle protein NuMA is preferentially localized to one side of the cell cortex during cell division, generating unequal inheritance of fate-altering molecules in human neuroblastoma cell lines. We also show that the cells with a single copy of MYCN showed significantly higher percentages of ACD than those with MYCN amplification. Moreover, suppression of MYCN in MYCN-amplified cells caused ACD, whereas expression of MYCN in MYCN-nonamplified cells enhanced symmetric cell division. Furthermore, we demonstrate that centrosome inheritance follows a definite rule in ACD: The daughter centrosome with younger mother centriole is inherited to the daughter cell with NuMA preferentially localized to the cell cortex, whereas the mother centrosome with the older mother centriole migrates to the other daughter cell. Thus, the mechanisms of cell division of ACD or symmetric cell division and centrosome inheritance are recapitulated in human cancer cells, and these findings may facilitate studies on cancer stem cells.

  12. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: Aberrant cellular division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, T.K.; Derby, M.; Martin, D.F.; Wright, S.D.; Dao, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells.

  13. Celebrating Soft Matter's 10th Anniversary: Cell division: a source of active stress in cellular monolayers.

    PubMed

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P; Saw, Thuan B; Lim, Chwee T; Ladoux, Benoit; Yeomans, Julia M

    2015-10-07

    We introduce the notion of cell division-induced activity and show that the cell division generates extensile forces and drives dynamical patterns in cell assemblies. Extending the hydrodynamic models of lyotropic active nematics we describe turbulent-like velocity fields that are generated by the cell division in a confluent monolayer of cells. We show that the experimentally measured flow field of dividing Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells is reproduced by our modeling approach. Division-induced activity acts together with intrinsic activity of the cells in extensile and contractile cell assemblies to change the flow and director patterns and the density of topological defects. Finally we model the evolution of the boundary of a cellular colony and compare the fingering instabilities induced by cell division to experimental observations on the expansion of MDCK cell cultures.

  14. Treadmilling by FtsZ filaments drives peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Bisson-Filho, Alexandre W; Hsu, Yen-Pang; Squyres, Georgia R; Kuru, Erkin; Wu, Fabai; Jukes, Calum; Sun, Yingjie; Dekker, Cees; Holden, Seamus; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; Brun, Yves V; Garner, Ethan C

    2017-02-17

    The mechanism by which bacteria divide is not well understood. Cell division is mediated by filaments of FtsZ and FtsA (FtsAZ) that recruit septal peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes to the division site. To understand how these components coordinate to divide cells, we visualized their movements relative to the dynamics of cell wall synthesis during cytokinesis. We found that the division septum was built at discrete sites that moved around the division plane. FtsAZ filaments treadmilled circumferentially around the division ring and drove the motions of the peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes. The FtsZ treadmilling rate controlled both the rate of peptidoglycan synthesis and cell division. Thus, FtsZ treadmilling guides the progressive insertion of new cell wall by building increasingly smaller concentric rings of peptidoglycan to divide the cell.

  15. Long-range ordered vorticity patterns in living tissue induced by cell division.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Ninna S; Tarp, Jens M; Mathiesen, Joachim; Jensen, Mogens H; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-12-08

    In healthy blood vessels with a laminar blood flow, the endothelial cell division rate is low, only sufficient to replace apoptotic cells. The division rate significantly increases during embryonic development and under halted or turbulent flow. Cells in barrier tissue are connected and their motility is highly correlated. Here we investigate the long-range dynamics induced by cell division in an endothelial monolayer under non-flow conditions, mimicking the conditions during vessel formation or around blood clots. Cell divisions induce long-range, well-ordered vortex patterns extending several cell diameters away from the division site, in spite of the system's low Reynolds number. Our experimental results are reproduced by a hydrodynamic continuum model simulating division as a local pressure increase corresponding to a local tension decrease. Such long-range physical communication may be crucial for embryonic development and for healing tissue, for instance around blood clots.

  16. Long-range ordered vorticity patterns in living tissue induced by cell division

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Ninna S.; Tarp, Jens M.; Mathiesen, Joachim; Jensen, Mogens H.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy blood vessels with a laminar blood flow, the endothelial cell division rate is low, only sufficient to replace apoptotic cells. The division rate significantly increases during embryonic development and under halted or turbulent flow. Cells in barrier tissue are connected and their motility is highly correlated. Here we investigate the long-range dynamics induced by cell division in an endothelial monolayer under non-flow conditions, mimicking the conditions during vessel formation or around blood clots. Cell divisions induce long-range, well-ordered vortex patterns extending several cell diameters away from the division site, in spite of the system’s low Reynolds number. Our experimental results are reproduced by a hydrodynamic continuum model simulating division as a local pressure increase corresponding to a local tension decrease. Such long-range physical communication may be crucial for embryonic development and for healing tissue, for instance around blood clots. PMID:25483750

  17. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Philipp; Pagano, Michele

    2006-04-03

    Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  18. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  19. Disruption of the keratin filament network during epithelial cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, E B; Goodman, S L; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of keratin filaments during cell division was examined in a wide range of epithelial lines from several species. Almost half of them show keratin disruption as described previously: by immunofluorescence, filaments are replaced during mitosis by a 'speckled' pattern of discrete cytoplasmic dots. In the electron microscope these ' speckles ' are seen as granules around the cell periphery, just below the actin cortical mesh, with no detectable 10 nm filament structure inside them and no keratin filament bundles in the rest of the cytoplasm. A time course of the filament reorganization was constructed from double immunofluorescence data; filaments are disrupted in prophase, and the filament network is intact again by cytokinesis. The phenomenon is restricted to cells rich in keratin filaments, such as keratinocytes; it is unrelated to the co-existence of vimentin in many of these cells, and vimentin is generally maintained as filaments while the keratin is restructured. Some resistance to the effect may be conferred by an extended cycle time. Filament reorganization takes place within minutes, so that a reversible mechanism seems more likely than one involving de novo protein synthesis, at this metabolically quiet stage of the cell cycle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6202508

  20. Planar multipolar cells in the cochlear nucleus project to medial olivocochlear neurons in mouse.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Keith N; Benson, Thane E; Brown, M Christian

    2012-05-01

    Medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons originate in the superior olivary complex and project to the cochlea, where they act to reduce the effects of noise masking and protect the cochlea from damage. MOC neurons respond to sound via a reflex pathway; however, in this pathway the cochlear nucleus cell type that provides input to MOC neurons is not known. We investigated whether multipolar cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus have projections to MOC neurons by labeling them with injections into the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The projections of one type of labeled multipolar cell, planar neurons, were traced into the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, where they were observed terminating on MOC neurons (labeled in some cases by a second cochlear injection of FluoroGold). These terminations formed what appear to be excitatory synapses, i.e., containing small, round vesicles and prominent postsynaptic densities. These data suggest that cochlear nucleus planar multipolar neurons drive the MOC neuron's response to sound.

  1. Towards an integrated understanding of the structure and mechanics of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rowat, Amy C; Lammerding, Jan; Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli

    2008-03-01

    Changes in the shape and structural organization of the cell nucleus occur during many fundamental processes including development, differentiation and aging. In many of these processes, the cell responds to physical forces by altering gene expression within the nucleus. How the nucleus itself senses and responds to such mechanical cues is not well understood. In addition to these external forces, epigenetic modifications of chromatin structure inside the nucleus could also alter its physical properties. To achieve a better understanding, we need to elucidate the relationship between nuclear structure and material properties. Recently, new approaches have been developed to systematically investigate nuclear mechanical properties. These experiments provide important new insights into the disease mechanism of a growing class of tissue-specific disorders termed 'nuclear envelopathies'. Here we review our current understanding of what determines the shape and mechanical properties of the cell nucleus.

  2. Division of shape-standardized tobacco cells reveals a limit to the occurrence of single-criterion-based selection of the plane of symmetric division.

    PubMed

    Asada, Tetsuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The plane of symmetric plant cell division tends to be selected so that the new cross-wall halving the cell volume has the least possible area, and several cases of such selection are best represented by a recently formulated model which promotes the view that the strength of the least area tendency is the only criterion for selecting the plane. To test this model, the present study examined the divisions of two types of shape-standardized tobacco BY-2 cell, oblate-spheroidal (os) cells prepared from protoplasts and spheri-cylindrical (sc) cells with unusual double-wall structures prepared from plasmolyzed cells. Measurements of cell shape parameters and division angles revealed that both cell types most frequently divide nearly along their short axes. While os cells did not exhibit any other division angle bias, sc cell division was characterized by another bias which made the frequency of longitudinal divisions secondarily high. The geometry of sc cells barely allows the longitudinal cross-walls to have locally minimum areas. Nevertheless, a comparison of detected and hypothetical standard divisions indicates that the frequency of longitudinal sc cell division can be significantly higher than that predicted when the longitudinal cross-walls are assumed to have locally minimum areas smaller than their original areas. These results suggest that, even in isolated plant cell types, the strength of the least area tendency is not the only criterion for selecting the division plane. The possibility that there is another basic, though often hidden, criterion is discussed.

  3. Hoechst tagging: a modular strategy to design synthetic fluorescent probes for live-cell nucleus imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Takigawa, Kazumasa; Kurishita, Yasutaka; Kuwata, Keiko; Ishida, Manabu; Shimoda, Yasushi; Hamachi, Itaru; Tsukiji, Shinya

    2014-06-11

    We report a general strategy to create small-molecule fluorescent probes for the nucleus in living cells. Our strategy is based on the attachment of the DNA-binding Hoechst compound to a fluorophore of interest. Using this approach, simple fluorescein, BODIPY, and rhodamine dyes were readily converted to novel turn-on fluorescent nucleus-imaging probes.

  4. Synchronization of Green Algae by Light and Dark Regimes for Cell Cycle and Cell Division Studies.

    PubMed

    Hlavová, Monika; Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    A synchronous population of cells is one of the prerequisites for studying cell cycle processes such as DNA replication, nuclear and cellular division. Green algae dividing by multiple fission represent a unique single cell system enabling the preparation of highly synchronous cultures by application of a light-dark regime similar to what they experience in nature. This chapter provides detailed protocols for synchronization of different algal species by alternating light-dark cycles; all critical points are discussed extensively. Moreover, detailed information on basic analysis of cell cycle progression in such cultures is presented, including analyses of nuclear, cellular, and chloroplast divisions. Modifications of basic protocols that enable changes in cell cycle progression are also suggested so that nuclear or chloroplast divisions can be followed separately.

  5. From HeLa cell division to infectious diarrhoea

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, J.; Osborne, M.P.; Spencer, A.J.; Warley, A. )

    1990-09-01

    Hela S3 cells were grown in suspension both randomly and, synchronously using hydroxyurea which blocks cells at the G1/S interface. Cryosections were prepared, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. As cells moved into S and through M phases (Na) and (Cl) increased; both returned to normal levels upon re-entering G1 phase. The Na/K ratio was 1:1 in G1 phase. Infection of HeLa S3 cells in G1 phase with vaccinia virus resulted in no change in intracellular (Na). Infection of neonatal mice with murine rotavirus was localized to villus tip enterocytes and gave rise to diarrhoea which was maximal at 72h post-infection (p.i.). Diarrhoea was preceded by ischemia of villi (18-42h p.i.) and villus shortening (maximal at 42h p.i.), and was also coincident with a dramatic regrowth of villi. At 48h p.i. a proliferative zone of electron lucent cells was observed in villus base regions. Cryosections of infected gut, taken before, during, and after infection, together with corresponding age-matched controls, were freeze-dried and analysed by X-ray microanalysis. At 48h p.i. electron lucent villus base cells were shown to be more hydrated, and, to contain higher levels of both Na and Cl and lower levels of P, S, K and Mg than corresponding control cells. These studies increase confidence in the use of X-ray microanalysis in studying biological systems, provide some insight into the process of cell division, and constitute the basis of a new concept of diarrhoeal secretion.27 references.

  6. Localization to the Nucleolus Is a Common Feature of Coronavirus Nucleoproteins, and the Protein May Disrupt Host Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Torsten; Chen, Hongying; Hodgson, Teri; Britton, Paul; Brooks, Gavin; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2001-01-01

    The subcellular localization of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) (group I and group II coronaviruses, respectively) nucleoproteins (N proteins) were examined by confocal microscopy. The proteins were shown to localize either to the cytoplasm alone or to the cytoplasm and a structure in the nucleus. This feature was confirmed to be the nucleolus by using specific antibodies to nucleolin, a major component of the nucleolus, and by confocal microscopy to image sections through a cell expressing N protein. These findings are consistent with our previous report for infectious bronchitis virus (group III coronavirus) (J. A. Hiscox et al., J. Virol. 75:506–512, 2001), indicating that nucleolar localization of the N protein is a common feature of the coronavirus family and is possibly of functional significance. Nucleolar localization signals were identified in the domain III region of the N protein from all three coronavirus groups, and this suggested that transport of N protein to the nucleus might be an active process. In addition, our results suggest that the N protein might function to disrupt cell division. Thus, we observed that approximately 30% of cells transfected with the N protein appeared to be undergoing cell division. The most likely explanation for this is that the N protein induced a cell cycle delay or arrest, most likely in the G2/M phase. In a fraction of transfected cells expressing coronavirus N proteins, we observed multinucleate cells and dividing cells with nucleoli (which are only present during interphase). These findings are consistent with the possible inhibition of cytokinesis in these cells. PMID:11533198

  7. RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED1 Regulates Asymmetric Cell Divisions in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Annika K.; Nowack, Moritz K.; Bouyer, Daniel; Zhao, Xin’Ai; Harashima, Hirofumi; Naseer, Sadaf; De Winter, Freya; Dissmeyer, Nico; Geldner, Niko; Schnittger, Arp

    2012-01-01

    Formative, also called asymmetric, cell divisions produce daughter cells with different identities. Like other divisions, formative divisions rely first of all on the cell cycle machinery with centrally acting cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cyclin partners to control progression through the cell cycle. However, it is still largely obscure how developmental cues are translated at the cellular level to promote asymmetric divisions. Here, we show that formative divisions in the shoot and root of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are controlled by a common mechanism that relies on the activity level of the Cdk1 homolog CDKA;1, with medium levels being sufficient for symmetric divisions but high levels being required for formative divisions. We reveal that the function of CDKA;1 in asymmetric cell divisions operates through a transcriptional regulation system that is mediated by the Arabidopsis Retinoblastoma homolog RBR1. RBR1 regulates not only cell cycle genes, but also, independent of the cell cycle transcription factor E2F, genes required for formative divisions and cell fate acquisition, thus directly linking cell proliferation with differentiation. This mechanism allows the implementation of spatial information, in the form of high kinase activity, with intracellular gating of developmental decisions. PMID:23104828

  8. Emergence of homeostatic epithelial packing and stress dissipation through divisions oriented along the long cell axis

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Tom P. J.; Harris, Andrew R.; Lam, Maxine; Cheng, Qian; Bellis, Julien; Dimitracopoulos, Andrea; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Charras, Guillaume T.; Baum, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    Cell division plays an important role in animal tissue morphogenesis, which depends, critically, on the orientation of divisions. In isolated adherent cells, the orientation of mitotic spindles is sensitive to interphase cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. In epithelia, the relative importance of these two factors is challenging to assess. To do this, we used suspended monolayers devoid of ECM, where divisions become oriented following a stretch, allowing the regulation and function of epithelial division orientation in stress relaxation to be characterized. Using this system, we found that divisions align better with the long, interphase cell axis than with the monolayer stress axis. Nevertheless, because the application of stretch induces a global realignment of interphase long axes along the direction of extension, this is sufficient to bias the orientation of divisions in the direction of stretch. Each division redistributes the mother cell mass along the axis of division. Thus, the global bias in division orientation enables cells to act collectively to redistribute mass along the axis of stretch, helping to return the monolayer to its resting state. Further, this behavior could be quantitatively reproduced using a model designed to assess the impact of autonomous changes in mitotic cell mechanics within a stretched monolayer. In summary, the propensity of cells to divide along their long axis preserves epithelial homeostasis by facilitating both stress relaxation and isotropic growth without the need for cells to read or transduce mechanical signals. PMID:25908119

  9. The length-response properties of cells in the feline perigeniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jones, H E; Sillito, A M

    1994-07-01

    Perigeniculate cells receive visual input from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and from the visual cortex. In contrast to the extensive literature documenting dLGN and cortical cell responses, comparatively little quantitative data exists for perigeniculate nucleus cells, and very little is known about the role of the corticofugal input to the perigeniculate nucleus. We have previously shown that dLGN relay cells have sharply length-tuned receptive fields and that a significant component of this is dependent on the corticofugal system. In this report, we have explored the length-response properties of perigeniculate nucleus cells in the presence and absence of corticofugal feedback. The response profiles of most perigeniculate nucleus cells contrasted markedly with the sharply length-tuned fields of dLGN cells, but exhibited a notable resemblance to those exhibited by VI cells with short summation lengths, which have recently been shown to constitute a considerable proportion of the layer VI cell population. This might suggest that the responses of perigeniculate nucleus cells to long bars derive from their cortical input. However, our data failed to reveal a discernible change in their profiles after removal of the corticofugal drive. This surprising observation implies that their length-tuning profiles follow from subcortical circuitry. The ways in which this might occur are discussed.

  10. SOS-independent coupling between DNA replication and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffé, A; D'Ari, R; Norris, V

    1986-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA synthesis in Escherichia coli mutants in which the SOS-dependent division inhibitors SfiA and SfiC were unable to operate led to a partial arrest of cell division. This SOS-independent mechanism coupling DNA replication and cell division was characterized with respect to residual division, particle number, and DNA content. Whether DNA replication was blocked in the initiation or the elongation step, numerous normal-sized anucleate cells were produced (not minicells or filaments). Their production was used to evaluate the efficiency of this coupling mechanism, which seems to involve the cell division protein FtsZ (SulB), also known to be the target of the division inhibitors SfiA and SfiC. In the absence of DNA synthesis, the efficiency of coupling was modulated by the cyclic-AMP-cyclic-AMP receptor protein complex, which was required for anucleate cell production. Images PMID:3001034

  11. Physical Description of Mitotic Spindle Orientation During Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Bornens, Michel; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During cell division, the duplicated chromosomes are physically separated by the action of the mitotic spindle. The spindle is a dynamic structure of the cytoskeleton, which consists of two microtubule asters. Its orientation defines the axis along which the cell divides. Recent experiments show that the spindle orientation depends on the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites. Here we show that the experimentally observed spindle orientation can be understood as the result of the action of cortical force generators acting on the spindle. We assume that the local activity of force generators is controlled by the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites determined by the particular geometry of the adhesive substrate. We develop a simple physical description of the spindle mechanics, which allows us to calculate the torque acting on the spindle, as well as the energy profile and the angular distribution of spindle orientation. Our model accounts for the preferred spindle orientation, as well as the full shape of the angular distributions of spindle orientation observed in a large variety of pattern geometries. M. Th'ery, A. Jim'enez-Dalmaroni, et al., Nature 447, 493 (2007).

  12. Identification of different subsets of lung cells using Raman microspectroscopy and whole cell nucleus isolation.

    PubMed

    Pijanka, Jacek K; Stone, Nicholas; Rutter, Abigail V; Forsyth, Nicholas; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Yang, Ying; Sulé-Suso, Josep

    2013-09-07

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used to study its possible clinical application in cancer diagnosis. However, in order to make it into clinical practice, it is important that this technique is able not only to identify cancer cells from their normal counterparts, but also from the array of cells present in human tissues. To this purpose, we used Raman spectroscopy to assess whether this technique was able to differentiate not only between lung cancer cells and lung epithelial cells but also from lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, we studied whether the differences were due to cell lineage (epithelial versus fibroblast) or to different proliferative characteristics of cells, and where in the cell compartment these differences might reside. To answer these questions we studied cell cytoplasm, cell nucleus and isolated whole cell nuclei. Our data suggests that Raman spectroscopy can differentiate between lung cancer, lung epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts. More important, it can also differentiate between 2 cells from the same lineage (fibroblast) but with one of them rendered immortal and with an increased proliferative activity. Finally, it seems that the main spectral differences reside in the cell nucleus and that the study of isolated nuclei strengthens the differences between cells.

  13. Arginine methylation regulates antibody responses through modulating cell division and isotype switching in B cells.

    PubMed

    Hata, Kikumi; Mizuguchi, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles, including signal transduction, transcriptional control, cell proliferation and/or differentiation. B cells undergo clonal division, isotype switching and differentiate into antibody forming cells following stimulation with Toll-like receptor-ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and T cell-derived signals, including CD40-ligand (CD40-L) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). Whether protein arginine methylation affects B cell division and/or isotype switching to IgG1 in response to LPS, IL-4, and CD40-L was examined using the arginine methyl transferase inhibitor adenosine-2',3'-dialdehyde (AdOx). Addition of AdOx substantially reduced the number of division cycles of stimulated B cells, whereas cell viability remained intact. Upon stimulation with LPS/IL-4/CD40-L, the proportion of surface IgG1 positive cells in each division cycle was slightly diminished by AdOx. However, the degree of expression of γ1 germ line transcript and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L were unaffected by addition of AdOx, suggesting that AdOx influences class switch recombination independent of AID expression through transcriptional control. Taken together, arginine methylation appears to be involved in B cell isotype switching, as well as in clonal expansion of B cells in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L.

  14. Differentiated melanocyte cell division occurs in vivo and is promoted by mutations in Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kerrie L.; Lister, James A.; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Ishizaki, Hironori; Anderson, Caroline; Kelsh, Robert N.; Jackson, Ian J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for tissue formation, repair and regeneration. Some tissues, such as skin and blood, depend on differentiation of a pluripotent stem cell population, whereas others depend on the division of differentiated cells. In development and in the hair follicle, pigmented melanocytes are derived from undifferentiated precursor cells or stem cells. However, differentiated melanocytes may also have proliferative capacity in animals, and the potential for differentiated melanocyte cell division in development and regeneration remains largely unexplored. Here, we use time-lapse imaging of the developing zebrafish to show that while most melanocytes arise from undifferentiated precursor cells, an unexpected subpopulation of differentiated melanocytes arises by cell division. Depletion of the overall melanocyte population triggers a regeneration phase in which differentiated melanocyte division is significantly enhanced, particularly in young differentiated melanocytes. Additionally, we find reduced levels of Mitf activity using an mitfa temperature-sensitive line results in a dramatic increase in differentiated melanocyte cell division. This supports models that in addition to promoting differentiation, Mitf also promotes withdrawal from the cell cycle. We suggest differentiated cell division is relevant to melanoma progression because the human melanoma mutation MITF4TΔ2B promotes increased and serial differentiated melanocyte division in zebrafish. These results reveal a novel pathway of differentiated melanocyte division in vivo, and that Mitf activity is essential for maintaining cell cycle arrest in differentiated melanocytes. PMID:21771814

  15. Differentiated melanocyte cell division occurs in vivo and is promoted by mutations in Mitf.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kerrie L; Lister, James A; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Ishizaki, Hironori; Anderson, Caroline; Kelsh, Robert N; Jackson, Ian J; Patton, E Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for tissue formation, repair and regeneration. Some tissues, such as skin and blood, depend on differentiation of a pluripotent stem cell population, whereas others depend on the division of differentiated cells. In development and in the hair follicle, pigmented melanocytes are derived from undifferentiated precursor cells or stem cells. However, differentiated melanocytes may also have proliferative capacity in animals, and the potential for differentiated melanocyte cell division in development and regeneration remains largely unexplored. Here, we use time-lapse imaging of the developing zebrafish to show that while most melanocytes arise from undifferentiated precursor cells, an unexpected subpopulation of differentiated melanocytes arises by cell division. Depletion of the overall melanocyte population triggers a regeneration phase in which differentiated melanocyte division is significantly enhanced, particularly in young differentiated melanocytes. Additionally, we find reduced levels of Mitf activity using an mitfa temperature-sensitive line results in a dramatic increase in differentiated melanocyte cell division. This supports models that in addition to promoting differentiation, Mitf also promotes withdrawal from the cell cycle. We suggest differentiated cell division is relevant to melanoma progression because the human melanoma mutation MITF(4T)(Δ)(2B) promotes increased and serial differentiated melanocyte division in zebrafish. These results reveal a novel pathway of differentiated melanocyte division in vivo, and that Mitf activity is essential for maintaining cell cycle arrest in differentiated melanocytes.

  16. Chemical divisions in the medial geniculate body and surrounding paralaminar nuclei of the rat: quantitative comparison of cell density, NADPH diaphorase, acetyl cholin esterase and basal expression of c-fos.

    PubMed

    Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E; Pérez-Villalba, Ana; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo

    2004-11-01

    Quantitative methods of cell density, the intensities of both acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd), as well as the basal expression of c-fos, have been carried out in order to study the anatomical divisions of the medial geniculate body (MGB) and the group of nuclei located ventromedially to the MGB called the paralaminar complex (PL). The MGB was composed of the dorsal (MGd), and the ventral (MGv) divisions. We included the medial, or the magnocellular division (MGm), in the PL complex. MGd was composed of a dorsolateral (DL) core and a belt. The belt was composed of the suprageniculate (SG), the deep dorsal (DD), the caudo-medial (CM) and the caudo-dorsal (CD) nuclei. In the MGv, the basal expression of c-fos was the only way to trace a clear boundary between the ovoid (Ov) and the ventrolateral (VL) divisions. However, the marginal zone (MZ) was clearly and contrastingly different. The PL was considered to be composed of: the MGm, the posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN), the peripeduncular nucleus (PP) and the nucleus subparafascicularis lateralis (SPFL). The MGm and the PIN share most of the chemical features, meanwhile both SPFL and PP displayed different patterns of NADPHd reactivity. The study of cell density on Giemsa stained sections confirmed main divisions of the area. AChE and NADPHd methods allowed the main MGB divisions to be discriminated. The differences between subdivisions were emphasized when cell density and c-fos activity were quantified in each nucleus. Each MGB division displayed a different pattern of c-fos activity under basal conditions. Thus, c-fos basal expression was a particular feature in each MGB or PL nucleus.

  17. Growth, Cell Division, and Fragmentation in a Species of Flexibacter

    PubMed Central

    Poos, Jocelyn C.; Turner, F. Rudolf; White, David; Simon, Gary D.; Bacon, Karen; Russell, Carl T.

    1972-01-01

    Flexibacter FS-1, a gram-negative gliding bacterium was grown in liquid culture as long (over 100-μm) filaments. The filaments possessed a triple-track wall which resembled that found in other gram-negative bacteria. Although phase-contrast microscopy indicated that the long filaments were nonseptate, electron microscopy revealed three or four septa along the length of each filament. The septa contained lysozyme-sensitive, electron-opaque material, presumed to be peptidoglycan, sandwiched between cell membranes. The outer triple track wall was not part of the septum. Mesosomes were seen in various areas of the cell and frequently were observed attached to septa in different stages of completion. Studies of the organism in slide culture revealed that individual filaments grew in an exponential fashion and divided in the middle despite the long length and multiseptate condition. When the temperature of a liquid culture growing exponentially with a generation time of 90 minutes was shifted from 30 to 35 C, the filaments fragmented into three or four shorter cells within 120 min. The short cells continued to grow exponentially at 35 C at approximately the same rate as at 30 C. When the culture was shifted back to 30 C, the cells immediately stopped dividing and began to elongate. After a period of 2 to 3 hr, cell division resumed. It is suggested that the shift-up in temperature induced the completion of the cross wall (centripetal growth of the triple-track wall) and cell separation at the sites of previously formed septa, whereas the shift-down in temperature caused a transient inhibition of cross-wall formation but not of growth. Fragmentation was inhibited by sodium azide but took place despite the inhibition of protein synthesis by chloramphenicol or the inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis by mitomycin C. Images PMID:4118297

  18. A plant cell division algorithm based on cell biomechanics and ellipse-fitting.

    PubMed

    Abera, Metadel K; Verboven, Pieter; Defraeye, Thijs; Fanta, Solomon Workneh; Hertog, Maarten L A T M; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart M

    2014-09-01

    The importance of cell division models in cellular pattern studies has been acknowledged since the 19th century. Most of the available models developed to date are limited to symmetric cell division with isotropic growth. Often, the actual growth of the cell wall is either not considered or is updated intermittently on a separate time scale to the mechanics. This study presents a generic algorithm that accounts for both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells with isotropic and anisotropic growth. Actual growth of the cell wall is simulated simultaneously with the mechanics. The cell is considered as a closed, thin-walled structure, maintained in tension by turgor pressure. The cell walls are represented as linear elastic elements that obey Hooke's law. Cell expansion is induced by turgor pressure acting on the yielding cell-wall material. A system of differential equations for the positions and velocities of the cell vertices as well as for the actual growth of the cell wall is established. Readiness to divide is determined based on cell size. An ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to determine the position and orientation of the dividing wall. The cell vertices, walls and cell connectivity are then updated and cell expansion resumes. Comparisons are made with experimental data from the literature. The generic plant cell division algorithm has been implemented successfully. It can handle both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells coupled with isotropic and anisotropic growth modes. Development of the algorithm highlighted the importance of ellipse-fitting to produce randomness (biological variability) even in symmetrically dividing cells. Unlike previous models, a differential equation is formulated for the resting length of the cell wall to simulate actual biological growth and is solved simultaneously with the position and velocity of the vertices. The algorithm presented can produce different tissues varying in topological and geometrical

  19. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-12-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic "rule breakers," control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals.

  20. Attributed relational graphs for cell nucleus segmentation in fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Salim; Ersahin, Tulin; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2013-06-01

    More rapid and accurate high-throughput screening in molecular cellular biology research has become possible with the development of automated microscopy imaging, for which cell nucleus segmentation commonly constitutes the core step. Although several promising methods exist for segmenting the nuclei of monolayer isolated and less-confluent cells, it still remains an open problem to segment the nuclei of more-confluent cells, which tend to grow in overlayers. To address this problem, we propose a new model-based nucleus segmentation algorithm. This algorithm models how a human locates a nucleus by identifying the nucleus boundaries and piecing them together. In this algorithm, we define four types of primitives to represent nucleus boundaries at different orientations and construct an attributed relational graph on the primitives to represent their spatial relations. Then, we reduce the nucleus identification problem to finding predefined structural patterns in the constructed graph and also use the primitives in region growing to delineate the nucleus borders. Working with fluorescence microscopy images, our experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm identifies nuclei better than previous nucleus segmentation algorithms.

  1. Dynamics of passive and active particles in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Feroz M; Rao, Madan; Shivashankar, G V

    2012-01-01

    Inspite of being embedded in a dense meshwork of nuclear chromatin, gene loci and large nuclear components are highly dynamic at 37°C. To understand this apparent unfettered movement in an overdense environment, we study the dynamics of a passive micron size bead in live cell nuclei at two different temperatures (25 and 37°C) with and without external force. In the absence of a force, the beads are caged over large time scales. On application of a threshold uniaxial force (about 10(2) pN), the passive beads appear to hop between cages; this large scale movement is absent upon ATP-depletion, inhibition of chromatin remodeling enzymes and RNAi of lamin B1 proteins. Our results suggest that the nucleus behaves like an active solid with a finite yield stress when probed at a micron scale. Spatial analysis of histone fluorescence anisotropy (a measure of local chromatin compaction, defined as the volume fraction of tightly bound chromatin) shows that the bead movement correlates with regions of low chromatin compaction. This suggests that the physical mechanism of the observed yielding is the active opening of free-volume in the nuclear solid via chromatin remodeling. Enriched transcription sites at 25°C also show caging in the absence of the applied force and directed movement beyond a yield stress, in striking contrast with the large scale movement of transcription loci at 37°C in the absence of a force. This suggests that at physiological temperatures, the loci behave as active particles which remodel the nuclear mesh and reduce the local yield stress.

  2. The reorientation of cell nucleus promotes the establishment of front-rear polarity in migrating fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maninová, Miloslava; Klímová, Zuzana; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2013-06-12

    The establishment of cell polarity is an essential step in the process of cell migration. This process requires precise spatiotemporal coordination of signaling pathways that in most cells create the typical asymmetrical profile of a polarized cell with nucleus located at the cell rear and the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) positioned between the nucleus and the leading edge. During cell polarization, nucleus rearward positioning promotes correct microtubule organizing center localization and thus the establishment of front-rear polarity and directional migration. We found that cell polarization and directional migration require also the reorientation of the nucleus. Nuclear reorientation is manifested as temporally restricted nuclear rotation that aligns the nuclear axis with the axis of cell migration. We also found that nuclear reorientation requires physical connection between the nucleus and cytoskeleton mediated by the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Nuclear reorientation is controlled by coordinated activity of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-mediated activation of GTPase Rho and the activation of integrin, FAK (focal adhesion kinase), Src, and p190RhoGAP signaling pathway. Integrin signaling is spatially induced at the leading edge as FAK and p190RhoGAP are predominantly activated or localized at this location. We suggest that integrin activation within lamellipodia defines cell front, and subsequent FAK, Src, and p190RhoGAP signaling represents the polarity signal that induces reorientation of the nucleus and thus promotes the establishment of front-rear polarity.

  3. A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Modell, Joshua W.; Kambara, Tracy K.; Perchuk, Barrett S.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  4. Chloroplast division checkpoint in eukaryotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont. It is believed that the synchronization of endosymbiotic and host cell division, as is commonly seen in existing algae, was a critical step in establishing the permanent organelle. Algal cells typically contain one or only a small number of chloroplasts that divide once per host cell cycle. This division is based partly on the S-phase–specific expression of nucleus-encoded proteins that constitute the chloroplast-division machinery. In this study, using the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, we show that cell-cycle progression is arrested at the prophase when chloroplast division is blocked before the formation of the chloroplast-division machinery by the overexpression of Filamenting temperature-sensitive (Fts) Z2-1 (Fts72-1), but the cell cycle progresses when chloroplast division is blocked during division-site constriction by the overexpression of either FtsZ2-1 or a dominant-negative form of dynamin-related protein 5B (DRP5B). In the cells arrested in the prophase, the increase in the cyclin B level and the migration of cyclin-dependent kinase B (CDKB) were blocked. These results suggest that chloroplast division restricts host cell-cycle progression so that the cell cycle progresses to the metaphase only when chloroplast division has commenced. Thus, chloroplast division and host cell-cycle progression are synchronized by an interactive restriction that takes place between the nucleus and the chloroplast. In addition, we observed a similar pattern of cell-cycle arrest upon the blockage of chloroplast division in the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa, raising the possibility that the chloroplast division checkpoint contributed to the establishment of the permanent organelle. PMID:27837024

  5. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    PubMed Central

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R.; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  6. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  7. Cell cycle and centromere FISH studies in premature centromere division.

    PubMed

    Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Salamanca-Gomez, Fabio; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Palomino-Cueva, Cesar; Garcia-Cobian, Teresa A; Corona-Rivera, Enrique

    2005-09-20

    Mitotic configurations consistent in split centromeres and splayed chromatids in all or most of the chromosomes or premature centromere division (PCD) have been described in three categories. (1) Low frequency of PCD observed in colchicines-treated lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. (2) High frequency of PCD with mosaic variegated aneuploidy. (3) High frequency of PCD as a sole chromosome abnormality observed in individuals with no recognizable clinical pattern. We report four members of a family with the third category of PCD. Cell cycle duration assessed by average generation time using differential sister chromatid stain analysis and FISH studies of DNA centromere sequences in PCD individuals, are included and compared with previously reported PCD individuals from 9 families. We observed PCD in colchicine-treated cultures from the propositus, his father, and two paternal aunts but not in his mother and four other paternal and maternal family members, as well as in untreated cultures from the propositus and his father. We observed cytological evidence of active centromeres by Cd stain. Significative cell cycle time reduction in anaphases of PCD individuals (average generation time of 21.8 h;SD 0.4) with respect to individuals without PCD (average generation time of 31.8 h;SD 3.9) was observed (P < 0.005, Student t-test for independent samples). Increased cell proliferation kinetics was observed in anaphasic cells of individuals with PCD, by differential sister chromatid stain analysis. FISH studies revealed the presence of alpha satellite DNA from chromosomes 1, 13, 21/18, X, all centromeres, and CENP-B box sequences in metaphasic and anaphasic cells from PCD individuals. This report examines evidences of a functional relationship between PCD and cell cycle impairment. It seems that essential centromere integrity is present in these cases.

  8. Regulation of the cell division cycle in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyin

    2012-10-01

    The cell division cycle is tightly regulated by the activation and inactivation of a series of proteins that control the replication and segregation of organelles to the daughter cells. During the past decade, we have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the cell cycle in Trypanosoma brucei and how the cycle is regulated by various regulatory proteins. However, many other regulators, especially those unique to trypanosomes, remain to be identified, and we are just beginning to delineate the signaling pathways that drive the transitions through different cell cycle stages, such as the G(1)/S transition, G(2)/M transition, and mitosis-cytokinesis transition. Trypanosomes appear to employ both evolutionarily conserved and trypanosome-specific molecules to regulate the various stages of its cell cycle, including DNA replication initiation, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis initiation and completion. Strikingly, trypanosomes lack some crucial regulators that are well conserved across evolution, such as Cdc6 and Cdt1, which are involved in DNA replication licensing, the spindle motor kinesin-5, which is required for spindle assembly, the central spindlin complex, which has been implicated in cytokinesis initiation, and the actomyosin contractile ring, which is located at the cleavage furrow. Conversely, trypanosomes possess certain regulators, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesins, that are greatly expanded and likely play diverse cellular functions. Overall, trypanosomes apparently have integrated unique regulators into the evolutionarily conserved pathways to compensate for the absence of those conserved molecules and, additionally, have evolved certain cell cycle regulatory pathways that are either different from its human host or distinct between its own life cycle forms.

  9. Cell cycle and centromere FISH studies in premature centromere division

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Salamanca-Gomez, Fabio; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Palomino-Cueva, Cesar; Garcia-Cobian, Teresa A; Corona-Rivera, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    Background Mitotic configurations consistent in split centromeres and splayed chromatids in all or most of the chromosomes or premature centromere division (PCD) have been described in three categories. (1) Low frequency of PCD observed in colchicines-treated lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. (2) High frequency of PCD with mosaic variegated aneuploidy. (3) High frequency of PCD as a sole chromosome abnormality observed in individuals with no recognizable clinical pattern. We report four members of a family with the third category of PCD. Methods Cell cycle duration assessed by average generation time using differential sister chromatid stain analysis and FISH studies of DNA centromere sequences in PCD individuals, are included and compared with previously reported PCD individuals from 9 families. Results We observed PCD in colchicine-treated cultures from the propositus, his father, and two paternal aunts but not in his mother and four other paternal and maternal family members, as well as in untreated cultures from the propositus and his father. We observed cytological evidence of active centromeres by Cd stain. Significative cell cycle time reduction in anaphases of PCD individuals (average generation time of 21.8 h;SD 0.4) with respect to individuals without PCD (average generation time of 31.8 h;SD 3.9) was observed (P < 0.005, Student t-test for independent samples). Increased cell proliferation kinetics was observed in anaphasic cells of individuals with PCD, by differential sister chromatid stain analysis. FISH studies revealed the presence of alpha satellite DNA from chromosomes 1, 13, 21/18, X, all centromeres, and CENP-B box sequences in metaphasic and anaphasic cells from PCD individuals. Conclusion This report examines evidences of a functional relationship between PCD and cell cycle impairment. It seems that essential centromere integrity is present in these cases. PMID:16174301

  10. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  11. Non-equilibrium thermodynamic effects during cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jorge

    2009-03-01

    A mitotic spindle is a regular structure within a cell consisting of oriented microtubule fibers. It plays a fundamental role in chromosome separation during cell division. Forming a spindle pattern is a major structural step towards mitosis. We have developed biophysical non-equilibrium thermodynamic models to describe in vitro chromosome driven spindle formation experiments in Xenopus extracts. Our first 2D model calculations [1] successfully described the order of events seen in some of the Xenopus extracts experiments, where the chromosomes are replaced by chromatin-covered micrometer magnetic beads. I will describe more realistic 3D improvements in our modeling analysis, which include microtubule contact forces and excluded volume [2, 3]. There are, however, a number of challenges that must be addressed for spindle modeling to continue to be a useful tool for understanding this fundamental biological process, in particular the biophysical simulation times. In this talk I will describe some important problems needing better biological data and hypothesis. I will also discuss our most recent numerical algorithmic improvements that are expected to greatly increase the simulations speed and thus allowing a more realistic representation of the experimental situation in Xenopus extracts. [1] S. C. Schaffner and J. V. Jose, PNAS, 103, 11166 (2006), [2] ibid in ``Methods in Cell Biology'' (Elsevier- Academic Press)(2008)and [3]ibid(to be published).

  12. Quantitative measures to reveal coordinated cytoskeleton-nucleus reorganization during in vitro invasion of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Liron; Nissim, Ronen; Alvarez-Elizondo, Martha B.; Weihs, Daphne

    2015-04-01

    Metastasis formation is a major cause of mortality in cancer patients and includes tumor cell relocation to distant organs. A metastatic cell invades through other cells and extracellular matrix by biochemical attachment and mechanical force application. Force is used to move on or through a 2- or 3-dimensional (3D) environment, respectively, or to penetrate a 2D substrate. We have previously shown that even when a gel substrate is impenetrable, metastatic breast cancer cells can still indent it by applying force. Cells typically apply force through the acto-myosin network, which is mechanically connected to the nucleus. We develop a 3D image-analysis to reveal relative locations of the cell elements, and show that as cells apply force to the gel, a coordinated process occurs that involves cytoskeletal remodeling and repositioning of the nucleus. Our approach shows that the actin and microtubules reorganize in the cell, bringing the actin to the leading edge of the cell. In parallel, the nucleus is transported behind the actin, likely by the cytoskeleton, into the indentation dimple formed in the gel. The nucleus volume below the gel surface correlates with indentation depth, when metastatic breast cancer cells indent gels deeply. However, the nucleus always remains above the gel in benign cells, even when small indentations are observed. Determining mechanical processes during metastatic cell invasion can reveal how cells disseminate in the body and can uncover targets for diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Single Granule Cells Excite Golgi Cells and Evoke Feedback Inhibition in the Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yaeger, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    In cerebellum-like circuits, synapses from thousands of granule cells converge onto principal cells. This fact, combined with theoretical considerations, has led to the concept that granule cells encode afferent input as a population and that spiking in individual granule cells is relatively unimportant. However, granule cells also provide excitatory input to Golgi cells, each of which provide inhibition to hundreds of granule cells. We investigated whether spiking in individual granule cells could recruit Golgi cells and thereby trigger widespread inhibition in slices of mouse cochlear nucleus. Using paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, trains of action potentials at 100 Hz in single granule cells was sufficient to evoke spikes in Golgi cells in ∼40% of paired granule-to-Golgi cell recordings. High-frequency spiking in single granule cells evoked IPSCs in ∼5% of neighboring granule cells, indicating that bursts of activity in single granule cells can recruit feedback inhibition from Golgi cells. Moreover, IPSPs mediated by single Golgi cell action potentials paused granule cell firing, suggesting that inhibitory events recruited by activity in single granule cells were able to control granule cell firing. These results suggest a previously unappreciated relationship between population coding and bursting in single granule cells by which spiking in a small number of granule cells may have an impact on the activity of a much larger number of granule cells. PMID:25788690

  14. Host actin polymerization tunes the cell division cycle of an intracellular pathogen.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, M Sloan; Aditham, Arjun K; Espaillat, Akbar; Cameron, Todd A; Whiteside, Sarah A; Cava, Felipe; Portnoy, Daniel A; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-04-28

    Growth and division are two of the most fundamental capabilities of a bacterial cell. While they are well described for model organisms growing in broth culture, very little is known about the cell division cycle of bacteria replicating in more complex environments. Using a D-alanine reporter strategy, we found that intracellular Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) spend a smaller proportion of their cell cycle dividing compared to Lm growing in broth culture. This alteration to the cell division cycle is independent of bacterial doubling time. Instead, polymerization of host-derived actin at the bacterial cell surface extends the non-dividing elongation period and compresses the division period. By decreasing the relative proportion of dividing Lm, actin polymerization biases the population toward cells with the highest propensity to form actin tails. Thus, there is a positive-feedback loop between the Lm cell division cycle and a physical interaction with the host cytoskeleton.

  15. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M.

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  16. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  17. Uncovering the link between malfunctions in Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric cell division and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a developmental process utilized by several organisms. On the most basic level, an asymmetric division produces two daughter cells, each possessing a different identity or fate. Drosophila melanogaster progenitor cells, referred to as neuroblasts, undergo asymmetric division to produce a daughter neuroblast and another cell known as a ganglion mother cell (GMC). There are several features of asymmetric division in Drosophila that make it a very complex process, and these aspects will be discussed at length. The cell fate determinants that play a role in specifying daughter cell fate, as well as the mechanisms behind setting up cortical polarity within neuroblasts, have proved to be essential to ensuring that neurogenesis occurs properly. The role that mitotic spindle orientation plays in coordinating asymmetric division, as well as how cell cycle regulators influence asymmetric division machinery, will also be addressed. Most significantly, malfunctions during asymmetric cell division have shown to be causally linked with neoplastic growth and tumor formation. Therefore, it is imperative that the developmental repercussions as a result of asymmetric cell division gone awry be understood. PMID:23151376

  18. Splitting the cell, building the organism: Mechanisms of cell division in metazoan embryos.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Megha; Pushpa, Kumari; Mylavarapu, Sivaram V S

    2015-07-01

    The unicellular metazoan zygote undergoes a series of cell divisions that are central to its development into an embryo. Differentiation of embryonic cells leads eventually to the development of a functional adult. Fate specification of pluripotent embryonic cells occurs during the early embryonic cleavage divisions in several animals. Early development is characterized by well-known stages of embryogenesis documented across animals--morulation, blastulation, and morphogenetic processes such as gastrulation, all of which contribute to differentiation and tissue specification. Despite this broad conservation, there exist clearly discernible morphological and functional differences across early embryonic stages in metazoans. Variations in the mitotic mechanisms of early embryonic cell divisions play key roles in governing these gross differences that eventually encode developmental patterns. In this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms of both karyokinesis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic separation) during early embryonic divisions. We outline the broadly conserved molecular pathways that operate in these two stages in early embryonic mitoses. In addition, we highlight mechanistic variations in these two stages across different organisms. We finally discuss outstanding questions of interest, answers to which would illuminate the role of divergent mitotic mechanisms in shaping early animal embryogenesis.

  19. Shuttling of the autoantigen La between nucleus and cell surface after uv irradiation of human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmann, M.; Chang, S.; Slor, H.; Kukulies, J.; Mueller, W.E. )

    1990-12-01

    During the past years we have established that the nuclear autoantigen La shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in tumor cells after inhibition of transcription or virus infection. We reinvestigated this shuttling using primary human keratinocytes from both healthy donors and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. Ultraviolet irradiation resulted in both an inhibition of transcription and a translocation of La protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After a prolonged inhibition of transcription La protein relocated into the nucleus and assembled with nuclear storage regions. The uv-induced shuttling included a translocation to the cell surface, where La protein colocalized with epidermal growth factor receptors.

  20. MioC and GidA proteins promote cell division in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lies, Mark; Visser, Bryan J; Joshi, Mohan C; Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The well-conserved genes surrounding the E. coli replication origin, mioC and gidA, do not normally affect chromosome replication and have little known function. We report that mioC and gidA mutants exhibit a moderate cell division inhibition phenotype. Cell elongation is exacerbated by a fis deletion, likely owing to delayed replication and subsequent cell cycle stress. Measurements of replication initiation frequency and origin segregation indicate that mioC and gidA do not inhibit cell division through any effect on oriC function. Division inhibition is also independent of the two known replication/cell division checkpoints, SOS and nucleoid occlusion. Complementation analysis indicates that mioC and gidA affect cell division in trans, indicating their effect is at the protein level. Transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing showed that expression of a cell division septum component, YmgF, is significantly altered in mioC and gidA mutants. Our data reveal new roles for the gene products of gidA and mioC in the division apparatus, and we propose that their expression, cyclically regulated by chromatin remodeling at oriC, is part of a cell cycle regulatory program coordinating replication initiation and cell division.

  1. Arabidopsis α Aurora Kinases Function in Formative Cell Division Plane Orientation[W

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Daniël; De Rybel, Bert; Gudesblat, Gustavo; Demidov, Dmitri; Grunewald, Wim; De Smet, Ive; Houben, Andreas; Beeckman, Tom; Russinova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    To establish three-dimensional structures/organs, plant cells continuously have to adapt the orientation of their division plane in a highly regulated manner. However, mechanisms underlying switches in division plane orientation remain elusive. Here, we characterize a viable double knockdown mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana group α Aurora (AUR) kinases, AUR1 and AUR2, (aur1-2 aur2-2), with a primary defect in lateral root formation and outgrowth. Mutant analysis revealed that aur1-2 aur2-2 lateral root primordia are built from randomly oriented cell divisions instead of distinct cell layers. This phenotype could be traced back to cytokinesis defects and misoriented cell plates during the initial anticlinal pericycle cell divisions that give rise to lateral root primordia. Complementation assays showed that the Arabidopsis α group Aurora kinases are functionally divergent from the single β group member AUR3 and that AUR1 functions in division plane orientation prior to cytokinesis. In addition to defective lateral root patterning, aur1-2 aur2-2 plants also show defects in orienting formative divisions during embryogenesis, divisions surrounding the main root stem cell niche, and divisions surrounding stomata formation. Taken together, our results put forward a central role for α Aurora kinases in regulating formative division plane orientation throughout development. PMID:22045917

  2. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  3. Nucleus deformation of SaOs-2 cells on rhombic µ-pillars.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Melanie; Stannard, Cleo; Anselme, Karine; Rühe, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    It has been previously shown that osteosarcoma (SaOs-2) cells respond to micropillared surfaces consisting of poly-L-lactic acid with strong deformation of the cell body and nucleus. Until now, cell nucleus deformation of SaOs-2 cells was only studied by exposing them to square shaped micropillars in an isotropic pattern. Here we report on experiments of the cell nucleus response of such cells to rhombic structures of different topographies generated from a rubbery polymer, namely poly(n-butyacrylate). It is observed that cells orientate themselves perpendicular to the long axis of the rhombi. While their spreading on the surface is not influenced by the opening angle of the structures, rhombic structures with sharper angles induce stronger deformation of the cells and accordingly more elongated nuclei.

  4. Cell division and cadherin-mediated adhesion regulate lens epithelial cell movement in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Luo, Yi-Jyun; Tsai, Hsieh-Fu; Hagiwara, Akane; Masai, Ichiro

    2017-02-15

    In vertebrates, lens epithelial cells cover the anterior half of the lens fiber core. During development, lens epithelial cells proliferate, move posteriorly and differentiate into lens fiber cells after passing through the equator. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying lens epithelial cell movement, we conducted time-lapse imaging of zebrafish lens epithelium. Lens epithelial cells do not intermingle but maintain their relative positions during development. Cell division induces epithelial rearrangement, which subsequently promotes cell movement towards the equator. These data suggest that cell division is the major driving force for cell movement. In zebrafish, E-cadherin is expressed in lens epithelium, whereas N-cadherin is required for lens fiber growth. E-cadherin reduced lens epithelial cell movement, whereas N-cadherin enhanced it. Laser ablation experiments revealed that lens epithelium is governed by pulling tension, which is modulated by these cadherins. Thus, cell division and cadherin-mediated adhesion regulate lens epithelial cell movement via modulation of epithelial tension. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. The DYRK-family kinase Pom1 phosphorylates the F-BAR protein Cdc15 to prevent division at cell poles

    PubMed Central

    Ullal, Pranav; McDonald, Nathan A.; Chen, Jun-Song; Lo Presti, Libera; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Division site positioning is critical for both symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. In many organisms, positive and negative signals cooperate to position the contractile actin ring for cytokinesis. In rod-shaped fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells, division at midcell is achieved through positive Mid1/anillin-dependent signaling emanating from the central nucleus and negative signals from the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase family kinase Pom1 at the cell poles. In this study, we show that Pom1 directly phosphorylates the F-BAR protein Cdc15, a central component of the cytokinetic ring. Pom1-dependent phosphorylation blocks Cdc15 binding to paxillin Pxl1 and C2 domain protein Fic1 and enhances Cdc15 dynamics. This promotes ring sliding from cell poles, which prevents septum assembly at the ends of cells with a displaced nucleus or lacking Mid1. Pom1 also slows down ring constriction. These results indicate that a strong negative signal from the Pom1 kinase at cell poles converts Cdc15 to its closed state, destabilizes the actomyosin ring, and thus promotes medial septation. PMID:26553932

  6. [Identification of cell division of CD8+ NKT cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ye-Lei; Chen, Yu; Zhong, Jiang; Zhang, Shi-Lun

    2011-02-01

    To measure the in vitro cell division ability of CD8(+);NKT cells by CFSE staining and flow cytometry(FCM). Fresh spleen lymphocytes of C57BL/J mice were separated and stained with CFSE, and then stimulated by ConA and LPS for 3 d, and by SEB for 5 d and 10 d respectively. The stimulated cells were harvested and analyzed for CD69 expression on the cell surface and the ability of cell division using FCM. The SEB-activated effector cells for 10 d further stimulated with IL-2 for the consecutive 10 days, and were analyzed for their cell division ability, CD69 expression and NKT cell subsets by FCM. ConA, LPS and SEB stimulated the proliferation of spleen cells. ConA and LPS made the cells divide 3 times within 3 d, and increased CD69 expression up to 74.19% and 41.56% respectively. SEB made the cells divide 5 times within 5 d and 7 times within 10 d respectively, with increased CD69 expression of 32.09% and 48.66% respectively. Ten-day IL-2 stimulation of SEB-activated cells caused population expansion for 7 times with the CD8(+);NKT cell subsets significantly increased from 0.36% to 38.58% and CD69 expression significantly increased from 0.11% to 83.74%. The SEB-activated CD8(+);NKT cells proliferated in vitro and their cell division capability could be determined by CFSE staining and FCM.

  7. Probabilistic Model of Microbial Cell Growth, Division, and Mortality ▿

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Joseph; Normand, Mark D.; Corradini, Maria G.; Peleg, Micha

    2010-01-01

    After a short time interval of length δt during microbial growth, an individual cell can be found to be divided with probability Pd(t)δt, dead with probability Pm(t)δt, or alive but undivided with the probability 1 − [Pd(t) + Pm(t)]δt, where t is time, Pd(t) expresses the probability of division for an individual cell per unit of time, and Pm(t) expresses the probability of mortality per unit of time. These probabilities may change with the state of the population and the habitat's properties and are therefore functions of time. This scenario translates into a model that is presented in stochastic and deterministic versions. The first, a stochastic process model, monitors the fates of individual cells and determines cell numbers. It is particularly suitable for small populations such as those that may exist in the case of casual contamination of a food by a pathogen. The second, which can be regarded as a large-population limit of the stochastic model, is a continuous mathematical expression that describes the population's size as a function of time. It is suitable for large microbial populations such as those present in unprocessed foods. Exponential or logistic growth with or without lag, inactivation with or without a “shoulder,” and transitions between growth and inactivation are all manifestations of the underlying probability structure of the model. With temperature-dependent parameters, the model can be used to simulate nonisothermal growth and inactivation patterns. The same concept applies to other factors that promote or inhibit microorganisms, such as pH and the presence of antimicrobials, etc. With Pd(t) and Pm(t) in the form of logistic functions, the model can simulate all commonly observed growth/mortality patterns. Estimates of the changing probability parameters can be obtained with both the stochastic and deterministic versions of the model, as demonstrated with simulated data. PMID:19915038

  8. Emp is a component of the nuclear matrix of mammalian cells and undergoes dynamic rearrangements during cell division

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Soni, Shivani; Sinha, Sudha; Hanspal, Manjit . E-mail: manjit.hanspal@tufts.edu

    2006-04-21

    Emp, originally detected in erythroblastic islands, is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues suggesting a functionality not limited to hematopoiesis. To study the function of Emp in non-hematopoietic cells, an epitope-tagged recombinant human Emp was expressed in HEK cells. Preliminary studies revealed that Emp partitioned into both the nuclear and Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions in approximately a 4:1 ratio. In this study, we report investigations of Emp in the nucleus. Sequential extractions of interphase nuclei showed that recombinant Emp was present predominantly in the nuclear matrix. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Emp was present in typical nuclear speckles enriched with the spliceosome assembly factor SC35 and partially co-localized with actin staining. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed the apparent close association of Emp with nuclear actin. During mitosis, Emp was detected at the mitotic spindle/spindle poles, as well as in the contractile ring during cytokinesis. These results suggest that Emp undergoes dynamic rearrangements within the nuclear architecture that are correlated with cell division.

  9. Emp is a component of the nuclear matrix of mammalian cells and undergoes dynamic rearrangements during cell division.

    PubMed

    Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Soni, Shivani; Sinha, Sudha; Hanspal, Manjit

    2006-04-21

    Emp, originally detected in erythroblastic islands, is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues suggesting a functionality not limited to hematopoiesis. To study the function of Emp in non-hematopoietic cells, an epitope-tagged recombinant human Emp was expressed in HEK cells. Preliminary studies revealed that Emp partitioned into both the nuclear and Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions in approximately a 4:1 ratio. In this study, we report investigations of Emp in the nucleus. Sequential extractions of interphase nuclei showed that recombinant Emp was present predominantly in the nuclear matrix. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Emp was present in typical nuclear speckles enriched with the spliceosome assembly factor SC35 and partially co-localized with actin staining. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed the apparent close association of Emp with nuclear actin. During mitosis, Emp was detected at the mitotic spindle/spindle poles, as well as in the contractile ring during cytokinesis. These results suggest that Emp undergoes dynamic rearrangements within the nuclear architecture that are correlated with cell division.

  10. Asymmetric Numb distribution is critical for asymmetric cell division of mouse cerebral cortical stem cells and neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qin; Zhong, Weimin; Jan, Yuh Nung; Temple, Sally

    2002-10-01

    Stem cells and neuroblasts derived from mouse embryos undergo repeated asymmetric cell divisions, generating neural lineage trees similar to those of invertebrates. In Drosophila, unequal distribution of Numb protein during mitosis produces asymmetric cell divisions and consequently diverse neural cell fates. We investigated whether a mouse homologue m-numb had a similar role during mouse cortical development. Progenitor cells isolated from the embryonic mouse cortex were followed as they underwent their next cell division in vitro. Numb distribution was predominantly asymmetric during asymmetric cell divisions yielding a beta-tubulin III(-) progenitor and a beta-tubulin III(+) neuronal cell (P/N divisions) and predominantly symmetric during divisions producing two neurons (N/N divisions). Cells from the numb knockout mouse underwent significantly fewer asymmetric P/N divisions compared to wild type, indicating a causal role for Numb. When progenitor cells derived from early (E10) cortex undergo P/N divisions, both daughters express the progenitor marker Nestin, indicating their immature state, and Numb segregates into the P or N daughter with similar frequency. In contrast, when progenitor cells derived from later E13 cortex (during active neurogenesis in vivo) undergo P/N divisions they produce a Nestin(+) progenitor and a Nestin(-) neuronal daughter, and Numb segregates preferentially into the neuronal daughter. Thus during mouse cortical neurogenesis, as in Drosophila neurogenesis, asymmetric segregation of Numb could inhibit Notch activity in one daughter to induce neuronal differentiation. At terminal divisions generating two neurons, Numb was symmetrically distributed in approximately 80% of pairs and asymmetrically in 20%. We found a significant association between Numb distribution and morphology: most sisters of neuron pairs with symmetric Numb were similar and most with asymmetric Numb were different. Developing cortical neurons with Numb had longer

  11. Teaching Cell Division to Secondary School Students: An Investigation of Difficulties Experienced by Turkish Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztap, Haydar; Ozay, Esra; Oztap, Fulya

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the difficulties biology teachers face when teaching cell division in the secondary schools of the central part of the Erzurum province in Turkey. During this research, a questionnaire was distributed to a total of 36 secondary school biology teachers. Findings of the study indicate biology teachers perceive cell division as…

  12. Termination of DNA replication is required for cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, N; Rosner, E; Ron, E Z

    1989-01-01

    The correlation between termination of DNA replication and cell division in Escherichia coli was studied under conditions in which DNA replication was slowed down without inducing SOS functions. The experimental system used involved amino acid starvation of synchronized cells in the presence of methionine. The results further support the essential correlation between termination of DNA replication and initiation of division processes. PMID:2644214

  13. Teaching Cell Division to Secondary School Students: An Investigation of Difficulties Experienced by Turkish Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztap, Haydar; Ozay, Esra; Oztap, Fulya

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the difficulties biology teachers face when teaching cell division in the secondary schools of the central part of the Erzurum province in Turkey. During this research, a questionnaire was distributed to a total of 36 secondary school biology teachers. Findings of the study indicate biology teachers perceive cell division as…

  14. Sequential closure of the cytoplasm and then the periplasm during cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Karl; Söderström, Bill; Widengren, Jerker; von Heijne, Gunnar; Daley, Daniel O

    2012-02-01

    To visualize the latter stages of cell division in live Escherichia coli, we have carried out fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on 121 cells expressing cytoplasmic green fluorescent protein and periplasmic mCherry. Our data show conclusively that the cytoplasm is sealed prior to the periplasm during the division event.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell division in neuroblastoma cells and bone marrow macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sans-Fons, M Gloria; Sole, Sonia; Sanfeliu, Coral; Planas, Anna M

    2010-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix and carry out key functions in cell development, cancer, injury, and regeneration. In addition to its well recognized extracellular action, functional intracellular MMP activity under certain conditions is supported by increasing evidence. In this study, we observed higher gelatinase activity by in situ zymography and increased MMP-9 immunoreactivity in human neuroblastoma cells and in bone marrow macrophages undergoing mitosis compared with resting cells. We studied the pattern of immunoreactivity at the different stages of cell division by confocal microscopy. Immunostaining with different monoclonal antibodies against MMP-9 revealed a precise, dynamic, and well orchestrated localization of MMP-9 at the different stages of cell division. The cellular distribution of MMP-9 staining was studied in relation to that of microtubules. The spatial pattern of MMP-9 immunoreactivity suggested some participation in both the reorganization of the nuclear content and the process of chromatid segmentation. We then used several MMP-9 inhibitors to find out whether MMP-9 might be involved in the cell cycle. These drugs impaired the entry of cells into mitosis, as revealed by flow cytometry, and reduced cell culture growth. In addition, the silencing of MMP-9 expression with small interfering RNA also reduced cell growth. Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular MMP-9 is involved in the process of cell division in neuroblastoma cells and in primary cultures of macrophages.

  16. Differential distribution of factors involved in pre-mRNA processing in the yeast cell nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Potashkin, J A; Derby, R J; Spector, D L

    1990-01-01

    The yeast cell nucleus has previously been shown to be divided into two regions by a variety of microscopic approaches. We used antibodies specific for the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap structure of small nuclear ribonucleic acids (snRNAs) and for a protein component of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles to identify the distribution of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles within the yeast cell nucleus. These studies were performed with the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By using immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy, most of the abundant snRNAs were localized to the portion of the nucleus which has heretofore been referred to as the nucleolus. This distribution of snRNAs is different from that found in mammalian cells and suggests that the nucleolar portion of the yeast nucleus contains functional domains in addition to those associated with RNA polymerase I activity. Images PMID:2192258

  17. Acentrosomal Drosophila epithelial cells exhibit abnormal cell division, leading to cell death and compensatory proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, John S; Cuningham, John C; Peifer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mitotic spindles are critical for accurate chromosome segregation. Centrosomes, the primary microtubule nucleating centers of animal cells, play key roles in forming and orienting mitotic spindles. However, the survival of Drosophila without centrosomes suggested they are dispensable in somatic cells, challenging the canonical view. We used fly wing disc epithelia as a model to resolve these conflicting hypotheses, revealing that centrosomes play vital roles in spindle assembly, function, and orientation. Many acentrosomal cells exhibit prolonged spindle assembly, chromosome mis-segregation, DNA damage, misoriented divisions, and eventual apoptosis. We found that multiple mechanisms buffer the effects of centrosome loss, including alternative microtubule nucleation pathways and the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint. Apoptosis of acentrosomal cells is mediated by JNK signaling, which also drives compensatory proliferation to maintain tissue integrity and viability. These data reveal the importance of centrosomes in fly epithelia, but also demonstrate the robust compensatory mechanisms at the cellular and organismal level. PMID:25241934

  18. Cell and plastid division are coordinated through the prereplication factor AtCDT1

    PubMed Central

    Raynaud, Cécile; Perennes, Claudette; Reuzeau, Christophe; Catrice, Olivier; Brown, Spencer; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The cell division cycle involves nuclear and cytoplasmic events, namely organelle multiplication and distribution between the daughter cells. Until now, plastid and plant cell division have been considered as independent processes because they can be uncoupled. Here, down-regulation of AtCDT1a and AtCDT1b, members of the prereplication complex, is shown to alter both nuclear DNA replication and plastid division in Arabidopsis thaliana. These data constitute molecular evidence for relationships between the cell-cycle and plastid division. Moreover, the severe developmental defects observed in AtCDT1-RNA interference (RNAi) plants underline the importance of coordinated cell and organelle division for plant growth and morphogenesis. PMID:15928083

  19. Shed Syndecan-1 Translocates to the Nucleus of Cells Delivering Growth Factors and Inhibiting Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mark D.; Ramani, Vishnu C.; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 is proteolytically shed from the surface of multiple myeloma cells and is abundant in the bone marrow microenvironment where it promotes tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that shed syndecan-1 present in the medium conditioned by tumor cells is taken up by bone marrow-derived stromal cells and transported to the nucleus. Translocation of shed syndecan-1 (sSDC1) to the nucleus was blocked by addition of exogenous heparin or heparan sulfate, pretreatment of conditioned medium with heparinase III, or growth of cells in sodium chlorate, indicating that sulfated heparan sulfate chains are required for nuclear translocation. Interestingly, cargo bound to sSDC1 heparan sulfate chains (i.e. hepatocyte growth factor) was transported to the nucleus along with sSDC1, and removal of heparan sulfate-bound cargo from sSDC1 abolished its translocation to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, sSDC1 binds to the histone acetyltransferase enzyme p300, and histone acetyltransferase activity and histone acetylation are diminished. These findings reveal a novel function for shed syndecan-1 in mediating tumor-host cross-talk by shuttling growth factors to the nucleus and by altering histone acetylation in host cells. In addition, this work has broad implications beyond myeloma because shed syndecan-1 is present in high levels in many tumor types as well as in other disease states. PMID:25404732

  20. Dynamic, mechanical integration between nucleus and cell- where physics meets biology

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B; Neelam, Srujana; Lele, Tanmay P

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear motions like rotation, translation and deformation suggest that the nucleus is acted upon by mechanical forces. Molecular linkages with the cytoskeleton are thought to transfer forces to the nuclear surface. We developed an approach to apply reproducible, known mechanical forces to the nucleus in spread adherent cells and quantified the elastic response of the mechanically integrated nucleus-cell. The method is sensitive to molecular perturbations and revealed new insight into the function of the LINC complex. While these experiments revealed elastic behaviors, turnover of the cytoskeleton by assembly/disassembly and binding/unbinding of linkages are expected to dissipate any stored mechanical energy in the nucleus or the cytoskeleton. Experiments investigating nuclear forces over longer time scales demonstrated the mechanical principle that expansive/compressive stresses on the nuclear surface arise from the movement of the cell boundaries to shape and position the nucleus. Such forces can shape the nucleus to conform to cell shapes during cell movements with or without myosin activity. PMID:26338356

  1. Dynamic, mechanical integration between nucleus and cell- where physics meets biology.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Richard B; Neelam, Srujana; Lele, Tanmay P

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear motions like rotation, translation and deformation suggest that the nucleus is acted upon by mechanical forces. Molecular linkages with the cytoskeleton are thought to transfer forces to the nuclear surface. We developed an approach to apply reproducible, known mechanical forces to the nucleus in spread adherent cells and quantified the elastic response of the mechanically integrated nucleus-cell. The method is sensitive to molecular perturbations and revealed new insight into the function of the LINC complex. While these experiments revealed elastic behaviors, turnover of the cytoskeleton by assembly/disassembly and binding/unbinding of linkages are expected to dissipate any stored mechanical energy in the nucleus or the cytoskeleton. Experiments investigating nuclear forces over longer time scales demonstrated the mechanical principle that expansive/compressive stresses on the nuclear surface arise from the movement of the cell boundaries to shape and position the nucleus. Such forces can shape the nucleus to conform to cell shapes during cell movements with or without myosin activity.

  2. Mechanisms of Regulating Tissue Elongation in Drosophila Wing: Impact of Oriented Cell Divisions, Oriented Mechanical Forces, and Reduced Cell Size

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X.; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division plays fundamental roles in tissue morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms of regulating tissue elongation through cell growth and cell division are still not well understood. The wing imaginal disc of Drosophila provides a model system that has been widely used to study tissue morphogenesis. Here we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the mechanisms of regulating tissue elongation in Drosophila wing. We simulate the effects of directional cues on tissue elongation. We also computationally analyze the role of reduced cell size. Our simulation results indicate that oriented cell divisions, oriented mechanical forces, and reduced cell size can all mediate tissue elongation, but they function differently. We show that oriented cell divisions and oriented mechanical forces act as directional cues during tissue elongation. Between these two directional cues, oriented mechanical forces have a stronger influence than oriented cell divisions. In addition, we raise the novel hypothesis that reduced cell size may significantly promote tissue elongation. We find that reduced cell size alone cannot drive tissue elongation. However, when combined with directional cues, such as oriented cell divisions or oriented mechanical forces, reduced cell size can significantly enhance tissue elongation in Drosophila wing. Furthermore, our simulation results suggest that reduced cell size has a short-term effect on cell topology by decreasing the frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. Our simulation results suggest that cell divisions without cell growth play essential roles in tissue elongation. PMID:24504016

  3. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley Jsc; Umen, James G

    2016-03-25

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a 'counting' mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control.

  4. BioClips of symmetric and asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W; White, John G

    2007-05-01

    Animations have long been used as tools to illustrate complex processes in such diverse fields as mechanical engineering, astronomy, bacteriology and physics. Animations in biology hold particular educational promise for depicting complex dynamic processes, such as photosynthesis, motility, viral replication and cellular respiration, which cannot be easily explained using static two-dimensional images. However, these animations have often been restrictive in scope, having been created for a specific classroom or research audience. In recent years, a new type of animation has emerged called the BioClip (http://www.bioclips.com) that strives to present science in an interactive multimedia format, which is, at once, informative and entertaining, by combining animations, text descriptions and music in one portable cross-platform document. In the present article, we illustrate the educational value of this new electronic resource by reviewing in depth two BioClips our group has created which describe the processes of symmetric and asymmetric cell division (http://www.wormclassroom.org/cb/bioclip).

  5. Projections to the cochlear nuclei from principal cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Schofield, B R

    1994-06-01

    Spherical and globular cells in the cochlear nucleus provide input to the cell groups in the superior olivary complex devoted to the analysis of binaural cues. Descending projections from the superior olivary complex appear to inhibit the spherical and globular cells. It is not known which of the numerous cell types in the superior olive provide this descending input, but recent studies have shown that some of the cells are located in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MTB). The present experiments were designed to determine whether the MTB projections arise from principal cells, which are known to play a role in sound localization, and to determine whether their projections terminate on spherical or globular cells. Principal cells in the MTB are characterized by their contacts with synaptic specializations called calyces, which arise from the axons of cells in the contralateral cochlear nucleus. In the first experiment, a fluorescent tracer was injected into one cochlear nucleus to label the calyces anterogradely. A different tracer was injected into the opposite cochlear nucleus to label cells retrogradely in the MTB. In every case, some of the labeled cells were enveloped by a labeled calyx, demonstrating that principal cells do project to the cochlear nucleus. In the second experiment, fluorescent tracers were injected into different parts of the cochlear nucleus. Analysis of the distribution of labeled cells suggested that MTB projections selectively target the globular cell region of the cochlear nucleus. In a third experiment, the axonal arborizations arising from this projection were labeled with biocytin or wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. Labeled boutons appeared to contact globular cells but not spherical cells. Multipolar cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus and cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus were also contacted. The results suggest that MTB projections to the cochlear nucleus arise largely from principal cells

  6. Cell division cycle 20 overexpression predicts poor prognosis for patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run; Sun, Qi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xin; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Gaochao; Wang, Anpeng; Jiang, Feng; Xu, Lin

    2017-03-01

    The cell division cycle 20, a key component of spindle assembly checkpoint, is an essential activator of the anaphase-promoting complex. Aberrant expression of cell division cycle 20 has been detected in various human cancers. However, its clinical significance has never been deeply investigated in non-small-cell lung cancer. By analyzing The Cancer Genome Atlas database and using some certain online databases, we validated overexpression of cell division cycle 20 in both messenger RNA and protein levels, explored its clinical significance, and evaluated the prognostic role of cell division cycle 20 in non-small-cell lung cancer. Cell division cycle 20 expression was significantly correlated with sex (p = 0.003), histological classification (p < 0.0001), and tumor size (p = 0.0116) in non-small-cell lung cancer patients. In lung adenocarcinoma patients, overexpression of cell division cycle 20 was significantly associated with bigger primary tumor size (p = 0.0023), higher MKI67 level (r = 0.7618, p < 0.0001), higher DNA ploidy level (p < 0.0001), and poor prognosis (hazard ratio = 2.39, confidence interval: 1.87-3.05, p < 0.0001). However, in lung squamous cell carcinoma patients, no significant association of cell division cycle 20 expression was observed with any clinical parameter or prognosis. Overexpression of cell division cycle 20 is associated with poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and its overexpression can also be used to identify high-risk groups. In conclusion, cell division cycle 20 might serve as a potential biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma patients.

  7. The Synchronization of Replication and Division Cycles in Individual E. coli Cells.

    PubMed

    Wallden, Mats; Fange, David; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Baltekin, Özden; Elf, Johan

    2016-07-28

    Isogenic E. coli cells growing in a constant environment display significant variability in growth rates, division sizes, and generation times. The guiding principle appears to be that each cell, during one generation, adds a size increment that is uncorrelated to its birth size. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying this "adder" behavior by mapping the chromosome replication cycle to the division cycle of individual cells using fluorescence microscopy. We have found that initiation of chromosome replication is triggered at a fixed volume per chromosome independent of a cell's birth volume and growth rate. Each initiation event is coupled to a division event after a growth-rate-dependent time. We formalize our findings in a model showing that cell-to-cell variation in division timing and cell size is mainly driven by variations in growth rate. The model also explains why fast-growing cells display adder behavior and correctly predict deviations from the adder behavior at slow growth.

  8. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-07-04

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis.

  9. Incompatibility of nucleus and mitochondria causes xenomitochondrial cybrid unviable across human, mouse, and pig cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guanghui; Tian, Jianhui; Yin, Jingdong; Li, Qiuyan; Zhao, Xingbo

    2014-04-03

    The nucleus and mitochondria are on correlative dependence; they interact in the process of protein transportation and energy metabolism. The compatibility of nucleus and mitochondria is essential for interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) and xenomitochondrial cybrid. In order to test the compatibility of nucleus and mitochondria among human, mouse, and pig cells, we compared the performances of cybrids that fused inter- and intra-species. The ρ0 cells from human and pig cell lines were created as nucleus donors which were transfected with GFP-neo for cell selective system in advance, and mitochondria donor cells were labeled by Mitochondria-RFP. Human and mouse platelets were also used as a mitochondrial donor. Results indicated that all interspecies cybrids declined to die in 2-4 d after the cell fusion in the selection medium, while intraspecies cybrid cells survived and formed stable clones. As a conclusion, the incompatibility between nucleus and mitochondria is the critical factor for the formation of interspecies cybrids.

  10. Toward a cancer therapy with boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters that target the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Akira; Guan, Lufeng; Kane, Robert R.; Kasamatsu, Harumi; Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    1999-01-01

    The viability of boron neutron capture therapy depends on the development of tumor-targeting agents that contain large numbers of boron-10 (10B) atoms and are readily taken up by cells. Here we report on the selective uptake of homogeneous fluorescein-labeled nido-carboranyl oligomeric phosphate diesters (nido-OPDs) by the cell nucleus and their long-term retention after their delivery into the cytoplasm of TC7 cells by microinjection. All nido-OPDs accumulated in the cell nucleus within 2 h after microinjection. However, nido-OPDs in which the carborane cage was located on a side chain attached to the oligomeric backbone were redistributed between both the cytoplasm and nucleus after 24 h of incubation, whereas nido-OPDs in which the carborane cage was located along the oligomeric backbone remained primarily in the nucleus. Furthermore, cell-free incubation of digitonin-permeabilized TC7 cells with the nido-OPDs resulted in nuclear accumulation of the compounds, thus corroborating the microinjection studies. Our observation of fluorescence primarily located in the cell nucleus indicates that nuclear-specific uptake of sufficient amounts of 10B for effective boron neutron capture therapy (≈108–109 10B atoms/tumor cell) via nido-OPDs is achievable. PMID:9874802

  11. Wisteria floribunda lectin is associated with specific cell types in the ventral cochlear nucleus of the gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus.

    PubMed

    Cant, Nell B; Benson, Christina G

    2006-01-01

    The cochlear nucleus is made up of a number of diverse cell types with different anatomical and physiological properties. A plant lectin, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin, that recognizes specific carbohydrate residues in the extracellular matrix binds to some cell types in the ventral cochlear nucleus but not to cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus. In the ventral cochlear nucleus, the most intensely labeled cells are octopus cells, a subset of multipolar cells and cochlear root neurons. The multipolar cells that are labeled may correspond to the population that projects to the inferior colliculus.

  12. Systematic study of cell isolation from bovine nucleus pulposus: Improving cell yield and experiment reliability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juliana T Y; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Leung, Victor Y L

    2015-12-01

    Differences in matrix compositions in human nucleus pulposus (NP) clinical samples demand different cell isolation protocols for optimal results but there is no clear guide about this to date. Sub-optimal protocols may result in low cell yield, limited reliability of results or even failure of experiments. Cell yield, viability and attachment of cells isolated from bovine NP tissue with different protocols were estimated by cell counting, Trypan blue staining and cell culturing respectively. RNA was extracted from isolated cells and quantified by Nanodrop spectrometry and RT-qPCR. Higher collagenase concentration, longer digestion duration and pronase pre-treatment increased the cell yield. Cell viability remained high (<5% dead cells) even after 0.2% collagenase treatment for overnight. NP cells remained to have high ACAN, COL2A1, CDH2, KRT18, and KRT19 expression compared to muscle cells for different cell isolation conditions tested. Digestion by collagenase alone without the use of pronase could isolate cells from human degenerated NP tissue but clusters of cells were observed. We suggest the use of the disappearance of tissue as an indirect measure of cells released. This study provides a guide for researchers to decide the parameters involved in NP cell isolation for optimal outcome.

  13. Continuous nucleus extraction by optically-induced cell lysis on a batch-type microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Hung, Lien-Yu; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-04-21

    The extraction of a cell's nucleus is an essential technique required for a number of procedures, such as disease diagnosis, genetic replication, and animal cloning. However, existing nucleus extraction techniques are relatively inefficient and labor-intensive. Therefore, this study presents an innovative, microfluidics-based approach featuring optically-induced cell lysis (OICL) for nucleus extraction and collection in an automatic format. In comparison to previous micro-devices designed for nucleus extraction, the new OICL device designed herein is superior in terms of flexibility, selectivity, and efficiency. To facilitate this OICL module for continuous nucleus extraction, we further integrated an optically-induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP) module with the OICL device within the microfluidic chip. This on-chip integration circumvents the need for highly trained personnel and expensive, cumbersome equipment. Specifically, this microfluidic system automates four steps by 1) automatically focusing and transporting cells, 2) releasing the nuclei on the OICL module, 3) isolating the nuclei on the ODEP module, and 4) collecting the nuclei in the outlet chamber. The efficiency of cell membrane lysis and the ODEP nucleus separation was measured to be 78.04 ± 5.70% and 80.90 ± 5.98%, respectively, leading to an overall nucleus extraction efficiency of 58.21 ± 2.21%. These results demonstrate that this microfluidics-based system can successfully perform nucleus extraction, and the integrated platform is therefore promising in cell fusion technology with the goal of achieving genetic replication, or even animal cloning, in the near future.

  14. Mitotic spindle rotation and mode of cell division in the developing telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Tarik F; Ang, Eugenius; Rakic, Pasko

    2003-03-04

    The mode of neural stem cell division in the forebrain proliferative zones profoundly influences neocortical growth by regulating the number and diversity of neurons and glia. Long-term time-lapse multiphoton microscopy of embryonic mouse cortex reveals new details of the complex three-dimensional rotation and oscillation of the mitotic spindle before stem cell division. Importantly, the duration and amplitude of spindle movement predicts and specifies the eventual mode of mitotic division. These technological advances have provided dramatic data and insights into the kinetics of neural stem cell division by elucidating the involvement of spindle rotation in selection of the cleavage plane and the mode of neural stem cell division that together determine the size of the mammalian neocortex.

  15. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase controls early and late events in mammalian cell division.

    PubMed

    García, Zaira; Kumar, Amit; Marqués, Miriam; Cortés, Isabel; Carrera, Ana C

    2006-02-22

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) plays a crucial role in triggering cell division. To initiate this process, PI3K induces two distinct routes, of which one promotes cell growth and the other regulates cyclin-dependent kinases. Fine-tuned PI3K regulation is also required for later cell cycle phases. Here, we review the multiple points at which PI3K controls cell division and discuss its impact on human cancer.

  16. Oocyte nucleus controls progression through meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Zbigniew; Hoffmann, Steffen; Tsurumi, Chizuko

    2005-05-15

    We analyzed progression through the meiotic maturation in oocytes manipulated to replace the prophase oocyte nucleus with the nucleus from a cumulus cell, a pachytene spermatocyte or the pronucleus from a fertilized egg. Removal of the oocyte nucleus led to a significant reduction in histone H1 kinase activity. Replacement of the oocyte nucleus by a pronucleus followed by culture resulted in premature pseudomeiotic division and occasional abnormal cytokinesis; however, histone H1 kinase activity was rescued, microtubules formed a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were condensed. In addition to the anomalies observed after pronuclear transfer, those after transfer of the nucleus from a cumulus cell or spermatocyte included a dramatically impaired ability to form the bipolar spindle or to condense chromosomes, and histone H1 kinase activity was not rescued. Expression of a cyclin B-YFP in enucleated oocytes receiving the cumulus cell nucleus rescued histone H1 kinase activity, but spindle formation and chromosome condensation remained impaired, indicating a pleiotropic effect of oocyte nucleus removal. However, when the cumulus cell nucleus was first transformed into pronuclei (transfer into a metaphase II oocyte followed by activation), such pronuclei supported maturation after transfer into the oocyte in a manner similar to that of normal pronuclei. These results show that the oocyte nucleus contains specific components required for the control of progression through the meiotic maturation and that some of these components are also present in pronuclei.

  17. Octopus Cells in the Posteroventral Cochlear Nucleus Provide the Main Excitatory Input to the Superior Paraolivary Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Felix Ii, Richard A; Gourévitch, Boris; Gómez-Álvarez, Marcelo; Leijon, Sara C M; Saldaña, Enrique; Magnusson, Anna K

    2017-01-01

    Auditory streaming enables perception and interpretation of complex acoustic environments that contain competing sound sources. At early stages of central processing, sounds are segregated into separate streams representing attributes that later merge into acoustic objects. Streaming of temporal cues is critical for perceiving vocal communication, such as human speech, but our understanding of circuits that underlie this process is lacking, particularly at subcortical levels. The superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON), a prominent group of inhibitory neurons in the mammalian brainstem, has been implicated in processing temporal information needed for the segmentation of ongoing complex sounds into discrete events. The SPON requires temporally precise and robust excitatory input(s) to convey information about the steep rise in sound amplitude that marks the onset of voiced sound elements. Unfortunately, the sources of excitation to the SPON and the impact of these inputs on the behavior of SPON neurons have yet to be resolved. Using anatomical tract tracing and immunohistochemistry, we identified octopus cells in the contralateral cochlear nucleus (CN) as the primary source of excitatory input to the SPON. Cluster analysis of miniature excitatory events also indicated that the majority of SPON neurons receive one type of excitatory input. Precise octopus cell-driven onset spiking coupled with transient offset spiking make SPON responses well-suited to signal transitions in sound energy contained in vocalizations. Targets of octopus cell projections, including the SPON, are strongly implicated in the processing of temporal sound features, which suggests a common pathway that conveys information critical for perception of complex natural sounds.

  18. Octopus Cells in the Posteroventral Cochlear Nucleus Provide the Main Excitatory Input to the Superior Paraolivary Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Felix II, Richard A.; Gourévitch, Boris; Gómez-Álvarez, Marcelo; Leijon, Sara C. M.; Saldaña, Enrique; Magnusson, Anna K.

    2017-01-01

    Auditory streaming enables perception and interpretation of complex acoustic environments that contain competing sound sources. At early stages of central processing, sounds are segregated into separate streams representing attributes that later merge into acoustic objects. Streaming of temporal cues is critical for perceiving vocal communication, such as human speech, but our understanding of circuits that underlie this process is lacking, particularly at subcortical levels. The superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON), a prominent group of inhibitory neurons in the mammalian brainstem, has been implicated in processing temporal information needed for the segmentation of ongoing complex sounds into discrete events. The SPON requires temporally precise and robust excitatory input(s) to convey information about the steep rise in sound amplitude that marks the onset of voiced sound elements. Unfortunately, the sources of excitation to the SPON and the impact of these inputs on the behavior of SPON neurons have yet to be resolved. Using anatomical tract tracing and immunohistochemistry, we identified octopus cells in the contralateral cochlear nucleus (CN) as the primary source of excitatory input to the SPON. Cluster analysis of miniature excitatory events also indicated that the majority of SPON neurons receive one type of excitatory input. Precise octopus cell-driven onset spiking coupled with transient offset spiking make SPON responses well-suited to signal transitions in sound energy contained in vocalizations. Targets of octopus cell projections, including the SPON, are strongly implicated in the processing of temporal sound features, which suggests a common pathway that conveys information critical for perception of complex natural sounds. PMID:28620283

  19. STUDIES ON CELL METABOLISM AND CELL DIVISION : II. STIMULATION OF CELLULAR OXIDATION AND REVERSIBLE INHIBITION OF CELL DIVISION BY DIHALO AND TRIHALOPHENOLS.

    PubMed

    Krahl, M E; Clowes, G H

    1936-11-20

    The dihalo and trihalophenols, and phenols containing both halo and nitro substituents in the same molecule, produce, in fertilized eggs of Arbacia punctulata, a rise in rate of oxygen consumption and a reversible block to cell division. To define the conditions which affect the degree of this activity, the following factors have been varied: the arrangement of substituents in the molecule, the concentration of reagent, and the time after fertilization at which the reagent is added. The stimulation of oxygen consumption and reversible block to cell division produced by the dihalophenols are qualitatively the same as those previously produced in fertilized Arbacia eggs by certain dinitrophenols. To yield optimum respiratory effect and maximum division block, it usually requires a higher concentration of dihalo than of the corresponding dinitrophenol. For example, with fertilized Arbacia eggs at 20 degrees C. 2,4-dinitrophenol, in optimum concentration of 3 x 10(-5) molar, raises oxygen consumption to 292 per cent of normal (4). The corresponding values for two dihalo analogues are: 2,4-dichlorophenol, 10(-4) molar and 236 per cent; 2,4-dibromophenol, 6 x 10(-5) molar and 282 per cent. The halophenols differ from the nitrophenols in two interesting respects: (a) The monohalophenols produce little or no oxidative stimulation or division block in fertilized Arbacia eggs; p-nitrophenol is very active in both respects. (b) The symmetrical trihalophenols have an appreciable ability to stimulate oxygen consumption and block division; symmetrical trinitrophenol is inactive in both respects (4). The increases in oxygen consumption produced in fertilized Arbacia eggs by 2,4-dichloro and 2,4-dinitrophenol are larger than the percentage increases given by methylene blue and o-cresol indophenol under the same experimental conditions. The dihalo and dinitrophenols produce a reversible block to the cell division of fertilized marine eggs. The oxidation-reduction indicators, in

  20. Light can rescue auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division in a tobacco cell line

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Fei; Petrášek, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pattern formation in plants has to cope with ambient variability and therefore must integrate environmental cues such as light. Synchrony of cell divisions was previously observed in cell files of tobacco suspension cultures, which represents a simple case of pattern formation. To develop cellular approaches for light-dependent patterning, light-responsive tobacco cell lines were screened from the cell line Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Virginia Bright Italia 0 (VBI-0). The light responsive and auxin-autonomous cell line VBI-3 was isolated. As in the progenitor line VBI-0, cell divisions are synchronized in VBI-3 during exponential growth phase. This synchrony can be inhibited by 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, and this process was accompanied by the disassembly of actin filaments. However, the synchrony could be rescued when the cells were cultured under white light or with exogenous indolyl-3-acetic acid. The rescue was most efficient for continuous far-red light followed by continuous blue light, whereas continuous red light was least effective. These findings are discussed in the context of phytochrome-induced auxin biosynthesis and auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division. PMID:19884227

  1. How Nucleus Mechanics and ECM Microstructure Influence the Invasion of Single Cells and Multicellular Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Giverso, Chiara; Arduino, Alessandro; Preziosi, Luigi

    2017-04-13

    In order to move in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix, the nucleus of a cell must squeeze through the narrow spacing among the fibers and, by adhering to them, the cell needs to exert sufficiently strong traction forces. If the nucleus is too stiff, the spacing too narrow, or traction forces too weak, the cell is not able to penetrate the network. In this article, we formulate a mathematical model based on an energetic approach, for cells entering cylindrical channels composed of extracellular matrix fibers. Treating the nucleus as an elastic body covered by an elastic membrane, the energetic balance leads to the definition of a necessary criterion for cells to pass through the regular network of fibers, depending on the traction forces exerted by the cells (or possibly passive stresses), the stretchability of the nuclear membrane, the stiffness of the nucleus, and the ratio of the pore size within the extracellular matrix with respect to the nucleus diameter. The results obtained highlight the importance of the interplay between mechanical properties of the cell and microscopic geometric characteristics of the extracellular matrix and give an estimate for a critical value of the pore size that represents the physical limit of migration and can be used in tumor growth models to predict their invasive potential in thick regions of ECM.

  2. Evaluating the nucleus effect on the dynamic indentation behavior of cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guoxin; Sui, Jie; Sun, Shuli

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the nucleus on the cell mechanical behavior was investigated based on the dynamic indentation response of cells under a spherical tip. A "two-component" cell model (including cytoplasm and nucleus) is used, and the dynamic indentation behavior is studied by a semiempirical method, which is established based on fitting the numerical simulation results of the quasi-static indentation response of cells. We found that the "routine analysis" (based on the Hertz's contact solution of homogeneous model) significantly overestimated the nucleus effect on the overall cell indentation response due to the effects of the Hertz contact radius and the substrate stiffening. These effects are significantly stronger in the "two-component" cell model than in the homogeneous model. The inaccuracy created by the "routine analysis" slightly increases with the modulus ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm and the volume fraction of nucleus. Finally, the error sensitivity to the geometrical parameters used in the model is discussed, which shows the indentation analysis is not very sensitive to these parameters, and the reasonable assumptions for these parameters are effective. This systematic analysis can provide a useful guideline to understanding the mechanical behavior of cells and nuclei.

  3. The equatorial position of the metaphase plate ensures symmetric cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chia Huei; Gasic, Ivana; Huber-Reggi, Sabina P; Dudka, Damian; Barisic, Marin; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick

    2015-07-18

    Chromosome alignment in the middle of the bipolar spindle is a hallmark of metazoan cell divisions. When we offset the metaphase plate position by creating an asymmetric centriole distribution on each pole, we find that metaphase plates relocate to the middle of the spindle before anaphase. The spindle assembly checkpoint enables this centering mechanism by providing cells enough time to correct metaphase plate position. The checkpoint responds to unstable kinetochore-microtubule attachments resulting from an imbalance in microtubule stability between the two half-spindles in cells with an asymmetric centriole distribution. Inactivation of the checkpoint prior to metaphase plate centering leads to asymmetric cell divisions and daughter cells of unequal size; in contrast, if the checkpoint is inactivated after the metaphase plate has centered its position, symmetric cell divisions ensue. This indicates that the equatorial position of the metaphase plate is essential for symmetric cell divisions.

  4. Optimal architecture of differentiation cascades with asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel

    2016-10-21

    The role of symmetric division in stem cell biology is ambiguous. It is necessary after injuries, but if symmetric divisions occur too often, the appearance of tumours is more likely. To explore the role of symmetric and asymmetric division in cell populations, we propose a mathematical model of competition of populations, in which the stem cell expansion is controlled by fully differentiated cells. We show that there is an optimal fraction of symmetric stem cell division, which maximises the long-term survival probability of the organism. Moreover, we show the optimal number of stem cells in a tissue, and we show that number has to be small enough to reduce the probability of the appearance of advantageous malignant cells, and large enough to assure that the population will not be suppressed by stochastic fluctuations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of the Min System on Timing of Cell Division in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuxin; Keilberg, Daniela; Hot, Edina; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Lenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the Min protein system plays an important role in positioning the division site. We show that this system also has an effect on timing of cell division. We do this in a quantitative way by measuring the cell division waiting time (defined as time difference between appearance of a division site and the division event) and the Z-ring existence time. Both quantities are found to be different in WT and cells without functional Min system. We develop a series of theoretical models whose predictions are compared with the experimental findings. Continuous improvement leads to a final model that is able to explain all relevant experimental observations. In particular, it shows that the chromosome segregation defect caused by the absence of Min proteins has an important influence on timing of cell division. Our results indicate that the Min system affects the septum formation rate. In the absence of the Min proteins this rate is reduced, leading to the observed strongly randomized cell division events and the longer division waiting times. PMID:25090009

  6. A theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Mohr, Elodie; Pelletier, Nadége; Zhang, Yang; Victora, Gabriel D; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2012-07-26

    High-affinity antibodies are generated in germinal centers in a process involving mutation and selection of B cells. Information processing in germinal center reactions has been investigated in a number of recent experiments. These have revealed cell migration patterns, asymmetric cell divisions, and cell-cell interaction characteristics, used here to develop a theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit (the LEDA model). According to this model, B cells selected by T follicular helper cells on the basis of successful antigen processing always return to the dark zone for asymmetric division, and acquired antigen is inherited by one daughter cell only. Antigen-retaining B cells differentiate to plasma cells and leave the germinal center through the dark zone. This theory has implications for the functioning of germinal centers because compared to previous models, high-affinity antibodies appear one day earlier and the amount of derived plasma cells is considerably larger.

  7. Nucleus and cell size changes in human bulbar conjunctival cells after soft contact lens wear, as assessed by impression cytology.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J; Naase, Taher

    2008-06-01

    To specifically assess the nucleus size and its relationship to cell size for human bulbar conjunctival cells. Impression cytology samples were taken from the nasal side of the intra-palpebral zone of the bulbar conjunctival surface from 20 young adult white European males, half of whom were successful daily soft contact lens wearers. A Millcell-CM filter was used, after topical anaesthesia with oxybuprocaine 0.4%, which was stained with Giemsa and colour images taken at 400x magnification by light microscopy. The images were graded and also a 35mm was prepared. From the projected image, an overlay method was used to outline the borders such that the cell and nucleus areas could be measured by planimetry. The group mean cell area values were 267+/-59microm(2) (n=10, +/-S.D.) and 1028+/-357microm(2) for the non-contact lens wearers and contact lens wearers, respectively. The cell nucleus areas were 64+/-11microm(2) and 99+/-19microm(2), respectively. Both the cell areas and nucleus area values were statistically different between the two groups (p<0.001). These studies confirm that soft contact lens wear can result in cell enlargement (squamous metaplasia) of the bulbar conjunctival cells. With this cell enlargement, the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio also changes, but the nucleus size generally increases (rather than decreases).

  8. Growth-Arrest-Specific Protein 2 Inhibits Cell Division in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Dayanandan, Bama; Rouiller, Isabelle; Lawrence, Elizabeth J.; Mandato, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported. Methodology and Principal Findings To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures. Conclusion and Significance Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest. PMID:21931817

  9. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape

    PubMed Central

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-01-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype. PMID:26515603

  10. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape.

    PubMed

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-02-09

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype.

  11. Pristionchus pacificus vulva formation: polarized division, cell migration, cell fusion, and evolution of invagination.

    PubMed

    Kolotuev, Irina; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2004-02-15

    Tube formation is a widespread process during organogenesis. Specific cellular behaviors participate in the invagination of epithelial monolayers that form tubes. However, little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms of cell assembly into tubes during development. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the detailed step-to-step process of vulva formation has been studied in wild type and in several mutants. Here we show that cellular processes during vulva development, which involve toroidal cell formation and stacking of rings, are conserved between C. elegans and Pristionchus pacificus, two species of nematodes that diverged approximately 100 million years ago. These cellular behaviors are divided into phases of cell proliferation, short-range migration, and cell fusion that are temporally distinct in C. elegans but not in P. pacificus. Thus, we identify heterochronic changes in the cellular events of vulva development between these two species. We find that alterations in the division axes of two equivalent vulval cells from Left-Right cleavage in C. elegans to Anterior-Posterior division in P. pacificus can cause the formation of an additional eighth ring. Thus, orthogonal changes in cell division axes with alterations in the number and sequence of cell fusion events result in dramatic differences in vulval shape and in the number of rings in the species studied. Our characterization of vulva formation in P. pacificus compared to C. elegans provides an evolutionary-developmental foundation for molecular genetic analyses of organogenesis in different species within the phylum Nematoda.

  12. Planar cell polarity signalling couples cell division and morphogenesis during neurulation

    PubMed Central

    Ciruna, Brian; Jenny, Andreas; Lee, Diana; Mlodzik, Marek; Schier, Alexander F.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental and genetic aberrations lead to neural tube closure defects (NTDs) in 1 in every 1000 births1. Mouse and frog models for these birth defects have suggested that Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2, also known as Strabismus) and other components of planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling control neurulation by promoting the convergence of neural progenitors to the midline2-8. Here we report a novel role for PCP signalling during neurulation in zebrafish. We demonstrate that non-canonical Wnt/PCP signalling polarizes neural progenitors along the anterior-posterior axis. This polarity is transiently lost during cell division in the neural keel but is re-established as daughter cells reintegrate into the neuroepithelium. Loss of zebrafish Vangl2 (in trilobite mutants) abolishes the polarization of neural keel cells, disrupts re-intercalation of daughter cells into the neuroepithelium, and results in ectopic neural progenitor accumulations and NTDs. Remarkably, blocking cell division leads to rescue of trilobite neural tube morphogenesis despite persistent defects in convergence and extension. These results reveal a role for PCP signalling in coupling cell division and morphogenesis at neurulation and suggest a novel mechanism underlying NTDs. PMID:16407953

  13. A plant cell division algorithm based on cell biomechanics and ellipse-fitting

    PubMed Central

    Abera, Metadel K.; Verboven, Pieter; Defraeye, Thijs; Fanta, Solomon Workneh; Hertog, Maarten L. A. T. M.; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The importance of cell division models in cellular pattern studies has been acknowledged since the 19th century. Most of the available models developed to date are limited to symmetric cell division with isotropic growth. Often, the actual growth of the cell wall is either not considered or is updated intermittently on a separate time scale to the mechanics. This study presents a generic algorithm that accounts for both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells with isotropic and anisotropic growth. Actual growth of the cell wall is simulated simultaneously with the mechanics. Methods The cell is considered as a closed, thin-walled structure, maintained in tension by turgor pressure. The cell walls are represented as linear elastic elements that obey Hooke's law. Cell expansion is induced by turgor pressure acting on the yielding cell-wall material. A system of differential equations for the positions and velocities of the cell vertices as well as for the actual growth of the cell wall is established. Readiness to divide is determined based on cell size. An ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to determine the position and orientation of the dividing wall. The cell vertices, walls and cell connectivity are then updated and cell expansion resumes. Comparisons are made with experimental data from the literature. Key Results The generic plant cell division algorithm has been implemented successfully. It can handle both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells coupled with isotropic and anisotropic growth modes. Development of the algorithm highlighted the importance of ellipse-fitting to produce randomness (biological variability) even in symmetrically dividing cells. Unlike previous models, a differential equation is formulated for the resting length of the cell wall to simulate actual biological growth and is solved simultaneously with the position and velocity of the vertices. Conclusions The algorithm presented can produce different

  14. Timing mechanism dependent on cell division is invoked by Polycomb eviction in plant stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Looi, Liang-Sheng; Guo, Siyi; He, Zemiao; Gan, Eng-Seng; Huang, Jiangbo; Xu, Yifeng; Wee, Wan-Yi; Ito, Toshiro

    2014-01-31

    Plant floral stem cells divide a limited number of times before they stop and terminally differentiate, but the mechanisms that control this timing remain unclear. The precise temporal induction of the Arabidopsis zinc finger repressor KNUCKLES (KNU) is essential for the coordinated growth and differentiation of floral stem cells. We identify an epigenetic mechanism in which the floral homeotic protein AGAMOUS (AG) induces KNU at ~2 days of delay. AG binding sites colocalize with a Polycomb response element in the KNU upstream region. AG binding to the KNU promoter causes the eviction of the Polycomb group proteins from the locus, leading to cell division-dependent induction. These analyses demonstrate that floral stem cells measure developmental timing by a division-dependent epigenetic timer triggered by Polycomb eviction.

  15. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    PubMed Central

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  16. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization.

    PubMed

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  17. [Expression of CD48 as a live marker to distinguish division of hematopoietic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Lu-Yun; Pang, Ya-Kun; Dong, Fang; Ji, Qing; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai

    2014-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation when they divide. Three types of cell divisions exist. A dividing stem cell may generate 2 new stem cells (symmetrical renewal division), or 2 differentiating cells (symmetrical differentiation division), or 1 cell of each type (asymmetrical division). This study was aimed to explore an efficient and stable method to distinguish the way of cell division in hematopoietic stem cells. Previous studies showed that the distribution of Numb in a cell could be used to distinguish the type of cell division in various kinds of cells. Therefore, the distribution of Numb protein was detected by immunofluorescence in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells of mice exploring the relationship between Numb protein and centrosomes. Since CD48 positive marks the HSC that have lost the ability to reconstitute the blood system in mice, CD48 marker could be used to distinguish cell fate decision between self-renewal and differentiation as a living marker. In this study, the CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells were sorted from bone marrow cells of mice and the cells were directly labeled with Alexa Fluor (AF) 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody in living cultures. After 3 days, the percentage of AF488(+) cells was evaluated under microscope and by FACS. Then colony forming cell assay (CFC) was performed and the ability of cell proliferation were compared between AF488(+) and AF488(-) cells. The results showed that Numb could be used to distinguish different cell division types of hematopoietic stem cells, which was symmetrically or asymmetrically segregated in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells. The self-labeled fluorochrome could be detected both by FACS as well as microscope. There were about 40% AF488(+) cells after 3 day-cultures in medium titrated with self-labeled AF 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody, and the results were consistent between confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. The colony forming ability of

  18. The cell polarity determinant CDC42 controls division symmetry to block leukemia cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Benjamin; O'Brien, Eric; Moreira, Daniel C; Wunderlich, Mark; Hochstetler, Cindy L; Duan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Orr, Emily; Grimes, H Leighton; Mulloy, James C; Zheng, Yi

    2017-09-14

    As a central regulator of cell polarity, the activity of CDC42 GTPase is tightly controlled in maintaining normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/P) functions. We found that transformation of HSC/P to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with increased CDC42 expression and activity in leukemia cells. In a mouse model of AML, the loss of Cdc42 abrogates MLL-AF9-induced AML development. Furthermore, genetic ablation of CDC42 in both murine and human MLL-AF9 (MA9) cells decreased survival and induced differentiation of the clonogenic leukemia-initiating cells. We show that MLL-AF9 leukemia cells maintain cell polarity in the context of elevated Cdc42-guanosine triphosphate activity, similar to nonmalignant, young HSC/Ps. The loss of Cdc42 resulted in a shift to depolarized AML cells that is associated with a decrease in the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions producing daughter cells capable of self-renewal. Importantly, we demonstrate that inducible CDC42 suppression in primary human AML cells blocks leukemia progression in a xenograft model. Thus, CDC42 loss suppresses AML cell polarity and division asymmetry, and CDC42 constitutes a useful target to alter leukemia-initiating cell fate for differentiation therapy. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. An Equatorial Contractile Mechanism Drives Cell Elongation but not Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Elsa; Bhattachan, Punit; Deng, Wei; Mathiesen, Birthe T.; Jiang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cell shape changes and proliferation are two fundamental strategies for morphogenesis in animal development. During embryogenesis of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis, elongation of individual notochord cells constitutes a crucial stage of notochord growth, which contributes to the establishment of the larval body plan. The mechanism of cell elongation is elusive. Here we show that although notochord cells do not divide, they use a cytokinesis-like actomyosin mechanism to drive cell elongation. The actomyosin network forming at the equator of each notochord cell includes phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain, α-actinin, cofilin, tropomyosin, and talin. We demonstrate that cofilin and α-actinin are two crucial components for cell elongation. Cortical flow contributes to the assembly of the actomyosin ring. Similar to cytokinetic cells, membrane blebs that cause local contractions form at the basal cortex next to the equator and participate in force generation. We present a model in which the cooperation of equatorial actomyosin ring-based constriction and bleb-associated contractions at the basal cortex promotes cell elongation. Our results demonstrate that a cytokinesis-like contractile mechanism is co-opted in a completely different developmental scenario to achieve cell shape change instead of cell division. We discuss the occurrences of actomyosin rings aside from cell division, suggesting that circumferential contraction is an evolutionally conserved mechanism to drive cell or tissue elongation. PMID:24503569

  20. Receptor-like kinase ACR4 restricts formative cell divisions in the Arabidopsis root.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Ive; Vassileva, Valya; De Rybel, Bert; Levesque, Mitchell P; Grunewald, Wim; Van Damme, Daniël; Van Noorden, Giel; Naudts, Mirande; Van Isterdael, Gert; De Clercq, Rebecca; Wang, Jean Y; Meuli, Nicholas; Vanneste, Steffen; Friml, Jirí; Hilson, Pierre; Jürgens, Gerd; Ingram, Gwyneth C; Inzé, Dirk; Benfey, Philip N; Beeckman, Tom

    2008-10-24

    During the development of multicellular organisms, organogenesis and pattern formation depend on formative divisions to specify and maintain pools of stem cells. In higher plants, these activities are essential to shape the final root architecture because the functioning of root apical meristems and the de novo formation of lateral roots entirely rely on it. We used transcript profiling on sorted pericycle cells undergoing lateral root initiation to identify the receptor-like kinase ACR4 of Arabidopsis as a key factor both in promoting formative cell divisions in the pericycle and in constraining the number of these divisions once organogenesis has been started. In the root tip meristem, ACR4 shows a similar action by controlling cell proliferation activity in the columella cell lineage. Thus, ACR4 function reveals a common mechanism of formative cell division control in the main root tip meristem and during lateral root initiation.

  1. Evidence for polar positional information independent of cell division and nucleoid occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Janakiraman, Anuradha; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2004-01-01

    We present evidence that, in Escherichia coli, polar positional information is present at midcell independent of known cell division factors. In filamented cells, IcsA, which is normally polar, localizes at or near potential cell division sites. Because the cell pole is derived from the septum, the sites to which IcsA localizes in filaments correspond to future poles. IcsA localization to these sites is independent of FtsZ, MinCDE, septation, and nucleoid occlusion, indicating that positional information for the future pole is independent of cell division and chromosome positioning. Upon IcsA localization to these sites, septation is inhibited, suggesting that IcsA recognition of this polar positional information may influence cell division. PMID:14715903

  2. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson–Dumais rule generalizes Errera’s rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson–Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson–Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants. PMID:27436908

  3. Cell Division and Targeted Cell Cycle Arrest Opens and Stabilizes Basement Membrane Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Chang, Emily; Makohon-Moore, Sasha C.; Hagedorn, Mary A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Large gaps in basement membrane (BM) occur during organ remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Whether dividing cells, which temporarily reduce their attachment to BM, influence these breaches is unknown. Here we analyse uterine-vulval attachment during development across 21 species of rhabditid nematodes and find that the BM gap that forms between these organs is always bounded by a non-dividing vulval cell. Through cell cycle manipulation and live cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that actively dividing vulval cells facilitate enlargement of this breach by promoting BM movement. In contrast, targeted cell-cycle arrest halts BM movement and limits gap opening. Further, we demonstrate that the BM component laminin accumulates at the BM gap edge and promotes increased integrin levels in non-dividing vulval cells, stabilizing gap position. Together, these studies reveal that cell division can be used as a mechanism to regulate BM breaches, thus controlling the exchange of cells between tissues. PMID:24924309

  4. Metformin protects against apoptosis and senescence in nucleus pulposus cells and ameliorates disc degeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deheng; Xia, Dongdong; Pan, Zongyou; Xu, Daoliang; Zhou, Yifei; Wu, Yaosen; Cai, Ningyu; Tang, Qian; Wang, Chenggui; Yan, Meijun; Zhang, Jing Jie; Zhou, Kailiang; Wang, Quan; Feng, Yongzeng; Wang, Xiangyang; Xu, Huazi; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tian, Naifeng

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a complicated process that involves both cellular apoptosis and senescence. Metformin has been reported to stimulate autophagy, whereas autophagy is shown to protect against apoptosis and senescence. Therefore, we hypothesize that metformin may have therapeutic effect on IDD through autophagy stimulation. The effect of metformin on IDD was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Our study showed that metformin attenuated cellular apoptosis and senescence induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in nucleus pulposus cells. Autophagy, as well as its upstream regulator AMPK, was activated by metformin in nucleus pulposus cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA partially abolished the protective effect of metformin against nucleus pulposus cells' apoptosis and senescence, indicating that autophagy was involved in the protective effect of metformin on IDD. In addition, metformin was shown to promote the expression of anabolic genes such as Col2a1 and Acan expression while inhibiting the expression of catabolic genes such as Mmp3 and Adamts5 in nucleus pulposus cells. In vivo study illustrated that metformin treatment could ameliorate IDD in a puncture-induced rat model. Thus, our study showed that metformin could protect nucleus pulposus cells against apoptosis and senescence via autophagy stimulation and ameliorate disc degeneration in vivo, revealing its potential to be a therapeutic agent for IDD. PMID:27787519

  5. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  6. Chromosome Segregation Impacts on Cell Growth and Division Site Selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids. PMID:23405112

  7. RNA processing body (P-body) dynamics in mesophyll protoplasts re-initiating cell division.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Dilbag S; Sheahan, Michael B; Rose, Ray J

    2016-12-07

    The ability of plants to regenerate lies in the capacity of differentiated cells to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. Reprogramming of cells requires changes in chromatin organisation and gene expression. However, there has been less focus on changes at the post transcription level. We have investigated P-bodies, sites of post transcriptional gene regulation, in plant cell reprogramming in cultured mesophyll protoplasts; by using a YFP-VARICOSE (YFP-VCSc) translational fusion. We showed an early increase in P-body number and volume, followed by a decline, then a subsequent continued increase in P-body number and volume as cell division was initiated and cell proliferation continued. We infer that plant P-bodies have a role to play in reprogramming the mature cell and re-initiating the cell division cycle. The timing of the first phase is consistent with the degredation of messages no longer required, as the cell transits to the division state, and may also be linked to the stress response associated with division induction in cultured cells. The subsequent increase in P-body formation, with partitioning to the daughter cells during the division process, suggests a role in the cell cycle and its re-initiation in daughter cells. P-bodies were shown to be mobile in the cytoplasm and show actin-based motility which facilitates their post-transcriptional role and partitioning to daughter cells.

  8. Stem and progenitor cell division kinetics during postnatal mouse mammary gland development

    PubMed Central

    Giraddi, Rajshekhar R.; Shehata, Mona; Gallardo, Mercedes; Blasco, Maria A.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Stingl, John

    2015-01-01

    The cycling properties of mammary stem and progenitor cells is not well understood. To determine the division properties of these cells, we administered synthetic nucleosides for varying periods of time to mice at different stages of postnatal development and monitored the rate of uptake of these nucleosides in the different mammary cell compartments. Here we show that most cell division in the adult virgin gland is restricted to the oestrogen receptor-expressing luminal cell lineage. Our data also demonstrate that the oestrogen receptor-expressing, milk and basal cell subpopulations have telomere lengths and cell division kinetics that are not compatible with these cells being hierarchically organized; instead, our data indicate that in the adult homeostatic gland, each cell type is largely maintained by its own restricted progenitors. We also observe that transplantable stem cells are largely quiescent during oestrus, but are cycling during dioestrus when progesterone levels are high. PMID:26511661

  9. Evolution of the global internal dynamics of a living cell nucleus during interphase.

    PubMed

    Suissa, M; Place, C; Goillot, E; Freyssingeas, E

    2009-07-22

    Progress in cellular biology based on fluorescent microscopy techniques, shows that the spatial organization of the nucleus is dynamic. This dynamic is very complex and involves a multitude of phenomena that occur on very different time and size scales. Using an original light scattering experimental device, we investigated the global internal dynamics of the nucleus of a living cell according to the phases of the cell cycle. This dynamic presents two different and independent kinds of relaxation that are well separated in time and specific to the phase of the cell cycle.

  10. Long-term microfluidic tracking of coccoid cyanobacterial cells reveals robust control of division timing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feiqiao Brian; Willis, Lisa; Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Zambon, Alessandro; Horowitz, Mark; Bhaya, Devaki; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-02-14

    Cyanobacteria are important agents in global carbon and nitrogen cycling and hold great promise for biotechnological applications. Model organisms such as Synechocystis sp. and Synechococcus sp. have advanced our understanding of photosynthetic capacity and circadian behavior, mostly using population-level measurements in which the behavior of individuals cannot be monitored. Synechocystis sp. cells are small and divide slowly, requiring long-term experiments to track single cells. Thus, the cumulative effects of drift over long periods can cause difficulties in monitoring and quantifying cell growth and division dynamics. To overcome this challenge, we enhanced a microfluidic cell-culture device and developed an image analysis pipeline for robust lineage reconstruction. This allowed simultaneous tracking of many cells over multiple generations, and revealed that cells expand exponentially throughout their cell cycle. Generation times were highly correlated for sister cells, but not between mother and daughter cells. Relationships between birth size, division size, and generation time indicated that cell-size control was inconsistent with the "sizer" rule, where division timing is based on cell size, or the "timer" rule, where division occurs after a fixed time interval. Instead, single cell growth statistics were most consistent with the "adder" rule, in which division occurs after a constant increment in cell volume. Cells exposed to light-dark cycles exhibited growth and division only during the light period; dark phases pause but do not disrupt cell-cycle control. Our analyses revealed that the "adder" model can explain both the growth-related statistics of single Synechocystis cells and the correlation between sister cell generation times. We also observed rapid phenotypic response to light-dark transitions at the single cell level, highlighting the critical role of light in cyanobacterial cell-cycle control. Our findings suggest that by monitoring the growth

  11. [Regulation of the Z ring positioning in bacterial cell division--a review].

    PubMed

    Sang, Yu; Tao, Jing; Yao, Yufeng

    2013-04-04

    The regulatory mechanism of bacterial cell division has long been a research focus. Forming a septum at the middle of the cell, the seemingly simple process is involved by multiple regulation factors. Zring (FtsZ ring) is the skeleton of the splitting complex. The locus where Z ring is formed is not only the position the septum formed but also determines the cell division site. Formation of Zring in the incorrect location results in inequality cell division. Several cell division regulation systems have been identified, including the Min system, nucleoid occlusion and the MipZ protein which effectively prevent Zring assembly by different mechanisms, ensuring formation of the fission complex at the correct position. Recent progresses about the formation process of Zring and regulation mechanism affecting the Z-ring positioning are summarized.

  12. Medicinal Plants: A Potential Source of Compounds for Targeting Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Zulkipli, Ihsan N; David, Sheba R; Rajabalaya, Rajan; Idris, Adi

    2015-01-01

    Modern medicinal plant drug discovery has provided pharmacologically active compounds targeted against a multitude of conditions and diseases, such as infection, inflammation, and cancer. To date, natural products from medicinal plants remain a solid niche as a source from which cancer therapies can be derived. Among other properties, one favorable characteristic of an anticancer drug is its ability to block the uncontrollable process of cell division, as cancer cells are notorious for their abnormal cell division. There are numerous other documented works on the potential anticancer activity of drugs derived from medicinal plants, and their effects on cell division are an attractive and growing therapeutic target. Despite this, there remains a vast number of unidentified natural products that are potentially promising sources for medical applications. This mini review aims to revise the current knowledge of the effects of natural plant products on cell division. PMID:26106261

  13. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  14. Coordinating bacterial cell division with nutrient availability: a role for glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Leigh G; Hajduk, Isabella V; Blaber, Sinead P; Charles, Ian G; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2014-05-13

    Cell division in bacteria is driven by a cytoskeletal ring structure, the Z ring, composed of polymers of the tubulin-like protein FtsZ. Z-ring formation must be tightly regulated to ensure faithful cell division, and several mechanisms that influence the positioning and timing of Z-ring assembly have been described. Another important but as yet poorly understood aspect of cell division regulation is the need to coordinate division with cell growth and nutrient availability. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that cell division is intimately linked to central carbon metabolism in the model Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We showed that a deletion of the gene encoding pyruvate kinase (pyk), which produces pyruvate in the final reaction of glycolysis, rescues the assembly defect of a temperature-sensitive ftsZ mutant and has significant effects on Z-ring formation in wild-type B. subtilis cells. Addition of exogenous pyruvate restores normal division in the absence of the pyruvate kinase enzyme, implicating pyruvate as a key metabolite in the coordination of bacterial growth and division. Our results support a model in which pyruvate levels are coupled to Z-ring assembly via an enzyme that actually metabolizes pyruvate, the E1α subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase. We have shown that this protein localizes over the nucleoid in a pyruvate-dependent manner and may stimulate more efficient Z-ring formation at the cell center under nutrient-rich conditions, when cells must divide more frequently. How bacteria coordinate cell cycle processes with nutrient availability and growth is a fundamental yet unresolved question in microbiology. Recent breakthroughs have revealed that nutritional information can be transmitted directly from metabolic pathways to the cell cycle machinery and that this can serve as a mechanism for fine-tuning cell cycle processes in response to changes in environmental conditions. Here we identified a novel link between

  15. Asymmetric Inheritance of Mother Versus Daughter Centrosome in Stem Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Mahowald, Anthony P.; Perlin, Julie R.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2007-01-01

    Adult stem cells often divide asymmetrically to produce one self-renewed stem cell and one differentiating cell, thus maintaining both populations. The asymmetric outcome of stem cell divisions can be specified by an oriented spindle and local self-renewal signals from the stem cell niche. Here we show that developmentally programmed asymmetric behavior and inheritance of mother and daughter centrosomes underlies the stereotyped spindle orientation and asymmetric outcome of stem cell divisions in the Drosophila male germ line. The mother centrosome remains anchored near the niche while the daughter centrosome migrates to the opposite side of the cell before spindle formation. PMID:17255513

  16. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) and nuclear calcium ([Ca(2+)]n) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca(2+)]n detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca(2+)]n and [Ca(2+)]c in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Formation of newly synthesized adeno-associated virus capsids in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bell, Peter; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, James M

    2014-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) particles inside the nucleus of a HEK 293 cell are shown by electron microscopy. Cells have been triple-transfected for vector production and were analyzed for capsid formation three days later. Newly assembled particle are visible as seemingly unstructured conglomerates or crystal-like arrays.

  18. Nucleoid occlusion prevents cell division during replication fork arrest in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Remi; Marquis, Kathleen A.; Rudner, David Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary How bacteria respond to chromosome replication stress has been traditionally studied using temperature-sensitive mutants and chemical inhibitors. These methods inevitably arrest all replication and lead to induction of transcriptional responses and inhibition of cell division. Here, we used repressor proteins bound to operator arrays to generate a single stalled replication fork. These replication roadblocks impeded replisome progression on one arm, leaving replication of the other arm and re-initiation unaffected. Remarkably, despite robust generation of RecA-GFP filaments and a strong block to cell division during the roadblock, patterns of gene expression were not significantly altered. Consistent with these findings, division inhibition was not mediated by the SOS-induced regulator YneA nor by RecA-independent repression of ftsL. In support of the idea that nucleoid occlusion prevents inappropriate cell division during fork arrest, immature FtsZ-rings formed adjacent to the DNA mass but rarely on top of it. Furthermore, mild alterations in chromosome compaction resulted in cell division that guillotined the DNA. Strikingly, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc had no discernable role in division inhibition. Our data indicate that Noc-independent nucleoid occlusion prevents inappropriate cell division during replication fork arrest. They further suggest that Bacillus subtilis normally manages replication stress rather than inducing a stress-response. PMID:20807205

  19. ANA detected by ELISA using nucleus of egg cell as antigen.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liu; Shijun, Li; Yue, Ma

    2008-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies, ANA, were usually detected with antigen of somatic cell nucleus. It has not been reported to detect ANA with egg cell nucleus as antigen. Enzyme linked immuosorbent assay, ELISA, coated with yolk was developed to detect ANA in our laboratory. A quality control test, cross absorption test, and cross antibody-induced test with yolk were performed. Results showed a good agreement between our method and IFA through measurement of the same samples from patients suspected of having rheumatic connective tissue diseases (Kappa=0.668, P=0.000). The results were not influenced by the RF and different sources of egg. CVs of inter-assay, were less than 10%. The cross absorption test was negative, as well; the ANA to somatic cell nucleus could be induced with egg cell nucleus. It is implied that there were both cross as well as overlapped Egg-ANA and Somatic-ANA. As egg nucleus, its volume was large, its purification was simple, so the better method might be established.

  20. Experimental systems to explore life origin: perspectives for understanding primitive mechanisms of cell division.

    PubMed

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Compartmentalization is a necessary element for the development of any cell cycle and the origin of speciation. Changes in shape and size of compartments might have been the first manifestation of development of so-called cell cycles. Cell growth and division, processes guided by biological reactions in modern cells, might have originated as purely physicochemical processes. Modern cells use enzymes to initiate and control all stages of cell cycle. Protocells, in the absence of advanced enzymatic machinery, might have needed to rely on physical properties of the membrane. As the division processes could not have been controlled by the cell's metabolism, the first protocells probably did not undergo regular cell cycles as we know it in cells of today. More likely, the division of protocells was triggered either by some inorganic catalyzing factor, such as porous surface, or protocells divided when the encapsulated contents reached some critical concentration.

  1. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Adler, H I; Fisher, W D; Hardigree, A A; Stapleton, G E

    1966-02-01

    Adler, Howard I. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.), William D. Fisher, Alice A. Hardigree, and George E. Stapleton. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 91:737-742. 1966.-Microscopic observations of irradiated populations of filamentous Escherichia coli cells indicated that filaments can be induced to divide by a substance donated by neighboring cells. We have made this observation the basis for a quantitative technique in which filaments are incubated in the presence of nongrowing donor cells. The presence of "donor" organisms promotes division and subsequent colony formation in filaments. "Donor" bacteria do not affect nonfilamentous cells. An extract of "donor" cells retains the division-promoting activity. The extract has been partially fractionated, and consists of a heat-stable and a heat-labile component. The heat-stable component is inactive in promoting cell division, but enhances the activity of the heat-labile component. The division-promoting system is discussed as a radiation repair mechanism and as a normal component of the cell division system in E. coli.

  2. Xenopus as a model for studies in mechanical stress and cell division.

    PubMed

    Stooke-Vaughan, Georgina A; Davidson, Lance A; Woolner, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    We exist in a physical world, and cells within biological tissues must respond appropriately to both environmental forces and forces generated within the tissue to ensure normal development and homeostasis. Cell division is required for normal tissue growth and maintenance, but both the direction and rate of cell division must be tightly controlled to avoid diseases of over-proliferation such as cancer. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues can cause mitotic entry and orient the mitotic spindle, suggesting that physical force could play a role in patterning tissue growth. However, to fully understand how mechanics guides cells in vivo, it is necessary to assess the interaction of mechanical strain and cell division in a whole tissue context. In this mini-review we first summarise the body of work linking mechanics and cell division, before looking at the advantages that the Xenopus embryo can offer as a model organism for understanding: (1) the mechanical environment during embryogenesis, and (2) factors important for cell division. Finally, we introduce a novel method for applying a reproducible strain to Xenopus embryonic tissue and assessing subsequent cell divisions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Notochordal cell-derived conditioned medium protects human nucleus pulposus cells from stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mehrkens, Arne; Matta, Ajay; Karim, Muhammad Zia; Kim, Sarah; Fehlings, Michael G; Schaeren, Stefan; Mark Erwin, William

    2017-04-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) remains without an effective therapy and presents a costly burden to society. Based upon prior reports concerning the effects of notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) on disc cells, we performed a proof of principle study to determine whether NCCM could reduce cytotoxic stress-induced apoptosis in human disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. This is an "in vitro" fundamental or basic science study. Nucleus pulpous cells derived from 15 patients undergoing spinal surgery were treated with interleukin (IL)-1β and Fas ligand or etoposide in the presence of NCCM. We determined pro- or antiapoptotic events using activated caspase assays and determined genomic regulation of apoptosis using polymerase chain reaction arrays validated using Western blotting methods. We interrogated cellular apoptotic regulation using JC-1 dye and flow cytometry and performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to evaluate NP inflammatory cytokine secretion. Notochordal cell-conditioned medium inhibits cytotoxic stress-induced caspase-9 and -3/7 activities and maintains the mitochondrial membrane potential in human NP cells, thereby suppressing the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Gene expression analysis revealed the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein as a key player responsible for evading etoposide-induced apoptosis in the presence of NCCM, and we verified these data using Western blotting. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results revealed distinct differences in IL-6 and IL-8 secretions by NP cells in response to etoposide in the presence of NCCM. Here we demonstrate for the first time that NCCM reduces cytotoxic stress-induced apoptosis in human NP cells. Soluble factors present in NCCM could be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of DDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Interplay of cell shape and division orientation promotes robust morphogenesis of developing epithelia.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fengzhu; Ma, Wenzhe; Hiscock, Tom W; Mosaliganti, Kishore R; Tentner, Andrea R; Brakke, Kenneth A; Rannou, Nicolas; Gelas, Arnaud; Souhait, Lydie; Swinburne, Ian A; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Megason, Sean G

    2014-10-09

    Epithelial cells acquire functionally important shapes (e.g., squamous, cuboidal, columnar) during development. Here, we combine theory, quantitative imaging, and perturbations to analyze how tissue geometry, cell divisions, and mechanics interact to shape the presumptive enveloping layer (pre-EVL) on the zebrafish embryonic surface. We find that, under geometrical constraints, pre-EVL flattening is regulated by surface cell number changes following differentially oriented cell divisions. The division pattern is, in turn, determined by the cell shape distribution, which forms under geometrical constraints by cell-cell mechanical coupling. An integrated mathematical model of this shape-division feedback loop recapitulates empirical observations. Surprisingly, the model predicts that cell shape is robust to changes of tissue surface area, cell volume, and cell number, which we confirm in vivo. Further simulations and perturbations suggest the parameter linking cell shape and division orientation contributes to epithelial diversity. Together, our work identifies an evolvable design logic that enables robust cell-level regulation of tissue-level development.

  5. Metabolic maintenance of cell asymmetry following division in activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Verbist, Katherine C; Guy, Cliff S; Milasta, Sandra; Liedmann, Swantje; Kamiński, Marcin M; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2016-04-21

    Asymmetric cell division, the partitioning of cellular components in response to polarizing cues during mitosis, has roles in differentiation and development. It is important for the self-renewal of fertilized zygotes in Caenorhabditis elegans and neuroblasts in Drosophila, and in the development of mammalian nervous and digestive systems. T lymphocytes, upon activation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), can undergo asymmetric cell division, wherein the daughter cell proximal to the APC is more likely to differentiate into an effector-like T cell and the distal daughter is more likely to differentiate into a memory-like T cell. Upon activation and before cell division, expression of the transcription factor c-Myc drives metabolic reprogramming, necessary for the subsequent proliferative burst. Here we find that during the first division of an activated T cell in mice, c-Myc can sort asymmetrically. Asymmetric distribution of amino acid transporters, amino acid content, and activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is correlated with c-Myc expression, and both amino acids and mTORC1 activity sustain the differences in c-Myc expression in one daughter cell compared to the other. Asymmetric c-Myc levels in daughter T cells affect proliferation, metabolism, and differentiation, and these effects are altered by experimental manipulation of mTORC1 activity or c-Myc expression. Therefore, metabolic signalling pathways cooperate with transcription programs to maintain differential cell fates following asymmetric T-cell division.

  6. Objective assessment of conjunctival squamous metaplasia by measures of cell and nucleus dimensions.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    The main aim of this work is to present a special method for conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) and objective measures of measure cell and nucleus dimensions. CIC using Millicell® Biopore filters was obtained from 50 Caucasian adults from the nasal bulbar conjunctiva. Giemsa-stained images of cells in a monolayer were photographed with a scale bar and projected at 1,500× to generate an overlay. Measures were made of both the long (L) and short (S) dimensions of the cells and the longest dimension of the nucleus (LN). The selected images comprised sets of 10 from different individuals, which had been assigned grades 0, 1, 2, or 3 and an additional grade 0.5. L ranged from 18.4 to 65.2 μm, S from 13.1 to 47.1 μm, to give average cell shape values (L:S ratio) of between 1.259 and 1.890. L and S were smallest for grade 0 cells (group mean 19.8 ± 1.1 and 14.8 ± 1.2 μm) and largest for grade 3 cells (group 51.2 ± 7.2 and 37.2 ± 4.7 μm), with no difference in L:S ratios across the cell grades. Longest dimension of the nucleus (NL) values ranged from 8.7 to 14.5 μm, with group mean values of 9.8 ± 0.6 μm for grade 0 cells and 12.9 ± 1.2 μm for grade 3 cells. NL was nonlinearly associated with L. Measures of conjunctival cell and nucleus dimensions can be used to objectively distinguish between cells assigned different grades of squamous metaplasia, with slight nucleus enlargement being the earliest detectable change (at grade 0.5). Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Transcription of the ftsZ gene and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Robin, A; Joseleau-Petit, D; D'Ari, R

    1990-01-01

    The ftsZ gene of Escherichia coli, which lies in a cluster of cell division genes at 2 min on the genetic map, codes for a protein which is thought to play a key role in triggering cell division. Using an ftsZ::lacZ operon fusion, we have studied the transcription of the ftsZ gene under conditions in which cell division was either inhibited or synchronized in the bacterial population. In ftsZ, ftsA, ftsQ, and ftsI (or pbpB) mutants, there was no change in the differential rate of expression of the ftsZ gene in nonpermissive conditions, when cell division was completely blocked. Although the FtsZ protein is thought to be limiting for cell division, in synchronized cultures the ftsZ gene was expressed not only at the moment of septation initiation but throughout the cell cycle. Its expression, however, was not exponential but linear, with a rapid doubling in rate at a specific cell age; this age, about 20 min after division in a 60-min cycle, was different from the age at which the ftsZ::lacZ operon was duplicated. However, it was close to the age at which replication initiated and at which the rate of phospholipid synthesis doubled. During the transient division inhibition after a nutritional shift-up, ftsZ transcription again became linear, with two doublings in rate at intervals equal to the mass doubling time in the rich medium; it adopted the exponential rate typical of rich medium about 60 min after the shift-up, just before the bacterial population resumed cell division. The doubling in the rate of ftsZ transcription once per cycle in synchronized cultures and once per mass doubling time during the transition period after a nutritional shift-up reflects a new cell cycle event. PMID:2106510

  8. Targeted delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible gold nanoparticles into cancer cell nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Wei; Curry, Taeyjuana; Che, Yong; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-02-01

    Nucleus remains a significant target for nanoparticles with diagnostic and therapeutic applications because both genetic information of the cell and transcription machinery reside there. Novel therapeutic strategies (for example, gene therapy), enabled by safe and efficient delivery of nanoparticles and drug molecules into the nucleus, are heralded by many as the ultimate treatment for severe and intractable diseases. However, most nanomaterials and macromolecules are incapable of reaching the cell nucleus on their own, because of biological barriers carefully honed by evolution including cellular membrane and nuclear envelope. In this paper, we have demonstrated an approach of fabrication of biocompatible gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based vehicles which can entering into cancer cell nucleus by modifying Au NPs with both PEG 5000 and two different peptides (RGD and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide). The Au NPs used were fabricated via femtosecond laser ablation of Au bulk target in deionized water. The Au NPs produced by this method provide chemical free, virgin surface, which allows us to carry out "Sequential Conjugation" to modify their surface with PEG 5000, RGD, and NLS. "Sequential Conjugation" described in this presentation is very critical for the fabrication of Au NP-based vehicles capable of entering into cancer cell nucleus as it enables the engineering and tuning surface chemistries of Au NPs by independently adjusting amounts of PEG and peptides bound onto surface of Au NPs so as to maximize their nuclear targeting performance and biocompatibility regarding the cell line of interest. Both optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to confirm the in vitro targeted nuclear delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible Au NPs by showing their presence in the cancer cell nucleus.

  9. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  10. Activity and Accumulation of Cell Division-Promoting Phenolics in Tobacco Tissue Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Teutonico, Rita A.; Dudley, Matthew W.; Orr, John D.; Lynn, David G.; Binns, Andrew N.

    1991-01-01

    Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucosides (DCGs) are derivatives of the phenylpropanoid pathway that have been isolated from Catharansus roseus L. (Vinca rosea) crown gall tumors. Fractions containing purified DCGs have been shown previously to promote the growth of cytokinin-requiring tissues of tobacco in the absence of exogenous cytokinins. In this study, we utilized synthetic DCG isomers to confirm the cell division-promoting activity of DCG isomers A and B and show that they neither promote shoot meristem initiation on Nicotiana tabacum L., cv Havana 425, leaf explants nor induce betacyanin synthesis in amaranth seedlings. Analysis of cultured tobacco pith tissue demonstrated that DCG accumulation was stimulated by cytokinin treatment and correlated with cytokinin-induced cell division. Thus, the accumulation of metabolites that could replace cytokinin in cell division bioassays is stimulated by cytokinins. These data support the model that DCGs are a component of a cytokinin-mediated regulatory circuit controlling cell division. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668384

  11. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis CwsA overproduction modulates cell division and cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Plocinski, P; Martinez, L; Sarva, K; Plocinska, R; Madiraju, M; Rajagopalan, M

    2013-12-01

    We recently showed that two small membrane proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, CwsA and CrgA, interact with each other, and that loss of CwsA in M. smegmatis is associated with defects in the cell division and cell wall synthesis processes. Here we show that CwsA overproduction also affected growth, cell division and cell shape of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis. CwsA overproduction in M. tuberculosis led to increased sensitivity to cefsulodin, a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 1A/1B targeting beta (β) -lactam, but was unaffected by other β-lactams and vancomycin. A M. smegmatis cwsA overexpressing strain showed bulgy cells, increased fluorescent vancomycin staining and altered localization of Wag31-mCherry fusion protein. However, the levels of phosphorylated Wag31, important for optimal peptidoglycan synthesis and growth in mycobacteria, were not affected. Interestingly, CwsA overproduction in E. coli led to the formation of large rounded cells that eventually lysed whereas the overproduction of FtsZ along with CwsA reversed this phenotype. Together, our results emphasize that optimal levels of CwsA are required for regulated cell wall synthesis, hence maintenance of cell shape, and that CwsA likely interacts with and modulates the activities of other cell wall synthetic components including PBPs.

  13. Asymmetric cell division and template DNA co-segregation in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pine, Sharon R; Liu, Wenyu

    2014-01-01

    During tissue homeostasis, normal stem cells self-renew and repopulate the diverse cell types found within the tissue via a series of carefully controlled symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs). The notion that solid tumors comprise a subset of cancer stem cells (CSCs) with dysregulated self-renewal and excessive symmetric cell divisions has led to numerous studies aimed to elucidate the mechanisms regulating ACD under steady-state conditions, during stem-cell expansion and in cancer. In this perspective, we focus on a type of asymmetry that can be established during ACD, called non-random co-segregation of template DNA, which has been identified across numerous species, cell types, and cancers. We discuss the role of p53 loss in maintaining self-renewal in both normal and malignant cells. We then review our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying co-segregation of template DNA strands and the stem-cell pathways associated with it in normal and CSCs.

  14. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  15. ESCRT-III mediated cell division in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius - a reconstitution perspective.

    PubMed

    Härtel, Tobias; Schwille, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of synthetic biology, it has become an intriguing question what would be the minimal representation of cell division machinery. Thus, it seems appropriate to compare how cell division is realized in different microorganisms. In particular, the cell division system of Crenarchaeota lacks certain proteins found in most bacteria and Euryarchaeota, such as FtsZ, MreB or the Min system. The Sulfolobaceae family encodes functional homologs of the eukaryotic proteins vacuolar protein sorting 4 (Vps4) and endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III). ESCRT-III is essential for several eukaryotic pathways, e.g., budding of intraluminal vesicles, or cytokinesis, whereas Vps4 dissociates the ESCRT-III complex from the membrane. Cell Division A (CdvA) is required for the recruitment of crenarchaeal ESCRT-III proteins to the membrane at mid-cell. The proteins polymerize and form a smaller structure during constriction. Thus, ESCRT-III mediated cell division in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius shows functional analogies to the Z ring observed in prokaryotes like Escherichia coli, which has recently begun to be reconstituted in vitro. In this short perspective, we discuss the possibility of building such an in vitro cell division system on basis of archaeal ESCRT-III.

  16. Kinetics of large-scale chromosomal movement during asymmetric cell division in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaana; O’Neill, Jordan C.

    2017-01-01

    Coordination between cell division and chromosome replication is essential for a cell to produce viable progeny. In the commonly accepted view, Escherichia coli realize this coordination via the accurate positioning of its cell division apparatus relative to the nucleoids. However, E. coli lacking proper positioning of its cell division planes can still successfully propagate. Here, we characterize how these cells partition their chromosomes into daughters during such asymmetric divisions. Using quantitative time-lapse imaging, we show that DNA translocase, FtsK, can pump as much as 80% (3.7 Mb) of the chromosome between daughters at an average rate of 1700±800 bp/s. Pauses in DNA translocation are rare, and in no occasions did we observe reversals at experimental time scales of a few minutes. The majority of DNA movement occurs at the latest stages of cell division when the cell division protein ZipA has already dissociated from the septum, and the septum has closed to a narrow channel with a diameter much smaller than the resolution limit of the microscope (~250 nm). Our data suggest that the narrow constriction is necessary for effective translocation of DNA by FtsK. PMID:28234902

  17. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  18. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation.

    PubMed

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N; Andersson-Svahn, Helene

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using droplet microfluidics for screening mammalian cell factories has been limited by the difficulty in achieving continuous cell division during cultivation in droplets. Here, we report the influence of droplet size on mammalian cell division and viability during cultivation in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped after 24 h, whereas continuous cell division was observed in 180 and 320 pL droplets for 72 h. The viability of the cells cultivated in the 33 pL droplets also dropped to about 50% in 72 h. In contrast, the viability of the cells in the larger droplets was above 90% even after 72 h of cultivation, making them a more suitable droplet size for 72-h cultivation. This study shows a direct correlation of microfluidic droplet size to the division and viability of mammalian cells. This highlights the importance of selecting suitable droplet size for mammalian cell factory screening assays. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Plasma cell differentiation is coupled to division-dependent DNA hypomethylation and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bally, Alexander P.R.; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic processes that regulate antibody secreting plasma cells are not well understood. Here, analysis of plasma cell differentiation revealed DNA hypomethylation of 10% of CpG loci that were overrepresented at enhancers. Inhibition of DNA methylation enhanced plasma cell commitment in a cell division-dependent manner. Examination of in vivo differentiating B cells stratified by cell division revealed a 5-fold increase in mRNA transcription coupled to DNA hypomethylation. Demethylation occurred first at binding motifs of NF-κB and AP-1 and later at those for IRF and Oct-2, and were coincident with activation and differentiation gene expression programs. These data provide mechanistic insight into the cell-division coupled transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming and suggest DNA hypomethylation reflects the cis-regulatory history of plasma cell differentiation. PMID:27500631

  20. Asymmetric cell division in land plants and algae: the driving force for differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Ive; Beeckman, Tom

    2011-03-01

    Asymmetric cell division generates two cells with different fates and has an important role in plant development. It produces distinct cell types and new organs, and maintains stem cell niches. To handle the constraints of having immobile cells, plants possess numerous unique features to obtain asymmetry, such as specific regulators of intrinsic polarity. Although several components have not yet been identified, new findings, together with knowledge from different developmental systems, now allow us to take an important step towards a mechanistic overview of asymmetric cell division in plants and algae. Strikingly, several key regulators are used for different developmental processes, and common mechanisms can be recognized.

  1. Ultrastructure and immunocytochemical characteristics of cells in the octopus cell area of the rat cochlear nucleus: comparison with multipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2003-01-01

    Cells in the octopus cell area of the rat ventral cochlear nucleus have been connected to the monaural interpretation of spectral patterns of sound such as those derived from speech. This is possible by their fast onset of firing after each octopus cell and its dendrites have been contacted by many auditory fibres carrying different frequencies. The cytological characteristics that make these large cells able to perform such a function have been studied with ultrastructural immunocytochemistry for glycine, GABA and glutamate, and compared to that of other multipolar neurons of other regions of the ventral cochlear nucleus. Cells in the octopus cell area have an ultrastructure similar to large-giant D-multipolar neurons present in other areas of the cochlear nucleus, from which they differ by the presence of a larger excitatory axo-somatic synaptic input and larger mitochondria. Octopus cells are glycine and GABA negative, and glutamate positive with different degree. Large octopus cells receive more axo-somatic boutons than smaller octopus cells. Fusiform octopus cells are found sparsely within the intermediate acoustic striae. These cells are large to giant excitatory neurons (23-35 microm) with 62-85% of their irregular perimeter covered with large axo-somatic synaptic boutons. Most boutons contain round vesicles and are glycine and GABA negative but glutamate positive. The latter excitatory boutons represent about 70% of the input to octopus cells. Glycine positive boutons with flat and pleomorphic vesicles account for 9-10% of the input while GABA-ergic boutons with pleomorphic vesicles represent about 20% of the synaptic input. Other few, multipolar cells within the rat octopus cell area are surrounded by more inhibitory than excitatory terminals which contain flat and pleomorphic vesicles, a feature distinctive from that of true octopus cells. The latter resemble multipolar cells seen outside the octopus cell area that project to the contralateral inferior

  2. The cell cycle of symbiotic Chlorella. I. The relationship between host feeding and algal cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    McAuley, P J

    1985-08-01

    When green hydra were starved, cell division of the symbiotic algae within their digestive cells was inhibited, but algal cell growth, measured as increase in either mean volume or protein content per cell, was not. Therefore, control of algal division by the host digestive cells must be effected by direct inhibition of algal mitosis rather than by controlling algal cell growth. The number of algae per digestive cell increased slightly during starvation, eventually reaching a new stable level. A number of experiments demonstrated that although there was a relationship between host cell and algal mitosis, this was not causal: the apparent entrainment of algal mitosis to that of the host cells could be disrupted. Thus, there was a delay in algal but not host cell mitosis when hydra were fed after prolonged starvation, and algae repopulated starved hydra with lower than normal numbers of algae (reinfected aposymbionts or hydra transferred to light after growth in continuous darkness). Two experiments demonstrated a direct stimulation of algal cell division by host feeding. Relationships of algal and host cell mitosis to numbers of Artemia digested per hydra were different, and in hydra fed extracted Artemia algal, but not host cell, mitosis was reduced in comparison to that in control hydra fed live shrimp. It is proposed that algal division may be dependent on a division factor, derived from host digestion of prey, whose supply is controlled by the host cells. Numbers of algae per cell would be regulated by competition for division factor, except at host cell mitosis, when the algae may have temporarily uncontrolled access to host pools of division factor. The identity of the division factor is not known, but presumably is a metabolite needed by both host cells and algae.

  3. Microdosimetric study for nanosecond pulsed electric fields on a cell circuit model with nucleus.

    PubMed

    Denzi, Agnese; Merla, Caterina; Camilleri, Paola; Paffi, Alessandra; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2013-10-01

    Recently, scientific interest in electric pulses, always more intense and shorter and able to induce biological effects on both plasma and nuclear membranes, has greatly increased. Hence, microdosimetric models that include internal organelles like the nucleus have assumed increasing importance. In this work, a circuit model of the cell including the nucleus is proposed, which accounts for the dielectric dispersion of all cell compartments. The setup of the dielectric model of the nucleus is of fundamental importance in determining the transmembrane potential (TMP) induced on the nuclear membrane; here, this is demonstrated by comparing results for three different sets of nuclear dielectric properties present in the literature. The results have been compared, even including or disregarding the dielectric dispersion of the nucleus. The main differences have been found when using pulses shorter than 10 ns. This is due to the fact that the high spectral components of the shortest pulses are differently taken into account by the nuclear membrane transfer functions computed with and without nuclear dielectric dispersion. The shortest pulses are also the most effective in porating the intracellular structures, as confirmed by the time courses of the TMP calculated across the plasma and nuclear membranes. We show how dispersive nucleus models are unavoidable when dealing with pulses shorter than 10 ns because of the large spectral contents arriving above 100 MHz, i.e., over the typical relaxation frequencies of the dipolar mechanism of the molecules constituting the nuclear membrane and the subcellular cell compartments.

  4. Nuclear matrix and structural and functional compartmentalization of the eucaryotic cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Razin, S V; Borunova, V V; Iarovaia, O V; Vassetzky, Y S

    2014-07-01

    Becoming popular at the end of the 20th century, the concept of the nuclear matrix implies the existence of a nuclear skeleton that organizes functional elements in the cell nucleus. This review presents a critical analysis of the results obtained in the study of nuclear matrix in the light of current views on the organization of the cell nucleus. Numerous studies of nuclear matrix have failed to provide evidence of the existence of such a structure. Moreover, the existence of a filamentous structure that supports the nuclear compartmentalization appears to be unnecessary, since this function is performed by the folded genome itself.

  5. Cell growth and division. II. Experimental studies of cell volume distributions in mammalian suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E C; Petersen, D F

    1967-07-01

    Experimental proof is given that the volume distribution spectrum of mammalian cells in suspension culture can be determined accurately with a Coulter spectrometer. Stable spectra corresponding to the predictions of a mathematical model are observed under favorable conditions of growth. Cell volume spectrometry appears to be a useful method for diagnosing the state of the culture with respect to past uniformity of growth rate and present population age distribution. In addition, it offers a method for quantitative study of the laws governing cell growth and division.

  6. Wnt and the cancer niche: paracrine interactions with gastrointestinal cancer cells undergoing asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E; Jaiswal, Kshama R; Garfield, Susan H; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy.

  7. Regulating the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Egger, Boris; Gold, Katrina S; Brand, Andrea H

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells proliferate through symmetric division or self-renew through asymmetric division whilst generating differentiating cell types. The balance between symmetric and asymmetric division requires tight control to either expand a stem cell pool or to generate cell diversity. In the Drosophila optic lobe, symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells transform into asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts. The switch from neuroepithelial cells to neuroblasts is triggered by a proneural wave that sweeps across the neuroepithelium. Here we review recent findings showing that the orchestrated action of the Notch, EGFR, Fat-Hippo, and JAK/STAT signalling pathways controls the progression of the proneural wave and the sequential transition from symmetric to asymmetric division. The neuroepithelial to neuroblast transition in the optic lobe bears many similarities to the switch from neuroepithelial cell to radial glial cell in the developing mammalian cerebral cortex. The Notch signalling pathway has a similar role in the transition from proliferating to differentiating stem cell pools in the developing vertebrate retina and in the neural tube. Therefore, findings in the Drosophila optic lobe provide insights into the transitions between proliferative and differentiative division in the stem cell pools of higher organisms.

  8. In Situ Live-Cell Nucleus Fluorescence Labeling with Bioinspired Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pan; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques for visualization of nuclear structure and function in live cells are fundamentally important for exploring major cellular events. The ideal cellular labeling method is capable of realizing label-free, in situ, real-time, and long-term nucleus labeling in live cells, which can fully obtain the nucleus-relative information and effectively alleviate negative effects of alien probes on cellular metabolism. However, current established fluorescent probes-based strategies (e.g., fluorescent proteins-, organic dyes-, fluorescent organic/inorganic nanoparticles-based imaging techniques) are unable to simultaneously realize label-free, in situ, long-term, and real-time nucleus labeling, resulting in inevitable difficulties in fully visualizing nuclear structure and function in live cells. To this end, we present a type of bioinspired fluorescent probes, which are highly efficacious for in situ and label-free tracking of nucleus in long-term and real-time manners. Typically, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, served as fluorescent probes, can be readily synthesized in situ within live cell nucleus without any further modifications under physiological conditions (37 °C, pH ∼7.4). Compared with other conventional nuclear dyes (e.g., propidium iodide (PI), Hoechst), superior spectroscopic properties (e.g., quantum yield of ∼35.8% and high photostability) and low cytotoxicity of PDA-based probes enable long-term (e.g., 3 h) fluorescence tracking of nucleus. We also demonstrate the generality of this type of bioinspired fluorescent probes in different cell lines and complex biological samples.

  9. Laser switching contrast microscopy to monitor free and restricted diffusion inside the cell nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Junghans, Cornelia; Sturm, Matthias; Keuer, Csongor; Eichler, Hans Joachim; Friedrich, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A novel microscopic technique termed laser switching contrast microscopy (LSCM) allows for the imaging of the dynamics of optically switchable proteins in single cell compartments. We present an application for the monitoring of diffusive properties of single molecules of the photo-switchable fluorescent protein Dreiklang (DRK). LSCM in the cell nucleus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cytoplasmically expressing DRK unravels quick diffusive equilibration of the DRK molecules inside the whole cytoplasm and inside the cell nucleus within seconds. The nuclear membrane is also highly permeable for DRK. Inside the nucleus entirely distinct regions are found that only partially enable diffusive protein redistribution with mean square displacement proportional to time while in other regions the mobility of the proteins seems to be restricted. After photo-switching string like patterns of light DRK molecules are observed in the cell nucleus. In addition a fraction of these DRK molecules appears immobile. The findings support recent theories of the cell interior described as a random obstacle model with an additional immobile fraction of DRK. Numerical simulations show that at different illumination intensity and different distance from the laser focus similar patterns for fluorescence recovery might be obtained in spite of strongly varying diffusion constants.

  10. Mitochondrial growth and division during the cell cycle in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Posakony, JW; England, JM; Attardi, G

    1977-01-01

    The growth and division of mitochondria during the cell cycle was investigated by a morphometric analysis of electron micrographs of synchronized HeLa cells. The ratio of total outer membrane contour length to cytoplasmic area did not vary significantly during the cell cycle, implying a continuous growth of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The mean fraction of cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondrial profiles was likewise found to remain constant, indicating that the increase in total mitochondrial volume per cell occurs continuously during interphase, in such a way that the mitochondrial complement occupies a constant fraction( approximately 10-11(percent)) of the volume of the cytoplasm. The mean area, outer membrane contour length, and axis ratio of the mitochondrial profiles also did not vary appreciably during the cell cycle; furthermore, the close similarity of the frequency distributions of these parameters for the six experimental time-points suggested a stable mitochondrial shape distribution. The constancy of both the mean mitochondrial profile area and the number of mitochondrial profiles per unit of cytoplasmic area was interpreted to indicate the continuous division of mitochondria at the level of the cell population. Furthermore, no evidence was found for the occurrence of synchronous mitochondrial growth and division within individual cells. Thus, it appears that, in HeLa cells, there is no fixed temporal relationship between the growth and division of mitochondria and the events of the cell cycle. A number of statistical methods were developed for the purpose of making numerical estimates of certain three-dimensional cellular and mitochondrial parameters. Mean cellular and cytoplasmic volumes were calculated for the six time-points; both exhibited a nonlinear, approx. twofold increase. A comparison of the axis ratio distributions of the mitochondrial profiles with theoretical distributions expected from random sectioning of bodies of various

  11. A conformational switch controls cell wall-remodelling enzymes required for bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Yang, Desirée C; Tan, Kemin; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2012-08-01

    Remodelling of the peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton is intimately tied to the growth and division of bacteria. Enzymes that hydrolyse PG are critical for these processes, but their activities must be tightly regulated to prevent the generation of lethal breaches in the PG matrix. Despite their importance, the mechanisms regulating PG hydrolase activity have remained elusive. Here we investigate the control of cell division hydrolases called amidases (AmiA, AmiB and AmiC) required for Escherichia coli cell division. Poorly regulated amiB mutants were isolated encoding lytic AmiB variants with elevated basal PG hydrolase activities in vitro. The structure of an AmiB orthologue was also solved, revealing that the active site of AmiB is occluded by a conserved alpha helix. Strikingly, most of the amino acid substitutions in the lytic AmiB variants mapped to this domain and are predicted to disrupt its interaction with the active site. Our results therefore support a model in which cell separation is stimulated by the reversible relief of amidase autoinhibition governed by conserved subcomplexes within the cytokinetic ring. Analogous conformational control mechanisms are likely to be part of a general strategy used to control PG hydrolases present within multienzyme PG-remodelling machines.

  12. WNT/β-catenin directs self-renewal symmetric cell division of hTERThigh prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Guo, Yanjing; Wang, Xue; Zhao, Huifang; Ji, Zhongzhong; Cheng, Chaping; Li, Li; Fang, Yuxiang; Xu, Dawei; Zhu, Helen He; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2017-02-16

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) drive cancer progression and recurrence. Self-renewal expansion of CSC is achieved through symmetric cell division, yet how external stimuli affect intracellular regulatory programs of CSC division modes and stemness remains obscure. Here we report that hTERThigh prostate cancer (PCa) cells exhibit CSC properties, including a stem cell-associated gene expression signature, long term tumor-propagating capacity and epithelial-to-mensenchymal transition (EMT). In promoting the self-renewal symmetric division of hTERThigh PCa cells, WNT3a dramatically decreased the ratio of hTERThigh PCa cells undergoing asymmetric division. Increased WNT/β-catenin signal activation was detected also in hTERThigh PCa cells. hTERT-mediated CSC properties were at least partially dependent on β-catenin. These findings provide novel cellular and molecular mechanisms for the self-renewal of CSC orchestrated by tumor microenvironmental stimuli and CSC intracellular signals.

  13. Protein segregation between dividing hematopoietic progenitor cells in the determination of the symmetry/asymmetry of cell division.

    PubMed

    Nteliopoulos, Georgios; Gordon, Myrtle Y

    2012-09-20

    In the present study, we investigated how the symmetry/asymmetry of cell division in mitotic CD34(+) cells can be evaluated by determining the plane of cell division and the potential distribution of proteins between daughter cells. The orientation of the mitotic spindle is dependent upon the positioning of the centrosomes, which determine the plane of cell division and the sharing of proteins. If the functions of unequally shared proteins are relevant to the kinetics of cell division, they could determine whether the daughter cells undergo self-renewal or differentiation. The kinetic function of the proteins of interest was investigated using a colony-replating assay and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining. We used Notch/Numb as a model system, since they have a role in balancing symmetric/asymmetric divisions. Mitotic cells were examined microscopically and centrosomal markers γ-tubulin/pericentrin were used with activated Notch-1 and Numb. We monitored the first crucial divisions by CFSE staining and found an inverse relationship between activated Notch and Numb expression, suggesting a reciprocal regulation. We suggest that the subpopulations expressing activated Notch or Numb have different cell fates. To determine the influence of Notch signaling on progenitor cell self-renewal, we used the γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-Difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl)]-S-phenylglycine t-Butyl ester (DAPT). DAPT influences self-renewal/differentiation outcome by affecting the frequency of symmetric renewal divisions without affecting the rate of divisions. Overall, the purpose of this study was to establish a cellular system for predicting the symmetry/asymmetry of hematopoietic progenitor divisions at the level of centrosomes and protein distribution and to investigate the influence of these proteins on progenitor cell kinetics.

  14. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi–related studies. PMID:27198968

  15. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-05-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi–related studies.

  16. Orientation of endothelial cell division is regulated by VEGF signaling during blood vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Gefei; Taylor, Sarah M.; McColm, Janet R.; Kappas, Nicholas C.; Kearney, Joseph B.; Williams, Lucy H.; Hartnett, Mary E.; Bautch, Victoria L.

    2007-01-01

    New blood vessel formation requires the coordination of endothelial cell division and the morphogenetic movements of vessel expansion, but it is not known how this integration occurs. Here, we show that endothelial cells regulate division orientation during the earliest stages of blood vessel formation, in response to morphogenetic cues. In embryonic stem (ES) cell–derived vessels that do not experience flow, the plane of endothelial cytokinesis was oriented perpendicular to the vessel long axis. We also demonstrated regulated cleavage orientation in vivo, in flow-exposed forming retinal vessels. Daughter nuclei moved away from the cleavage plane after division, suggesting that regulation of endothelial division orientation effectively extends vessel length in these developing vascular beds. A gain-of-function mutation in VEGF signaling increased randomization of endothelial division orientation, and this effect was rescued by a transgene, indicating that regulation of division orientation is a novel mechanism whereby VEGF signaling affects vessel morphogenesis. Thus, our findings show that endothelial cell division and morphogenesis are integrated in developing vessels by flow-independent mechanisms that involve VEGF signaling, and this cross talk is likely to be critical to proper vessel morphogenesis. PMID:17068148

  17. The involvement of phospholipases C and D in the asymmetric division of subsidiary cell mother cells of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Apostolakos, Panagiotis; Panteris, Emmanuel; Galatis, Basil

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, the involvement of phospholipase C and D (PLC and PLD) pathways in the asymmetric divisions that produce the stomatal complexes of Zea mays was investigated. In particular, the polar organization of microtubules (MTs) and actin filaments (AFs) and the process of asymmetric division were studied in subsidiary cell mother cells (SMCs) treated with PLC and PLD modulators. In SMCs treated with butanol-1 (but-1), which blocks phosphatidic acid (PA) production via PLDs, AF-patch formation laterally to the inducing guard cell mother cell (GMC) and the subsequent asymmetric division were inhibited. In these SMCs, cell division plane determination, as expressed by MT preprophase band (MT-PPB) formation, was not disturbed. Exogenously applied PA partially relieved the but-1 effects on SMCs. In contrast to SMCs, but-1 did not affect the symmetric GMC division. Inhibition of the PLC catalytic activity by neomycin or U73122 resulted in inhibition of asymmetric SMC division, while AF-patch and MT-PPB were organized as in control SMCs. These data show that the PLC and PLD signaling pathways are involved in the transduction and/or perception of the inductive stimulus that is emitted by the GMCs and induces the polar AF organization and asymmetric SMC division. In contrast, division plane determination in SMCs, as expressed by MT-PPB formation, does not depend on PLC and PLD signaling pathways.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived Semaphorin3B orients neuroepithelial cell divisions in the apicobasal axis.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, Elise; Reynaud, Florie; Sanyas, Isabelle; Bozon, Muriel; Kindbeiter, Karine; Causeret, Frédéric; Pierani, Alessandra; Falk, Julien; Moret, Frédéric; Castellani, Valérie

    2015-02-27

    The spatial orientation of cell divisions is fundamental for tissue architecture and homeostasis. Here we analysed neuroepithelial progenitors in the developing mouse spinal cord to determine whether extracellular signals orient the mitotic spindle. We report that Semaphorin3B (Sema3B) released from the floor plate and the nascent choroid plexus in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) controls progenitor division orientation. Delivery of exogenous Sema3B to neural progenitors after neural tube opening in living embryos promotes planar orientation of their division. Preventing progenitor access to cues present in the CSF by genetically engineered canal obstruction affects the proportion of planar and oblique divisions. Sema3B knockout phenocopies the loss of progenitor access to the CSF. Sema3B binds to the apical surface of mitotic progenitors and exerts its effect via Neuropilin receptors, GSK3 activation and subsequent inhibition of the microtubule stabilizer CRMP2. Thus, extrinsic control mediated by the Semaphorin signalling orients progenitor divisions in neurogenic zones.

  19. A subpopulation of adult skeletal muscle stem cells retains all template DNA strands after cell division.

    PubMed

    Rocheteau, Pierre; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Siegl-Cachedenier, Irene; Blasco, Maria A; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-01-20

    Satellite cells are adult skeletal muscle stem cells that are quiescent and constitute a poorly defined heterogeneous population. Using transgenic Tg:Pax7-nGFP mice, we show that Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells are less primed for commitment and have a lower metabolic status and delayed first mitosis compared to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells. Pax7-nGFP(Hi) can give rise to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells after serial transplantations. Proliferating Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells exhibit lower metabolic activity, and the majority performs asymmetric DNA segregation during cell division, wherein daughter cells retaining template DNA strands express stem cell markers. Using chromosome orientation-fluorescence in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that all chromatids segregate asymmetrically, whereas Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells perform random DNA segregation. Therefore, quiescent Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells represent a reversible dormant stem cell state, and during muscle regeneration, Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells generate distinct daughter cell fates by asymmetrically segregating template DNA strands to the stem cell. These findings provide major insights into the biology of stem cells that segregate DNA asymmetrically.

  20. The Escherichia coli datA site promotes proper regulation of cell division.

    PubMed

    Morigen, Morigen; Flåtten, Ingvild; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In Escherichia coli inhibition of replication leads to a block of cell division. This checkpoint mechanism ensures that no cell divides without having two complete copies of the genome to pass on to the two daughter cells. The chromosomal datA site is a 1 kb region that contains binding sites for the DnaA replication initiator protein, and which contributes to the inactivation of DnaA. An excess of datA sites provided on plasmids has been found to lead to both a delay in initiation of replication and in cell division during exponential growth. Here we have investigated the effect of datA on the cell division block that occurs upon inhibition of replication initiation in a dnaC2 mutant. We found that this checkpoint mechanism was aided by the presence of datA. In cells where datA was deleted or an excess of DnaA was provided, cell division occurred in the absence of replication and anucleate cells were formed. This finding indicates that loss of datA and/or excess of DnaA protein promote cell division. This conclusion was supported by the finding that the lethality of the division-compromised mutants ftsZ84 and ftsI23 was suppressed by deletion of datA, at the lowest non-permissive temperature. We propose that the cell division block that occurs upon inhibition of DNA replication is, at least in part, due to a drop in the concentration of the ATP-DnaA protein.

  1. Transposon insertions in the Flavobacterium johnsoniae ftsX gene disrupt gliding motility and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M J; McBride, M J

    2000-03-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae is a gram-negative bacterium that exhibits gliding motility. To determine the mechanism of flavobacterial gliding motility, we isolated 33 nongliding mutants by Tn4351 mutagenesis. Seventeen of these mutants exhibited filamentous cell morphology. The region of DNA surrounding the transposon insertion in the filamentous mutant CJ101-207 was cloned and sequenced. The transposon was inserted in a gene that was similar to Escherichia coli ftsX. Two of the remaining 16 filamentous mutants also carried insertions in ftsX. Introduction of the wild-type F. johnsoniae ftsX gene restored motility and normal cell morphology to each of the three ftsX mutants. CJ101-207 appears to be blocked at a late stage of cell division, since the filaments produced cross walls but cells failed to separate. In E. coli, FtsX is thought to function with FtsE in translocating proteins involved in potassium transport, and perhaps proteins involved in cell division, into the cytoplasmic membrane. Mutations in F. johnsoniae ftsX may prevent translocation of proteins involved in cell division and proteins involved in gliding motility into the cytoplasmic membrane, thus resulting in defects in both processes. Alternatively, the loss of gliding motility may be an indirect result of the defect in cell division. The inability to complete cell division may alter the cell architecture and disrupt gliding motility by preventing the synthesis, assembly, or functioning of the motility apparatus.

  2. Control of cell division and the spatial localization of assembled gene products in Caulobacter crescentus

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are described that examine the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the regulation of cell division in Caulobacter crescentus; and the spatial localization of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in C. crescentus swarmer and predivisional cells. In the analysis of PBP function, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus PBPs with (/sup 3/H) penicillin G in wild type strain CB15, in a series of conditional cell division mutants and in new temperature sensitive cephalosporin C resistant mutants PC8002 and PC8003. 14 PBPs are characterized and a high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1B) that is required for cell division is identified. PBP 1B competes for ..beta..-lactams that induce filament formation and may be a high affinity binding protein. A second high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1C) is also associated with defective cell division. The examination of PBP patterns in synchronous swarmer cells reveals that the in vivo activity of PBP 1B and PBP 1C increases at the time that the cell division pathway is initiated. None of the PBPs, however, appear to be differentially localized in the C. crescentus cell. In the analysis of MCP localization, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus MCPs with methyl-/sup 3/H. MCPs are examined in flagellated and non-flagellated vesicles prepared from cells by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  3. Dynamic self-organisation of haematopoiesis and (a)symmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Måløy, Marthe; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Olav Brandsdal, Bjørn

    2017-02-07

    A model of haematopoiesis that links self-organisation with symmetric and asymmetric cell division is presented in this paper. It is assumed that all cell divisions are completely random events, and that the daughter cells resulting from symmetric and asymmetric stem cell divisions are, in general, phenotypically identical, and still, the haematopoietic system has the flexibility to self-renew, produce mature cells by differentiation, and regenerate undifferentiated and differentiated cells when necessary, due to self-organisation. As far as we know, no previous model implements symmetric and asymmetric division as the result of self-organisation. The model presented in this paper is inspired by experiments on the Drosophila germline stem cell, which imply that under normal conditions, the stem cells typically divide asymmetrically, whereas during regeneration, the rate of symmetric division increases. Moreover, the model can reproduce several of the results from experiments on female Safari cats. In particular, the model can explain why significant fluctuation in the phenotypes of haematopoietic cells was observed in some cats, when the haematopoietic system had reached normal population level after regeneration. To our knowledge, no previous model of haematopoiesis in Safari cats has captured this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment.

  5. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  6. Rostrocaudal changes in neuronal cell size in human lateral vestibular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Diaz, C; Suarez, C; Navarro, A; Gonzalez del Rey, C; Tolivia, J

    1993-07-09

    A cytoarchitectonic and morphometric study of the human lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN) is presented. In sagittal sections, the LVN appears as a triangular cell group rostrally located near the motor trigeminal nucleus and caudally near the vestibular root. The estimated volume is 13.49 mm3 with a neuronal population of 25,046 cells and 1855 neurons/mm3 in density. The average neuronal cross-sectional area changes from a minimum caudally (380.02 +/- 7.23 microns 2) to a maximum rostrally (825.16 +/- 25.10 microns 2). Four types of neurons can be observed: small (< 200 microns 2), medium (200-500 microns 2), large (500-100 microns 2) and giant or Deiter's cells (> 1000 microns 2). The small and medium cells constitute 62%, large cells 26% and the giant cells only 12% of the neuronal population.

  7. Computational prediction of strain-dependent diffusion of transcription factors through the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nava, Michele M; Fedele, Roberto; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear spreading plays a crucial role in stem cell fate determination. In previous works, we reported evidence of multipotency maintenance for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on three-dimensional engineered niche substrates, fabricated via two-photon laser polymerization. We correlated maintenance of multipotency to a more roundish morphology of these cells with respect to those cultured on conventional flat substrates. To interpret these findings, here we present a multiphysics model coupling nuclear strains induced by cell adhesion to passive diffusion across the cell nucleus. Fully three-dimensional reconstructions of cultured cells were developed on the basis of confocal images: in particular, the level of nuclear spreading resulted significantly dependent on the cell localization within the niche architecture. We assumed that the cell diffusivity varies as a function of the local volumetric strain. The model predictions indicate that the higher the level of spreading of the cell, the higher the flux across the nucleus of small solutes such as transcription factors. Our results point toward nuclear spreading as a primary mechanism by which the stem cell translates its shape into a fate decision, i.e., by amplifying the diffusive flow of transcriptional activators into the nucleus.

  8. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to inter-observer variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literatures. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast (DIC), fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. PMID:26742143

  9. The plant cell nucleus: a true arena for the fight between plants and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Laurent; Rivas, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is a fundamental feature shared by both plant and animal cells. Cellular factors involved in the transport of macromolecules through the nuclear envelope, including nucleoporins, importins and Ran-GTP related components, are conserved among a variety of eukaryotic systems. Interestingly, mutations in these nuclear components compromise resistance signalling, illustrating the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking in plant innate immunity. Indeed, spatial restriction of defence regulators by the nuclear envelope and stimulus-induced nuclear translocation constitute an important level of defence-associated gene regulation in plants. A significant number of effectors from different microbial pathogens are targeted to the plant cell nucleus. In addition, key host factors, including resistance proteins, immunity components, transcription factors and transcriptional regulators shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and their level of nuclear accumulation determines the output of the defence response, further confirming the crucial role played by the nucleus during the interaction between plants and pathogens. Here, we discuss recent findings that situate the nucleus at the frontline of the mutual recognition between plants and invading microbes.

  10. Pixantrone induces cell death through mitotic perturbations and subsequent aberrant cell divisions

    PubMed Central

    Beeharry, Neil; Di Rora, Andrea Ghelli Luserna; Smith, Mitchell R; Yen, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Pixantrone is a novel aza-anthracenedione active against aggressive lymphoma and is being evaluated for use against various hematologic and solid tumors. The drug is an analog of mitoxantrone, but displays less cardiotoxicity than mitoxantrone or the more commonly used doxorubicin. Although pixantrone is purported to inhibit topoisomerase II activity and intercalate with DNA, exact mechanisms of how it induces cell death remain obscure. Here we evaluated the effect of pixantrone on a panel of solid tumor cell lines to understand its mechanism of cell killing. Initial experiments with pixantrone showed an apparent discrepancy between its anti-proliferative effects in MTS assays (short-term) compared with clonogenic assays (long-term). Using live cell videomicroscopy to track the fates of cells, we found that cells treated with pixantrone underwent multiple rounds of aberrant cell division before eventually dying after approximately 5 d post-treatment. Cells underwent abnormal mitosis in which chromosome segregation was impaired, generating chromatin bridges between cells or within cells containing micronuclei. While pixantrone-treated cells did not display γH2AX foci, a marker of DNA damage, in the main nuclei, such foci were often detected in the micronuclei. Using DNA content analysis, we found that pixantrone concentrations that induced cell death in a clonogenic assay did not impede cell cycle progression, further supporting the lack of canonical DNA damage signaling. These findings suggest pixantrone induces a latent type of DNA damage that impairs the fidelity of mitosis, without triggering DNA damage response or mitotic checkpoint activation, but is lethal after successive rounds of aberrant division. PMID:26177126

  11. Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ganhui; Daniels, Brian R; Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2009-01-06

    Forces are important in biological systems for accomplishing key cell functions, such as motility, organelle transport, and cell division. Currently, known force generation mechanisms typically involve motor proteins. In bacterial cells, no known motor proteins are involved in cell division. Instead, a division ring (Z-ring) consists of mostly FtsZ, FtsA, and ZipA is used to exerting a contractile force. The mechanism of force generation in bacterial cell division is unknown. Using computational modeling, we show that Z-ring formation results from the colocalization of FtsZ and FtsA mediated by the favorable alignment of FtsZ polymers. The model predicts that the Z-ring undergoes a condensation transition from a low-density state to a high-density state and generates a sufficient contractile force to achieve division. FtsZ GTP hydrolysis facilitates monomer turnover during the condensation transition, but does not directly generate forces. In vivo fluorescence measurements show that FtsZ density increases during division, in accord with model results. The mechanism is akin to van der Waals picture of gas-liquid condensation, and shows that organisms can exploit microphase transitions to generate mechanical forces.

  12. Maf acts downstream of ComGA to arrest cell division in competent cells of B. subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Briley, Kenneth; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J.; Hahn, Jeanette; Dubnau, David

    2011-01-01

    Transformable (competent) cells of Bacillus subtilis are blocked in cell division because the traffic ATPase ComGA prevents the formation of FtsZ rings. Although ComGA-deficient cells elongate and form FtsZ rings, cell division remains blocked at a later stage and the cells become mildly filamented. Here we show that the highly conserved protein Maf is synthesized predominantly in competent cells under the direct control of the transcription factor ComK and is solely responsible for the later block in cell division. In vivo and in vitro data show that Maf binds to both ComGA and DivIVA. A point mutation in maf that interferes with Maf binding to DivIVA also interferes with the ability of Maf to inhibit cell division. Based on these findings, we propose that Maf and ComGA mediate mechanisms for the inhibition of cell division in competent cells with Maf acting downstream of ComGA. We further suggest that Maf must interact with DivIVA to inhibit cell division. PMID:21564336

  13. Maf acts downstream of ComGA to arrest cell division in competent cells of B. subtilis.

    PubMed

    Briley, Kenneth; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J; Hahn, Jeanette; Dubnau, David

    2011-07-01

    Transformable (competent) cells of Bacillus subtilis are blocked in cell division because the traffic ATPase ComGA prevents the formation of FtsZ rings. Although ComGA-deficient cells elongate and form FtsZ rings, cell division remains blocked at a later stage and the cells become mildly filamented. Here we show that the highly conserved protein Maf is synthesized predominantly in competent cells under the direct control of the transcription factor ComK and is solely responsible for the later block in cell division. In vivo and in vitro data show that Maf binds to both ComGA and DivIVA. A point mutation in maf that interferes with Maf binding to DivIVA also interferes with the ability of Maf to inhibit cell division. Based on these findings, we propose that Maf and ComGA mediate mechanisms for the inhibition of cell division in competent cells with Maf acting downstream of ComGA. We further suggest that Maf must interact with DivIVA to inhibit cell division.

  14. [Response of HeLa cells to mitomycine C. I. Cell division].

    PubMed

    Petrov, Iu P

    2013-01-01

    Using light microscopy, time-lapse imaging, and digital image analysis, the effect of mitomycine C (10 μg/ml) on HeLa-M cells has been studied. It has been shown that, after a 2 h contact with mitomycine, the cells could be separated into 2 groups: M-1--the functional cells surviving after division but non-entering mitosis any more; M-II--the cells entering mitosis but incapable to finish it; they are lost. Mitomycine C is known to specifically block DNA replication being located in the DNA minor groove. It should inhibit PHK synthesis if one follows the standard hypothesis of a transcription bubble formation. However, increasing the cell and nucleolus area during the M-I cell growth suggests that RNA and protein synthesis is not blocked. The author concludes that the presented data confirm his hypothesis about RNA synthesis in the major DNA groove (Petrov, 2006).

  15. Myo19 ensures symmetric partitioning of mitochondria and coupling of mitochondrial segregation to cell division.

    PubMed

    Rohn, Jennifer L; Patel, Jigna V; Neumann, Beate; Bulkescher, Jutta; Mchedlishvili, Nunu; McMullan, Rachel C; Quintero, Omar A; Ellenberg, Jan; Baum, Buzz

    2014-11-03

    During animal cell division, an actin-based ring cleaves the cell into two. Problems with this process can cause chromosome missegregation and defects in cytoplasmic inheritance and the partitioning of organelles, which in turn are associated with human diseases. Although much is known about how chromosome segregation is coupled to cell division, the way organelles coordinate their inheritance during partitioning to daughter cells is less well understood. Here, using a high-content live-imaging small interfering RNA screen, we identify Myosin-XIX (Myo19) as a novel regulator of cell division. Previously, this actin-based motor was shown to control the interphase movement of mitochondria. Our analysis shows that Myo19 is indeed localized to mitochondria and that its silencing leads to defects in the distribution of mitochondria within cells and in mitochondrial partitioning at division. Furthermore, many Myo19 RNAi cells undergo stochastic division failure--a phenotype that can be mimicked using a treatment that blocks mitochondrial fission and rescued by decreasing mitochondrial fusion, implying that mitochondria can physically interfere with cytokinesis. Strikingly, using live imaging we also observe the inappropriate movement of mitochondria to the poles of spindles in cells depleted for Myo19 as they enter anaphase. Since this phenocopies the results of an acute loss of actin filaments in anaphase, these data support a model whereby the Myo19 actin-based motor helps to control mitochondrial movement to ensure their faithful segregation during division. The presence of DNA within mitochondria makes their inheritance an especially important aspect of symmetrical cell division.

  16. Myo19 Ensures Symmetric Partitioning of Mitochondria and Coupling of Mitochondrial Segregation to Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Rohn, Jennifer L.; Patel, Jigna V.; Neumann, Beate; Bulkescher, Jutta; Mchedlishvili, Nunu; McMullan, Rachel C.; Quintero, Omar A.; Ellenberg, Jan; Baum, Buzz

    2014-01-01

    Summary During animal cell division, an actin-based ring cleaves the cell into two. Problems with this process can cause chromosome missegregation and defects in cytoplasmic inheritance and the partitioning of organelles, which in turn are associated with human diseases [1–3]. Although much is known about how chromosome segregation is coupled to cell division, the way organelles coordinate their inheritance during partitioning to daughter cells is less well understood. Here, using a high-content live-imaging small interfering RNA screen, we identify Myosin-XIX (Myo19) as a novel regulator of cell division. Previously, this actin-based motor was shown to control the interphase movement of mitochondria [4]. Our analysis shows that Myo19 is indeed localized to mitochondria and that its silencing leads to defects in the distribution of mitochondria within cells and in mitochondrial partitioning at division. Furthermore, many Myo19 RNAi cells undergo stochastic division failure—a phenotype that can be mimicked using a treatment that blocks mitochondrial fission and rescued by decreasing mitochondrial fusion, implying that mitochondria can physically interfere with cytokinesis. Strikingly, using live imaging we also observe the inappropriate movement of mitochondria to the poles of spindles in cells depleted for Myo19 as they enter anaphase. Since this phenocopies the results of an acute loss of actin filaments in anaphase, these data support a model whereby the Myo19 actin-based motor helps to control mitochondrial movement to ensure their faithfu