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Sample records for cell polarization processes

  1. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  2. Optimization of Spin-Polarization of Helium-3 Target Cell by Thermal Convection Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthas, Stacy

    2013-10-01

    Polarized Helium-3 (3He) is an effective polarized neutron target that has been used in particle accelerators like the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) for the past three decades to study properties of the neutron. Due to the spin structure of its nucleons, the nucleus of 3He can be approximated as a single polarized neutron. The previous generations of 3He targets have reached their limit in polarization and are not ideal for use as targets with the 12 GeV update at TJNAF due to large polarization gradients. The new target cell uses thermal convection to transfer polarized gas to the target chamber quickly. The focus of this project was to study the effects of the new convection system, at various gas velocities, on Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) polarization loss that results from measuring the polarization of 3He with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Gas velocities were varied by using a Kapton flexible heater to induce thermal convection. This target cell loses less than one percent of its polarization by measurement when convection is induced at a gas velocity under 6 cm/min thereby verifying the possible use of convection induction for the future experiments. Research conducted at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility funded through a grant from NSF by the Old Dominion University Research Experience for Undergraduates Program.

  3. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways.

  4. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  5. Organelle positioning and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Bornens, Michel

    2008-11-01

    In spite of conspicuous differences in their polarized architecture, swimming unicellular eukaryotes and migrating cells from metazoa display a conserved hierarchical interlocking of the main cellular compartments, in which the microtubule network has a dominant role. A microtubule array can organize the distribution of endomembranes owing to a cell-wide and polarized extension around a unique nucleus-associated structure. The nucleus-associated structure in animal cells contains a highly conserved organelle, the centriole or basal body. This organelle has a defined polarity that can be transmitted to the cell. Its conservative mode of duplication seems to be a core mechanism for the transmission of polarities through cell division.

  6. Planar cell polarity of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Ulrike; Carroll, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) or tissue polarity refers to the polarization of tissues perpendicular to the apical-basal axis. Most epithelia, including the vertebrate kidney, show signs of planar polarity. In the kidney, defects in planar polarity are attributed to several disease states including multiple forms of cystic kidney disease. Indeed, planar cell polarity has been shown to be essential for several cellular processes that appear to be necessary for establishing and maintaining tubule diameter. However, uncovering the genetic mechanisms underlying PCP in the kidney has been complicated as the roles of many of the main players are not conserved in flies and vice versa. Here, we review a number of cellular and molecular processes that can affect PCP of the kidney with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms that do not appear to be conserved in flies or that are not part of canonical determinants.

  7. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27362918

  9. The cell biology of planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the coordinated alignment of cell polarity across the tissue plane. Key to the establishment of PCP is asymmetric partitioning of cortical PCP components and intercellular communication to coordinate polarity between neighboring cells. Recent progress has been made toward understanding how protein transport, endocytosis, and intercellular interactions contribute to asymmetric PCP protein localization. Additionally, the functions of gradients and mechanical forces as global cues that bias PCP orientation are beginning to be elucidated. Together, these findings are shedding light on how global cues integrate with local cell interactions to organize cellular polarity at the tissue level. PMID:25349257

  10. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica L.; Streuli, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell–matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical–basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. For further reading, please see related articles: ‘ERM proteins at a glance’ by Andrea McClatchey (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3199–3204). ‘Establishment of epithelial polarity – GEF who's minding the GAP?’ by Siu Ngok et al. (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3205–3215). PMID:24994933

  11. Tissue morphodynamics: Translating planar polarity cues into polarized cell behaviors.

    PubMed

    Devenport, Danelle

    2016-07-01

    The ability of cells to collectively orient and align their behaviors is essential in multicellular organisms for unidirectional cilia beating, collective cell movements, oriented cell divisions, and asymmetric cell fate specification. The planar cell polarity pathway coordinates a vast and diverse array of collective cell behaviors by intersecting with downstream pathways that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and intercellular signaling. How the planar polarity pathway translates directional cues to produce polarized cell behaviors is the focus of this review.

  12. Cell Polarity As A Regulator of Cancer Cell Behavior Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Senthil K; Xue, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is an evolutionarily conserved process that facilitates asymmetric distribution of organelles and proteins, is an evolutionarily conserved property that is modified dynamically during physiological processes such as cell division, migration, and morphogenesis. The plasticity with which cells change their behavior and phenotype in response to cell intrinsic and extrinsic cues is an essential feature of normal physiology. In disease states such as cancer, cells lose their ability to behave normally in response to physiological cues. A molecular understanding of mechanisms that alter the behavior of cancer cells is limited. Cell polarity proteins are an recognized class of molecules that can receive and interpret both intrinsic and extrinsic signals to modulate cell behavior. In this review, we discuss how cell polarity proteins regulate a diverse array of biological processes and how they can contribute to alterations in the behavior of cancer cells. PMID:22881459

  13. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P.; Belland, Robert J.; Cox, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  14. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  15. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  16. A gas cell for stopping, storing and polarizing radioactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytema, A.; van den Berg, J. E.; Böll, O.; Chernowitz, D.; Dijck, E. A.; Grasdijk, J. O.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mathavan, S. C.; Meinema, C.; Mohanty, A.; Müller, S. E.; Nuñez Portela, M.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pijpker, C.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2016-06-01

    A radioactive beam of 20Na is stopped in a gas cell filled with Ne gas. The stopped particles are polarized by optical pumping. The degree of polarization that can be achieved is studied. A maximum polarization of 50% was found. The dynamic processes in the cell are described with a phenomenological model.

  17. Organic photovoltaic cells with controlled polarization sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Awartani, Omar; O'Connor, Brendan T.; Kudenov, Michael W.

    2014-03-03

    In this study, we demonstrate linearly polarized organic photovoltaic cells with a well-controlled level of polarization sensitivity. The polarized devices were created through the application of a large uniaxial strain to the bulk heterojunction poly(3-hexylthiophene):Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) film and printing the plastically deformed active layer onto a PEDOT:PSS and indium tin oxide coated glass substrate. The P3HT:PCBM layer is processed such that it is able to accommodate high strains (over 100%) without fracture. After printing the strained films, thermal annealing is used to optimize solar cell performance while maintaining polarization sensitivity. A dichroic ratio and short circuit current ratio of ≈6.1 and ≈1.6 were achieved, respectively.

  18. Polarized cytokinesis in vacuolate cells of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Sean R.; Ehrhardt, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The view of plant-cell cytokinesis commonly depicted in textbooks is of a symmetrical process, with the phragmoplast initiating in the center of the cell and growing outward to the parental cell membrane. In contrast to this picture, we observe that cell-plate development in Arabidopsis shoot cells is highly polarized along the plane of division. Three-dimensional live-cell imaging reveals that the mitotic spindle and phragmoplast are laterally displaced, and that the growing cell plate anchors on one side of the cell at an early stage of cytokinesis. Growth of phragmoplast across the cell creates a new partition in its wake, giving the visual effect of a curtain being pulled across the cell. Throughout this process, the advancing front of the phragmoplast is in intimate contact with the parental wall, suggesting that short-range interactions between the phragmoplast and plasma membrane may play important roles in guiding the cell plate throughout much of its development. Polarized cytokinesis was observed in a wide variety of vacuolate shoot cells and in some small root cells, implying that it is not solely a function of cell size. This mode of cytokinesis may provide a mechanically robust mechanism for cell-plate formation in large cells and suggests a simple explanation for the occurrence of cell wall stubs observed upon drug treatment or in cytokinetic mutants. PMID:11880633

  19. A bistable model of cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Semplice, Matteo; Veglio, Andrea; Naldi, Giovanni; Serini, Guido; Gamba, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasensitivity, as described by Goldbeter and Koshland, has been considered for a long time as a way to realize bistable switches in biological systems. It is not as well recognized that when ultrasensitivity and reinforcing feedback loops are present in a spatially distributed system such as the cell plasmamembrane, they may induce bistability and spatial separation of the system into distinct signaling phases. Here we suggest that bistability of ultrasensitive signaling pathways in a diffusive environment provides a basic mechanism to realize cell membrane polarity. Cell membrane polarization is a fundamental process implicated in several basic biological phenomena, such as differentiation, proliferation, migration and morphogenesis of unicellular and multicellular organisms. We describe a simple, solvable model of cell membrane polarization based on the coupling of membrane diffusion with bistable enzymatic dynamics. The model can reproduce a broad range of symmetry-breaking events, such as those observed in eukaryotic directional sensing, the apico-basal polarization of epithelium cells, the polarization of budding and mating yeast, and the formation of Ras nanoclusters in several cell types.

  20. Processing Polarity Items: Contrastive Licensing Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saddy, Douglas; Drenhaus, Heiner; Frisch, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment that investigated the failure to license polarity items in German using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). The results reveal distinct processing reflexes associated with failure to license positive polarity items in comparison to failure to license negative polarity items. Failure to license both negative and…

  1. Cell Polarization and Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Erfei; Park, Hay-Oak

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division, which includes cell polarization and cytokinesis, is essential for generating cell diversity during development. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduces by asymmetric cell division, and has thus served as an attractive model for unraveling the general principles of eukaryotic cell polarization and cytokinesis. Polarity development requires G-protein signaling, cytoskeletal polarization, and exocytosis, whereas cytokinesis requires concerted actions of a contractile actomyosin ring and targeted membrane deposition. In this chapter, we discuss the mechanics and spatial control of polarity development and cytokinesis, emphasizing the key concepts, mechanisms, and emerging questions in the field. PMID:22701052

  2. Physical processes in spin polarized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Valeo, E.J.; Cowley, S.

    1984-05-01

    If the plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor is polarized, the nuclear reactions are modified in such a way as to enhance the reactor performance. We calculate in detail the modification of these nuclear reactions by different modes of polarization of the nuclear fuel. We also consider in detail the various physical processes that can lead to depolarization and show that they are by and large slow enough that a high degree of polarization can be maintained.

  3. The interdependence of the Rho GTPases and apicobasal cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Natalie Ann; Georgiou, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via the Rho GTPases provides crucial regulation of numerous cell polarization events, including apicobasal (AB) polarity, polarized cell migration, polarized cell division and neuronal polarity. Here we review the relationships between the Rho family GTPases and epithelial AB polarization events, focusing on the 3 best-characterized members: Rho, Rac and Cdc42. We discuss a multitude of processes that are important for AB polarization, including lumen formation, apical membrane specification, cell-cell junction assembly and maintenance, as well as tissue polarity. Our discussions aim to highlight the immensely complex regulatory mechanisms that encompass Rho GTPase signaling during AB polarization. More specifically, in this review we discuss several emerging common themes, that include: 1) the need for Rho GTPase activities to be carefully balanced in both a spatial and temporal manner through a multitude of mechanisms; 2) the existence of signaling feedback loops and crosstalk to create robust cellular responses; and 3) the frequent multifunctionality that exists among AB polarity regulators. Regarding this latter theme, we provide further discussion of the potential plasticity of the cell polarity machinery and as a result the possible implications for human disease. PMID:25469537

  4. The interdependence of the Rho GTPases and apicobasal cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Mack, Natalie Ann; Georgiou, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via the Rho GTPases provides crucial regulation of numerous cell polarization events, including apicobasal (AB) polarity, polarized cell migration, polarized cell division and neuronal polarity. Here we review the relationships between the Rho family GTPases and epithelial AB polarization events, focusing on the 3 best-characterized members: Rho, Rac and Cdc42. We discuss a multitude of processes that are important for AB polarization, including lumen formation, apical membrane specification, cell-cell junction assembly and maintenance, as well as tissue polarity. Our discussions aim to highlight the immensely complex regulatory mechanisms that encompass Rho GTPase signaling during AB polarization. More specifically, in this review we discuss several emerging common themes, that include: 1) the need for Rho GTPase activities to be carefully balanced in both a spatial and temporal manner through a multitude of mechanisms; 2) the existence of signaling feedback loops and crosstalk to create robust cellular responses; and 3) the frequent multifunctionality that exists among AB polarity regulators. Regarding this latter theme, we provide further discussion of the potential plasticity of the cell polarity machinery and as a result the possible implications for human disease.

  5. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization. PMID:27180904

  6. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  7. Electrochemical control of cell and tissue polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fred; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Localized ion fluxes at the plasma membrane provide electrochemical gradients at the cell surface that contribute to cell polarization, migration, and division. Ion transporters, local pH gradients, membrane potential, and organization are emerging as important factors in cell polarization mechanisms. The power of electrochemical effects is illustrated by the ability of exogenous electric fields to redirect polarization in cells ranging from bacteria, fungi, and amoebas to keratocytes and neurons. Electric fields normally surround cells and tissues and thus have been proposed to guide cell polarity in development, cancer, and wound healing. Recent studies on electric field responses in model systems and development of new biosensors provide new avenues to dissect molecular mechanisms. Here, we review recent advances that bring molecular understanding of how electrochemistry contributes to cell polarity in various contexts. PMID:25062359

  8. Epithelial Cell Polarity Determinant CRB3 in Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pingping; Mao, Xiaona; Ren, Yu; Liu, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Cell polarity, which is defined as asymmetry in cell shape, organelle distribution and cell function, is essential in numerous biological processes, including cell growth, cell migration and invasion, molecular transport, and cell fate. Epithelial cell polarity is mainly regulated by three conserved polarity protein complexes, the Crumbs (CRB) complex, partitioning defective (PAR) complex and Scribble (SCRIB) complex. Research evidence has indicated that dysregulation of cell polarity proteins may play an important role in cancer development. Crumbs homolog 3 (CRB3), a member of the CRB complex, may act as a cancer suppressor in mouse kidney epithelium and mouse mammary epithelium. In this review, we focus on the current data available on the roles of CRB3 in cancer development. PMID:25552927

  9. Mechanisms of planar cell polarity establishment in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria

    2014-01-01

    Correct patterning and polarization of epithelial and mesenchymal cells are essential for morphogenesis and function of all organs and organisms. Epithelial cells are generally polarized in two axes: (a) the ubiquitous apical-basal axis and (b) polarity within the plane of the epithelium. The latter is generally referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP) and also is found in several contexts of mesenchymal cell patterning. In Drosophila, all adult structures display PCP features, and two conserved molecular systems (the Fat [Ft]/Dachsous [Ds] system and the Frizzled [Fz]/PCP pathway) that regulate this process have been identified. Although significant progress has been made in dissecting aspects of PCP signaling within cells, much remains to be discovered about the mechanisms of long-range and local PCP cell-cell interactions. Here, we discuss the current models based on Drosophila studies and incorporate recent insights into this long-standing cell and developmental biology problem. PMID:25580252

  10. Rebuilding cytoskeleton roads: Active-transport-induced polarization of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, R. J.; Bénichou, O.; Piel, M.; Voituriez, R.

    2009-10-01

    Many cellular processes require a polarization axis which generally initially emerges as an inhomogeneous distribution of molecular markers in the cell. We present a simple analytical model of a general mechanism of cell polarization taking into account the positive feedback due to the coupled dynamics of molecular markers and cytoskeleton filaments. We find that the geometry of the organization of cytoskeleton filaments, nucleated on the membrane (e.g., cortical actin) or from a center in the cytoplasm (e.g., microtubule asters), dictates whether the system is capable of spontaneous polarization or polarizes only in response to external asymmetric signals. Our model also captures the main features of recent experiments of cell polarization in two considerably different biological systems, namely, mating budding yeast and neuron growth cones.

  11. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

  12. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness. PMID:26872368

  13. Does cell polarity matter during spermatogenesis?

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is crucial to development since apico-basal polarity conferred by the 3 polarity protein modules (or complexes) is essential during embryogenesis, namely the Par (partition defective)-, the CRB (Crumbs)-, and the Scribble-based polarity protein modules. While these protein complexes and their component proteins have been extensively studied in Drosophila and C. elegans and also other mammalian tissues and/or cells, their presence and physiological significance in the testis remain unexplored until the first paper on the Par-based protein published in 2008. Since then, the Par-, the Scribble- and the CRB-based protein complexes and their component proteins in the testis have been studied. These proteins are known to confer Sertoli and spermatid polarity in the seminiferous epithelium, and they are also integrated components of the tight junction (TJ) and the basal ectoplasmic specialization (ES) at the Sertoli cell-cell interface near the basement membrane, which in turn constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB). These proteins are also found at the apical ES at the Sertoli-spermatid interface. Thus, these polarity proteins also play a significant role in regulating Sertoli and spermatid adhesion in the testis through their actions on actin-based cytoskeletal function. Recent studies have shown that these polarity proteins are having antagonistic effects on the BTB integrity in which the Par6- and CRB3-based polarity complexes promotes the integrity of the Sertoli cell TJ-permeability barrier, whereas the Scribble-based complex promotes restructuring/remodeling of the Sertoli TJ-barrier function. Herein, we carefully evaluate these findings and provide a hypothetic model regarding their role in the testis in the context of the functions of these polarity proteins in other epithelia, so that better experiments can be designed in future studies to explore their significance in spermatogenesis. PMID:27635303

  14. Does cell polarity matter during spermatogenesis?

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is crucial to development since apico-basal polarity conferred by the 3 polarity protein modules (or complexes) is essential during embryogenesis, namely the Par (partition defective)-, the CRB (Crumbs)-, and the Scribble-based polarity protein modules. While these protein complexes and their component proteins have been extensively studied in Drosophila and C. elegans and also other mammalian tissues and/or cells, their presence and physiological significance in the testis remain unexplored until the first paper on the Par-based protein published in 2008. Since then, the Par-, the Scribble- and the CRB-based protein complexes and their component proteins in the testis have been studied. These proteins are known to confer Sertoli and spermatid polarity in the seminiferous epithelium, and they are also integrated components of the tight junction (TJ) and the basal ectoplasmic specialization (ES) at the Sertoli cell-cell interface near the basement membrane, which in turn constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB). These proteins are also found at the apical ES at the Sertoli-spermatid interface. Thus, these polarity proteins also play a significant role in regulating Sertoli and spermatid adhesion in the testis through their actions on actin-based cytoskeletal function. Recent studies have shown that these polarity proteins are having antagonistic effects on the BTB integrity in which the Par6- and CRB3-based polarity complexes promotes the integrity of the Sertoli cell TJ-permeability barrier, whereas the Scribble-based complex promotes restructuring/remodeling of the Sertoli TJ-barrier function. Herein, we carefully evaluate these findings and provide a hypothetic model regarding their role in the testis in the context of the functions of these polarity proteins in other epithelia, so that better experiments can be designed in future studies to explore their significance in spermatogenesis.

  15. Mechanics and polarity in cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, D.; Zanzottera, A.

    2016-09-01

    The motility of a fish keratocyte on a flat substrate exhibits two distinct regimes: the non-migrating and the migrating one. In both configurations the shape is fixed in time and, when the cell is moving, the velocity is constant in magnitude and direction. Transition from a stable configuration to the other one can be produced by a mechanical or chemotactic perturbation. In order to point out the mechanical nature of such a bistable behaviour, we focus on the actin dynamics inside the cell using a minimal mathematical model. While the protein diffusion, recruitment and segregation govern the polarization process, we show that the free actin mass balance, driven by diffusion, and the polymerized actin retrograde flow, regulated by the active stress, are sufficient ingredients to account for the motile bistability. The length and velocity of the cell are predicted on the basis of the parameters of the substrate and of the cell itself. The key physical ingredient of the theory is the exchange among actin phases at the edges of the cell, that plays a central role both in kinematics and in dynamics.

  16. Lobe cell convection and polar cap precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Su, Y.-J.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.-K.; Parks, G. K.; Carlson, C. W.

    2003-05-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite in 55 dawn-dusk passes are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 34 events of UV image coverage suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation in ˜62% of these cases. However, in some cases where the field signatures are suggestive of lobe cell convection, there is no detectable particle precipitation either in Polar UVI or the FAST data sets. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2000-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ˜59% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of lobe cell events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes during these events.

  17. Planar Cell Polarity in vertebrate limb morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo; Yang, Yingzi

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the vertebrate limb development have contributed significantly to understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying growth, patterning and morphogenesis of a complex multicellular organism. In the limb, well-defined signaling centers interact to coordinate limb growth and patterning along the three axes. Recent analyses of live imaging and mathematical modeling have provided evidence that polarized cell behaviors governed by morphogen gradients play an important role in shaping the limb bud. Furthermore, the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway that controls uniformly polarized cellular behaviors in a field of cells has emerged to be critical for directional morphogenesis in the developing limb. Directional information coded in the morphogen gradient may be interpreted by responding cells through regulating the activities of PCP components in a Wnt morphogen dose-dependent manner. PMID:23747034

  18. Genetic control of polar cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.; Ford, S. ); Somerville, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Certain plant cells, like root hairs and pollen tubes, exhibit polar cell growth, with expansion limited to the tip of the growing cell. In order to understand the mechanisms regulating polar cell expansion, we are studying the process of root hair elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana. By visually screening roots from 12,000 mutagenized Arabidopsis seedlings on Petri dishes, more than 40 root hair mutants have been identified. We have focused our attention on mutants that possess nuclear recessive mutations in three genes (RHD2, RHD3, and RDH4) that appear to be involved in controlling polar cell growth in root hairs. We are currently using cellular, genetic, and molecular approaches to understand these genes' normal roles in root hair elongation.

  19. Kif26b controls endothelial cell polarity through the Dishevelled/Daam1-dependent planar cell polarity-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Guillabert-Gourgues, Aude; Jaspard-Vinassa, Beatrice; Bats, Marie-Lise; Sewduth, Raj N; Franzl, Nathalie; Peghaire, Claire; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Moreau, Catherine; Roux, Etienne; Larrieu-Lahargue, Frederic; Dufourcq, Pascale; Couffinhal, Thierry; Duplàa, Cecile

    2016-03-15

    Angiogenesis involves the coordinated growth and migration of endothelial cells (ECs) toward a proangiogenic signal. The Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, through the recruitment of Dishevelled (Dvl) and Dvl-associated activator of morphogenesis (Daam1), has been proposed to regulate cell actin cytoskeleton and microtubule (MT) reorganization for oriented cell migration. Here we report that Kif26b--a kinesin--and Daam1 cooperatively regulate initiation of EC sprouting and directional migration via MT reorganization. First, we find that Kif26b is recruited within the Dvl3/Daam1 complex. Using a three-dimensional in vitro angiogenesis assay, we show that Kif26b and Daam1 depletion impairs tip cell polarization and destabilizes extended vascular processes. Kif26b depletion specifically alters EC directional migration and mislocalized MT organizing center (MTOC)/Golgi and myosin IIB cell rear enrichment. Therefore the cell fails to establish a proper front-rear polarity. Of interest, Kif26b ectopic expression rescues the siDaam1 polarization defect phenotype. Finally, we show that Kif26b functions in MT stabilization, which is indispensable for asymmetrical cell structure reorganization. These data demonstrate that Kif26b, together with Dvl3/Daam1, initiates cell polarity through the control of PCP signaling pathway-dependent activation. PMID:26792835

  20. Dynacortin facilitates polarization of chemotaxing cells

    PubMed Central

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Xiong, Yuan; Musib, Runa; Reichl, Elizabeth M; Kim, John; Iglesias, Pablo A; Robinson, Douglas N

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell shape changes during cytokinesis and chemotaxis require regulation of the actin cytoskeletal network. Dynacortin, an actin cross-linking protein, localizes to the cell cortex and contributes to cortical resistance, thereby helping to define the cell shape changes of cytokinesis. Dynacortin also becomes highly enriched in cortical protrusions, which are sites of new actin assembly. Results We studied the effect of dynacortin on cell motility during chemotaxis and on actin dynamics in vivo and in vitro. Dynacortin enriches with the actin, particularly at the leading edge of chemotaxing cells. Cells devoid of dynacortin do not become as polarized as wild-type control cells but move with similar velocities as wild-type cells. In particular, they send out multiple pseudopods that radiate at a broader distribution of angles relative to the chemoattractant gradient. Wild-type cells typically only send out one pseudopod at a time that does not diverge much from 0° on average relative to the gradient. Though dynacortin-deficient cells show normal bulk (whole-cell) actin assembly upon chemoattractant stimulation, dynacortin can promote actin assembly in vitro. By fluorescence spectroscopy, co-sedimentation and transmission electron microscopy, dynacortin acts as an actin scaffolder in which it assembles actin monomers into polymers with a stoichiometry of 1 Dyn2:1 actin under salt conditions that disfavor polymer assembly. Conclusion Dynacortin contributes to cell polarization during chemotaxis. By cross-linking and possibly stabilizing actin polymers, dynacortin also contributes to cortical viscoelasticity, which may be critical for establishing cell polarity. Though not essential for directional sensing or motility, dynacortin is required to establish cell polarity, the third core feature of chemotaxis. PMID:18039371

  1. Cellular Polarization and Contractility in Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utuje, Kazage J. Christophe; Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Collective cell migration drives many biological processes such as metastasis, morphogenesis and wound healing. These coordinated motions are driven by active forces. The physical nature of these forces and the mechanisms by which they generate collective cell migration are still not fully understood. We have developed a minimum physical model of a cell monolayer as an elastic continuum whose deformation field is coupled to two internal degrees of freedom: the concentration of a chemical signal, controlling cell Contractility, and the polarization field controlling the direction of local cell motion. By combining theory with experiments, we show that these two internal variables account for the sloshing waves and the systematic deviations of the direction of cell polarization from that of local cell velocity observed in confined cell monolayers. KJCU and MCM were supported by the Simons Foundation.

  2. Role of polarized cell divisions in zebrafish neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jon

    2009-04-01

    Development of epithelial cell polarity and morphogenesis of a central lumen are essential prerequisites for the formation of the vertebrate neural tube. In teleost fish embryos this first involves the formation of a solid neural rod structure that then undergoes a process of cavitation to form a lumen. This process is initiated from a neural plate that has a distinct organization compared to other vertebrates, and involves complex cell intercalations and rearrangements. A key element is a mode of polarized cell division that generates daughters with mirror-image apico-basal polarity. These mirror-symmetric divisions have powerful morphogenetic influence because when they occur in ectopic locations they orchestrate the development of ectopic apical and basal specializations and the development of ectopic neural tubes.

  3. Asymmetric protein localization in planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The polarization of epithelial cells along an axis orthogonal to their apical-basal axis is increasingly recognized for roles in a variety of developmental events and physiological functions. While now studied in many model organisms, mechanistic understanding is rooted in intensive investigations of Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) in Drosophila. Consensus has emerged that two molecular modules, referred to here as the global and core modules, operate upstream of effector proteins to produce morphological PCP. Proteins of the core module develop subcellular asymmetry, accumulating in two groups on opposite sides of cells, consistent with proposed functions in producing cell polarity and in communicating that polarity between neighboring cells. Less clear are the molecular and cell biological mechanisms underlying core module function in the generation and communication of subcellular asymmetry, and the relationship between the global and core modules. In this review, we discuss these two unresolved questions, highlighting important studies and potentially enlightening avenues for further investigation. It is likely that results from Drosophila will continue to inform our views of the growing list of examples of PCP in vertebrate systems. PMID:23140624

  4. Module level solutions to solar cell polarization

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Grace , Li; Bo

    2012-05-29

    A solar cell module includes interconnected solar cells, a transparent cover over the front sides of the solar cells, and a backsheet on the backsides of the solar cells. The solar cell module includes an electrical insulator between the transparent cover and the front sides of the solar cells. An encapsulant protectively packages the solar cells. To prevent polarization, the insulator has resistance suitable to prevent charge from leaking from the front sides of the solar cells to other portions of the solar cell module by way of the transparent cover. The insulator may be attached (e.g., by coating) directly on an underside of the transparent cover or be a separate layer formed between layers of the encapsulant. The solar cells may be back junction solar cells.

  5. Search for Polarization Effects in the Antiproton Production Process

    SciTech Connect

    Grzonka, D.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Oelert, W.; Diermaier, M.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Głowacz, B.; Moskal, P.; Zieliński, M.; Wolke, M.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Carmignotto, M.; Horn, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Asaturyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Eyrich, W.; Hauenstein, F.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam, various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization, a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described.

  6. Lobe Cell Convection and Polar cap Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Su, Y.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.; Parks, G.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-12-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 55 events suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2100-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ~54% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the Tsyganenko [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes.

  7. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita

    2016-01-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca2+) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca2+ and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. PMID:27208283

  8. Wnt proteins can direct planar cell polarity in vertebrate ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chih-Wen; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated orientation of cells across the tissue plane, known as planar cell polarity (PCP), is manifested by the segregation of core PCP proteins to different sides of the cell. Secreted Wnt ligands are involved in many PCP-dependent processes, yet whether they act as polarity cues has been controversial. We show that in Xenopus early ectoderm, the Prickle3/Vangl2 complex was polarized to anterior cell edges and this polarity was disrupted by several Wnt antagonists. In midgastrula embryos, Wnt5a, Wnt11, and Wnt11b, but not Wnt3a, acted across many cell diameters to orient Prickle3/Vangl2 complexes away from their sources regardless of their positions relative to the body axis. The planar polarity of endogenous Vangl2 in the neuroectoderm was similarly redirected by an ectopic Wnt source and disrupted after depletion of Wnt11b in the presumptive posterior region of the embryo. These observations provide evidence for the instructive role of Wnt ligands in vertebrate PCP. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16463.001 PMID:27658614

  9. Mechanochemical Pattern Formation in the Polarization of the One-Cell C. Elegans Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bois, Justin S.; Grill, Stephan W.

    2013-12-01

    Cellular polarity refers to the uneven distribution of certain proteins and nucleic acids on one half of a cell versus the other. Polarity establishment is often an essential process in the development, being responsible for cell differentiation upon division of the polarized cell. The one cell embryo of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a classic model system for the study of polarity. Interestingly, distribution of polarity proteins is accompanied by directional movements of the cell cytoskeleton in this system. In addition to undergoing diffusion, the polarity proteins are transported by these movements. Thus, polarization is achieved by both mechanical and chemical means. We discuss our current understanding of this process in the C. elegans model system. We also discuss more general consequences of mechanochemical coupling in morphogenesis.

  10. Observing planar cell polarity in multiciliated mouse airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Lee, Yin Loon; Stearns, Tim; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The concerted movement of cilia propels inhaled contaminants out of the lungs, safeguarding the respiratory system from toxins, pathogens, pollutants, and allergens. Motile cilia on the multiciliated cells (MCCs) of the airway epithelium are physically oriented along the tissue axis for directional motility, which depends on the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway. The MCCs of the mouse respiratory epithelium have emerged as an important model for the study of motile ciliogenesis and the PCP signaling mechanism. Unlike other motile ciliated or planar polarized tissues, airway epithelial cells are relatively easily accessible and primary cultures faithfully model many of the essential features of the in vivo tissue. There is growing interest in understanding how cells acquire and polarize motile cilia due to the impact of mucociliary clearance on respiratory health. Here, we present methods for observing and quantifying the planar polarized orientation of motile cilia both in vivo and in primary culture airway epithelial cells. We describe how to acquire and evaluate electron and light microscopy images of ciliary ultrastructural features that reveal planar polarized orientation. Furthermore, we describe the immunofluorescence localization of PCP pathway components as a simple readout for airway epithelial planar polarization and ciliary orientation. These methods can be adapted to observe ciliary orientation in other multi- and monociliated cells and to detect PCP pathway activity in any tissue or cell type. PMID:25837385

  11. Studies of 3He polarization losses during NMR and EPR measurment and Polarized 3He target cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Peibo

    2014-09-01

    The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but three other kinds of losses are inevitable: losses during Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) sweep, losses due to flux change caused by different cell orientation with respect to RF fields and physical losses. Fortunately there is only flux change in NMR measurements. The second part of my work presents the study of cell lifetime improvement. The polarization decreases in a process called relaxation exponentially. The lifetime of a cell is how long it can keep its polarization. The typical lifetime of cells produced in our lab is about 22 hours. With a newly designed vacuum system. The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but

  12. Anisotropy of cell adhesive microenvironment governs cell internal organization and orientation of polarity

    PubMed Central

    Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Piel, Matthieu; Pépin, Anne; Dimitrov, Ariane; Chen, Yong; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Bornens, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Control of the establishment of cell polarity is an essential function in tissue morphogenesis and renewal that depends on spatial cues provided by the extracellular environment. The molecular role of cell–cell or cell–extracellular matrix (ECM) contacts on the establishment of cell polarity has been well characterized. It has been hypothesized that the geometry of the cell adhesive microenvironment was directing cell surface polarization and internal organization. To define how the extracellular environment affects cell polarity, we analyzed the organization of individual cells plated on defined micropatterned substrates imposing cells to spread on various combinations of adhesive and nonadhesive areas. The reproducible normalization effect on overall cell compartmentalization enabled quantification of the spatial organization of the actin network and associated proteins, the spatial distribution of microtubules, and the positioning of nucleus, centrosome, and Golgi apparatus. By using specific micropatterns and statistical analysis of cell compartment positions, we demonstrated that ECM geometry determines the orientation of cell polarity axes. The nucleus–centrosome orientations were reproducibly directed toward cell adhesive edges. The anisotropy of the cell cortex in response to the adhesive conditions did not affect the centrosome positioning at the cell centroid. Based on the quantification of microtubule plus end distribution we propose a working model that accounts for that observation. We conclude that, in addition to molecular composition and mechanical properties, ECM geometry plays a key role in developmental processes. PMID:17179050

  13. Polarization phenomena in projectile fragmentation process

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuta, K.; Ozawa, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Minamisono, T.; Fukuda, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Momota, S.; Ohtsubo, T.; Matsuo, Y.; Takechi, H.; Fukuda, S.; Minami, I.; Sugimoto, K.; Tanihata, I.; Omata, K.; Alonso, J.R.; Krebs, G.F.; Symons, T.J.M.

    1992-03-01

    The nuclear spin polarization of beta-emitting fragments {sup 37}K and {sup 39} Ca has been measured at around the grazing angle of the {sup 40}Ca + Au collision at 106 MeV/u. Momentum dependence of the observed fragment polarization supports the idea that the origin of the polarization is the orbital angular momentum held by the fragment part of the projectile before the collision takes place. The sizable polarization of about 5% that was observed for the fragments will be a powerful tool for NMR study of the fragments.

  14. Arabidopsis  SABRE and CLASP interact to stabilize cell division plane orientation and planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Pietra, Stefano; Gustavsson, Anna; Kiefer, Christian; Kalmbach, Lothar; Hörstedt, Per; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Stepanova, Anna N.; Alonso, Jose M.; Grebe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The orientation of cell division and the coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) contribute to shape diverse multicellular organisms. The root of Arabidopsis thaliana displays regularly oriented cell divisions, cell elongation and planar polarity providing a plant model system to study these processes. Here we report that the SABRE protein, which shares similarity with proteins of unknown function throughout eukaryotes, has important roles in orienting cell division and planar polarity. SABRE localizes at the plasma membrane, endomembranes, mitotic spindle and cell plate. SABRE stabilizes the orientation of CLASP-labelled preprophase band microtubules predicting the cell division plane, and of cortical microtubules driving cell elongation. During planar polarity establishment, sabre is epistatic to clasp at directing polar membrane domains of Rho-of-plant GTPases. Our findings mechanistically link SABRE to CLASP-dependent microtubule organization, shedding new light on the function of SABRE-related proteins in eukaryotes. PMID:24240534

  15. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1994-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  16. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1994-02-15

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  17. Cell polarity in plants: a PARspective on PINs.

    PubMed

    Geldner, Niko

    2009-02-01

    Plants have acquired the ability for organized multicellular development independent from animals. Because of this, they represent an independent example in nature for the development of coordinated, complex cell polarity from the simple polarity found in unicellular eukaryotes. Plants display a striking array of polarized cell types, with different axes of polarity being defined in one cell. The most investigated and best understood aspect of plant polarity is the apical-basal polarity of the PIN family of auxin efflux facilitators, which are of crucial importance for the organization of the entire plant body. Striking differences exist between the PAR-polarity modules known in animals and the ways PINs polarize plant cells. Nonetheless, a common regulatory logic probably applies to all polarizing eukaryotic cells, which includes self-reinforcing, positive feedback loops, intricate interactions between membrane-attached proteins, lipid signatures, and the targeting of transmembrane proteins to the correct domains of the plasma membrane. PMID:18993110

  18. Prenylation is required for polar cell elongation, cell adhesion, and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Thole, Julie M; Perroud, Pierre-Francois; Quatrano, Ralph S; Running, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Protein prenylation is required for a variety of growth and developmental processes in flowering plants. Here we report the consequences of loss of function of all known prenylation subunits in the moss Physcomitrella patens. As in Arabidopsis, protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I are not required for viability. However, protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I activity is required for cell adhesion, polar cell elongation, and cell differentiation. Loss of protein geranylgeranyltransferase activity results in colonies of round, single-celled organisms that resemble unicellular algae. The loss of protein farnesylation is not as severe but also results in polar cell elongation and differentiation defects. The complete loss of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase activity appears to be lethal in P. patens. Labeling with antibodies to cell wall components support the lack of polarity establishment and the undifferentiated state of geranylgeranyltransferase type I mutant plants. Our results show that prenylated proteins play key roles in P. patens development and differentiation processes.

  19. Physical processes in polar stratospheric ice clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard; Jordan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A one dimensional model of cloud microphysics was used to simulate the formation and evolution of polar stratospheric ice clouds. Some of the processes which are included in the model are outlined. It is found that the clouds must undergo preferential nucleation upon the existing aerosols just as do tropospheric cirrus clouds. Therefore, there is an energy barrier between stratospheric nitric acid particles and ice particles implying that nitric acid does not form a continuous set of solutions between the trihydrate and ice. The Kelvin barrier is not significant in controlling the rate of formation of ice particles. It was found that the cloud properties are sensitive to the rate at which the air parcels cool. In wave clouds, with cooling rates of hundreds of degrees per day, most of the existing aerosols nucleate and become ice particles. Such clouds have particles with sizes on the order of a few microns, optical depths on order of unity and are probably not efficient at removing materials from the stratosphere. In clouds which form with cooling rates of a few degrees per day or less, only a small fraction of the aerosols become cloud particles. In such clouds the particle radius is larger than 10 microns, the optical depths are low and water vapor is efficiently removed. Seasonal simulations show that the lowest water vapor mixing ratio is determined by the lowest temperature reached, and that the time when clouds disappear is controlled by the time when temperatures begin to rise above the minimum values.

  20. Mechanosensitive store-operated calcium entry regulates the formation of cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Jing; I-Chen Harn, Hans; Huang, Hui-Ting; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Shen, Meng-Ru; Tang, Ming-Jer; Chiu, Wen-Tai

    2015-09-01

    Ca(2+) -mediated formation of cell polarity is essential for directional migration which plays an important role in physiological and pathological processes in organisms. To examine the critical role of store-operated Ca(2+) entry, which is the major form of extracellular Ca(2+) influx in non-excitable cells, in the formation of cell polarity, we employed human bone osteosarcoma U2OS cells, which exhibit distinct morphological polarity during directional migration. Our analyses showed that Ca(2+) was concentrated at the rear end of cells and that extracellular Ca(2+) influx was important for cell polarization. Inhibition of store-operated Ca(2+) entry using specific inhibitors disrupted the formation of cell polarity in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the channelosomal components caveolin-1, TRPC1, and Orai1 were concentrated at the rear end of polarized cells. Knockdown of TRPC1 or a TRPC inhibitor, but not knockdown of Orai1, reduced cell polarization. Furthermore, disruption of lipid rafts or overexpression of caveolin-1 contributed to the downregulation of cell polarity. On the other hand, we also found that cell polarity, store-operated Ca(2+) entry activity, and cell stiffness were markedly decreased by low substrate rigidity, which may be caused by the disorganization of actin filaments and microtubules that occurs while regulating the activity of the mechanosensitive TRPC1 channel.

  1. Self-Polarization of Cells in Elastic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    The shape of a cell as well as the rigidity and geometry of its surroundings play an important role in vital cellular processes. The contractile activity of cells provides a generic means by which cells may sense and respond to mechanical features. The matrix stresses, that depend on the elasticity and geometry of cells, feedback on the cells and influence their activity. This suggests a mechanical mechanism by which cells control their shape and forces. We present a quantitative, mechanical model that predicts that cells in an elastic medium can self-polarize to form well ordered stress fibers. We focus on both single cells in a gel, as well as on an ensemble of cells that is confined to some region within the gel. While the magnitude of the cellular forces is found to increase monotonically with the matrix rigidity the anisotropy of the forces, and thus the ability of the cells to polarize, is predicted to depend non-monotonically on the medium's rigidity. We discuss these results with experimental findings and with the observation of an optimal medium elasticity for cell function and differentiation.

  2. Anthrax Toxin Entry into Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beauregard, Kathryn E.; Wimer-Mackin, Susan; Collier, R. John; Lencer, Wayne I.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the entry of anthrax edema toxin (EdTx) into polarized human T84 epithelial cells using cyclic AMP-regulated Cl− secretion as an index of toxin entry. EdTx is a binary A/B toxin which self assembles at the cell surface from anthrax edema factor and protective antigen (PA). PA binds to cell surface receptors and delivers EF, an adenylate cyclase, to the cytosol. EdTx elicited a strong Cl− secretory response when it was applied to the basolateral surface of T84 cells but no response when it was applied to the apical surface. PA alone had no effect when it was applied to either surface. T84 cells exposed basolaterally bound at least 30-fold-more PA than did T84 cells exposed apically, indicating that the PA receptor is largely or completely restricted to the basolateral membrane of these cells. The PA receptor did not fractionate with detergent-insoluble caveola-like membranes as cholera toxin receptors do. These findings have implications regarding the nature of the PA receptor and confirm the view that EdTx and CT coopt fundamentally different subcellular systems to enter the cell and cause disease. PMID:10338515

  3. Auxin regulation of cell polarity in plants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xue; Chen, Jisheng; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2015-12-01

    Auxin is well known to control pattern formation and directional growth at the organ/tissue levels via the nuclear TIR1/AFB receptor-mediated transcriptional responses. Recent studies have expanded the arena of auxin actions as a trigger or key regulator of cell polarization and morphogenesis. These actions require non-transcriptional responses such as changes in the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking, which are commonly regulated by ROP/Rac GTPase-dependent pathways. These findings beg for the question about the nature of auxin receptors that regulate these responses and renew the interest in ABP1 as a cell surface auxin receptor, including the work showing auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP1) interacts with the extracellular domain of the transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor-like kinases in an auxin-dependent manner, as well as the debate on this auxin binding protein discovered about 40 years ago. This review highlights recent work on the non-transcriptional auxin signaling mechanisms underscoring cell polarity and shape formation in plants.

  4. Auxin regulation of cell polarity in plants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xue; Chen, Jisheng; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2015-12-01

    Auxin is well known to control pattern formation and directional growth at the organ/tissue levels via the nuclear TIR1/AFB receptor-mediated transcriptional responses. Recent studies have expanded the arena of auxin actions as a trigger or key regulator of cell polarization and morphogenesis. These actions require non-transcriptional responses such as changes in the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking, which are commonly regulated by ROP/Rac GTPase-dependent pathways. These findings beg for the question about the nature of auxin receptors that regulate these responses and renew the interest in ABP1 as a cell surface auxin receptor, including the work showing auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP1) interacts with the extracellular domain of the transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor-like kinases in an auxin-dependent manner, as well as the debate on this auxin binding protein discovered about 40 years ago. This review highlights recent work on the non-transcriptional auxin signaling mechanisms underscoring cell polarity and shape formation in plants. PMID:26599954

  5. Cellular mechanisms for cargo delivery and polarity maintenance at different polar domains in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Łangowski, Łukasz; Wabnik, Krzysztof; Li, Hongjiang; Vanneste, Steffen; Naramoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric localization of proteins in the plasma membrane domains of eukaryotic cells is a fundamental manifestation of cell polarity that is central to multicellular organization and developmental patterning. In plants, the mechanisms underlying the polar localization of cargo proteins are still largely unknown and appear to be fundamentally distinct from those operating in mammals. Here, we present a systematic, quantitative comparative analysis of the polar delivery and subcellular localization of proteins that characterize distinct polar plasma membrane domains in plant cells. The combination of microscopic analyses and computational modeling revealed a mechanistic framework common to diverse polar cargos and underlying the establishment and maintenance of apical, basal, and lateral polar domains in plant cells. This mechanism depends on the polar secretion, constitutive endocytic recycling, and restricted lateral diffusion of cargos within the plasma membrane. Moreover, our observations suggest that polar cargo distribution involves the individual protein potential to form clusters within the plasma membrane and interact with the extracellular matrix. Our observations provide insights into the shared cellular mechanisms of polar cargo delivery and polarity maintenance in plant cells. PMID:27462465

  6. Cellular mechanisms for cargo delivery and polarity maintenance at different polar domains in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Łangowski, Łukasz; Wabnik, Krzysztof; Li, Hongjiang; Vanneste, Steffen; Naramoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric localization of proteins in the plasma membrane domains of eukaryotic cells is a fundamental manifestation of cell polarity that is central to multicellular organization and developmental patterning. In plants, the mechanisms underlying the polar localization of cargo proteins are still largely unknown and appear to be fundamentally distinct from those operating in mammals. Here, we present a systematic, quantitative comparative analysis of the polar delivery and subcellular localization of proteins that characterize distinct polar plasma membrane domains in plant cells. The combination of microscopic analyses and computational modeling revealed a mechanistic framework common to diverse polar cargos and underlying the establishment and maintenance of apical, basal, and lateral polar domains in plant cells. This mechanism depends on the polar secretion, constitutive endocytic recycling, and restricted lateral diffusion of cargos within the plasma membrane. Moreover, our observations suggest that polar cargo distribution involves the individual protein potential to form clusters within the plasma membrane and interact with the extracellular matrix. Our observations provide insights into the shared cellular mechanisms of polar cargo delivery and polarity maintenance in plant cells. PMID:27462465

  7. Measuring receptor recycling in polarized MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luciana; Apodaca, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of proteins such as channels, pumps, and receptors is critical for epithelial cell function. In this chapter we present a method to measure receptor recycling in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells using an iodinated ligand. We describe a technique to iodinate transferrin (Tf), we discuss how (125)I-Tf can be used to label a cohort of endocytosed Tf receptor, and then we provide methods to measure the rate of recycling of the (125)I-Tf-receptor complex. We also show how this approach, which is easily adaptable to other proteins, can be used to simultaneously measure the normally small amount of (125)I-Tf transcytosis and degradation.

  8. Hemin controls T cell polarization in sickle cell alloimmunization

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hui; Bao, Weili; Friedman, David; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) often require transfusions to treat and prevent worsening anemia and other SCD complications. However, transfusions can trigger alloimmunization against transfused red blood cells (RBCs) with serious clinical sequelae. Risk factors for alloimmunization in SCD remain poorly understood. We recently reported altered regulatory T cell (Treg) and T helper (Th) responses with higher circulating Th1 (IFN-γ+) cytokines in chronically transfused SCD patients with alloantibodies as compared to those without alloantibodies. Since monocytes play a critical role in polarization of T cell subsets and participate in clearance of transfused RBCs, we tested the hypothesis that in response to RBC breakdown product, hemin, monocyte control of T cell polarization will differ between alloimmunized and non-alloimmunized SCD patients. Exogenous hemin induced Treg polarization in purified T-cell-monocyte cocultures from healthy volunteers through monocyte anti-inflammatory heme degrading enzyme HO-1. Importantly, hemin primarily through its effect on CD16+ monocytes induced an anti-inflammatory (higher Treg/lower Th1) polarization state in non-alloimmunized SCD group, whereas it had little effect in the alloimmunized group. Non-alloimmunized SCD CD16+ monocytes expressed higher basal levels of HO-1. Furthermore, IL-12, which contributed to a pro-inflammatory polarization state (low Treg/high Th1) in SCD, was dampened in hemin-treated stimulated monocytes from non-alloimmunized SCD patients, but not in alloimmunized group. These data suggest that unlike alloimmunized patients, non-alloimmunized SCD CD16+ monocytes in response to transfused RBC breakdown products promote an anti-inflammatory state that is less conductive to alloimmunization. PMID:24879794

  9. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization. PMID:27312576

  10. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization.

  11. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed.

  12. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed. PMID:26689739

  13. Lethal (2) giant larvae: an indispensable regulator of cell polarity and cancer development.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Miao, Yi; Xu, Kedong; Liu, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Cell polarity is one of the most basic properties of all normal cells and is essential for regulating numerous biological processes. Loss of polarity is considered a hallmark for cancer. Multiple polarity proteins are implicated in maintenance of cell polarity. Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl) is one of polarity proteins that plays an important role in regulating cell polarity, asymmetric division as well as tumorigenesis. Lgl proteins in different species have similar structures and conserved functions. Lgl acts as an indispensable regulator of cell biological function, including cell polarity and asymmetric division, through interplaying with other polarity proteins, regulating exocytosis, mediating cytoskeleton and being involved in signaling pathways. Furthermore, Lgl plays a role of a tumor suppressor, and the aberrant expression of Hugl, a human homologue of Lgl, contributes to multiple cancers. However, the exact functions of Lgl and the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. In this review, we will give an overview of the Lgl functions in cell polarity and cancer development, discuss the potential mechanisms underlying these functions, and raise our conclusion of previous studies and points of view about the future studies.

  14. Superresolution microscopy reveals a dynamic picture of cell polarity maintenance during directional growth.

    PubMed

    Ishitsuka, Yuji; Savage, Natasha; Li, Yiming; Bergs, Anna; Grün, Nathalie; Kohler, Daria; Donnelly, Rebecca; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Fischer, Reinhard; Takeshita, Norio

    2015-11-01

    Polar (directional) cell growth, a key cellular mechanism shared among a wide range of species, relies on targeted insertion of new material at specific locations of the plasma membrane. How these cell polarity sites are stably maintained during massive membrane insertion has remained elusive. Conventional live-cell optical microscopy fails to visualize polarity site formation in the crowded cell membrane environment because of its limited resolution. We have used advanced live-cell imaging techniques to directly observe the localization, assembly, and disassembly processes of cell polarity sites with high spatiotemporal resolution in a rapidly growing filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans. We show that the membrane-associated polarity site marker TeaR is transported on microtubules along with secretory vesicles and forms a protein cluster at that point of the apical membrane where the plus end of the microtubule touches. There, a small patch of membrane is added through exocytosis, and the TeaR cluster gets quickly dispersed over the membrane. There is an incessant disassembly and reassembly of polarity sites at the growth zone, and each new polarity site locus is slightly offset from preceding ones. On the basis of our imaging results and computational modeling, we propose a transient polarity model that explains how cell polarity is stably maintained during highly active directional growth.

  15. Superresolution microscopy reveals a dynamic picture of cell polarity maintenance during directional growth

    PubMed Central

    Ishitsuka, Yuji; Savage, Natasha; Li, Yiming; Bergs, Anna; Grün, Nathalie; Kohler, Daria; Donnelly, Rebecca; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Fischer, Reinhard; Takeshita, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Polar (directional) cell growth, a key cellular mechanism shared among a wide range of species, relies on targeted insertion of new material at specific locations of the plasma membrane. How these cell polarity sites are stably maintained during massive membrane insertion has remained elusive. Conventional live-cell optical microscopy fails to visualize polarity site formation in the crowded cell membrane environment because of its limited resolution. We have used advanced live-cell imaging techniques to directly observe the localization, assembly, and disassembly processes of cell polarity sites with high spatiotemporal resolution in a rapidly growing filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans. We show that the membrane-associated polarity site marker TeaR is transported on microtubules along with secretory vesicles and forms a protein cluster at that point of the apical membrane where the plus end of the microtubule touches. There, a small patch of membrane is added through exocytosis, and the TeaR cluster gets quickly dispersed over the membrane. There is an incessant disassembly and reassembly of polarity sites at the growth zone, and each new polarity site locus is slightly offset from preceding ones. On the basis of our imaging results and computational modeling, we propose a transient polarity model that explains how cell polarity is stably maintained during highly active directional growth. PMID:26665168

  16. Airway epithelial homeostasis and planar cell polarity signaling depend on multiciliated cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Nayak, Jayakar V.; Milla, Carlos E.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Motile airway cilia that propel contaminants out of the lung are oriented in a common direction by planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, which localizes PCP protein complexes to opposite cell sides throughout the epithelium to orient cytoskeletal remodeling. In airway epithelia, PCP is determined in a 2-phase process. First, cell-cell communication via PCP complexes polarizes all cells with respect to the proximal-distal tissue axis. Second, during ciliogenesis, multiciliated cells (MCCs) undergo cytoskeletal remodeling to orient their cilia in the proximal direction. The second phase not only directs cilium polarization, but also consolidates polarization across the epithelium. Here, we demonstrate that in airway epithelia, PCP depends on MCC differentiation. PCP mutant epithelia have misaligned cilia, and also display defective barrier function and regeneration, indicating that PCP regulates multiple aspects of airway epithelial homeostasis. In humans, MCCs are often sparse in chronic inflammatory diseases, and these airways exhibit PCP dysfunction. The presence of insufficient MCCs impairs mucociliary clearance in part by disrupting PCP-driven polarization of the epithelium. Consistent with defective PCP, barrier function and regeneration are also disrupted. Pharmacological stimulation of MCC differentiation restores PCP and reverses these defects, suggesting its potential for broad therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27570836

  17. Front-Rear Polarization by Mechanical Cues: From Single Cells to Tissues.

    PubMed

    Ladoux, Benoit; Mège, René-Marc; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Directed cell migration is a complex process that involves front-rear polarization, characterized by cell adhesion and cytoskeleton-based protrusion, retraction, and contraction of either a single cell or a cell collective. Single cell polarization depends on a variety of mechanochemical signals including external adhesive cues, substrate stiffness, and confinement. In cell ensembles, coordinated polarization of migrating tissues results not only from the application of traction forces on the extracellular matrix but also from the transmission of mechanical stress through intercellular junctions. We focus here on the impact of mechanical cues on the establishment and maintenance of front-rear polarization from single cell to collective cell behaviors through local or large-scale mechanisms. PMID:26920934

  18. Front-Rear Polarization by Mechanical Cues: From Single Cells to Tissues.

    PubMed

    Ladoux, Benoit; Mège, René-Marc; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Directed cell migration is a complex process that involves front-rear polarization, characterized by cell adhesion and cytoskeleton-based protrusion, retraction, and contraction of either a single cell or a cell collective. Single cell polarization depends on a variety of mechanochemical signals including external adhesive cues, substrate stiffness, and confinement. In cell ensembles, coordinated polarization of migrating tissues results not only from the application of traction forces on the extracellular matrix but also from the transmission of mechanical stress through intercellular junctions. We focus here on the impact of mechanical cues on the establishment and maintenance of front-rear polarization from single cell to collective cell behaviors through local or large-scale mechanisms.

  19. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  20. The reorientation of cell nucleus promotes the establishment of front-rear polarity in migrating fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maninová, Miloslava; Klímová, Zuzana; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2013-06-12

    The establishment of cell polarity is an essential step in the process of cell migration. This process requires precise spatiotemporal coordination of signaling pathways that in most cells create the typical asymmetrical profile of a polarized cell with nucleus located at the cell rear and the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) positioned between the nucleus and the leading edge. During cell polarization, nucleus rearward positioning promotes correct microtubule organizing center localization and thus the establishment of front-rear polarity and directional migration. We found that cell polarization and directional migration require also the reorientation of the nucleus. Nuclear reorientation is manifested as temporally restricted nuclear rotation that aligns the nuclear axis with the axis of cell migration. We also found that nuclear reorientation requires physical connection between the nucleus and cytoskeleton mediated by the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Nuclear reorientation is controlled by coordinated activity of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-mediated activation of GTPase Rho and the activation of integrin, FAK (focal adhesion kinase), Src, and p190RhoGAP signaling pathway. Integrin signaling is spatially induced at the leading edge as FAK and p190RhoGAP are predominantly activated or localized at this location. We suggest that integrin activation within lamellipodia defines cell front, and subsequent FAK, Src, and p190RhoGAP signaling represents the polarity signal that induces reorientation of the nucleus and thus promotes the establishment of front-rear polarity.

  1. Getting to the root of plant iron uptake and cell-cell transport: Polarity matters!

    PubMed

    Dubeaux, Guillaume; Zelazny, Enric; Vert, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins play pivotal roles in mediating responses to endogenous and environmental cues. Regulation of membrane protein levels and establishment of polarity are fundamental for many cellular processes. In plants, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) is the major root iron transporter but is also responsible for the absorption of other divalent metals such as manganese, zinc and cobalt. We recently uncovered that IRT1 is polarly localized to the outer plasma membrane domain of plant root epidermal cells upon depletion of its secondary metal substrates. The endosome-recruited FYVE1 protein interacts with IRT1 in the endocytic pathway and plays a crucial role in the establishment of IRT1 polarity, likely through its recycling to the cell surface. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of radial transport of nutrients across the different cell types of plant roots toward the vascular tissues and raises interesting parallel with iron transport in mammals.

  2. Getting to the root of plant iron uptake and cell-cell transport: Polarity matters!

    PubMed

    Dubeaux, Guillaume; Zelazny, Enric; Vert, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins play pivotal roles in mediating responses to endogenous and environmental cues. Regulation of membrane protein levels and establishment of polarity are fundamental for many cellular processes. In plants, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) is the major root iron transporter but is also responsible for the absorption of other divalent metals such as manganese, zinc and cobalt. We recently uncovered that IRT1 is polarly localized to the outer plasma membrane domain of plant root epidermal cells upon depletion of its secondary metal substrates. The endosome-recruited FYVE1 protein interacts with IRT1 in the endocytic pathway and plays a crucial role in the establishment of IRT1 polarity, likely through its recycling to the cell surface. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of radial transport of nutrients across the different cell types of plant roots toward the vascular tissues and raises interesting parallel with iron transport in mammals. PMID:26479146

  3. Positioning of polarity formation by extracellular signaling during asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-07-01

    Anterior-posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which ultimately generates cell diversity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a single fertilized egg cell (P0), its daughter cell (P1), and the germline precursors (P2 and P3 cells) form two exclusive domains of different PAR proteins on the membrane along the anterior-posterior axis. However, the phenomenon of polarity reversal has been observed in which the axis of asymmetric cell division of the P2 and P3 cells is formed in an opposite manner to that of the P0 and P1 cells. The extracellular signal MES-1/SRC-1 has been shown to induce polarity reversal, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, using a mathematical model, I explore the mechanism by which MES-1/SRC-1 signaling can induce polarity reversal and ultimately affect the process of polarity formation. I show that a positive correlation between SRC-1 and the on-rate of PAR-2 is the essential mechanism underlying polarity reversal, providing a mathematical basis for the orientation of cell polarity patterns.

  4. Spatial and temporal aspects of Wnt signaling and planar cell polarity during vertebrate embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways act at multiple locations and developmental stages to specify cell fate and polarity in vertebrate embryos. A long-standing question is how the same molecular machinery can be reused to produce different outcomes. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin branch modulates target gene transcription to specify cell fates along the dorsoventral and anteroposterior embryonic axes. By contrast, the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) branch is responsible for cell polarization along main body axes, which coordinates morphogenetic cell behaviors during gastrulation and neurulation. Whereas both cell fate and cell polarity are modulated by spatially- and temporally-restricted Wnt activity, the downstream signaling mechanisms are very diverse. This review highlights recent progress in the understanding of Wnt-dependent molecular events leading to the establishment of PCP and linking it to early morphogenetic processes. PMID:25986055

  5. Mathematical analysis of spontaneous emergence of cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wing-Cheong; Park, Hay-Oak; Chou, Ching-Shan

    2014-08-01

    Cell polarization, in which intracellular substances are asymmetrically distributed, enables cells to carry out specialized functions. While cell polarity is often induced by intracellular or extracellular spatial cues, spontaneous polarization (the so-called symmetry breaking) may also occur in the absence of spatial cues. Many computational models have been used to investigate the mechanisms of symmetry breaking, and it was proved that spontaneous polarization occurs when the lateral diffusion of inactive signaling molecules is much faster than that of active signaling molecules. This conclusion leaves an important question of how, as observed in many biological systems, cell polarity emerges when active and inactive membrane-bound molecules diffuse at similar rates while cycling between cytoplasm and membrane takes place. The recent studies of Rätz and Röger showed that, when the cytosolic and membrane diffusion are very different, spontaneous polarization is possible even if the membrane-bound species diffuse at the same rate. In this paper, we formulate a two-equation non-local reaction-diffusion model with general forms of positive feedback. We apply Turing stability analysis to identify parameter conditions for achieving cell polarization. Our results show that spontaneous polarization can be achieved within some parameter ranges even when active and inactive signaling molecules diffuse at similar rates. In addition, different forms of positive feedback are explored to show that a non-local molecule-mediated feedback is important for sharping the localization as well as giving rise to fast dynamics to achieve robust polarization.

  6. Self-organization and advective transport in the cell polarity formation for asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    Anterior-Posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which depends not only on the several genetic process but also biochemical and biophysical interactions. The mechanism of AP formation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is characterized into the three processes: (i) membrane association and dissociation of posterior and anterior proteins, (ii) diffusion into the membrane and cytosol, and (iii) active cortical and cytoplasmic flows induced by the contraction of the acto-myosin cortex. We explored the mechanism of symmetry breaking and AP polarity formation using self-recruitment model of posterior proteins. We found that the AP polarity pattern is established over wide range in the total mass of polarity proteins and the diffusion ratio in the cytosol to the membrane. We also showed that the advective transport in both membrane and cytosol during the establishment phase affects optimal time interval of establishment and positioning of the posterior domain, and plays a role to increase the robustness in the AP polarity formation by reducing the number of posterior domains for the sensitivity of initial conditions. We also demonstrated that a proper ratio of the total mass to cell size robustly regulate the length scale of the posterior domain.

  7. Actin and microtubules drive differential aspects of planar cell polarity in multiciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Michael E.; Hwang, Peter; Huisman, Fawn; Taborek, Peter; Yu, Clare C.

    2011-01-01

    Planar cell polarization represents the ability of cells to orient within the plane of a tissue orthogonal to the apical basal axis. The proper polarized function of multiciliated cells requires the coordination of cilia spacing and cilia polarity as well as the timing of cilia beating during metachronal synchrony. The planar cell polarity pathway and hydrodynamic forces have been shown to instruct cilia polarity. In this paper, we show how intracellular effectors interpret polarity to organize cellular morphology in accordance with asymmetric cellular function. We observe that both cellular actin and microtubule networks undergo drastic reorganization, providing differential roles during the polarized organization of cilia. Using computational angular correlation analysis of cilia orientation, we report a graded cellular organization downstream of cell polarity cues. Actin dynamics are required for proper cilia spacing, global coordination of cilia polarity, and coordination of metachronic cilia beating, whereas cytoplasmic microtubule dynamics are required for local coordination of polarity between neighboring cilia. PMID:21949415

  8. A process for low cost wire grid polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, M. P. C.; Little, M.; Egan, E.; Hochbaum, A.; Johns, C.; Stephansen, S.

    2013-03-01

    Oblique angle metal deposition has been combined with high aspect ratio imprinted structures to create wire grid polarizers (WGP's) for use as polarization recyclers in liquid crystal displays. The process of oblique deposition was simulated to determine optimal feature profile and deposition geometry. The optical results for the oblique deposition WGP show contrast comparable to a conventionally etched WGP. The next steps to the fabrication of meter sized WGP are proposed.

  9. Synthetic aperture radar processing with polar formatted subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses the motion of a small real antenna to synthesize a larger aperture, and thereby achieve very fine azimuth resolution. Efficient SAR image formation requires modelling the radar echo and compensating (focusing) the delay and phase for various positions in the target scene. Polar-Format processing is one successful algorithm developed to process large scenes at fine resolutions, but is still limited, especially at resolutions near a wavelength. This paper shows how using tiers of subapertures can overcome the limitations of Polar-Format processing and increase the focused scene size substantially while using only efficient vector multiplies and Fast Fourier Transforms.

  10. Pak3 regulates apical-basal polarity in migrating border cells during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Felix, Martina; Chayengia, Mrinal; Ghosh, Ritabrata; Sharma, Aditi; Prasad, Mohit

    2015-11-01

    Group cell migration is a highly coordinated process that is involved in a number of physiological events such as morphogenesis, wound healing and tumor metastasis. Unlike single cells, collectively moving cells are physically attached to each other and retain some degree of apical-basal polarity during the migratory phase. Although much is known about direction sensing, how polarity is regulated in multicellular movement remains unclear. Here we report the role of the protein kinase Pak3 in maintaining apical-basal polarity in migrating border cell clusters during Drosophila oogenesis. Pak3 is enriched in border cells and downregulation of its function impedes border cell movement. Time-lapse imaging suggests that Pak3 affects protrusive behavior of the border cell cluster, specifically regulating the stability and directionality of protrusions. Pak3 functions downstream of guidance receptor signaling to regulate the level and distribution of F-actin in migrating border cells. We also provide evidence that Pak3 genetically interacts with the lateral polarity marker Scribble and that it regulates JNK signaling in the moving border cells. Since Pak3 depletion results in mislocalization of several apical-basal polarity markers and overexpression of Jra rescues the polarity of the Pak3-depleted cluster, we propose that Pak3 functions through JNK signaling to modulate apical-basal polarity of the migrating border cell cluster. We also observe loss of apical-basal polarity in Rac1-depleted border cell clusters, suggesting that guidance receptor signaling functions through Rac GTPase and Pak3 to regulate the overall polarity of the cluster and mediate efficient collective movement of the border cells to the oocyte boundary.

  11. Measurement of dynamic variations of polarized light in processed meat due to aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubaker, Hamed M.; Tománek, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of laser light in biological tissues is of growing importance in many medical and food applications. This problem is seriously studied in live science. The biological tissues consist of cells which dimensions are bigger than wavelength of visible light and display large compositional variations, inhomogeneities, and anisotropic structures. Therefore a Mie scattering of transmitted or backscattered light occurs and different polarization states arise. The changes of polarization state due to the multiple scattering of light in the biological cellular tissues also allow measure the freshness of processed victuals. The transmitted and backscattered laser light exhibits multiple scattering on the thin slice of sample. The phenomenon is different if the cellular tissues are living or dead. In the case of meat, there are temporal and dynamic changes not only as a result of chemical process, but also geometric deformations due to the water evaporation from intracellular and extracellular sites. The polarization measurement shows the changes in polarization orientation due to the muscle orientation and meat aging. Two types of measurements were provided: a) Measurement of polarized light reflected and twice transmitted forward and backward through the biological tissue samples - meat slice attached on sample holder mirror. b) Measurement of polarized light transmitted through the biological tissue sample. The relationship between polarization changes and meat freshness, and a dynamic temporal behavior of polarization states in the aged meat is reported.

  12. Inversion by P4: polarization-picture post-processing.

    PubMed

    Schechner, Yoav Y

    2011-03-12

    Polarization may be sensed by imaging modules. This is done in various engineering systems as well as in biological systems, specifically by insects and some marine species. However, polarization per pixel is usually not the direct variable of interest. Rather, polarization-related data serve as a cue for recovering task-specific scene information. How should polarization-picture post-processing (P(4)) be done for the best scene understanding? Answering this question is not only helpful for advanced engineering (computer vision), but also to prompt hypotheses as to the processing occurring within biological systems. In various important cases, the answer is found by a principled expression of scene recovery as an inverse problem. Such an expression relies directly on a physics-based model of effects in the scene. The model includes analysis that depends on the different polarization components, thus facilitating the use of these components during the inversion, in a proper, even if non-trivial, manner. We describe several examples for this approach. These include automatic removal of path radiance in haze or underwater, overcoming partial semireflections and visual reverberations; three-dimensional recovery and distance-adaptive denoising. The resulting inversion algorithms rely on signal-processing methods, such as independent component analysis, deconvolution and optimization.

  13. Gamma-ray burst polarization via Compton scattering process

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. The measurement of the polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive an analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power-law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision, and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as 100% for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of ∼10%-20% can still be achieved. The Compton scattering process can be used to explain the polarization of GRB 041219A and GRB 100826A.

  14. Ratiometric fluorescence imaging of cellular polarity: decrease in mitochondrial polarity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Na; Fan, Jiangli; Xu, Feng; Peng, Xiaojun; Mu, Huiying; Wang, Jingyun; Xiong, Xiaoqing

    2015-02-16

    Mitochondrial polarity strongly influences the intracellular transportation of proteins and interactions between biomacromolecules. The first fluorescent probe capable of the ratiometric imaging of mitochondrial polarity is reported. The probe, termed BOB, has two absorption maxima (λabs = 426 and 561 nm) and two emission maxima--a strong green emission (λem = 467 nm) and a weak red emission (642 nm in methanol)--when excited at 405 nm. However, only the green emission is markedly sensitive to polarity changes, thus providing a ratiometric fluorescence response with a good linear relationship in both extensive and narrow ranges of solution polarity. BOB possesses high specificity to mitochondria (Rr =0.96) that is independent of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The mitochondrial polarity in cancer cells was found to be lower than that of normal cells by ratiometric fluorescence imaging with BOB. The difference in mitochondrial polarity might be used to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells.

  15. The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone), TBE-31, targets microtubule dynamics and cell polarity in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eddie; Saito, Akira; Honda, Tadashi; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M

    2016-04-01

    Cell migration is dependent on the microtubule network for structural support as well as for the proper delivery and positioning of polarity proteins at the leading edge of migrating cells. Identification of drugs that target cytoskeletal-dependent cell migration and protein transport in polarized migrating cells is important in understanding the cell biology of normal and tumor cells and can lead to new therapeutic targets in disease processes. Here, we show that the tricyclic compound TBE-31 directly binds to tubulin and interferes with microtubule dynamics, as assessed by end binding 1 (EB1) live cell imaging. Interestingly, this interference is independent of in vitro tubulin polymerization. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we also observed that TBE-31 interferes with the polarity of migratory cells. The polarity proteins Rac1, IQGAP and Tiam1 were localized at the leading edge of DMSO-treated migrating cell, but were observed to be in multiple protrusions around the cell periphery of TBE-31-treated cells. Finally, we observed that TBE-31 inhibits the migration of Rat2 fibroblasts with an IC50 of 0.75 μM. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of cell migration by TBE-31 may result from the improper maintenance of cell polarity of migrating cells.

  16. The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone), TBE-31, targets microtubule dynamics and cell polarity in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eddie; Saito, Akira; Honda, Tadashi; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M

    2016-04-01

    Cell migration is dependent on the microtubule network for structural support as well as for the proper delivery and positioning of polarity proteins at the leading edge of migrating cells. Identification of drugs that target cytoskeletal-dependent cell migration and protein transport in polarized migrating cells is important in understanding the cell biology of normal and tumor cells and can lead to new therapeutic targets in disease processes. Here, we show that the tricyclic compound TBE-31 directly binds to tubulin and interferes with microtubule dynamics, as assessed by end binding 1 (EB1) live cell imaging. Interestingly, this interference is independent of in vitro tubulin polymerization. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we also observed that TBE-31 interferes with the polarity of migratory cells. The polarity proteins Rac1, IQGAP and Tiam1 were localized at the leading edge of DMSO-treated migrating cell, but were observed to be in multiple protrusions around the cell periphery of TBE-31-treated cells. Finally, we observed that TBE-31 inhibits the migration of Rat2 fibroblasts with an IC50 of 0.75 μM. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of cell migration by TBE-31 may result from the improper maintenance of cell polarity of migrating cells. PMID:26775215

  17. Proceedings of the Polar Processes on Mars Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Included in this publication is a collection of abstracts from the NASA-sponsored workshop, Polar Processes on Mars, which was held at the Sunnyvale Hilton Hotel, Sunnyvale, California, on 12 to 13 May 1988. Support for the workshop came from NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program managed by Dr. Jospeh Boyce. The workshop is one of a series identified by MECA (an acronym for Mars: Evolution of its Climate and Atmosphere) as being worthy of focused research, but one for which it was not possible to hold during the project's lifetime. Consequently, it was held after the project ended. The MECA project was part of the Mars Data Analysis program. The workshop consisted of four sessions: The Polar Caps, Dynamics/Atmospheric Processes, Polar Geology, and Future Measurements. To put things into perspective, each of the first three sessions began with a review. All sessions were scheduled to allow ample time for discussion. A brief review of each session is provided.

  18. Proceedings of the Polar Processes on Mars Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, Robert M.

    1988-12-01

    Included in this publication is a collection of abstracts from the NASA-sponsored workshop, Polar Processes on Mars, which was held at the Sunnyvale Hilton Hotel, Sunnyvale, California, on 12 to 13 May 1988. Support for the workshop came from NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program managed by Dr. Jospeh Boyce. The workshop is one of a series identified by MECA (an acronym for Mars: Evolution of its Climate and Atmosphere) as being worthy of focused research, but one for which it was not possible to hold during the project's lifetime. Consequently, it was held after the project ended. The MECA project was part of the Mars Data Analysis program. The workshop consisted of four sessions: The Polar Caps, Dynamics/Atmospheric Processes, Polar Geology, and Future Measurements. To put things into perspective, each of the first three sessions began with a review. All sessions were scheduled to allow ample time for discussion. A brief review of each session is provided.

  19. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-09-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration. PMID:27555588

  20. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M.; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-01-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration. PMID:27555588

  1. Polarization and molecular information transmission in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez-Gomez, Adriano; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo

    2012-02-01

    During chemotaxis, pseudopodia are extended at the leading edge and retracted at the back of the cell. Efficient chemotaxis is the result of a refined interplay between signaling modules to transmit and integrate spatial information such as PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. The localization of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is expected to depend on the distributions or activities of PI3Ks, PTEN, and 5-phosphatases. The spatial signals spread relatively slowly so that high local concentrations of PIP3 in the plasma membrane appear in patches. These gradients induce localization of PIP3 and PTEN to the front and back of the cell, respectively. To simulate this polarization process that involves the action of seven reaction-channels inside the cell we carried out extensive stochastic simulations using Gilliespie algorithm. The simulations were done on a square cell with ten thousand sites (100x100) emulating a square cell with side 10>μm long. We found that there are localized patches of PIP3 at the active receptors and segregation of PTEN on the opposite side of the cell. When we block the reaction-channel, PTEN + PIP3 ->PIP2 that involves the production of PIP2 we obtained a five-fold increase in the concentration of PIP3. This finding appears to be consistent with the o

  2. Mathematical analysis of steady-state solutions in compartment and continuum models of cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhenzhen; Chou, Ching-Shan; Yi, Tau-Mu; Nie, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Cell polarization, in which substances previously uniformly distributed become asymmetric due to external or/and internal stimulation, is a fundamental process underlying cell mobility, cell division, and other polarized functions. The yeast cell S. cerevisiae has been a model system to study cell polarization. During mating, yeast cells sense shallow external spatial gradients and respond by creating steeper internal gradients of protein aligned with the external cue. The complex spatial dynamics during yeast mating polarization consists of positive feedback, degradation, global negative feedback control, and cooperative effects in protein synthesis. Understanding such complex regulations and interactions is critical to studying many important characteristics in cell polarization including signal amplification, tracking dynamic signals, and potential trade-off between achieving both objectives in a robust fashion. In this paper, we study some of these questions by analyzing several models with different spatial complexity: two compartments, three compartments, and continuum in space. The step-wise approach allows detailed characterization of properties of the steady state of the system, providing more insights for biological regulations during cell polarization. For cases without membrane diffusion, our study reveals that increasing the number of spatial compartments results in an increase in the number of steady-state solutions, in particular, the number of stable steady-state solutions, with the continuum models possessing infinitely many steady-state solutions. Through both analysis and simulations, we find that stronger positive feedback, reduced diffusion, and a shallower ligand gradient all result in more steady-state solutions, although most of these are not optimally aligned with the gradient. We explore in the different settings the relationship between the number of steady-state solutions and the extent and accuracy of the polarization. Taken together

  3. Postnatal Refinement of Auditory Hair Cell Planar Polarity Deficits Occurs in the Absence of Vangl2

    PubMed Central

    Copley, Catherine O.; Duncan, Jeremy S.; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Haixia

    2013-01-01

    The distinctive planar polarity of auditory hair cells is evident in the polarized organization of the stereociliary bundle. Mutations in the core planar cell polarity gene Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) result in hair cells that fail to properly orient their stereociliary bundles along the mediolateral axis of the cochlea. The severity of this phenotype is graded along the length of the cochlea, similar to the hair cell differentiation gradient, suggesting that an active refinement process corrects planar polarity phenotypes in Vangl2 knock-out (KO) mice. Because Vangl2 gene deletions are lethal, Vangl2 conditional knock-outs (CKOs) were generated to test this hypothesis. When crossed with Pax2–Cre, Vangl2 is deleted from the inner ear, yielding planar polarity phenotypes similar to Vangl2 KOs at late embryonic stages except that Vangl2 CKO mice are viable and do not have craniorachischisis like Vangl2 KOs. Quantification of planar polarity deficits through postnatal development demonstrates the activity of a Vangl2-independent refinement process that rescues the planar polarity phenotype within 10 d of birth. In contrast, the Pax2–Cre;Vangl2 CKO has profound changes in the shape and distribution of outer pillar cell and Deiters' cell phalangeal processes that are not corrected during the period of planar polarity refinement. Auditory brainstem response analyses of adult mice show a 10–15 dB shift in auditory threshold, and distortion product otoacoustic emission measurements indicate that this mild hearing deficit is of cochlear origin. Together, these data demonstrate a Vangl2-independent refinement mechanism that actively reorients auditory stereociliary bundles and reveals an unexpected role of Vangl2 during supporting cell morphogenesis. PMID:23986237

  4. Process and apparatus for measuring degree of polarization and angle of major axis of polarized beam of light

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.; Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process are disclosed for calibrating measurements of the phase of the polarization of a polarized beam and the angle of the polarized optical beam's major axis of polarization at a diagnostic point with measurements of the same parameters at a point of interest along the polarized beam path prior to the diagnostic point. The process is carried out by measuring the phase angle of the polarization of the beam and angle of the major axis at the point of interest, using a rotatable polarizer and a detector, and then measuring these parameters again at a diagnostic point where a compensation apparatus, including a partial polarizer, which may comprise a stack of glass plates, is disposed normal to the beam path between a rotatable polarizer and a detector. The partial polarizer is then rotated both normal to the beam path and around the axis of the beam path until the detected phase of the beam polarization equals the phase measured at the point of interest. The rotatable polarizer at the diagnostic point may then be rotated manually to determine the angle of the major axis of the beam and this is compared with the measured angle of the major axis of the beam at the point of interest during calibration. Thereafter, changes in the polarization phase, and in the angle of the major axis, at the point of interest can be monitored by measuring the changes in these same parameters at the diagnostic point.

  5. Cell polarity in filamentous fungi: shaping the mold.

    PubMed

    Harris, Steven D

    2006-01-01

    The formation of highly polarized hyphae that grow by apical extension is a defining feature of the filamentous fungi. High-resolution microscopy and mathematical modeling have revealed the importance of the cytoskeleton and the Spitzenkorper (an apical vesicle cluster) in hyphal morphogenesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly characterized. In this review, the pathways and functions known to be involved in polarized hyphal growth are summarized. A central theme is the notion that the polarized growth of hyphae is more complex than in yeast, though similar sets of core pathways are likely utilized. In addition, a model for the establishment and maintenance of hyphal polarity is presented. Key features of the model include the idea that polarity establishment is a stochastic process that occurs independent of internal landmarks. Moreover, the stabilization of nascent polarity axes may be the critical step that permits the emergence of a new hypha.

  6. Collective Chemotaxis Requires Contact-Dependent Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Theveneau, Eric; Marchant, Lorena; Kuriyama, Sei; Gull, Mazhar; Moepps, Barbara; Parsons, Maddy; Mayor, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary Directional collective migration is now a widely recognized mode of migration during embryogenesis and cancer. However, how a cluster of cells responds to chemoattractants is not fully understood. Neural crest cells are among the most motile cells in the embryo, and their behavior has been likened to malignant invasion. Here, we show that neural crest cells are collectively attracted toward the chemokine Sdf1. While not involved in initially polarizing cells, Sdf1 directionally stabilizes cell protrusions promoted by cell contact. At this cell contact, N-cadherin inhibits protrusion and Rac1 activity and in turn promotes protrusions and activation of Rac1 at the free edge. These results show a role for N-cadherin during contact inhibition of locomotion, and they reveal a mechanism of chemoattraction likely to function during both embryogenesis and cancer metastasis, whereby attractants such as Sdf1 amplify and stabilize contact-dependent cell polarity, resulting in directional collective migration. PMID:20643349

  7. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other. PMID:27077831

  8. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients.

    PubMed

    Muller, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu; Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other. PMID:27077831

  9. Induction of CD4+ Regulatory and Polarized Effector/helper T Cells by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to play major roles during the induction of T cell immune responses as well as the maintenance of T cell tolerance. Naive CD4+ T cells have been shown to respond with high plasticity to signals inducing their polarization into effector/helper or regulatory T cells. Data obtained from in vitro generated bone-marrow (BM)-derived DCs as well as genetic mouse models revealed an important but not exclusive role of DCs in shaping CD4+ T cell responses. Besides the specialization of some conventional DC subsets for the induction of polarized immunity, also the maturation stage, activation of specialized transcription factors and the cytokine production of DCs have major impact on CD4+ T cells. Since in vitro generated BM-DCs show a high diversity to shape CD4+ T cells and their high similarity to monocyte-derived DCs in vivo, this review reports data mainly on BM-DCs in this process and only touches the roles of transcription factors or of DC subsets, which have been discussed elsewhere. Here, recent findings on 1) the conversion of naive into anergic and further into Foxp3− regulatory T cells (Treg) by immature DCs, 2) the role of RelB in steady state migratory DCs (ssmDCs) for conversion of naive T cells into Foxp3+ Treg, 3) the DC maturation signature for polarized Th2 cell induction and 4) the DC source of IL-12 for Th1 induction are discussed. PMID:26937228

  10. Modified Polar-Format Software for Processing SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    HMPF is a computer program that implements a modified polar-format algorithm for processing data from spaceborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) systems. Unlike prior polar-format processing algorithms, this algorithm is based on the assumption that the radar signal wavefronts are spherical rather than planar. The algorithm provides for resampling of SAR pulse data from slant range to radial distance from the center of a reference sphere that is nominally the local Earth surface. Then, invoking the projection-slice theorem, the resampled pulse data are Fourier-transformed over radial distance, arranged in the wavenumber domain according to the acquisition geometry, resampled to a Cartesian grid, and inverse-Fourier-transformed. The result of this process is the focused SAR image. HMPF, and perhaps other programs that implement variants of the algorithm, may give better accuracy than do prior algorithms for processing strip-map SAR data from high altitudes and may give better phase preservation relative to prior polar-format algorithms for processing spotlight-mode SAR data.

  11. Polarization of yeast cells in spatial gradients of alpha mating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Segall, J E

    1993-01-01

    The process of cell fusion during mating of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by factors secreted by the mating partners. Spatial gradients of one of these mating factors, alpha-factor, polarized the growth of projections by MATa cells. The site of previous budding did not affect the direction of polarization, and subsequent budding was also polarized if mating factor was removed. Orientation occurred in the presence of nocodazole, suggesting that microtubules were not critical. At extremely low concentrations of alpha-factor, sst2-mutants (which in genetic studies do not discriminate between partners producing different amounts of alpha-factor) were able to polarize their projections. The sensitivity of this spatial sensing mechanism in wild-type cells is such that differences in receptor occupancy estimated to be about 1% are sufficient for orientation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8397402

  12. Disruption of Bardet-Biedl syndrome ciliary proteins perturbs planar cell polarity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alison J; May-Simera, Helen; Eichers, Erica R; Kai, Masatake; Hill, Josephine; Jagger, Daniel J; Leitch, Carmen C; Chapple, J Paul; Munro, Peter M; Fisher, Shannon; Tan, Perciliz L; Phillips, Helen M; Leroux, Michel R; Henderson, Deborah J; Murdoch, Jennifer N; Copp, Andrew J; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Lupski, James R; Kemp, David T; Dollfus, Hélène; Tada, Masazumi; Katsanis, Nicholas; Forge, Andrew; Beales, Philip L

    2005-10-01

    The evolutionarily conserved planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway (or noncanonical Wnt pathway) drives several important cellular processes, including epithelial cell polarization, cell migration and mitotic spindle orientation. In vertebrates, PCP genes have a vital role in polarized convergent extension movements during gastrulation and neurulation. Here we show that mice with mutations in genes involved in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), a disorder associated with ciliary dysfunction, share phenotypes with PCP mutants including open eyelids, neural tube defects and disrupted cochlear stereociliary bundles. Furthermore, we identify genetic interactions between BBS genes and a PCP gene in both mouse (Ltap, also called Vangl2) and zebrafish (vangl2). In zebrafish, the augmented phenotype results from enhanced defective convergent extension movements. We also show that Vangl2 localizes to the basal body and axoneme of ciliated cells, a pattern reminiscent of that of the BBS proteins. These data suggest that cilia are intrinsically involved in PCP processes.

  13. Characterization of PEM fuel cell degradation by polarization change curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezmalinovic, Dario; Simic, Boris; Barbir, Frano

    2015-10-01

    Polarization change curves, defined as a difference between the polarization curve at the beginning of life and the actual polarization curve after the cell has been operational for some time, were used to analyze degradation of a PEM fuel cell exposed to voltage cycling as an accelerated stress test for electrocatalyst degradation. Degradation, i.e., loss of voltage was due to increase of activation losses and increase of resistance in the catalyst layer, both most likely due to the loss of catalyst electrochemically active area. The results of the polarization change curves analysis correspond to the findings of the periodic individual tests performed during the accelerated stress test, such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry. Therefore, this method has potential to be used as a relatively quick and simple, yet effective, degradation diagnostic tool.

  14. Endomembrane control of cell polarity: Relevance to cancer.

    PubMed

    Baschieri, Francesco; Farhan, Hesso

    2015-01-01

    The role of polarity in cancer is an emerging research area and loss of polarity is widely considered an important event in cancer. Among the polarity regulating molecules, the small GTPase Cdc42 was extensively studied. Most attention was given to Cdc42 signaling at the plasma membrane, but whether and how Cdc42 is regulated at endomembranes remained poorly understood. Moreover, whether the endomembrane pool of Cdc42 is of any relevance to cell polarity was unknown. In our recent work, we identified a complex between the Golgi matrix protein GM130 and RasGRF and showed that it is responsible for regulating the Golgi pool of Cdc42, but had no effect on the plasma membrane pool of Cdc42. Depletion of GM130 disrupted apico-basal polarity as well as front-rear polarity, indicating that the spatial pool of Cdc42 is functionally relevant. The biomedical relevance of this finding was supported by the observation than GM130 is progressively lost in colorectal cancer. These findings support a role of the endomembrane pool of Cdc42 in cell polarity and point to a potential role of alterations of this pool in cancer.

  15. Buder revisited: cell and organ polarity during phototropism.

    PubMed

    Nick, P; Furuya, M

    1996-10-01

    The induction of a radial polarity by environmental stimuli was studied at the cellular and organ levels, with phototropism chosen as a model. The light gradient acting on the whole coleoptile was opposed to the light direction acting upon individual cells in the classical Buder experiment, irradiating from the inside out. Alternatively, the stimulus was administered to the coleoptile tip with a microbeam-irradiation device. Tropistic curvature was assayed as a marker for the response of the whole organ, whereas cell elongation and the orientation of cortical microtubules were taken as markers for the responses of individual cells. Upon tip irradiation, signals much faster than basipetal auxin transport migrate towards the base. The data are discussed in terms of an organ polarity that is the primary result of the asymmetric light signal and affects, in a second step, an endogenous radial polarity of epidermal cells. PMID:11539325

  16. Influence of cell shape, inhomogeneities and diffusion barriers in cell polarization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Wolfgang; Eigel, Martin; Westerheide, Sebastian; Engwer, Christian; Klipp, Edda

    2015-12-01

    In silico experiments bear the potential for further understanding of biological transport processes by allowing a systematic modification of any spatial property and providing immediate simulation results. Cell polarization and spatial reorganization of membrane proteins are fundamental for cell division, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. We chose the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an exemplary model system which entails the shuttling of small Rho GTPases such as Cdc42 and Rho, between an active membrane-bound form and an inactive cytosolic form. We used partial differential equations to describe the membrane-cytosol shuttling of proteins. In this study, a consistent extension of a class of 1D reaction-diffusion systems into higher space dimensions is suggested. The membrane is modeled as a thin layer to allow for lateral diffusion and the cytosol is modeled as an enclosed volume. Two well-known polarization mechanisms were considered. One shows the classical Turing-instability patterns, the other exhibits wave-pinning dynamics. For both models, we investigated how cell shape and diffusion barriers like septin structures or bud scars influence the formation of signaling molecule clusters and subsequent polarization. An extensive set of in silico experiments with different modeling hypotheses illustrated the dependence of cell polarization models on local membrane curvature, cell size and inhomogeneities on the membrane and in the cytosol. In particular, the results of our computer simulations suggested that for both mechanisms, local diffusion barriers on the membrane facilitate Rho GTPase aggregation, while diffusion barriers in the cytosol and cell protrusions limit spontaneous molecule aggregations of active Rho GTPase locally.

  17. Influence of cell shape, inhomogeneities and diffusion barriers in cell polarization models.

    PubMed

    Giese, Wolfgang; Eigel, Martin; Westerheide, Sebastian; Engwer, Christian; Klipp, Edda

    2015-11-24

    In silico experiments bear the potential for further understanding of biological transport processes by allowing a systematic modification of any spatial property and providing immediate simulation results. Cell polarization and spatial reorganization of membrane proteins are fundamental for cell division, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. We chose the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an exemplary model system which entails the shuttling of small Rho GTPases such as Cdc42 and Rho, between an active membrane-bound form and an inactive cytosolic form. We used partial differential equations to describe the membrane-cytosol shuttling of proteins. In this study, a consistent extension of a class of 1D reaction-diffusion systems into higher space dimensions is suggested. The membrane is modeled as a thin layer to allow for lateral diffusion and the cytosol is modeled as an enclosed volume. Two well-known polarization mechanisms were considered. One shows the classical Turing-instability patterns, the other exhibits wave-pinning dynamics. For both models, we investigated how cell shape and diffusion barriers like septin structures or bud scars influence the formation of signaling molecule clusters and subsequent polarization. An extensive set of in silico experiments with different modeling hypotheses illustrated the dependence of cell polarization models on local membrane curvature, cell size and inhomogeneities on the membrane and in the cytosol. In particular, the results of our computer simulations suggested that for both mechanisms, local diffusion barriers on the membrane facilitate Rho GTPase aggregation, while diffusion barriers in the cytosol and cell protrusions limit spontaneous molecule aggregations of active Rho GTPase locally.

  18. Study on preparation and polarization process of PVDF thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaopei; Wang, Jun; Ding, Jie; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-09-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is a semi-crystalline polymer, which indicates four different crystalline forms. In this paper, the preparation of nanoscale PVDF thin film was introduced in detail. Initially PVDF was dissolved in the N,N-dimethyl Formamide and acetone mixed solution (volume ratio 1:1). The PVDF films were prepared by spin coating method with different solution concentration, then were characterized by SEM, XRD and FTIR after annealed at different annealing temperatures (60 centigrade to 120 centigrade). Due to the formation of polarized β crystal phase in the annealing process, the pyroelectric coefficient p would be affected by different annealing temperatures. The thermal poling technique of PVDF was also shown in this paper. We investigated the polarization behavior of PVDF when they were subjected to different poling electric fields (from 50 V/μm to 80 V/μm) and poling temperatures (from 90 centigrade to 120 centigrade). For a long enough poling time, the polarization is only related to poling electric filed, while poling temperature affects the poling rate merely. Under the condition of PVDF thin film beforet breakdown, the strongger the poling electric filed intensity, the higher the pyroelectric coefficient is. The pyroelectric coefficient of fibricated PVDF film is 9.0×10-10C/cm2K after 80v/μm electric field intensity polarization from experiment result.

  19. Nipah Virus Entry and Egress from Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lamp, Boris; Dietzel, Erik; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Sauerhering, Lucie; Erbar, Stephanie; Weingartl, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV) infections are transmitted via airway secretions and urine, commonly via the respiratory route. Epithelial surfaces represent important replication sites in both primary and systemic infection phases. NiV entry and spread from polarized epithelial cells therefore determine virus entry and dissemination within a new host and influence virus shedding via mucosal surfaces in the respiratory and urinary tract. To date, there is no knowledge regarding the entry and exit sites of NiV in polarized epithelial cells. In this report, we show for the first time that NiV can infect polarized kidney epithelial cells (MDCK) from both cell surfaces, while virus release is primarily restricted to the apical plasma membrane. Substantial amounts of basolateral infectivity were detected only after infection with high virus doses, at time points when the integrity of the cell monolayer was largely disrupted as a result of cell-to-cell fusion. Confocal immunofluorescence analyses of envelope protein distribution at early and late infection stages suggested that apical virus budding is determined by the polarized sorting of the NiV matrix protein, M. Studies with stably M-expressing and with monensin-treated cells furthermore demonstrated that M protein transport is independent from the glycoproteins, implying that the M protein possesses an intrinsic apical targeting signal. PMID:23283941

  20. Kif26b controls endothelial cell polarity through the Dishevelled/Daam1-dependent planar cell polarity–signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guillabert-Gourgues, Aude; Jaspard-Vinassa, Beatrice; Bats, Marie-Lise; Sewduth, Raj N.; Franzl, Nathalie; Peghaire, Claire; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Moreau, Catherine; Roux, Etienne; Larrieu-Lahargue, Frederic; Dufourcq, Pascale; Couffinhal, Thierry; Duplàa, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the coordinated growth and migration of endothelial cells (ECs) toward a proangiogenic signal. The Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, through the recruitment of Dishevelled (Dvl) and Dvl-associated activator of morphogenesis (Daam1), has been proposed to regulate cell actin cytoskeleton and microtubule (MT) reorganization for oriented cell migration. Here we report that Kif26b—a kinesin—and Daam1 cooperatively regulate initiation of EC sprouting and directional migration via MT reorganization. First, we find that Kif26b is recruited within the Dvl3/Daam1 complex. Using a three-dimensional in vitro angiogenesis assay, we show that Kif26b and Daam1 depletion impairs tip cell polarization and destabilizes extended vascular processes. Kif26b depletion specifically alters EC directional migration and mislocalized MT organizing center (MTOC)/Golgi and myosin IIB cell rear enrichment. Therefore the cell fails to establish a proper front–rear polarity. Of interest, Kif26b ectopic expression rescues the siDaam1 polarization defect phenotype. Finally, we show that Kif26b functions in MT stabilization, which is indispensable for asymmetrical cell structure reorganization. These data demonstrate that Kif26b, together with Dvl3/Daam1, initiates cell polarity through the control of PCP signaling pathway–dependent activation. PMID:26792835

  1. Loss of GM130 in breast cancer cells and its effects on cell migration, invasion and polarity.

    PubMed

    Baschieri, Francesco; Uetz-von Allmen, Edith; Legler, Daniel F; Farhan, Hesso

    2015-01-01

    Spatially distinct pools of the small GTPase Cdc42 were observed, but the major focus of research so far has been to investigate its signaling at the plasma membrane. We recently showed that the Golgi pool of Cdc42 is relevant for cell polarity and that it is regulated by GM130, a Golgi matrix protein. Loss of GM130 abrogated cell polarity and consistent with the notion that polarity is frequently impaired in cancer, we found that GM130 is downregulated in colorectal cancer. Whether the loss of GM130 solely affects polarity, or whether it affects other processes relevant for tumorigenesis remains unclear. In a panel of breast cancer cells lines, we investigated the consequences of GM130 depletion on traits of relevance for tumor progression, such as survival, proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion. We show that cellular assays that depend on polarity, such as chemotaxis and wound scratch assays, are only of limited use to investigate the role of polarity modulators in cancer. Depletion of GM130 increases cellular velocity and increases the invasiveness of breast cancer cells, therefore supporting the view that alterations of polarity contribute to tumor progression.

  2. Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy to Study Cytoskeleton Assembly and Organization in live cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuilken, Molly; Mehta, Shalin B.; Verma, Amitabh; Harris, Grant; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of not only the location but also the organization of molecules in live cells is crucial to understanding diverse biological processes. Polarized light microscopy provides a nondestructive means to evaluate order within subcellular domains. When combined with fluorescence microscopy and GFP-tagged proteins, the approach can reveal organization within specific populations of molecules. This unit describes a protocol for measuring the architectural dynamics of cytoskeletal components using polarized fluorescence microscopy and OpenPolScope open-access software (www.openpolscope.org). The protocol describes installation of linear polarizers or a liquid crystal (LC) universal compensator, calibration of the system, polarized fluorescence imaging, and analysis. The use of OpenPolScope software and hardware allows for reliable, user-friendly image acquisition to measure and analyze polarized fluorescence. PMID:26061244

  3. Carbon Dioxide Convection in the Martian Polar Night and Its Implications for Polar Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    Each Martian year nearly 30% of the atmosphere is exchanged with the polar ice caps. This exchange occurs through a combination of direct surface condensation and atmospheric precipitation of carbon dioxide. It has long been thought the amount of condensation within the polar night is maintained by a balance between diabatic processes such as radiative cooling and latent heating from condensing CO2. This assumption manifests itself in Mars General Circulation Models (GCM) in such a way as to never allow the atmospheric temperature to dip below the saturation temperature of CO2. However, observations from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have demonstrated this assumption to be, at best, approximate. Both RS and TES observations within the polar nights of both poles indicate substantial supersaturated regions with respect to CO2. The observed temperature profiles suggest conditionally unstable regions containing planetary significant amounts of potential convective energy. Presented here are estimates of the total planetary inventory of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the potential convective energy flux (PCEF). The values for CAPE and PCEF are derived from RS temperature profiles and compared to Mars GCM results using a new convective CO2 cloud model that allows for the formation of CAPE.

  4. Chimera proteins with affinity for membranes and microtubule tips polarize in the membrane of fission yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Sokolowski, Thomas R; Grammoustianou, Aristea; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-02-16

    Cell polarity refers to a functional spatial organization of proteins that is crucial for the control of essential cellular processes such as growth and division. To establish polarity, cells rely on elaborate regulation networks that control the distribution of proteins at the cell membrane. In fission yeast cells, a microtubule-dependent network has been identified that polarizes the distribution of signaling proteins that restricts growth to cell ends and targets the cytokinetic machinery to the middle of the cell. Although many molecular components have been shown to play a role in this network, it remains unknown which molecular functionalities are minimally required to establish a polarized protein distribution in this system. Here we show that a membrane-binding protein fragment, which distributes homogeneously in wild-type fission yeast cells, can be made to concentrate at cell ends by attaching it to a cytoplasmic microtubule end-binding protein. This concentration results in a polarized pattern of chimera proteins with a spatial extension that is very reminiscent of natural polarity patterns in fission yeast. However, chimera levels fluctuate in response to microtubule dynamics, and disruption of microtubules leads to disappearance of the pattern. Numerical simulations confirm that the combined functionality of membrane anchoring and microtubule tip affinity is in principle sufficient to create polarized patterns. Our chimera protein may thus represent a simple molecular functionality that is able to polarize the membrane, onto which additional layers of molecular complexity may be built to provide the temporal robustness that is typical of natural polarity patterns.

  5. LKB1 Regulates Pancreatic β Cell Size, Polarity, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Zvi; Swisa, Avital; Magenheim, Judith; Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Fujimoto, Wakako; Manduchi, Elisabetta; Miki, Takashi; Lennerz, Jochen K.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Meyuhas, Oded; Seino, Susumu; Permutt, M. Alan; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Dor, Yuval

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic β cells, organized in the islets of Langerhans, sense glucose and secrete appropriate amounts of insulin. We have studied the roles of LKB1, a conserved kinase implicated in the control of cell polarity and energy metabolism, in adult β cells. LKB1-deficient β cells show a dramatic increase in insulin secretion in vivo. Histologically, LKB1-deficient β cells have striking alterations in the localization of the nucleus and cilia relative to blood vessels, suggesting a shift from hepatocyte-like to columnar polarity. Additionally, LKB1 deficiency causes a 65% increase in β cell volume. We show that distinct targets of LKB1 mediate these effects. LKB1 controls β cell size, but not polarity, via the mTOR pathway. Conversely, the precise position of the β cell nucleus, but not cell size, is controlled by the LKB1 target Par1b. Insulin secretion and content are restricted by LKB1, at least in part, via AMPK. These results expose a molecular mechanism, orchestrated by LKB1, for the coordinated maintenance of β cell size, form, and function. PMID:19808022

  6. Matrix rigidity optimizes the polarization of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, Assaf; Rehfeldt, Florian; Brown, Andre; Discher, Dennis; Safran, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical model and experiments to explain the non-monotonic dependence of stress-fiber polarization in stem cells on matrix rigidity. The theory generalizes the treatment of elastic inclusions to ``living'' inclusions (cells) whose active polarizability, unlike non-living matter, depends on the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. We demonstrate experimentally that the stress fibers in adult mesenchymal stem cells, generally orient parallel to the long axis of the cells, with an anisotropy that depends non-monotonically on substrate stiffness. Consistent with these experiments, our theory predicts that the magnitude of the cellular force increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity while the polarization anisotropy shows a maximum that depends on the cell shape and the elastic modulus of the medium. These findings offer a mechanical correlate for the observation that stem cell differentiation optimizes in a range of matrix rigidities that depends on the tissue type.

  7. Coordinating cell polarity and cell cycle progression: what can we learn from flies and worms?

    PubMed Central

    Noatynska, Anna; Tavernier, Nicolas; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal coordination of events during cell division is crucial for animal development. In recent years, emerging data have strengthened the notion that tight coupling of cell cycle progression and cell polarity in dividing cells is crucial for asymmetric cell division and ultimately for metazoan development. Although it is acknowledged that such coupling exists, the molecular mechanisms linking the cell cycle and cell polarity machineries are still under investigation. Key cell cycle regulators control cell polarity, and thus influence cell fate determination and/or differentiation, whereas some factors involved in cell polarity regulate cell cycle timing and proliferation potential. The scope of this review is to discuss the data linking cell polarity and cell cycle progression, and the importance of such coupling for asymmetric cell division. Because studies in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have started to reveal the molecular mechanisms of this coordination, we will concentrate on these two systems. We review examples of molecular mechanisms suggesting a coupling between cell polarity and cell cycle progression. PMID:23926048

  8. Competition for actin between two distinct F-actin networks defines a bistable switch for cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Alexis J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J; Bui, Duyen A; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype after relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. Under low-contractility regimes, epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner owing to the emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally 'locks' actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high-contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient.

  9. Opposing Wnt pathways orient cell polarity during organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer L; Inoue, Takao; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-08-22

    The orientation of asymmetric cell division contributes to the organization of cells within a tissue or organ. For example, mirror-image symmetry of the C. elegans vulva is achieved by the opposite division orientation of the vulval precursor cells (VPCs) flanking the axis of symmetry. We characterized the molecular mechanisms contributing to this division pattern. Wnts MOM-2 and LIN-44 are expressed at the axis of symmetry and orient the VPCs toward the center. These Wnts act via Fz/LIN-17 and Ryk/LIN-18, which control beta-catenin localization and activate gene transcription. In addition, VPCs on both sides of the axis of symmetry possess a uniform underlying "ground" polarity, established by the instructive activity of Wnt/EGL-20. EGL-20 establishes ground polarity via a novel type of signaling involving the Ror receptor tyrosine kinase CAM-1 and the planar cell polarity component Van Gogh/VANG-1. Thus, tissue polarity is determined by the integration of multiple Wnt pathways.

  10. High voltage processing of the SLC polarized electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.; Clendenin, J.; Garden, C.; Hoyt, E.; Klaisner, L.; Prescott, C.; Schultz, D.; Tang, H.

    1993-04-01

    The SLC polarized electron gun operates at 120 kV with very low dark current to maintain the ultra high vacuum (UHV). This strict requirement protects the extremely sensitive photocathode from contaminants caused by high voltage (HV) activity. Thorough HV processing is thus required x-ray sensitive photographic film, a nanoammeter in series with gun power supply, a radiation meter, a sensitive residual gas analyzer and surface x-ray spectrometry were used to study areas in the gun where HV activity occurred. By reducing the electric field gradients, carefully preparing the HV surfaces and adhering to very strict clean assembly procedures, we found it possible to process the gun so as to reduce both the dark current at operating voltage and the probability of HV discharge. These HV preparation and processing techniques are described.

  11. Planar Cell Polarity Pathway Regulates Nephrin Endocytosis in Developing Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Babayeva, Sima; Rocque, Brittany; Aoudjit, Lamine; Zilber, Yulia; Li, Jane; Baldwin, Cindy; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Takano, Tomoko; Torban, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls a variety of cell behaviors such as polarized protrusive cell activity, directional cell movement, and oriented cell division and is crucial for the normal development of many tissues. Mutations in the PCP genes cause malformation in multiple organs. Recently, the PCP pathway was shown to control endocytosis of PCP and non-PCP proteins necessary for cell shape remodeling and formation of specific junctional protein complexes. During formation of the renal glomerulus, the glomerular capillary becomes enveloped by highly specialized epithelial cells, podocytes, that display unique architecture and are connected via specialized cell-cell junctions (slit diaphragms) that restrict passage of protein into the urine; podocyte differentiation requires active remodeling of cytoskeleton and junctional protein complexes. We report here that in cultured human podocytes, activation of the PCP pathway significantly stimulates endocytosis of the core slit diaphragm protein, nephrin, via a clathrin/β-arrestin-dependent endocytic route. In contrast, depletion of the PCP protein Vangl2 leads to an increase of nephrin at the cell surface; loss of Vangl2 functions in Looptail mice results in disturbed glomerular maturation. We propose that the PCP pathway contributes to podocyte development by regulating nephrin turnover during junctional remodeling as the cells differentiate. PMID:23824190

  12. Functional modelling of planar cell polarity: an approach for identifying molecular function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cells in some tissues acquire a polarisation in the plane of the tissue in addition to apical-basal polarity. This polarisation is commonly known as planar cell polarity and has been found to be important in developmental processes, as planar polarity is required to define the in-plane tissue coordinate system at the cellular level. Results We have built an in-silico functional model of cellular polarisation that includes cellular asymmetry, cell-cell signalling and a response to a global cue. The model has been validated and parameterised against domineering non-autonomous wing hair phenotypes in Drosophila. Conclusions We have carried out a systematic comparison of in-silico polarity phenotypes with patterns observed in vivo under different genetic manipulations in the wing. This has allowed us to classify the specific functional roles of proteins involved in generating cell polarity, providing new hypotheses about their specific functions, in particular for Pk and Dsh. The predictions from the model allow direct assignment of functional roles of genes from genetic mosaic analysis of Drosophila wings. PMID:23672397

  13. Vangl1 and Vangl2: planar cell polarity components with a developing role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Jason; Wald, Jessica H; Printsev, Ignat; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Carraway, Kermit L

    2015-01-01

    Cancers commonly reactivate embryonic developmental pathways to promote the aggressive behavior of their cells, resulting in metastasis and poor patient outcome. While developmental pathways such as canonical Wnt signaling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition have received much attention, our understanding of the role of the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway in tumor progression remains rudimentary. Protein components of PCP, including a subset that overlaps with the canonical Wnt pathway, partition in polarized epithelial cells along the planar axis and are required for the establishment and maintenance of lateral epithelial polarity. Significant insight into PCP regulation of developmental and cellular processes has come from analysis of the functions of the core PCP scaffolding proteins Vangl1 and Vangl2. In particular, studies on zebrafish and with Looptail (Lp) mice, which harbor point mutations in Vangl2 that alter its trafficking and localization, point to roles for the PCP pathway in maintaining cell polarization along both the apical–basal and planar axes as well as in collective cell motility and invasiveness. Recent findings have suggested that the Vangls can promote similar processes in tumor cells. Initial data-mining efforts suggest that VANGL1 and VANGL2 are dysregulated in human cancers, and estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients whose tumors exhibit elevated VANGL1 expression suffer from shortened overall survival. Overall, evidence is beginning to accumulate that the heightened cellular motility and invasiveness associated with PCP reactivation may contribute to the malignancy of some cancer subtypes. PMID:24981109

  14. Organising cells into tissues: new roles for cell adhesion molecules in planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Saburi, Sakura; McNeill, Helen

    2005-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the coordinated organization of cells within the plane of the epithelium, first described in Drosophila. A Frizzled signalling pathway dedicated to PCP (the non-canonical Frizzled pathway) acts through Dishevelled and small G proteins, as does the classical Wnt pathway, but then diverges downstream of Dishevelled. Recent studies have demonstrated a crucial role for several atypical cadherin molecules (Fat, Dachsous and Flamingo) in controlling PCP signalling. Recent work has also indicated that the first sign of PCP during development is the polarized localization of PCP proteins (Frizzled, Flamingo, Dishevelled, etc). Exciting new data reveal that this PCP pathway is conserved to man.

  15. Dressed spin of polarized {sup 3}He in a cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.-H.; Esler, A. M.; Peng, J. C.; Beck, D. H.; Chandler, D. E.; Clayton, S.; Williamson, S.; Yoder, J.; Hu, B.-Z.; Ngan, S. Y.; Sham, C. H.; So, L. H.

    2011-08-15

    We report a measurement of the modification of the effective precession frequency of polarized {sup 3}He atoms in response to a dressing field in a room-temperature cell. The {sup 3}He atoms were polarized using the metastability spin-exchange method. An oscillating dressing field was then applied perpendicular to the constant magnetic field. Modification of the {sup 3}He effective precession frequency was observed over a broad range of the amplitude and frequency of the dressing field. The observed effects are compared with calculations based on quantum optics formalism.

  16. Local Pheromone Release from Dynamic Polarity Sites Underlies Cell-Cell Pairing during Yeast Mating.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Laura; Khalili, Bita; Bendezú, Felipe O; Hurwitz, Daniel; Vincenzetti, Vincent; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Martin, Sophie G

    2016-04-25

    Cell pairing is central for many processes, including immune defense, neuronal connection, hyphal fusion, and sexual reproduction. How does a cell orient toward a partner, especially when faced with multiple choices? Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe P and M cells, which respectively express P and M factor pheromones [1, 2], pair during the mating process induced by nitrogen starvation. Engagement of pheromone receptors Map3 and Mam2 [3, 4] with their cognate pheromone ligands leads to activation of the Gα protein Gpa1 to signal sexual differentiation [3, 5, 6]. Prior to cell pairing, the Cdc42 GTPase, a central regulator of cell polarization, forms dynamic zones of activity at the cell periphery at distinct locations over time [7]. Here we show that Cdc42-GTP polarization sites contain the M factor transporter Mam1, the general secretion machinery, which underlies P factor secretion, and Gpa1, suggesting that these are sub-cellular zones of pheromone secretion and signaling. Zone lifetimes scale with pheromone concentration. Computational simulations of pair formation through a fluctuating zone show that the combination of local pheromone release and sensing, short pheromone decay length, and pheromone-dependent zone stabilization leads to efficient pair formation. Consistently, pairing efficiency is reduced in the absence of the P factor protease. Similarly, zone stabilization at reduced pheromone levels, which occurs in the absence of the predicted GTPase-activating protein for Ras, leads to reduction in pairing efficiency. We propose that efficient cell pairing relies on fluctuating local signal emission and perception, which become locked into place through stimulation. PMID:27020743

  17. Noise filtering tradeoffs in spatial gradient sensing and cell polarization response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cells sense chemical spatial gradients and respond by polarizing internal components. This process can be disrupted by gradient noise caused by fluctuations in chemical concentration. Results We investigated how external gradient noise affects spatial sensing and response focusing on noise-filtering and the resultant tradeoffs. First, using a coarse-grained mathematical model of gradient-sensing and cell polarity, we characterized three negative consequences of noise: Inhibition of the extent of polarization, degradation of directional accuracy, and production of a noisy output polarization. Next, we explored filtering strategies and discovered that a combination of positive feedback, multiple signaling stages, and time-averaging produced good results. There was an important tradeoff, however, because filtering resulted in slower polarization. Simulations demonstrated that a two-stage filter-amplifier resulted in a balanced outcome. Then, we analyzed the effect of noise on a mechanistic model of yeast cell polarization in response to gradients of mating pheromone. This analysis showed that yeast cells likely also combine the above three filtering mechanisms into a filter-amplifier structure to achieve impressive spatial-noise tolerance, but with the consequence of a slow response time. Further investigation of the amplifier architecture revealed two positive feedback loops, a fast inner and a slow outer, both of which contributed to noise-tolerant polarization. This model also made specific predictions about how orientation performance depended upon the ratio between the gradient slope (signal) and the noise variance. To test these predictions, we performed microfluidics experiments measuring the ability of yeast cells to orient to shallow gradients of mating pheromone. The results of these experiments agreed well with the modeling predictions, demonstrating that yeast cells can sense gradients shallower than 0.1% μm-1, approximately a single receptor

  18. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Characteristics and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Zhu, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. The power distribution was analyzed for an argon plasma gas flow constituting the fluid in the VPPA Welding Process. The major heat loss at the torch nozzle is convective heat transfer; in the space between the outlet of the nozzle and the workpiece; radiative heat transfer; and in the keyhole in the workpiece, convective heat transfer. The power absorbed at the workpiece produces the molten puddle that solidifies into the weld bead. Crown and root widths, and crown and root heights of the weld bead are predicted. The basis is provided for an algorithm for automatic control of VPPA welding machine parameters to obtain desired weld bead dimensions.

  19. Cell interactions and planar polarity in the abdominal epidermis of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Peter A; Casal, José; Struhl, Gary

    2004-10-01

    The integument of the Drosophila adult abdomen bears oriented hairs and bristles that indicate the planar polarity of the epidermal cells. We study four polarity genes, frizzled (fz), prickle (pk), Van gogh/strabismus (Vang/stbm) and starry night/flamingo (stan/fmi), and note what happens when these genes are either removed or overexpressed in clones of cells. The edges of the clones are interfaces between cells that carry different amounts of gene products, interfaces that can cause reversals of planar polarity in the clone and wild-type cells outside them. To explain, we present a model that builds on our earlier picture of a gradient of X, the vector of which specifies planar polarity and depends on two cadherin proteins, Dachsous and Fat. We conjecture that the X gradient is read out, cell by cell, as a scalar value of Fz activity, and that Pk acts in this process, possibly to determine the sign of the Fz activity gradient. We discuss evidence that cells can compare their scalar readout of the level of X with that of their neighbours and can set their own readout towards an average of those. This averaging, when it occurs near the edges of clones, changes the scalar response of cells inside and outside the clones, leading to new vectors that change polarity. The results argue that Stan must be present in both cells being compared and acts as a conduit between them for the transfer of information. And also that Vang assists in the receipt of this information. The comparison between neighbours is crucial, because it gives the vector that orients hairs--these point towards the neighbour cell that has the lowest level of Fz activity. Recently, it has been shown that, for a limited period shortly before hair outgrowth in the wing, the four proteins we study, as well as others, become asymmetrically localised in the cell membrane, and this process is thought to be instrumental in the acquisition of cell polarity. However, some results do not fit with this view

  20. A combined binary interaction and phenotypic map of C. elegans cell polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koorman, Thijs; Lemmens, Irma; Ramalho, João J.; Nieuwenhuize, Susan; van den Heuvel, Sander; Tavernier, Jan; Nance, Jeremy; Boxem, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of cell polarity is an essential process for the development of multicellular organisms and the functioning of cells and tissues. Here, we combine large-scale protein interaction mapping with systematic phenotypic profiling to study the network of physical interactions that underlies polarity establishment and maintenance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using a fragment-based yeast two-hybrid strategy, we identified 439 interactions between 296 proteins, as well as the protein regions that mediate these interactions. Phenotypic profiling of the network resulted in the identification of 100 physically interacting protein pairs for which RNAi-mediated depletion caused a defect in the same polarity-related process. We demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the network by showing that the physical interaction between the RhoGAP PAC-1 and PAR-6 is required for radial polarization of the C. elegans embryo. Our network represents a valuable resource of candidate interactions that can be used to further our insight into cell polarization. PMID:26780296

  1. Spectral induced polarization for monitoring electrokinetic remediation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, Matteo; Losito, Gabriella

    2015-12-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is an emerging technology for extracting heavy metals from contaminated soils and sediments. This method uses a direct or alternating electric field to induce the transport of contaminants toward the electrodes. The electric field also produces pH variations, sorption/desorption and precipitation/dissolution of species in the porous medium during remediation. Since heavy metal mobility is pH-dependent, the accurate control of pH inside the material is required in order to enhance the removal efficiency. The common approach for monitoring the remediation process both in laboratory and in the field is the chemical analysis of samples collected from discrete locations. The purpose of this study is the evaluation of Spectral Induced Polarization as an alternative method for monitoring geochemical changes in the contaminated mass during remediation. The advantage of this technique applied to field-scale is to offer higher resolution mapping of the remediation site and lower cost compared to the conventional sampling procedure. We carried out laboratory-scale electrokinetic remediation experiments on fine-grained marine sediments contaminated by heavy metal and we made Spectral Induced Polarization measurements before and after each treatment. Measurements were done in the frequency range 10- 3-103 Hz. By the deconvolution of the spectra using the Debye Decomposition method we obtained the mean relaxation time and total chargeability. The main finding of this work is that a linear relationship exists between the local total chargeability and pH, with good agreement. The observed behaviour of chargeability is interpreted as a direct consequence of the alteration of the zeta potential of the sediment particles due to pH changes. Such relationship has a significant value for the interpretation of induced polarization data, allowing the use of this technique for monitoring electrokinetic remediation at field-scale.

  2. Iron repletion relocalizes hephaestin to a proximal basolateral compartment in polarized MDCK and Caco2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Min; Attieh, Zouhair K.; Son, Hee Sook; Chen, Huijun; Bacouri-Haidar, Mhenia; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin localizes in the perinuclear space in non-polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin localizes in the perinuclear space in iron deficient and polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin with apical iron moves near to basolateral membrane of polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peri-basolateral location of hephaestin is accessible to the extracellular space. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin is involved in iron mobilization from the intestine to circulation. -- Abstract: While intestinal cellular iron entry in vertebrates employs multiple routes including heme and non-heme routes, iron egress from these cells is exclusively channeled through the only known transporter, ferroportin. Reduced intestinal iron export in sex-linked anemia mice implicates hephaestin, a ferroxidase, in this process. Polarized cells are exposed to two distinct environments. Enterocytes contact the gut lumen via the apical surface of the cell, and through the basolateral surface, to the body. Previous studies indicate both local and systemic control of iron uptake. We hypothesized that differences in iron availability at the apical and/or basolateral surface may modulate iron uptake via cellular localization of hephaestin. We therefore characterized the localization of hephaestin in two models of polarized epithelial cell lines, MDCK and Caco2, with varying iron availability at the apical and basolateral surfaces. Our results indicate that hephaestin is expressed in a supra-nuclear compartment in non-polarized cells regardless of the iron status of the cells and in iron deficient and polarized cells. In polarized cells, we found that both apical (as FeSO{sub 4}) and basolateral iron (as the ratio of apo-transferrin to holo-transferrin) affect mobilization of hephaestin from the supra-nuclear compartment. We find that the presence of apical iron is essential for relocalization of hephaestin to a

  3. Satellite Cells in Muscular Dystrophy - Lost in Polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Chevalier, Fabien P; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings employing the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have revealed that muscle satellite stem cells play a direct role in contributing to disease etiology and progression of DMD, the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Lack of dystrophin expression in DMD has critical consequences in satellite cells including an inability to establish cell polarity, abrogation of asymmetric satellite stem-cell divisions, and failure to enter the myogenic program. Thus, muscle wasting in dystrophic mice is not only caused by myofiber fragility but is exacerbated by intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction leading to impaired regeneration. Despite intense research and clinical efforts, there is still no effective cure for DMD. In this review we highlight recent research advances in DMD and discuss the current state of treatment and, importantly, how we can incorporate satellite cell-targeted therapeutic strategies to correct satellite cell dysfunction in DMD.

  4. Rho1-Wnd signaling regulates loss-of-cell polarity-induced cell invasion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Chen, Y; Zhang, S; Xu, W; Shao, Y; Yang, Y; Li, W; Li, M; Xue, L

    2016-02-18

    Both cell polarity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity are essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and disruption of either is commonly seen in cancer progression. Despite the established connection between loss-of-cell polarity and JNK activation, much less is known about the molecular mechanism by which aberrant cell polarity induces JNK-mediated cell migration and tumor invasion. Here we show results from a genetic screen using an in vivo invasion model via knocking down cell polarity gene in Drosophila wing discs, and identify Rho1-Wnd signaling as an important molecular link that mediates loss-of-cell polarity-triggered JNK activation and cell invasion. We show that Wallenda (Wnd), a protein kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, by forming a complex with the GTPase Rho1, is both necessary and sufficient for Rho1-induced JNK-dependent cell invasion, MMP1 activation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, Wnd promotes cell proliferation and tissue growth through wingless production when apoptosis is inhibited by p35. Finally, Wnd shows oncogenic cooperation with Ras(V12) to trigger tumor growth in eye discs and causes invasion into the ventral nerve cord. Together, our data not only provides a novel mechanistic insight on how cell polarity loss contributes to cell invasion, but also highlights the value of the Drosophila model system to explore human cancer biology.

  5. MMP28 promotes macrophage polarization toward M2 cells and augments pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Sina A; Johnston, Laura K; Huizar, Isham; Birkland, Timothy P; Hanson, Josiah; Wang, Ying; Parks, William C; Manicone, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Members of the MMP family function in various processes of innate immunity, particularly in controlling important steps in leukocyte trafficking and activation. MMP28 (epilysin) is a member of this family of proteinases, and we have found that MMP28 is expressed by macrophages and regulates their recruitment to the lung. We hypothesized that MMP28 regulates other key macrophage responses, such as macrophage polarization. Furthermore, we hypothesized that these MMP28-dependent changes in macrophage polarization would alter fibrotic responses in the lung. We examined the gene expression changes in WT and Mmp28-/- BMDMs, stimulated with LPS or IL-4/IL-13 to promote M1 and M2 cells, respectively. We also collected macrophages from the lungs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-exposed WT and Mmp28-/- mice to evaluate changes in macrophage polarization. Lastly, we evaluated the macrophage polarization phenotypes during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in WT and Mmp28-/- mice and assessed mice for differences in weight loss and total collagen levels. We found that MMP28 dampens proinflammatory macrophage function and promots M2 programming. In both in vivo models, we found deficits in M2 polarization in Mmp28-/- mice. In bleomycin-induced lung injury, these changes were associated with reduced fibrosis. MMP28 is an important regulator of macrophage polarization, promoting M2 function. Loss of MMP28 results in reduced M2 polarization and protection from bleomycin-induced fibrosis. These findings highlight a novel role for MMP28 in macrophage biology and pulmonary disease.

  6. Initiation of Hippo signaling is linked to polarity rather than to cell position in the pre-implantation mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Anani, Shihadeh; Bhat, Shivani; Honma-Yamanaka, Nobuko; Krawchuk, Dayana; Yamanaka, Yojiro

    2014-07-01

    In the mouse embryo, asymmetric divisions during the 8-16 cell division generate two cell types, polar and apolar cells, that are allocated to outer and inner positions, respectively. This outer/inner configuration is the first sign of the formation of the first two cell lineages: trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM). Outer polar cells become TE and give rise to the placenta, whereas inner apolar cells become ICM and give rise to the embryo proper and yolk sac. Here, we analyze the frequency of asymmetric divisions during the 8-16 cell division and assess the relationships between cell polarity, cell and nuclear position, and Hippo signaling activation, the pathway that initiates lineage-specific gene expression in 16-cell embryos. Although the frequency of asymmetric divisions varied in each embryo, we found that more than six blastomeres divided asymmetrically in most embryos. Interestingly, many apolar cells in 16-cell embryos were located at outer positions, whereas only one or two apolar cells were located at inner positions. Live imaging analysis showed that outer apolar cells were eventually internalized by surrounding polar cells. Using isolated 8-cell blastomeres, we carefully analyzed the internalization process of apolar cells and found indications of higher cortical tension in apolar cells than in polar cells. Last, we found that apolar cells activate Hippo signaling prior to taking inner positions. Our results suggest that polar and apolar cells have intrinsic differences that establish outer/inner configuration and differentially regulate Hippo signaling to activate lineage-specific gene expression programs. PMID:24948601

  7. Evolutionary adaptation after crippling cell polarization follows reproducible trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Laan, Liedewij; Koschwanez, John H; Murray, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Cells are organized by functional modules, which typically contain components whose removal severely compromises the module's function. Despite their importance, these components are not absolutely conserved between parts of the tree of life, suggesting that cells can evolve to perform the same biological functions with different proteins. We evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae for 1000 generations without the important polarity gene BEM1. Initially the bem1∆ lineages rapidly increase in fitness and then slowly reach >90% of the fitness of their BEM1 ancestors at the end of the evolution. Sequencing their genomes and monitoring polarization reveals a common evolutionary trajectory, with a fixed sequence of adaptive mutations, each improving cell polarization by inactivating proteins. Our results show that organisms can be evolutionarily robust to physiologically destructive perturbations and suggest that recovery by gene inactivation can lead to rapid divergence in the parts list for cell biologically important functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09638.001 PMID:26426479

  8. Cell polarity and neurogenesis in embryonic stem cell-derived neural rosettes.

    PubMed

    Banda, Erin; McKinsey, Anna; Germain, Noelle; Carter, James; Anderson, Nickesha Camille; Grabel, Laura

    2015-04-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) undergoing neural differentiation form radial arrays of neural stem cells, termed neural rosettes. These structures manifest many of the properties associated with embryonic and adult neurogenesis, including cell polarization, interkinetic nuclear migration (INM), and a gradient of neuronal differentiation. We now identify novel rosette structural features that serve to localize key regulators of neurogenesis. Cells within neural rosettes have specialized basal as well as apical surfaces, based on localization of the extracellular matrix receptor β1 integrin. Apical processes of cells in mature rosettes terminate at the lumen, where adherens junctions are apparent. Primary cilia are randomly distributed in immature rosettes and tightly associated with the neural stem cell's apical domain as rosettes mature. Components of two signaling pathways known to regulate neurogenesis in vivo and in rosettes, Hedgehog and Notch, are apically localized, with the Hedgehog effector Smoothened (Smo) associated with primary cilia and the Notch pathway γ-secretase subunit Presenilin 2 associated with the adherens junction. Increased neuron production upon treatment with the Notch inhibitor DAPT suggests a major role for Notch signaling in maintaining the neural stem cell state, as previously described. A less robust outcome was observed with manipulation of Hedgehog levels, though consistent with a role in neural stem cell survival or proliferation. Inhibition of both pathways resulted in an additive effect. These data support a model by which cells extending a process to the rosette lumen maintain neural stem cell identity whereas release from this association, either through asymmetric cell division or apical abscission, promotes neuronal differentiation.

  9. Minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Franck; Ambühl, Mark E.; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-04-01

    How cells break symmetry and organize activity at their edges to move directionally is a fundamental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly incorporate gradients of regulatory proteins and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe the polarization of this edge activity. These approaches, however, fail to explain cell behaviour before the onset of polarization. We use polarizing and moving fish epidermal cells as a model system to bridge the gap between cell behaviours before and after polarization. Our analysis suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organizing cell activity, in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell centre, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviours. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell centre.

  10. Cell polarity determinants establish asymmetry in MEN signaling

    PubMed Central

    Monje-Casas, Fernando; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    Summary Components of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), a signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis, localize to the spindle pole body (SPB) that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase but are largely absent from the SPB that remains in the mother cell. Through the analysis of one of the determinants of this asymmetry, Bfa1, we find that the machinery responsible for establishing cell polarity and cytoplasmic microtubules collaborate to establish MEN asymmetry. In cells defective in the Cdc42 signaling pathway or the formin Bni1, Bfa1 localizes to both SPBs. The quantitative analysis of Bfa1 localization further shows that Bfa1 can associate with both SPBs in a transient and highly dynamic fashion, but the protein is stabilized on the SPB that migrates into the daughter cell during anaphase through microtubule – bud cortex interactions. Our results indicate that mother – daughter cell asymmetry determinants establish MEN signaling asymmetry through microtubule – bud cortex interactions. PMID:19154724

  11. Optimal matrix rigidity for stress fiber polarization in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is especially sensitive to the rigidity of their environment; the physical mechanisms involved are unknown. A theoretical model and experiments demonstrate here that the polarization/alignment of stress-fibers within stem cells is a non-monotonic function of matrix rigidity. We treat the cell as an active elastic inclusion in a surrounding matrix whose polarizability, unlike dead matter, depends on the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. The theory correctly predicts the monotonic increase of the cellular forces with the matrix rigidity and the alignment of stress-fibers parallel to the long axis of cells. We show that the anisotropy of this alignment depends non-monotonically on matrix rigidity and demonstrate it experimentally by quantifying the orientational distribution of stress-fibers in stem cells. These findings offer a first physical insight for the dependence of stem cell differentiation on tissue elasticity. PMID:20563235

  12. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  13. ErbB receptors and cell polarity: New pathways and paradigms for understanding cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Feigin, Michael E.; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.

    2009-02-15

    The ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases is involved in initiation and progression of a number of human cancers, and receptor activation or overexpression correlates with poor patient survival. Research over the past two decades has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying ErbB-induced tumorigenesis, which has resulted in the development of effective targeted therapies. ErbB-induced signal transduction cascades regulate a wide variety of cell processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell polarity, migration and invasion. Within tumors, disruption of these core processes, through cooperative oncogenic lesions, results in aggressive, metastatic disease. This review will focus on the ErbB signaling networks that regulate migration and invasion and identify a potential role for cell polarity pathways during cancer progression.

  14. Gravity-induced PIN transcytosis for polarization of auxin fluxes in gravity-sensing root cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Ding, Zhaojun; Jones, Angharad R.; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.; Friml, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Auxin is an essential plant-specific regulator of patterning processes that also controls directional growth of roots and shoots. In response to gravity stimulation, the PIN3 auxin transporter polarizes to the bottom side of gravity-sensing root cells, presumably redirecting the auxin flux toward the lower side of the root and triggering gravitropic bending. By combining live-cell imaging techniques with pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that PIN3 polarization does not require secretion of de novo synthesized proteins or protein degradation, but instead involves rapid, transient stimulation of PIN endocytosis, presumably via a clathrin-dependent pathway. Moreover, gravity-induced PIN3 polarization requires the activity of the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for ARF GTPases (ARF-GEF) GNOM-dependent polar-targeting pathways and might involve endosome-based PIN3 translocation from one cell side to another. Our data suggest that gravity perception acts at several instances of PIN3 trafficking, ultimately leading to the polarization of PIN3, which presumably aligns auxin fluxes with gravity vector and mediates downstream root gravitropic response. PMID:21135243

  15. The apical polarity protein network in Drosophila epithelial cells: regulation of polarity, junctions, morphogenesis, cell growth, and survival.

    PubMed

    Tepass, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial tissue formation and function requires the apical-basal polarization of individual epithelial cells. Apical polarity regulators (APRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of key factors that govern polarity and several other aspects of epithelial differentiation. APRs compose a diverse set of molecules including a transmembrane protein (Crumbs), a serine/threonine kinase (aPKC), a lipid phosphatase (PTEN), a small GTPase (Cdc42), FERM domain proteins (Moesin, Yurt), and several adaptor or scaffolding proteins (Bazooka/Par3, Par6, Stardust, Patj). These proteins form a dynamic cooperative network that is engaged in negative-feedback regulation with basolateral polarity factors to set up the epithelial apical-basal axis. APRs support the formation of the apical junctional complex and the segregation of the junctional domain from the apical membrane. It is becoming increasingly clear that APRs interact with the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking machinery, regulate morphogenesis, and modulate epithelial cell growth and survival. Not surprisingly, APRs have multiple fundamental links to human diseases such as cancer and blindness.

  16. A Distinct Pathway for Polar Exocytosis in Plant Cell Wall Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Wang, Xiangfeng; Law, Angus Ho Yin; Zhao, Teng; Du, Shengwang; Loy, Michael M.T.; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Post-Golgi protein sorting and trafficking to the plasma membrane (PM) is generally believed to occur via the trans-Golgi network (TGN). In this study using Nicotiana tabacum pectin methylesterase (NtPPME1) as a marker, we have identified a TGN-independent polar exocytosis pathway that mediates cell wall formation during cell expansion and cytokinesis. Confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Golgi-derived secretory vesicles (GDSVs) labeled by NtPPME1-GFP are distinct from those organelles belonging to the conventional post-Golgi exocytosis pathway. In addition, pharmaceutical treatments, superresolution imaging, and dynamic studies suggest that NtPPME1 follows a polar exocytic process from Golgi-GDSV-PM/cell plate (CP), which is distinct from the conventional Golgi-TGN-PM/CP secretion pathway. Further studies show that ROP1 regulates this specific polar exocytic pathway. Taken together, we have demonstrated an alternative TGN-independent Golgi-to-PM polar exocytic route, which mediates secretion of NtPPME1 for cell wall formation during cell expansion and cytokinesis and is ROP1-dependent. PMID:27531442

  17. Fine-scale dissection of the subdomains of polarity protein BASL in stomatal asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Bergmann, Dominique C; Dong, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Cell polarity is a prerequisite for asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) that generate cell type diversity during development of multicellular organisms. In Arabidopsis, stomatal lineage ACDs are regulated by the plant-specific protein BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL). BASL exhibits dynamic subcellular localization, accumulating initially in the nucleus, but then additionally in a highly polarized crescent at the cell cortex before division. BASL polarization requires a phosphorylation-mediated activation process, but how this is achieved remains unknown. In this study, we performed a fine-scale dissection of BASL protein subdomains and elucidated a nuclear localization sequence for nuclear import and a critical FxFP motif for cortical polarity formation, respectively. Artificially tethering BASL subdomains to the plasma membrane suggests that novel protein partner/s might exist and bind to an internal region of BASL. In addition, we suspect the existence of a protein degradation mechanism associated with the amino terminal domain of BASL that accounts for restricting its predominant expression to the stomatal lineage cells of the epidermis. Taken together, our results revealed that BASL, through its distinct subdomains, integrates multiple regulatory inputs to provide a mechanism that promotes difference during stomatal lineage ACDs.

  18. Fine-scale dissection of the subdomains of polarity protein BASL in stomatal asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Bergmann, Dominique C.; Dong, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is a prerequisite for asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) that generate cell type diversity during development of multicellular organisms. In Arabidopsis, stomatal lineage ACDs are regulated by the plant-specific protein BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL). BASL exhibits dynamic subcellular localization, accumulating initially in the nucleus, but then additionally in a highly polarized crescent at the cell cortex before division. BASL polarization requires a phosphorylation-mediated activation process, but how this is achieved remains unknown. In this study, we performed a fine-scale dissection of BASL protein subdomains and elucidated a nuclear localization sequence for nuclear import and a critical FxFP motif for cortical polarity formation, respectively. Artificially tethering BASL subdomains to the plasma membrane suggests that novel protein partner/s might exist and bind to an internal region of BASL. In addition, we suspect the existence of a protein degradation mechanism associated with the amino terminal domain of BASL that accounts for restricting its predominant expression to the stomatal lineage cells of the epidermis. Taken together, our results revealed that BASL, through its distinct subdomains, integrates multiple regulatory inputs to provide a mechanism that promotes difference during stomatal lineage ACDs. PMID:27422992

  19. Cell division resets polarity and motility for the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Cameron W; Madukoma, Chinedu S; Mahserejian, Shant; Alber, Mark S; Shrout, Joshua D

    2014-11-01

    Links between cell division and other cellular processes are poorly understood. It is difficult to simultaneously examine division and function in most cell types. Most of the research probing aspects of cell division has experimented with stationary or immobilized cells or distinctly asymmetrical cells. Here we took an alternative approach by examining cell division events within motile groups of cells growing on solid medium by time-lapse microscopy. A total of 558 cell divisions were identified among approximately 12,000 cells. We found an interconnection of division, motility, and polarity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. For every division event, motile cells stop moving to divide. Progeny cells of binary fission subsequently move in opposing directions. This behavior involves M. xanthus Frz proteins that regulate M. xanthus motility reversals but is independent of type IV pilus "S motility." The inheritance of opposing polarity is correlated with the distribution of the G protein RomR within these dividing cells. The constriction at the point of division limits the intracellular distribution of RomR. Thus, the asymmetric distribution of RomR at the parent cell poles becomes mirrored at new poles initiated at the site of division. PMID:25157084

  20. Appearance of differentiated cells derived from polar body nuclei in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Tsuguru; Suzuki, Masataka G

    2013-01-01

    In Bombyx mori, polar body nuclei are observed until 9 h after egg lying, however, the fate of polar body nuclei remains unclear. To examine the fate of polar body nuclei, we employed a mutation of serosal cell pigmentation, pink-eyed white egg (pe). The heterozygous pe/+ (pe) females produced black serosal cells in white eggs, while pe/pe females did not produce black serosal cells in white eggs. These results suggest that the appearance of black serosal cells in white eggs depends on the genotype (pe/+ (pe) ) of the mother. Because the polar body nuclei had + (pe) genes in the white eggs laid by a pe/+ (pe) female, polar body nuclei participate in development and differentiate into functional cell (serosal cells). Analyses of serosal cells pigmentation indicated that ~30% of the eggs contained polar-body-nucleus-derived cells. These results demonstrate that polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared at a high frequency under natural conditions. Approximately 80% of polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared near the anterior pole and the dorsal side, which is opposite to where embryogenesis occurs. The number of cells derived from the polar body nuclei was very low. Approximately 26% of these eggs contained only one black serosal cell. PCR-based analysis revealed that the polar-body-nucleus-derived cells disappeared in late embryonic stages (stage 25). Overall, polar-body-nuclei-derived cells were unlikely to contribute to embryos.

  1. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona.

    PubMed

    Veeman, Michael T; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-01-01

    Tissues in developing embryos exhibit complex and dynamic rearrangements that shape forming organs, limbs, and body axes. Directed migration, mediolateral intercalation, lumen formation, and other rearrangements influence the topology and topography of developing tissues. These collective cell behaviors are distinct phenomena but all involve the fine-grained control of cell polarity. Here we review recent findings in the dynamics of polarized cell behavior in both the Drosophila ovarian border cells and the Ciona notochord. These studies reveal the remarkable reorganization of cell polarity during organ formation and underscore conserved mechanisms of developmental cell polarity including the Par/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and planar cell polarity pathways. These two very different model systems demonstrate important commonalities but also key differences in how cell polarity is controlled in tissue morphogenesis. Together, these systems raise important, broader questions on how the developmental control of cell polarity contributes to morphogenesis of diverse tissues across the metazoa.

  2. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona

    PubMed Central

    Veeman, Michael T.; McDonald, Jocelyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissues in developing embryos exhibit complex and dynamic rearrangements that shape forming organs, limbs, and body axes. Directed migration, mediolateral intercalation, lumen formation, and other rearrangements influence the topology and topography of developing tissues. These collective cell behaviors are distinct phenomena but all involve the fine-grained control of cell polarity. Here we review recent findings in the dynamics of polarized cell behavior in both the Drosophila ovarian border cells and the Ciona notochord. These studies reveal the remarkable reorganization of cell polarity during organ formation and underscore conserved mechanisms of developmental cell polarity including the Par/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and planar cell polarity pathways. These two very different model systems demonstrate important commonalities but also key differences in how cell polarity is controlled in tissue morphogenesis. Together, these systems raise important, broader questions on how the developmental control of cell polarity contributes to morphogenesis of diverse tissues across the metazoa. PMID:27303647

  3. Dominant processes for microstructure evolution in polar ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Daniela; Faria, Sergio H.; Weikusat, Ilka; Azuma, Nobuhiko

    2013-04-01

    The microstructure of polycrystalline polar ice is affected by many recrystallization processes, which can occur simultaneously as well as in succession. The size and shape of individual grains, the orientation of c-axes and the occurrence of sub-grain boundaries are all influenced by a number of agents, including stress, strain, impurity content, and temperature within the ice. To interpret the structures found in ice core data with respect to the generating deformation mechanisms, it is necessary to better understand the feedback between microstructure and rheology of the ice. A better knowledge of ice rheology is also required for improving macroscopic ice flow models and producing realistic projections of the mass balance of ice sheets. The analysis of microstructural data of deep ice cores within the last decades contributed significantly to the understanding of recrystallization processes. The review paper by Faria et al. (in preparation) revisits some historic results: The analysis of grain sizes and c-axis orientation distributions with depth of the Byrd deep ice core, Antarctica, suggested that microstructural evolution could be characterized by three main depth ranges of the ice core, defined by their predominant recrystallization regimes. A generalization of these results gave rise to the tripartite paradigm of polar ice microstructure, also called the "three-stage model": (1) In the upper part Normal Grain Growth (NGG) dominates the evolution of the microstructure, leading to steady increase of the average grain size with age/depth. (2) In the central part the NGG is balanced by rotation recrystallization (sometimes also called "polygonisation"), which describes splitting of grains along sub-grain boundaries and consequently leads to a stationary average grain size. (3) In the lower (and warmer) parts of the ice core strain-induced boundary migration including nucleation of new grains was thought to be the dominant factor, resulting in larger average

  4. Planar Cell Polarity Breaks the Symmetry of PAR Protein Distribution prior to Mitosis in Drosophila Sensory Organ Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Besson, Charlotte; Bernard, Fred; Corson, Francis; Rouault, Hervé; Reynaud, Elodie; Keder, Alyona; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, François

    2015-04-20

    During development, cell-fate diversity can result from the unequal segregation of fate determinants at mitosis. Polarization of the mother cell is essential for asymmetric cell division (ACD). It often involves the formation of a cortical domain containing the PAR complex proteins Par3, Par6, and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). In the fly notum, sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs) divide asymmetrically within the plane of the epithelium and along the body axis to generate two distinct cells. Fate asymmetry depends on the asymmetric localization of the PAR complex. In the absence of planar cell polarity (PCP), SOPs divide with a random planar orientation but still asymmetrically, showing that PCP is dispensable for PAR asymmetry at mitosis. To study when and how the PAR complex localizes asymmetrically, we have used a quantitative imaging approach to measure the planar polarization of the proteins Bazooka (Baz, fly Par3), Par6, and aPKC in living pupae. By using imaging of functional GFP-tagged proteins with image processing and computational modeling, we find that Baz, Par6, and aPKC become planar polarized prior to mitosis in a manner independent of the AuroraA kinase and that PCP is required for the planar polarization of Baz, Par6, and aPKC during interphase. This indicates that a "mitosis rescue" mechanism establishes asymmetry at mitosis in PCP mutants. This study therefore identifies PCP as the initial symmetry-breaking signal for the planar polarization of PAR proteins in asymmetrically dividing SOPs.

  5. Planar Cell Polarity Breaks the Symmetry of PAR Protein Distribution prior to Mitosis in Drosophila Sensory Organ Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Besson, Charlotte; Bernard, Fred; Corson, Francis; Rouault, Hervé; Reynaud, Elodie; Keder, Alyona; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, François

    2015-04-20

    During development, cell-fate diversity can result from the unequal segregation of fate determinants at mitosis. Polarization of the mother cell is essential for asymmetric cell division (ACD). It often involves the formation of a cortical domain containing the PAR complex proteins Par3, Par6, and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). In the fly notum, sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs) divide asymmetrically within the plane of the epithelium and along the body axis to generate two distinct cells. Fate asymmetry depends on the asymmetric localization of the PAR complex. In the absence of planar cell polarity (PCP), SOPs divide with a random planar orientation but still asymmetrically, showing that PCP is dispensable for PAR asymmetry at mitosis. To study when and how the PAR complex localizes asymmetrically, we have used a quantitative imaging approach to measure the planar polarization of the proteins Bazooka (Baz, fly Par3), Par6, and aPKC in living pupae. By using imaging of functional GFP-tagged proteins with image processing and computational modeling, we find that Baz, Par6, and aPKC become planar polarized prior to mitosis in a manner independent of the AuroraA kinase and that PCP is required for the planar polarization of Baz, Par6, and aPKC during interphase. This indicates that a "mitosis rescue" mechanism establishes asymmetry at mitosis in PCP mutants. This study therefore identifies PCP as the initial symmetry-breaking signal for the planar polarization of PAR proteins in asymmetrically dividing SOPs. PMID:25843034

  6. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Bazooka/PAR3 is dispensable for polarity in Drosophila follicular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Jaffer; Tiwari, Manu D; Honemann-Capito, Mona; Krahn, Michael P; Wodarz, Andreas

    2015-03-13

    Apico-basal polarity is the defining characteristic of epithelial cells. In Drosophila, apical membrane identity is established and regulated through interactions between the highly conserved Par complex (Bazooka/Par3, atypical protein kinase C and Par6), and the Crumbs complex (Crumbs, Stardust and PATJ). It has been proposed that Bazooka operates at the top of a genetic hierarchy in the establishment and maintenance of apico-basal polarity. However, there is still ambiguity over the correct sequence of events and cross-talk with other pathways during this process. In this study, we reassess this issue by comparing the phenotypes of the commonly used baz(4) and baz(815-8) alleles with those of the so far uncharacterized baz(XR11) and baz(EH747) null alleles in different Drosophila epithelia. While all these baz alleles display identical phenotypes during embryonic epithelial development, we observe strong discrepancies in the severity and penetrance of polarity defects in the follicular epithelium: polarity is mostly normal in baz(EH747) and baz(XR11) while baz(4) and baz(815) (-8) show loss of polarity, severe multilayering and loss of epithelial integrity throughout the clones. Further analysis reveals that the chromosomes carrying the baz(4) and baz(815-8) alleles may contain additional mutations that enhance the true baz loss-of-function phenotype in the follicular epithelium. This study clearly shows that Baz is dispensable for the regulation of polarity in the follicular epithelium, and that the requirement for key regulators of cell polarity is highly dependent on developmental context and cell type.

  8. Bazooka/PAR3 is dispensable for polarity in Drosophila follicular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahab, Jaffer; Tiwari, Manu D.; Honemann-Capito, Mona; Krahn, Michael P.; Wodarz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Apico-basal polarity is the defining characteristic of epithelial cells. In Drosophila, apical membrane identity is established and regulated through interactions between the highly conserved Par complex (Bazooka/Par3, atypical protein kinase C and Par6), and the Crumbs complex (Crumbs, Stardust and PATJ). It has been proposed that Bazooka operates at the top of a genetic hierarchy in the establishment and maintenance of apico-basal polarity. However, there is still ambiguity over the correct sequence of events and cross-talk with other pathways during this process. In this study, we reassess this issue by comparing the phenotypes of the commonly used baz4 and baz815-8 alleles with those of the so far uncharacterized bazXR11 and bazEH747 null alleles in different Drosophila epithelia. While all these baz alleles display identical phenotypes during embryonic epithelial development, we observe strong discrepancies in the severity and penetrance of polarity defects in the follicular epithelium: polarity is mostly normal in bazEH747 and bazXR11 while baz4 and baz815-8 show loss of polarity, severe multilayering and loss of epithelial integrity throughout the clones. Further analysis reveals that the chromosomes carrying the baz4 and baz815-8 alleles may contain additional mutations that enhance the true baz loss-of-function phenotype in the follicular epithelium. This study clearly shows that Baz is dispensable for the regulation of polarity in the follicular epithelium, and that the requirement for key regulators of cell polarity is highly dependent on developmental context and cell type. PMID:25770183

  9. Modular coherence of protein dynamics in yeast cell polarity system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Juntao Tony; Guimerà, Roger; Li, Hua; Pinto, Inês Mendes; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Wai, Stephanie C.; Rubinstein, Boris; Li, Rong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated on a systems level how complex protein interactions underlying cell polarity in yeast determine the dynamic association of proteins with the polar cortical domain (PCD) where they localize and perform morphogenetic functions. We constructed a network of physical interactions among >100 proteins localized to the PCD. This network was further divided into five robust modules correlating with distinct subprocesses associated with cell polarity. Based on this reconstructed network, we proposed a simple model that approximates a PCD protein's molecular residence time as the sum of the characteristic time constants of the functional modules with which it interacts, weighted by the number of edges forming these interactions. Regression analyses showed excellent fitting of the model with experimentally measured residence times for a large subset of the PCD proteins. The model is able to predict residence times using small training sets. Our analysis also revealed a scaffold protein that imposes a local constraint of dynamics for certain interacting proteins. PMID:21502521

  10. A biomechanical model for cell polarization and intercalation during Drosophila germband extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Haihan; Wang, Qiming; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Feng, James J.

    2015-10-01

    Germband extension during Drosophila development features the merging of cells along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis and their separation along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis. This intercalation process involves planar cell polarity, anisotropic contractile forces along cell edges, and concerted cell deformation and movement. Although prior experiments have probed each of these factors separately, the connection among them remains unclear. This paper presents a chemo-mechanical model that integrates the three factors into a coherent framework. The model predicts the polarization of Rho-kinase, myosin and Bazooka downstream of an anisotropic Shroom distribution. In particular, myosin accumulates on cell edges along the DV axis, causing them to contract into a vertex. Subsequently, medial myosin in the cells anterior and posterior to the vertex helps to elongate it into a new edge parallel to the body axis. Thus, the tissue extends along the AP axis and narrows in the transverse direction through neighbor exchange. Model predictions of the polarity of the proteins and cell and tissue deformation are in good agreement with experimental observations.

  11. A biomechanical model for cell polarization and intercalation during Drosophila germband extension.

    PubMed

    Lan, Haihan; Wang, Qiming; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Feng, James J

    2015-10-01

    Germband extension during Drosophila development features the merging of cells along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis and their separation along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis. This intercalation process involves planar cell polarity, anisotropic contractile forces along cell edges, and concerted cell deformation and movement. Although prior experiments have probed each of these factors separately, the connection among them remains unclear. This paper presents a chemo-mechanical model that integrates the three factors into a coherent framework. The model predicts the polarization of Rho-kinase, myosin and Bazooka downstream of an anisotropic Shroom distribution. In particular, myosin accumulates on cell edges along the DV axis, causing them to contract into a vertex. Subsequently, medial myosin in the cells anterior and posterior to the vertex helps to elongate it into a new edge parallel to the body axis. Thus, the tissue extends along the AP axis and narrows in the transverse direction through neighbor exchange. Model predictions of the polarity of the proteins and cell and tissue deformation are in good agreement with experimental observations. PMID:26356256

  12. High efficiency solar cell processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, cells made by several groups are approaching 19% efficiency. General aspects of the processing required for such cells are discussed. Most processing used for high efficiency cells is derived from space-cell or concentrator cell technology, and recent advances have been obtained from improved techniques rather than from better understanding of the limiting mechanisms. Theory and modeling are fairly well developed, and adequate to guide further asymptotic increases in performance of near conventional cells. There are several competitive cell designs with promise of higher performance ( 20%) but for these designs further improvements are required. The available cell processing technology to fabricate high efficiency cells is examined.

  13. Dual polarization of microglia isolated from mixed glial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ju, Lili; Zeng, Hui; Chen, Yun; Wu, Yanhong; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Qunyuan

    2015-09-01

    Microglia are versatile immune effector cells of the CNS and are sensitive to various stimuli. The different methods used to isolate microglia may affect some of their characteristics, such as their polarization state. The influence of cell sorting methods on the polarization state of microglia has never been studied. Mixed glial culture system (MGCS) and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) are two methods that are commonly used to purify microglia. This study compares the immunological states between microglia isolated by MGCS and microglia isolated by MACS. We show that microglia isolated by MGCS exhibit a stronger immune-activated state than microglia isolated by MACS. They present an elevated phagocytic ability and high levels of markers associated with classical activation (M1) and alternative activation (M2). In addition, high levels of M1-type and M2-type chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 and transforming growth factor-β1 were detected in the culture medium of mixed glial cells. Our results show that microglia isolated by MGCS are in an immune-activated state, whereas microglia isolated by MACS appear to be closer to their primary in vivo state. Therefore, the immune status of microglia, depending on the protocol used to purify them, should be carefully considered in neuropathology research.

  14. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  15. Polarization information processing and software system design for simultaneously imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yahui; Liu, Jing; Jin, Weiqi; Wen, Renjie

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous imaging polarimetry can realize real-time polarization imaging of the dynamic scene, which has wide application prospect. This paper first briefly illustrates the design of the double separate Wollaston Prism simultaneous imaging polarimetry, and then emphases are put on the polarization information processing methods and software system design for the designed polarimetry. Polarization information processing methods consist of adaptive image segmentation, high-accuracy image registration, instrument matrix calibration. Morphological image processing was used for image segmentation by taking dilation of an image; The accuracy of image registration can reach 0.1 pixel based on the spatial and frequency domain cross-correlation; Instrument matrix calibration adopted four-point calibration method. The software system was implemented under Windows environment based on C++ programming language, which realized synchronous polarization images acquisition and preservation, image processing and polarization information extraction and display. Polarization data obtained with the designed polarimetry shows that: the polarization information processing methods and its software system effectively performs live realize polarization measurement of the four Stokes parameters of a scene. The polarization information processing methods effectively improved the polarization detection accuracy.

  16. Prickle/spiny-legs isoforms control the polarity of the apical microtubule network in planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jessica; Sharp, Katherine A.; Matis, Maja; Cho, Bomsoo; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are substrates upon which plus- and minus-end directed motors control the directional movement of cargos that are essential for generating cell polarity. Although centrosomal MTs are organized with plus-ends away from the MT organizing center, the regulation of non-centrosomal MT polarity is poorly understood. Increasing evidence supports the model that directional information for planar polarization is derived from the alignment of a parallel apical network of MTs and the directional MT-dependent trafficking of downstream signaling components. The Fat/Dachsous/Four-jointed (Ft/Ds/Fj) signaling system contributes to orienting those MTs. In addition to previously defined functions in promoting asymmetric subcellular localization of ‘core’ planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins, we find that alternative Prickle (Pk-Sple) protein isoforms control the polarity of this MT network. This function allows the isoforms of Pk-Sple to differentially determine the direction in which asymmetry is established and therefore, ultimately, the direction of tissue polarity. Oppositely oriented signals that are encoded by oppositely oriented Fj and Ds gradients produce the same polarity outcome in different tissues or compartments, and the tissue-specific activity of alternative Pk-Sple protein isoforms has been observed to rectify the interpretation of opposite upstream directional signals. The control of MT polarity, and thus the directionality of apical vesicle traffic, by Pk-Sple provides a mechanism for this rectification. PMID:25005476

  17. The Rac-GAP Bcr is a novel regulator of the Par complex that controls cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Anjana S.; Reyes, Steve B.; Um, Kyongmi; McCarty, Joseph H.; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is essential for many biological processes, including directed cell migration, and loss of polarity contributes to pathological conditions such as cancer. The Par complex (Par3, Par6, and PKCζ) controls cell polarity in part by recruiting the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) to specialized cellular sites, where Tiam1 promotes local Rac1 activation and cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the mechanisms that restrict Par-Tiam1 complex activity to the leading edge to maintain cell polarity during migration remain unclear. We identify the Rac-specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) breakpoint cluster region protein (Bcr) as a novel regulator of the Par-Tiam1 complex. We show that Bcr interacts with members of the Par complex and inhibits both Rac1 and PKCζ signaling. Loss of Bcr results in faster, more random migration and striking polarity defects in astrocytes. These polarity defects are rescued by reducing PKCζ activity or by expressing full-length Bcr, but not an N-terminal deletion mutant or the homologous Rac-GAP, Abr, both of which fail to associate with the Par complex. These results demonstrate that Bcr is an integral member of the Par-Tiam1 complex that controls polarized cell migration by locally restricting both Rac1 and PKCζ function. PMID:24152735

  18. Nuclear Lamin A/C Deficiency Induces Defects in Cell Mechanics, Polarization, and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jerry S. H.; Hale, Christopher M.; Panorchan, Porntula; Khatau, Shyam B.; George, Jerry P.; Tseng, Yiider; Stewart, Colin L.; Hodzic, Didier; Wirtz, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Lamin A/C is a major constituent of the nuclear lamina, a thin filamentous protein layer that lies beneath the nuclear envelope. Here we show that lamin A/C deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Lmna−/− MEFs) diminishes the ability of these cells to polarize at the edge of a wound and significantly reduces cell migration speed into the wound. Moreover, lamin A/C deficiency induces significant separation of the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) from the nuclear envelope. Investigations using ballistic intracellular nanorheology reveal that lamin A/C deficiency also dramatically affects the micromechanical properties of the cytoplasm. Both the elasticity (stretchiness) and the viscosity (propensity of a material to flow) of the cytoplasm in Lmna−/− MEFs are significantly reduced. Disassembly of either the actin filament or microtubule networks in Lmna+/+ MEFs results in decrease of cytoplasmic elasticity and viscosity down to levels found in Lmna−/− MEFs. Together these results show that both the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-based processes, including cell motility, coupled MTOC and nucleus dynamics, and cell polarization, depend critically on the integrity of the nuclear lamina, which suggest the existence of a functional mechanical connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. These results also suggest that cell polarization during cell migration requires tight mechanical coupling between MTOC and nucleus, which is mediated by lamin A/C. PMID:17631533

  19. Silicon planar lightwave circuits: Raman amplification and polarization processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tak-Keung

    Silicon photonics is of topical interest because of the possibility of building on the large investments and technological advances already made for microelectronics processing. Although silicon has found many applications for passive optical devices, the development of active (the ability to amplify or generate light) devices using silicon has been a major challenge that has prompted much research. Optical amplification from stimulated Raman scattering in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides is an attractive possibility. The large Raman coefficient of silicon and small optical mode field profile in planar waveguides make it possible to build amplifiers in lengths short enough to be of practical interest. In this thesis we first studied the inter-relationship between nonlinear absorption (two-photon absorption and free-carrier absorption) and spontaneous Raman scattering in SOI waveguides. The non-degenerate two-photon absorption coefficient of silicon was measured for the first time using a picosecond pump-probe technique. We showed experimentally that free carriers generated by two-photon absorption in SOI waveguides can introduce large losses which limit the useable pump power for Raman amplification at telecommunication wavelengths. Simply increasing the continuous-wave pump power does not achieve higher gain because the induced losses can be greater than the gain from stimulated Raman scattering. Two types of ultrashort pulse sources have been developed for the characterization of planar waveguide devices. A wavelength tunable femtosecond pulse source base on soliton self-frequency shift was successfully built. The soliton pulse source had a repetition rate of 18 MHz and full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) pulse width of 0.9 ps. The second pulse source was the gain-switched distributed feedback (DFB) laser with a pulse compressor. The compressed pulse had repetition rate of 10 GHz and FWHM pulse width of 1.7 ps with excellent pedestal suppression. Potential

  20. Requirement of Phosphoinositides Containing Stearic Acid To Control Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Doignon, François; Laquel, Patricia; Testet, Eric; Tuphile, Karine; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are present in very small amounts but are essential for cell signaling, morphogenesis, and polarity. By mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that some PIPs with stearic acyl chains were strongly disturbed in a psi1Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deficient in the specific incorporation of a stearoyl chain at the sn-1 position of phosphatidylinositol. The absence of PIPs containing stearic acid induced disturbances in intracellular trafficking, although the total amount of PIPs was not diminished. Changes in PIPs also induced alterations in the budding pattern and defects in actin cytoskeleton organization (cables and patches). Moreover, when the PSI1 gene was impaired, a high proportion of cells with bipolar cortical actin patches that occurred concomitantly with the bipolar localization of Cdc42p was specifically found among diploid cells. This bipolar cortical actin phenotype, never previously described, was also detected in a bud9Δ/bud9Δ strain. Very interestingly, overexpression of PSI1 reversed this phenotype.

  1. Polarizing intestinal epithelial cells electrically through Ror2

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lin; McCaig, Colin D.; Scott, Roderick H.; Zhao, Siwei; Milne, Gillian; Clevers, Hans; Zhao, Min; Pu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The apicobasal polarity of enterocytes determines where the brush border membrane (apical membrane) will form, but how this apical membrane faces the lumen is not well understood. The electrical signal across the epithelium could serve as a coordinating cue, orienting and polarizing enterocytes. Here, we show that applying a physiological electric field to intestinal epithelial cells, to mimic the natural electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference, polarized phosphorylation of the actin-binding protein ezrin, increased expression of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI, a differentiation marker) and remodeled the actin cytoskeleton selectively on the cathode side. In addition, an applied electric field also activated ERK1/2 and LKB1 (also known as STK11), key molecules in apical membrane formation. Disruption of the tyrosine protein kinase transmembrane receptor Ror2 suppressed activation of ERK1/2 and LKB1 significantly, and subsequently inhibited apical membrane formation in enterocytes. Our findings indicate that the endogenous electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference might act as an essential coordinating signal for apical membrane formation at a tissue level, through activation of LKB1 mediated by Ror2–ERK signaling. PMID:24928904

  2. Polarizing intestinal epithelial cells electrically through Ror2.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lin; McCaig, Colin D; Scott, Roderick H; Zhao, Siwei; Milne, Gillian; Clevers, Hans; Zhao, Min; Pu, Jin

    2014-08-01

    The apicobasal polarity of enterocytes determines where the brush border membrane (apical membrane) will form, but how this apical membrane faces the lumen is not well understood. The electrical signal across the epithelium could serve as a coordinating cue, orienting and polarizing enterocytes. Here, we show that applying a physiological electric field to intestinal epithelial cells, to mimic the natural electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference, polarized phosphorylation of the actin-binding protein ezrin, increased expression of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI, a differentiation marker) and remodeled the actin cytoskeleton selectively on the cathode side. In addition, an applied electric field also activated ERK1/2 and LKB1 (also known as STK11), key molecules in apical membrane formation. Disruption of the tyrosine protein kinase transmembrane receptor Ror2 suppressed activation of ERK1/2 and LKB1 significantly, and subsequently inhibited apical membrane formation in enterocytes. Our findings indicate that the endogenous electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference might act as an essential coordinating signal for apical membrane formation at a tissue level, through activation of LKB1 mediated by Ror2-ERK signaling. PMID:24928904

  3. Wave-Pinning and Cell Polarity from a Bistable Reaction-Diffusion System

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoichiro; Jilkine, Alexandra; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2008-01-01

    Motile eukaryotic cells polarize in response to external signals. Numerous mechanisms have been suggested to account for this symmetry breaking and for the ensuing robust polarization. Implicated in this process are various proteins that are recruited to the plasma membrane and segregate at an emergent front or back of the polarizing cell. Among these are PI3K, PTEN, and members of the Rho family GTPases such as Cdc42, Rac, and Rho. Many such proteins, including the Rho GTPases, cycle between active membrane-bound forms and inactive cytosolic forms. In previous work, we have shown that this property, together with appropriate crosstalk, endows a biochemical circuit (Cdc42, Rac, and Rho) with the property of inherent polarizability. Here we show that this property is present in an even simpler system comprised of a single active/inactive protein pair with positive feedback to its own activation. The simplicity of this minimal system also allows us to explain the mechanism using insights from mathematical analysis. The basic idea resides in a well-known property of reaction-diffusion systems with bistable kinetics, namely, propagation of fronts. However, it crucially depends on exchange between active and inactive forms of the chemicals with unequal rates of diffusion, and overall conservation to pin the waves into a stable polar distribution. We refer to these dynamics as wave-pinning and we show that this phenomenon is distinct from Turing-instability-generated pattern formation that occurs in reaction-diffusion systems that appear to be very similar. We explain the mathematical basis of the phenomenon, relate it to spatial segregation of Rho GTPases, and show how it can account for spatial amplification and maintenance of polarity, as well as sensitivity to new stimuli typical in polarization of eukaryotic cells. PMID:18212014

  4. Coordination of planar cell polarity pathways through Spiny-legs

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaonkar, Abhijit A; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis and physiology of tissues and organs requires planar cell polarity (PCP) systems that orient and coordinate cells and their behaviors, but the relationship between PCP systems has been controversial. We have characterized how the Frizzled and Dachsous-Fat PCP systems are connected through the Spiny-legs isoform of the Prickle-Spiny-legs locus. Two different components of the Dachsous-Fat system, Dachsous and Dachs, can each independently interact with Spiny-legs and direct its localization in vivo. Through characterization of the contributions of Prickle, Spiny-legs, Dachsous, Fat, and Dachs to PCP in the Drosophila wing, eye, and abdomen, we define where Dachs-Spiny-legs and Dachsous-Spiny-legs interactions contribute to PCP, and provide a new understanding of the orientation of polarity and the basis of PCP phenotypes. Our results support the direct linkage of PCP systems through Sple in specific locales, while emphasizing that cells can be subject to and must ultimately resolve distinct, competing PCP signals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09946.001 PMID:26505959

  5. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Coyne G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and

  6. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  7. Rictor Regulates Spermatogenesis by Controlling Sertoli Cell Cytoskeletal Organization and Cell Polarity in the Mouse Testis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Heling; Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Caixia; Xiong, Zhi; Zhao, Wanlu; Jia, Chunhong; Lin, Jun; Lin, Yan; Yuan, Weiping; Zhao, Allan Z; Bai, Xiaochun

    2015-11-01

    Maintenance of cell polarity is essential for Sertoli cell and blood-testis barrier (BTB) function and spermatogenesis; however, the signaling mechanisms that regulate the integrity of the cytoskeleton and polarity of Sertoli cells are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that rapamycin-insensitive component of target of rapamycin (TOR) (Rictor), a core component of mechanistic TOR complex 2 (mTORC2), was expressed in the seminiferous epithelium during testicular development, and was down-regulated in a cadmium chloride-induced BTB damage model. We then conditionally deleted the Rictor gene in Sertoli cells and mutant mice exhibited azoospermia and were sterile as early as 3 months old. Further study revealed that Rictor may regulate actin organization via both mTORC2-dependent and mTORC2-independent mechanisms, in which the small GTPase, ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, and phosphorylation of the actin filament regulatory protein, Paxillin, are involved, respectively. Loss of Rictor in Sertoli cells perturbed actin dynamics and caused microtubule disarrangement, both of which accumulatively disrupted Sertoli cell polarity and BTB integrity, accompanied by testicular developmental defects, spermiogenic arrest and excessive germ cell loss in mutant mice. Together, these findings establish the importance of Rictor/mTORC2 signaling in Sertoli cell function and spermatogenesis through the maintenance of Sertoli cell cytoskeletal dynamics, BTB integrity, and cell polarity. PMID:26360620

  8. Polar process and world climate /A brief overview/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goody, R.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of events relating polar regions to the world climate, the mechanisms of sea ice and polar ice sheets, and of two theories of the Pleistocene Ice Ages. The sea ice which varies over time scales of one or two years and the polar ice sheets with time changes measured in tens or hundreds of thousands of years introduce two distinct time constants into global time changes; the yearly Arctic sea ice variations affect northern Europe and have some effect over the entire Northern Hemisphere; the ice-albedo coupling in the polar ice sheets is involved in major climatic events such as the Pleistocene ice ages. It is concluded that climate problems require a global approach including the atmosphere, the oceans, and the cryosphere.

  9. Studies of interactive plasma processes in the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Progress during the reporting period is presented. Several distinctly different areas of research are presently being pursued: (1) studies of the thermal structure of polar outflows; (2) Prognoz data analysis; and (3) Ulysses Jupiter encounter.

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  11. The planar cell-polarity gene stbm regulates cell behaviour and cell fate in vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Park, Maiyon; Moon, Randall T

    2002-01-01

    The gene strabismus (stbm)/Van Gogh (Vang) functions in the planar cell-polarity pathway in Drosophila. As the existence of such a pathway in vertebrates has not been firmly established, we investigated the functions and signalling activities encoded by stbm in vertebrate embryos. In regard to cell fate, inhibition of Stbm function in zebrafish embryos leads to reduction of anterior neural markers, whereas gain of function leads to a rise in the levels of these markers. In regard to cell behaviour, both gain-of-function and loss-of-function assays reveal a role for Stbm in mediating cell movements during gastrulation. Mechanistically, Stbm inhibits Wnt-mediated activation of beta-catenin-dependent transcription while promoting phosphorylation of c-Jun- and AP-1-dependent transcription. This complex effect on intracellular signalling pathways probably involves dishevelled (dsh), as Stbm was found to interact with the Dsh protein, and as Dsh is known to function in both planar cell-polarity and beta-catenin pathways in Drosophila.

  12. Ectopic KNOX Expression Affects Plant Development by Altering Tissue Cell Polarity and Identity[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rebocho, Alexandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant development involves two polarity types: tissue cell (asymmetries within cells are coordinated across tissues) and regional (identities vary spatially across tissues) polarity. Both appear altered in the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Hooded mutant, in which ectopic expression of the KNOTTED1-like Homeobox (KNOX) gene, BKn3, causes inverted polarity of differentiated hairs and ectopic flowers, in addition to wing-shaped outgrowths. These lemma-specific effects allow the spatiotemporal analysis of events following ectopic BKn3 expression, determining the relationship between KNOXs, polarity, and shape. We show that tissue cell polarity, based on localization of the auxin transporter SISTER OF PINFORMED1 (SoPIN1), dynamically reorients as ectopic BKn3 expression increases. Concurrently, ectopic expression of the auxin importer LIKE AUX1 and boundary gene NO APICAL MERISTEM is activated. The polarity of hairs reflects SoPIN1 patterns, suggesting that tissue cell polarity underpins oriented cell differentiation. Wing cell files reveal an anisotropic growth pattern, and computational modeling shows how polarity guiding growth can account for this pattern and wing emergence. The inverted ectopic flower orientation does not correlate with SoPIN1, suggesting that this form of regional polarity is not controlled by tissue cell polarity. Overall, the results suggest that KNOXs trigger different morphogenetic effects through interplay between tissue cell polarity, identity, and growth. PMID:27553356

  13. Physiological extracellular electrical signals guide and orient the polarity of gut epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jin; Cao, Lin; McCaig, Colin D

    2015-01-01

    Apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells is a fundamental process in the morphogenesis of many tissues. But how epithelial cells become oriented with functionally specialized luminal and serosal facing membranes is not understood fully. Cell-cell and cell-substrate contacts induce the asymmetric distribution of Na+/K+-ATPase pumps on basal membrane and are essential for apical-basal polarity formation. Inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase pump abolished apical formation completely. But it is unclear how this pump regulated the apical polarity. We discovered that the transepithelial potential difference (TEP) which is dependent on the basal Na+/K+-ATPase distribution acts as an essential coordinating signal for apical membrane formation through Ror2/ERK1/2/LKB1 signaling. A similar concept applies to all other ion-transporting epithelial and endothelial tissues and this raises the possibility of regulating the TEP as a therapeutic intervention for disorders in which epithelial function is compromised by faulty electrical signaling. PMID:26451341

  14. Dchs1–Fat4 regulation of polarized cell behaviours during skeletal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yaopan; Kuta, Anna; Crespo-Enriquez, Ivan; Whiting, Danielle; Martin, Tina; Mulvaney, Joanna; Irvine, Kenneth D.; Francis-West, Philippa

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal shape varies widely across species as adaptation to specialized modes of feeding and locomotion, but how skeletal shape is established is unknown. An example of extreme diversity in the shape of a skeletal structure can be seen in the sternum, which varies considerably across species. Here we show that the Dchs1–Fat4 planar cell polarity pathway controls cell orientation in the early skeletal condensation to define the shape and relative dimensions of the mouse sternum. These changes fit a model of cell intercalation along differential Dchs1–Fat4 activity that drives a simultaneous narrowing, thickening and elongation of the sternum. Our results identify the regulation of cellular polarity within the early pre-chondrogenic mesenchyme, when skeletal shape is established, and provide the first demonstration that Fat4 and Dchs1 establish polarized cell behaviour intrinsically within the mesenchyme. Our data also reveal the first indication that cell intercalation processes occur during ventral body wall elongation and closure. PMID:27145737

  15. Implementation of polarization processes in a charge transport model applied on poly(ethylene naphthalate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, M.-Q.; Le Roy, S.; Boudou, L.; Teyssedre, G.

    2016-06-01

    One of the difficulties in unravelling transport processes in electrically insulating materials is the fact that the response, notably charging current transients, can have mixed contributions from orientation polarization and from space charge processes. This work aims at identifying and characterizing the polarization processes in a polar polymer in the time and frequency-domains and to implement the contribution of the polarization into a charge transport model. To do so, Alternate Polarization Current (APC) and Dielectric Spectroscopy measurements have been performed on poly(ethylene naphthalene 2,6-dicarboxylate) (PEN), an aromatic polar polymer, providing information on polarization mechanisms in the time- and frequency-domain, respectively. In the frequency-domain, PEN exhibits 3 relaxation processes termed β, β* (sub-glass transitions), and α relaxations (glass transition) in increasing order of temperature. Conduction was also detected at high temperatures. Dielectric responses were treated using a simplified version of the Havriliak-Negami model (Cole-Cole (CC) model), using 3 parameters per relaxation process, these parameters being temperature dependent. The time dependent polarization obtained from the CC model is then added to a charge transport model. Simulated currents issued from the transport model implemented with the polarization are compared with the measured APCs, showing a good consistency between experiments and simulations in a situation where the response comes essentially from dipolar processes.

  16. Cell Fate Determination and the Switch from Diffuse Growth to Planar Polarity in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balcerowicz, Daria; Schoenaers, Sébastjen; Vissenberg, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots fulfill important functions as they serve in water and nutrient uptake, provide anchorage of the plant body in the soil and in some species form the site of symbiotic interactions with soil-living biota. Root hairs, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specific epidermal cells, significantly increase the root’s surface area and aid in these processes. In this review we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine the hair and non-hair cell fate of epidermal cells and that define the site on the epidermal cell where the root hair will be initiated (=planar polarity determination). In the model plant Arabidopsis, trichoblast and atrichoblast cell fate results from intra- and intercellular position-dependent signaling and from complex feedback loops that ultimately regulate GL2 expressing and non-expressing cells. When epidermal cells reach the end of the root expansion zone, root hair promoting transcription factors dictate the establishment of polarity within epidermal cells followed by the selection of the root hair initiation site at the more basal part of the trichoblast. Molecular players in the abovementioned processes as well as the role of phytohormones are discussed, and open areas for future experiments are identified. PMID:26779192

  17. Differential sensitivity of epithelial cells to extracellular matrix in polarity establishment.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of apical-basal polarity is crucial for epithelial sheets that form a compartment in the body, which function to maintain the environment in the compartment. Effects of impaired polarization are easily observed in three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems rather than in two-dimensional (2-D) culture systems. Although the mechanisms for establishing the polarity are not completely understood, signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM) are considered to be essential for determining the basal side and eventually generating polarity in the epithelial cells. To elucidate the common features and differences in polarity establishment among various epithelial cells, we analyzed the formation of epithelial apical-basal polarity using three cell lines of different origin: MDCK II cells (dog renal tubules), EpH4 cells (mouse mammary gland), and R2/7 cells (human colon) expressing wild-type α-catenin (R2/7 α-Cate cells). These cells showed clear apical-basal polarity in 2-D cultures. In 3-D cultures, however, each cell line displayed different responses to the same ECM. In MDCK II cells, spheroids with a single lumen formed in both Matrigel and collagen gel. In R2/7 α-Cate cells, spheroids showed similar apical-basal polarity as that seen in MDCK II cells, but had multiple lumens. In EpH4 cells, the spheroids displayed an apical-basal polarity that was opposite to that seen in the other two cell types in both ECM gels, at least during the culture period. On the other hand, the three cell lines showed the same apical-basal polarity both in 2-D cultures and in 3-D cultures using the hanging drop method. The three lines also had similar cellular responses to ECM secreted by the cells themselves. Therefore, appropriate culture conditions should be carefully determined in advance when using various epithelial cells to analyze cell polarity or 3-D morphogenesis.

  18. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  19. Mass Wasting Processes in Vesta's South Polar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, K.; Jaumann, R.; Krohn, K.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.; Stephan, K.; Sykes, M. V.; Schenk, P.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    Images of Asteroid Vesta taken by the Dawn framing camera give insight to a wide range of geologic phenomena on Vesta's surface. In this abstract we focus on the evidence of different types of gravity-driven mass wasting that can be seen on Vesta with an emphasis on the south polar region where the formation of the giant impact basin of Rheasilvia (1, 2) caused significant mass movements and lateral displacement. During the formation of the impact basin various processes such as uplift and stretching moved material of the impact site (3). The remnant are fault scarps, ridges, and uplift features inside the Rheasilvia basin (2). Beside these mass movements, there are also three types of debris movement associated with the Rheasilvia impact basin: block slumping of solid material, granular landslides, and flow-like features. They all occur on the rim of the basin and the central peak with slopes varying from 10° to 40°. The movement, however, is in different directions. While the block slumping and landslides occur on the steep slopes of the crater wall facing inward, the flow-like movements go outward from the crater rim on less steep slopes. The block slumping is most prominent in the region between 80° and 120° east and 50° and 60° south (4). The slump blocks in a rotational movement showing multiple scarps and ridges. Landslides on the steep slopes inward of Rheasilvia have a length to height ratio of about 1. The flow-like features occur in the region between 50° and 90° east and 20° to 40° south. They are in a relatively young area and have a length to height ratio up to 35. Additionally, many small elongate depressions of about 1.5 km length can be found near the central peak of Rheasilvia. They are mainly arranged parallel to the slope with a slight curvature and are related to instability of granular material on a slope. References: (1) Jaumann et al., Science 336, 687 (2012); (2) Schenk et al., Science 336, 694 (2012); (3) Melosh, Impact Cratering

  20. GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION INDUCED BY COLD ELECTRONS VIA COMPTON PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zhe; Jiang Yunguo; Lin Hainan E-mail: jiangyg@ihep.ac.cn

    2013-05-20

    The polarization measurement is an important tool to probe the prompt emission mechanism in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The synchrotron photons can be scattered by cold electrons in the outflow via Compton scattering (CS) processes. The observed polarization depends on both the photon energy and the viewing angle. With the typical bulk Lorentz factor {Gamma} {approx} 200, photons with energy E > 10 MeV tend to have smaller polarization than photons with energy E < 1 MeV. At the right viewing angle, i.e., {theta} {approx} {Gamma}{sup -1}, the polarization achieves its maximal value, and the polarization angle changes 90 Degree-Sign relative to the initial polarization direction. Thus, the synchrotron radiation plus CS model can naturally explain the 90 Degree-Sign change of the polarization angle in GRB 100826A.

  1. N-cadherin is required for the polarized cell behaviors that drive neurulation in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hong, Elim; Brewster, Rachel

    2006-10-01

    Through the direct analysis of cell behaviors, we address the mechanisms underlying anterior neural tube morphogenesis in the zebrafish and the role of the cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin (N-cad) in this process. We demonstrate that although the mode of neurulation differs at the morphological level between amphibians and teleosts, the underlying cellular mechanisms are conserved. Contrary to previous reports, the zebrafish neural plate is a multi-layered structure, composed of deep and superficial cells that converge medially while undergoing radial intercalation, to form a single cell-layered neural tube. Time-lapse recording of individual cell behaviors reveals that cells are polarized along the mediolateral axis and exhibit protrusive activity. In N-cad mutants, both convergence and intercalation are blocked. Moreover, although N-cad-depleted cells are not defective in their ability to form protrusions, they are unable to maintain them stably. Taken together, these studies uncover key cellular mechanisms underlying neural tube morphogenesis in teleosts, and reveal a role for cadherins in promoting the polarized cell behaviors that underlie cellular rearrangements and shape the vertebrate embryo.

  2. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  3. Modeling Yeast Cell Polarization Induced by Pheromone Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tau-Mu; Chen, Shanqin; Chou, Ching-Shan; Nie, Qing

    2007-07-01

    Yeast cells respond to spatial gradients of mating pheromones by polarizing and projecting up the gradient toward the source. It is thought that they employ a spatial sensing mechanism in which the cell compares the concentration of pheromone at different points on the cell surface and determines the maximum point, where the projection forms. Here we constructed the first spatial mathematical model of the yeast pheromone response that describes the dynamics of the heterotrimeric and Cdc42p G-protein cycles, which are linked in a cascade. Two key performance objectives of this system are (1) amplification—converting a shallow external gradient of ligand to a steep internal gradient of protein components and (2) tracking—following changes in gradient direction. We used simulations to investigate amplification mechanisms that allow tracking. We identified specific strategies for regulating the spatial dynamics of the protein components (i.e. their changing location in the cell) that would enable the cell to achieve both objectives.

  4. Planar cell polarity signalling couples cell division and morphogenesis during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Ciruna, Brian; Jenny, Andreas; Lee, Diana; Mlodzik, Marek; Schier, Alexander F

    2006-01-12

    Environmental and genetic aberrations lead to neural tube closure defects (NTDs) in 1 out of every 1,000 births. Mouse and frog models for these birth defects have indicated that Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2, also known as Strabismus) and other components of planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling might control neurulation by promoting the convergence of neural progenitors to the midline. Here we show a novel role for PCP signalling during neurulation in zebrafish. We demonstrate that non-canonical Wnt/PCP signalling polarizes neural progenitors along the anteroposterior axis. This polarity is transiently lost during cell division in the neural keel but is re-established as daughter cells reintegrate into the neuroepithelium. Loss of zebrafish Vangl2 (in trilobite mutants) abolishes the polarization of neural keel cells, disrupts re-intercalation of daughter cells into the neuroepithelium, and results in ectopic neural progenitor accumulations and NTDs. Remarkably, blocking cell division leads to rescue of trilobite neural tube morphogenesis despite persistent defects in convergence and extension. These results reveal a function for PCP signalling in coupling cell division and morphogenesis at neurulation and indicate a previously unrecognized mechanism that might underlie NTDs.

  5. Studies of interactive plasma processes in the polar cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The final report for NAGW-1657 (SwRI Project 15-2783) is presented. Several distinctly different areas of research are discussed: (1) studies of the thermal structure of polar outflows; (2) Prognoz-8 data analysis; and (3) the Ulysses Jupiter encounter.

  6. Interhemispheric Differences in Dentifrication and Related Processes Affecting Polar Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Manney, G. L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.; Peckham, G. E.

    1994-01-01

    The severe depletion of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica in late winter and early spring is caused by enhanced CLO abundances arising from heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). CLO abundances comparable to those over Antarctica have also been observed throughout the Arctic Vortex, but the accompanying loss of Arctic ozone has been much less severe.

  7. Rear Polarization of the Microtubule-Organizing Center in Neointimal Smooth Muscle Cells Depends on PKCα, ARPC5, and RHAMM

    PubMed Central

    Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind; Silverman-Gavrila, Lorelei; Hou, Guangpei; Zhang, Ming; Charlton, Milton; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2011-01-01

    Directed migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from the media to the intima in arteries occurs during atherosclerotic plaque formation and during restenosis after angioplasty or stent application. The polarized orientation of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) is a key determinant of this process, and we therefore investigated factors that regulate MTOC polarity in vascular SMCs. SMCs migrating in vivo from the medial to the intimal layer of the rat carotid artery following balloon catheter injury were rear polarized, with the MTOC located posterior of the nucleus. In tissue culture, migrating neointimal cells maintained rear polarization, whereas medial cells were front polarized. Using phosphoproteomic screening and mass spectrometry, we identified ARPC5 and RHAMM as protein kinase C (PKC)-phosphorylated proteins associated with rear polarization of the MTOC in neointimal SMCs. RNA silencing of ARPC5 and RHAMM, PKC inhibition, and transfection with a mutated nonphosphorylatable ARPC5 showed that these proteins regulate rear polarization by organizing the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in neointimal SMCs. Both ARPC5 and RHAMM, in addition to PKC, were required for migration of neointimal SMCs. PMID:21281821

  8. Complex polar machinery required for proper chromosome segregation in vegetative and sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Lenarcic, Rok; Willis, Clare R.; Roberts, David M.; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Errington, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chromosome segregation is an essential process of cell multiplication. In prokaryotes, segregation starts with the newly replicated sister origins of replication, oriCs, which move apart to defined positions in the cell. We have developed a genetic screen to identify mutants defective in placement of oriC during spore development in the Gram‐positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. In addition to the previously identified proteins Soj and DivIVA, our screen identified several new factors involved in polar recruitment of oriC: a reported regulator of competence ComN, and the regulators of division site selection MinD and MinJ. Previous work implicated Soj as an important regulator of oriC positioning in the cell. Our results suggest a model in which the DivIVA‐interacting proteins ComN and MinJ recruit MinD to the cell pole, and that these proteins work upstream of Soj to enable oriC placement. We show that these proteins form a polar complex, which acts in parallel with but distinct from the sporulation‐specific RacA pathway of oriC placement, and also functions during vegetative growth. Our study further shows that MinD has two distinct cell cycle roles, in cell division and chromosome segregation, and highlights that cell probably use multiple parallel mechanisms to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:27059541

  9. Cortical PAR polarity proteins promote robust cytokinesis during asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Shawn N.; Davies, Tim; Zhuravlev, Yelena; Dumont, Julien; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis, the physical division of one cell into two, is thought to be fundamentally similar in most animal cell divisions and driven by the constriction of a contractile ring positioned and controlled solely by the mitotic spindle. During asymmetric cell divisions, the core polarity machinery (partitioning defective [PAR] proteins) controls the unequal inheritance of key cell fate determinants. Here, we show that in asymmetrically dividing Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, the cortical PAR proteins (including the small guanosine triphosphatase CDC-42) have an active role in regulating recruitment of a critical component of the contractile ring, filamentous actin (F-actin). We found that the cortical PAR proteins are required for the retention of anillin and septin in the anterior pole, which are cytokinesis proteins that our genetic data suggest act as inhibitors of F-actin at the contractile ring. Collectively, our results suggest that the cortical PAR proteins coordinate the establishment of cell polarity with the physical process of cytokinesis during asymmetric cell division to ensure the fidelity of daughter cell formation. PMID:26728855

  10. Diesel exhaust particles induce aberrant alveolar epithelial directed cell movement by disruption of polarity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    LaGier, Adriana J; Manzo, Nicholas D; Dye, Janice A

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following injury requires efficient and directed alveolar epithelial cell migration, this study's goal was to understand the mechanisms underlying alveolar epithelial cells response to DEP, particularly when exposure is accompanied with comorbid lung injury. Separate mechanistic steps of directed migration were investigated in confluent murine LA-4 cells exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-100 μg/cm(2)) of either automobile-emitted diesel exhaust particles (DEP(A)) or carbon black (CB) particles. A scratch wound model ascertained how DEP(A) exposure affected directional cell migration and BCECF ratio fluorimetry-monitored intracellular pH (pHi). Cells were immunostained with giantin to assess cell polarity, and with paxillin to assess focal cell adhesions. Cells were immunoblotted for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) to assess cytoskeletal anchoring. Data demonstrate herein that exposure of LA-4 cells to DEP(A) (but not CB) resulted in delayed directional cell migration, impaired de-adhesion of the trailing edge cell processes, disrupted regulation of pHi, and altered Golgi polarity of leading edge cells, along with modified focal adhesions and reduced ERM levels, indicative of decreased cytoskeletal anchoring. The ability of DEP(A) to disrupt directed cell migration at multiple levels suggests that signaling pathways such as ERM/Rho are critical for transduction of ion transport signals into cytoskeletal arrangement responses. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which chronic exposure to traffic-based emissions may result in decrements in lung capacity. PMID:23294296

  11. LFA-1 Engagement Triggers T Cell Polarization at the HIV-1 Virological Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Shimona

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 efficiently disseminates by cell-cell spread at intercellular contacts called virological synapses (VS), where the virus preferentially assembles and buds. Cell-cell contact triggers active polarization of organelles and viral proteins within infected cells to the contact site to support efficient VS formation and HIV-1 spread; critically, however, which cell surface protein triggers contact-induced polarization at the VS remains unclear. Additionally, the mechanism by which the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is recruited to the VS remains ill defined. Here, we use a reductionist bead-coupled antibody assay as a model of the VS and show that cross-linking the integrin LFA-1 alone is sufficient to induce active T cell polarization and recruitment of the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) in HIV-1-infected cells. Mutant cell lines coupled with inhibitors demonstrated that LFA-1-induced polarization was dependent on the T cell kinase ZAP70. Notably, immunofluorescent staining of viral proteins revealed an accumulation of surface Env at sites of LFA-1 engagement, with intracellular Env localized to a Golgi compartment proximal to the polarized MTOC. Furthermore, blocking LFA-1-induced MTOC polarization through ZAP70 inhibition prevented intracellular Env polarization. Taken together, these data reveal that LFA-1 is a key determinant in inducing dynamic T cell remodeling to the VS and suggest a model in which LFA-1 engagement triggers active polarization of the MTOC and the associated Env-containing secretory apparatus to sites of cell-cell contact to support polarized viral assembly and egress for efficient cell-cell spread. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 causes AIDS by spreading within immune cells and depletion of CD4 T lymphocytes. Rapid spread between these cells occurs by highly efficient cell-cell transmission that takes place at virological synapses (VS). VS are characterized by striking T cell remodeling that is spatially associated with polarized virus

  12. Establishing and maintaining cell polarity with mRNA localization in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Barr, Justinn; Yakovlev, Konstantin V; Shidlovskii, Yulii; Schedl, Paul

    2016-03-01

    How cell polarity is established and maintained is an important question in diverse biological contexts. Molecular mechanisms used to localize polarity proteins to distinct domains are likely context-dependent and provide a feedback loop in order to maintain polarity. One such mechanism is the localized translation of mRNAs encoding polarity proteins, which will be the focus of this review and may play a more important role in the establishment and maintenance of polarity than is currently known. Localized translation of mRNAs encoding polarity proteins can be used to establish polarity in response to an external signal, and to maintain polarity by local production of polarity determinants. The importance of this mechanism is illustrated by recent findings, including orb2-dependent localized translation of aPKC mRNA at the apical end of elongating spermatid tails in the Drosophila testis, and the apical localization of stardust A mRNA in Drosophila follicle and embryonic epithelia.

  13. Non-invasive imaging of cellulose microfibril orientation within plant cell walls by polarized Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Singh, Seema; Joo, Michael; Vega-Sanchez, Miguel; Ronald, Pamela; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils represent the major scaffold of plant cell walls. Different packing and orientation of the microfibrils at the microscopic scale determines the macroscopic properties of cell walls and thus affect their functions with a profound effect on plant survival. We developed a polarized Raman microspectroscopic method to determine cellulose microfibril orientation within rice plant cell walls. Employing an array of point measurements as well as area imaging and subsequent Matlab-assisted data processing, we were able to characterize the distribution of cellulose microfibril orientation in terms of director angle and anisotropy magnitude. Using this approach we detected differences between wild type rice plants and the rice brittle culm mutant, which shows a more disordered cellulose microfibril arrangement, and differences between different tissues of a wild type rice plant. This novel non-invasive Raman imaging approach allows for quantitative assessment of cellulose fiber orientation in cell walls of herbaceous plants, an important advancement in cell wall characterization.

  14. Acquisition of cell polarity during cell cycle and oral replacement in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Kaczanowska, Janina; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Kiersnowska, Mauryla; Fabczak, Hanna; Tulodziecka, Karolina; Kaczanowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to search for a mechanism responsible for the acquisition of cell polarity in a ciliate Tetrahymena. Homologs of the mammalian genes coding for CDC42-GSK3beta- MARK/PAR1-MAPs proteins were found in the Tetrahymena genome (Eisen et al., 2006, and this study). These proteins belong to a pathway which controls assembly and disassembly of microtubule bundles and cell polarity in neural cells. In Tetrahymena, there are two types of morphogenesis: divisional and oral replacement (OR). In divisional morphogenesis, an elongation of longitudinal microtubule bundles (LMs) takes place during cell division. In contrast, in OR type morphogenesis, which occurs in starved non-dividing cells, a polar retraction of LMs occurs. In T. pyriformis, the frequency of developmental switch to OR morphogenesis increases in the presence of wortmannin, an inhibitor of the CDC42-GSK3beta-MARK pathway. In contrast, wortmannin when applied to dividing cells does not affect divisional morphogenesis. Using immunostaining with the antibody against mammalian mitotic phosphoproteins (MPM-2) we show that these proteins co-localize with the LMs and are distributed along the anterior-posterior gradient. In addition, we show that during OR type morphogenesis, the fate of LMs correlates with the anterior-posterior gradient of instability of the cortical structures. We used the conditional mouth-less mutant of T. thermophila (Tiedtke et al., 1988) to test if the presence of the oral apparatus is required for the maintenance of cell polarity. We discuss our results in relation to the hypothesis of GSK3-beta-MARK pathway involvement in the acquisition of cell polarity in Tetrahymena.

  15. Dystroglycan loss disrupts polarity and beta-casein induction inmammary epithelial cells by perturbing laminin anchoring

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, M. Lynn; Oppizzi, Maria Luisa; Henry, Michael D.; Onishi,Akiko; Campbell, Kevin P.; Bissell, Mina J.; Muschler, John L.

    2006-02-17

    Precise contact between epithelial cells and their underlying basement membrane is critical to the maintenance of tissue architecture and function. To understand the role that the laminin receptor dystroglycan (DG) plays in these processes, we assayed cell responses to laminin-111 following conditional ablation of DG expression in cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Strikingly, DG loss disrupted laminin-111-induced polarity and {beta}-casein production, and abolished laminin assembly at the step of laminin binding to the cell surface. DG re-expression restored these deficiencies. Investigations of mechanism revealed that DG cytoplasmic sequences were not necessary for laminin assembly and signaling, and only when the entire mucin domain of extracellular DG was deleted did laminin assembly not occur. These results demonstrate that DG is essential as a laminin-111 co-receptor in MECs that functions by mediating laminin anchoring to the cell surface, a process that allows laminin polymerization, tissue polarity, and {beta}-casein induction. The observed loss of laminin-111 assembly and signaling in DG-/-MECs provides insights into the signaling changes occurring in breast carcinomas and other cancers, where DG's laminin-binding function is frequently defective.

  16. Interaction of Motility, Directional Sensing, and Polarity Modules Recreates the Behaviors of Chemotaxing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changji; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Devreotes, Peter N.; Iglesias, Pablo A.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis involves the coordinated action of separable but interrelated processes: motility, gradient sensing, and polarization. We have hypothesized that these are mediated by separate modules that account for these processes individually and that, when combined, recreate most of the behaviors of chemotactic cells. Here, we describe a mathematical model where the modules are implemented in terms of reaction-diffusion equations. Migration and the accompanying changes in cellular morphology are demonstrated in simulations using a mechanical model of the cell cortex implemented in the level set framework. The central module is an excitable network that accounts for random migration. The response to combinations of uniform stimuli and gradients is mediated by a local excitation, global inhibition module that biases the direction in which excitability is directed. A polarization module linked to the excitable network through the cytoskeleton allows unstimulated cells to move persistently and, for cells in gradients, to gradually acquire distinct sensitivity between front and back. Finally, by varying the strengths of various feedback loops in the model we obtain cellular behaviors that mirror those of genetically altered cell lines. PMID:23861660

  17. Transient Tissue-Scale Deformation Coordinates Alignment of Planar Cell Polarity Junctions in the Mammalian Skin.

    PubMed

    Aw, Wen Yih; Heck, Bryan W; Joyce, Bradley; Devenport, Danelle

    2016-08-22

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective alignment of polarity along the tissue plane. In skin, the largest mammalian organ, PCP aligns over extremely long distances, but the global cues that orient tissue polarity are unknown. Here, we show that Celsr1 asymmetry arises concomitant with a gradient of tissue deformation oriented along the medial-lateral axis. This uniaxial tissue tension, whose origin remains unknown, transiently transforms basal epithelial cells from initially isotropic and disordered states into highly elongated and aligned morphologies. Reorienting tissue deformation is sufficient to shift the global axis of polarity, suggesting that uniaxial tissue strain can act as a long-range polarizing cue. Observations both in vivo and in vitro suggest that the effect of tissue anisotropy on Celsr1 polarity is not a direct consequence of cell shape but rather reflects the restructuring of cell-cell interfaces during oriented cell divisions and cell rearrangements that serve to relax tissue strain. We demonstrate that cell intercalations remodel intercellular junctions predominantly between the mediolateral interfaces of neighboring cells. This restructuring of the cell surface polarizes Celsr1, which is slow to accumulate at nascent junctions yet stably associates with persistent junctions. We propose that tissue anisotropy globally aligns Celsr1 polarity by creating a directional bias in the formation of new cell interfaces while simultaneously aligning the persistent interfaces at which Celsr1 prefers to accumulate.

  18. Transient Tissue-Scale Deformation Coordinates Alignment of Planar Cell Polarity Junctions in the Mammalian Skin.

    PubMed

    Aw, Wen Yih; Heck, Bryan W; Joyce, Bradley; Devenport, Danelle

    2016-08-22

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective alignment of polarity along the tissue plane. In skin, the largest mammalian organ, PCP aligns over extremely long distances, but the global cues that orient tissue polarity are unknown. Here, we show that Celsr1 asymmetry arises concomitant with a gradient of tissue deformation oriented along the medial-lateral axis. This uniaxial tissue tension, whose origin remains unknown, transiently transforms basal epithelial cells from initially isotropic and disordered states into highly elongated and aligned morphologies. Reorienting tissue deformation is sufficient to shift the global axis of polarity, suggesting that uniaxial tissue strain can act as a long-range polarizing cue. Observations both in vivo and in vitro suggest that the effect of tissue anisotropy on Celsr1 polarity is not a direct consequence of cell shape but rather reflects the restructuring of cell-cell interfaces during oriented cell divisions and cell rearrangements that serve to relax tissue strain. We demonstrate that cell intercalations remodel intercellular junctions predominantly between the mediolateral interfaces of neighboring cells. This restructuring of the cell surface polarizes Celsr1, which is slow to accumulate at nascent junctions yet stably associates with persistent junctions. We propose that tissue anisotropy globally aligns Celsr1 polarity by creating a directional bias in the formation of new cell interfaces while simultaneously aligning the persistent interfaces at which Celsr1 prefers to accumulate. PMID:27451904

  19. Solar-cell power system for the BESS Polar Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masaya

    The Balloon-born Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS), aiming to search for antiparticle/antimatter in the cosmic radiation, successfully carried out two long-duration flights over Antarctica in 2004 (BESS Polar-I, 8.5days) and 2007/2008 (BESS Polar-II, 24.5days science, 29.5 days total). To achieve the long duration flights, establishment of a reliable power supply system was one of our new challenges. The requirements for the new system were to enable detector system operation with a capacity of 500W for a flight period of ˜30 days, and the total weight was required to be less than ˜300kg from the view point of the global payload weight constraints. To meet these requirements, we adopted solar panels (Sharp NT3436BD solar cell modules) as a power source. Thanks to their high efficiency and light weight, we could design a simple and compact omni-directional solar array structure with enough power generation capability and mechanical strength. Moreover, because each side of the structure is designed to have the same solar-cell area, no directional control is required. This was preferred because the superconducting magnet controls the direction of the instrument and a directional system for the solar array would have to incorporate independent azimuth control. The basic performance was first verified through two technical flights. Subsequently, this system was flown for 8.5 days and nearly 30 days over Antarctica successfully supplying the electric power fro instrument as expected. In the paper, an overview and flight performance of the solar power system will be presented.

  20. Hook2, a microtubule-binding protein, interacts with Par6α and controls centrosome orientation during polarized cell migration.

    PubMed

    Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Bazellieres, Elsa; Viallat-Lieutaud, Annelise; Delgrossi, Marie-Hélène; Barthelemy-Requin, Magali; Le Bivic, André; Massey-Harroche, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes function during polarized cell migration and a subset of these proteins localizes to the reoriented centrosome during this process. Despite these observations, the mechanisms behind the recruitment of these polarity complexes such as the aPKC/PAR6α complex to the centrosome are not well understood. Here we identify Hook2 as an interactor for the aPKC/PAR6α complex that functions to localize this complex at the centrosome. We first demonstrate that Hook2 is essential for the polarized Golgi re-orientation towards the migration front. Depletion of Hook2 results in a decrease of PAR6α at the centrosome during cell migration, while overexpression of Hook2 in cells induced the formation of aggresomes with the recruitment of PAR6α, aPKC and PAR3. In addition, we demonstrate that the interaction between the C-terminal domain of Hook2 and the aPKC-binding domain of PAR6α localizes PAR6α to the centrosome during cell migration. Our data suggests that Hook2, a microtubule binding protein, plays an important role in the regulation of PAR6α recruitment to the centrosome to bridge microtubules and the aPKC/PAR complex. This data reveals how some of the polarity protein complexes are recruited to the centrosome and might regulate pericentriolar and microtubule organization and potentially impact on polarized migration. PMID:27624926

  1. Hook2, a microtubule-binding protein, interacts with Par6α and controls centrosome orientation during polarized cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Bazellieres, Elsa; Viallat-Lieutaud, Annelise; Delgrossi, Marie-Hélène; Barthelemy-Requin, Magali; Le Bivic, André; Massey-Harroche, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes function during polarized cell migration and a subset of these proteins localizes to the reoriented centrosome during this process. Despite these observations, the mechanisms behind the recruitment of these polarity complexes such as the aPKC/PAR6α complex to the centrosome are not well understood. Here we identify Hook2 as an interactor for the aPKC/PAR6α complex that functions to localize this complex at the centrosome. We first demonstrate that Hook2 is essential for the polarized Golgi re-orientation towards the migration front. Depletion of Hook2 results in a decrease of PAR6α at the centrosome during cell migration, while overexpression of Hook2 in cells induced the formation of aggresomes with the recruitment of PAR6α, aPKC and PAR3. In addition, we demonstrate that the interaction between the C-terminal domain of Hook2 and the aPKC-binding domain of PAR6α localizes PAR6α to the centrosome during cell migration. Our data suggests that Hook2, a microtubule binding protein, plays an important role in the regulation of PAR6α recruitment to the centrosome to bridge microtubules and the aPKC/PAR complex. This data reveals how some of the polarity protein complexes are recruited to the centrosome and might regulate pericentriolar and microtubule organization and potentially impact on polarized migration. PMID:27624926

  2. Self-organized spatiotemporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules, which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Gerisch et al. have shown that randomly triggered excitable PIP3 waves regulate the anti-correlated PTEN concentration. Here we show that this requires a switch-like dynamics of the overall membrane bound PTEN concentration in combination with two species of PTEN differing in their dephosphorylation rates. A quantitative modeling with a coupled reaction-diffusion system shows excellent agreement with experimental results and predicts a ratio σ of dephosphorylation rates acting on PIP3 of σ ~ 80 - 100. Our quantitative analysis suggests that surface-attached cell membrane spanning PIP3 waves are necessary for resetting the global actin network. This is evidenced by the experimentally observed delay between polarization-cycles also quantitatively captured by our analysis. Max Planck Society and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.

  3. Planar cell polarity breaks bilateral symmetry by controlling ciliary positioning.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai; Hu, Jianxin; Chen, Wen; Elliott, Gene; Andre, Philipp; Gao, Bo; Yang, Yingzi

    2010-07-15

    Defining the three body axes is a central event of vertebrate morphogenesis. Establishment of left-right (L-R) asymmetry in development follows the determination of dorsal-ventral and anterior-posterior (A-P) body axes, although the molecular mechanism underlying precise L-R symmetry breaking in reference to the other two axes is still poorly understood. Here, by removing both Vangl1 and Vangl2, the two mouse homologues of a Drosophila core planar cell polarity (PCP) gene Van Gogh (Vang), we reveal a previously unrecognized function of PCP in the initial breaking of lateral symmetry. The leftward nodal flow across the posterior notochord (PNC) has been identified as the earliest event in the de novo formation of L-R asymmetry. We show that PCP is essential in interpreting the A-P patterning information and linking it to L-R asymmetry. In the absence of Vangl1 and Vangl2, cilia are positioned randomly around the centre of the PNC cells and nodal flow is turbulent, which results in disrupted L-R asymmetry. PCP in mouse, unlike what has been implicated in other vertebrate species, is not required for ciliogenesis, cilium motility, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling or apical docking of basal bodies in ciliated tracheal epithelial cells. Our data suggest that PCP acts earlier than the unidirectional nodal flow during bilateral symmetry breaking in vertebrates and provide insight into the functional mechanism of PCP in organizing the vertebrate tissues in development.

  4. Requirement of Phosphoinositides Containing Stearic Acid To Control Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Laquel, Patricia; Testet, Eric; Tuphile, Karine; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are present in very small amounts but are essential for cell signaling, morphogenesis, and polarity. By mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that some PIPs with stearic acyl chains were strongly disturbed in a psi1Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deficient in the specific incorporation of a stearoyl chain at the sn-1 position of phosphatidylinositol. The absence of PIPs containing stearic acid induced disturbances in intracellular trafficking, although the total amount of PIPs was not diminished. Changes in PIPs also induced alterations in the budding pattern and defects in actin cytoskeleton organization (cables and patches). Moreover, when the PSI1 gene was impaired, a high proportion of cells with bipolar cortical actin patches that occurred concomitantly with the bipolar localization of Cdc42p was specifically found among diploid cells. This bipolar cortical actin phenotype, never previously described, was also detected in a bud9Δ/bud9Δ strain. Very interestingly, overexpression of PSI1 reversed this phenotype. PMID:26711260

  5. Design and implementation of the parallel processing system of multi-channel polarization images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-yong; Huang, Qin-chao

    2013-08-01

    Compared with traditional optical intensity image processing, polarization images processing has two main problems. One is that the amount of data is larger. The other is that processing tasks is more complex. To resolve these problems, the parallel processing system of multi-channel polarization images is designed by the multi-DSP technique. It contains a communication control unit (CCU) and a data processing array (DPA). CCU controls communications inside and outside the system. Its logics are designed by a FPGA chip. DPA is made up of four Digital Signal Processor (DSP) chips, which are interlinked by the loose coupling method. DPA implements processing tasks including images registration and images synthesis by parallel processing methods. The polarization images parallel processing model is designed on multi levels including the system task, the algorithm and the operation. Its program is designed by the assemble language. While the polarization image resolution is 782x582 pixels, the pixel data length is 12 bits in the experiment. After it received 3 channels of polarization image simultaneously, this system implements parallel task to acquire the target polarization characteristics. Experimental results show that this system has good real-time and reliability. The processing time of images registration is 293.343ms while the registration accuracy achieves 0.5 pixel. The processing time of images synthesis is 3.199ms.

  6. Noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways in C. elegans converge on POP-1/TCF and control cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Herman, Michael A; Wu, Mingfu

    2004-05-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a canonical Wnt signaling pathway controls a cell migration whereas noncanonical Wnt pathways control the polarities of individual cells. Despite the differences in the identities and interactions among canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathway components, as well as the processes they regulate, almost all C. elegans Wnt pathways involve the sole Tcf homolog, POP-1. Intriguingly, POP-1 is asymmetrically distributed between the daughters of an asymmetric cell division, with the anterior sister cell usually having a higher level of nuclear POP-1 than its posterior sister. At some divisions, asymmetric distribution of POP-1 is controlled by noncanonical Wnt signaling, but at others the asymmetry is generated independently. Recent experiments suggest that despite this elaborate anterior-posterior POP-1 asymmetry, the quantity of POP-1 protein may have less to do with the subsequent determination of fate than does the quality of the POP-1 protein in the cell. In this review, we will embark on a quest to understand Quality (1), at least from the standpoint of the effect POP/Tcf quality has on the control of cell polarity in C. elegans. PMID:14977564

  7. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo Albors, Aida; Tazaki, Akira; Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-11-14

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue.

  8. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo Albors, Aida; Tazaki, Akira; Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue. PMID:26568310

  9. PHENOTYPE AND POLARIZATION OF AUTOLOGOUS T CELLS BY BIOMATERIAL-TREATED DENDRITIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H.; Babensee, Julia E.

    2014-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T cell phenotype was investigated. Here, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pre-treat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes, and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels, as compared to DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared to that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T cell responses. PMID:24616366

  10. The Hedgehog pathway: role in cell differentiation, polarity and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanfei; Wang, Yunshan; Xie, Jingwu

    2015-02-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is first described as a genetic mutation that has "spiked" phenotype in the cuticles of Drosophila in later 1970s. Since then, Hh signaling has been implicated in regulation of differentiation, proliferation, tissue polarity, stem cell population and carcinogenesis. The first link of Hh signaling to cancer was established through discovery of genetic mutations of Hh receptor gene PTCH1 being responsible for Gorlin syndrome in 1996. It was later shown that Hh signaling is associated with many types of cancer, including skin, leukemia, lung, brain and gastrointestinal cancers. Another important milestone for the Hh research field is the FDA approval for the clinical use of Hh inhibitor Erivedge/Vismodegib for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinomas. However, recent clinical trials of Hh signaling inhibitors in pancreatic, colon and ovarian cancer all failed, indicating a real need for further understanding of Hh signaling in cancer. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in the Hh signaling mechanism and its role in human cancer. PMID:25559776

  11. The Influence of Local Geometric Effects on Mars Polar Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Using simple, qualitative heat balance models, this paper addresses textures and structures that will result from the evolution of volatile layers by accretion and by ablation. Such phenomena may have global implications that are not apparent when only flat or sloped surfaces are modeled. In general, structures such as mounds or depressions formed out of volatile materials will evolve in shape such that the growth or retreat of any particular surface will be maximized. It can be shown that the local radius of curvature is proportional to the growth or retreat rate. For example, icy surfaces will tend to form facets that face the dominant sun direction. Two such cases are evaluated: a) Features associated with condensation of volatiles, include cold-trapping and redistribution, such as the concentration of frost around the Viking 2 lander [1]. Here I will focus on textures that likely result from the formation of seasonal CO2 deposits. b) Features associated with sublimation of volatiles, such as those described by Ingersoll et. al. [2] result in textured surfaces that affect both the apparent emissivity and albedo. Similar calculations have been performed with respect to the "Swiss cheese" features on the South Polar Cap [3]. Here, I evaluate the likely sublimation rates from optimal ice scarp structures and their implications for the long-term evolution of the polar caps and formation of layered terrain.

  12. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Indrayani

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib) belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib-) surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells. PMID:27327956

  13. Gamma-ray polarization of the synchrotron self-compton process from a highly relativistic jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The high polarization observed in the prompt phase of some gamma-ray bursts invites extensive study of the emission mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process from a highly relativistic jet. A magnetic-dominated, baryon-loaded jet ejected from the central engine travels with a large Lorentz factor. Shells with slightly different velocities collide with each other and produce shocks. The shocks accelerate electrons to a power-law distribution and, at the same time, magnify the magnetic field. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. Synchrotron photons suffer from the Compton scattering (CS) process and then are detected by an observer located slightly off-axis. We analytically derive the formulae of photon polarization in the SSC process in two magnetic configurations: a magnetic field in the shock plane and perpendicular to the shock plane. We show that photons induced by the SSC process can be highly polarized, with the maximum polarization Π ∼ 24% in the energy band [0.5, 5] MeV. The polarization depends on the viewing angles, peaking in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the energy band [0.05, 0.5] MeV, in which most γ-ray polarimeters are active, the polarization is about twice that in the Thomson limit, reaching Π ∼ 20%. This implies that the Klein-Nishina effect, which is often neglected in the literature, should be carefully considered.

  14. A polarized cell model for Chikungunya virus infection: entry and egress of virus occurs at the apical domain of polarized cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pei Jin; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has resulted in several outbreaks in the past six decades. The clinical symptoms of Chikungunya infection include fever, skin rash, arthralgia, and an increasing incidence of encephalitis. The re-emergence of CHIKV with more severe pathogenesis highlights its potential threat on our human health. In this study, polarized HBMEC, polarized Vero C1008 and non-polarized Vero cells grown on cell culture inserts were infected with CHIKV apically or basolaterally. Plaque assays, viral binding assays and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated apical entry and release of CHIKV in polarized HBMEC and Vero C1008. Drug treatment studies were performed to elucidate both host cell and viral factors involved in the sorting and release of CHIKV at the apical domain of polarized cells. Disruption of host cell myosin II, microtubule and microfilament networks did not disrupt the polarized release of CHIKV. However, treatment with tunicamycin resulted in a bi-directional release of CHIKV, suggesting that N-glycans of CHIKV envelope glycoproteins could serve as apical sorting signals. PMID:24587455

  15. Effect of dust particle polarization on scattering processes in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kodanova, S. K.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bastykova, N. Kh.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.

    2015-06-15

    Screened interaction potentials in dusty plasmas taking into account the polarization of dust particles have been obtained. On the basis of screened potentials scattering processes for ion-dust particle and dust particle-dust particle pairs have been studied. In particular, the scattering cross section is considered. The scattering processes for which the dust grain polarization is unimportant have been found. The effect of zero angle dust particle-dust particle scattering is predicted.

  16. Peak polarity overturn for charged particles in laser ablation process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Ji, Y. J.; Lai, X. M.; Bian, B. M.; Li, Z. H.

    2006-07-01

    The charged particles emitted during laser ablation off a brass target are detected using a metal probe in air. A special phenomenon is found in the recorded signals: following a giant electromagnetic peak observed immediately after the emission of the pulsed laser, a minor peak occurs whose polarity merely depends on the distance between the probe and the laser focal spot on the target. Under the condition of our experiment, the overturn point is 1.47 mm, i.e., the minor peak remains negative when the probe distance is less than 1.47 mm; it becomes positive while the probe is set at a distance beyond 1.47 mm. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the overturn that takes the flight behavior of the charged particles both in plasma and propagating shock wave into consideration.

  17. Neurotypic cell attachment and growth on III-nitride lateral polarity structures.

    PubMed

    Bain, L E; Kirste, R; Johnson, C A; Ghashghaei, H T; Collazo, R; Ivanisevic, A

    2016-01-01

    III-nitride materials have recently received increasing levels of attention for their potential to successfully interface with, and sense biochemical interactions in biological systems. Expanding on available sensing schemes (including transistor-based devices,) a III-N lateral polarity structure capable of introducing quasi-phase matching through a periodic polarity grating presents a novel platform for second harmonic generation. This platform constitutes a non-linear optical phenomenon with exquisite sensitivity to the chemical state of a surface or interface. To characterize the response of a biological system to the nanostructured lateral polarity structures, we cultured neurotypic PC12 cells on AlGaN with varying ratios of Al:Ga - 0, 0.4, 0.6, and 1 - and on surfaces of varying pitch to the III-polar vs. N-polar grating - 5, 10, 20 and 50 μm. While some toxicity associated with increasing Al is observed, we documented and quantified trends in cell responses to the local material polarity and nanoscale roughness. The nitrogen-polar material has a significantly higher nanoscale roughness than III-polar regions, and a 80-200 nm step height difference between the III-polar and N-polar materials in the lateral polarity configuration generates adequate changes in topography to influence cell growth, improves cell adhesion and promotes cell migration along the direction of the features. As the designed material configuration is further explored for biochemical sensing, the lateral polarity scheme may provide a route in assessing the non-specific protein adsorption to this varying nano-topography that drives the subsequent cell response.

  18. Measurement of relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells by using the polarization microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, In Hee; Lee, Ji Yong; Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Dong Ju; Kim, Dug Young

    2007-02-01

    Bio-cells and tissues have intrinsic polarization characteristics, which are changed by external stimulus and internal metamorphosis in cells and tissues and some of the bio-cells and tissues have intrinsic birefringence characteristics, which are also changed by external stimulus and internal metamorphosis in cells and tissues. In this paper, we have developed the polarization microscope for measurement of relative phase which results from birefringence characteristics of materials with improved linear polarizing method and have measured relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells. From the measurement of the relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells, decrease of relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells was investigated as the elapse of time. In decrease of relative phase distribution, relative phase of cell membrane in onion epidermal cells decreased radically as compared with that of cytoplasm because decline of function in cell membrane that takes charge of matter transfer in onion epidermal cells has occurred.

  19. Role of the Polycystins in Cell Migration, Polarity, and Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Elisa Agnese; Castelli, Maddalena; Boletta, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKD) is a class of disorders characterized by ciliary dysfunction and, therefore, belonging to the ciliopathies. The prototype CKD is autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), whose mutated genes encode for two membrane-bound proteins, polycystin-1 (PC-1) and polycystin-2 (PC-2), of unknown function. Recent studies on CKD-associated genes identified new mechanisms of morphogenesis that are central for establishment and maintenance of proper renal tubular diameter. During embryonic development in the mouse and lower vertebrates a convergent-extension (CE)-like mechanism based on planar cell polarity (PCP) and cellular intercalation is involved in “sculpting” the tubules into a narrow and elongated shape. Once the appropriate diameter is established, further elongation occurs through oriented cell division (OCD). The polycystins (PCs) regulate some of these essential processes. In this review we summarize recent work on the role of PCs in regulating cell migration, the cytoskeleton, and front-rear polarity. These important properties are essential for proper morphogenesis of the renal tubules and the lymphatic vessels. We highlight here several open questions and controversies. Finally, we try to outline some of the next steps required to study these processes and their relevance in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26529018

  20. Bioinspired Polarization Imaging Sensors: From Circuits and Optics to Signal Processing Algorithms and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    York, Timothy; Powell, Samuel B.; Gao, Shengkui; Kahan, Lindsey; Charanya, Tauseef; Saha, Debajit; Roberts, Nicholas W.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Marshall, Justin; Achilefu, Samuel; Lake, Spencer P.; Raman, Baranidharan; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent work on bioinspired polarization imaging sensors and their applications in biomedicine. In particular, we focus on three different aspects of these sensors. First, we describe the electro–optical challenges in realizing a bioinspired polarization imager, and in particular, we provide a detailed description of a recent low-power complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) polarization imager. Second, we focus on signal processing algorithms tailored for this new class of bioinspired polarization imaging sensors, such as calibration and interpolation. Third, the emergence of these sensors has enabled rapid progress in characterizing polarization signals and environmental parameters in nature, as well as several biomedical areas, such as label-free optical neural recording, dynamic tissue strength analysis, and early diagnosis of flat cancerous lesions in a murine colorectal tumor model. We highlight results obtained from these three areas and discuss future applications for these sensors. PMID:26538682

  1. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Erica M.; Vijayraghavan, Deepthi; Davidson, Lance A.; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE) movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs. PMID:25596276

  2. 10.6% Certified Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Solvent-Polarity-Engineered Halide Passivation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xinzheng; Voznyy, Oleksandr; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Liu, Mengxia; Xu, Jixian; Proppe, Andrew H; Walters, Grant; Fan, Fengjia; Tan, Hairen; Liu, Min; Yang, Zhenyu; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-07-13

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells are solution-processed photovoltaics with broad spectral absorption tunability. Major advances in their efficiency have been made via improved CQD surface passivation and device architectures with enhanced charge carrier collection. Herein, we demonstrate a new strategy to improve further the passivation of CQDs starting from the solution phase. A cosolvent system is employed to tune the solvent polarity in order to achieve the solvation of methylammonium iodide (MAI) and the dispersion of hydrophobic PbS CQDs simultaneously in a homogeneous phase, otherwise not achieved in a single solvent. This process enables MAI to access the CQDs to confer improved passivation. This, in turn, allows for efficient charge extraction from a thicker photoactive layer device, leading to a certified solar cell power conversion efficiency of 10.6%, a new certified record in CQD photovoltaics.

  3. 10.6% Certified Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Solvent-Polarity-Engineered Halide Passivation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xinzheng; Voznyy, Oleksandr; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Liu, Mengxia; Xu, Jixian; Proppe, Andrew H; Walters, Grant; Fan, Fengjia; Tan, Hairen; Liu, Min; Yang, Zhenyu; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-07-13

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells are solution-processed photovoltaics with broad spectral absorption tunability. Major advances in their efficiency have been made via improved CQD surface passivation and device architectures with enhanced charge carrier collection. Herein, we demonstrate a new strategy to improve further the passivation of CQDs starting from the solution phase. A cosolvent system is employed to tune the solvent polarity in order to achieve the solvation of methylammonium iodide (MAI) and the dispersion of hydrophobic PbS CQDs simultaneously in a homogeneous phase, otherwise not achieved in a single solvent. This process enables MAI to access the CQDs to confer improved passivation. This, in turn, allows for efficient charge extraction from a thicker photoactive layer device, leading to a certified solar cell power conversion efficiency of 10.6%, a new certified record in CQD photovoltaics. PMID:27351104

  4. A self-propelled particle model with experimentally quantified cell polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passucci, Giuseppe; Brasch, Megan E.; Deakin, Nicholas O.; Turner, Christopher E.; Henderson, James H.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled particle (SPP) models have been used extensively to study collective cell motion, but they do not always accurately capture the long-time behavior observed in experiments. Furthermore, the equation for polarization in these models is not experimentally well-constrained. Therefore we developed a novel method for quantifying polarization in Hs578T breast carcinoma cells in a wound healing geometry. During cell movement, the nucleus orients toward the anterior of a cell while the Golgi body orients towards the posterior; we simultaneously imaged and tracked the Golgi and nuclei and constructed a polarization vector defined by the Golgi-nuclei axis. We find that cells in the bulk are not highly polarized, while those on the edge are highly polarized outward perpendicular to the wound edge. We also study the temporal correlations between a cell's internal polarization determined by the Golgi-nuclei axis and the polarization of its motion determined from nuclei displacements. We incorporate these polarization dynamics into a SPP model, and compare wound healing and long-time diffusion in the model to the experiments. These SPP equations can also be coarse-grained to generate a continuum model.

  5. Polarized epithelial cells secrete matriptase as a consequence of zymogen activation and HAI-1-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Tseng, I-Chu; Chou, Feng-Pai; Chen, Ya-Wen; Fulton, Amy; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Chen, Cheng-Jueng; Johnson, Michael D.; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Matriptase, a transmembrane serine protease, is broadly expressed by, and crucial for the integrity of, the epithelium. Matriptase is synthesized as a zymogen and undergoes autoactivation to become an active protease that is immediately inhibited by, and forms complexes with, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI-1). To investigate where matriptase is activated and how it is secreted in vivo, we determined the expression and activation status of matriptase in seminal fluid and urine and the distribution and subcellular localization of the protease in the prostate and kidney. The in vivo studies revealed that while the latent matriptase is localized at the basolateral surface of the ductal epithelial cells of both organs, only matriptase-HAI-1 complexes and not latent matriptase are detected in the body fluids, suggesting that activation, inhibition, and transcytosis of matriptase would have to occur for the secretion of matriptase. These complicated processes involved in the in vivo secretion were also observed in polarized Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. The cells target latent matriptase to the basolateral plasma membrane where activation, inhibition, and secretion of matriptase appear to take place. However, a proportion of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but not the latent matriptase, appears to undergo transcytosis to the apical plasma membrane for secretion. When epithelial cells lose their polarity, they secrete both latent and activated matriptase. Although most epithelial cells retain very low levels of matriptase-HAI-1 complex by rapidly secreting the complex, gastric chief cells may activate matriptase and store matriptase-HAI-1 complexes in the pepsinogen-secretory granules, suggesting an intracellular activation and regulated secretion in these cells. Taken together, while zymogen activation and closely coupled HAI-1-mediated inhibition are common features for matriptase regulation, the cellular location of matriptase activation and

  6. Cell spreading as a hydrodynamic process

    PubMed Central

    Fardin, M.A.; Rossier, O.M.; Rangamani, P.; Avigan, P.D.; Gauthier, N.C.; Vonnegut, W.; Mathur, A.; Hone, J.; Iyengar, R.; Sheetz, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Many cell types have the ability to move themselves by crawling on extra-cellular matrices. Although cell motility is governed by actin and myosin filament assembly, the pattern of the movement follows the physical properties of the network ensemble average. The first step of motility, cell spreading on matrix substrates, involves a transition from round cells in suspension to polarized cells on substrates. Here we show that the spreading dynamics on 2D surfaces can be described as a hydrodynamic process. In particular, we show that the transition from isotropic spreading at early time to anisotropic spreading is reminiscent of the fingering instability observed in many spreading fluids. During cell spreading, the main driving force is the polymerization of actin filaments that push the membrane forward. From the equilibrium between the membrane force and the cytoskeleton, we derive a first order expression of the polymerization stress that reproduces the observed behavior. Our model also allows an interpretation of the effects of pharmacological agents altering the polymerization of actin. In particular we describe the influence of Cytochalasin D on the nucleation of the fingering instability. PMID:23908673

  7. Solar cell module lamination process

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Aceves, Randy C.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

  8. The BASL Polarity Protein Controls a MAPK Signaling Feedback Loop in Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Pengcheng; Shao, Wanchen; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Dong, Juan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell polarization is linked to fate determination during asymmetric division of plant stem cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In Arabidopsis, BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL) is polarized to control stomatal asymmetric division. A MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE (MAPK) cascade determines terminal stomatal fate by promoting the degradation of the lineage determinant SPEECHLESS (SPCH). Here we demonstrate that a positive feedback loop between BASL and the MAPK pathway constitutes a polarity module at the cortex. Cortical localization of BASL requires phosphorylation mediated by MPK3/6. Phosphorylated BASL functions as a scaffold and recruits the MAPKKK YODA and MPK3/6 to spatially concentrate signaling at the cortex. Activated MPK3/6 reinforces the feedback loop by phosphorylating BASL, and inhibits stomatal fate by phosphorylating SPCH. Polarization of the BASL-MAPK signaling feedback module represents a mechanism connecting cell polarity to fate differentiation during asymmetric stem cell division in plants. PMID:25843888

  9. PrPC Undergoes Basal to Apical Transcytosis in Polarized Epithelial MDCK Cells.

    PubMed

    Arkhipenko, Alexander; Syan, Sylvie; Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Lebreton, Stéphanie; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The Prion Protein (PrP) is an ubiquitously expressed glycosylated membrane protein attached to the external leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI). While the misfolded PrPSc scrapie isoform is the infectious agent of prion disease, the cellular isoform (PrPC) is an enigmatic protein with unclear function. Of interest, PrP localization in polarized MDCK cells is controversial and its mechanism of trafficking is not clear. Here we investigated PrP traffic in MDCK cells polarized on filters and in three-dimensional MDCK cysts, a more physiological model of polarized epithelia. We found that, unlike other GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs), PrP undergoes basolateral-to-apical transcytosis in fully polarized MDCK cells. Following this event full-length PrP and its cleavage fragments are segregated in different domains of the plasma membrane in polarized cells in both 2D and 3D cultures. PMID:27389581

  10. PrPC Undergoes Basal to Apical Transcytosis in Polarized Epithelial MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arkhipenko, Alexander; Syan, Sylvie; Victoria, Guiliana Soraya

    2016-01-01

    The Prion Protein (PrP) is an ubiquitously expressed glycosylated membrane protein attached to the external leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI). While the misfolded PrPSc scrapie isoform is the infectious agent of prion disease, the cellular isoform (PrPC) is an enigmatic protein with unclear function. Of interest, PrP localization in polarized MDCK cells is controversial and its mechanism of trafficking is not clear. Here we investigated PrP traffic in MDCK cells polarized on filters and in three-dimensional MDCK cysts, a more physiological model of polarized epithelia. We found that, unlike other GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs), PrP undergoes basolateral-to-apical transcytosis in fully polarized MDCK cells. Following this event full-length PrP and its cleavage fragments are segregated in different domains of the plasma membrane in polarized cells in both 2D and 3D cultures. PMID:27389581

  11. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Its application to the Space Shuttle external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, O. E., Jr.; Jones, C. S., III; Munafo, A. P.; Wilson, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    The technical history of the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process being introduced as a partial replacement for the gas shielded tungsten arc process in assembly welding of the space shuttle external tank is described. Interim results of the weld strength qualification studies, and plans for further work on the implementation of the VPPA process are included.

  12. Comparisons of polar processing diagnostics from 34 years of the ERA-Interim and MERRA reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Z. D.; Manney, G. L.; Minschwaner, K.; Santee, M. L.; Lambert, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive comparison of polar processing diagnostics derived from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim). We use diagnostics that focus on meteorological conditions related to stratospheric chemical ozone loss based on temperatures, polar vortex dynamics, and air parcel trajectories to evaluate the effects these reanalyses might have on polar processing studies. Our results show that the agreement between MERRA and ERA-Interim changes significantly over the 34 years from 1979 through 2013 in both hemispheres, and in many cases improves. By comparing our diagnostics during five time periods when an increasing number of higher quality observations were brought into these reanalyses, we show how changes in the data assimilation systems (DAS) of MERRA and ERA-Interim affected their meteorological data. Many of our stratospheric temperature diagnostics show a convergence toward significantly better agreement, in both hemispheres, after 2001 when Aqua and GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) radiances were introduced into the DAS. Other diagnostics, such as the winter mean volume of air with temperatures below polar stratospheric cloud formation thresholds (VPSC) and some diagnostics of polar vortex size and strength, do not show improved agreement between the two reanalyses in recent years when data inputs into the DAS were more comprehensive. The polar processing diagnostics calculated from MERRA and ERA-Interim agree much better than those calculated from earlier reanalysis datasets. We still, however, see fairly large relative biases in many of the diagnostics in years prior to 2002, raising the possibility that the choice of one reanalysis over another could significantly influence the results of polar processing studies. After 2002, we see

  13. Comparisons of polar processing diagnostics from 34 years of the ERA-Interim and MERRA reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Z. D.; Manney, G. L.; Minschwaner, K.; Santee, M. L.; Lambert, A.

    2015-04-01

    We present a comprehensive comparison of polar processing diagnostics derived from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim). We use diagnostics that focus on meteorological conditions related to stratospheric chemical ozone loss based on temperatures, polar vortex dynamics, and air parcel trajectories to evaluate the effects these reanalyses might have on polar processing studies. Our results show that the agreement between MERRA and ERA-Interim changes significantly over the 34 years from 1979 to 2013 in both hemispheres and in many cases improves. By comparing our diagnostics during five time periods when an increasing number of higher-quality observations were brought into these reanalyses, we show how changes in the data assimilation systems (DAS) of MERRA and ERA-Interim affected their meteorological data. Many of our stratospheric temperature diagnostics show a convergence toward significantly better agreement, in both hemispheres, after 2001 when Aqua and GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) radiances were introduced into the DAS. Other diagnostics, such as the winter mean volume of air with temperatures below polar stratospheric cloud formation thresholds (VPSC) and some diagnostics of polar vortex size and strength, do not show improved agreement between the two reanalyses in recent years when data inputs into the DAS were more comprehensive. The polar processing diagnostics calculated from MERRA and ERA-Interim agree much better than those calculated from earlier reanalysis data sets. We still, however, see fairly large differences in many of the diagnostics in years prior to 2002, raising the possibility that the choice of one reanalysis over another could significantly influence the results of polar processing studies. After 2002, we see overall

  14. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Christie A.; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M.; Werrett, Melissa V.; Wright, Phillip J.; Simpson, Peter V.; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Lay, Peter A.; Massi, Massimiliano; Brooks, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  15. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Bader, Christie A; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M; Werrett, Melissa V; Wright, Phillip J; Simpson, Peter V; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Lay, Peter A; Massi, Massimiliano; Plush, Sally E; Brooks, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  16. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain–delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. PMID:24876254

  17. Features of the processes of ion heating in polar boundary of the night auroral oval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunin, Dmitriy; Lutsenko, Volt; Romantsova, Tatiana; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Moiseenko, Irina

    Investigation of the processes of ion heating in polar boundary of the night auroral oval measured by INTERBALL-2 (Auroral probe) is presented. Measurements of particles and waves were made on altitude about 20000 км. Feature of the orbits was the satellite slid along auroral oval and stay long time in the auroral zone. It were cases chosen when the polar boundary moved and passed through satellite. Particular attention is given to ions heating at this border and to ion heating position in relation to polar boundary of particle precipitation.

  18. Proceedings of a Workshop on Polar Stratospheric Clouds: Their Role in Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P. (Editor); Mcmaster, L. R. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The potential role of polar stratospheric clouds in atmospheric processes was assessed. The observations of polar stratospheric clouds with the Nimbus 7 SAM II satellite experiment were reviewed and a preliminary analysis of their formation, impact on other remote sensing experiments, and potential impact on climate were presented. The potential effect of polar stratospheric clouds on climate, radiation balance, atmospheric dynamics, stratospheric chemistry and water vapor budget, and cloud microphysics was assessed. Conclusions and recommendations, a synopsis of materials and complementary material to support those conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  19. Novel role for the midbody in primary ciliogenesis by polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bernabé-Rubio, Miguel; Andrés, Germán; Casares-Arias, Javier; Fernández-Barrera, Jaime; Rangel, Laura; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Gershlick, David C; Fernández, José J; Millán, Jaime; Correas, Isabel; Miguez, David G; Alonso, Miguel A

    2016-08-01

    The primary cilium is a membrane protrusion that is crucial for vertebrate tissue homeostasis and development. Here, we investigated the uncharacterized process of primary ciliogenesis in polarized epithelial cells. We show that after cytokinesis, the midbody is inherited by one of the daughter cells as a remnant that initially locates peripherally at the apical surface of one of the daughter cells. The remnant then moves along the apical surface and, once proximal to the centrosome at the center of the apical surface, enables cilium formation. The physical removal of the remnant greatly impairs ciliogenesis. We developed a probabilistic cell population-based model that reproduces the experimental data. In addition, our model explains, solely in terms of cell area constraints, the various observed transitions of the midbody, the beginning of ciliogenesis, and the accumulation of ciliated cells. Our findings reveal a biological mechanism that links the three microtubule-based organelles-the midbody, the centrosome, and the cilium-in the same cellular process. PMID:27458130

  20. New circular polarization selective surface concepts based on the Pierrot cell using printed circuit technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Humberto Israel

    This M.A.Sc. thesis focuses on finding an alternative method of constructing a circular polarization selective surface (CPSS) based on the Pierrot cell using the standard printed circuit technology. This technique uses a folded flexible substrate, which enables the implementation of the 3D Pierrot cells on a single metal layer defined with precision printed circuit board techniques, without the need for metalized via holes. Different topologies of the CPSS are analyzed in order to make the CPSS more efficient in terms of bandwidth and independence on the direction of propagation of the incident wave. A left-hand CPSS is designed to illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach. The first approach is a simple Pierrot unit cell CPSS which is optimized to have good reflection and transmission coefficients. A prototype is built and then characterized in a test bench operating in the K-band. For the fabricated prototype, the transmission coefficients of plane waves at normal incidence in the right-hand and the left-hand circular polarizations are --0.48 dB and --24 dB respectively. The bandwidth for which the transmission coefficient of the incident left-handed incident wave is greater than --3 dB was of 17.6%. These results are in good agreement with simulations results obtained with HFSS. A second variant considered is a Pierrot cell with a series load in the middle segment. With this cell it is possible to equalize the frequencies giving a better operation in the right- and left-handed circular polarized waves. There is an improvement for the co-pol to cross-pol ratio for the RHCP waves of 10 dB at 20 GHz. The added load does not affect the performance for the left-hand circular polarization, as expected. The third modification is a Pierrot cell at 90 degrees. This cell is designed to allow the combination of two Pierrot cells working at different frequencies on the same substrate in order to increase the frequency bandwidth of the CPSS. Unfortunately, the axial

  1. Terrestrial photovoltaic cell process testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper examines critical test parameters, criteria for selecting appropriate tests, and the use of statistical controls and test patterns to enhance PV-cell process test results. The coverage of critical test parameters is evaluated by examining available test methods and then screening these methods by considering the ability to measure those critical parameters which are most affected by the generic process, the cost of the test equipment and test performance, and the feasibility for process testing.

  2. Prickle1 stunts limb growth through alteration of cell polarity and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt/PCP signaling plays a critical role in multiple developmental processes, including limb development. Wnt5a, a ligand of the PCP pathway, signals through the Ror2/Vangl2 or the Vangl2/Ryk complex to regulate limb development along the proximal-distal axis in mice. Based on the interaction between Van Gogh and Prickle in Drosophila, we hypothesized the vertebrate Prickle1 have similar function as Vangl2 in limb development. Results We show Prickle1 is expressed in the skeletal condensates that will differentiate into chondrocytes and later form bones. Disrupted Prickle1 function in Prickle1C251X/C251X mouse mutants alters expression of genes such as Bmp4, Fgf8, Vangl2 and Wnt5a. These expression changes correlate with shorter and wider bones in the limbs and loss of one phalangeal segment in digits 2-5 of Prickle1C251X mutants. These growth defects along the proximal-distal axis are also associated with increased cell death in the growing digit tip, reduced cell death in the interdigital membrane and disrupted chondrocyte polarity. Conclusions We suggest Prickle1 is part of the Wnt5a/PCP signaling, regulating cell polarity and affecting expression of multiple factors to stunt limb growth through altered patterns of gene expression, including the PCP genes Wnt5a and Vangl2. PMID:23913870

  3. Dishevelled is essential for neural connectivity and planar cell polarity in planarians.

    PubMed

    Almuedo-Castillo, Maria; Saló, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2011-02-15

    The Wingless/Integrated (Wnt) signaling pathway controls multiple events during development and homeostasis. It comprises multiple branches, mainly classified according to their dependence on β-catenin activation. The Wnt/β-catenin branch is essential for the establishment of the embryonic anteroposterior (AP) body axis throughout the phylogenetic tree. It is also required for AP axis establishment during planarian regeneration. Wnt/β-catenin-independent signaling encompasses several different pathways, of which the most extensively studied is the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which is responsible for planar polarization of cell structures within an epithelial sheet. Dishevelled (Dvl) is the hub of Wnt signaling because it regulates and channels the Wnt signal into every branch. Here, we analyze the role of Schmidtea mediterranea Dvl homologs (Smed-dvl-1 and Smed-dvl-2) using gene silencing. We demonstrate that in addition to a role in AP axis specification, planarian Dvls are involved in at least two different β-catenin-independent processes. First, they are essential for neural connectivity through Smed-wnt5 signaling. Second, Smed-dvl-2, together with the S. mediterranea homologs of Van-Gogh (Vang) and Diversin (Div), is required for apical positioning of the basal bodies of epithelial cells. These data represent evidence not only of the function of the PCP network in lophotrocozoans but of the involvement of the PCP core elements Vang and Div in apical positioning of the cilia.

  4. Selective functionalization of nanofiber scaffolds to regulate salivary gland epithelial cell proliferation and polarity.

    PubMed

    Cantara, Shraddha I; Soscia, David A; Sequeira, Sharon J; Jean-Gilles, Riffard P; Castracane, James; Larsen, Melinda

    2012-11-01

    Epithelial cell types typically lose apicobasal polarity when cultured on 2D substrates, but apicobasal polarity is required for directional secretion by secretory cells, such as salivary gland acinar cells. We cultured salivary gland epithelial cells on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofiber scaffolds that mimic the basement membrane, a specialized extracellular matrix, and examined cell proliferation and apicobasal polarization. Although cells proliferated on nanofibers, chitosan-coated nanofiber scaffolds stimulated proliferation of salivary gland epithelial cells. Although apicobasal cell polarity was promoted by the nanofiber scaffolds relative to flat surfaces, as determined by the apical localization of ZO-1, it was antagonized by the presence of chitosan. Neither salivary gland acinar nor ductal cells fully polarized on the nanofiber scaffolds, as determined by the homogenous membrane distribution of the mature tight junction marker, occludin. However, nanofiber scaffolds chemically functionalized with the basement membrane protein, laminin-111, promoted more mature tight junctions, as determined by apical localization of occludin, but did not affect cell proliferation. To emulate the multifunctional capabilities of the basement membrane, bifunctional PLGA nanofibers were generated. Both acinar and ductal cell lines responded to signals provided by bifunctional scaffolds coupled to chitosan and laminin-111, demonstrating the applicability of such scaffolds for epithelial cell types.

  5. High performance single step co-fired solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC): Polarization measurements and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kyung Joong

    At present, one of the major obstacles for the commercialization of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems is their high manufacturing costs expressed in terms of SOFC system cost per unit power ($/kW). In this work, anode-supported planar SOFCs were fabricated by a cost-competitive single step co-firing process. The cells were comprised of a porous Ni + yittria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode support, a porous-fine-grained Ni + YSZ anode active layer for some experiments, a dense YSZ electrolyte, a porous-fine-grained Ca-doped LaMnO3 (LCM) + YSZ cathode active layer, and a porous LCM cathode current collector layer. The fabrication process involved tape casting or high shear compaction (HSC) of the anode support followed by screen printing of the remaining component layers. The cells were then co-fired at 1300˜1340°C for 2 hours. The performance of the cell fabricated with the tape casting anode was improved by minimizing various polarization losses through experimental and theoretical modeling approaches, and the maximum power density of 1.5 W/cm 2 was obtained at 800°C with humidified hydrogen (3% H2O) and air. The cells were also tested with various compositions of humidified hydrogen (3˜70% H2O) to simulate the effect of practical fuel utilization on the cell performance. Based on these measurements, an analytical model describing anodic reactions was developed to understand reaction kinetics and rate limiting steps. The cell performance at high fuel utilization was significantly improved by increasing the number of the reaction sites near the anode-electrolyte interface. For anode substrate fabrication, the HSC process offers many advantages such as low fabrication costs, high production throughput, and good control of shrinkage and thickness over the conventional tape casting process. HSC process was successfully employed in single step co-firing process, and SOFCs fabricated with HSC anodes showed adequate performance both at low and high fuel

  6. Novel Strategy for Tracking the Microbial Degradation of Azo Dyes with Different Polarities in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Xu, Meiying; Chen, Xingjuan; Yang, Yonggang; Wang, Haiji; Sun, Guoping

    2015-10-01

    Direct visualization evidence is important for understanding the microbial degradation mechanisms. To track the microbial degradation pathways of azo dyes with different polar characterizations, sensors based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from 1,8-naphthalimide to azo dyes were synthesized, in which the quenched fluorescence will recover when the azo bond was cleaved. In living cells, the sensor-tracking experiment showed that the low polarity and hydrophobic azo dye can be taken up into the cells and reduced inside the cells, whereas the high polarity and hydrophilic azo dye can be reduced only outside the cells because of the selective permeability of the cell membranes. These results indicated that there were two different bacterial degradation pathways available for different polarity azo dyes. To our knowledge, no fluorescent sensor has yet been designed for illuminating the microbial degradation mechanisms of organic pollutants with different characteristics.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates hypoxic cancer cells induced m2-polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Shrivastava, R; Tripathi, C; Jain, N K; Tewari, B N; Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kumar, V; Misra, S; Bhadauria, S; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-09-12

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), represent a major subpopulation of tumor infiltrating immune cells. These alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages are well known for their pro-tumor functions. Owing to their established role in potentiating tumor-neovasculogenesis and metastasis, TAMs have emerged as promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. One of the key TAMs related phenomenon that is amenable to therapeutic intervention is their phenotype switching into alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages. Hindering macrophage polarization towards a pro-tumor M2 phenotype, or better still reprogramming the M2 like TAMs towards M1 subtype is being considered a beneficial anti-cancer strategy. Hypoxic tumor milieu has been proposed as one of the most plausible factor governing M2-polarization of macrophages. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic tumor cells imparted a pro—angiogenic M2 skewed phenotype to macrophages. Furthermore, sizeable body of data indicates for participation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage polarization. Concordantly, inhibition of COX-2 is associated with impaired macrophage polarization. Prompted by this in the current study we decided to explore if inhibition of COX-2 activity via chemical inhibitors may prevent hypoxic cancer cell induced M2-polarization of macrophages. We observed that treatment with Flunixin meglumine, an established preferential inhibitor of COX-2 activity markedly inhibited hypoxic cancer cell induced of M2-polarization of macrophages thereby indicating for usage of COX-2 inhibition as possible anti-cancer treatment modality.

  8. AmotL2 disrupts apical-basal cell polarity and promotes tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Mojallal, Mahdi; Zheng, Yujuan; Hultin, Sara; Audebert, Stéphane; van Harn, Tanja; Johnsson, Per; Lenander, Claes; Fritz, Nicolas; Mieth, Christin; Corcoran, Martin; Lembo, Frédérique; Hallström, Marja; Hartman, Johan; Mazure, Nathalie M; Weide, Thomas; Grandér, Dan; Borg, Jean-Paul; Uhlén, Per; Holmgren, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity is essential for the functionality of glandular epithelia. Cell polarity is often lost in advanced tumours correlating with acquisition of invasive and malignant properties. Despite extensive knowledge regarding the formation and maintenance of polarity, the mechanisms that deregulate polarity in metastasizing cells remain to be fully characterized. Here we show that AmotL2 expression correlates with loss of tissue architecture in tumours from human breast and colon cancer patients. We further show that hypoxic stress results in activation of c-Fos-dependent expression of AmotL2 leading to loss of polarity. c-Fos/hypoxia-induced p60 AmotL2 interacts with the Crb3 and Par3 polarity complexes retaining them in large vesicles and preventing them from reaching the apical membrane. The resulting loss of polarity potentiates the response to invasive cues in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data provide a molecular mechanism how hypoxic stress deregulates cell polarity during tumour progression. PMID:25080976

  9. Processing Polarity: How the Ungrammatical Intrudes on the Grammatical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasishth, Shravan; Brussow, Sven; Lewis, Richard L.; Drenhaus, Heiner

    2008-01-01

    A central question in online human sentence comprehension is, "How are linguistic relations established between different parts of a sentence?" Previous work has shown that this dependency resolution process can be computationally expensive, but the underlying reasons for this are still unclear. This article argues that dependency resolution is…

  10. Enhanced plasmid DNA utilization in transiently transfected CHO-DG44 cells in the presence of polar solvents.

    PubMed

    Rajendra, Yashas; Balasubramanian, Sowmya; Kiseljak, Divor; Baldi, Lucia; Wurm, Florian M; Hacker, David L

    2015-01-01

    Although the protein yields from transient gene expression (TGE) with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have recently improved, the amount of plasmid DNA (pDNA) needed for transfection remains relatively high. We describe a strategy to reduce the pDNA amount by transfecting CHO-DG44 cells with 0.06 μg pDNA/10(6) cells (10% of the optimal amount) in the presence of nonspecific (filler) DNA and various polar solvents including dimethylsufoxide, dimethyl formamide, acetonitrile, dimethyl acetamide (DMA), and hexamethyl phosphoramide (HMP). All of the polar solvents with the exception of HMP increased the production of a recombinant antibody in comparison to the untreated control transfection. In the presence of 0.25% DMA, the antibody yield in a 7-day batch culture was 500 mg/L. This was fourfold higher than the yield from the untreated control transfection. Mechanistic studies revealed that the polar solvents did not affect polyethylenimine-mediated pDNA delivery into cells or nuclei. The steady-state transgene mRNA level was elevated in the presence of each of the polar solvents tested, while the transgene mRNA half-life remained the same. These results indicated that the polar solvents enhanced transgene transcription. When screening a panel of recombinant antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins for production in the presence of the polar solvents, the highest increase in yield was observed following DMA addition for 11 of the 12 proteins. These results are expected to enhance the applicability of high-yielding TGE processes with CHO-DG44 cells by decreasing the amount of pDNA required for transfection.

  11. Cell shape, spreading symmetry and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model, and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments. PMID:20458358

  12. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  13. Identification of Genes Required for Normal Pheromone-Induced Cell Polarization in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, J.; Valtz, N.; Herskowitz, I.

    1994-01-01

    In response to mating pheromones, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae adopt a polarized ``shmoo'' morphology, in which the cytoskeleton and proteins involved in mating are localized to a cell-surface projection. This polarization is presumed to reflect the oriented morphogenesis that occurs between mating partners to facilitate cell and nuclear fusion. To identify genes involved in pheromone-induced cell polarization, we have isolated mutants defective in mating to an enfeebled partner and studied a subset of these mutants. The 34 mutants of interest are proficient for pheromone production, arrest in response to pheromone, mate to wild-type strains, and exhibit normal cell polarity during vegetative growth. The mutants were divided into classes based on their morphological responses to mating pheromone. One class is unable to localize cell-surface growth in response to mating factor and instead enlarges in a uniform manner. These mutants harbor special alleles of genes required for cell polarization during vegetative growth, BEM1 and CDC24. Another class of mutants forms bilobed, peanut-like shapes when treated with pheromone and defines two genes, PEA1 and PEA2. PEA1 is identical to SPA2. A third class forms normally shaped but tiny shmoos and defines the gene TNY1. A final group of mutants exhibits apparently normal shmoo morphology. The nature of their mating defect is yet to be determined. We discuss the possible roles of these gene products in establishing cell polarity during mating. PMID:8013906

  14. Airway epithelial cell-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 triggers skewed CD8(+) T cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-Yong; Huang, Shao-hong; Li, Yun; Chen, Hui-guo; Rong, Jian; Ye, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Skewed CD8(+) T cell responses are important in airway inflammation. This study investigates the role of the airway epithelial cell-derived insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) in contributing to CD8(+) T cell polarization. Expression of IGF1 in the airway epithelial cell line, RPMI2650 cells, was assessed by quantitative real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The role of IGF1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation was observed by coculture of mite allergen-primed RPMI2650 cells and naïve CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cell polarization was assessed by the carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-dilution assay and the determination of cytotoxic cytokine levels in the culture medium. Exposure to mite allergen, Der p1, increased the expression of IGF1 by RPMI2650 cells. The epithelial cell-derived IGF1 prevented the activation-induced cell death by inducing the p53 gene hypermethylation. Mite allergen-primed RPMI2650 cells induced an antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell polarization. We conclude that mite allergens induce airway epithelial cell line, RPMI2650 cells, to produce IGF1; the latter contributes to antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell polarization. PMID:24844927

  15. Wnt-Frizzled/planar cell polarity signaling: cellular orientation by facing the wind (Wnt).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingzi; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelial and mesenchymal cells is a critical, evolutionarily conserved process during development and organogenesis. Analyses in Drosophila and several vertebrate model organisms have contributed a wealth of information on the regulation of PCP. A key conserved pathway regulating PCP, the so-called core Wnt-Frizzled PCP (Fz/PCP) signaling pathway, was initially identified through genetic studies of Drosophila. PCP studies in vertebrates, most notably mouse and zebrafish, have identified novel factors in PCP signaling and have also defined cellular features requiring PCP signaling input. These studies have shifted focus to the role of Van Gogh (Vang)/Vangl genes in this molecular system. This review focuses on new insights into the core Fz/Vangl/PCP pathway and recent advances in Drosophila and vertebrate PCP studies. We attempt to integrate these within the existing core Fz/Vangl/PCP signaling framework.

  16. Laser processing of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, David E.

    2012-10-01

    Laser processing has a long history in the manufacturing of solar cells since most thin-film photovoltaic modules have been manufactured using laser scribing for more than thirty years. Lasers have also been used by many solar cell manufacturers for a variety of applications such as edge isolation, identification marking, laser grooving for selective emitters and cutting of silicon wafers and ribbons. In addition, several laser-processing techniques are currently being investigated for the production of new types of high performance silicon solar cells. There have also been research efforts on utilizing laser melting, laser annealing and laser texturing in the fabrication of solar cells. Recently, a number of manufacturers have been developing new generations of solar cells where they use laser ablation of dielectric layers to form selective emitters or passivated rear point contacts. Others have been utilizing lasers to drill holes through the silicon wafers for emitter-wrap-through or metal-wrap-through back-contact solar cells. Scientists at Fraunhofer ISE have demonstrated high efficiency silicon solar cells (21.7%) by using laser firing to form passivated rear point contacts in p-type silicon wafers. Investigators art both the University of Stuttgart and the University of New South Wales have produced high efficiency silicon solar cells using laser doping to form selective emitters, and some companies are now developing commercial products based on both laser doping and laser firing of contacts. The use of lasers in solar cell processing appears destined to grow given the advances that are continually being made in laser technology.

  17. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components. PMID:22935613

  18. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components.

  19. Alternative cell polarity behaviours arise from changes in G-protein spatial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ching-Shan; Moore, Travis I.; Nie, Qing; Yi, Tau-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Yeast cells form a single mating projection when exposed to mating pheromone, a classic example of cell polarity. Prolonged treatment with pheromone or specific mutations results in alternative cell polarity behaviours. The authors performed mathematical modelling to investigate these unusual cell morphologies from the perspective of balancing spatial amplification (i.e. positive feedback that localises components) with spatial tracking (i.e. negative feedback that allows sensing of gradient). First, they used generic models of cell polarity to explore different cell polarity behaviours that arose from changes in the model spatial dynamics. By exploring the positive and negative feedback loops in each stage of a two-stage model, they simulated a variety of cell morphologies including single bending projections, single straight projections, periodic multiple projections and simultaneous double projections. In the second half of the study, they used a two-stage mechanistic model of yeast cell polarity focusing on G-protein signalling to integrate the modelling results more closely with the authors’ previously published experimental observations. In summary, the combination of modelling and experiments describes how yeast cells exhibit a diversity of cell morphologies arising from two-stage G-protein signalling dynamics modulated by positive and negative feedbacks. PMID:26029251

  20. The Hippo pathway controls border cell migration through distinct mechanisms in outer border cells and polar cells of the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Huai; Yeh, Tsung-Han; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Yu, Jenn-Yah

    2014-11-01

    The Hippo pathway is a key signaling cascade in controlling organ size. The core components of this pathway are two kinases, Hippo (Hpo) and Warts (Wts), and a transcriptional coactivator, Yorkie (Yki). Yes-associated protein (YAP, a Yki homolog in mammals) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell migration in vitro. Here, we use border cells in the Drosophila ovary as a model to study Hippo pathway functions in cell migration in vivo. During oogenesis, polar cells secrete Unpaired (Upd), which activates JAK/STAT signaling of neighboring cells and specifies them into outer border cells. The outer border cells form a cluster with polar cells and undergo migration. We find that hpo and wts are required for migration of the border cell cluster. In outer border cells, overexpression of hpo disrupts polarization of the actin cytoskeleton and attenuates migration. In polar cells, knockdown of hpo and wts or overexpression of yki impairs border cell induction and disrupts migration. These manipulations in polar cells reduce JAK/STAT activity in outer border cells. Expression of upd-lacZ is increased and decreased in yki and hpo mutant polar cells, respectively. Furthermore, forced expression of upd in polar cells rescues defects of border cell induction and migration caused by wts knockdown. These results suggest that Yki negatively regulates border cell induction by inhibiting JAK/STAT signaling. Together, our data elucidate two distinct mechanisms of the Hippo pathway in controlling border cell migration: (1) in outer border cells, it regulates polarized distribution of the actin cytoskeleton; (2) in polar cells, it regulates upd expression to control border cell induction and migration.

  1. Cells must express components of the planar cell polarity system and extracellular matrix to support cytonemes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila dorsal air sac development depends on Decapentaplegic (Dpp) and Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) proteins produced by the wing imaginal disc and transported by cytonemes to the air sac primordium (ASP). Dpp and FGF signaling in the ASP was dependent on components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) system in the disc, and neither Dpp- nor FGF-receiving cytonemes extended over mutant disc cells that lacked them. ASP cytonemes normally navigate through extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen, laminin, Dally and Dally-like (Dlp) proteins that are stratified in layers over the disc cells. However, ECM over PCP mutant cells had reduced levels of laminin, Dally and Dlp, and whereas Dpp-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dally layer and required Dally (but not Dlp), FGF-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dlp layer, requiring Dlp (but not Dally). These findings suggest that cytonemes interact directly and specifically with proteins in the stratified ECM. PMID:27591355

  2. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of oligothiophene crystals to determine unit cell orientation.

    PubMed

    Heckel, John C; Weisman, Andrew L; Schneebeli, Severin T; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Sherry, Leif J; Stranahan, Sarah M; DuBay, Kateri H; Friesner, Richard A; Willets, Katherine A

    2012-06-28

    Raman spectra were recorded experimentally and calculated theoretically for bithiophene, terthiophene, and quaterthiophene samples as a function of excitation polarization. Distinct spectral signatures were assigned and correlated to the molecular/unit cell orientation as determined by X-ray diffraction. The ability to predict molecular/unit cell orientation within organic crystals using polarized Raman spectroscopy was evaluated by predicting the unit cell orientation in a simulated terthiophene crystal given a random set of simulated polarized Raman spectra. Polarized Raman spectroscopy offers a promising tool to quickly and economically determine the unit cell orientation in known organic crystals and crystalline thin films. Implications of our methodologies for studying individual molecule conformations are discussed.

  3. Polarization Sensitive THz TDS and Fabrication of Alignment Cells for Solution Phase THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Deepu Koshy

    sense that it makes use of the polarization state of THz pulse which is also the case for the alignment spectroscopy. PMOTS technique detects the rotation and change in ellipticity to the incident polarization from which the hall coefficients of the sample can be calculated. The final section deals with the fabrication of Dynamical Alignment Terahertz Spectroscopy cells for solution phase measurements. Design, fabrication and process optimization are detailed. Micro-fabrication based on optical lithography and SU-8 negative photoresist has been explored.

  4. Autoreactive T cell responses show proinflammatory polarization in diabetes but a regulatory phenotype in health

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Sefina; Tree, Timothy I.; Astill, Thomas P.; Tremble, Jennifer M.; Bishop, Amanda J.; Dayan, Colin M.; Roep, Bart O.; Peakman, Mark

    2004-01-01

    According to the quality of response they mediate, autoreactive T cells recognizing islet β cell peptides could represent both disease effectors in the development of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and directors of tolerance in nondiabetic individuals or those undergoing preventative immunotherapy. A combination of the rarity of these cells, inadequate technology, and poorly defined epitopes, however, has hampered examination of this paradigm. We have identified a panel of naturally processed islet epitopes by direct elution from APCs bearing HLA-DR4. Employing these epitopes in a sensitive, novel cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay, we show that the quality of autoreactive T cells in patients with T1DM exhibits extreme polarization toward a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrate that rather than being unresponsive, the majority of nondiabetic, HLA-matched control subjects also manifest a response against islet peptides, but one that shows extreme T regulatory cell (Treg, IL-10–secreting) bias. We conclude that development of T1DM depends on the balance of autoreactive Th1 and Treg cells, which may be open to favorable manipulation by immune intervention. PMID:14755342

  5. A quest for the mechanism regulating global planar cell polarity of tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Mlodzik, Marek

    2009-07-01

    Most epithelial cells, besides their ubiquitous apical-basal polarity, are polarized within the plane of the epithelium, which is called planar cell polarity (PCP). Using Drosophila as a model, meaningful progress has been made in the identification of key PCP factors and the dissection of their intracellular molecular interactions. The long-range, global aspects of coordinated polarization and the overlying regulatory mechanisms that create the initial polarity direction have, however, remained elusive. Several recent publications have outlined potential mechanisms of how the global regulation of PCP might be controlled and how the distinct core factor groups might interact via frizzled, Van Gogh or flamingo. This review focuses on these exciting features and attempts to provide an integrated picture of these recent and novel insights.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  7. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10230.001 PMID:26568310

  8. Wg and Wnt4 provide long-range directional input to planar cell polarity orientation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mlodzik, Marek

    2013-09-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is cellular polarity within the plane of an epithelial tissue or organ. PCP is established through interactions of the core Frizzled (Fz)/PCP factors and, although their molecular interactions are beginning to be understood, the upstream input providing the directional bias and polarity axis remains unknown. Among core PCP genes, Fz is unique as it regulates PCP both cell-autonomously and non-autonomously, with its extracellular domain acting as a ligand for Van Gogh (Vang). We demonstrate in Drosophila melanogaster wings that Wg (Wingless) and dWnt4 (Drosophila Wnt homologue) provide instructive regulatory input for PCP axis determination, establishing polarity axes along their graded distribution and perpendicular to their expression domain borders. Loss-of-function studies reveal that Wg and dWnt4 act redundantly in PCP determination. They affect PCP by modulating the intercellular interaction between Fz and Vang, which is thought to be a key step in setting up initial polarity, thus providing directionality to the PCP process.

  9. Wg and Wnt4 provide long-range directional input to planar cell polarity orientation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mlodzik, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is cellular polarity within the plane of an epithelial tissue or organ. PCP is established through interactions of the core Frizzled(Fz)/PCP factors and although their molecular interactions are beginning to be understood, the upstream input providing directional bias/polarity axis remains unknown. Among core PCP genes, Fz is unique as it regulates PCP both cell-autonomously and non-autonomously, with the extra-cellular domain of Fz acting as a ligand for Van-Gogh (Vang). We demonstrate in Drosophila wings that Wg and dWnt4 provide instructive regulatory input for PCP axis determination, establishing polarity axes along their graded distribution and perpendicular to their expression domain borders. Loss-of-function studies reveal that Wg/dWnt4 act redundantly in PCP determination. They affect PCP by modulating the intercellular interaction between Fz and Vang, which is thought to be a key step in setting up initial polarity, thus providing directionality to the PCP process. PMID:23912125

  10. Control of vertebrate core planar cell polarity protein localization and dynamics by Prickle 2

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Mitchell T.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a ubiquitous property of animal tissues and is essential for morphogenesis and homeostasis. In most cases, this fundamental property is governed by a deeply conserved set of ‘core PCP’ proteins, which includes the transmembrane proteins Van Gogh-like (Vangl) and Frizzled (Fzd), as well as the cytoplasmic effectors Prickle (Pk) and Dishevelled (Dvl). Asymmetric localization of these proteins is thought to be central to their function, and understanding the dynamics of these proteins is an important challenge in developmental biology. Among the processes that are organized by the core PCP proteins is the directional beating of cilia, such as those in the vertebrate node, airway and brain. Here, we exploit the live imaging capabilities of Xenopus to chart the progressive asymmetric localization of fluorescent reporters of Dvl1, Pk2 and Vangl1 in a planar polarized ciliated epithelium. Using this system, we also characterize the influence of Pk2 on the asymmetric dynamics of Vangl1 at the cell cortex, and we define regions of Pk2 that control its own localization and those impacting Vangl1. Finally, our data reveal a striking uncoupling of Vangl1 and Dvl1 asymmetry. This study advances our understanding of conserved PCP protein functions and also establishes a rapid, tractable platform to facilitate future in vivo studies of vertebrate PCP protein dynamics. PMID:26293301

  11. Polarity determination in breast tissue: Desmosomal adhesion, myoepit helial cells, and laminin 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J.; Bilder, David

    2003-06-05

    In all epithelial organs, apicobasal polarity determines functional integrity and contributes to the maintenance of tissue and organ specificity. In the breast, the functional unit is a polar double-layered tube consisting of luminal epithelial cells surrounded by myoepithelial cells and a basement membrane. It is far from clear how this double-layered structure is established and how polarity is maintained. Two recent papers have shed some light onto this intriguing problem in mammary gland biology. The results point to desmosomes and laminin 1 as having crucial roles. However, some questions remain.

  12. Active self-polarization of contractile cells in asymmetrically shaped domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, A.; Safran, S. A.

    2007-08-01

    Mechanical forces generated by contractile cells allow the cells to sense their environment and to interact with other cells. By locally pulling on their environment, cells can sense and respond to mechanical features such as the local stress (or strain), the shape of a cellular domain, and the surrounding rigidity; at the same time, they also modify the mechanical state of the system. This creates a mechanical feedback loop that can result in self-polarization of cells. In this paper, we present a quantitative mechanical model that predicts the self-polarization of cells in spheroidally shaped domains, comprising contractile cells and an elastic matrix, that are embedded in a three-dimensional, cell-free gel. The theory is based on a generalization of the known results for passive inclusions in solids to include the effects of cell activity. We use the active cellular susceptibility tensor presented by Zemel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 128103 (2006)] to calculate the polarization response and hence the elastic stress field developed by the cells in the cellular domain. The cell polarization is analyzed as a function of the shape and the elastic moduli of the cellular domain compared with the cell-free surrounding material. Consistent with experiment, our theory predicts the development of a stronger contractile force for cells in a gel that is surrounded by a large, cell-free material whose elastic modulus is stiffer than that of the gel that contains the cells. This provides a quantitative explanation of the differences in the development of cellular forces as observed in free and fixed gels. In the case of an asymmetrically shaped (spheroidal) domain of cells, we show that the anisotropic elastic field within the domain leads to a spontaneous self-polarization of the cells along the long axis of the domain.

  13. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  14. Video image processing greatly enhances contrast, quality, and speed in polarization-based microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Video cameras with contrast and black level controls can yield polarized light and differential interference contrast microscope images with unprecedented image quality, resolution, and recording speed. The theoretical basis and practical aspects of video polarization and differential interference contrast microscopy are discussed and several applications in cell biology are illustrated. These include: birefringence of cortical structures and beating cilia in Stentor, birefringence of rotating flagella on a single bacterium, growth and morphogenesis of echinoderm skeletal spicules in culture, ciliary and electrical activity in a balancing organ of a nudibranch snail, and acrosomal reaction in activated sperm. PMID:6788777

  15. Video image processing greatly enhances contrast, quality, and speed in polarization-based microscopy.

    PubMed

    Inoué, S

    1981-05-01

    Video cameras with contrast and black level controls can yield polarized light and differential interference contrast microscope images with unprecedented image quality, resolution, and recording speed. The theoretical basis and practical aspects of video polarization and differential interference contrast microscopy are discussed and several applications in cell biology are illustrated. These include: birefringence of cortical structures and beating cilia in Stentor, birefringence of rotating flagella on a single bacterium, growth and morphogenesis of echinoderm skeletal spicules in culture, ciliary and electrical activity in a balancing organ of a nudibranch snail, and acrosomal reaction in activated sperm. PMID:6788777

  16. Theoretical estimate on tensor-polarization asymmetry in proton-deuteron Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, S.; Song, Qin-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Tensor-polarized parton distribution functions are new quantities in spin-1 hadrons such as the deuteron, and they could probe new quark-gluon dynamics in hadron and nuclear physics. In charged-lepton deep inelastic scattering, they are studied by the twist-2 structure functions b1 and b2. The HERMES Collaboration found unexpectedly large b1 values compared to a naive theoretical expectation based on the standard deuteron model. The situation should be significantly improved in the near future by an approved experiment to measure b1 at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). There is also an interesting indication in the HERMES result that finite antiquark tensor polarization exists. It could play an important role in solving a mechanism on tensor structure in the quark-gluon level. The tensor-polarized antiquark distributions are not easily determined from the charged-lepton deep inelastic scattering; however, they can be measured in a proton-deuteron Drell-Yan process with a tensor-polarized deuteron target. In this article, we estimate the tensor-polarization asymmetry for a possible Fermilab Main-Injector experiment by using optimum tensor-polarized parton distribution functions to explain the HERMES measurement. We find that the asymmetry is typically a few percent. If it is measured, it could probe new hadron physics, and such studies could create an interesting field of high-energy spin physics. In addition, we find that a significant tensor-polarized gluon distribution should exist due to Q2 evolution, even if it were zero at a low Q2 scale. The tensor-polarized gluon distribution has never been observed, so it is an interesting future project.

  17. Myosin Id is required for planar cell polarity in ciliated tracheal and ependymal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hegan, Peter S; Ostertag, Eric; Geurts, Aron M; Mooseker, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    In wild type (WT) tracheal epithelial cells, ciliary basal bodies are oriented such that all cilia on the cell surface beat in the same upward direction. This precise alignment of basal bodies and, as a result, the ciliary axoneme, is termed rotational planar cell polarity (PCP). Rotational PCP in the multi-ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea is perturbed in rats lacking myosin Id (Myo1d). Myo1d is localized in the F-actin and basal body rich subapical cortex of the ciliated tracheal epithelial cell. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of Myo1d knock out (KO) trachea revealed that the unidirectional bending pattern is disrupted. Instead, cilia splay out in a disordered, often radial pattern. Measurement of the alignment axis of the central pair axonemal microtubules was much more variable in the KO, another indicator that rotational PCP is perturbed. The asymmetric localization of the PCP core protein Vangl1 is lost. Both the velocity and linearity of cilia-driven movement of beads above the tracheal mucosal surface was impaired in the Myo1d KO. Multi-ciliated brain ependymal epithelial cells exhibit a second form of PCP termed translational PCP in which basal bodies and attached cilia are clustered at the anterior side of the cell. The precise asymmetric clustering of cilia is disrupted in the ependymal cells of the Myo1d KO rat. While basal body clustering is maintained, left-right positioning of the clusters is lost.

  18. The Hippo pathway polarizes the actin cytoskeleton during collective migration of Drosophila border cells.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Eliana P; Khanal, Ichha; Gaspar, Pedro; Fletcher, Georgina C; Polesello, Cedric; Tapon, Nicolas; Thompson, Barry J

    2013-06-10

    Collective migration of Drosophila border cells depends on a dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is highly polarized such that it concentrates around the outer rim of the migrating cluster of cells. How the actin cytoskeleton becomes polarized in these cells to enable collective movement remains unknown. Here we show that the Hippo signaling pathway links determinants of cell polarity to polarization of the actin cytoskeleton in border cells. Upstream Hippo pathway components localize to contacts between border cells inside the cluster and signal through the Hippo and Warts kinases to polarize actin and promote border cell migration. Phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki)/YAP by Warts does not mediate the function of this pathway in promoting border cell migration, but rather provides negative feedback to limit the speed of migration. Instead, Warts phosphorylates and inhibits the actin regulator Ena to activate F-actin Capping protein activity on inner membranes and thereby restricts F-actin polymerization mainly to the outer rim of the migrating cluster.

  19. Plasma membrane protein polarity and trafficking in RPE cells: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Guillermo L.; Benedicto, Ignacio; Philp, Nancy J.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) comprises a monolayer of polarized pigmented epithelial cells that is strategically interposed between the neural retina and the fenestrated choroid capillaries. The RPE performs a variety of vectorial transport functions (water, ions, metabolites, nutrients and waste products) that regulate the composition of the subretinal space and support the functions of photoreceptors (PRs) and other cells in the neural retina. To this end, RPE cells display a polarized distribution of channels, transporters and receptors in their plasma membrane (PM) that is remarkably different from that found in conventional extra-ocular epithelia, e.g. intestine, kidney, and gall bladder. This characteristic PM protein polarity of RPE cells depends on the interplay of sorting signals in the RPE PM proteins and sorting mechanisms and biosynthetic/recycling trafficking routes in the RPE cell. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the RPE trafficking machinery, most available data have been obtained from immortalized RPE cell lines that only partially maintain the RPE phenotype and by extrapolation of data obtained in the prototype Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. The increasing availability of RPE cell cultures that more closely resemble the RPE in vivo together with the advent of advanced live imaging microscopy techniques provides a platform and an opportunity to rapidly expand our understanding of how polarized protein trafficking contributes to RPE PM polarity. PMID:25152359

  20. Cdc42-dependent Modulation of Tight Junctions and Membrane Protein Traffic in Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Raul; Ruiz, Wily G.; Leung, Som-Ming; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Apodaca, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cells maintain the asymmetric composition of their apical and basolateral membrane domains by at least two different processes. These include the regulated trafficking of macromolecules from the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway to the appropriate membrane domain and the ability of the tight junction to prevent free mixing of membrane domain-specific proteins and lipids. Cdc42, a Rho family GTPase, is known to govern cellular polarity and membrane traffic in several cell types. We examined whether this protein regulated tight junction function in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and pathways that direct proteins to the apical and basolateral surface of these cells. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells that expressed dominant-active or dominant-negative mutants of Cdc42 under the control of a tetracycline-repressible system. Here we report that expression of dominant-active Cdc42V12 or dominant-negative Cdc42N17 altered tight junction function. Expression of Cdc42V12 slowed endocytic and biosynthetic traffic, and expression of Cdc42N17 slowed apical endocytosis and basolateral to apical transcytosis but stimulated biosynthetic traffic. These results indicate that Cdc42 may modulate multiple cellular pathways required for the maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. PMID:11514615

  1. Establishing and maintaining cell polarity with mRNA localization in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Justinn; Yakovlev, Konstantin V.; Shidlovskii, Yulii; Schedl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    How cell polarity is established and maintained is an important question in diverse biological contexts. Molecular mechanisms used to localize polarity proteins to distinct domains are likely context-dependent and provide a feedback loop in order to maintain polarity. One such mechanism is the localized translation of mRNAs encoding polarity proteins, which will be the focus of this review and may play a more important role in the establishment and maintenance of polarity than is currently known. Localized translation of mRNAs encoding polarity proteins can be used to establish polarity in response to an external signal, and to maintain polarity by local production of polarity determinants. The importance of this mechanism is illustrated by recent findings, including orb2-dependent localized translation of aPKC mRNA at the apical end of elongating spermatid tails in the Drosophila testis, and the apical localization of stardust A mRNA in Drosophila follicle and embryonic epithelia. PMID:26773560

  2. Regulation of cell polarity determinants by the Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Payankaulam, Sandhya; Yeung, Kelvin; McNeill, Helen; Henry, R. William; Arnosti, David N.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their canonical roles in the cell cycle, RB family proteins regulate numerous developmental pathways, although the mechanisms remain obscure. We found that Drosophila Rbf1 associates with genes encoding components of the highly conserved apical–basal and planar cell polarity pathways, suggesting a possible regulatory role. Here, we show that depletion of Rbf1 in Drosophila tissues is indeed associated with polarity defects in the wing and eye. Key polarity genes aPKC, par6, vang, pk, and fmi are upregulated, and an aPKC mutation suppresses the Rbf1-induced phenotypes. RB control of cell polarity may be an evolutionarily conserved function, with important implications in cancer metastasis. PMID:26971715

  3. Regulation of cell polarity determinants by the Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Payankaulam, Sandhya; Yeung, Kelvin; McNeill, Helen; Henry, R William; Arnosti, David N

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their canonical roles in the cell cycle, RB family proteins regulate numerous developmental pathways, although the mechanisms remain obscure. We found that Drosophila Rbf1 associates with genes encoding components of the highly conserved apical-basal and planar cell polarity pathways, suggesting a possible regulatory role. Here, we show that depletion of Rbf1 in Drosophila tissues is indeed associated with polarity defects in the wing and eye. Key polarity genes aPKC, par6, vang, pk, and fmi are upregulated, and an aPKC mutation suppresses the Rbf1-induced phenotypes. RB control of cell polarity may be an evolutionarily conserved function, with important implications in cancer metastasis. PMID:26971715

  4. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Process: Its Application to the Space Shuttle External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Wilson, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes progress in the implementation of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process at the External Tank (ET) assembly facility. Design allowable data has been developed for thicknesses up to 1.00 in. More than 24,000 in. of welding on liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen cylinders has been made without an internal defect.

  5. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  6. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M.

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  7. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  8. Radially polarized annular beam generated through a second-harmonic-generation process.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunichi; Kozawa, Yuichi

    2009-10-15

    A radially polarized beam with an annular intensity pattern was generated through a second-harmonic-generation process by focusing an azimuthally polarized Ti:sapphire pulsed laser beam to a c-cut beta-barium borate (BBO) crystal. The annular intensity pattern of the second-harmonic wave had a nearly sixfold symmetry as a result of the nonlinear susceptibility tensor of the BBO crystal. The width of the annulus was as narrow as less than 1/40th of its radius.

  9. TWF process cell throughput study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.L.

    1992-02-28

    The TWF will prepare transuranic (TRU) waste for permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). WH MP's early participation in the TWF project included the installation and testing of a WPC mockup (using the conceptual design). Operating experience indicated significant improvements could be made in the WPC scheme, so we conducted a process cell equipment study with Equipment Engineering to identify better equipment and methods (ref. 4). The results of that study were used to construct the WPC computer simulation model.

  10. Real time polarization sensor image processing on an embedded FPGA/multi-core DSP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednara, Marcus; Chuchacz-Kowalczyk, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    Most embedded image processing SoCs available on the market are highly optimized for typical consumer applications like video encoding/decoding, motion estimation or several image enhancement processes as used in DSLR or digital video cameras. For non-consumer applications, on the other hand, optimized embedded hardware is rarely available, so often PC based image processing systems are used. We show how a real time capable image processing system for a non-consumer application - namely polarization image data processing - can be efficiently implemented on an FPGA and multi-core DSP based embedded hardware platform.

  11. Human eccrine sweat gland cells reconstitute polarized spheroids when subcutaneously implanted with Matrigel in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Liyun; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Bingna

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that maintenance of cell polarity plays a pivotal role in the regulation of glandular homeostasis and function. We examine the markers for polarity at different time points to investigate the formation of cell polarity during 3D reconstitution of eccrine sweat glands. Mixtures of eccrine sweat gland cells and Matrigel were injected subcutaneously into the inguinal regions of nude mice. At 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks post-implantation, Matrigel plugs were removed and immunostained for basal collagen IV, lateral β-catenin, lateroapical ZO-1 and apical F-actin. The results showed that the cell polarity of the spheroids appeared in sequence. Formation of basal polarity was prior to lateral, apical and lateroapical polarity. Collagen IV was detected basally at 2 weeks, β-catenin laterally and ZO-1 lateroapically at 3 weeks, and F-actin apically at 4 weeks post-implantation. At week 5 and week 6, the localization and the positive percentage of collagen IV, β-catenin, ZO-1 or F-actin in spheroids was similar to that in native eccrine sweat glands. We conclude that the reconstituted 3D eccrine sweat glands are functional or potentially functional. PMID:27492422

  12. Polar delivery in plants; commonalities and differences to animal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Urszula; Fendrych, Matyáš; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Although plant and animal cells use a similar core mechanism to deliver proteins to the plasma membrane, their different lifestyle, body organization and specific cell structures resulted in the acquisition of regulatory mechanisms that vary in the two kingdoms. In particular, cell polarity regulators do not seem to be conserved, because genes encoding key components are absent in plant genomes. In plants, the broad knowledge on polarity derives from the study of auxin transporters, the PIN-FORMED proteins, in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In animals, much information is provided from the study of polarity in epithelial cells that exhibit basolateral and luminal apical polarities, separated by tight junctions. In this review, we summarize the similarities and differences of the polarization mechanisms between plants and animals and survey the main genetic approaches that have been used to characterize new genes involved in polarity establishment in plants, including the frequently used forward and reverse genetics screens as well as a novel chemical genetics approach that is expected to overcome the limitation of classical genetics methods. PMID:24740985

  13. Regulation of cochlear convergent extension by the vertebrate planar cell polarity pathway is dependent on p120-catenin.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Ren, Dongdong; Reynolds, Albert B; Chi, Fanglu; Chen, Ping

    2012-03-01

    The vertebrate planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway consists of conserved PCP and ciliary genes. During development, the PCP pathway regulates convergent extension (CE) and uniform orientation of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. It is not clear how these diverse morphogenetic processes are regulated by a common set of PCP genes. Here, we show that cellular contacts and geometry change drastically and that the dynamic expression of N-cadherin and E-cadherin demarcates sharp boundaries during cochlear extension. The conditional knockout of a component of the adherens junctions, p120-catenin, leads to the reduction of E-cadherin and N-cadherin and to characteristic cochlear CE defects but not misorientation of hair cells. The specific CE defects in p120-catenin mutants are in contrast to associated CE and hair cell misorientation defects observed in common PCP gene mutants. Moreover, the loss-of-function of a conserved PCP gene, Vangl2, alters the dynamic distribution of N-cadherin and E-cadherin in the cochlea and causes similar abnormalities in cellular morphology to those found in p120-catenin mutants. Conversely, we found that Pcdh15 interacts genetically with PCP genes to regulate the formation of polar hair bundles, but not CE defects in the cochlea. Together, these results indicate that the vertebrate PCP pathway regulates CE and hair cell polarity independently and that a p120-catenin-dependent mechanism regulates CE of the cochlea. PMID:22318628

  14. Dynamics of Cdc42 network embodies a Turing-type mechanism of yeast cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Goryachev, Andrew B; Pokhilko, Alexandra V

    2008-04-30

    Complex biochemical networks can be understood by identifying their principal regulatory motifs and mode of action. We model the early phase of budding yeast cellular polarization and show that the biochemical processes in the presumptive bud site comprise a Turing-type mechanism. The roles of the prototypical activator and substrate are played by GTPase Cdc42 in its active and inactive states, respectively. We demonstrate that the nucleotide cycling of Cdc42 converts cellular energy into a stable cluster of activated Cdc42. This energy drives a continuous membrane-cytoplasmic exchange of the cluster components to counteract diffusive spread of the cluster. This exchange explains why only one bud forms per cell cycle, because the winner-takes-all competition of candidate sites inevitably selects a single site. PMID:18381072

  15. Azimuthal asymmetries in single polarized proton-proton Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhun; Ma Boqiang; Zhu Jiacai

    2011-10-01

    We study the azimuthal asymmetries in proton-proton Drell-Yan processes with one incident proton being transversely or longitudinally polarized. We consider particularly the asymmetries contributed by the leading-twist chiral-odd quark distributions. We analyze the asymmetries with sin(2{phi}+{phi}{sub S}) and sin(2{phi}-{phi}{sub S}) modulations in transverse single polarized p{sup {up_arrow}p} Drell-Yan and sin2{phi} asymmetries in longitudinal single polarized p{sup {yields}p} Drell-Yan at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, E906 (Fermi Lab), and the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research). We show that the measurements of the asymmetries in those facilities can provide valuable information of the chiral-odd structure of the nucleon both in the valence and sea regions.

  16. Climatic anomalous patterns associated with the Arctic and Polar cell strength variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Wu, Kaijun; Leung, Jeremy Cheuk-Hin

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic cell as a reversed and closed loop next to the Polar cell has been recently revealed in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). In this paper, we study the interannual variability of the Arctic and Polar cell strengths during 1979-2012, and their influence on surface air temperature (SAT), precipitation, and sea-ice concentration (SIC) at mid- and high-latitudes of the NH. We show that there is a significant negative correlation between the Arctic and Polar cell strengths. Both the Arctic and Polar cell strengths can well indicate the recurring climatic anomalies of SAT, precipitation, and SIC in their extreme winters. The surface large-scale cold-warm and dry-wet anomalous patterns in these extreme winters are directly linked with the vertical structure of height and temperature anomalies in the troposphere. Results suggest that the past climatic anomalies are better indicated by the strength anomalies of the Polar and Arctic cells than the traditional indices of mid-high latitude pattern such as the Arctic Oscillation and North Atlantic Oscillation. This study illustrates a three-dimensional picture of atmospheric variable anomalies in the troposphere that result in surface climatic anomalies.

  17. Diacylglycerol kinase α establishes T cell polarity by shaping diacylglycerol accumulation at the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Anne; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Bantilan, Niels S; Koretzky, Gary A; Huse, Morgan

    2014-08-26

    Polarization of the T cell microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) to the immunological synapse between the T cell and an antigen-presenting cell (APC) maintains the specificity of T cell effector responses by enabling directional secretion toward the APC. The reorientation of the MTOC is guided by a sharp gradient of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG), which is centered at the immunological synapse. We used a single-cell photoactivation approach to demonstrate that diacylglycerol kinase α (DGK-α), which catalyzes the conversion of DAG to phosphatidic acid, determined T cell polarity by limiting the diffusion of DAG. DGK-α-deficient T cells exhibited enlarged accumulations of DAG at the immunological synapse, as well as impaired reorientation of the MTOC. In contrast, T cells lacking the related isoform DGK-ζ did not display polarization defects. We also found that DGK-α localized preferentially to the periphery of the immunological synapse, suggesting that it constrained the area over which DAG accumulated. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity was required for the peripheral localization pattern of DGK-α, which suggests a link between DAG and phosphatidylinositol signaling during T cell activation. These results reveal a previously unappreciated function of DGK-α and provide insight into the mechanisms that determine lymphocyte polarity.

  18. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  19. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells.

    PubMed

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A; Davidson, Michael W; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T; Mahadevan, L; Shah, Jagesh V

    2016-02-01

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues.

  20. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells

    PubMed Central

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V.; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T.; Mahadevan, L.; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues. PMID:26764383

  1. Neogenin and RGMa control neural tube closure and neuroepithelial morphology by regulating cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Kee, Nigel; Wilson, Nicole; De Vries, Melissa; Bradford, DanaKai; Key, Brian; Cooper, Helen M

    2008-11-26

    In humans, neural tube closure defects occur in 1:1000 pregnancies. The design of new strategies for the prevention of such common defects would benefit from an improved understanding of the molecular events underlying neurulation. Neural fold elevation is a key morphological process that acts during neurulation to drive neural tube closure. However, to date, the molecular pathways underpinning neural fold elevation have not been elucidated. Here, we use morpholino knock-down technology to demonstrate that Repulsive Guidance Molecule (RGMa)-Neogenin interactions are essential for effective neural fold elevation during Xenopus neurulation and that loss of these molecules results in disrupted neural tube closure. We demonstrate that Neogenin and RGMa are required for establishing the morphology of deep layer cells in the neural plate throughout neurulation. We also show that loss of Neogenin severely disrupts the microtubule network within the deep layer cells suggesting that Neogenin-dependent microtubule organization within the deep cells is essential for radial intercalation with the overlying superficial cell layer, thereby driving neural fold elevation. In addition, we show that sustained Neogenin activity is also necessary for the establishment of the apicobasally polarized pseudostratified neuroepithelium of the neural tube. Therefore, our study identifies a novel signaling pathway essential for radial intercalation and epithelialization during neural fold elevation and neural tube morphogenesis.

  2. Par-aPKC-dependent and -independent mechanisms cooperatively control cell polarity, Hippo signaling, and cell positioning in 16-cell stage mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Hirate, Yoshikazu; Hirahara, Shino; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Niwa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    In preimplantation mouse embryos, the Hippo signaling pathway plays a central role in regulating the fates of the trophectoderm (TE) and the inner cell mass (ICM). In early blastocysts with more than 32 cells, the Par-aPKC system controls polarization of the outer cells along the apicobasal axis, and cell polarity suppresses Hippo signaling. Inactivation of Hippo signaling promotes nuclear accumulation of a coactivator protein, Yap, leading to induction of TE-specific genes. However, whether similar mechanisms operate at earlier stages is not known. Here, we show that slightly different mechanisms operate in 16-cell stage embryos. Similar to 32-cell stage embryos, disruption of the Par-aPKC system activated Hippo signaling and suppressed nuclear Yap and Cdx2 expression in the outer cells. However, unlike 32-cell stage embryos, 16-cell stage embryos with a disrupted Par-aPKC system maintained apical localization of phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (p-ERM), and the effects on Yap and Cdx2 were weak. Furthermore, normal 16-cell stage embryos often contained apolar cells in the outer position. In these cells, the Hippo pathway was strongly activated and Yap was excluded from the nuclei, thus resembling inner cells. Dissociated blastomeres of 8-cell stage embryos form polar-apolar couplets, which exhibit different levels of nuclear Yap, and the polar cell engulfed the apolar cell. These results suggest that cell polarization at the 16-cell stage is regulated by both Par-aPKC-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Asymmetric cell division is involved in cell polarity control, and cell polarity regulates cell positioning and most likely controls Hippo signaling.

  3. Light-emitting liquid-crystal cells with polarization switching function: Electrochemiluminescent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michinori; Horiuchi, Takao; Nose, Toshiaki

    2009-07-01

    A unique light-emitting liquid-crystal (LC) cell that emits polarized light is developed by an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) method; sandwich-type LC cells filled with a nematic LC doped with an organic fluorescent dye are constructed. Luminance and current density characteristics as a function of an applied voltage are investigated under different sample preparation conditions such as mixing temperature and time. It is shown that luminance strongly depends on the abovementioned conditions. From the results of ECL and photoluminescent measurements, we conclude that a significant increase in luminance by heating is attributed to an increase in the molecularly dissolved rubrene concentration. Furthermore, attempts were made to develop a dynamic polarization switch by introducing a pair of crossed interdigitated electrodes. As a result, although a not so high polarization ratio smaller than 2 was obtained, the polarization direction of the emitted light was switched by changing the direction of the in-plane electric field.

  4. Polarized distribution of IQGAP proteins in gastric parietal cells and their roles in regulated epithelial cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rihong; Guo, Zhen; Watson, Charles; Chen, Emily; Kong, Rong; Wang, Wenxian; Yao, Xuebiao

    2003-03-01

    Actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in the establishment of epithelial cell polarity. Cdc42, a member of Rho GTPase family, modulates actin dynamics via its regulators, such as IQGAP proteins. Gastric parietal cells are polarized epithelial cells in which regulated acid secretion occurs in the apical membrane upon stimulation. We have previously shown that actin isoforms are polarized to different membrane domains and that the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton is essential for acid secretion. Herein, we show that Cdc42 is preferentially distributed to the apical membrane of gastric parietal cells. In addition, we revealed that two Cdc42 regulators, IQGAP1 and IQGAP2, are present in gastric parietal cells. Interestingly, IQGAP2 is polarized to the apical membrane of the parietal cells, whereas IQGAP1 is mainly distributed to the basolateral membrane. An IQGAP peptide that competes with full-length IQGAP proteins for Cdc42-binding in vitro also inhibits acid secretion in streptolysin-O-permeabilized gastric glands. Furthermore, this peptide disrupts the association of IQGAP and Cdc42 with the apical actin cytoskeleton and prevents the apical membrane remodeling upon stimulation. We propose that IQGAP2 forms a link that associates Cdc42 with the apical cytoskeleton and thus allows for activation of polarized secretion in gastric parietal cells.

  5. Polarity Protein Complex Scribble/Lgl/Dlg and Epithelial Cell Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen-Hui; Mruk, Dolores D.; Wong, Elissa W.P.; Lui, Wing-Yee; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The Scribble polarity complex or module is one of the three polarity modules that regulate cell polarity in multiple epithelia including blood-tissue barriers. This protein complex is composed of Scribble, Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) and Discs large (Dlg), which are well conserved across species from fruitflies and worms to mammals. Originally identified in Drosophila and C. elegans where the Scribble complex was found to work with the Par-based and Crumbs-based polarity modules to regulate apicobasal polarity and asymmetry in cells and tissues during embryogenesis, their mammalian homologs have all been identified in recent years. Components of the Scribble complex are known to regulate multiple cellular functions besides cell polarity, which include cell proliferation, assembly and maintenance of adherens junction (AJ) and tight junction (TJ), and they are also tumor suppressors. Herein, we provide an update on the Scribble polarity complex and how this protein complex modulates cell adhesion with some emphasis on its role in Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) function. It should be noted that this is a rapidly developing field, in particular the role of this protein module in blood-tissue barriers, and this short chapter attempts to provide the information necessary for investigators studying reproductive biology and blood-tissue barriers to design future studies. We also include results of recent studies from flies and worms since this information will be helpful in planning experiments for future functional studies in the testis to understand how Scribble-based proteins regulate BTB dynamics and spermatogenesis. PMID:23397623

  6. Distinct Integrin-Dependent Signals Define Requirements for Lytic Granule Convergence and Polarization in Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Orange, Jordan S.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic granules in natural killer (NK) cells represent a dangerous cargo that is targeted for secretion to destroy diseased cells. The appropriate management of these organelles enables the mounting of a precise and valuable host defense. The process of NK cell adhesion to a target cell through engagement of the integrin LFA-1 (lymphocyte function–associated antigen 1) promotes lytic granule organization through complex cellular mechanics and a signaling pathway characterized by Zhang et al. in this issue of Science Signaling. A limited, partially overlapping set of signaling molecules can be distinguished for their ability to promote the convergence of NK cell lytic granules on the microtubule organizing center and their polarization as they progress en masse toward the interface with a target cell. PMID:25292212

  7. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh. RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh. We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB’s function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  8. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB's function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB.

  9. A dynamic intracellular distribution of Vangl2 accompanies cell polarization during zebrafish gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Roszko, Isabelle; S. Sepich, Diane; Jessen, Jason R.; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2015-01-01

    During vertebrate gastrulation, convergence and extension movements elongate embryonic tissues anteroposteriorly and narrow them mediolaterally. Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is essential for mediolateral cell elongation underlying these movements, but how this polarity arises is poorly understood. We analyzed the elongation, orientation and migration behaviors of lateral mesodermal cells undergoing convergence and extension movements in wild-type zebrafish embryos and mutants for the Wnt/PCP core component Vangl2 (Trilobite). We demonstrate that Vangl2 function is required at the time when cells transition to a highly elongated and mediolaterally aligned body. vangl2 mutant cells fail to undergo this transition and to migrate along a straight path with high net speed towards the dorsal midline. Instead, vangl2 mutant cells exhibit an anterior/animal pole bias in cell body alignment and movement direction, suggesting that PCP signaling promotes effective dorsal migration in part by suppressing anterior/animalward cell polarity and movement. Endogenous Vangl2 protein accumulates at the plasma membrane of mesenchymal converging cells at the time its function is required for mediolaterally polarized cell behavior. Heterochronic cell transplantations demonstrated that Vangl2 cell membrane accumulation is stage dependent and regulated by both intrinsic factors and an extracellular signal, which is distinct from PCP signaling or other gastrulation regulators, including BMP and Nodals. Moreover, mosaic expression of fusion proteins revealed enrichment of Vangl2 at the anterior cell edges of highly mediolaterally elongated cells. These results demonstrate that the dynamic Vangl2 intracellular distribution is coordinated with and necessary for the changes in convergence and extension cell behaviors during gastrulation. PMID:26062934

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Soybean Leaf Abscission Identifies Transcriptional Regulators of Organ Polarity and Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joonyup; Yang, Jinyoung; Yang, Ronghui; Sicher, Richard C.; Chang, Caren; Tucker, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Abscission, organ separation, is a developmental process that is modulated by endogenous and environmental factors. To better understand the molecular events underlying the progression of abscission in soybean, an agriculturally important legume, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of RNA isolated from the leaf abscission zones (LAZ) and petioles (Non-AZ, NAZ) after treating stem/petiole explants with ethylene for 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. As expected, expression of several families of cell wall modifying enzymes and many pathogenesis-related (PR) genes specifically increased in the LAZ as abscission progressed. Here, we focus on the 5,206 soybean genes we identified as encoding transcription factors (TFs). Of the 5,206 TFs, 1,088 were differentially up- or down-regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ over time, and, within this group, 188 of the TFs were differentially regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ relative to the NAZ. These 188 abscission-specific TFs include several TFs containing domains for homeobox, MYB, Zinc finger, bHLH, AP2, NAC, WRKY, YABBY, and auxin-related motifs. To discover the connectivity among the TFs and highlight developmental processes that support organ separation, the 188 abscission-specific TFs were then clustered based on a >four-fold up- or down-regulation in two consecutive time points (i.e., 0 and 12 h, 12 and 24 h, 24 and 48 h, or 48 and 72 h). By requiring a sustained change in expression over two consecutive time intervals and not just one or several time intervals, we could better tie changes in TFs to a particular process or phase of abscission. The greatest number of TFs clustered into the 0 and 12 h group. Transcriptional network analysis for these abscission-specific TFs indicated that most of these TFs are known as key determinants in the maintenance of organ polarity, lateral organ growth, and cell fate. The abscission-specific expression of these TFs prior to the onset of abscission and their functional

  11. Tethering of ICAM on target cells is required for LFA-1-dependent NK cell adhesion and granule polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Catharina C.; Brzostowski, Joseph A.; Liu, Dongfang; Long, Eric O.

    2013-01-01

    αLβ2 integrin (LFA-1) has an important role in the formation of T cell and NK cell cytotoxic immunological synapses and in target cell killing. Binding of LFA-1 to ICAM on target cells promotes not only adhesion, but also polarization of cytolytic granules in NK cells. Here we tested whether LFA-1-dependent NK cell responses are regulated by the distribution and mobility of ICAM at the surface of target cells. We show that depolymerization of F-actin in NK-sensitive target cells abrogated LFA-1-dependent conjugate formation and granule polarization in primary NK cells. Degranulation, which is not controlled by LFA-1, was not impaired. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and particle tracking by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 were distributed in largely immobile clusters. ICAM clusters were maintained and became highly mobile after actin depolymerization. Moreover, reducing ICAM-2 mobility on an NK-resistant target cell through expression of ezrin, an adapter molecule that tethers proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, enhanced LFA-1-dependent adhesion and granule polarization. Finally, while NK cells kept moving over freely diffusible ICAM-1 on a lipid bilayer, they bound and spread over solid-phase ICAM-1. We conclude that tethering, rather than clustering of ICAM promotes proper signaling by LFA-1 in NK cells. Our findings suggest that the lateral diffusion of integrin ligands on cells may be an important determinant of susceptibility to lysis by cytotoxic lymphocytes. PMID:20675589

  12. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical–basal cell polarity modules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K.; Moya, Ivan M.; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B.; Halder, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical–basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non–cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non–cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation. PMID:25624491

  13. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation.

  14. Mechanisms of CDC-42 activation during contact-induced cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Emily; Nance, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    Polarization of early embryos provides a foundation to execute essential patterning and morphogenetic events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, cell contacts polarize early embryos along their radial axis by excluding the cortical polarity protein PAR-6 from sites of cell contact, thereby restricting PAR-6 to contact-free cell surfaces. Radial polarization requires the cortically enriched Rho GTPase CDC-42, which in its active form recruits PAR-6 through direct binding. The Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) PAC-1, which localizes specifically to cell contacts, triggers radial polarization by inactivating CDC-42 at these sites. The mechanisms responsible for activating CDC-42 at contact-free surfaces are unknown. Here, in an overexpression screen of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs), which can activate Rho GTPases, we identify CGEF-1 and ECT-2 as RhoGEFs that act through CDC-42 to recruit PAR-6 to the cortex. We show that ECT-2 and CGEF-1 localize to the cell surface and that removing their activity causes a reduction in levels of cortical PAR-6. Through a structure-function analysis, we show that the tandem DH-PH domains of CGEF-1 and ECT-2 are sufficient for GEF activity, but that regions outside of these domains target each protein to the cell surface. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting that the N-terminal region of ECT-2 may direct its in vivo preference for CDC-42 over another known target, the Rho GTPase RHO-1. We propose that radial polarization results from a competition between RhoGEFs, which activate CDC-42 throughout the cortex, and the RhoGAP PAC-1, which inactivates CDC-42 at cell contacts.

  15. ZDHHC7-mediated S-palmitoylation of Scribble regulates cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baoen; Zheng, Baohui; DeRan, Michael; Jarugumilli, Gopala K; Fu, Jianjun; Brooks, Yang S; Wu, Xu

    2016-09-01

    Scribble (SCRIB) is a tumor-suppressor protein, playing critical roles in establishing and maintaining epithelial cell polarity. SCRIB is frequently amplified in human cancers but does not localize properly to cell-cell junctions, suggesting that mislocalization of SCRIB disrupts its tumor-suppressive activities. Using chemical reporters, here we showed that SCRIB localization was regulated by S-palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues. Palmitoylation-deficient mutants of SCRIB were mislocalized, leading to disruption of cell polarity and loss of their tumor-suppressive activities to oncogenic YAP, MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways. We further found that ZDHHC7 was the major palmitoyl acyltransferase regulating SCRIB. Knockout of ZDHHC7 led to SCRIB mislocalization and YAP activation, and disruption of SCRIB's suppressive activities in HRas(V12)-induced cell invasion. In summary, we demonstrated that ZDHHC7-mediated SCRIB palmitoylation is critical for SCRIB membrane targeting, cell polarity and tumor suppression, providing new mechanistic insights of how dynamic protein palmitoylation regulates cell polarity and tumorigenesis.

  16. Polarized apical distribution of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in a renal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, M P; Sargiacomo, M; Graeve, L; Saltiel, A R; Rodriguez-Boulan, E

    1988-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cell monolayers contain two distinct plasma membrane domains as delineated by the presence of tight junctions--i.e., an apical surface that faces the external environment and a basolateral surface that functions both in cell-cell contact and cell-substrate attachment. Central to the understanding of epithelial cell polarity is the question of how such cell-surface specializations are generated. A different class of membrane glycoproteins has recently emerged that may yield new insight into the mechanism underlying the biogenesis of this polarity. Members of this class contain a large extracellular protein domain linked to the membrane via glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol. Using a polarized renal epithelial cell line (Madin-Darby canine kidney), we identified endogenous glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins through release by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Six glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins of 110, 85, 70, 55, 38, and 35 kDa were identified and appeared to be restricted to the apical surface. Our data are consistent with the notion that the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchor may contain the necessary information for "targeting" to the apical surface. Images PMID:2974157

  17. TWF process cell throughput study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.L.

    1992-02-28

    The TWF will prepare transuranic (TRU) waste for permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). WH&MP`s early participation in the TWF project included the installation and testing of a WPC mockup (using the conceptual design). Operating experience indicated significant improvements could be made in the WPC scheme, so we conducted a process cell equipment study with Equipment Engineering to identify better equipment and methods (ref. 4). The results of that study were used to construct the WPC computer simulation model.

  18. Cells must express components of the planar cell polarity system and extracellular matrix to support cytonemes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila dorsal air sac development depends on Decapentaplegic (Dpp) and Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) proteins produced by the wing imaginal disc and transported by cytonemes to the air sac primordium (ASP). Dpp and FGF signaling in the ASP was dependent on components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) system in the disc, and neither Dpp- nor FGF-receiving cytonemes extended over mutant disc cells that lacked them. ASP cytonemes normally navigate through extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen, laminin, Dally and Dally-like (Dlp) proteins that are stratified in layers over the disc cells. However, ECM over PCP mutant cells had reduced levels of laminin, Dally and Dlp, and whereas Dpp-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dally layer and required Dally (but not Dlp), FGF-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dlp layer, requiring Dlp (but not Dally). These findings suggest that cytonemes interact directly and specifically with proteins in the stratified ECM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18979.001 PMID:27591355

  19. Polarization birefringence measurements for characterizing the myocardium, including healthy, infarcted, and stem-cell-regenerated tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael F. G.; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Wallenburg, Marika A.; Li, Shu-Hong; Weisel, Richard D.; Wilson, Brian C.; Li, Ren-Ke; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2010-07-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to structural remodeling of the myocardium, in particular to the loss of cardiomyocytes due to necrosis and an increase in collagen with scar formation. Stem cell regenerative treatments have been shown to alter this remodeling process, resulting in improved cardiac function. As healthy myocardial tissue is highly fibrous and anisotropic, it exhibits optical linear birefringence due to the different refractive indices parallel and perpendicular to the fibers. Accordingly, changes in myocardial structure associated with infarction and treatment-induced remodeling will alter the anisotropy exhibited by the tissue. Polarization-based linear birefringence is measured on the myocardium of adult rat hearts after myocardial infarction and compared with hearts that had received mesenchymal stem cell treatment. Both point measurement and imaging data show a decrease in birefringence in the region of infarction, with a partial rebound back toward the healthy values following regenerative treatment with stem cells. These results demonstrate the ability of optical polarimetry to characterize the micro-organizational state of the myocardium via its measured anisotropy, and the potential of this approach for monitoring regenerative treatments of myocardial infarction.

  20. Identification of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling network: adding new regulatory players in plant stem cell maintenance and cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zermiani, Monica; Begheldo, Maura; Nonis, Alessandro; Palme, Klaus; Mizzi, Luca; Morandini, Piero; Nonis, Alberto; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The RAM/MOR signalling network of eukaryotes is a conserved regulatory module involved in co-ordination of stem cell maintenance, cell differentiation and polarity establishment. To date, no such signalling network has been identified in plants. Methods Genes encoding the bona fide core components of the RAM/MOR pathway were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (arabidopsis) by sequence similarity searches conducted with the known components from other species. The transcriptional network(s) of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling pathway were identified by running in-depth in silico analyses for genes co-regulated with the core components. In situ hybridization was used to confirm tissue-specific expression of selected RAM/MOR genes. Key Results Co-expression data suggested that the arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may include genes involved in floral transition, by co-operating with chromatin remodelling and mRNA processing/post-transcriptional gene silencing factors, and genes involved in the regulation of pollen tube polar growth. The RAM/MOR pathway may act upstream of the ROP1 machinery, affecting pollen tube polar growth, based on the co-expression of its components with ROP-GEFs. In silico tissue-specific co-expression data and in situ hybridization experiments suggest that different components of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR are expressed in the shoot apical meristem and inflorescence meristem and may be involved in the fine-tuning of stem cell maintenance and cell differentiation. Conclusions The arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may be part of the signalling cascade that converges in pollen tube polarized growth and in fine-tuning stem cell maintenance, differentiation and organ polarity. PMID:26078466

  1. Polar Processes in a 50-year Simulation of Stratospheric Chemistry and Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S.R.; Douglass, A. R.; Patrick, L. C.; Allen, D. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    The unique chemical, dynamical, and microphysical processes that occur in the winter polar lower stratosphere are expected to interact strongly with changing climate and trace gas abundances. Significant changes in ozone have been observed and prediction of future ozone and climate interactions depends on modeling these processes successfully. We have conducted an off-line model simulation of the stratosphere for trace gas conditions representative of 1975-2025 using meteorology from the NASA finite-volume general circulation model. The objective of this simulation is to examine the sensitivity of stratospheric ozone and chemical change to varying meteorology and trace gas inputs. This presentation will examine the dependence of ozone and related processes in polar regions on the climatological and trace gas changes in the model. The model past performance is base-lined against available observations, and a future ozone recovery scenario is forecast. Overall the model ozone simulation is quite realistic, but initial analysis of the detailed evolution of some observable processes suggests systematic shortcomings in our description of the polar chemical rates and/or mechanisms. Model sensitivities, strengths, and weaknesses will be discussed with implications for uncertainty and confidence in coupled climate chemistry predictions.

  2. Alternative 3' UTR selection controls PAR-5 homeostasis and cell polarity in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Mikl, Martin; Cowan, Carrie R

    2014-09-11

    Cell polarity in one-cell C. elegans embryos guides asymmetric cell division and cell-fate specification. Shortly after fertilization, embryos establish two antagonistic cortical domains of PAR proteins. Here, we find that the conserved polarity factor PAR-5 regulates PAR domain size in a dose-dependent manner. Using quantitative imaging and controlled genetic manipulation, we find that PAR-5 protein levels reflect the cumulative output of three mRNA isoforms with different translational efficiencies mediated by their 3' UTRs. 3' UTR selection is regulated, influencing PAR-5 protein abundance. Alternative splicing underlies the selection of par-5 3' UTR isoforms. 3' UTR splicing is enhanced by the SR protein kinase SPK-1, and accordingly, SPK-1 is required for wild-type PAR-5 levels and PAR domain size. Precise regulation of par-5 isoform selection is essential for polarization when the posterior PAR network is compromised. Together, strict control of PAR-5 protein levels and feedback from polarity to par-5 3' UTR selection confer robustness to embryo polarization. PMID:25199833

  3. Theoretical investigation into the effects of polar anchoring in antiferroelectric liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, N. J.; Elston, S. J.

    2000-11-01

    We present a theoretical investigation into the effects of polar anchoring, which induces ferroelectric ordering close to the cell surfaces, in a liquid crystal cell containing an antiferroelectric liquid crystalline material. Our model includes effects due to finite polar and nonpolar anchoring, quadrupolar ordering and polarization self interaction. By minimizing the free energy of the system, we find parameter domains in which multiple zero-voltage solutions are stable. We find that these solutions may undergo thresholdless or hysteretic switching depending on the parameter values. In two instances, the presence of quadrupolar ordering or weak anchoring means that the cell must first be primed into the thresholdless state through a discontinuous transition from an initial antiferroelectric state.

  4. Epithelia suspended in collagen gels can lose polarity and express characteristics of migrating mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Greenburg, G; Hay, E D

    1982-10-01

    This study of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation and epithelial cell polarity in vitro reveals that environmental conditions can have a profound effect on the epithelial phenotype, cell shape, and polarity as expressed by the presence of apical and basal surfaces. A number of different adult and embryonic epithelia were suspended within native collagen gels. Under these conditions, cells elongate, detach from the explants, and migrate as individual cells within the three-dimensional lattice, a previously unknown property of well-differentiated epithelia. Epithelial cells from adult and embryonic anterior lens were studied in detail. Elongated cells derived from the apical surface develop pseudopodia and filopodia characteristic of migratory cells and acquire a morphology and ultrastructure virtually indistinguishable from that of mesenchymal cells in vivo. It is concluded from these experiments that the three-dimensional collagen gel can promote dissociation, migration, and acquisition of secretory organelles by differentiated epithelial cells, and can abolish the apical-basal cell polarity characteristic of the original epithelium.

  5. A dynamic complex of signaling proteins uses polar localization to regulate cell-fate asymmetry in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, Christos G; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2011-03-15

    Cellular asymmetry is critical to metazoan development and the life cycle of many microbes. In Caulobacter, cell cycle progression and the formation of asymmetric daughter cells depend on the polarly-localized histidine kinase CckA. How CckA is regulated and why activity depends on localization are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the unorthodox kinase DivL promotes CckA activity and that the phosphorylated regulator DivK inhibits CckA by binding to DivL. Early in the cell cycle, CckA is activated by the dephosphorylation of DivK throughout the cell. However, in later stages, when phosphorylated DivK levels are high, CckA activation relies on polar localization with a DivK phosphatase. Localization thus creates a protected zone for CckA within the cell, without the use of membrane-enclosed compartments. Our results reveal the mechanisms by which CckA is regulated in a cell-type-dependent manner. More generally, our findings reveal how cells exploit subcellular localization to orchestrate sophisticated regulatory processes.

  6. Chemokine-Dependent pH Elevation at the Cell Front Sustains Polarity in Directionally Migrating Zebrafish Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Grimaldi, Cecilia; Raz, Erez

    2015-04-20

    Directional cell migration requires cell polarization with respect to the distribution of the guidance cue. Cell polarization often includes asymmetric distribution of response components as well as elements of the motility machinery. Importantly, the function and regulation of most of these molecules are known to be pH dependent. Intracellular pH gradients were shown to occur in certain cells migrating in vitro, but the functional relevance of such gradients for cell migration and for the response to directional cues, particularly in the intact organism, is currently unknown. In this study, we find that primordial germ cells migrating in the context of the developing embryo respond to the graded distribution of the chemokine Cxcl12 by establishing elevated intracellular pH at the cell front. We provide insight into the mechanisms by which a polar pH distribution contributes to efficient cell migration. Specifically, we show that Carbonic Anhydrase 15b, an enzyme controlling the pH in many cell types, including metastatic cancer cells, is expressed in migrating germ cells and is crucial for establishing and maintaining an asymmetric pH distribution within them. Reducing the level of the protein and thereby erasing the pH elevation at the cell front resulted in abnormal cell migration and impaired arrival at the target. The basis for the disrupted migration is found in the stringent requirement for pH conditions in the cell for regulating contractility, for the polarization of Rac1 activity, and hence for the formation of actin-rich structures at the leading edge of the migrating cells.

  7. Mitotic Control of Planar Cell Polarity by Polo-like Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rezma; Little, Katherine A.; Tamayo, Joel V.; Li, Wenyang; Perlman, David H.; Devenport, Danelle

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY During cell division, polarized epithelial cells employ mechanisms to preserve cell polarity and tissue integrity. In dividing cells of the mammalian skin, planar cell polarity (PCP) is maintained through the bulk internalization, equal segregation, and polarized recycling of cortical PCP proteins. The dramatic redistribution of PCP proteins coincides precisely with cell cycle progression, but the mechanisms coordinating PCP and mitosis are unknown. Here we identify Plk1 as a master regulator of PCP dynamics during mitosis. Plk1 interacts with core PCP component, Celsr1, via a conserved polo-box domain (PBD) binding motif, localizes to mitotic endosomes and directly phosphorylates Celsr1. Plk1-dependent phosphorylation activates the endocytic motif specifically during mitosis, allowing bulk recruitment of Celsr1 into endosomes. Inhibiting Plk1 activity blocks PCP internalization and perturbs PCP asymmetry. Mimicking dileucine motif phosphorylation is sufficient to drive Celsr1 internalization during interphase. Thus, Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Celsr1 ensures PCP redistribution is precisely coordinated with mitotic entry. PMID:26004507

  8. Influence of collagen gel on the orientation of epithelial cell polarity: follicle formation from isolated thyroid cells and from preformed monolayers

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The influence of collagen gels on the orientation of the polarity of epithelial thyroid cells in culture was studied under four different conditions. (a) Isolated cells cultured on the surface of a collagen gel formed a monolayer. The apical pole was in contact with the culture medium and the basal membrane was attached to the substratum. (b) Isolated cells embedded inside the gel organized within 8 into follicles. The basal pole was in contact with collagen and the apical pole was oriented towards the interior of the follicular lumen. (c) Cells were first organized into floating vesicles, structures in which the apical surface is in contact with the culture medium, and the vesicles were embedded inside the collagen gel. After 3 d, cell polarity was inverted, the apical pole being oriented towards the cavity encompassed by cells. Vesicles had been transformed into follicles. (d) Monolayers formed on collagen gels as in a were overlaid with a second layer of collagen, which was polymerized in contact with the apical cell surface. A disorganization of the continuous pavement occurred within 24 h; cells attached to the upper layer of collagen and reorganized into follicles in the collagen sandwich within 4-8 d. A similar process occurred when the monolayer was grown on plastic and overlaid with collagen, or grown on collagen and covered with small pieces of glass cover slips. No reorganization was observed between two glass surfaces. In conclusion, first, a basal pole was always formed in the area of contact between the cell membrane and an adhesive surface and, second, the interaction of a preformed apical pole with an adhesive surface was not compatible with the stability of this domain of the plasma membrane. The interaction of the cell membrane with extracellular components having adhesive properties appears to be a determinant factor in the orientation and stabilization of epithelial cell polarity. PMID:7298715

  9. Polarity in mechanoreceptor cells of trigger hairs of Dionaea muscipula Ellis.

    PubMed

    Buchen, B; Hensel, D; Sievers, A

    1983-08-01

    Both the apical and the basal cell poles of the sensory cells in trigger hairs of Dionaea muscipula are structured identically. A complex of concentrically arranged endoplasmic reticulum cisternae occupies each of the poles. One to four vacuoles are enclosed within the central cisterna and contain polyphenols (deposits of "tannin"). Structural polarity, whether symmetric or asymmetric, as well as the occurrence of abundant endoplasmic reticulum and numerous mitochondria are characteristics of the perception cells of most animals and plants.

  10. A one-dimensional model of PCP signaling: polarized cell behavior in the notochord of the ascidian Ciona

    PubMed Central

    Kourakis, Matthew J.; Reeves, Wendy; Newman-Smith, Erin; Maury, Benoit; Abdul-Wajid, Sarah; Smith, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its importance in development and physiology the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway remains one of the most enigmatic signaling mechanisms. The notochord of the ascidian Ciona provides a unique model for investigating the PCP pathway. Interestingly, the notochord appears to be the only embryonic structure in Ciona activating the PCP pathway. Moreover, the Ciona notochord as a single-file array of forty polarized cells is a uniquely tractable system for the study of polarization dynamics and the transmission of the PCP pathway. Here, we test models for propagation of a polarizing signal, interrogating temporal, spatial and signaling requirements. A simple cell-cell relay cascading through the entire length of the notochord is not supported; instead a more complex mechanism is revealed, with interactions influencing polarity between neighboring cells, but not distant ones. Mechanisms coordinating notochord-wide polarity remain elusive, but appear to entrain general (i.e., global) polarity even while local interactions remain important. However, this global polarizer does not appear to act as a localized, spatially-restricted determinant. Coordination of polarity along the long axis of the notochord requires the PCP pathway, a role we demonstrate is temporally distinct from this pathway’s earlier role in convergent extension and intercalation. We also reveal polarity in the notochord to be dynamic: a cell’s polarity state can be changed and then restored, underscoring the Ciona notochord’s amenability for in vivo studies of PCP. PMID:25173874

  11. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  12. Evaluation of Surface Sorption Processes Using Spectral Induced Polarization and a (22)Na Tracer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Na; Moysey, Stephen M J; Powell, Brian A; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-08-18

    We investigate mechanisms controlling the complex electrical conductivity of a porous media using noninvasive spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of a silica gel during a pH dependent surface adsorption experiment. Sorption of sodium on silica gel surfaces was monitored as the pH of a column was equilibrated at 5.0 and then successively raised to 6.5 and 8.0, but the composition of the 0.01 M NaCl solution was otherwise unchanged. SIP measurements show an increase in the imaginary conductivity of the sample (17.82 ± 0.07 μS/cm) in response to the pH change, interpreted as deprotonation of silanol groups on the silica gel surface followed by sorption of sodium cations. Independent measurements of Na(+) accumulation on grain surfaces performed using a radioactive (22)Na tracer support the interpretation of pH-dependent sorption as a dominant process controlling the electrical properties of the silica gel (R(2) = 0.99) and confirms the importance of grain polarization (versus membrane polarization) in influencing SIP measurements of silicate minerals. The number of surface sorption sites estimated by fitting a mechanistic, triple-layer model for the complex conductivity to the SIP data (13.22 × 10(16) sites/m(2)) was 2.8 times larger than that estimated directly by a (22)Na mass balance (5.13 × 10(16) sites/m(2)), suggesting additional contributions to polarization exist.

  13. Near-IR Auroral Processes in the Polar Regions of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. J.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, 3 micron auroral emission lines of CH4, C2H2, and C2H6 from the south polar auroral region of Jupiter were detected [1]. In order to understand the auroral processes producing these emissions, we constructed an electron precipitation model for the auroral atmosphere including H2, He, H, and the hydrocarbon molecules. We present preliminary results for the mixing ratios of these molecules in the stratosphere, which are consistent with the observed auroral emission intensities.

  14. Theoretical description of transverse measurements of polarization in optically-pumped Rb vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiling, Joan; Tupa, Dale; Norrgard, Eric; Gay, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    In optical pumping of alkali-metal vapors, the polarization of the atoms is typically determined by probing along the entire length of the pumping beam, resulting in an averaged value of polarization over the length of the cell. Such measurements do not give any information about spatial variations of the polarization along the pump beam axis. Using a D1 probe beam oriented perpendicular to the pumping beam, we have demonstrated a heuristic method for determining the polarization along the pump beam's axis. Adapting a previously developed theory [1], we provide an analysis of the experiment which explains why this method works. The model includes the effects of Rb density, buffer gas pressure, and pump detuning. [4pt] [1] E.B. Norrgard, D. Tupa, J.M. Dreiling, and T.J. Gay, Phys. Rev. A 82, 033408 (2010).

  15. Polarized protein membrane for high cell seeding efficiency.

    PubMed

    Atthoff, Björn; Aulin, Cecilia; Adelöw, Catharina; Hilborn, Jöns

    2007-11-01

    A new type of scaffold for tissue engineering was developed to give enhanced cell seeding in three dimensions. A gradient of either collagen or fibrin protein was prepared, supported by a knitted poly(ethylene terephtalate) PET fabric. The membranes were, after hydrolysis and acetic acid wash, submerged in a protein solution for adsorption followed by immersion into a gelling agent. The immediate contact between the protein solution held by the fabric and the gelling agent resulted in a dense, fibrous protein network with pore sizes around 0.5 microm at the surface, and larger pores of 10-50 microm size throughout the interior of the fabric as observed by scanning electron microscopy. By separating the fabric double layers holding this network, a gradient porosity membrane was produced. To evaluate the fractions of cells trapped in the matrix upon seeding, i.e. the seeding efficiency, 500 microl 3T3 fibroblasts cell suspension containing one million cells was seeded by filtering through the gradient protein membrane. For both the collagen and fibrin membranes, the seeding efficiency was approximately 93%, which was significantly higher than that of 28% from the corresponding PET fabric without protein immobilization. Attempt to seed cells from the dense side of the protein networks resulted in no cell penetration into the scaffold. Histology on subsequent culture of the cells in the scaffold demonstrated viability and proliferation in three dimensions throughout the scaffold. This new and simple way of producing scaffolds play an important role when the cells are precious or scarce and cell seeding in three dimensions is important. PMID:17443668

  16. Evolution and development of hair cell polarity and efferent function in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Sienknecht, Ulrike J; Köppl, Christine; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The function of the inner ear critically depends on mechanoelectrically transducing hair cells and their afferent and efferent innervation. The first part of this review presents data on the evolution and development of polarized vertebrate hair cells that generate a sensitive axis for mechanical stimulation, an essential part of the function of hair cells. Beyond the cellular level, a coordinated alignment of polarized hair cells across a sensory epithelium, a phenomenon called planar cell polarity (PCP), is essential for the organ's function. The coordinated alignment of hair cells leads to hair cell orientation patterns that are characteristic of the different sensory epithelia of the vertebrate inner ear. Here, we review the developmental mechanisms that potentially generate molecular and morphological asymmetries necessary for the control of PCP. In the second part, this review concentrates on the evolution, development and function of the enigmatic efferent neurons terminating on hair cells. We present evidence suggestive of efferents being derived from motoneurons and synapsing predominantly onto a unique but ancient cholinergic receptor. A review of functional data shows that the plesiomorphic role of the efferent system likely was to globally shut down and protect the peripheral sensors, be they vestibular, lateral line or auditory hair cells, from desensitization and damage during situations of self-induced sensory overload. The addition of a dedicated auditory papilla in land vertebrates appears to have favored the separation of vestibular and auditory efferents and specializations for more sophisticated and more diverse functions.

  17. Comparing the O+ and H+ Escape Fluxes from Fluid and Particle-in-Cell Solutions of the Polar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, J. V.; Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    There are different theoretical descriptions of the terrestrial polar wind. Fluid models of mass, momentum, and energy equations can be used to solve the field-aligned flow of H+ and O+ ions from the ionosphere into the earth's magnetosphere. Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, which include kinetic processes, have also treated polar wind flow between an active ionospheric boundary condition and the outflow boundary into the magnetosphere. In study, we compare the O+ and H+ escape fluxes from the USU Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Model (IPM) [Schunk et al., 2003] with the escape fluxes from the macroscopic PIC solution of the Generalized Polar Wind (GPW) Model of Barakat and Schunk [2006]. The IPM model results at 1500km are used to supply the time-varying boundary conditions to the GPW model. The escape flux comparisons will be made at the 2.5 Re, which is a typical boundary condition radius for fluxes into MHD magnetosphere models. Classical fluid codes generate escape fluxes driven by the pressure gradients in the ionosphere, while the PIC code has additional energization processes for the polar wind fluxes. Differencing the two escape flux solutions at 2.5 Re will quantify the importance of the additional energization processes within the PIC GPW model. We will make the comparisons of escape fluxes using the model results of 4 different storm periods: an idealized storm period, April 5-8, 2000, 2002 September 27 to October 4, and 2002 October 22-29. These storm periods were chosen for the collaborative studies of the Outflow Measuring Modeling, and Merging GEM focus group. Barakat, A. R. and R. W. Schunk (2006), A three-dimensional model of the generalized polar wind, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A12314, doi:10.1029/2006JA011662. Schunk, R. W., J. V. Eccles, J. J. Sojka, D. C. Thompson, and L. Zhu (2003), Assimilation Ionosphere Model (AIM), Final report, Space Environment Corporation, Providence, Utah.

  18. Ovarian cancer stem-like cells elicit the polarization of M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Cai, Da-Jun; Li, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is a life‑threatening disease in females worldwide. The polarization of macrophages is crucial in oncogenesis and the development of ovarian cancer. Increasing evidence has supported the correlation between ovarian cancer stem‑like cells (OCSCs) and macrophages, however, whether OCSCs can affect the polarization of macrophages and the underlying mechanisms involved remain to be elucidated. To examine the interplay between OCSCs and macrophages, a co‑culture system was used to detect the effect of OCSCs on macrophage polarization. The expression of cluster of differentiation 206+ and the secretion of interleukin‑10 were significantly increased and the production of tumor necrosis factor‑α was suppressed, confirming macrophage polarization to M2 macrophages. Further investigation of the macrophages in a Transwell culture system with OCSCs revealed polarization to the M2 macrophages to a similar extent, indicating that the cytokines of the OCSCs, rather than direct cell‑cell contact, are important for the polarization of M2 macrophages. Furthermore, the expression levels of chemokine (C‑C motif) ligand (CCL)2, cyclooxygenase (COX)‑2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were increased in the Transwell system and the inhibition of COX‑2, but not CCL2, significantly decreased the polarization of the M2 macrophages. In addition, mechanistic analysis revealed the importance of the COX‑2/PGE2 pathway in OCSCs to activate Janus kinase (JAK) signaling in macrophages to elicit M2 polarization. These findings provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that OCSCs are capable of altering macrophages into the M2 phenotype via the overexpression of COX‑2 and the increased production of PGE2 cytokines and that the JAK signaling pathway in macrophages is important for this alteration. The present study provided evidence supporting possible molecular targets for cancer treatment.

  19. Electronic polarization-division demultiplexing based on digital signal processing in intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2014-01-27

    We propose a novel configuration of optical receivers for intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM · DD) systems, which can cope with dual-polarization (DP) optical signals electrically. Using a Stokes analyzer and a newly-developed digital signal-processing (DSP) algorithm, we can achieve polarization tracking and demultiplexing in the digital domain after direct detection. Simulation results show that the power penalty stemming from digital polarization manipulations is negligibly small.

  20. Development and localization of reverse-polarity mechanotransducer channels in cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Beurg, Maryline; Goldring, Adam C; Ricci, Anthony J; Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-06-14

    Cochlear hair cells normally detect positive deflections of their hair bundles, rotating toward their tallest edge, which opens mechanotransducer (MT) channels by increased tension in interciliary tip links. After tip-link destruction, the normal polarity of MT current is replaced by a mechanically sensitive current evoked by negative bundle deflections. The "reverse-polarity" current was investigated in cochlear hair cells after tip-link destruction with BAPTA, in transmembrane channel-like protein isoforms 1/2 (Tmc1:Tmc2) double mutants, and during perinatal development. This current is a natural adjunct of embryonic development, present in all wild-type hair cells but declining after birth with emergence of the normal-polarity current. Evidence indicated the reverse-polarity current seen developmentally was a manifestation of the same ion channel as that evident under abnormal conditions in Tmc mutants or after tip-link destruction. In all cases, sinusoidal fluid-jet stimuli from different orientations suggested the underlying channels were opened not directly by deflections of the hair bundle but by deformation of the apical plasma membrane. Cell-attached patch recording on the hair-cell apical membrane revealed, after BAPTA treatment or during perinatal development, 90-pS stretch-activated cation channels that could be blocked by Ca(2+) and by FM1-43. High-speed Ca(2+) imaging, using swept-field confocal microscopy, showed the Ca(2+) influx through the reverse-polarity channels was not localized to the hair bundle, but distributed across the apical plasma membrane. These reverse-polarity channels, which we propose to be renamed "unconventional" mechanically sensitive channels, have some properties similar to the normal MT channels, but the relationship between the two types is still not well defined.

  1. Regulation of neuronal migration by Dchs1-Fat4 planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Sana; Mao, Yaopan; Kuta, Anna; Ferreira de Sousa, Catia; Gaufo, Gary O; McNeill, Helen; Hindges, Robert; Guthrie, Sarah; Irvine, Kenneth D; Francis-West, Philippa H

    2014-07-21

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) describes the polarization of cell structures and behaviors within the plane of a tissue. PCP is essential for the generation of tissue architecture during embryogenesis and for postnatal growth and tissue repair, yet how it is oriented to coordinate cell polarity remains poorly understood [1]. In Drosophila, PCP is mediated via the Frizzled-Flamingo (Fz-PCP) and Dachsous-Fat (Fat-PCP) pathways [1-3]. Fz-PCP is conserved in vertebrates, but an understanding in vertebrates of whether and how Fat-PCP polarizes cells, and its relationship to Fz-PCP signaling, is lacking. Mutations in human FAT4 and DCHS1, key components of Fat-PCP signaling, cause Van Maldergem syndrome, characterized by severe neuronal abnormalities indicative of altered neuronal migration [4]. Here, we investigate the role and mechanisms of Fat-PCP during neuronal migration using the murine facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons as a model. We find that Fat4 and Dchs1 are expressed in complementary gradients and are required for the collective tangential migration of FBM neurons and for their PCP. Fat4 and Dchs1 are required intrinsically within the FBM neurons and extrinsically within the neuroepithelium. Remarkably, Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP regulate FBM neuron migration along orthogonal axes. Disruption of the Dchs1 gradients by mosaic inactivation of Dchs1 alters FBM neuron polarity and migration. This study implies that PCP in vertebrates can be regulated via gradients of Fat4 and Dchs1 expression, which establish intracellular polarity across FBM cells during their migration. Our results also identify Fat-PCP as a novel neuronal guidance system and reveal that Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP can act along orthogonal axes. PMID:24998526

  2. Positive feedback and mutual antagonism combine to polarize Crumbs in the Drosophila follicle cell epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Georgina C; Lucas, Eliana P; Brain, Ruth; Tournier, Alexander; Thompson, Barry J

    2012-06-19

    Epithelial tissues are composed of polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains. In the Drosophila ovarian follicle cell epithelium, apical membranes are specified by Crumbs (Crb), Stardust (Sdt), and the aPKC-Par6-cdc42 complex. Basolateral membranes are specified by Lethal giant larvae (Lgl), Discs large (Dlg), and Scribble (Scrib). Apical and basolateral determinants are known to act in a mutually antagonistic fashion, but it remains unclear how this interaction generates polarity. We have built a computer model of apicobasal polarity that suggests that the combination of positive feedback among apical determinants plus mutual antagonism between apical and basal determinants is essential for polarization. In agreement with this model, in vivo experiments define a positive feedback loop in which Crb self-recruits via Crb-Crb extracellular domain interactions, recruitment of Sdt-aPKC-Par6-cdc42, aPKC phosphorylation of Crb, and recruitment of Expanded (Ex) and Kibra (Kib) to prevent endocytic removal of Crb from the plasma membrane. Lgl antagonizes the operation of this feedback loop, explaining why apical determinants do not normally spread into the basolateral domain. Once Crb is removed from the plasma membrane, it undergoes recycling via Rab11 endosomes. Our results provide a dynamic model for understanding how epithelial polarity is maintained in Drosophila follicle cells.

  3. The Crumbs3-Pals1 complex participates in the establishment of polarity in mammalian epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roh, Michael H; Fan, Shuling; Liu, Chia-Jen; Margolis, Ben

    2003-07-15

    In Drosophila, the Crumbs-Stardust-Discs-lost complex is required during the establishment of polarized epithelia. Embryos that lack a component of this complex or overexpress Crumbs exhibit defects in epithelial morphogenesis. We recently cloned a novel mammalian epithelial Crumbs isoform, Crumbs3 (CRB3). CRB3 exists in a complex at tight junctions (TJs) with Pals1 and PATJ, the mammalian homologues of Stardust and Discs lost, respectively. Here, we observe that overexpression of CRB3 leads to delayed TJ formation in MDCK epithelial cell monolayers and disruption of polarity in MDCK cysts cultured in collagen. Both phenomena require the last four residues of CRB3. Next, we expressed, in MDCK cells, a dominant-negative Myc-Lin-2-Pals1 chimeric protein, where the PDZ domain of Lin-2 was replaced with that of Pals1. TJ and apical polarity defects were also observed in these cells. Collectively, this suggests that the CRB-Pals1 interaction is important for formation of TJs and polarized epithelia. These results provide insight into the function of the mammalian Crumbs complex during TJ formation and epithelial polarization.

  4. ROCK1 and 2 differentially regulate actomyosin organization to drive cell and synaptic polarity

    PubMed Central

    Badoual, Mathilde; Asmussen, Hannelore; Patel, Heather; Whitmore, Leanna; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2015-01-01

    RhoGTPases organize the actin cytoskeleton to generate diverse polarities, from front–back polarity in migrating cells to dendritic spine morphology in neurons. For example, RhoA through its effector kinase, RhoA kinase (ROCK), activates myosin II to form actomyosin filament bundles and large adhesions that locally inhibit and thereby polarize Rac1-driven actin polymerization to the protrusions of migratory fibroblasts and the head of dendritic spines. We have found that the two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, differentially regulate distinct molecular pathways downstream of RhoA, and their coordinated activities drive polarity in both cell migration and synapse formation. In particular, ROCK1 forms the stable actomyosin filament bundles that initiate front–back and dendritic spine polarity. In contrast, ROCK2 regulates contractile force and Rac1 activity at the leading edge of migratory cells and the spine head of neurons; it also specifically regulates cofilin-mediated actin remodeling that underlies the maturation of adhesions and the postsynaptic density of dendritic spines. PMID:26169356

  5. Polarity and cell division orientation in the cleavage embryo: from worm to human

    PubMed Central

    Ajduk, Anna; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Cleavage is a period after fertilization, when a 1-cell embryo starts developing into a multicellular organism. Due to a series of mitotic divisions, the large volume of a fertilized egg is divided into numerous smaller, nucleated cells—blastomeres. Embryos of different phyla divide according to different patterns, but molecular mechanism of these early divisions remains surprisingly conserved. In the present paper, we describe how polarity cues, cytoskeleton and cell-to-cell communication interact with each other to regulate orientation of the early embryonic division planes in model animals such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and mouse. We focus particularly on the Par pathway and the actin-driven cytoplasmic flows that accompany it. We also describe a unique interplay between Par proteins and the Hippo pathway in cleavage mammalian embryos. Moreover, we discuss the potential meaning of polarity, cytoplasmic dynamics and cell-to-cell communication as quality biomarkers of human embryos. PMID:26660321

  6. Analyzing the role of AP-1B in polarized sorting from recycling endosomes in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fölsch, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells polarize their plasma membrane into apical and basolateral domains where the apical membrane faces the luminal side of an organ and the basolateral membrane is in contact with neighboring cells and the basement membrane. To maintain this polarity, newly synthesized and internalized cargos must be sorted to their correct target domain. Over the last ten years, recycling endosomes have emerged as an important sorting station at which proteins destined for the apical membrane are segregated from those destined for the basolateral membrane. Essential for basolateral sorting from recycling endosomes is the tissue-specific adaptor complex AP-1B. This chapter describes experimental protocols to analyze the AP-1B function in epithelial cells including the analysis of protein sorting in LLC-PK1 cells lines, immunoprecipitation of cargo proteins after chemical crosslinking to AP-1B, and radioactive pulse-chase experiments in MDCK cells depleted of the AP-1B subunit μ1B.

  7. Proliferative effects of apical, but not basal, matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity in polarized MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, Permila C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; Fingleton, Barbara; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M. . E-mail: lynn.matrisian@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-02-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is primarily expressed in glandular epithelium. Therefore, its mechanism of action may be influenced by its regulated vectorial release to either the apical and/or basolateral compartments, where it would act on its various substrates. To gain a better understanding of where MMP-7 is released in polarized epithelium, we have analyzed its pattern of secretion in polarized MDCK cells expressing stably transfected human MMP-7 (MDCK-MMP-7), and HCA-7 and Caco2 human colon cancer cell lines. In all cell lines, latent MMP-7 was secreted to both cellular compartments, but was 1.5- to 3-fold more abundant in the basolateral compartment as compared to the apical. However, studies in the MDCK system demonstrated that MMP-7 activity was 2-fold greater in the apical compartment of MDCK-MMP-7{sup HIGH}-polarized monolayers, which suggests the apical co-release of an MMP-7 activator. In functional assays, MMP-7 over-expression increased cell saturation density as a result of increased cell proliferation with no effect on apoptosis. Apical MMP-7 activity was shown to be responsible for the proliferative effect, which occurred, as demonstrated by media transfer experiments, through cleavage of an apical substrate and not through the generation of a soluble factor. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the importance of MMP-7 secretion in relation to its mechanism of action when expressed in a polarized epithelium.

  8. A new source of Southern Ocean and Antarctic aerosol from tropospheric polar cell chemistry of sea ice emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, R. S.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Schofield, R.; Robinson, A. D.; Harris, N. R. P.; Keywood, M.; Ward, J.; Galbally, I.; Molloy, S.; Thomas, A.; Wilson, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Antarctic region is a pristine environment with minimal anthropogenic influence. Aerosol measurements in this environment allow the study of natural aerosols and polar atmospheric dynamics. Measurements in this region have been limited primarily to continental and coastal locations where permanent stations exist, with a handful of measurements in the sea ice region. The MAPS campaign (Measurements of Aerosols and Precursors during SIPEXII) occurred as part of SIPEX II (Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment II) voyage in Spring, 2012, and produced the first Antarctic pack-ice focused aerosol dataset aimed at characterizing new particle formation processes off the coast of East Antarctica (~65°S, 120°E). Numerous atmospheric parameters and species were measured, including the number of aerosol particles in the 3-10 nm size range, the range associated with nucleating particle formation. A latitudinal transect through the sea ice identified the Polar Front from sudden changes in nucleating particle concentrations, averaging 51cm-3 north of the front in the Ferrel cell, and 766 cm-3 south of the front, in the Polar cell region. The Polar Front location was also confirmed by meteorological and back-trajectory data. Background aerosol populations in the Polar cell fluctuated significantly but displayed no growth indicators, suggesting transport. Back-trajectories revealed that air parcels often descended from the free-troposphere within the previous 24-48 hrs. It is proposed that particle formation occurs in the free troposphere from precursors uplifted at the polar front region which, being a sea-ice/ocean region, is a significant precursor source. After tropospheric formation, populations descending at the poles are transported northward and reach the sea ice surface, missing continental stations. Current measurements of Antarctic aerosol suggest very low loading which may be explained by these circulation patterns and may underestimate total regional loading

  9. Silicon film solar cell process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. B.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The most promising way to reduce the cost of silicon in solar cells while still maintaining performance is to utilize thin films (10 to 20 microns thick) of crystalline silicon. The method of solution growth is being employed to grow thin polycrystalline films of silicon on dissimilar substrates. The initial results indicate that, using tin as the solvent, this growth process only requires operating temperatures in the range of 800 C to 1000 C. Growth rates in the range of 0.4 to 2.0 microns per minute and grain sizes in the range of 20 to 100 microns were achieved on both quartz and coated steel substrates. Typically, an aspect ratio of two to three between the width and the Si grain thickness is seen. Uniform coverage of Si growth on quartz over a 2.5 x 2.5 cm area was observed.

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfers measurements on cell surfaces via fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kashi, Meir; Moshkov, Sergey; Zurgil, Naomi; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency between moieties located on cell surfaces by performing individual cell fluorescence polarization (FP) measurements. The absolute value of energy transfer efficiency (E) is calculated on an individual cell basis. The examination of this methodology was carried out using model experiments on human T lymphocyte cells. The cells were labeled with fluorescein-conjugated Concanavalin A (ConA) as donor, or rhodamine-conjugated ConA as acceptor. The experiments and results clearly indicate that determination of E via FP measurements is possible, efficient, and more convenient than other methods. PMID:12202365

  11. Rotaviruses require basolateral molecules for efficient infection of polarized MDCKII cells.

    PubMed

    Realpe, Mauricio; Espinosa, Rafaela; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2010-02-01

    In this work we evaluated the ability of rotavirus strains with different receptor requirements to infect the apical and basolateral surfaces of polarized MDCKII cells. We used neuraminidase (NA)-sensitive (RRV and TFR-1) and neuraminidase-resistant (Wa and UK) viruses that differ in their use of integrins. Regardless of their receptor requirements, all virus strains tested were found to efficiently infect cells from both membrane surface domains, with preference for the basolateral domain, since: (i) disruption of tight junctions of polarized cell monolayers by calcium chelation led to a reversible increase of rotavirus infectivity, (ii) the viruses infected preferentially the cells located at the borders of microcolonies of polarized cells, and (iii) in cells grown on a permeable support all four virus strains were able to start the infection by either plasma membrane domain. Preferential infection (5-11-fold more efficiently) of the basolateral surface correlated with the neuraminidase resistance of the virus strains, but not with their requirement for integrins, which in MDCKII cells seem to be used by all four viruses. The infection of both cell surface domains by RRV was found to depend on the presence of terminal sialic acids, since its infectivity was reduced by neuraminidase treatment of the cells and it was also blocked by incubation of the virus with glycophorin A. The efficient infection through the basolateral membrane surface of polarized cells might be relevant for the pathogenesis of rotavirus, especially given the recent reports of antigenemia and extraintestinal spread of the virus in children and animal models. PMID:19932141

  12. Compartmentalized microchannel array for high-throughput analysis of single cell polarized growth and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Tao; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Szymanski, Craig J.; Liu, Bingwen; Baker, Scott E.; Orr, Galya; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Interrogating polarized growth is technologically challenging due to extensive cellular branching and uncontrollable environmental conditions in conventional assays. Here we present a robust and high-performance microfluidic system that enables observations of polarized growth with enhanced temporal and spatial control over prolonged periods. The system has built-in tunability and versatility to accommodate a variety of scientific applications requiring precisely controlled environments. Using the model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, our microfluidic system enabled direct visualization and analysis of cellular heterogeneity in a clonal fungal cell population, nuclear distribution and dynamics at the subhyphal level, and quantitative dynamics of gene expression with single hyphal compartment resolution in response to carbon source starvation and exchange. Although the microfluidic device is demonstrated on filamentous fungi, the technology is immediately extensible to a wide array of other biosystems that exhibit similar polarized cell growth, with applications ranging from bioenergy production to human health. PMID:26530004

  13. Compartmentalized microchannel array for high-throughput analysis of single cell polarized growth and dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Geng, Tao; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Szymanski, Craig J.; Liu, Bingwen; Baker, Scott E.; Orr, Galya; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2015-11-04

    Here, interrogating polarized growth is technologically challenging due to extensive cellular branching and uncontrollable environmental conditions in conventional assays. Here we present a robust and high-performance microfluidic system that enables observations of polarized growth with enhanced temporal and spatial control over prolonged periods. The system has built-in tunability and versatility to accommodate a variety of science applications requiring precisely controlled environments. Using the model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, this microfluidic system enabled direct visualization and analysis of cellular heterogeneity in a clonal fungal cell population, nuclear distribution and dynamics at the subhyphal level, and quantitative dynamics of gene expression withmore » single hyphal compartment resolution in response to carbon source starvation and exchange experiments. Although the microfluidic device is demonstrated on filamentous fungi, our technology is immediately extensible to a wide array of other biosystems that exhibit similar polarized cell growth with applications ranging from bioenergy production to human health.« less

  14. Compartmentalized microchannel array for high-throughput analysis of single cell polarized growth and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Tao; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Szymanski, Craig J.; Liu, Bingwen; Baker, Scott E.; Orr, Galya; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2015-11-04

    Here, interrogating polarized growth is technologically challenging due to extensive cellular branching and uncontrollable environmental conditions in conventional assays. Here we present a robust and high-performance microfluidic system that enables observations of polarized growth with enhanced temporal and spatial control over prolonged periods. The system has built-in tunability and versatility to accommodate a variety of science applications requiring precisely controlled environments. Using the model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, this microfluidic system enabled direct visualization and analysis of cellular heterogeneity in a clonal fungal cell population, nuclear distribution and dynamics at the subhyphal level, and quantitative dynamics of gene expression with single hyphal compartment resolution in response to carbon source starvation and exchange experiments. Although the microfluidic device is demonstrated on filamentous fungi, our technology is immediately extensible to a wide array of other biosystems that exhibit similar polarized cell growth with applications ranging from bioenergy production to human health.

  15. Assembly of enveloped viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells: polarized budding from single attached cells and from clusters of cells in suspension

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    In confluent monolayers of the dog kidney epithelial cell line Madin- Darby canine kidney (MDCK) assembly of RNA enveloped viruses reflects the functional polarization of the cells. Thus, influenza, Sendai, and Simian virus 5 bud from the apical (free) surface, while vesicular stomatitis virions (VSV) are assembled at basolateral plasma membrane domains (Rodriguez-Boulan, E., and D.D. Sabatini, 1978, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 75:5071-5075). MDCK cells derived from confluent monolayers by dissociation with trypsin-EDTA and maintained as single cells in spinner medium for 12-20 h before infection, lose their characteristic structural polarity. Furthermore, when these cells were infected with influenza or VSV, virions assembled in a nonpolarized fashion over most of the cell surface. However, when dissociated MDCK cells infected in suspension were sparsely plated on collagen gels to prevent intercellular contact and the formation of junctions, the characteristic polarity of viral budding observed in confluent monolayers was again manifested; i.e., VSV budded preferentially from adherent surfaces and influenza almost exclusively from free surface regions. Similar polarization was observed in cells which became aggregated during incubation in spinner medium: influenza budded from the free surface, while VSV was produced at regions of cell-cell contact. It therefore appears that in isolated epithelial cells attachment to a substrate or to another cell is sufficient to trigger the expression of plasma membrane polarity which is manifested in the asymmetric budding of viruses. PMID:6300140

  16. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kirjavainen, Anna; Laos, Maarja; Anttonen, Tommi; Pirvola, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea.

  17. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Affect Electrolyte Transport in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Dependence on Cyclooxygenase and Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Nüsing, Rolf M.; Schweer, Horst; Fleming, Ingrid; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wegmann, Markus

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on ion transport in the polarized renal distal tubular cell line, MDCK C7. Of the four EET regioisomers (5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET) studied, only apical, but not basolateral, application of 5,6-EET increased short circuit current (Isc) with kinetics similar to those of arachidonic acid. The ion transport was blocked by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or with the chloride channel blocker NPPB. Further, both a Cl−-free bath solution and the Ca2+ antagonist verapamil blocked 5,6-EET-induced ion transport. Although the presence of the PGE2 receptors EP2, EP3, and EP4 was demonstrated, apically added PGE2 was ineffective and basolaterally added PGE2 caused a different kinetics in ion transport compared to 5,6-EET. Moreover, PGE2 sythesis in MDCK C7 cells was unaffected by 5,6-EET treatment. GC/MS/MS analysis of cell supernatants revealed the presence of the biologically inactive 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1 in 5,6-EET-treated cells, but not in control cells. Indomethacin suppressed the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1. 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 the precursor of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1, caused a similar ion transport as 5,6-EET. Cytochrome P450 enzymes homolog to human CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 protein were detected immunologically in the MDCK C7 cells. Our findings suggest that 5,6-EET affects Cl-transport in renal distal tubular cells independent of PGE2 but by a mechanism, dependent on its conversion to 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 by cyclooxygenase. We suggest a role for this P450 epoxygenase product in the regulation of electrolyte transport, especially as a saluretic compound acting from the luminal side of tubular cells in the mammalian kidney. PMID:17494091

  18. Spillage of lunar polar crater volatiles onto adjacent terrains: The case for dynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Hurley, D. M.; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2015-05-01

    We present an investigation of the release and transport of lunar polar crater volatiles onto topside regions surrounding the cold traps. The volatiles are liberated via surface energization processes associated with the harsh space environment, including solar wind plasma sputtering and impact vaporization. We find that some fraction of these volatiles can migrate from crater floors onto topside regions (those regions directly adjacent to and above the polar crater floors), and that these surrounding terrains should contain a sampling of the material originating within the crater itself. It is concluded that the nature of the volatile content on crater floors can be obtained by sampling the surface volatiles that have migrated or "spilled out" onto the adjacent terrain. This "spillage" effect could make human or robotic prospecting for crater resources significantly easier, since an assessment may not require direct entry into the very harsh polar crater environment. We also suggest that there are dynamic processes actively operating on the crater floors, and we estimate their source rates assuming dynamic equilibrium of the observed water frost and our modeled loss rates.

  19. Spillage of Lunar Polar Crater Volatiles onto Adjacent Terrains: The Case for Dynamic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, William M.; Hurley, D M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation of the release and transport of lunar polar crater volatiles onto topside regions surrounding the cold traps. The volatiles are liberated via surface energization processes associated with the harsh space environment, including solar wind plasma sputtering and impact vaporization. We find that some fraction of these volatiles can migrate from crater floors onto topside regions (those regions directly adjacent to and above the polar crater floors), and that these surrounding terrains should contain a sampling of the material originating within the crater itself. It is concluded that the nature of the volatile content on crater floors can be obtained by sampling the surface volatiles that have migrated or "spilled out" onto the adjacent terrain. This "spillage" effect could make human or robotic prospecting for crater resources significantly easier, since an assessment may not require direct entry into the very harsh polar crater environment. We also suggest that there are dynamic processes actively operating on the crater floors, and we estimate their source rates assuming dynamic equilibrium of the observed water frost and our modeled loss rates.

  20. Dissociating space charge processes from orientation polarization in poly(ethylene naphthalate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, M.-Q.; Boudou, L.; Le Roy, S.; Teyssedre, G.

    2014-11-01

    Thermo-stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) measurements and space charge measurements were performed on poly(ethylene naphthalene 2,6-dicarboxylate) (PEN), an aromatic and polar polyester. The aim is to develop an understanding of the dipolar and conduction processes at play in this material and in particular to understand the effects of temperature. For the TSDC measurements, when polarizing at 130 and 170 °C, the sub-glass transition and the glass transition relaxations are observed. However, in the case of a polarization temperature of 170 °C, one more current peak, labelled ρ peak, is observed at temperatures above the glass transition. This peak is not only of dipolar origin and could be associated with charge detrapping in the material. To unravel the mechanisms behind this process, a TSDC was combined with space charge measurements using the pulsed electroacoustic method (PEA) and the partial heating method was used. It is shown that the ρ peak is predominantly associated with the release of the negative charge build-up in the material.

  1. Mechanochemical Interplay Drives Polarization in Cellular and Developmental Systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiyan; Lecuit, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Polarity plays important roles in biological processes, such as motility, differentiation, growth, and pattern formation. One major goal in the field of biological polarity is to understand logics used by signaling networks underlying diverse polarization processes: symmetry breaking, amplification, inhibition, and coordination. In this essay, we explore various polarization processes on cell, tissue, and whole-organism scales, aiming to elucidate how diverse mechanical signals, in addition to chemical cues, can be integrated to a common framework of polarization.

  2. The skinny on Fat: an enormous cadherin that regulates cell adhesion, tissue growth, and planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Sopko, Richelle; McNeill, Helen

    2009-10-01

    Fat is an extremely large atypical cadherin involved in the regulation of cell adhesion, tissue growth, and planar cell polarity (PCP). Recent studies have begun to illuminate the mechanisms by which Fat performs these functions during development. Fat relays signals to the Hippo pathway to regulate tissue growth, and to PCP proteins to regulate tissue patterning. In this review we briefly cover the historical data demonstrating that Fat regulates tissue growth and tissue patterning, and then focus on advances in the past three years illuminating the mechanisms by which Fat controls growth and planar polarity in flies and mammals.

  3. Conserved function of Rho-related Rop/RAC GTPase signaling in regulation of cell polarity in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kanako; Ren, Junling; Fujita, Tomomichi

    2014-07-10

    Cell polarity is fundamentally important to growth and development in higher plants, from pollen tubes to root hairs. Basal land plants (mosses and ferns) also have cell polarity, developing protonemal apical cells that show polar tip growth. Flowering plants have a distinct group of Rho GTPases that regulate polarity in polarized cell growth. Rop/RAC signaling module components have been identified in non-flowering plants, but their roles remain unclear. To understand the importance and evolution of Rop/RAC signaling in polarity regulation in land plants, we examined the functions of PpRop and PpRopGEF in protonemal apical cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Inducible overexpression of PpRop2 or PpRopGEF3 caused depolarized growth of tip-growing apical cells. PpRop2 overexpression also caused aberrant cross wall formation. Fluorescent protein-tagged PpRop2 localized to the plasma membrane, including the cross wall membrane, and fluorescent-tagged PpRopGEF3 showed polarized localization to the tip region in apical cells. Thus, our results suggest common functions of PpRop and PpRopGEF in the tip-growing apical cells and the importance of a conserved Rop/RAC signaling module in the control of cell polarity in land plants.

  4. How Cells Integrate Complex Stimuli: The Effect of Feedback from Phosphoinositides and Cell Shape on Cell Polarization and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2012-01-01

    To regulate shape changes, motility and chemotaxis in eukaryotic cells, signal transduction pathways channel extracellular stimuli to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The complexity of such networks makes it difficult to understand the roles of individual components, let alone their interactions and multiple feedbacks within a given layer and between layers of signalling. Even more challenging is the question of if and how the shape of the cell affects and is affected by this internal spatiotemporal reorganization. Here we build on our previous 2D cell motility model where signalling from the Rho family GTPases (Cdc42, Rac, and Rho) was shown to organize the cell polarization, actin reorganization, shape change, and motility in simple gradients. We extend this work in two ways: First, we investigate the effects of the feedback between the phosphoinositides (PIs) , and Rho family GTPases. We show how that feedback increases heights and breadths of zones of Cdc42 activity, facilitating global communication between competing cell “fronts”. This hastens the commitment to a single lamellipodium initiated in response to multiple, complex, or rapidly changing stimuli. Second, we show how cell shape feeds back on internal distribution of GTPases. Constraints on chemical isocline curvature imposed by boundary conditions results in the fact that dynamic cell shape leads to faster biochemical redistribution when the cell is repolarized. Cells with frozen cytoskeleton, and static shapes, consequently respond more slowly to reorienting stimuli than cells with dynamic shape changes, the degree of the shape-induced effects being proportional to the extent of cell deformation. We explain these concepts in the context of several in silico experiments using our 2D computational cell model. PMID:22396633

  5. Simple system for evaluating retardation of liquid crystal cells using grating type liquid crystal polarization splitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michinori; Nose, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We propose a unique optical system for measuring the retardation of birefringent films using a pair of liquid crystal (LC) gratings; that is, the examined birefringent films are inserted between two LC gratings. Because the LC grating functions as a polarization beam splitter for circularly polarized light, the proposed system is optically equivalent to the measurement system using a pair of two circular polarizers. First, the polarization splitting performance of the LC grating is discussed. It is found that a sufficiently high voltage (such that the retardation is less than a half wavelength) has to be applied for the almost pure circularly polarized diffracted light. Next, the measurement of the retardation of a homogeneous LC cell as an examined birefringent film was demonstrated using the proposed method. The proposed method is revealed to have the same measurement performance as that of the conventional method using a pair of linear polarizers and has an advantage that there is no need for the optic axis of the test birefringent specimen to be set at a specific angle.

  6. FGF signaling regulates Wnt ligand expression to control vulval cell lineage polarity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Paul J.; He, Ting-Fang; Sohn, Chang Ho; Asthagiri, Anand R.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of extracellular cues leading to the polarization of intracellular components and asymmetric cell divisions is a fundamental part of metazoan organogenesis. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva, with its invariant cell lineage and interaction of multiple cell signaling pathways, provides an excellent model for the study of cell polarity within an organized epithelial tissue. Here, we show that the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathway acts in concert with the Frizzled homolog LIN-17 to influence the localization of SYS-1, a component of the Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway, indirectly through the regulation of cwn-1. The source of the FGF ligand is the primary vulval precursor cell (VPC) P6.p, which controls the orientation of the neighboring secondary VPC P7.p by signaling through the sex myoblasts (SMs), activating the FGF pathway. The Wnt CWN-1 is expressed in the posterior body wall muscle of the worm as well as in the SMs, making it the only Wnt expressed on the posterior and anterior sides of P7.p at the time of the polarity decision. Both sources of cwn-1 act instructively to influence P7.p polarity in the direction of the highest Wnt signal. Using single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that the FGF pathway regulates the expression of cwn-1 in the SMs. These results demonstrate an interaction between FGF and Wnt in C. elegans development and vulval cell lineage polarity, and highlight the promiscuous nature of Wnts and the importance of Wnt gradient directionality within C. elegans. PMID:23946444

  7. The fenestrin antigen in submembrane skeleton of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is proposed as a marker of cell polarity during cell division and in oral replacement.

    PubMed

    Kaczanowska, Janina; Joachimiak, Ewa; Kiersnowska, Mauryla; Krzywicka, Anna; Golinska, Krystyna; Kaczanowski, Andrzej

    2003-07-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila cells have two types of polarized morphogenesis: divisional morphogenesis and oral reorganization (OR). The aim of this research is the analysis of cortical patterns of immunostaining during cell division and in OR using previously characterized antibodies against fenestrin and epiplasm B proteins. During cell division, the anarchic field of basal body proliferation of the new developing oral apparatus (AF) showed concomitant strong binding of the fenestrin antigen and withdrawal of a signal of the epiplasm B antigen. At a specific stage, the fenestrin antigen also appeared as a character of the anterior cortex pole, with a co-localized decrease in the detected epiplasm B antigen. The fenestrin antigen also showed a polarity of duplicating basal bodies in ciliary rows. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling experiments were performed in the absence and presence of an inhibitor of activity of serine/threonine kinases, 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) as an inducer of the oral replacement process. In the presence of 6-DMAP, one class of cells started OR, and some others were trapped and affected in cell division. Both types of cells showed an instability of oral structures and formed enlarged primordial oral fields. These anarchic fields (AFs) bind the fenestrin antigen, with disappearance of epiplasmic antigen staining. Only one protein (about 64 kDa) is detected in western blots by the anti-fenestrin antibody and it accumulated in 6-DMAP-treated cells that are involved in uncompleted morphogenetic activity. At a defined stage of oral development, both during cell division and in OR, the fenestrin antigen served as a marker of polarity of the cell of the anterior pole character.

  8. Different populations of Wnt-containing vesicles are individually released from polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuhong; Takada, Ritsuko; Noda, Chiyo; Kobayashi, Satoru; Takada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exosomes are heterogeneous in molecular composition and physical properties. Here we examined whether epithelial cells secrete a heterogeneous population of exosomes, and if that is the case, whether epithelial cell polarity affects release of different populations of exosomes, especially that of those carrying Wnt. Sucrose-density ultracentrifugation and molecular marker analysis revealed that different populations of exosomes or exosome-like vesicles were released from MDCK cells depending on the cell polarity. Wnt3a associated with these vesicles were detectable in culture media collected from both apical and basolateral sides of the cells. Basolaterally secreted Wnt3a were co-fractionated with a typical exosomal protein TSG101 in fractions having typical exosome densities. In contrast, most of apically secreted Wnt3a, as well as Wnt11, were co-fractionated with CD63 and Hsp70, which are also common to the most exosomes, but recovered in higher density fractions. Wnt3a exhibiting similar floatation behavior to the apically secreted ones were also detectable in the culture media of Wnt3a-expressing L and HEK293 cells. The lipidation of Wnt3a was required for its basolateral secretion in exosomes but was dispensable for the apical one. Thus, epithelial cells release Wnt via distinct populations of vesicles differing in secretion polarity and lipidation dependency. PMID:27765945

  9. The young and happy marriage of membrane traffic and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Barry J; Perez, Franck; Vaccari, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    The ESF-EMBO meeting on 'Cell Polarity and Membrane Traffic' took place in Poland in April 2012. It brought together scientists from two once separate fields and highlighted their emerging interdependence. The wealth of scientific insights and discoveries presented laid a path for future research.

  10. Banding and polarity of actin filaments in interphase and cleaving cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) decoration of actin filaments was used to detect the polarity of microfilaments in interphase and cleaving rat kangaroo (PtK2) cells. Ethanol at -20 degrees C was used to make the cells permeable to HMM followed by tannic acid-glutaraldehyde fixation for electron microscopy. Uniform polarity of actin filaments was observed at cell junctions and central attachment plaques with the HMM arrowheads always pointing away from the junction or plaque. Stress fibers were banded in appearance with their component microfilaments exhibiting both parallel and antiparallel orientation with respect to one another. Identical banding of microfilament bundles was also seen in cleavage furrows with the same variation in filament polarity as found in stress fibers. Similarly banded fibers were not seen outside the cleavage furrow in mitotic cells. By the time that a mid-body was present, the actin filaments in the cleavage furrow were no longer in banded fibers. The alternating dark and light bands of both the stress fibers and cleavage furrow fibers are approximately equal in length, each measuring approximately 0.16 micrometer. Actin filaments were present in both bands, and individual decorated filaments could sometimes be traced through four band lengths. Undecorated filaments, 10 nm in diameter, could often be seen within the light bands. A model is proposed to explain the arrangement of filaments in stress fibers and cleavage furrows based on the striations observed with tannic acid and the polarity of the actin filaments. PMID:6995468

  11. The Drosophila selectin furrowed mediates intercellular planar cell polarity interactions via frizzled stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chin, Mei-Ling; Mlodzik, Marek

    2013-09-16

    Establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) in a tissue requires coordination of directional signals from cell to cell. It is thought that this is mediated by the core PCP factors, which include cell-adhesion molecules. Here, we demonstrate that furrowed, the Drosophila selectin, is required for PCP generation. Disruption of PCP in furrowed-deficient flies results from a primary defect in Fz levels and cell adhesion. Furrowed localizes at or near apical junctions, largely colocalizing with Frizzled and Flamingo (Fmi). It physically interacts with and stabilizes Frizzled, and it mediates intercellular Frizzled-Van Gogh (Vang)/Strabismus interactions, similarly to Fmi. Furrowed does so through a homophilic cell-adhesion role that is distinct from its known carbohydrate-binding function described during vertebrate blood-cell/endothelial cell interactions. Importantly, the carbohydrate function is dispensable for PCP establishment. In vivo studies suggest that Furrowed functions partially redundantly with Fmi, mediating intercellular Frizzled-Vang interactions between neighboring cells.

  12. A new efficient method for the processing of post-consumer polypropylene and other polyolefin wastes into polar waxes.

    PubMed

    Marek, Adam Andrzej; Zawadiak, Jan; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Hefczyc, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new efficient method for the processing of post-consumer polypropylene (and other polyolefins) wastes into polar waxes that have potential applications. This technology includes two key steps. In the first step, the post-consumer polyolefins are purified mostly from oil which is used as a solvent in processing of polyolefin wastes (like metalized polyolefin films), and in the second step, the oxidative degradation process is initiated to obtain polar waxes or, alternatively, the purified polymer can be granulated. The results of laboratory research on both steps are presented, as well as a comparison of the obtained granulates and polar waxes with commercially available products. PMID:26341829

  13. Enhanced metabolic and redox activity of vascular aquatic plant Lemna valdiviana under polarization in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In this study, duckweed species Lemna valdiviana was investigated as a photoautotrophycally grown biocatalyst in recently developed Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell. Stable current outputs, reaching maximum of 226±11 mА/m(2), were achieved during the operating period. The electricity production is associated with electrons generated through the light-dependent reactions in the chloroplasts as well as the respiratory processes in the mitochondria and transferred to the anode via endogenous electron shuttle, synthesized by the plants as a specific response to the polarization. In parallel, a considerable increase in the content of proteins (47%) and reserve carbohydrates (44%) of duckweeds grown under polarization conditions was established by means of biochemical analyses. This, combined with the electricity generation, makes the technology a feasible approach for the duckweed farming.

  14. Enhanced metabolic and redox activity of vascular aquatic plant Lemna valdiviana under polarization in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In this study, duckweed species Lemna valdiviana was investigated as a photoautotrophycally grown biocatalyst in recently developed Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell. Stable current outputs, reaching maximum of 226±11 mА/m(2), were achieved during the operating period. The electricity production is associated with electrons generated through the light-dependent reactions in the chloroplasts as well as the respiratory processes in the mitochondria and transferred to the anode via endogenous electron shuttle, synthesized by the plants as a specific response to the polarization. In parallel, a considerable increase in the content of proteins (47%) and reserve carbohydrates (44%) of duckweeds grown under polarization conditions was established by means of biochemical analyses. This, combined with the electricity generation, makes the technology a feasible approach for the duckweed farming. PMID:25129413

  15. Comparison study of distinguishing cancerous and normal prostate epithelial cells by confocal and polarization diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenhuan; Lu, Jun Qing; Yang, Li V.; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Accurate classification of malignant cells from benign ones can significantly enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis by detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We have investigated two approaches of quantitative morphology and polarization diffraction imaging on two prostate cell types to evaluate their feasibility as single-cell assay methods toward CTC detection after cell enrichment. The two cell types have been measured by a confocal imaging method to obtain their three-dimensional morphology parameters and by a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method to obtain image texture parameters. The support vector machine algorithm was applied to examine the accuracy of cell classification with the morphology and diffraction image parameters. Despite larger mean values of cell and nuclear sizes of the cancerous prostate cells than the normal ones, it has been shown that the morphologic parameters cannot serve as effective classifiers. In contrast, accurate classification of the two prostate cell types can be achieved with high classification accuracies on measured data acquired separately in three measurements. These results provide strong evidence that the p-DIFC method has the potential to yield morphology-related "fingerprints" for accurate and label-free classification of the two prostate cell types.

  16. Polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and cultured plant cells in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1989-01-01

    Plant development entails an orderly progression of cellular events both in terms of time and geometry. There is only circumstantial evidence that, in the controlled environment of the higher plant embryo sac, gravity may play a role in embryo development. It is still not known whether or not normal embryo development and differentiation in higher plants can be expected to take place reliably and efficiently in the micro g space environment. It seems essential that more attention be given to studying aspects of reproductive biology in order to be confident that plants will survive seed to seed to seed in a space environment. Until the time arrives when successive generations of plants can be grown, the best that can be done is utilize the most appropriate systems and begin, piece meal, to accumulate information on important aspects of plant reproduction. Cultured plant cells can play an important role in these activities since they can be grown so as to be morphogenetically competent, and thus can simulate those embryogenic events more usually identified with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary. Also, they can be manipulated with relative ease. The extreme plasticity of such demonstrably totipotent cell systems provides a means to test environmental effects such as micro g on a potentially free-running entity. The successful manipulation and management of plant cells and propagules in space also has significance for exploitation of biotechnologies in space since such systems, perforce, are an important vehicle whereby many genetic engineering manipulations are achieved.

  17. Hybrid T-Helper Cells: Stabilizing the Moderate Center in a Polarized System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sui

    2013-01-01

    Polarization of cell phenotypes, a common strategy to achieve cell type diversity in metazoa, results from binary cell-fate decisions in the branching pedigree of development. Such “either-or” fate decisions are controlled by two opposing cell fate-determining transcription factors. Each of the two distinct “master regulators” promotes differentiation of its respective sister lineage. But they also suppress one other, leading to their mutually exclusive expression in the two ensuing lineages. Thus, promiscuous coexistence of the antagonist regulators in the same cell, the hallmark of the common “undecided” progenitor of two sister lineages, is considered unstable. This antagonism ensures robust polarization into two discretely distinct cell types. But now the immune system's T-helper (Th) cells and their two canonical subtypes, Th1 and Th2 cells, tell a different story, as revealed in three papers recently published in PLOS Biology. The intermediate state that co-expresses the two opposing master regulators of the Th1 and Th2 subtypes, T-bet and Gata3, is highly stable and is not necessarily an undecided precursor. Instead, the Th1/Th2 hybrid cell is a robust new type with properties of both Th1 and Th2 cells. These hybrid cells are functionally active and possess the benefit of moderation: self-limitation of effector T cell function to prevent excessive inflammation, a permanent risk in host defense that can cause tissue damage or autoimmunity. Gene regulatory network analysis suggests that stabilization of the intermediate center in a polarizing system can be achieved by minor tweaking of the architecture of the mutual suppression gene circuit, and thus is a design option readily available to evolution. PMID:23976879

  18. Polarized entry and release in epithelial cells of Black Creek Canal virus, a New World hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Ravkov, E V; Nichol, S T; Compans, R W

    1997-02-01

    Black Creek Canal (BCC) virus is a newly identified hantavirus from Florida which is carried by the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) and is associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). We have investigated the interaction of BCC virus with polarized epithelial cells to examine whether entry and release of this virus occur at specific plasma membrane domains. The polarized Vero C1008 monkey kidney cell line was grown on permeable filters and infected with BCC virus either through the apical or basolateral surface. As shown by indirect immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation analysis, cells infected through the apical surface demonstrated a high level of susceptibility to BCC virus infection. In contrast, Vero C1008 cells infected basolaterally exhibited a barely detectable level of BCC virus-synthesized proteins. Titration of virus from apical and basolateral media of infected cells has demonstrated that virus titers released from the apical surface are about 1,200-fold greater than the titer of virus released into the basolateral media. The site of BCC virus release from polarized cells is, therefore, different from that previously described for release of other members of the family Bunyaviridae and may reflect one of the determinants of hantavirus pathogenesis. In addition, we have shown that BCC viral glycoproteins are expressed at the plasma membrane on the apical surface of polarized cells. Electron microscopy studies of the infected cells revealed evidence of BCC virus budding at the plasma membrane. This strongly indicates that, in contrast to most other members of the Bunyaviridae, BCC virus is assembled at the plasma membrane. Since the same site of virus assembly was recently described for Sin Nombre virus, it is likely that all of the new American hantaviruses associated with HPS utilize this same type of virus maturation.

  19. MiR-16 regulates mouse peritoneal macrophage polarization and affects T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoqin; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Yating; Miao, Junjun; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoli; Wang, Zhengbing

    2016-10-01

    MiR-16 is a tumour suppressor that is down-regulated in certain human cancers. However, little is known on its activity in other cell types. In this study, we examined the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of miR-16 on macrophage polarization and subsequent T-cell activation. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were isolated and induced to undergo either M1 polarization with 100 ng/ml of interferon-γ and 20 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide, or M2 polarization with 20 ng/ml of interleukin (IL)-4. The identity of polarized macrophages was determined by profiling cell-surface markers by flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISA. Macrophages were infected with lentivirus-expressing miR-16 to assess the effects of miR-16. Effects on macrophage-T cell interactions were analysed by co-culturing purified CD4(+) T cells with miR-16-expressing peritoneal macrophages, and measuring activation marker CD69 by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion by ELISA. Bioinformatics analysis was applied to search for potential miR-16 targets and understand its underlying mechanisms. MiR-16-induced M1 differentiation of mouse peritoneal macrophages from either the basal M0- or M2-polarized state is indicated by the significant up-regulation of M1 marker CD16/32, repression of M2 marker CD206 and Dectin-1, and increased secretion of M1 cytokine IL-12 and nitric oxide. Consistently, miR-16-expressing macrophages stimulate the activation of purified CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, miR-16 significantly down-regulates the expression of PD-L1, a critical immune suppressor that controls macrophage-T cell interaction and T-cell activation. MiR-16 plays an important role in shifting macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 status, and functionally activating CD4(+) T cells. This effect is potentially mediated through the down-regulation of immune suppressor PD-L1.

  20. Development and localization of reverse-polarity mechanotransducer channels in cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Goldring, Adam C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells normally detect positive deflections of their hair bundles, rotating toward their tallest edge, which opens mechanotransducer (MT) channels by increased tension in interciliary tip links. After tip-link destruction, the normal polarity of MT current is replaced by a mechanically sensitive current evoked by negative bundle deflections. The “reverse-polarity” current was investigated in cochlear hair cells after tip-link destruction with BAPTA, in transmembrane channel-like protein isoforms 1/2 (Tmc1:Tmc2) double mutants, and during perinatal development. This current is a natural adjunct of embryonic development, present in all wild-type hair cells but declining after birth with emergence of the normal-polarity current. Evidence indicated the reverse-polarity current seen developmentally was a manifestation of the same ion channel as that evident under abnormal conditions in Tmc mutants or after tip-link destruction. In all cases, sinusoidal fluid-jet stimuli from different orientations suggested the underlying channels were opened not directly by deflections of the hair bundle but by deformation of the apical plasma membrane. Cell-attached patch recording on the hair-cell apical membrane revealed, after BAPTA treatment or during perinatal development, 90-pS stretch-activated cation channels that could be blocked by Ca2+ and by FM1-43. High-speed Ca2+ imaging, using swept-field confocal microscopy, showed the Ca2+ influx through the reverse-polarity channels was not localized to the hair bundle, but distributed across the apical plasma membrane. These reverse-polarity channels, which we propose to be renamed “unconventional” mechanically sensitive channels, have some properties similar to the normal MT channels, but the relationship between the two types is still not well defined. PMID:27162344

  1. Energy requirements of the switchable polarity solvent forward osmosis (SPS-FO) water purification process

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Daniel S.; Orme, Christopher J.; Mines, Gregory L.; Wilson, Aaron D.

    2015-08-01

    A model was developed to estimate the process energy requirements of a switchable polarity solvent forward osmosis (SPS FO) system for water purification from aqueous NaCl feed solution concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 molal at an operational scale of 480 m3/day (feed stream). The model indicates recovering approximately 90% of the water from a feed solution with NaCl concentration similar to seawater using SPS FO would have total equivalent energy requirements between 2.4 and 4.3 kWh per m3 of purified water product. The process is predicted to be competitive with current costs for disposal/treatment of produced water from oil and gas drilling operations. As a result, once scaled up the SPS FO process may be a thermally driven desalination process that can compete with the cost of seawater reverse osmosis.

  2. Energy requirements of the switchable polarity solvent forward osmosis (SPS-FO) water purification process

    DOE PAGES

    Wendt, Daniel S.; Orme, Christopher J.; Mines, Gregory L.; Wilson, Aaron D.

    2015-08-01

    A model was developed to estimate the process energy requirements of a switchable polarity solvent forward osmosis (SPS FO) system for water purification from aqueous NaCl feed solution concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 molal at an operational scale of 480 m3/day (feed stream). The model indicates recovering approximately 90% of the water from a feed solution with NaCl concentration similar to seawater using SPS FO would have total equivalent energy requirements between 2.4 and 4.3 kWh per m3 of purified water product. The process is predicted to be competitive with current costs for disposal/treatment of produced water from oilmore » and gas drilling operations. As a result, once scaled up the SPS FO process may be a thermally driven desalination process that can compete with the cost of seawater reverse osmosis.« less

  3. Transient junction anisotropies orient annular cell polarization in the Drosophila airway tubes.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Chie; Matsuda, Ryo; Adryan, Boris; Samakovlis, Christos

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to planes, three-dimensional (3D) structures such as tubes are physically anisotropic. Tubular organs exhibit a striking orientation of landmarks according to the physical anisotropy of the 3D shape, in addition to planar cell polarization. However, the influence of 3D tissue topography on the constituting cells remains underexplored. Here, we identify a regulatory network polarizing cellular biochemistry according to the physical anisotropy of the 3D tube geometry (tube cell polarization) by a genome-wide, tissue-specific RNAi screen. During Drosophila airway remodelling, each apical cellular junction is equipotent to establish perpendicular actomyosin cables, irrespective of the longitudinal or transverse tube axis. A dynamic transverse enrichment of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) shifts the balance and transiently targets activated small GTPase RhoA, myosin phosphorylation and Rab11 vesicle trafficking to longitudinal junctions. We propose that the PAR complex translates tube physical anisotropy into longitudinal junctional anisotropy, where cell-cell communication aligns the contractile cytoskeleton of neighbouring cells.

  4. In Vitro Polarization of Colonoids to Create an Intestinal Stem Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Attayek, Peter J.; Ahmad, Asad A.; Wang, Yuli; Williamson, Ian; Sims, Christopher E.; Magness, Scott T.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    The polarity of proliferative and differentiated cellular compartments of colonic crypts is believed to be specified by gradients of key mitogens and morphogens. Indirect evidence demonstrates a tight correlation between Wnt- pathway activity and the basal-luminal patterning; however, to date there has been no direct experimental manipulation demonstrating that a chemical gradient of signaling factors can produce similar patterning under controlled conditions. In the current work, colonic organoids (colonoids) derived from cultured, multicellular organoid fragments or single stem cells were exposed in culture to steep linear gradients of two Wnt-signaling ligands, Wnt-3a and R-spondin1. The use of a genetically engineered Sox9-Sox9EGFP:CAGDsRED reporter gene mouse model and EdU-based labeling enabled crypt patterning to be quantified in the developing colonoids. Colonoids derived from multicellular fragments cultured for 5 days under a Wnt-3a or a combined Wnt-3a and R-spondin1 gradient were highly polarized with proliferative cells localizing to the region of the higher morphogen concentration. In a Wnt-3a gradient, Sox9EGFP polarization was 7.3 times greater than that of colonoids cultured in the absence of a gradient; and the extent of EdU polarization was 2.2 times greater than that in the absence of a gradient. Under a Wnt-3a/R-spondin1 gradient, Sox9EGFP polarization was 8.2 times greater than that of colonoids cultured in the absence of a gradient while the extent of EdU polarization was 10 times greater than that in the absence of a gradient. Colonoids derived from single stem cells cultured in Wnt-3a/R-spondin1 gradients were most highly polarized demonstrated by a Sox9EGFP polarization 20 times that of colonoids grown in the absence of a gradient. This data provides direct evidence that a linear gradient of Wnt signaling factors applied to colonic stem cells is sufficient to direct patterning of the colonoid unit in culture. PMID:27100890

  5. Complete all-optical processing polarization-based binary logic gates and optical processors.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Y A; Zaghloul, A R M

    2006-10-16

    We present a complete all-optical-processing polarization-based binary-logic system, by which any logic gate or processor can be implemented. Following the new polarization-based logic presented in [Opt. Express 14, 7253 (2006)], we develop a new parallel processing technique that allows for the creation of all-optical-processing gates that produce a unique output either logic 1 or 0 only once in a truth table, and those that do not. This representation allows for the implementation of simple unforced OR, AND, XOR, XNOR, inverter, and more importantly NAND and NOR gates that can be used independently to represent any Boolean expression or function. In addition, the concept of a generalized gate is presented which opens the door for reconfigurable optical processors and programmable optical logic gates. Furthermore, the new design is completely compatible with the old one presented in [Opt. Express 14, 7253 (2006)], and with current semiconductor based devices. The gates can be cascaded, where the information is always on the laser beam. The polarization of the beam, and not its intensity, carries the information. The new methodology allows for the creation of multiple-input-multiple-output processors that implement, by itself, any Boolean function, such as specialized or non-specialized microprocessors. Three all-optical architectures are presented: orthoparallel optical logic architecture for all known and unknown binary gates, singlebranch architecture for only XOR and XNOR gates, and the railroad (RR) architecture for polarization optical processors (POP). All the control inputs are applied simultaneously leading to a single time lag which leads to a very-fast and glitch-immune POP. A simple and easy-to-follow step-by-step algorithm is provided for the POP, and design reduction methodologies are briefly discussed. The algorithm lends itself systematically to software programming and computer-assisted design. As examples, designs of all binary gates, multiple

  6. Unloading Versus Driven Processes Derived from Auroral Energy Deposition and Polar Cap Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.; Fillingim, M. O.; Elsen, R.; Chua, D.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The intensity of far ultraviolet auroral emissions at all local times during the three substorm phases has been monitored by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on the Polar spacecraft for many substorms. Changes in the energy flux and characteristic energy of the precipitating electrons can be derived from these observations by modeling of the spectral emission processes. The global and local energy deposition is a new parameter that can be used in substorm studies since it provides a measure of energy transfer from the tail to the ionosphere due to precipitating electrons at a time resolution of three minutes. The polar cap area and area of auroral emissions can also be determined at high time resolution during substorms from the UVI images. An example of a substorm that appears to be driven by solar wind dynamic pressure alone will be presented. The polar cap area and other parameters do not indicate a growth phase prior to substorm onset. In another example, the slow growth phase followed by a very rapid increase in energy deposition during the expansion phase will be shown. This substorm was preceded by a southward IMF orientation. In these two examples, the role the solar wind in determining polar cap area is discussed. The time development of the area of auroral emissions is also discussed in relation to substorm phase and energy deposition. If the auroral emissions occur on closed field lines then the area of auroral emissions may provide an indication of changes in the thickness of the plasma sheet during each substorm phase.

  7. Polarization of Diploid Daughter Cells Directed by Spatial Cues and GTP Hydrolysis of Cdc42 in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Monisha; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization occurs along a single axis that is generally determined by a spatial cue. Cells of the budding yeast exhibit a characteristic pattern of budding, which depends on cell-type-specific cortical markers, reflecting a genetic programming for the site of cell polarization. The Cdc42 GTPase plays a key role in cell polarization in various cell types. Although previous studies in budding yeast suggested positive feedback loops whereby Cdc42 becomes polarized, these mechanisms do not include spatial cues, neglecting the normal patterns of budding. Here we combine live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand how diploid daughter cells establish polarity preferentially at the pole distal to the previous division site. Live-cell imaging shows that daughter cells of diploids exhibit dynamic polarization of Cdc42-GTP, which localizes to the bud tip until the M phase, to the division site at cytokinesis, and then to the distal pole in the next G1 phase. The strong bias toward distal budding of daughter cells requires the distal-pole tag Bud8 and Rga1, a GTPase activating protein for Cdc42, which inhibits budding at the cytokinesis site. Unexpectedly, we also find that over 50% of daughter cells lacking Rga1 exhibit persistent Cdc42-GTP polarization at the bud tip and the distal pole, revealing an additional role of Rga1 in spatiotemporal regulation of Cdc42 and thus in the pattern of polarized growth. Mathematical modeling indeed reveals robust Cdc42-GTP clustering at the distal pole in diploid daughter cells despite random perturbation of the landmark cues. Moreover, modeling predicts different dynamics of Cdc42-GTP polarization when the landmark level and the initial level of Cdc42-GTP at the division site are perturbed by noise added in the model. PMID:23437206

  8. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-11-01

    Polarization and positive phase contrast microscope were concomitantly used in the study of the internal structure of microbial cells. Positive phase contrast allowed us to view even the fine cell structure with a refractive index approaching that of the surrounding environment, e.g., the cytoplasm, and transferred the invisible phase image to a visible amplitude image. With polarization microscopy, crossed polarizing filters together with compensators and a rotary stage showed the birefringence of different cell structures. Material containing algae was collected in ponds in Sýkořice and Zbečno villages (Křivoklát region). The objects were studied in laboratory microscopes LOMO MIN-8 Sankt Petersburg and Polmi A Carl Zeiss Jena fitted with special optics for positive phase contrast, polarizers, analyzers, compensators, rotary stages, and digital SLR camera Nikon D 70 for image capture. Anisotropic granules were found in the cells of flagellates of the order Euglenales, in green algae of the orders Chlorococcales and Chlorellales, and in desmid algae of the order Desmidiales. The cell walls of filamentous algae of the orders Zygnematales and Ulotrichales were found to exhibit significant birefringence; in addition, relatively small amounts of small granules were found in the cytoplasm. A typical shape-related birefringence of the cylindrical walls and the septa between the cells differed in intensity, which was especially apparent when using a Zeiss compensator RI-c during its successive double setting. In conclusion, the anisotropic granules found in the investigated algae mostly showed strong birefringence and varied in number, size, and location of the cells. Representatives of the order Chlorococcales contained the highest number of granules per cell, and the size of these granules was almost double than that of the other monitored microorganisms. Very strong birefringence was exhibited by cell walls of filamentous algae; it differed in the intensity

  9. Dual roles of Notch in regulation of apically restricted mitosis and apicobasal polarity of neuroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Shinya; Aoki, Ryo; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Tsuruoka-Kinoshita, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hideomi; Wada, Hironori; Watabe, Shugo; Tsuboi, Takashi; Masai, Ichiro; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2011-01-27

    How the mitosis of neuroepithelial stem cells is restricted to the apical ventricular area remains unclear. In zebrafish, the mosaic eyes(rw306) (moe/epb41l5(rw306)) mutation disrupts the interaction between the putative adaptor protein Moe and the apicobasal polarity regulator Crumbs (Crb), and impairs the maintenance of neuroepithelial apicobasal polarity. While Crb interacts directly with Notch and inhibits its activity, Moe reverses this inhibition. In the moe(rw306) hindbrain, Notch activity is significantly reduced, and the number of cells that proliferate basally away from the apical area is increased. Surprisingly, activation of Notch in the moe(rw306) mutant rescues not only the basally localized proliferation but also the aberrant neuroepithelial apicobasal polarity. We present evidence that the Crb⋅Moe complex and Notch play key roles in a positive feedback loop to maintain the apicobasal polarity and the apical-high basal-low gradient of Notch activity in neuroepithelial cells, both of which are essential for their apically restricted mitosis. PMID:21262462

  10. Is a Persistent Global Bias Necessary for the Establishment of Planar Cell Polarity?

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sabine; Houston, Paul; Monk, Nicholas A. M.; Owen, Markus R.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP)–the coordinated polarisation of a whole field of cells within the plane of a tissue–relies on the interaction of three modules: a global module that couples individual cellular polarity to the tissue axis, a local module that aligns the axis of polarisation of neighbouring cells, and a readout module that directs the correct outgrowth of PCP-regulated structures such as hairs and bristles. While much is known about the molecular components that are required for PCP, the functional details of–and interactions between–the modules remain unclear. In this work, we perform a mathematical and computational analysis of two previously proposed computational models of the local module (Amonlirdviman et al., Science, 307, 2005; Le Garrec et al., Dev. Dyn., 235, 2006). Both models can reproduce wild-type and mutant phenotypes of PCP observed in the Drosophila wing under the assumption that a tissue-wide polarity cue from the global module persists throughout the development of PCP. We demonstrate that both models can also generate tissue-level PCP when provided with only a transient initial polarity cue. However, in these models such transient cues are not sufficient to ensure robustness of the resulting cellular polarisation. PMID:23593163

  11. Signaling through the G-protein-coupled receptor Rickets is important for polarity, detachment, and migration of the border cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Anllo, Lauren; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2016-06-15

    Cell migration plays crucial roles during development. An excellent model to study coordinated cell movements is provided by the migration of border cell clusters within a developing Drosophila egg chamber. In a mutagenesis screen, we isolated two alleles of the gene rickets (rk) encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor. The rk alleles result in border cell migration defects in a significant fraction of egg chambers. In rk mutants, border cells are properly specified and express the marker Slbo. Yet, analysis of both fixed as well as live samples revealed that some single border cells lag behind the main border cell cluster during migration, or, in other cases, the entire border cell cluster can remain tethered to the anterior epithelium as it migrates. These defects are observed significantly more often in mosaic border cell clusters, than in full mutant clusters. Reduction of the Rk ligand, Bursicon, in the border cell cluster also resulted in migration defects, strongly suggesting that Rk signaling is utilized for communication within the border cell cluster itself. The mutant border cell clusters show defects in localization of the adhesion protein E-cadherin, and apical polarity proteins during migration. E-cadherin mislocalization occurs in mosaic clusters, but not in full mutant clusters, correlating well with the rk border cell migration phenotype. Our work has identified a receptor with a previously unknown role in border cell migration that appears to regulate detachment and polarity of the border cell cluster coordinating processes within the cells of the cluster themselves.

  12. Polar processing and development of the 2004 Antarctic ozone hole : first results from MLS on Aura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Read, W. G.; Schwartz, M. J.; Waters, J. W.; Harwood, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on Aura is providing an extensive data set on stratospheric winter polar processing, including the first daily global observations of HCl, together with simultaneous measurements of ClO, HNO3, H2O, O3, N2O, and temperature (among others). We present first results charting the evolution of these quantities during the 2004 Antarctic late winter. MLS observations of chlorine deactivation and ozone loss during this period are shown to be consistent with results from the SLIMCAT chemical transport model.

  13. Surface wettability enhancement of silicone hydrogel lenses by processing with polar plastic molds.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y C; Friends, G D

    1997-06-01

    In the quest for hydrogel contact lenses with improved extended wear capability, the use of siloxane moieties in the lens materials was investigated. However, the introduction of hydrophobic siloxane groups gave rise to wettability and lipidlike deposit problems. It was found that when polysiloxane-based compositions for hydrogels were processed with polar plastic molds, such as those fabricated from an acrylonitrile-based polymer, the hydrogel lenses fabricated were wettable, with minimized lipidlike deposits. These findings were supported by the wettability of silicone hydrogel films, silicon, and nitrogen element contents near lens surfaces, as well as the results from clinical assessment of silicone hydrogel lenses. PMID:9138069

  14. Recording of polarization holograms in a liquid crystal cell with a photosensitive chalcogenide orientation layer [Invited].

    PubMed

    Sheremet, Nina; Kurioz, Yuriy; Slyusarenko, Kostyantyn; Trunov, Michael; Reznikov, Yuriy

    2013-08-01

    Polarization gratings have been recorded in a combined liquid crystal (LC) cell made of a substrate covered with a photosensitive chalcogenide orientation layer and a reference substrate covered with a rubbed polyimide film. The gratings are formed due to the spatially modulated light-induced easy orientation axis on the chalcogenide surface recorded by two beams with opposite circular polarizations. The gratings are permanent, but they can be erased by one of the recording beams and re-recorded. The diffraction intensity of the circularly polarized light is achromatic and does not depend on the birefringence of the LC. The diffraction efficiency of the grating is of the order of a few percents. Application of an ac field causes a strong increase of the diffraction efficiency up to 45%. PMID:23913086

  15. An efficient means to mitigate wavefront curvature effects in polar format processed SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnehan, Robert; Yasuda, Mark; Doerry, Armin

    2012-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images processed using the polar format algorithm (PFA) may exhibit distortion if the curvature of the spherical wavefronts are not accounted for. The distortion manifests in geometric shifts and defocusing of targets, and intensifies as distances between pixels and the scene reference position increase. In this work, we demonstrate a method to mitigate the effects of wavefront curvature by applying localized (space-variant) phase corrections to sub-regions selected from the polar format processed image. The modified sub-images are then reassembled into a full image. To minimize discontinuities in the reconstructed image, the spatially variant phase adjustments are made to regions larger than the sub-images, and pared down before being reinserted into the complete image. The result is a SAR process that retains the efficiency of the PFA, yet avoids scene size limitations due to wavefront curvature distortions. The method is illustrated and validated using simulations and real data collected by the General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Lynx® Multi-mode Radar System.

  16. Fluorescence polarization of DPH-labeled cells adsorbing viruses and its diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Levanon, A; Inbar, M; Kohn, A

    1979-01-01

    Mammalian or avian cells were labeled with a fluorescent probe DPH (1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene). Within a few minutes after adsorption of various naked and enveloped viruses, the degree of fluorescence polarization (P) of the DPH embedded in the adsorbing cells as measured at 37 degrees C, was reduced, a finding indicating a decrease in the microviscosity of the lipids in the cell membrane. This change of fluidity was proportional to the concentration of the adsorbing virus and could be abolished or inhibited by homologous specific antiviral sera, but not by heterologous sera. Potential use of fluorescence polarization tests is described for titration of virus concentration, as well as for serological identification of a virus.

  17. Solvent polarity and nanoscale morphology in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ajith; Elsa Tom, Anju; Ison, V. V. E-mail: praveen@materials.iisc.ernet.in; Rao, Arun D.; Varman, K. Arul; Ranjith, K.; Ramamurthy, Praveen C. E-mail: praveen@materials.iisc.ernet.in; Vinayakan, R.

    2014-03-14

    Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated under identical experimental conditions, except by varying the solvent polarity used for spin coating the active layer components and their performance was evaluated systematically. Results showed that presence of nitrobenzene-chlorobenzene composition governs the morphology of active layer formed, which is due to the tuning of solvent polarity as well as the resulting solubility of the P3HT:PCBM blend. Trace amount of nitrobenzene favoured the formation of better organised P3HT domains, as evident from conductive AFM, tapping mode AFM and surface, and cross-sectional SEM analysis. The higher interfacial surface area thus generated produced cells with high efficiency. But, an increase in the nitrobenzene composition leads to a decrease in cell performance, which is due to the formation of an active layer with larger size polymer domain networks with poor charge separation possibility.

  18. Drosophila Stardust is a partner of Crumbs in the control of epithelial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, A; Schneider, M; Theilenberg, E; Grawe, F; Knust, E

    2001-12-01

    The polarized architecture of epithelial cells depends on the highly stereotypic distribution of cellular junctions and other membrane-associated protein complexes. In epithelial cells of the Drosophila embryo, three distinct domains subdivide the lateral plasma membrane. The most apical one comprises the subapical complex (SAC). It is followed by the zonula adherens (ZA) and, further basally, by the septate junction. A core component of the SAC is the transmembrane protein Crumbs, the cytoplasmic domain of which recruits the PDZ-protein Discs Lost into the complex. Cells lacking crumbs or the functionally related gene stardust fail to organize a continuous ZA and to maintain cell polarity. Here we show that stardust provides an essential component of the SAC. Stardust proteins colocalize with Crumbs and bind to the carboxy-terminal amino acids of its cytoplasmic tail. We introduce two different Stardust proteins here: one MAGUK protein, characterized by a PDZ domain, an SH3 domain and a guanylate kinase domain; and a second isoform comprising only the guanylate kinase domain. The Stardust proteins represent versatile candidates as structural and possibly regulatory constituents of the SAC, a crucial element in the control of epithelial cell polarity.

  19. Thimerosal compromises human dendritic cell maturation, IL-12 production, chemokine release, and T-helper polarization

    PubMed Central

    Loison, Emily; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative used in multidose vials of vaccine formulations to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination. We recently reported that nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal induce cell cycle arrest of human T cells activated via the TCR and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production, thus interfering with T-cell functions. Given the essential role of dendritic cells (DCs) in T-cell polarization and vaccine immunity, we studied the influence of non-toxic concentrations of thimerosal on DC maturation and functions. Ex-vivo exposure of human monocyte-derived DCs to nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal prevented LPS-induced DC maturation, as evidenced by the inhibition of morphological changes and a decreased expression of the maturation markers CD86 and HLA-DR. In addition thimerosal dampened their proinflammatory response, in particular the production of the Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12, as well as TNF-α and IL-6. DC-dependent T helper polarization was altered, leading to a decreased production of IFN-γ IP10 and GM-CSF and increased levels of IL-8, IL-9, and MIP-1α. Although multi-dose vials of vaccines containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery, our results alert about the ex-vivo immunomodulatory effects of thimerosal on DCs, a key player for the induction of an adaptive response PMID:25424939

  20. Collective cell migration requires suppression of actomyosin at cell-cell contacts mediated by DDR1 and the cell polarity regulators Par3 and Par6.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Carcedo, Cristina; Hooper, Steven; Chaudhry, Shahid I; Williamson, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Leitinger, Birgit; Sahai, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Collective cell migration occurs in a range of contexts: cancer cells frequently invade in cohorts while retaining cell-cell junctions. Here we show that collective invasion by cancer cells depends on decreasing actomyosin contractility at sites of cell-cell contact. When actomyosin is not downregulated at cell-cell contacts, migrating cells lose cohesion. We provide a molecular mechanism for this downregulation. Depletion of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) blocks collective cancer-cell invasion in a range of two-dimensional, three-dimensional and 'organotypic' models. DDR1 coordinates the Par3/Par6 cell-polarity complex through its carboxy terminus, binding PDZ domains in Par3 and Par6. The DDR1-Par3/Par6 complex controls the localization of RhoE to cell-cell contacts, where it antagonizes ROCK-driven actomyosin contractility. Depletion of DDR1, Par3, Par6 or RhoE leads to increased actomyosin contactility at cell-cell contacts, a loss of cell-cell cohesion and defective collective cell invasion.

  1. Process for preparing organoclays for aqueous and polar-organic systems

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A process for preparing organoclays as thixotropic agents to control the rheology of water-based paints and other aqueous and polar-organic systems. The process relates to treating low-grade clay ores to achieve highly purified organoclays and/or to incorporate surface modifying agents onto the clay by adsorption and/or to produce highly dispersed organoclays without excessive grinding or high shear dispersion. The process involves the treatment of impure, or run-of-mine, clay using an aqueous biphasic extraction system to produce a highly dispersed clay, free of mineral impurities and with modified surface properties brought about by adsorption of the water-soluble polymers used in generating the aqueous biphasic extraction system. This invention purifies the clay to greater than 95%.

  2. Ultrastructural analyses of somatic embryo initiation, development and polarity establishment from mesophyll cells of Dactylis glomerata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilenko, A.; McDaniel, J. K.; Conger, B. V.

    2000-01-01

    Somatic embryos initiate and develop directly from single mesophyll cells in in vitro-cultured leaf segments of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.). Embryogenic cells establish themselves in the predivision stage by formation of thicker cell walls and dense cytoplasm. Electron microscopy observations for embryos ranging from the pre-cell-division stage to 20-cell proembryos confirm previous light microscopy studies showing a single cell origin. They also confirm that the first division is predominantly periclinal and that this division plane is important in establishing embryo polarity and in determining the embryo axis. If the first division is anticlinal or if divisions are in random planes after the first division, divisions may not continue to produce an embryo. This result may produce an embryogenic cell mass, callus formation, or no structure at all. Grant numbers: NAGW-3141, NAG10-0221.

  3. Polarity and cell fate specification in the control of C. elegans gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Rohrschneider, Monica R.; Nance, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Gastrulation is a time during development when cells destined to produce internal tissues and organs move from the surface of the embryo into the interior. It is critical that the cell movements of gastrulation be precisely controlled, and coordinated with cell specification, in order for the embryo to develop normally. C. elegans gastrulation is relatively simple, can be observed easily in the transparent embryo, and can be manipulated genetically to uncover important regulatory mechanisms. Many of these cellular and molecular mechanisms – including cell shape, cytoskeletal, and cell cycle changes – appear to be conserved from flies to vertebrates. Here we review gastrulation in C. elegans, with an emphasis on recent data linking contact-induced cell polarity, PAR proteins, and cell fate specification to gastrulation control. PMID:19253398

  4. Increased malignancy of oral squamous cell carcinomas (oscc) is associated with macrophage polarization in regional lymph nodes – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is largely accepted that specific immunological parameters in solid malignancies are associated with patient’s prognosis. Recently a correlation of macrophage polarization with histomorphological parameters could also be shown in oral squamous cell carcinoma (oscc). The observed tumor derived peripheral immune tolerance could be associated with the macrophage polarization in regional tumor draining lymph nodes. So far there are no studies analyzing the macrophage polarization in cervical lymph nodes of oscc patients. In the present study we aimed to correlate macrophage polarization in different anatomical lymph node compartments of patients diagnosed with oscc with histopathologic parameters of the primary tumor (T-, N-, L-, V-, Pn-status, grading). Methods Tumor free (n = 37) and metastatic (n = 17) lymph nodes of T1 and T2 oscc patients were processed for immunohistochemistry to detect CD68, CD11c, CD163 and MRC1 positive cells. Samples were digitized using whole slide imaging and the number of cells expressing the aforementioned markers in the region of interest quantitatively analyzed. Results The malignancy of the primary tumor (defined by T-, L-, Pn-status, grading) correlated with the lymph node macrophage polarization. L1 and Pn1 tumor cases displayed a significantly (p < 0.05) decreased M1 and increased M2 polarization in the sinus of the lymph nodes. G3 cases presented a significantly (p < 0.05) increased M2 polarization in the sinus compared to G2 cases. T2 tumors had significantly (p < 0.05) increased M2 polarization in the interfollicular zone of regional lymph nodes compared to T1 tumors. Metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes did not differ regarding their macrophage polarization. Conclusions The current study revealed for the first time an influence of oscc on the macrophage polarization in regional lymph nodes. Markers of malignant behavior in the primary tumor were associated with a shift of macrophage

  5. The RHIC polarized H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, A.; Atoian, G.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Steski, D.

    2016-02-01

    A novel polarization technique had been successfully implemented for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) polarized H- ion source upgrade to higher intensity and polarization. In this technique, a proton beam inside the high magnetic field solenoid is produced by ionization of the atomic hydrogen beam (from external source) in the He-gaseous ionizer cell. Further proton polarization is produced in the process of polarized electron capture from the optically pumped Rb vapor. The use of high-brightness primary beam and large cross sections of charge-exchange cross sections resulted in production of high intensity H- ion beam of 85% polarization. The source very reliably delivered polarized beam in the RHIC Run-2013 and Run-2015. High beam current, brightness, and polarization resulted in 75% polarization at 23 GeV out of Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and 60%-65% beam polarization at 100-250 GeV colliding beams in RHIC.

  6. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Multi-ciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: i) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and ii) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multi-step process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells. PMID:20164345

  7. Host cell polarity proteins participate in innate immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cindy S.; Eran, Yoni; Ruch, Travis R.; Bryant, David M.; Datta, Anirban; Brakeman, Paul; Kierbel, Arlinet; Wittmann, Torsten; Metzger, Ross J.; Mostov, Keith E.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mucosal epithelium consists of polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral membranes that serve as functional and physical barriers to the organisms’ exterior. The apical surface of the epithelium constitutes the first point of contact between mucosal pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and their host. We observed that binding of P. aeruginosa aggregates to the apical surface of polarized cells leads to the striking formation of an actin-rich membrane protrusion with ‘inverted’ polarity, containing basolateral lipids and membrane components. Such protrusions were associated with a spatially localized host immune response to P. aeruginosa aggregates that required bacterial flagella and a Type III secretion system apparatus. Host protrusions form de novo underneath bacterial aggregates and involve the apical recruitment of a Par3/Par6α/aPKC/Rac1 signaling module for a robust, spatially localized host NFκB response. Our data reveal an unanticipated role for spatio-temporal epithelial polarity changes in the activation of innate immune responses. PMID:24832456

  8. Positioning of centrioles is a conserved readout of Frizzled planar cell polarity signalling.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling is a well-conserved developmental pathway regulating cellular orientation during development. An evolutionarily conserved pathway readout is not established and, moreover, it is thought that PCP mediated cellular responses are tissue-specific. A key PCP function in vertebrates is to regulate coordinated centriole/cilia positioning, a function that has not been associated with PCP in Drosophila. Here we report instructive input of Frizzled-PCP (Fz/PCP) signalling into polarized centriole positioning in Drosophila wings. We show that centrioles are polarized in pupal wing cells as a readout of PCP signalling, with both gain and loss-of-function Fz/PCP signalling affecting centriole polarization. Importantly, loss or gain of centrioles does not affect Fz/PCP establishment, implicating centriolar positioning as a conserved PCP-readout, likely downstream of PCP-regulated actin polymerization. Together with vertebrate data, these results suggest a unifying model of centriole/cilia positioning as a common downstream effect of PCP signalling from flies to mammals. PMID:27021213

  9. Positioning of centrioles is a conserved readout of Frizzled planar cell polarity signalling

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling is a well-conserved developmental pathway regulating cellular orientation during development. An evolutionarily conserved pathway readout is not established and, moreover, it is thought that PCP mediated cellular responses are tissue-specific. A key PCP function in vertebrates is to regulate coordinated centriole/cilia positioning, a function that has not been associated with PCP in Drosophila. Here we report instructive input of Frizzled-PCP (Fz/PCP) signalling into polarized centriole positioning in Drosophila wings. We show that centrioles are polarized in pupal wing cells as a readout of PCP signalling, with both gain and loss-of-function Fz/PCP signalling affecting centriole polarization. Importantly, loss or gain of centrioles does not affect Fz/PCP establishment, implicating centriolar positioning as a conserved PCP-readout, likely downstream of PCP-regulated actin polymerization. Together with vertebrate data, these results suggest a unifying model of centriole/cilia positioning as a common downstream effect of PCP signalling from flies to mammals. PMID:27021213

  10. Positioning of centrioles is a conserved readout of Frizzled planar cell polarity signalling.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-03-29

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling is a well-conserved developmental pathway regulating cellular orientation during development. An evolutionarily conserved pathway readout is not established and, moreover, it is thought that PCP mediated cellular responses are tissue-specific. A key PCP function in vertebrates is to regulate coordinated centriole/cilia positioning, a function that has not been associated with PCP in Drosophila. Here we report instructive input of Frizzled-PCP (Fz/PCP) signalling into polarized centriole positioning in Drosophila wings. We show that centrioles are polarized in pupal wing cells as a readout of PCP signalling, with both gain and loss-of-function Fz/PCP signalling affecting centriole polarization. Importantly, loss or gain of centrioles does not affect Fz/PCP establishment, implicating centriolar positioning as a conserved PCP-readout, likely downstream of PCP-regulated actin polymerization. Together with vertebrate data, these results suggest a unifying model of centriole/cilia positioning as a common downstream effect of PCP signalling from flies to mammals.

  11. Retromer controls epithelial cell polarity by trafficking the apical determinant Crumbs.

    PubMed

    Pocha, Shirin Meher; Wassmer, Thomas; Niehage, Christian; Hoflack, Bernard; Knust, Elisabeth

    2011-07-12

    The evolutionarily conserved apical determinant Crumbs (Crb) is essential for maintaining apicobasal polarity and integrity of many epithelial tissues [1]. Crb levels are crucial for cell polarity and homeostasis, yet strikingly little is known about its trafficking or the mechanism of its apical localization. Using a newly established, liposome-based system described here, we determined Crb to be an interaction partner and cargo of the retromer complex. Retromer is essential for the retrograde transport of numerous transmembrane proteins from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and is conserved between plants, fungi, and animals [2]. We show that loss of retromer function results in a substantial reduction of Crb in Drosophila larvae, wing discs, and the follicle epithelium. Moreover, loss of retromer phenocopies loss of crb by preventing apical localization of key polarity molecules, such as atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and Par6 in the follicular epithelium, an effect that can be rescued by overexpression of Crb. Additionally, loss of retromer results in multilayering of the follicular epithelium, indicating that epithelial integrity is severely compromised. Our data reveal a mechanism for Crb trafficking by retromer that is vital for maintaining Crb levels and localization. We also show a novel function for retromer in maintaining epithelial cell polarity. PMID:21700461

  12. PAR polarity: from complexity to design principles.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Nathan W

    2014-11-01

    The par-titioning-defective or PAR proteins comprise the core of an essential cell polarity network that underlies polarization in a wide variety of cell types and developmental contexts. The output of this network in nearly every case is the establishment of opposing and complementary membrane domains that define a cell׳s polarity axis. Yet, behind this simple pattern is a complex system of interactions, regulation and dynamic behaviors. How these various parts combine to generate polarized patterns of protein localization in cells is only beginning to become clear. This review, part of the Special Issue on Cell Polarity, aims to highlight several emerging themes and design principles that underlie the process of cell polarization by components of the PAR network. PMID:25128809

  13. Quantum-state storage and processing for polarization qubits in an inhomogeneously broadened {Lambda}-type three-level medium

    SciTech Connect

    Viscor, D.; Ferraro, A.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.; Loiko, Yu.

    2011-10-15

    We address the propagation of a single-photon pulse with two polarization components, i.e., a polarization qubit, in an inhomogeneously broadened ''phaseonium''{Lambda}-type three-level medium. We combine some of the nontrivial propagation effects characteristic for this kind of coherently prepared systems and the controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening technique to propose several quantum information-processing applications, such as a protocol for polarization qubit filtering and sieving as well as a tunable polarization beam splitter. Moreover, we show that by imposing a spatial variation of the atomic coherence phase, an efficient quantum memory for the incident polarization qubit can be also implemented in {Lambda}-type three-level systems.

  14. Heterogeneous chemistry on Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds - A microphysical estimate of the extent of chemical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Turco, R. P.; Elliott, S.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed model of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which includes nucleation, condensational growth. and sedimentation processes, has been applied to the study of heterogeneous chemical reactions. For the first time, the extent of chemical processing during a polar winter has been estimated for an idealized air parcel in the Antarctic vortex by calculating in detail the rates of heterogeneous reactions on PSC particles. The resulting active chlorine and NO(x) concentrations at first sunrise are analyzed with respect to their influence upon the Antarctic ozone hole using a photochemical model. It is found that the species present at sunrise are primarily influenced by the relative values of the heterogeneous reaction rate constants and the initial gas concentrations. However, the extent of chlorine activation is also influenced by whether N2O5 is removed by reaction with HCl or H2O. The reaction of N2O5 with HCl, which occurs rapidly on type 1 PSCs, activates the chlorine contained in the reservoir species HCl. Hence the presence and surface area of type 1 PSCs early in the winter are crucial in determining ozone depletion.

  15. In the dark: A review of ecosystem processes during the Arctic polar night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Jørgen; Renaud, Paul E.; Darnis, Gerald; Cottier, Finlo; Last, Kim; Gabrielsen, Tove M.; Johnsen, Geir; Seuthe, Lena; Weslawski, Jan Marcin; Leu, Eva; Moline, Mark; Nahrgang, Jasmine; Søreide, Janne E.; Varpe, Øystein; Lønne, Ole Jørgen; Daase, Malin; Falk-Petersen, Stig

    2015-12-01

    Several recent lines of evidence indicate that the polar night is key to understanding Arctic marine ecosystems. First, the polar night is not a period void of biological activity even though primary production is close to zero, but is rather characterized by a number of processes and interactions yet to be fully understood, including unanticipated high levels of feeding and reproduction in a wide range of taxa and habitats. Second, as more knowledge emerges, it is evident that a coupled physical and biological perspective of the ecosystem will redefine seasonality beyond the "calendar perspective". Third, it appears that many organisms may exhibit endogenous rhythms that trigger fitness-maximizing activities in the absence of light-based cues. Indeed a common adaptation appears to be the ability to utilize the dark season for reproduction. This and other processes are most likely adaptations to current environmental conditions and community and trophic structures of the ecosystem, and may have implications for how Arctic ecosystems can change under continued climatic warming.

  16. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Huang, Yunxia; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye.

  17. Cortical and cytoplasmic flow polarity in early embryonic cells of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the cortex of Caenorhabditis elegans eggs during pseudocleavage (PC), a period of the first cell cycle which is important for the generation of asymmetry at first cleavage (Strome, S. 1989. Int. Rev. Cytol. 114: 81-123). We have found that directed, actin dependent, cytoplasmic, and cortical flow occurs during this period coincident with a rearrangement of the cortical actin cytoskeleton (Strome, S. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103: 2241-2252). The flow velocity (4-7 microns/min) is similar to previously determined particle movements driven by cortical actin flows in motile cells. We show that directed flows occur in one of the daughters of the first division that itself divides asymmetrically, but not in its sister that divides symmetrically. The cortical and cytoplasmic events of PC can be mimicked in other cells during cytokinesis by displacing the mitotic apparatus with the microtubule polymerization inhibitor nocodazole. In all cases, the polarity of the resulting cortical and cytoplasmic flows correlates with the position of the attenuated mitotic spindle formed. These cortical flows are also accompanied by a change in the distribution of the cortical actin network. The polarity of this redistribution is similarly correlated with the location of the attenuated spindle. These observations suggest a mechanism for generating polarized flows of cytoplasmic and cortical material during embryonic cleavages. We present a model for the events of PC and suggest how the poles of the mitotic spindle mediate the formation of the contractile ring during cytokinesis in C. elegans. PMID:8509454

  18. Self-organization of polarized cerebellar tissue in 3D culture of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muguruma, Keiko; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Kawakami, Hideshi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2015-02-01

    During cerebellar development, the main portion of the cerebellar plate neuroepithelium gives birth to Purkinje cells and interneurons, whereas the rhombic lip, the germinal zone at its dorsal edge, generates granule cells and cerebellar nuclei neurons. However, it remains elusive how these components cooperate to form the intricate cerebellar structure. Here, we found that a polarized cerebellar structure self-organizes in 3D human embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture. The self-organized neuroepithelium differentiates into electrophysiologically functional Purkinje cells. The addition of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) promotes spontaneous generation of dorsoventrally polarized neural-tube-like structures at the level of the cerebellum. Furthermore, addition of SDF1 and FGF19 promotes the generation of a continuous cerebellar plate neuroepithelium with rhombic-lip-like structure at one end and a three-layer cytoarchitecture similar to the embryonic cerebellum. Thus, human-ESC-derived cerebellar progenitors exhibit substantial self-organizing potential for generating a polarized structure reminiscent of the early human cerebellum at the first trimester. PMID:25640179

  19. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Balmer, Sophie; Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-04-07

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo-distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo.

  20. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo–distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo. PMID:25849195

  1. Establishment and maintenance of planar epithelial cell polarity by asymmetric cadherin bridges: a computer model.

    PubMed

    Le Garrec, Jean-François; Lopez, Philippe; Kerszberg, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Animal scales, hairs, feathers, and cilia are oriented due to cell polarization in the epithelial plane. Genes involved have been identified, but the signal and mechanism remain unknown. In Drosophila wing polarization, the action of a gradient of Frizzled activity is widely assumed; and cell-cell signalling by cadherins such as Flamingo surely plays a major role. We present a computer model where reading the Frizzled gradient occurs through biased, feedback-reinforced formation of Flamingo-based asymmetric intercellular complexes. Through these complexes neighboring cells are able to compare their Frizzled activity levels. Our computations are highly noise-resistant and reproduce both wild-type and all known mutant wing phenotypes; other phenotypes are predicted. The model puts stringent limits on a Frizzled activation signal, which should exhibit unusual properties: (1) the extracellular Frizzled signalling gradient should be counterdirectional--decreasing from proximal (P) to distal (D), whereas during polarization, the intracellular Frizzled gradient builds up from P to D; (2) the external gradient should be relatively weak and short-lived, lest it prevent inversion of intracellular Frizzled. These features, largely independent of model details, may provide useful clues for future experimental efforts.

  2. Effect of Polarization on Airway Epithelial Conditioning of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Papazian, Dick; Chhoden, Tashi; Arge, Maria; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Nielsen, Claus H; Lund, Kaare; Würtzen, Peter A; Hansen, Soren

    2015-09-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) form polarized barriers that interact with inhaled allergens and are involved in immune homeostasis. We examined how monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) are affected by contact with the airway epithelium. In traditional setups, bronchial epithelial cell lines were allowed to polarize on filter inserts, and MDDCs were allowed to adhere to the epithelial basal side. In an optimized setup, the cell application was reversed, and the culture conditions were modified to preserve cellular polarization and integrity. These two parameters were crucial for the MDDCs' immunoregulatory properties; thus, previous observations obtained using traditional setups should be considered with caution. Using the optimized setup, AEC conditioning of MDDCs led to increased expression of programmed death 1 ligand 1, immunoglobulin-like transcript 3, CD40, CD80, and CD23. This increased expression was accompanied by decreased secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and eotaxin and donor-variable effects on IL-12 and IL-10 secretion. Conditioning varied between maturation states and depended partly on direct contact between AECs and MDDCs. The setup allowed MDDCs on the basal side of the epithelium to sample allergens administered to the apical side. Allergen uptake depended on polarization and the nature of the allergen. AEC conditioning led to decreased birch allergen-specific proliferation of autologous T cells and a trend toward decreased secretion of the Th2-specific cytokines IL-5 and IL-13. In conclusion, we determined that AEC conditioning favoring cellular integrity leads to a tolerogenic MDDC phenotype, which is likely to be important in regulating immune responses against commonly inhaled allergens.

  3. Polarity mechanisms such as contact inhibition of locomotion regulate persistent rotational motion of mammalian cells on micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Camley, Brian A; Zhang, Yunsong; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-10-14

    Pairs of endothelial cells on adhesive micropatterns rotate persistently, but pairs of fibroblasts do not; coherent rotation is present in normal mammary acini and kidney cells but absent in cancerous cells. Why? To answer this question, we develop a computational model of pairs of mammalian cells on adhesive micropatterns using a phase field method and study the conditions under which persistent rotational motion (PRM) emerges. Our model couples the shape of the cell, the cell's internal chemical polarity, and interactions between cells such as volume exclusion and adhesion. We show that PRM can emerge from this minimal model and that the cell-cell interface may be influenced by the nucleus. We study the effect of various cell polarity mechanisms on rotational motion, including contact inhibition of locomotion, neighbor alignment, and velocity alignment, where cells align their polarity to their velocity. These polarity mechanisms strongly regulate PRM: Small differences in polarity mechanisms can create significant differences in collective rotation. We argue that the existence or absence of rotation under confinement may lead to insight into the cell's methods for coordinating collective cell motility.

  4. Polar Location of the Chemoreceptor Complex in the Escherichia coli Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The eukaryotic cell exhibits compartmentalization of functions to various membrane-bound organelles and to specific domains within each membrane. The spatial distribution of the membrane chemoreceptors and associated cytoplasmic chemotaxis proteins in Escherichia coli were examined as a prototypic functional aggregate in bacterial cells. Bacterial chemotaxis involves a phospho-relay system brought about by ligand association with a membrane receptor, culminating in a switch in the direction of flagellar rotation. The transduction of the chemotaxis signal is initiated by a chemoreceptor-CheW-CheA ternary complex at the inner membrane. These ternary complexes aggregate predominantly at the cell poles. Polar localization of the cytoplasmic CheA and CheW proteins is dependent on membrane-bound chemoreceptor. Chemoreceptors are not confined to the cell poles in strains lacking both CheA and CheW. The chemoreceptor-CheW binary complex is polarly localized in the absence of CheA, whereas the chemoreceptor-CheA binary complex is not confined to the cell poles in strains lacking CheW. The subcellular localization of the chemotaxis proteins may reflect a general mechanism by which the bacterial cell sequesters different regions of the cell for specialized functions.

  5. Dual functions for the Schizosaccharomyces pombe inositol kinase Ipk1 in nuclear mRNA export and polarized cell growth.

    PubMed

    Sarmah, Bhaskarjyoti; Wente, Susan R

    2009-02-01

    The inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate (IP(5)) 2-kinase (Ipk1) catalyzes the production of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP(6)) in eukaryotic cells. Previous studies have shown that IP(6) is required for efficient nuclear mRNA export in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report the first functional analysis of ipk1(+) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe Ipk1 (SpIpk1) is unique among Ipk1 orthologues in that it harbors a novel amino (N)-terminal domain with coiled-coil structural motifs similar to those of BAR (Bin-amphiphysin-Rvs) domain proteins. Mutants with ipk1(+) deleted (ipk1Delta) had mRNA export defects as well as pleiotropic defects in polarized growth, cell morphology, endocytosis, and cell separation. The SpIpk1 catalytic carboxy-terminal domain was required to rescue these defects, and the mRNA export block was genetically linked to SpDbp5 function and, likely, IP(6) production. However, the overexpression of the N-terminal domain alone also inhibited these functions in wild-type cells. This revealed a distinct noncatalytic function for the N-terminal domain. To test for connections with other inositol polyphosphates, we also analyzed whether the loss of asp1(+) function, encoding an IP(6) kinase downstream of Ipk1, had an effect on ipk1Delta cells. The asp1Delta mutant alone did not block mRNA export, and its cell morphology, polarized growth, and endocytosis defects were less severe than those of ipk1Delta cells. Moreover, ipk1Delta asp1Delta double mutants had altered inositol polyphosphate levels distinct from those of the ipk1Delta mutant. This suggested novel roles for asp1(+) upstream of ipk1(+). We propose that IP(6) production is a key signaling linchpin for regulating multiple essential cellular processes. PMID:19047361

  6. Biosynthesis and polarized distribution of neutral endopeptidase in primary cultures of kidney proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, F; Dehbi, M; Berteloot, A; Crine, P

    1994-01-01

    When cultured in defined medium, kidney proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) cells form a homogeneous population and retain a number of differentiated functions. To characterize this cell system further as a functional model of epithelial polarity, we investigated the biogenic pathway of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), one of the most abundant microvillar membrane proteins in intestinal and kidney cells. We showed that, in contrast with some tumoral cell lines, RNA extracted from PCT cells shows the presence of a single mRNA species encoding NEP. Pulse-chase studies followed by selective immunoprecipitation of NEP molecules present either at the cell surface or in intracellular cell compartments showed that newly synthesized NEP molecules reached the cell surface as early as 30 min after the beginning of the chase with maximum cell surface expression at 60 min. When grown on semipermeable supports, PCT cells were found to target NEP exclusively to the apical plasma membrane. Similar results have been described using MDCK cells to study targeting of recombinant NEP. Thus primary cultures of PCT cells represent a new model with which to investigate the biogenic pathway of endogenous proteins in native epithelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7945190

  7. Changes in the electrical polarity of tobacco cells following the application of weak external currents.

    PubMed

    Mina, M G; Goldsworthy, A

    1991-12-01

    Weak externally applied electric currents changed the natural electrical pattern surrounding cells from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) suspension cultures. The artificial currents were applied transversely to short filaments of cells placed between a microelectrode lose to the filament surface and a large platinum electrode some distance away. The natural current patterns before and after electrical treatment were measured with a vibrating probe. Significant effects were confined to the cell adjacent to the microelectrode. Currents with densities of 100 μA · cm(-2) at the cell surface applied for 10 min or 3 μA · cm(-2) for several hours caused a localized increase in the natural current entering the part of the cell which had been nearest the positive electrode. There was no corresponding local increase in current leaving from the opposite side of the cell. Instead, the extra current appeared to leave over a relatively large area. The overall effect was a tendency for the cell to repolarize transversely with a greater proportion of its transcellular currents flowing in the direction of the current applied. The effect was measurable for several hours after the external current was discontinued and may be evidence for a natural mechanism by which neighbouring cells entrain one another's polarities during differentiation. The effect of external currents on cells growing in a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) medium (which suppresses differentiation) was qualitatively the same as on cells in an indole-3-acetic acid medium (which promotes differentiation). If anything, the response was greater in 2,4-D, implying that the disruptive effect of 2,4-D on cell and tissue polarization is not a consequence of it preventing cells sensing the transcellular currents of their neighbours.

  8. The role of VAMP7/TI-VAMP in cell polarity and lysosomal exocytosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mahito; Yoshimura, Shinichiro; Hirai, Rika; Goto, Ayako; Kunii, Masataka; Atik, Nur; Sato, Takashi; Sato, Ken; Harada, Reiko; Shimada, Junko; Hatabu, Toshimitsu; Yorifuji, Hiroshi; Harada, Akihiro

    2011-10-01

    VAMP7 or tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle- associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) has been proposed to regulate apical transport in polarized epithelial cells, axonal transport in neurons and lysosomal exocytosis. To investigate the function of VAMP7 in vivo, we generated VAMP7 knockout mice. Here, we show that VAMP7 knockout mice are indistinguishable from control mice and display a similar localization of apical proteins in the kidney and small intestine and a similar localization of axonal proteins in the nervous system. Neurite outgrowth of cultured mutant hippocampal neurons was reduced in mutant neurons. However, lysosomal exocytosis was not affected in mutant fibroblasts. Our results show that VAMP7 is required in neurons to extend axons to the full extent. However, VAMP7 does not seem to be required for epithelial cell polarity and lysosomal exocytosis.

  9. Interaction of red blood cells with a polarized electrode: evidence of long-range intermolecular forces.

    PubMed Central

    Gingell, D; Fornes, J A

    1976-01-01

    We have investigated the electrostatic interaction of glutaraldehyde-fixed human red cells with a polarizable electrode carrying a defined surface charge density which can be varied continuously through a wide range. Cells in a dilute salt solution are unable to adhere to the electrode at high negative charge, but at lower negative charge densities they are reversibly adherent and can be forced off by increasing the negative polarization. Near zero electrode charge they become irreversibly stuck to the electrode and cannot be evicted even at maximum electrode polarization. Calculation of the electrostatic repulsive force using measured charge densities indicates the existence of an attractive force which may be acting over several hundred angstroms. PMID:822894

  10. Enhanced biological processes associated with alopecia in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A Keith; Stott, Jeffrey; Waters, Shannon; Atwood, Todd

    2015-10-01

    Populations of wildlife species worldwide experience incidents of mass morbidity and mortality. Primary or secondary drivers of these events may escape classical detection methods for identifying microbial insults, toxin exposure, or additional stressors. In 2012, 28% of polar bears sampled in a study in the southern Beaufort Sea region of Alaska had varying degrees of alopecia that was concomitant with reduced body condition. Concurrently, elevated numbers of sick or dead ringed seals were detected in the southern Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering seas in 2012, resulting in the declaration of an unusual mortality event (UME) by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The primary and possible ancillary causative stressors of these events are unknown, and related physiological changes within individual animals have been undetectable using classical diagnostic methods. Here we present an emerging technology as a potentially guiding investigative approach aimed at elucidating the circumstances responsible for the susceptibility of certain polar bears to observed conditions. Using transcriptomic analysis we identified enhanced biological processes including immune response, viral defense, and response to stress in polar bears with alopecia. Our results support an alternative mechanism of investigation into the causative agents that, when used proactively, could serve as an early indicator for populations and species at risk. We suggest that current or classical methods for investigation into events of unusual morbidity and mortality can be costly, sometimes unfocused, and often inconclusive. Advances in technology allow for implementation of a holistic system of surveillance and investigation that could provide early warning of health concerns in wildlife species important to humans. PMID:26005754

  11. Enhanced biological processes associated with alopecia in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A Keith; Stott, Jeffrey; Waters, Shannon; Atwood, Todd

    2015-10-01

    Populations of wildlife species worldwide experience incidents of mass morbidity and mortality. Primary or secondary drivers of these events may escape classical detection methods for identifying microbial insults, toxin exposure, or additional stressors. In 2012, 28% of polar bears sampled in a study in the southern Beaufort Sea region of Alaska had varying degrees of alopecia that was concomitant with reduced body condition. Concurrently, elevated numbers of sick or dead ringed seals were detected in the southern Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering seas in 2012, resulting in the declaration of an unusual mortality event (UME) by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The primary and possible ancillary causative stressors of these events are unknown, and related physiological changes within individual animals have been undetectable using classical diagnostic methods. Here we present an emerging technology as a potentially guiding investigative approach aimed at elucidating the circumstances responsible for the susceptibility of certain polar bears to observed conditions. Using transcriptomic analysis we identified enhanced biological processes including immune response, viral defense, and response to stress in polar bears with alopecia. Our results support an alternative mechanism of investigation into the causative agents that, when used proactively, could serve as an early indicator for populations and species at risk. We suggest that current or classical methods for investigation into events of unusual morbidity and mortality can be costly, sometimes unfocused, and often inconclusive. Advances in technology allow for implementation of a holistic system of surveillance and investigation that could provide early warning of health concerns in wildlife species important to humans.

  12. Enhanced biological processes associated with alopecia in polar bears (Ursus maritimus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Stott, Jeffrey L.; Waters, Shannon C.; Atwood, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of wildlife species worldwide experience incidents of mass morbidity and mortality. Primary or secondary drivers of these events may escape classical detection methods for identifying microbial insults, toxin exposure, or additional stressors. In 2012, 28% of polar bears sampled in a study in the southern Beaufort Sea region of Alaska had varying degrees of alopecia that was concomitant with reduced body condition. Concurrently, elevated numbers of sick or dead ringed seals were detected in the southern Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering seas in 2012, resulting in the declaration of an unusual mortality event (UME) by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The primary and possible ancillary causative stressors of these events are unknown, and related physiological changes within individual animals have been undetectable using classical diagnostic methods. Here we present an emerging technology as a potentially guiding investigative approach aimed at elucidating the circumstances responsible for the susceptibility of certain polar bears to observed conditions. Using transcriptomic analysis we identified enhanced biological processes including immune response, viral defense, and response to stress in polar bears with alopecia. Our results support an alternative mechanism of investigation into the causative agents that, when used proactively, could serve as an early indicator for populations and species at risk. We suggest that current or classical methods for investigation into events of unusual morbidity and mortality can be costly, sometimes unfocused, and often inconclusive. Advances in technology allow for implementation of a holistic system of surveillance and investigation that could provide early warning of health concerns in wildlife species important to humans.

  13. Gaalas/Gaas Solar Cell Process Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    Available information on liquid phase, vapor phase (including chemical vapor deposition) and molecular beam epitaxy growth procedures that could be used to fabricate single crystal, heteroface, (AlGa) As/GaAs solar cells, for space applications is summarized. A comparison of the basic cost elements of the epitaxy growth processes shows that the current infinite melt LPE process has the lower cost per cell for an annual production rate of 10,000 cells. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process has the potential for low cost production of solar cells but there is currently a significant uncertainty in process yield, i.e., the fraction of active material in the input gas stream that ends up in the cell. Additional work is needed to optimize and document the process parameters for the MO-CVD process.

  14. ASYMPTOTIC AND BIFURCATION ANALYSIS OF WAVE-PINNING IN A REACTION-DIFFUSION MODEL FOR CELL POLARIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoichiro; Jilkine, Alexandra; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyze a bistable reaction-diffusion (RD) model for two interconverting chemical species that exhibits a phenomenon of wave-pinning: a wave of activation of one of the species is initiated at one end of the domain, moves into the domain, decelerates, and eventually stops inside the domain, forming a stationary front. The second (“inactive”) species is depleted in this process. This behavior arises in a model for chemical polarization of a cell by Rho GTPases in response to stimulation. The initially spatially homogeneous concentration profile (representative of a resting cell) develops into an asymmetric stationary front profile (typical of a polarized cell). Wave-pinning here is based on three properties: (1) mass conservation in a finite domain, (2) nonlinear reaction kinetics allowing for multiple stable steady states, and (3) a sufficiently large difference in diffusion of the two species. Using matched asymptotic analysis, we explain the mathematical basis of wave-pinning, and predict the speed and pinned position of the wave. An analysis of the bifurcation of the pinned front solution reveals how the wave-pinning regime depends on parameters such as rates of diffusion and total mass of the species. We describe two ways in which the pinned solution can be lost depending on the details of the reaction kinetics: a saddle-node or a pitchfork bifurcation. PMID:22171122

  15. Polarity and transport properties of rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells on collagen IV-coated porous membranes.

    PubMed

    Genestie, I; Morin, J P; Vannier, B; Lorenzon, G

    1995-07-01

    A high degree of functional polarity has been obtained in primary cultures of rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells grown on collagen IV-coated porous membranes. Tight confluency was attained 6 days after seeding and maintained for at least 6 more days, as shown by analysis of paracellular inulin diffusion. From day 6 onward, L-lactate, ammonia, and D-glucose concentration gradient and a pH difference of approximately 1 unit developed between the two nutrient medium compartments. Confluent monolayers expressed organic ion transport properties higher than those formerly reported for other cell models. Transcellular transport of 20 microM tetraethylammonium was directed from basal to apical compartment and was specifically inhibited by mepiperphenidol (1 mM). Unidirectional transport of 2.4 microM p-aminohippurate also occurred from basal to apical compartment, was saturable, and specifically inhibited by probenecid (1 mM). These results suggest that rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells, cultured under the experimental conditions described here, may be a useful model for the in vitro study of highly polarized renal transport processes.

  16. Rack1 is required for Vangl2 membrane localization and planar cell polarity signaling while attenuating canonical Wnt activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangding; Esterberg, Robert; Lachance, Veronik; Ren, Dongdong; Radde-Gallwitz, Kristen; Chi, Fanglu; Parent, Jean-Luc; Fritz, Andreas; Chen, Ping

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway shares molecular components with the β-catenin–mediated canonical Wnt pathway but acts through membrane complexes containing Vang or Frizzled to orient neighboring cells coordinately. The molecular interactions underlying the action of Vang in PCP signaling and specification, however, are yet to be delineated. Here, we report the identification of Rack1 as an interacting protein of a vertebrate Vang protein, Vangl2. We demonstrate that Rack1 is required in zebrafish for PCP-regulated processes, including oriented cell division, cellular polarization, and convergent extension during gastrulation. We further show that the knockdown of Rack1 affects membrane localization of Vangl2 and that the Vangl2-interacting domain of Rack1 has a dominant-negative effect on Vangl2 localization and gastrulation. Moreover, Rack1 antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling. Together, our data suggest that Rack1 regulates the localization of an essential PCP protein and acts as a molecular switch to promote PCP signaling. PMID:21262816

  17. The Cdc42 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor FGD6 Coordinates Cell Polarity and Endosomal Membrane Recycling in Osteoclasts*

    PubMed Central

    Steenblock, Charlotte; Heckel, Tobias; Czupalla, Cornelia; Espírito Santo, Ana Isabel; Niehage, Christian; Sztacho, Martin; Hoflack, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The initial step of bone digestion is the adhesion of osteoclasts onto bone surfaces and the assembly of podosomal belts that segregate the bone-facing ruffled membrane from other membrane domains. During bone digestion, membrane components of the ruffled border also need to be recycled after macropinocytosis of digested bone materials. How osteoclast polarity and membrane recycling are coordinated remains unknown. Here, we show that the Cdc42-guanine nucleotide exchange factor FGD6 coordinates these events through its Src-dependent interaction with different actin-based protein networks. At the plasma membrane, FGD6 couples cell adhesion and actin dynamics by regulating podosome formation through the assembly of complexes comprising the Cdc42-interactor IQGAP1, the Rho GTPase-activating protein ARHGAP10, and the integrin interactors Talin-1/2 or Filamin A. On endosomes and transcytotic vesicles, FGD6 regulates retromer-dependent membrane recycling through its interaction with the actin nucleation-promoting factor WASH. These results provide a mechanism by which a single Cdc42-exchange factor controlling different actin-based processes coordinates cell adhesion, cell polarity, and membrane recycling during bone degradation. PMID:24821726

  18. The Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor FGD6 coordinates cell polarity and endosomal membrane recycling in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Steenblock, Charlotte; Heckel, Tobias; Czupalla, Cornelia; Espírito Santo, Ana Isabel; Niehage, Christian; Sztacho, Martin; Hoflack, Bernard

    2014-06-27

    The initial step of bone digestion is the adhesion of osteoclasts onto bone surfaces and the assembly of podosomal belts that segregate the bone-facing ruffled membrane from other membrane domains. During bone digestion, membrane components of the ruffled border also need to be recycled after macropinocytosis of digested bone materials. How osteoclast polarity and membrane recycling are coordinated remains unknown. Here, we show that the Cdc42-guanine nucleotide exchange factor FGD6 coordinates these events through its Src-dependent interaction with different actin-based protein networks. At the plasma membrane, FGD6 couples cell adhesion and actin dynamics by regulating podosome formation through the assembly of complexes comprising the Cdc42-interactor IQGAP1, the Rho GTPase-activating protein ARHGAP10, and the integrin interactors Talin-1/2 or Filamin A. On endosomes and transcytotic vesicles, FGD6 regulates retromer-dependent membrane recycling through its interaction with the actin nucleation-promoting factor WASH. These results provide a mechanism by which a single Cdc42-exchange factor controlling different actin-based processes coordinates cell adhesion, cell polarity, and membrane recycling during bone degradation. PMID:24821726

  19. Polycystin-1 is a microtubule-driven desmosome-associated component in polarized epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Basora, Nuria; Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Boucher, Marie-Pierre; Herring, Elizabeth; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois

    2010-05-15

    In this study, we have analyzed the expression and localization of polycystin-1 in intestinal epithelial cells, a system lacking primary cilia. Polycystin-1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of the small intestine during development and levels remained elevated in the adult. Dual-labelling indirect immunofluorescence revealed polycystin-1 at sites of cell-cell contact co-localizing with the desmosomes both in situ as well as in polarized Caco-2/15 cells. In unpolarized cultures of Caco-2/15 cells, polycystin-1 was recruited to the cell surface early during initiation of cell junction assembly. In isolated Caco-2/15 cells and HIEC-6 cell cultures, where junctional complexes are absent, polycystin-1 was found predominantly associated with the cytoskeletal elements of the intermediate filaments and microtubule networks. More precisely, polycystin-1 was seen as brightly labelled puncta decorating the keratin-18 positive filaments as well as the {beta}-tubulin positive microtubules, which was particularly obvious in the lamellipodia. Treatment with the microtubule-disrupting agent, nocodazole, eliminated the microtubule association of polycystin-1 but did not seem to affect its association with keratin or the desmosomes. Taken together these data suggest that polycystin-1 is involved with the establishment of cell-cell junctions in absorptive intestinal epithelial cells and exploits the microtubule-based machinery in order to be transported to the plasma membrane.

  20. Dissecting the molecular bridges that mediate the function of Frizzled in planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Struhl, Gary; Casal, José; Lawrence, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    Many epithelia have a common planar cell polarity (PCP), as exemplified by the consistent orientation of hairs on mammalian skin and insect cuticle. One conserved system of PCP depends on Starry night (Stan, also called Flamingo), an atypical cadherin that forms homodimeric bridges between adjacent cells. Stan acts together with other transmembrane proteins, most notably Frizzled (Fz) and Van Gogh (Vang, also called Strabismus). Here, using an in vivo assay for function, we show that the quintessential core of the Stan system is an asymmetric intercellular bridge between Stan in one cell and Stan acting together with Fz in its neighbour: such bridges are necessary and sufficient to polarise hairs in both cells, even in the absence of Vang. By contrast, Vang cannot polarise cells in the absence of Fz; instead, it appears to help Stan in each cell form effective bridges with Stan plus Fz in its neighbours. Finally, we show that cells containing Stan but lacking both Fz and Vang can be polarised to make hairs that point away from abutting cells that express Fz. We deduce that each cell has a mechanism to estimate and compare the numbers of asymmetric bridges, made between Stan and Stan plus Fz, that link it with its neighbouring cells. We propose that cells normally use this mechanism to read the local slope of tissue-wide gradients of Fz activity, so that all cells come to point in the same direction.

  1. Polarized cell motility induces hydrogen peroxide to inhibit cofilin via cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jenifer M; Gabrielsen, Mads; Chim, Ya Hua; Munro, June; McGhee, Ewan J; Sumpton, David; Eaton, Philip; Anderson, Kurt I; Yin, Huabing; Olson, Michael F

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal cell motility is driven by polarized actin polymerization [1]. Signals at the leading edge recruit actin polymerization machinery to promote membrane protrusion, while matrix adhesion generates tractive force to propel forward movement. To work effectively, cell motility is regulated by a complex network of signaling events that affect protein activity and localization. H2O2 has an important role as a diffusible second messenger [2], and mediates its effects through oxidation of cysteine thiols. One cell activity influenced by H2O2 is motility [3]. However, a lack of sensitive and H2O2-specific probes for measurements in live cells has not allowed for direct observation of H2O2 accumulation in migrating cells or protrusions. In addition, the identities of proteins oxidized by H2O2 that contribute to actin dynamics and cell motility have not been characterized. We now show, as determined by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, that motile cells generate H2O2 at membranes and cell protrusions and that H2O2 inhibits cofilin activity through oxidation of cysteines 139 (C139) and 147 (C147). Molecular modeling suggests that C139 oxidation would sterically hinder actin association, while the increased negative charge of oxidized C147 would lead to electrostatic repulsion of the opposite negatively charged surface. Expression of oxidation-resistant cofilin impairs cell spreading, adhesion, and directional migration. These findings indicate that H2O2 production contributes to polarized cell motility through localized cofilin inhibition and that there are additional proteins oxidized during cell migration that might have similar roles.

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 polarizes THP-1 cells into M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Crystal; Singla, Reetu; Singal, Pawan K; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Singla, Dinender K

    2012-07-01

    It was hypothesized that monocyte treatment with bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) would significantly enhance monocyte polarization into M2 macrophages as well as increasing the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In a cell culture system using monocytes (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1), we studied the effects of BMP7 on monocytes polarizing into M2 macrophages. The data demonstrate that THP-1 cells contain a BMP type II receptor (BMPR2), and that its activation is significantly (p < 0.05) increased following treatment with BMP7. Furthermore, there was an increase of M2 macrophages, BMPR2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-1ra compared with the respective controls. Moreover, treatment with BMP7 caused a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), compared with the controls. In conclusion, we suggest for the first time that BMP7 has a unique potential to polarize monocytes into M2 macrophages, required for tissue repair, which will have significant applications for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:22720873

  3. Novel Regulators of Planar Cell Polarity: A Genetic Analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ursula; Gault, William J.; Olguin, Patricio; Serysheva, Ekaterina; Mlodzik, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a common feature of many epithelia and epithelial organs. Although progress has been made in the dissection of molecular mechanisms regulating PCP, many questions remain. Here we describe a screen to identify novel PCP regulators in Drosophila. We employed mild gain-of-function (GOF) phenotypes of two cytoplasmic Frizzled (Fz)/PCP core components, Diego (Dgo) and Prickle (Pk), and screened these against the DrosDel genome-wide deficiency collection for dominant modifiers. Positive genomic regions were rescreened and narrowed down with smaller overlapping deficiencies from the Exelixis collection and RNAi-mediated knockdown applied to individual genes. This approach isolated new regulators of PCP, which were confirmed with loss-of-function analyses displaying PCP defects in the eye and/or wing. Furthermore, knockdown of a subset was also sensitive to dgo dosage or dominantly modified a dishevelled (dsh) GOF phenotype, supporting a role in Fz/PCP-mediated polarity establishment. Among the new “PCP” genes we identified several kinases, enzymes required for lipid modification, scaffolding proteins, and genes involved in substrate modification and/or degradation. Interestingly, one of them is a member of the Meckel-Gruber syndrome factors, associated with human ciliopathies, suggesting an important role for cell polarity in nonciliated cells. PMID:22391484

  4. Knockin' on pollen's door: live cell