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Sample records for cell regulatory function

  1. Mechanisms of T regulatory cell function.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yarkoni, Shai

    2008-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a pivotal role in tolerance to self-antigens and tissue grafts, and suppression of autoimmune reactions. These cells modulate the intensity and quality of immune reactions through attenuation of the cytolytic activities of reactive immune cells. Treg cells operate primarily at the site of inflammation where they modulate the immune reaction through three major mechanisms: a) direct killing of cytotoxic cells through cell-to-cell contact, b) inhibition of cytokine production by cytotoxic cells, in particular interleukin-2, c) direct secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines, in particular TGF-beta and interleukin-10. In addition to differential contributions of these mechanisms under variable inflammatory conditions, mechanistic complexity and diversity evolves from the diverse tasks performed by various Treg cell subsets in different stages of the immune reaction. Here we attempt to integrate the current experimental evidence to delineate the major suppressive pathways of Treg cells.

  2. Regulatory Functions of Natural Killer Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Catharina C.; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Wiendl, Heinz; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Uccelli, Antonio; Laroni, Alice

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that natural killer (NK) cells exhibit regulatory features. Among them, CD56bright NK cells have been suggested to play a major role in controlling T cell responses and maintaining homeostasis. Dysfunction in NK cell-mediated regulatory features has been recently described in untreated multiple sclerosis (MS), suggesting a contribution to MS pathogenesis. Moreover, biological disease-modifying treatments effective in MS apparently enhance the frequencies and/or regulatory function of NK cells, further pointing toward an immunoprotective role of NK cells in MS. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the regulatory functions of NK cells, based on their interactions with other cells belonging to the innate compartment, as well as with adaptive effector cells. We review the more recent data reporting disruption of NK cell/T cell interactions in MS and discuss how disease-modifying treatments for MS affect NK cells. PMID:28066417

  3. Oct4 Targets Regulatory Nodes to Modulate Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Pearl A.; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1) is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain ‘ES’ have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer. PMID:17579724

  4. Negative transcriptional regulatory element that functions in embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ariizumi, K; Takahashi, H; Nakamura, M; Ariga, H

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned the polyomavirus mutant fPyF9, which persists in an episomal state in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells (K. Ariizumi and H. Ariga, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:3920-3927, 1986). fPyF9 carries three copies of exogenous sequences, the prototype of which is a 21-base-pair repeat (box DNA), in the region of the enhancer B domain of wild-type polyomavirus DNA. The consensus sequence, GCATTCCATTGTT, is 13 base pairs long. The box DNA inserted into fPyF9 appeared to come from a cellular sequence and was present in many kinds of DNAs, including F9 chromosomal DNA. The biological function of box DNA was analyzed by chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression assays, using chimeric plasmids containing box DNA conjugated with simian virus 40 promoter elements. The results showed that box DNA repressed the activities both of the simian virus 40 promoter and enhancer only in transfected undifferentiated F9 cells and not in differentiated LTK- cells. Box DNA functioned independently of orientation and position with respect to the promoter in an enhancerlike manner, although the effect of box DNA was opposite that of the enhancer. The XhoI linker insertion into the consensus sequences of box DNA abolished the repression activity, and the protein(s) recognizing the consensus sequences was identified only in F9 cells, not in L cells. These analyses suggest that box DNA may be a negative regulatory element that functions in undifferentiated cells. Images PMID:2550812

  5. Development and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Ghali, Joanna; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Wang, Ya; Sawyer, Andrew; Zhou, Jimmy Jianheng; Hapudeniya, Dhanushka A; Wang, Yiping; Cao, Qi; Zheng, Guoping; Harris, David C; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as having a major role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing and limiting autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Tregs derive from the thymus and also develop peripherally. In this review, we discuss recent progress in our understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in Treg development and function in protecting against autoimmunity in the periphery, including thymic selection, peripheral induction and the many mechanisms of Treg suppression. Specifically in kidney disease, Tregs have been shown to play a role in limiting injury and may potentially have a therapeutic role.

  6. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  7. Control of Regulatory T Cell Migration, Function, and Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Daniel J

    2015-09-15

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for preventing autoimmunity and uncontrolled inflammation, and they modulate immune responses during infection and the development of cancer. Accomplishing these tasks requires the widespread distribution of Tregs in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues, and the selective recruitment of Tregs to different tissue sites has emerged as a key checkpoint that controls tissue inflammation in autoimmunity, infection, and cancer development, as well as in the context of allograft acceptance or rejection. Additionally, Tregs are functionally diverse, and it has become clear that some of this diversity segregates with Treg localization to particular tissue sites. In this article, I review the progress in understanding the mechanisms of Treg trafficking and discuss factors controlling their homeostatic maintenance and function in distinct tissue sites.

  8. Introduction: characterization and functions of human T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Romagnani, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    The field of human T regulatory (Treg) cells is a rapidly progressing, but still confused field of immunology. The effects of dendritic cell (DC) manipulation in Treg generation and the main features of human "natural" Treg cells, as well as of different populations of adaptive Treg subsets, are still partially unclear. However, it is clear that Treg cells play an important role in human diseases, such as autoimmune disorders, allergy, HIV infection, tumors and graft-versus-host disease.

  9. Regulatory T cells require TCR signaling for their suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amanda M; Lu, Wen; Sindhava, Vishal J; Huang, Yanping; Burkhardt, Janis K; Yang, Enjun; Riese, Matthew J; Maltzman, Jonathan S; Jordan, Martha S; Kambayashi, Taku

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4(+) T cells that maintain immune tolerance in part by their ability to inhibit the proliferation of conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconvs). The role of the TCR and the downstream signaling pathways required for this suppressive function of Tregs are not fully understood. To yield insight into how TCR-mediated signals influence Treg suppressive function, we assessed the ability of Tregs with altered TCR-mediated signaling capacity to inhibit Tconv proliferation. Mature Tregs deficient in Src homology 2 domain containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76), an adaptor protein that nucleates the proximal signaling complex downstream of the TCR, were unable to inhibit Tconv proliferation, suggesting that TCR signaling is required for Treg suppressive function. Moreover, Tregs with defective phospholipase C γ (PLCγ) activation due to a Y145F mutation of SLP-76 were also defective in their suppressive function. Conversely, enhancement of diacylglycerol-mediated signaling downstream of PLCγ by genetic ablation of a negative regulator of diacylglycerol kinase ζ increased the suppressive ability of Tregs. Because SLP-76 is also important for integrin activation and signaling, we tested the role of integrin activation in Treg-mediated suppression. Tregs lacking the adaptor proteins adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein or CT10 regulator of kinase/CT10 regulator of kinase-like, which are required for TCR-mediated integrin activation, inhibited Tconv proliferation to a similar extent as wild-type Tregs. Together, these data suggest that TCR-mediated PLCγ activation, but not integrin activation, is required for Tregs to inhibit Tconv proliferation.

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor controls regulatory CD4+ T cell function.

    PubMed

    Pot, Caroline

    2012-05-31

    The ligand activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been studied for many decades in toxicology as the ligand for the environmental contaminant dioxin. However, AhR has recently emerged as a critical physiological regulator of immune responses affecting both innate and adaptive systems, and several AhR ligands with different pharmacological profiles have recently been studied. The current review discusses new insights into the role of AhR signalling and AhR ligands on the regulation of the immune system, with a focus on regulatory T cells which maintain immune tolerance. Notably, AhR is expressed and modulates the development of two induced regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets, the forkhead box P3-positive (Foxp3+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) and the IL-10-secreting type 1 regulatory T (T(R)1) cells, through different signalling pathways. We will finally discuss how AhR ligands could be exploited to alleviate human autoimmune diseases. Clearly, drugs targeted against AhR should promote the development of new strategies to fight against autoimmune diseases.

  11. Regulatory immune cells and functions in autoimmunity and transplantation immunology.

    PubMed

    Papp, Gabor; Boros, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2017-03-07

    In physiological circumstances, various tolerogenic mechanisms support the protection of self-structures during immune responses. However, quantitative and/or qualitative changes in regulatory immune cells and mediators can evoke auto-reactive immune responses, and upon susceptible genetic background, along with the presence of other concomitant etiological factors, autoimmune disease may develop. In transplant immunology, tolerogenic mechanisms are also critical, since the balance between of alloantigen-reactive effector cells and the regulatory immune cells will ultimately determine whether a graft is accepted or rejected. Better understanding of the immunological tolerance and the potential modulations of immune regulatory processes are crucial for developing effective therapies in autoimmune diseases as well as in organ transplantation. In this review, we focus on the novel insights regarding the impaired immune regulation and other relevant factors contributing to the development of auto-reactive and graft-reactive immune responses in autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection, respectively. We also address some promising approaches for modification of immune-regulatory processes and tolerogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity and solid organ transplantation, which may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  12. Generation and Function of Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Erica G.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential to the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. There are two major subsets of Treg cells, “natural” Treg (nTreg) cells that develop in the thymus, and “induced” Treg (iTreg) cells that arise in the periphery from CD4+ Foxp3− conventional T cells and can be generated in vitro. Previous work has established that both subsets are required for immunological tolerance. Additionally, in vitro-derived iTreg cells can reestablish tolerance in situations where Treg cells are decreased or defective. This review will focus on iTreg cells, drawing comparisons to nTreg cells when possible. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of iTreg cell induction, both in vivo and in vitro, review the Foxp3-dependent and -independent transcriptional landscape of iTreg cells, and examine the proposed suppressive mechanisms utilized by each Treg cell subset. We also compare the T cell receptor repertoire of the Treg cell subsets, discuss inflammatory conditions where iTreg cells are generated or have been used for treatment, and address the issue of iTreg cell stability. PMID:23801990

  13. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology.

  14. Regulatory Roles of Fluctuation-Driven Mechanotransduction in Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2016-09-01

    Cells in the body are exposed to irregular mechanical stimuli. Here, we review the so-called fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction in which stresses stretching cells vary on a cycle-by-cycle basis. We argue that such mechanotransduction is an emergent network phenomenon and offer several potential mechanisms of how it regulates cell function. Several examples from the vasculature, the lung, and tissue engineering are discussed. We conclude with a list of important open questions.

  15. B Cells with Regulatory Function in Animal Models of Autoimmune and Non-Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Wang, Zuomin; Han, Xiaozhe

    2015-03-01

    Although the identification of B cell subsets with negative regulatory functions and the definition of their mechanisms of action are recent events, the important negative regulatory roles of B cells in immune responses are now broadly recognized. There is an emerging appreciation for the pivotal role played by B cells in several areas of human diseases including autoimmune diseases and non-autoimmune diseases such as parasite infections and cancer. The recent research advancement of regulatory B cells in human disease coincides with the vastly accelerated pace of research on the bridging of innate and adaptive immune system. Current study and our continued research may provide better understanding of the mechanisms that promote regulatory B10 cell function to counteract exaggerated immune activation in autoimmune as well as non-autoimmune conditions. This review is focused on the current knowledge of BREG functions studied in animal models of autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases.

  16. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  17. Accumulation of peripheral autoreactive B cells in the absence of functional human regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, Tuure; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Morbach, Henner; Choi, Jinyoung; Kim, Sangtaek; Craft, Joseph; Mayer, Lloyd; Cancrini, Caterina; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role in preventing autoimmunity. Mutations in the forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) gene, which encodes a transcription factor critical for Treg function, result in a severe autoimmune disorder and the production of various autoantibodies in mice and in IPEX (immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) patients. However, it is unknown whether Tregs normally suppress autoreactive B cells. To investigate a role for Tregs in maintaining human B-cell tolerance, we tested the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells isolated from IPEX patients. Characteristics and reactivity of antibodies expressed by new emigrant/transitional B cells from IPEX patients were similar to those from healthy donors, demonstrating that defective Treg function does not impact central B-cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from IPEX patients often expressed autoreactive antibodies, suggesting an important role for Tregs in maintaining peripheral B-cell tolerance. T cells displayed an activated phenotype in IPEX patients, including their Treg-like cells, and showed up-regulation of CD40L, PD-1, and inducibl T-cell costimulator (ICOS), which may favor the accumulation of autoreactive mature naive B cells in these patients. Hence, our data demonstrate an essential role for Tregs in the establishment and the maintenance of peripheral B-cell tolerance in humans. PMID:23223361

  18. Function of fusion regulatory proteins (FRPs) in immune cells and virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Tsurudome, M; Ito, Y

    2000-01-01

    Two molecules that regulate cell fusion have been identified and designated fusion regulatory protein-1 (FRP-1) and FRP-2. FRP-1 is a complex composed of a glycosylated heavy chain and a nonglycosylated light chain that are disulfide linked. FRP-1 heavy chain is identical to 4F2/CD98 heavy chain, whereas FRP-2 is identical to integrin alpha3 subunit. The FRP-1 heavy chain is a multifunctional molecule: that is, fusion regulator, amino acid transporter, integrin regulator, comitogenic factor, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, oncogenic protein, and so on. Several aspects of the structure and function of the FRP-1 system are reviewed: fusion regulatory molecular mechanisms, cross-talk between the FRP-1 and integrin, the FRP-1 system as amino acid transporter, and FRP-1-mediated T-cell activation. The FRP-1 system is involved in virus-mediated cell fusion and multinucleated giant cell formation of blood monocytes. Monoclonal antibodies against human FRP-1 heavy chain induce polykaryocytes that have properties as osteoclasts. Multiple steps participate in molecular mechanisms regulating cell fusion. The FRP-1 heavy chain supports amino acid transport activity and the FRP-1 light chains have recently been cloned as amino acid transporters that require association with the heavy chain to exhibit their activity. Novel pathways for monocyte-dependent regulation of T-cell activation have recently been found that are mediated by the FRP-1 system. In conclusion, the FRP-1 molecules are essential factors for basic cellular functions.

  19. Multiple sclerosis associated genetic variants of CD226 impair regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Piédavent-Salomon, Melanie; Willing, Anne; Engler, Jan Broder; Steinbach, Karin; Bauer, Simone; Eggert, Britta; Ufer, Friederike; Kursawe, Nina; Wehrmann, Sabine; Jäger, Jan; Reinhardt, Stefanie; Friese, Manuel A

    2015-11-01

    Recent association studies have linked numerous genetic variants with an increased risk for multiple sclerosis, although their functional relevance remains largely unknown. Here we investigated phenotypical and functional consequences of a genetic variant in the CD226 gene that, among other autoimmune diseases, predisposes to multiple sclerosis. Phenotypically, effector and regulatory CD4(+) memory T cells of healthy individuals carrying the predisposing CD226 genetic variant showed, in comparison to carriers of the protective variant, reduced surface expression of CD226 and an impaired induction of CD226 after stimulation. This haplotype-dependent reduction in CD226 expression on memory T cells was abrogated in patients with multiple sclerosis, as CD226 expression was comparable to healthy risk haplotype carriers irrespective of genetic variant. Functionally, FOXP3-positive regulatory T cells from healthy carriers of the genetic protective variant showed superior suppressive capacity, which was again abrogated in multiple sclerosis patients. Mimicking the phenotype of human CD226 genetic risk variant carriers, regulatory T cells derived from Cd226-deficient mice showed similarly reduced inhibitory activity, eventually resulting in an exacerbated disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis. Therefore, by combining human and mouse analyses we show that CD226 exhibits an important role in the activation of regulatory T cells, with its genetically imposed dysregulation impairing regulatory T cell function. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. [Regulatory T cells].

    PubMed

    Marinić, Igor; Gagro, Alenka; Rabatić, Sabina

    2006-12-01

    Regulatory T-cells are a subset of T cells that have beene extensively studied in modern immunology. They are important for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, and have an important role in various clinical conditions such as allergy, autoimmune disorders, tumors, infections, and in transplant medicine. Basically, this population has a suppressive effect on the neighboring immune cells, thus contributing to the local modulation and control of immune response. There are two main populations of regulatory T cells - natural regulatory T cells, which form a distinct cellular lineage, develop in thymus and perform their modulatory action through direct intercellular contact, along with the secreted cytokines; and inducible regulatory T cells, which develop in the periphery after contact with the antigen that is presented on the antigen presenting cell, and their primary mode of action is through the interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-alpha) cytokines. Natural regulatory T cells are activated through T cell receptor after contact with specific antigen and inhibit proliferation of other T cells in an antigen independent manner. One of the major difficulties in the research of regulatory T cells is the lack of specific molecular markers that would identify these cells. Natural regulatory T cells constitutively express surface molecule CD25, but many other surface and intracellular molecules (HLA-DR, CD122, CD45RO, CD62, CTLA-4, GITR, PD-1, Notch, FOXP3, etc.) are being investigated for further phenotypic characterization of these cells. Because regulatory T cells have an important role in establishing peripheral tolerance, their importance is manifested in a number of clinical conditions. In the IPEX syndrome (immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy and enteropathy, X-linked), which is caused by mutation in Foxp3 gene that influences the development and function of regulatory T cells, patients develop severe autoimmune reactions that

  1. An essential role for IL-2 receptor in regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Andrew G; Fan, Xiying; Klein, Ulf; Zheng, Ye; Gasteiger, Georg; Feng, Yongqiang; Fontenot, Jason D.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, expressing abundant amounts of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), are reliant on IL-2 produced by activated T cells. This feature implied a key role for a simple network based on IL-2 consumption by Treg cells in their suppressor function. However, congenital deficiency in IL-2R results in reduced expression of the Treg cell lineage specification factor Foxp3, confounding experimental efforts to understand the role of IL-2R expression and signaling in Treg suppressor function. Using genetic gain and loss of function approaches, we demonstrate that IL-2 capture is dispensable for control of CD4+ T cells, but is important for limiting CD8+ T cell activation, and that IL-2R dependent STAT5 transcription factor activation plays an essential role in Treg cell suppressor function separable from T cell receptor signaling. PMID:27595233

  2. Affinity for self antigen selects regulatory T cells with distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Lena; Stadinski, Brian D.; King, Carolyn G.; Schallenberg, Sonja; McCarthy, Nicholas I.; Lee, Jun Young; Kretschmer, Karsten; Terracciano, Luigi M.; Anderson, Graham; Surh, Charles D.; Huseby, Eric S.; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    How regulatory T cells (Treg cell) control lymphocyte homeostasis is not fully understood. Here we identify two Treg cell populations with differing degrees of self-reactivity and distinct regulatory functions. Triplehi (GITRhiPD-1hiCD25hi) Treg cell are highly self-reactive and control lympho-proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes. Triplelo (GITRloPD-1loCD25lo) Treg cells are less self-reactive and limit development of colitis by promoting conversion of CD4+ Tconv cells into induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). Although Foxp3-deficient (scurfy) mice lack Treg cells, they contain Triplehi-like and Triplelo-like CD4+ T cells with distinct pathological properties. Scurfy TriplehiCD4+T cells infiltrate the skin whereas scurfy TripleloCD4+T cells induce colitis and wasting disease. These findings indicate that T cell receptor affinity for self-antigens drives the differentiation of Tregs into distinct subsets with non-overlapping regulatory activities. PMID:27478940

  3. Bone marrow-resident NK cells prime monocytes for regulatory function during infection

    PubMed Central

    Askenase, Michael H.; Han, Seong-Ji; Byrd, Allyson L.; da Fonseca, Denise Morais; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Wilhelm, Christoph; Konkel, Joanne E.; Hand, Timothy W.; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Grainger, John R.; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Tissue-infiltrating Ly6Chi monocytes play diverse roles in immunity, ranging from pathogen killing to immune regulation. How and where this diversity of function is imposed remains poorly understood. Here we show that during acute gastrointestinal infection, priming of monocytes for regulatory function preceded systemic inflammation and was initiated prior to bone marrow egress. Notably, natural killer (NK) cell-derived IFN-γ promoted a regulatory program in monocyte progenitors during development. Early bone marrow NK cell activation was controlled by systemic interleukin-12 (IL-12) produced by Batf3-dependent dendritic cells (DC) in the mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). This work challenges the paradigm that monocyte function is dominantly imposed by local signals following tissue recruitment, and instead proposes a sequential model of differentiation in which monocytes are pre-emptively educated during development in the bone marrow to promote their tissue-specific function. PMID:26070484

  4. Loss of B cell regulatory function is associated with delayed healing in patients with tibia fracture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shufeng; Ding, Wei; Feng, Dapeng; Gong, Haiyang; Zhu, Dongmei; Chen, Bin; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-11-01

    The process of bone regeneration after fracture is a complex and well-orchestrated process usually requiring 3-12 weeks. A subset of patients, however, exhibit delayed healing time and even incomplete restoration of the normal bone structure. Although the precise mechanism is unknown, studies have shown that smurf1 may play a role during the process. Here, we sought to determine the involvement of the immune system in impaired bone healing. We found that immediately after fracture, the B-cell composition was shifted toward increased frequency of plasmablasts and decreased frequency of naïve B cells, reflecting higher inflammatory status. The percentage of CD19(+) CD24(+) CD38(+) regulatory B cells was also upregulated in response to bone fracture. The production of IL-10, a pivotal cytokine in regulatory B-cell function, was upregulated in all patients. Interestingly, the increase in IL-10 production was only sustained throughout the healing course in normal healing patients but not in delayed healing patients. Rather, delayed healing patients downregulated B-cell IL-10 secretion early and had reduced level of regulatory B-cell activity. Together, these data revealed a role of regulatory B cells in the endogenous bone regeneration process and an alternation in B-cell-mediated regulation in delayed healing patients.

  5. Interleukin 35 Rescues Regulatory B Cell Function, but the Effect Is Dysregulated in Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoxuan; Qin, Chengyong

    2017-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long-time inflammatory condition arising from aberrant immune activation in the colon and the rectum. Interleukin (IL)-35 plays critical roles in autoimmune disorders. In this study, we explored the pathways of IL-35 in affecting UC. First, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from UC patients were obtained. Pretreating PBMCs with IL-35 resulted in significantly elevated IL-10 production from whole PBMCs as well as B cells, whereas pretreating PBMCs with IL-12 or IL-27 did not demonstrate a similar effect. IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, and CD8(+) T cells, but did not inhibit the proliferation of B cells. IL-35-mediated IL-10 secretion in B cells did not require the presence of Treg cells. After treatment with IL-35, B cells from UC patients presented significantly enhanced regulatory function, characterized by inhibiting cell proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion from autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which was dependent on IL-10 signaling. However, IL-35-treatment did not demonstrate an effect on regulating IL-5 and IL-13 responses. These discoveries identified a Th1, Th17, and CD8(+) T cell-targeting role of IL-35 in UC patients. Next, we examined the IL-35 expression in the intestinal mucosal in UC patients. Data showed that both noninflamed and inflamed tissues from UC patients presented significantly lower IL-35 secretion compared to healthy control tissues, which was associated with suppressed p35 transcription. UC patients with higher IL-35 also presented higher IL-10 secretion in gut mucosa. Together, our study identified that IL-35 could mediate anti-inflammatory function through promoting regulatory B cell functions, but this effect was suppressed in UC patients.

  6. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of CD39(high) human regulatory B cells (Breg).

    PubMed

    Figueiró, F; Muller, L; Funk, S; Jackson, E K; Battastini, A M O; Whiteside, T L

    2016-02-01

    CD39 and CD73 are key enzymes in the adenosine (ADO) pathway. ADO modulates pathophysiological responses of immune cells, including B cells. It has recently emerged that a subpopulation of ADO-producing CD39(+)CD73(+) B cells has regulatory properties. Here, we define the CD39(high) subset of these cells as the major contributor to the regulatory network operated by human B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells were sorted into CD39(neg), CD39(inter) and CD39(high) subsets. The phenotype, proliferation and IL-10 secretion by these B cells were studied by flow cytometry. 5'-AMP and ADO levels were measured by mass spectrometry. Agonists or antagonists of A1R, A2AR and A3R were used to study ADO-receptor signaling in B cells. Inhibition of effector T-cell (Teff) activation/proliferation by B cells was assessed in co-cultures. Cytokine production was measured by Luminex. Upon in vitro activation and culture of B cells, the subset of CD39(high) B cells increased in frequency (p < 0.001). CD39(high) B cells upregulated CD73 expression, proliferated (approximately 40% of CD39(high) B cells were Ki-67(+) and secreted fold-2 higher IL-10 and ADO levels than CD39(neg) or CD39(inter) B cells. CD39(high) B cells co-cultured with autologous Teff suppressed T-cell activation/proliferation and secreted elevated levels of IL-6 and IL-10. The A1R and A2AR agonists promoted expansion and functions of CD39(high) B cells. CD39 ectonucleotidase is upregulated in a subset of in vitro-activated B cells which utilize ADO and IL-10 to suppress Teff functions. Proliferation and functions of these CD39(high) B cells are regulated by A1R- and A2AR-mediated autocrine signaling.

  7. Inflammation-associated genes: risks and benefits to Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell function.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Richard A; Anderton, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells prevent the development of autoimmunity and immunopathology, as well as maintaining homeostasis and tolerance to commensal microorganisms. The suppressive activity of Treg cells is their defining characteristic, generating great interest in their therapeutic potential. However, suppressive and effector functions are not entirely exclusive. Considerable evidence points to the ability of supposedly anti-inflammatory Foxp3-expressing Treg cells to also express transcription factors that have been characterized as cardinal drivers of T effector cell function. We will consider the mounting evidence that Treg cells can function in non-suppressive capacities and review the impetus for this functional change, its relevance to developing immune and autoimmune responses and its significance to the development of Treg-based therapies.

  8. Autocrine IFNγ Controls the Regulatory Function of Lymphoproliferative Double Negative T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C.; Han, Mei; Vanama, Ramesh; Joe, Betty; Kim, Edward Y.; Zhao, Fei Linda; Jeon, Caroline; Adeyi, Oyedele; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    TCRαβ+ CD4−CD8−NK− double negative T cells (DN T cells) can act as regulatory T cells to inhibit allograft rejection and autoimmunity. Their role in graft-versus-host disease and mechanisms of suppression remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DN T cells can inhibit CD4+ T cell-mediated GVHD in a semi-allogeneic model of bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, we present evidence of a novel autocrine IFNγ signaling pathway in Fas-deficient C57BL/6.lpr (B6.lpr) DN T cells. B6.lpr DN T cells lacking IFNγ or its receptor were impaired in their ability to suppress syngeneic CD4+ T cells responding to alloantigen stimulation both in vitro and in vivo. Autocrine IFNγ signaling was required for sustained B6.lpr DN T cell IFNγ secretion in vivo and for upregulation of surface Fas ligand expression during TCR stimulation. Fas ligand (FasL) expression by B6.lpr DN T cells permitted lysis of activated CD4+ T cells and was required for suppression of GVHD. Collectively, our data indicate that DN T cells can inhibit GVHD and that IFNγ plays a critical autocrine role in controlling the regulatory function of B6.lpr DN T cells. PMID:23077665

  9. TRAF3 regulates the effector function of regulatory T cells and humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae-Hoon; Hu, Hongbo; Jin, Jin; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Xiao, Yichuan; Gilbert, Brian E.; Brink, Robert; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control different aspects of immune responses, but how the effector functions of Treg cells are regulated is incompletely understood. Here we identified TNF receptor–associated factor 3 (TRAF3) as a regulator of Treg cell function. Treg cell–specific ablation of TRAF3 impaired CD4 T cell homeostasis, characterized by an increase in the Th1 type of effector/memory T cells. Moreover, the ablation of TRAF3 in Treg cells resulted in increased antigen-stimulated activation of follicular T helper cells (TFH cells), coupled with heightened formation of germinal centers and production of high-affinity IgG antibodies. Although the loss of TRAF3 did not reduce the overall frequency of Treg cells, it attenuated the antigen-stimulated production of follicular Treg cells (TFR cells). TRAF3 signaling in Treg cells was required to maintain high level expression of inducible co-stimulator (ICOS), which in turn was required for TFR cell generation and inhibition of antibody responses. These findings establish TRAF3 as a mediator of Treg cell function in the regulation of antibody responses and suggest a role for TRAF3 in mediating ICOS expression in Treg cells. PMID:24378539

  10. LFA-1 is critical for regulatory T cell homeostasis and function.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian; Bullard, Dan; Schoeb, Trent; Barnum, Scott

    2009-07-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules involved in cell-to-cell mediated suppression by Tregs are not well characterized. We found that the majority of Tregs expressed LFA-1 but most strikingly that the frequency of Tregs in LFA-1(-/-) mice was significantly lower (approximately 50%) in the spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches compared to wild type controls. The reduction in LFA-1(-/-) Treg cells appears due in part to a reduced capacity of LFA-1(-/-) CD4(+)CD25(-) cells to be induced to become Tregs in the lymph nodes. Importantly, we found that LFA-1(-/-) Tregs fail to suppress T cell responses in vitro and have reduced function in vivo. Treg-mediated suppression does not depend on LFA-1 interactions with ICAM-1 on the surface of responder cells. Our data demonstrate that LFA-1 plays a critical role in regulatory T cell homeostasis and function.

  11. Azacytidine Treatment Inhibits the Progression of Herpes Stromal Keratitis by Enhancing Regulatory T Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Siva Karthik; Reddy, Pradeep B J; Bhela, Siddheshvar; Jaggi, Ujjaldeep; Gimenez, Fernanda; Rouse, Barry T

    2017-04-01

    Ocular infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) sets off an inflammatory reaction in the cornea which leads to both virus clearance and chronic lesions that are orchestrated by CD4 T cells. Approaches that enhance the function of regulatory T cells (Treg) and dampen effector T cells can be effective to limit stromal keratitis (SK) lesion severity. In this report, we explore the novel approach of inhibiting DNA methyltransferase activity using 5-azacytidine (Aza; a cytosine analog) to limit HSV-1-induced ocular lesions. We show that therapy begun after infection when virus was no longer actively replicating resulted in a pronounced reduction in lesion severity, with markedly diminished numbers of T cells and nonlymphoid inflammatory cells, along with reduced cytokine mediators. The remaining inflammatory reactions had a change in the ratio of CD4 Foxp3(+) Treg to effector Th1 CD4 T cells in ocular lesions and lymphoid tissues, with Treg becoming predominant over the effectors. In addition, compared to those from control mice, Treg from Aza-treated mice showed more suppressor activity in vitro and expressed higher levels of activation molecules. Additionally, cells induced in vitro in the presence of Aza showed epigenetic differences in the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) of Foxp3 and were more stable when exposed to inflammatory cytokines. Our results show that therapy with Aza is an effective means of controlling a virus-induced inflammatory reaction and may act mainly by the effects on Treg.IMPORTANCE HSV-1 infection has been shown to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the cornea that leads to tissue damage and loss of vision. The inflammatory reaction is orchestrated by gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting Th1 cells, and regulatory T cells play a protective role. Hence, novel therapeutics that can rebalance the ratio of regulatory T cells to effectors are a relevant issue. This study opens up a new avenue in treating HSV-induced SK lesions by

  12. Impact of alemtuzumab treatment on the survival and function of human regulatory T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Havari, Evis; Turner, Michael J; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Shankara, Srinivas; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Roberts, Bruce; Siders, William; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the CD52 protein present at high levels on the surface of B and T lymphocytes. In clinical trials, alemtuzumab has shown a clinical benefit superior to that of interferon-β in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Treatment with alemtuzumab leads to the depletion of circulating lymphocytes followed by a repopulation process characterized by alterations in the number, proportions and properties of lymphocyte subsets. Of particular interest, an increase in the percentage of T cells with a regulatory phenotype (Treg cells) has been observed in multiple sclerosis patients after alemtuzumab. Since Treg cells play an important role in the control of autoimmune responses, the effect of alemtuzumab on Treg cells was further studied in vitro. Alemtuzumab effectively mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of human T lymphocytes and the remaining population was enriched in T cells with a regulatory phenotype. The alemtuzumab-exposed T cells displayed functional regulatory characteristics including anergy to stimulation with allogeneic dendritic cells and ability to suppress the allogeneic response of autologous T cells. Consistent with the observed increase in Treg cell frequency, the CD25(hi) T-cell population was necessary for the suppressive activity of alemtuzumab-exposed T cells. The mechanism of this suppression was found to be dependent on both cell-cell contact and interleukin-2 consumption. These findings suggest that an alemtuzumab-mediated increase in the proportion of Treg cells may play a role in promoting the long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with multiple sclerosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Notch signalling suppresses regulatory T-cell function in murine experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hua; Shen, Hongjie; Xu, Yueli; Yang, Hai

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an intraocular inflammatory disorder in developed countries. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and modulation of immune reaction in uveitic eyes is critical for designing therapeutic interventions. Here we investigated the role of Notch signalling in regulatory T-cell (Treg cell) function during experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Using the Foxp3-GFP reporter mouse strain, the significance of Notch signalling for the function of infiltrating Treg cells was characterized in an EAU model. We found that infiltrating Treg cells substantially expressed Notch-1, Notch-2, JAG1 and DLL1 in uveitic eyes. Activation of Notch signalling, represented by expression of HES1 and HES5, was enhanced in infiltrating Treg cells. Treatment with JAG1 and DLL1 down-regulated Foxp3 expression and immunosuppressive activity of isolated infiltrating Treg cells in vitro, whereas neutralizing antibodies against JAG1 and DLL1 diminished Notch ligand-mediated negative effects on Treg cells. To investigate the significance of Notch signalling for Treg cell function in vivo, lentivirus-derived Notch short hairpin RNAs were transduced into in vitro expanded Treg cells before adoptive transfer of Treg cells into EAU mice. Transfer of Notch-1-deficient Treg cells remarkably reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and inflammatory cell infiltration in uveitic eyes. Taken together, Notch signalling negatively modulates the immunosuppressive function of infiltrating Treg cells in mouse EAU.

  14. Impact of alemtuzumab treatment on the survival and function of human regulatory T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Havari, Evis; Turner, Michael J; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Shankara, Srinivas; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Roberts, Bruce; Siders, William; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the CD52 protein present at high levels on the surface of B and T lymphocytes. In clinical trials, alemtuzumab has shown a clinical benefit superior to that of interferon-β in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Treatment with alemtuzumab leads to the depletion of circulating lymphocytes followed by a repopulation process characterized by alterations in the number, proportions and properties of lymphocyte subsets. Of particular interest, an increase in the percentage of T cells with a regulatory phenotype (Treg cells) has been observed in multiple sclerosis patients after alemtuzumab. Since Treg cells play an important role in the control of autoimmune responses, the effect of alemtuzumab on Treg cells was further studied in vitro. Alemtuzumab effectively mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of human T lymphocytes and the remaining population was enriched in T cells with a regulatory phenotype. The alemtuzumab-exposed T cells displayed functional regulatory characteristics including anergy to stimulation with allogeneic dendritic cells and ability to suppress the allogeneic response of autologous T cells. Consistent with the observed increase in Treg cell frequency, the CD25hi T-cell population was necessary for the suppressive activity of alemtuzumab-exposed T cells. The mechanism of this suppression was found to be dependent on both cell–cell contact and interleukin-2 consumption. These findings suggest that an alemtuzumab-mediated increase in the proportion of Treg cells may play a role in promoting the long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24116901

  15. Haspin has Multiple Functions in the Plant Cell Division Regulatory Network.

    PubMed

    Kozgunova, Elena; Suzuki, Takamasa; Ito, Masaki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kurihara, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Progression of cell division is controlled by various mitotic kinases. In animal cells, phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 by the kinase Haspin (haploid germ cell-specific nuclear protein kinase) promotes centromeric Aurora B localization to regulate chromosome segregation. However, less is known about the function of Haspin in regulatory networks in plant cells. Here, we show that inhibition of Haspin with 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITu) in Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells delayed chromosome alignment. Haspin inhibition also prevented the centromeric localization of Aurora3 kinase (AUR3) and disrupted its function. This suggested that Haspin plays a role in the specific positioning of AUR3 on chromosomes in plant cells, a function conserved in animals. The results also indicated that Haspin and AUR3 are involved in the same pathway, which regulates chromosome alignment during prometaphase/metaphase. Remarkably, Haspin inhibition by 5-ITu also led to a severe cytokinesis defect, resulting in binuclear cells with a partially formed cell plate. The 5-ITu treatment did not affect microtubules, AUR1/2 or the NACK-PQR pathway; however, it did alter the distribution of actin filaments on the cell plate. Together, these results suggested that Haspin has several functions in regulating cell division in plant cells: in the localization of AUR3 on centromeres and in regulating late cell plate expansion during cytokinesis.

  16. The role of pregnancy-associated hormones in the development and function of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Damián; Zygmunt, Marek; Jensen, Federico

    2014-01-01

    During mammalian pregnancy, highly specialized mechanisms of immune tolerance are triggered in order to allow the semi-allogeneic fetus to grow within the maternal uterus in harmony with the maternal immune system. Among other mechanisms, changes in the endocrine status have been proposed to be at least part of the machinery responsible for the induction of immune tolerance during pregnancy. Indeed, pregnancy-associated hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and human chorionic gonadotropin are known to confer immune suppressive capacity to innate as well as adaptive immune cells. Regulatory B cells, a subpopulation of B lymphocytes with strong immunosuppressive functions, were shown to expand during pregnancy. Furthermore, it is well-known that some women suffering from multiple sclerosis, significantly improve their symptoms during pregnancy and this was attributed to the effect of female sex hormones. Accordingly, estradiol protects mice from developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by triggering the expansion and activation of regulatory B cells. In this review, we discuss different mechanisms associated with the development, activation, and function of regulatory B cells with a special focus on those involving pregnancy-associated hormones.

  17. The Ets-1 transcription factor controls the development and function of natural regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Nguyen, Hai Vu; Chopin, Martine; Mesnard, Laurent; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Burlen-defranoux, Odile; Bandeira, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) constitute a population of CD4+ T cells that limits immune responses. The transcription factor Foxp3 is important for determining the development and function of T reg cells; however, the molecular mechanisms that trigger and maintain its expression remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that mice deficient for the Ets-1 transcription factor (Ets-1−/−) developed T cell–mediated splenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity that can be blocked by functional wild-type T reg cells. Spleens of Ets-1−/− mice contained mostly activated T cells, including Th2-polarized CD4+ cells and had reduced percentages of T reg cells. Splenic and thymic Ets-1−/− T reg cells expressed low levels of Foxp3 and displayed the CD103 marker that characterizes antigen-experienced T reg cells. Thymic development of Ets-1−/− T reg cells appeared intrinsically altered as Foxp3-expressing cells differentiate poorly in mixed fetal liver reconstituted chimera and fetal thymic organ culture. Ets-1−/− T reg cells showed decreased in vitro suppression activity and did not protect Rag2−/− hosts from naive T cell–induced inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore, in T reg cells, Ets-1 interacted with the Foxp3 intronic enhancer and was required for demethylation of this regulatory sequence. These data demonstrate that Ets-1 is required for the development of natural T reg cells and suggest a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of Foxp3 expression. PMID:20855499

  18. A Stat6/Pten Axis Links Regulatory T Cells with Adipose Tissue Function.

    PubMed

    Kälin, Stefanie; Becker, Maike; Ott, Verena B; Serr, Isabelle; Hosp, Fabian; Mollah, Mohammad M H; Keipert, Susanne; Lamp, Daniel; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Francoise; Flynn, Victoria K; Scherm, Martin G; Nascimento, Lucas F R; Gerlach, Katharina; Popp, Vanessa; Dietzen, Sarah; Bopp, Tobias; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Kaplan, Mark H; Serrano, Manuel; Woods, Stephen C; Tripal, Philipp; Palmisano, Ralf; Jastroch, Martin; Blüher, Matthias; Wolfrum, Christian; Weigmann, Benno; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Mann, Matthias; Tschöp, Matthias H; Daniel, Carolin

    2017-09-05

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with metabolic defects and adipose tissue inflammation. Foxp3(+) regulatorycells (Tregs) control tissue homeostasis by counteracting local inflammation. However, if and how T cells interlink environmental influences with adipocyte function remains unknown. Here, we report that enhancing sympathetic tone by cold exposure, beta3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) stimulation or a short-term high-calorie diet enhances Treg induction in vitro and in vivo. CD4(+) T cell proteomes revealed higher expression of Foxp3 regulatory networks in response to cold or ADRB3 stimulation in vivo reflecting Treg induction. Specifically, Ragulator-interacting protein C17orf59, which limits mTORC1 activity, was upregulated in CD4(+) T cells by either ADRB3 stimulation or cold exposure, suggesting contribution to Treg induction. By loss- and gain-of-function studies, including Treg depletion and transfers in vivo, we demonstrated that a T cell-specific Stat6/Pten axis links cold exposure or ADRB3 stimulation with Foxp3(+) Treg induction and adipose tissue function. Our findings offer a new mechanistic model in which tissue-specific Tregs maintain adipose tissue function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claire; Powrie, Fiona

    2004-08-01

    Regulatory T (TR) cells are a subset of T cells that function to control immune responses. Different populations of TR cells have been described, including thymically derived CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells and Tr1 cells induced in the periphery through exposure to antigen. A transcription factor, Foxp3, has been identified that is essential for CD4(+)CD25+ TR cell development and function. There is now evidence that transforming growth factor-beta might play a role in this pathway. CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells proliferate extensively in vivo in an antigen-specific manner, and can respond to both self and foreign peptides. By suppressing excessive immune responses, TR cells play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, thus preventing autoimmune disease, as well as inhibiting harmful inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Stability and function of regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet.

    PubMed

    Levine, Andrew G; Medoza, Alejandra; Hemmers, Saskia; Moltedo, Bruno; Niec, Rachel E; Schizas, Michail; Hoyos, Beatrice E; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Dikiy, Stanislav; Fujisawa, Sho; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Treuting, Piper M; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2017-06-15

    Adaptive immune responses are tailored to different types of pathogens through differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into functionally distinct subsets of effector T cells (T helper 1 (TH1), TH2, and TH17) defined by expression of the key transcription factors T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt, respectively. Regulatory T (Treg) cells comprise a distinct anti-inflammatory lineage specified by the X-linked transcription factor Foxp3 (refs 2, 3). Paradoxically, some activated Treg cells express the aforementioned effector CD4 T cell transcription factors, which have been suggested to provide Treg cells with enhanced suppressive capacity. Whether expression of these factors in Treg cells-as in effector T cells-is indicative of heterogeneity of functionally discrete and stable differentiation states, or conversely may be readily reversible, is unknown. Here we demonstrate that expression of the TH1-associated transcription factor T-bet in mouse Treg cells, induced at steady state and following infection, gradually becomes highly stable even under non-permissive conditions. Loss of function or elimination of T-bet-expressing Treg cells-but not of T-bet expression in Treg cells-resulted in severe TH1 autoimmunity. Conversely, following depletion of T-bet(-) Treg cells, the remaining T-bet(+) cells specifically inhibited TH1 and CD8 T cell activation consistent with their co-localization with T-bet(+) effector T cells. These results suggest that T-bet(+) Treg cells have an essential immunosuppressive function and indicate that Treg cell functional heterogeneity is a critical feature of immunological tolerance.

  1. FIREWACh: High-throughput Functional Detection of Transcriptional Regulatory Modules in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murtha, Matthew; Tokcaer-Keskin, Zeynep; Tang, Zuojian; Strino, Francesco; Chen, Xi; Wang, Yatong; Xi, Xiangmei; Basilico, Claudio; Brown, Stuart; Bonneau, Richard; Kluger, Yuval; Dailey, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Promoters and enhancers establish precise gene transcription patterns. The development of functional approaches for their identification in mammalian cells has been complicated by the size of these genomes. Here we report a new method called FIREWACh (Functional Identification of Regulatory Elements Within Accessible Chromatin), a high-throughput functional assay for directly identifying active promoter and enhancer elements. FIREWACh simultaneously assessed over 80,000 DNA fragments derived from “nucleosome-free regions” within embryonic stem cell (ESC) chromatin to identify 6,364 new active regulatory elements. Many FIREWACh DNAs represent newly discovered ESC-specific enhancers and their analyses identified enriched binding site motifs for ESC transcription factors including SOX2, OCT4 (POU5f1), and KLF4. Thus FIREWACh identifies endogenous regulators of gene expression and can be used for the discovery of key cell-specific transcription factors. The application of FIREWACh to additional cultured cell types will facilitate functional annotation of the genome and expand our view of transcriptional network dynamics. PMID:24658142

  2. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  3. Impaired function of regulatory T cells in cord blood of children of allergic mothers.

    PubMed

    Hrdý, J; Kocourková, I; Prokešová, L

    2012-10-01

    Allergy is one of the most common diseases with constantly increasing incidence. The identification of prognostic markers pointing to increased risk of allergy development is of importance. Cord blood represents a suitable source of cells for searching for such prognostic markers. In our previous work, we described the increased reactivity of cord blood cells of newborns of allergic mothers in comparison to newborns of healthy mothers, which raised the question of whether or not this was due to the impaired function of regulatory T cells (T(regs)) in high-risk children. Therefore, the proportion and functional properties of T(regs) in cord blood of children of healthy and allergic mothers were estimated by flow cytometry. The proportion of T(regs) [CD4(+)CD25(high)CD127(low) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+))] in cord blood of children of allergic mothers tends to be higher while, in contrast, the median of fluorescence intensity of FoxP3 was increased significantly in the healthy group. Intracellular presence of regulatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta was also higher in T(regs) of children of healthy mothers. Although we detected an increased proportion of T(regs) in cord blood of children of allergic mothers, the functional indicators (intracellular presence of regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta, median of fluorescence intensity of FoxP3) of those T(regs) were lower in comparison to the healthy group. We can conclude that impaired function of T(regs) in cord blood of children of allergic mothers could be compensated partially by their increased number. Insufficient function of T(regs) could facilitate allergen sensitization in high-risk individuals after subsequent allergen encounter.

  4. PKC-Theta in Regulatory and Effector T-cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Brezar, Vedran; Tu, Wen Juan; Seddiki, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    One of the major goals in immunology research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms that underpin the rapid switch on/off of robust and efficient effector (Teffs) or regulatory (Tregs) T-cell responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of such responses is critical for the development of effective therapies. T-cell activation involves the engagement of T-cell receptor and co-stimulatory signals, but the subsequent recruitment of serine/threonine-specific protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-θ) to the immunological synapse (IS) is instrumental for the formation of signaling complexes, which ultimately lead to a transcriptional network in T cells. Recent studies demonstrated that major differences between Teffs and Tregs occurred at the IS where its formation induces altered signaling pathways in Tregs. These pathways are characterized by reduced recruitment of PKC-θ, suggesting that PKC-θ inhibits Tregs suppressive function in a negative feedback loop. As the balance of Teffs and Tregs has been shown to be central in several diseases, it was not surprising that some studies revealed that PKC-θ plays a major role in the regulation of this balance. This review will examine recent knowledge on the role of PKC-θ in T-cell transcriptional responses and how this protein can impact on the function of both Tregs and Teffs. PMID:26528291

  5. Origin and functions of pro-inflammatory cytokine producing Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Zhu, Jinfang

    2016-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory cells (Tregs) are a special lineage of cells central in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, and are targeted for human immunotherapy. They are conventionally associated with the production of classical anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10, TGF-β and IL-35, consistent to their anti-inflammatory functions. However, emerging evidence show that they also express effector cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-17A under inflammatory conditions. While some studies reveal that these pro-inflammatory cytokine producing Foxp3+ regulatory cells retain their suppressive ability, others believe that these cells are dys-regulated and are associated with perpetuation of immunopathology. Therefore the development of these cells may challenge the efficacy of human Treg therapy. Mechanistically, toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and the pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu have been shown to play important roles in the induction of effector cytokines in Tregs. Here we review the mechanisms of development and the possible functions of pro-inflammatory cytokine producing Foxp3+ Tregs. PMID:26165923

  6. Origin and functions of pro-inflammatory cytokine producing Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory cells (Tregs) are a special lineage of cells central in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, and are targeted for human immunotherapy. They are conventionally associated with the production of classical anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10, TGF-β and IL-35, consistent to their anti-inflammatory functions. However, emerging evidence show that they also express effector cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-17A under inflammatory conditions. While some studies reveal that these pro-inflammatory cytokine producing Foxp3(+) regulatory cells retain their suppressive ability, others believe that these cells are dys-regulated and are associated with perpetuation of immunopathology. Therefore the development of these cells may challenge the efficacy of human Treg therapy. Mechanistically, toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and the pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu have been shown to play important roles in the induction of effector cytokines in Tregs. Here we review the mechanisms of development and the possible functions of pro-inflammatory cytokine producing Foxp3+ Tregs.

  7. Loss of Functionally Redundant p38 Isoforms in T Cells Enhances Regulatory T Cell Induction*

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Morisada; Hayakawa, Hiroko; Petrova, Tsvetana; Ritprajak, Patcharee; Sutavani, Ruhcha V.; Jiménez-Andrade, Guillermina Yanek; Sano, Yasuyo; Choo, Min-Kyung; Seavitt, John; Venigalla, Ram K. C.; Otsu, Kinya; Georgopoulos, Katia; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Park, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein kinase p38 mediates innate resistance to environmental stress and microbial infection. Four p38 isoforms exist in mammals and may have been co-opted for new roles in adaptive immunity. Murine T cells deficient in p38α, the ubiquitously expressed p38 isoform, showed no readily apparent cell-autonomous defects while expressing elevated amounts of another isoform, p38β. Mice with T cells simultaneously lacking p38α and p38β displayed lymphoid atrophy and elevated Foxp3+ regulatory T cell frequencies. Double deficiency of p38α and p38β in naïve CD4+ T cells resulted in an attenuation of MAPK-activated protein kinase (MK)-dependent mTOR signaling after T cell receptor engagement, and enhanced their differentiation into regulatory T cells under appropriate inducing conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of the p38-MK-mTOR signaling module produced similar effects, revealing potential for therapeutic applications. PMID:28011639

  8. Human mesenchymal stromal cells enhance the immunomodulatory function of CD8+CD28− regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiuli; Zheng, Haiqing; Chen, Xiaoyong; Peng, Yanwen; Huang, Weijun; Li, Xiaobo; Li, Gang; Xia, Wenjie; Sun, Qiquan; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2015-01-01

    One important aspect of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-mediated immunomodulation is the recruitment and induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells. However, we do not yet know whether MSCs have similar effects on the other subsets of Treg cells. Herein, we studied the effects of MSCs on CD8+CD28− Treg cells and found that the MSCs could not only increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells, but also enhance CD8+CD28−T cells' ability of hampering naive CD4+ T-cell proliferation and activation, decreasing the production of IFN-γ by activated CD4+ T cells and inducing the apoptosis of activated CD4+ T cells. Mechanistically, the MSCs affected the functions of the CD8+CD28− T cells partially through moderate upregulating the expression of IL-10 and FasL. The MSCs had no distinct effect on the shift from CD8+CD28+ T cells to CD8+CD28− T cells, but did increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells by reducing their rate of apoptosis. In summary, this study shows that MSCs can enhance the regulatory function of CD8+CD28− Treg cells, shedding new light on MSCs-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25482073

  9. Stem cell regulatory function mediated by expression of a novel mouse Oct4 pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey; Shabbir, Arsalan; Molnar, Merced; Lee, Techung . E-mail: chunglee@buffalo.edu

    2007-03-30

    Multiple pseudogenes have been proposed for embryonic stem (ES) cell-specific genes, and their abundance suggests that some of these potential pseudogenes may be functional. ES cell-specific expression of Oct4 regulates stem cell pluripotency and self-renewing state. Although Oct4 expression has been reported in adult tissues during gene reprogramming, the detected Oct4 signal might be contributed by Oct4 pseudogenes. Among the multiple Oct4 transcripts characterized here is a {approx}1 kb clone derived from P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells, which shares a {approx}87% sequence homology with the parent Oct4 gene, and has the potential of encoding an 80-amino acid product (designated as Oct4P1). Adenoviral expression of Oct4P1 in mesenchymal stem cells promotes their proliferation and inhibits their osteochondral differentiation. These dual effects of Oct4P1 are reminiscent of the stem cell regulatory function of the parent Oct4, and suggest that Oct4P1 may be a functional pseudogene or a novel Oct4-related gene with a unique function in stem cells.

  10. Immune enhancing effects of Echinacea purpurea root extract by reducing regulatory T cell number and function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Oh, Sei-Kwan; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Hyeon Kook; Moon, Byung-In; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-04-01

    Echinacea purpurea preparations (EPs) have been traditionally used for the treatment of various infections and also for wound healing. Accumulating evidence suggests their immunostimulatory effects. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to play a key role in immune regulation in vivo. However, there have been no reports so far on the effects of EP on the frequency or function of Tregs in vivo. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the quantitative and functional changes in Tregs by in vivo administration with EP. The frequencies of CD4+FoxP3+ and CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the spleens of BALB/c mice administered with EP for 3 weeks were investigated by flow cytometry. The suppressive function of CD4CD25+ Tregs in association with the proliferative activity of CD4+CD25 effector T cells (Teffs) and the feeder function of CD4 antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were analyzed by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-dilution assay. The results showed a lowered frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ and CD4+CD25+ Tregs and attenuated suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ Tregs, while the feeder function of APCs was enhanced in the EP-administered mice. On the other hand, the proliferative activity of Teffs was not significantly different in the EP-administered mice. The results suggest that decreased number and function of Tregs, in association with the enhanced feeder function of APCs, may contribute to the enhancement of immune function by EP.

  11. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, J.; Yuan, J.; Chandrakar, A.; Iacomini, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25low Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3+, CD25high, CD4+ Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3+CD25lowCD4+ T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance. PMID:26079467

  12. FcRγ Controls the Fas-Dependent Regulatory Function of Lymphoproliferative Double Negative T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C.; Thomson, Christopher W.; Kim, Edward Y.; Han, Mei; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and lymphoproliferation (LPR) mice are deficient in Fas, and accumulate large numbers of αβ-TCR+, CD4−, CD8− double negative (DN) T cells. The function of these DN T cells remains largely unknown. The common γ subunit of the activating Fc receptors, FcRγ, plays an important role in mediating innate immune responses. We have shown previously that a significant proportion of DN T cells express FcRγ, and that this molecule is required for TCR transgenic DN T cells to suppress allogeneic immune responses. Whether FcRγ plays a critical role in LPR DN T cell-mediated suppression of immune responses to auto and allo-antigens is not known. Here, we demonstrated that FcRγ+, but not FcRγ− LPR DN T cells could suppress Fas+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro and attenuated CD4+ T cell-mediated graft-versus host disease. Although FcRγ expression did not allow LPR DN T cells to inhibit the expansion of Fas-deficient cells within the LPR context, adoptive transfer of FcRγ+, but not FcRγ−, DN T cells inhibited lymphoproliferation in generalized lymphoproliferative disease (GLD) mice. Furthermore, FcRγ acted in a cell-intrinsic fashion to limit DN T cell accumulation by increasing the rate of apoptosis in proliferated cells. These results indicate that FcRγ can confer Fas-dependent regulatory properties on LPR DN T cells, and suggest that FcRγ may be a novel marker for functional DN Tregs. PMID:23762329

  13. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 controls TH1 cell effector function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Justus; Schumacher, Valéa; Ahrens, Stefanie; Käding, Nadja; Feldhoff, Lea Marie; Huber, Magdalena; Rupp, Jan; Raczkowski, Friederike; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) is essential for TH2 and TH17 cell formation and controls peripheral CD8+ T cell differentiation. We used Listeria monocytogenes infection to characterize the function of IRF4 in TH1 responses. IRF4−/− mice generated only marginal numbers of listeria-specific TH1 cells. After transfer into infected mice, IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells failed to differentiate into TH1 cells as indicated by reduced T-bet and IFN-γ expression, and showed limited proliferation. Activated IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells exhibited diminished uptake of the glucose analog 2-NBDG, limited oxidative phosphorylation and strongly reduced aerobic glycolysis. Insufficient metabolic adaptation contributed to the limited proliferation and TH1 differentiation of IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells. Our study identifies IRF4 as central regulator of TH1 responses and cellular metabolism. We propose that this function of IRF4 is fundamental for the initiation and maintenance of all TH cell responses. PMID:27762344

  14. Mechanisms of Regulatory B cell Function in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases beyond IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Avijit; Dittel, Bonnie N.

    2017-01-01

    In the past two decades it has become clear that in addition to antigen presentation and antibody production B cells play prominent roles in immune regulation. While B cell-derived IL-10 has garnered much attention, B cells also effectively regulate inflammation by a variety of IL-10-independent mechanisms. B cell regulation has been studied in both autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. While collectively called regulatory B cells (Breg), no definitive phenotype has emerged for B cells with regulatory potential. This has made their study challenging and thus unique B cell regulatory mechanisms have emerged in a disease-dependent manner. Thus to harness the therapeutic potential of Breg, further studies are needed to understand how they emerge and are induced to evoke their regulatory activities. PMID:28124981

  15. LFA-1 is Critical for Regulatory T cell Homeostasis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wohler, Jillian; Bullard, Dan; Schoeb, Trent; Barnum, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules involved in cell-to-cell mediated suppression by Tregs are not well characterized. We found that the majority of Tregs expressed LFA-1 but most strikingly that the frequency of Tregs in LFA-1−/− mice was significantly lower (~50%) in the spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer’s Patches compared to wild type controls. The reduction in LFA-1−/− Treg cells appears due in part to a reduced capacity of LFA-1−/− CD4+CD25− cells to be induced to become Tregs in the lymph nodes. Importantly, we found that LFA-1−/− Tregs fail to suppress T cell responses in vitro and have reduced function in vivo. Treg mediated-suppression does not depend on LFA-1 interactions with ICAM-1 on the surface of responder cells. Our data demonstrate that LFA-1 plays a critical role in regulatory T cell homeostasis and function. PMID:19428111

  16. CD4 T Follicular Helper and Regulatory Cell Dynamics and Function in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Miller, Shannon M.; Connick, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (TFH) are a specialized subset of CD4 T cells that reside in B cell follicles and promote B cell maturation into plasma cells and long-lived memory B cells. During chronic infection prior to the development of AIDS, HIV-1 (HIV) replication is largely concentrated in TFH. Paradoxically, TFH numbers are increased in early and midstages of disease, thereby promoting HIV replication and disease progression. Despite increased TFH numbers, numerous defects in humoral immunity are detected in HIV-infected individuals, including dysregulation of B cell maturation, impaired somatic hypermutation, and low quality of antibody production despite hypergammaglobulinemia. Clinically, these defects are manifested by increased vulnerability to bacterial infections and impaired vaccine responses, neither of which is fully reversed by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Deficits in TFH function, including reduced HIV-specific IL-21 production and low levels of co-stimulatory receptor expression, have been linked to these immune impairments. Impairments in TFH likely contribute as well to the ability of HIV to persist and evade humoral immunity, particularly the inability to develop broadly neutralizing antibodies. In addition to direct infection of TFH, other mechanisms that have been linked to TFH deficits in HIV infection include upregulation of PD-L1 on germinal center B cells and augmented follicular regulatory T cell responses. Challenges to development of strategies to enhance TFH function in HIV infection include lack of an established phenotype for memory TFH as well as limited understanding of the relationship between peripheral TFH and lymphoid tissue TFH. Interventions to augment TFH function in HIV-infected individuals could enhance immune reconstitution during ART and potentially augment cure strategies. PMID:28082992

  17. Galectin-9-CD44 interaction enhances stability and function of adaptive regulatory T cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The β-galactoside-binding protein galectin-9 is critical in regulating the immune response, but the mechanism by which it functions remains unclear. We have demonstrated that galectin-9 is highly expressed by induced regulatory T cells (iTreg) and was crucial for the generation and function of iTreg cells, but not natural regulatory T (nTreg) cells. Galectin-9 expression within iTreg cells was driven by the transcription factor Smad3, forming a feed-forward loop, which further promoted Foxp3 expression.

  18. THE INITIAL PHASE OF AN IMMUNE RESPONSE FUNCTIONS TO ACTIVATE REGULATORY T CELLS

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, William E.; Dooms, Hans; Thorne, Steve H.; Kuswanto, Wilson F.; Simonds, Erin F.; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.; Abbas, Abul K.

    2009-01-01

    An early reaction of CD4+ T lymphocytes to antigen is the production of cytokines, notably IL-2. In order to detect cytokine dependent responses, naive antigen-specific T cells were stimulated in vivo and the presence of phosphorylated STAT5 molecules was used to identify the cell populations responding to IL-2. Within hours of T-cell priming, IL-2-dependent STAT5 phosphorylation occurred primarily in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In contrast, the antigen-specific T cells received STAT5 signals only after repeated antigen exposure or memory differentiation. Regulatory T cells receiving IL-2 signals proliferated and developed enhanced suppressive activity. These results indicate that one of the earliest events in a T cell response is the activation of endogenous regulatory cells, potentially to prevent autoimmunity. PMID:19542444

  19. The alarmin IL-33 promotes regulatory T-cell function in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Schiering, Chris; Krausgruber, Thomas; Chomka, Agnieszka; Fröhlich, Anja; Adelmann, Krista; Wohlfert, Elizabeth A; Pott, Johanna; Griseri, Thibault; Bollrath, Julia; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Harrison, Oliver J; Owens, Benjamin M J; Löhning, Max; Belkaid, Yasmine; Fallon, Padraic G; Powrie, Fiona

    2014-09-25

    FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are abundant in the intestine, where they prevent dysregulated inflammatory responses to self and environmental stimuli. It is now appreciated that Treg cells acquire tissue-specific adaptations that facilitate their survival and function; however, key host factors controlling the Treg response in the intestine are poorly understood. The interleukin (IL)-1 family member IL-33 is constitutively expressed in epithelial cells at barrier sites, where it functions as an endogenous danger signal, or alarmin, in response to tissue damage. Recent studies in humans have described high levels of IL-33 in inflamed lesions of inflammatory bowel disease patients, suggesting a role for this cytokine in disease pathogenesis. In the intestine, both protective and pathological roles for IL-33 have been described in murine models of acute colitis, but its contribution to chronic inflammation remains ill defined. Here we show in mice that the IL-33 receptor ST2 is preferentially expressed on colonic Treg cells, where it promotes Treg function and adaptation to the inflammatory environment. IL-33 signalling in T cells stimulates Treg responses in several ways. First, it enhances transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated differentiation of Treg cells and, second, it provides a necessary signal for Treg-cell accumulation and maintenance in inflamed tissues. Strikingly, IL-23, a key pro-inflammatory cytokine in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, restrained Treg responses through inhibition of IL-33 responsiveness. These results demonstrate a hitherto unrecognized link between an endogenous mediator of tissue damage and a major anti-inflammatory pathway, and suggest that the balance between IL-33 and IL-23 may be a key controller of intestinal immune responses.

  20. Impaired function of regulatory T-cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Tan, Dino B A; Fernandez, Sonia; Price, Patricia; French, Martyn A; Thompson, Philip J; Moodley, Yuben P

    2014-12-01

    Anti-inflammatory pathways affecting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are poorly understood. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are important negative regulators of T-cell activity and hence were investigated in COPD patients in this study. We hypothesised that functional defects in Tregs may promote increased inflammation contributing to the pathogenesis of COPD. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from patients with stable COPD and age-matched non-smoking controls. Treg-mediated suppression of memory non-Treg (Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) T-cell activation was analysed by comparing PBMC responses to staphylococcal enterotoxin-B (SEB) pre- and post-depletion of Tregs (CD25(+)CD127(low)CD4(+) T-cells) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Activation of T-cells was assessed by HLA-DR expression. Levels of secreted cytokines were measured by ELISA. Depletion of Tregs increased SEB-induced activation of Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+) CD4(+) T-cells in samples from 15/15 healthy controls (demonstrating Treg-mediated suppression) and 9/14 COPD patients (Fisher's test, p=0.017). A screen of clinical data associated a failure of Treg-mediated suppression in the remaining five COPD patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) (33-38 kg/m(2)) compared to patients with unimpaired Treg function (20-32 kg/m(2)). In conclusion, we demonstrate impaired Treg-mediated suppression of CD4(+) T-cell activation in a subset of COPD patients, all of whom had high BMI. Obesity and/or perturbed homeostasis of Treg subsets may explain this defect and therefore contribute to increased inflammation observed in COPD.

  1. Structural and biological features of FOXP3 dimerization relevant to regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaomin; Li, Bin; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Chunxia; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yujie; Berezov, Alan; Xu, Chen; Gao, Yayi; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Zhang, Hongtao; Karger, Barry L.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Wells, Andrew D.; Zhou, Zhaocai; Greene, Mark I.

    2012-01-01

    FOXP3 is a key transcription factor for regulatory T cell function. We report the crystal structure of the FOXP3 coiled coil domain, through which a loose or transient dimeric association is formed and modulated, accounting for the activity variations introduced by disease-causing mutations or posttranslational modifications. Structure-guided mutagenesis revealed that FOXP3 coiled coil mediated homo-dimerization is essential for Treg function in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we identified human FOXP3 K250 and K252 as key residues for the conformational change and stability of the FOXP3 dimer, which can be regulated by protein posttranslational modifications such as reversible lysine acetylation. These studies provide structural and mechanistic explanations for certain disease-causing mutations in the coiled coil domain of FOXP3 that are commonly found in IPEX syndrome. Overall the regulatory machinery involving homo-oligomerization, acetylation, and hetero-association has been dissected, defining atomic insights into the biological and pathological characteristics of the FOXP3 complex. PMID:22813742

  2. Regulatory T cell transfer ameliorates lymphedema and promotes lymphatic vessel function

    PubMed Central

    Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Proulx, Steven T.; Bachmann, Samia B.; Scholl, Jeannette; Dionyssiou, Dimitris; Demiri, Efterpi; Halin, Cornelia; Dieterich, Lothar C.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common postcancer treatment complication, but the underlying pathological processes are poorly understood and no curative treatment exists. To investigate lymphedema pathomechanisms, a top-down approach was applied, using genomic data and validating the role of a single target. RNA sequencing of lymphedematous mouse skin indicated upregulation of many T cell–related networks, and indeed depletion of CD4+ cells attenuated lymphedema. The significant upregulation of Foxp3, a transcription factor specifically expressed by regulatory T cells (Tregs), along with other Treg-related genes, implied a potential role of Tregs in lymphedema. Indeed, increased infiltration of Tregs was identified in mouse lymphedematous skin and in human lymphedema specimens. To investigate the role of Tregs during disease progression, loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies were performed. Depletion of Tregs in transgenic mice with Tregs expressing the primate diphtheria toxin receptor and green fluorescent protein (Foxp3-DTR-GFP) mice led to exacerbated edema, concomitant with increased infiltration of immune cells and a mixed TH1/TH2 cytokine profile. Conversely, expansion of Tregs using IL-2/anti–IL-2 mAb complexes significantly reduced lymphedema development. Therapeutic application of adoptively transferred Tregs upon lymphedema establishment reversed all of the major hallmarks of lymphedema, including edema, inflammation, and fibrosis, and also promoted lymphatic drainage function. Collectively, our results reveal that Treg application constitutes a potential new curative treatment modality for lymphedema. PMID:27734032

  3. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  4. Ionizing radiation selectively reduces skin regulatory T cells and alters immune function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Wilson, Jolaine M; Cengel, Keith A; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth's magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel.

  5. Ionizing Radiation Selectively Reduces Skin Regulatory T Cells and Alters Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Cengel, Keith A.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth’s magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel. PMID:24959865

  6. Pph13 and orthodenticle define a dual regulatory pathway for photoreceptor cell morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Monalisa; Oke, Ashwini; Lebel, Cindy; McDonald, Elizabeth C; Plummer, Zachary; Cook, Tiffany A; Zelhof, Andrew C

    2010-09-01

    The function and integrity of photoreceptor cells are dependent upon the creation and maintenance of specialized apical structures: membrane discs/outer segments in vertebrates and rhabdomeres in insects. We performed a molecular and morphological comparison of Drosophila Pph13 and orthodenticle (otd) mutants to investigate the transcriptional network controlling the late stages of rhabdomeric photoreceptor cell development and function. Although Otd and Pph13 have been implicated in rhabdomere morphogenesis, we demonstrate that it is necessary to remove both factors to completely eliminate rhabdomere formation. Rhabdomere absence is not the result of degeneration or a failure of initiation, but rather the inability of the apical membrane to transform and elaborate into a rhabdomere. Transcriptional profiling revealed that Pph13 plays an integral role in promoting rhabdomeric photoreceptor cell function. Pph13 regulates Rh2 and Rh6, and other phototransduction genes, demonstrating that Pph13 and Otd control a distinct subset of Rhodopsin-encoding genes in adult visual systems. Bioinformatic, DNA binding and transcriptional reporter assays showed that Pph13 can bind and activate transcription via a perfect Pax6 homeodomain palindromic binding site and the Rhodopsin core sequence I (RCSI) found upstream of Drosophila Rhodopsin genes. In vivo studies indicate that Pph13 is necessary and sufficient to mediate the expression of a multimerized RCSI reporter, a marker of photoreceptor cell specificity previously suggested to be regulated by Pax6. Our studies define a key transcriptional regulatory pathway that is necessary for late Drosophila photoreceptor development and will serve as a basis for better understanding rhabdomeric photoreceptor cell development and function.

  7. T-bet Regulates Natural Regulatory T Cell Afferent Lymphatic Migration and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Iwami, Daiki; Brinkman, C Colin; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2016-03-15

    T-bet is essential for natural regulatory T cells (nTreg) to regulate Th1 inflammation, but whether T-bet controls other Treg functions after entering the inflammatory site is unknown. In an islet allograft model, T-bet(-/-) nTreg, but not induced Treg, failed to prolong graft survival as effectively as wild-type Treg. T-bet(-/-) nTreg had no functional deficiency in vitro but failed to home from the graft to draining lymph nodes (dLN) as efficiently as wild type. T-bet regulated expression of adhesion- and migration-related molecules, influencing nTreg distribution in tissues, so that T-bet(-/-) nTreg remained in the grafts rather than migrating to lymphatics and dLN. In contrast, both wild-type and T-bet(-/-) CD4(+) conventional T cells and induced Treg migrated normally toward afferent lymphatics. T-bet(-/-) nTreg displayed instability in the graft, failing to suppress Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells and prevent their infiltration into the graft and dLN. Thus, T-bet regulates nTreg migration into afferent lymphatics and dLN and consequently their suppressive stability in vivo. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Monitoring the frequency and function of regulatory T cells and summary of the approaches currently used to inhibit regulatory T cells in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Camisaschi, Chiara; Tazzari, Marcella; Rivoltini, Licia; Castelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subset of T lymphocytes that in humans represent less than the 10 % of circulating CD4(+) T cells. Treg are specialized in the inhibition of the immune responses and play a crucial role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance. Several lines of evidence clearly documented the role of Treg in restraining antitumor immune responses. For this reason, antitumor immunotherapy approaches have been recently associated with drug treatments aimed at depleting Treg or blocking their functions. A summary of the currently used in vivo approaches to limit Treg expansion in cancer patients is here provided.A comprehensive phenotypic and functional monitoring of Treg is crucial for the precise assessment of the effects that these different drug treatments exert on Treg. In this chapter, we will provide guidelines for an accurate ex vivo identification of human Treg. Due to the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, intrinsic plasticity, and the lack of a unique marker exclusively expressed by human Treg, the clear-cut identification of this T cell subset requires the expert usage of multiparametric flow cytometry analysis (FACS). In this view, a combination of phenotypic and functional assessment of Treg is mandatory. In this chapter, we will describe the most reliable methods to identify and monitor the modulation of human Treg in patients undergoing immunological or drug-based treatments. Protocols to measure ex vivo the suppressive functions of Treg are also provided.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor 2 enhances regulatory T-cell functions and suppresses food allergy in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Song, Jiang-Ping; Wu, Yingying; Yan, Hao; Zhan, Zhengke; Yang, Litao; He, Weiyi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Qiu, Shuqi; Liu, Zhigang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2014-06-01

    The functions of regulatory T (Treg) cells are important in immunity, and the regulatory mechanisms of Treg cell activities are not fully understood yet. We sought to investigate the role of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 2 in the upregulation of Treg cell function. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) on T cells was assessed by using flow cytometry. Treg cell functions were evaluated by assessing the suppressor effect on proliferation of other effector T (Teff) cells. The effect of IGF2 on regulating Treg cell functions were evaluated with a cell-culture model and a food allergy mouse model. Expression of IGF2R was observed in more than 90% of murine and human Treg cells but in less than 10% of effector CD4(+) T cells. Activation of IGF2R and T-cell receptor induced marked Treg cell proliferation and release of TGF-β from Treg cells, which enhanced Treg cell immune suppressor effects on other Teff cell activities and allergic inflammation in the intestine. Activation of IGF2R enhances Treg cell functions in suppressing other Teff cell activities and inhibiting allergic inflammation in the intestine. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Notch Balances Th17 and Induced Regulatory T Cell Functions in Dendritic Cells by Regulating Aldh1a2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Taskia Sultana; Arimochi, Hideki; Maruyama, Satoshi; Ishifune, Chieko; Tsukumo, Shin-Ichi; Kitamura, Akiko; Yasutomo, Koji

    2017-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important for adaptive immune responses through the activation of T cells. The molecular interplay between DCs and T cells determines the magnitude of T cell responses or outcomes of functional differentiation of T cells. In this study, we demonstrated that DCs in mice that are Rbpj deficient in CD11c(+) cells (Rbpj(-/-) mice) promoted the differentiation of IL-17A-producing Th17 cells. Rbpj-deficient DCs expressed little Aldh1a2 protein that is required for generating retinoic acid. Those DCs exhibited a reduced ability for differentiating regulatory T cells induced by TGF-β. Rbpj protein directly regulated Aldh1a2 transcription by binding to its promoter region. The overexpression of Aldh1a2 in Rbpj-deficient DCs negated their Th17-promoting ability. Transfer of naive CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-deficient Rbpj(-/-) mice enhanced colitis with increased Th17 and reduced induced regulatory T cells (iTreg) compared with control Rag1-deficient mice. The cotransfer of iTreg and naive CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-deficient Rbpj(-/-) mice improved colitis compared with transfer of naive CD4(+) T cell alone. Furthermore, cotransfer of DCs from Rbpj(-/-) mice that overexpressed Aldh1a2 or Notch-stimulated DCs together with naive CD4(+) T cells into Rbpj(-/-)Rag1-deficient mice led to reduced colitis with increased iTreg numbers. Therefore, our studies identify Notch signaling in DCs as a crucial balancer of Th17/iTreg, which depends on the direct regulation of Aldh1a2 transcription in DCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. The regulatory network of B-cell differentiation: a focused view of early B-cell factor 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Boller, Sören; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, many studies have investigated the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of lineage decision in the hematopoietic system. These efforts led to a model in which extrinsic signals and intrinsic cues establish a permissive chromatin context upon which a regulatory network of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers act to guide the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. These networks include lineage-specific factors that further modify the epigenetic landscape and promote the generation of specific cell types. The process of B lymphopoiesis requires a set of transcription factors, including Ikaros, PU.1, E2A, and FoxO1 to ‘prime’ cis-regulatory regions for subsequent activation by the B-lineage-specific transcription factors EBF1 and Pax-5. The expression of EBF1 is initiated by the combined action of E2A and FoxO1, and it is further enhanced and maintained by several positive feedback loops that include Pax-5 and IL-7 signaling. EBF1 acts in concert with Ikaros, PU.1, Runx1, E2A, FoxO1, and Pax-5 to establish the B cell-specific transcription profile. EBF1 and Pax-5 also collaborate to repress alternative cell fates and lock cells into the B-lineage fate. In addition to the functions of EBF1 in establishing and maintaining B-cell identity, EBF1 is required to coordinate differentiation with cell proliferation and survival. PMID:25123279

  12. Targeting regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; Curiel, Tyler; Faget, Julien; Manuel, Manuarii; Caux, Christophe; Zou, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    Cancers express tumor-associated antigens that should elicit immune response to antagonize the tumor growth, but spontaneous immune rejection of established cancer is rare, suggesting an immunosuppressive environment hindering host antitumor immunity. Among the specific and active tumor-mediated mechanisms, CD4(+)CD25(high) T regulatory cells (Treg) are important mediators of active immune evasion in cancer. In this review, we will discuss Treg subpopulations and the mechanisms of their suppressive functions. Treg depletion improves endogenous antitumor immunity and the efficacy of active immunotherapy in animal models for cancer, suggesting that inhibiting Treg function could also improve the limited successes of human cancer immunotherapy. We will also discuss specific strategies for devising effective cancer immunotherapy targeting Treg.

  13. Functional defect of regulatory CD4(+)CD25+ T cells in the thymus of patients with autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Balandina, Anna; Lécart, Sandrine; Dartevelle, Philippe; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2005-01-15

    Thymus-derived CD4(+)CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance. Despite their critical role in the active suppression of experimental autoimmune disorders, little is known about their involvement in human autoimmune diseases. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a CD4+ T cell-dependent autoimmune disease and the thymus is assumed to be the initiation site. To identify possible defects in the Treg cells in MG, we analyzed CD4(+)CD25+ cells in thymi from patients with MG compared to those from healthy subjects. We found a normal CD4(+)CD25+ number but a severe functional defect in their regulatory activity together with a decreased expression of the transcription factor, Foxp3, which is essential for T-cell regulatory function. The phenotypic analysis of CD4(+)CD25+ thymocytes revealed an increased number of activated effector cells with strong Fas expression in patients with MG. However, whatever their level of Fas, CD4(+)CD25+ thymocytes from patients with MG remained unable to suppress the proliferation of responding cells, indicating that the impaired Treg cell function is not due to contamination by activated effector T cells. These data are the first to demonstrate a severe functional impairment of thymic Treg cells in MG, which could contribute to the onset of this autoimmune disease.

  14. Specificity of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cell Function in Alloimmunity1

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Sandner, Sigrid; Habicht, Antje; Mariat, Christophe; Kenny, James; Degauque, Nicolas; Zheng, Xin Xiao; Strom, Terry B.; Turka, Laurence A.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2010-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (TRegs) are critical for the acquisition of peripheral allograft tolerance. However, it is unclear whether TRegs are capable of mediating alloantigen-specific suppressive effects and, hence, contributing to the specificity of the tolerant state. In the current report we have used the ABM TCR transgenic (Tg) system, a C57BL/6-derived strain in which CD4+ T cells directly recognize the allogeneic MHC-II molecule I-Abm12, to assess the capacity of TRegs to mediate allospecific effects. In these mice, 5–6% of Tg CD4+ T cells exhibit conventional markers of the TReg phenotype. ABM TRegs are more effective than wild-type polyclonal TRegs at suppressing effector immune responses directed against I-Abm12 alloantigen both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, they are incapable of suppressing responses directed against third-party alloantigens unless these are expressed in the same allograft as I-Abm12. Taken together, our results indicate that in transplantation, TReg function is dependent on TCR stimulation, providing definitive evidence for their specificity in the regulation of alloimmune responses. PMID:16365425

  15. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuan-Yue; Hinkley, Sarah J.; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, L.; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R.; O'Neill, Colleen M.; Song, Alex H.; Mich, Andrea; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E.; Holmes, Michael C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe a facile approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function. PMID:26322838

  16. Enhanced suppressor function of TIM-3+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Gautron, Anne-Sophie; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; de Marcken, Marine; Hafler, David A

    2014-09-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3) is an Ig-superfamily member expressed on IFN-γ-secreting Th1 and Tc1 cells and was identified as a negative regulator of immune tolerance. TIM-3 is expressed by a subset of activated CD4(+) T cells, and anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation increases both the level of expression and the number of TIM-3(+) T cells. In mice, TIM-3 is constitutively expressed on natural regulatory T (Treg) cells and has been identified as a regulatory molecule of alloimmunity through its ability to modulate CD4(+) T-cell differentiation. Here, we examined TIM-3 expression on human Treg cells to determine its role in T-cell suppression. In contrast to mice, TIM-3 is not expressed on Treg cells ex vivo but is upregulated after activation. While TIM-3(+) Treg cells with increased gene expression of LAG3, CTLA4, and FOXP3 are highly efficient suppressors of effector T (Teff) cells, TIM-3(-) Treg cells poorly suppressed Th17 cells as compared with their suppression of Th1 cells; this decreased suppression ability was associated with decreased STAT-3 expression and phosphorylation and reduced gene expression of IL10, EBI3, GZMB, PRF1, IL1Rα, and CCR6. Thus, our results suggest that TIM-3 expression on Treg cells identifies a population highly effective in inhibiting pathogenic Th1- and Th17-cell responses.

  17. Immunomodulation in host-protective immune response against murine tuberculosis through regulation of the T regulatory cell function.

    PubMed

    Das, Shibali; Halder, Kuntal; Goswami, Avranil; Chowdhury, Bidisha Paul; Pal, Nishith K; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is characterized by an infection in lung and spleen. In the present study, we have elucidated the mechanism by which Mycobacterium indicus pranii renders protection in in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We observed that Mycobacterium indicus pranii treated infected C57BL/6 mice showed a strong host-protective Th1 immune response along with a marked decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines, TGF-β, and IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T cells. This Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines was correlated with the reduction in the elevated frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells, along with the reduced TGF-β production from these T regulatory cells in tuberculosis-infected mice. This reduction in the T regulatory cell population was a result of effective modulation of STAT4-STAT5 transcription factor counter-regulation by Mycobacterium indicus pranii, which in turn, reduced the immunosuppressive activity of T regulatory cells. Thus, these findings put forward a detailed mechanistic insight into Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated regulation of the T regulatory cell functioning during experimental murine tuberculosis, which might be helpful in combating Mycobacterium-induced pathogenesis.

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species Prevent Imiquimod-Induced Psoriatic Dermatitis through Enhancing Regulatory T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Jeong; Hong, Min-Pyo; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Hyeon Kook; Moon, Byung-In; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in the prevention of psoriasis. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, but many recent studies suggested the protective role of ROS in immune-mediated diseases. In particular, severe cases of psoriasis vulgaris have been reported to be successfully treated by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), which raises tissue level of ROS. Also it was reported that Treg function was closely associated with ROS level. However, it has been only investigated in lowered levels of ROS so far. Thus, in this study, to clarify the relationship between ROS level and Treg function, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, we investigated imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis (PD) in association with Treg function both in elevated and lowered levels of ROS by using knockout mice, such as glutathione peroxidase-1−/− and neutrophil cytosolic factor-1−/− mice, as well as by using HBOT or chemicals, such as 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and N-acetylcysteine. The results consistently showed Tregs were hyperfunctional in elevated levels of ROS, whereas hypofunctional in lowered levels of ROS. In addition, imiquimod-induced PD was attenuated in elevated levels of ROS, whereas aggravated in lowered levels of ROS. For the molecular mechanism that may link ROS level and Treg function, we investigated the expression of an immunoregulatory enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) which is induced by ROS, in PD lesions. Taken together, it was implied that appropriately elevated levels of ROS might prevent psoriasis through enhancing IDO expression and Treg function. PMID:24608112

  19. Effects of conventional therapeutic interventions on the number and function of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, Mario; Cereda, Vittore; di Bari, Maria Giovanna; Formica, Vincenzo; Spila, Antonella; Jochems, Caroline; Farsaci, Benedetto; Donahue, Renee; Gulley, James L; Schlom, Jeffrey; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of investigation have revealed the apparent interplay between the immune system of the host and many conventional, “standard-of-care” anticancer therapies, including chemotherapy and small molecule targeted therapeutics. In particular, preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the important role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in inhibiting immune responses elicited by immunotherapeutic regimens such as those based on anticancer vaccines or checkpoint inhibitors. However, how the number and immunosuppressive function of Tregs change in cancer patients undergoing treatment with non-immune anticancer therapies remains to be precisely elucidated. To determine whether immunostimulatory therapies can be employed successfully in combination with conventional anticancer regimens, we have investigated both the number and function of Tregs obtained from the peripheral blood of carcinoma patients before the initiation and during the course of chemotherapeutic and targeted agent regimens. Our studies show that the treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen plus leuprolide, a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist, has minimal effects on Tregs, while sunitinib appears to exert differential effects on Tregs among patients with metastatic renal carcinoma. However, the administration of docetaxel to patients with metastatic prostate or breast cancer, as well as that of cisplatin plus vinorelbine to non-small cell lung cancer patients, appears to significantly increase the ratio between effector T cells and Tregs and to reduce the immunosuppressive activity of the latter in the majority of patients. These studies provide the rationale for the selective use of active immunotherapy regimens in combination with specific standard-of-care therapies to achieve the most beneficial clinical outcome among carcinoma patients. PMID:24353914

  20. Insulin inhibits IL-10-mediated regulatory T cell function: implications for obesity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jonathan M; Patterson, Scott J; Speck, Madeleine; Ehses, Jan A; Levings, Megan K

    2014-01-15

    Chronic inflammation is known to promote metabolic dysregulation in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although the precise origin of the unchecked inflammatory response in obesity is unclear, it is known that overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells affects metabolism. For example, TNF-α contributes to the inability of cells to respond to insulin and to the increase in levels of insulin. Whether this hyperinsulinemia itself is part of a feedback loop that affects the progression of chronic adipose inflammation is unknown. In this article, we show that regulatory T cells (Tregs) express the insulin receptor, and that high levels of insulin impair the ability of Tregs to suppress inflammatory responses via effects on the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Insulin activated AKT signaling in Tregs, leading to inhibition of both IL-10 production and the ability of Tregs to suppress the production of TNF-α by macrophages in a contact-independent manner. The effect of insulin on Treg suppression was limited to IL-10 production and it did not alter the expression of other proteins associated with Treg function, including CTLA-4, CD39, and TGF-β. In a model of diet-induced obesity, Tregs from the visceral adipose tissue of hyperinsulinemic, obese mice showed a similar specific decrease in IL-10 production, as well as a parallel increase in production of IFN-γ. These data suggest that hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of obesity-associated inflammation via a previously unknown effect of insulin on the IL-10-mediated function of Tregs.

  1. Cells with regulatory function of the innate and adaptive immune system in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Szodoray, P; Papp, G; Horvath, I F; Barath, S; Sipka, S; Nakken, B; Zeher, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe subsets of cells with regulatory properties in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), and to correlate these cell populations with clinical symptoms. Among the 32 investigated patients, 23 had extraglandular manifestations (EGMs), while nine had only glandular symptoms. Twenty healthy individuals served as controls. The percentages of natural killer (NK), natural killer T cells (NK T), interleukin (IL)-10 producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) cells were determined by flow cytometry and serum cytokine levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Functional tests were carried out to assess the suppressor properties of Treg cells in patients and controls. Peripheral NK, NK T and Tr1 cell percentages were elevated in pSS, while CD4+CD25+ Treg cells showed reduced frequencies in patients compared to controls. In pSS, elevated percentages of NK T, Tr1 and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were observed in patients with EGMs, when compared to patients with sicca symptoms only. CD4+CD25+ Treg cell percentages showed a negative correlation with sialometry values. The in vitro functional assay demonstrated lower suppression activity of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in patients compared to controls. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels were elevated, while IL-10 was decreased in patients compared to controls. Negative correlation was found between IL-10 levels and the percentages of Tr1 cells. Changes in the investigated subsets of regulatory cells in pSS may contribute to the development and progression of the disease. PMID:19664141

  2. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses. PMID:25987564

  3. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I

    2015-08-14

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses.

  4. Regulatory myeloid cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, Brian R; Raïch-Regué, Dàlia; Turnquist, Heth R; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-02-27

    Regulatory myeloid cells (RMC) are emerging as novel targets for immunosuppressive (IS) agents and hold considerable promise as cellular therapeutic agents. Herein, we discuss the ability of regulatory macrophages, regulatory dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to regulate alloimmunity, their potential as cellular therapeutic agents, and the IS agents that target their function. We consider protocols for the generation of RMC and the selection of donor- or recipient-derived cells for adoptive cell therapy. Additionally, the issues of cell trafficking and antigen (Ag) specificity after RMC transfer are discussed. Improved understanding of the immunobiology of these cells has increased the possibility of moving RMC into the clinic to reduce the burden of current IS agents and to promote Ag-specific tolerance. In the second half of this review, we discuss the influence of established and experimental IS agents on myeloid cell populations. IS agents believed historically to act primarily on T cell activation and proliferation are emerging as important regulators of RMC function. Better insights into the influence of IS agents on RMC will enhance our ability to develop cell therapy protocols to promote the function of these cells. Moreover, novel IS agents may be designed to target RMC in situ to promote Ag-specific immune regulation in transplantation and to usher in a new era of immune modulation exploiting cells of myeloid origin.

  5. Disorders of regulatory T cell function in patients with the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Zabay, J M; Fontán, G; Campos, A; García-Rodriguez, M C; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Bootello, A; de la Concha, E G

    1984-01-01

    Three patients with the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome were studied. One of them had no past history of relevant infections. The other two presented different degrees of humoral and cellular immunodeficiency and their T cells in vitro showed a defect in regulatory activity of Ig production in PWM stimulated cultures. This defect was not observed in the third patient. All three had normal numbers of B cells, producing normal amounts of Ig in vitro when co-cultured with normal T cells. It is suggested that the immunoregulatory T cell abnormality might play an important role in the pathogenesis of the humoral immunodeficiency. PMID:6609033

  6. Effects of epigallocatechin gallate on regulatory T cell number and function in obese v. lean volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Jialal, Ishwarlal; Devaraj, Sridevi

    2010-06-01

    Obesity predisposes to an increased incidence of diabetes and CVD. Also, obesity is a pro-inflammatory state. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential negative regulators of inflammation and are down-regulated in pro-inflammatory states. Animal models of obesity are associated with decreased Tregs. The dietary modulation of Tregs could be used as a therapeutic strategy to control inflammation. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a potent anti-inflammatory agent and an active ingredient of green tea and is suggested to have a role as a preventive agent in obesity, diabetes and CVD. The role of EGCG in the modulation of Tregs has, however, not been studied. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effect of EGCG on the number and function of Tregs in obese and lean human subjects in vitro, and to delineate its specific regulation mechanisms. Tregs were isolated from normal-weight and obese subjects. Tregs were cultured in the absence or presence of EGCG (20 mum) for 24 h. Foxp3-expressing Tregs were enumerated using flow cytometry. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and nuclear NF-kappaBp65 level were measured by ELISA and Western blots. Obese subjects had lower Tregs and IL-10 production than lean subjects. EGCG treatment significantly enhanced the number of Foxp3-expressing Tregs and IL-10 production in vitro (P < 0.05) in both groups. Also, EGCG decreased NF-kappaB activity and increased HDAC activity and HDAC-2 expression in Tregs (P < 0.05) in both groups. Thus, in part, EGCG enhances the functionality of Tregs, i.e. IL-10 production and number by suppressing the NF-kappaB signalling pathway via inducing epigenetic changes.

  7. Protein Kinase C-η Controls CTLA-4-Mediated Regulatory T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kok-Fai; Fu, Guo; Zhang, Yaoyang; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Casas, Javier; Canonigo-Balancio, Ann J.; Becart, Stephane; Kim, Gisen; Yates, John R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Saito, Takashi; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.; Altman, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which maintain immune homeostasis and self-tolerance, form an immunological synapse (IS) with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, signaling events at the Treg IS remain unknown. Here we show that protein kinase C-η (PKC-η) associated with CTLA-4 and was recruited to the Treg IS. PKC-η-deficient Treg cells displayed defective suppressive activity, including suppression of tumor immunity but not autoimmune colitis. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed an association between CTLA-4-PKC-η and the GIT-PIX-PAK complex, an IS-localized focal adhesion complex. Defective activation of this complex in PKC-η-deficient Treg cells was associated with reduced CD86 depletion from APCs by Treg cells. These results reveal a novel CTLA-4-PKC-η signaling axis required for contact-dependent suppression, implicating this pathway as a potential cancer immunotherapy target. PMID:24705298

  8. Phenotypical and functional alterations of CD8 regulatory T cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernuzzi, Francesca; Fenoglio, Daniela; Battaglia, Florinda; Fravega, Marco; Gershwin, M. Eric; Indiveri, Francesco; Ansari, Aftab A.; Podda, Mauro; Invernizzi, Pietro; Filaci, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that lead to loss of tolerance in autoimmune disease have remained both elusive and diverse, including both genetic predisposition and generic dysregulation of critical mononuclear cell subsets. In primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), patients exhibit a multilineage response to the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase involving antibody as well as autoreactive CD4 and CD8 responses. Recent data from murine models of PBC have suggested that a critical mechanism of biliary destruction is mediated by liver-infiltrating CD8 cells. Further, the number of autoreactive liver-infiltrating CD4 and CD8 cells is significantly higher in liver than blood in patients with PBC. Based on this data, we have studied the frequencies and phenotypic characterization of both CD4 and CD8 regulatory T cell components in both patients with PBC and age–sex matched controls. Our data is striking and indicate that CD8 Treg populations from PBC patients, but not controls, have significant phenotypic alterations, including increased expression of CD127 and reduced CD39. Furthermore, in vitro induction of CD8 Tregs by incubation with IL10 is significantly reduced in PBC patients. Importantly, the frequencies of circulating CD4+CD25+ and CD8+ and CD28− T cell subpopulations are not significantly different between patients and controls. In conclusion, these data identify the CD8 Treg subset as a regulatory T cell subpopulation altered in patients with PBC. PMID:20638239

  9. Expansion and function of Foxp3-expressing T regulatory cells during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Scott-Browne, James P; Shafiani, Shahin; Tucker-Heard, Glady's; Ishida-Tsubota, Kumiko; Fontenot, Jason D; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Bevan, Michael J; Urdahl, Kevin B

    2007-09-03

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) frequently establishes persistent infections that may be facilitated by mechanisms that dampen immunity. T regulatory (T reg) cells, a subset of CD4(+) T cells that are essential for preventing autoimmunity, can also suppress antimicrobial immune responses. We use Foxp3-GFP mice to track the activity of T reg cells after aerosol infection with Mtb. We report that during tuberculosis, T reg cells proliferate in the pulmonary lymph nodes (pLNs), change their cell surface phenotype, and accumulate in the pLNs and lung at a rate parallel to the accumulation of effector T cells. In the Mtb-infected lung, T reg cells accumulate in high numbers in all sites where CD4(+) T cells are found, including perivascular/peribronchiolar regions and within lymphoid aggregates of granulomas. To determine the role of T reg cells in the immune response to tuberculosis, we generated mixed bone marrow chimeric mice in which all cells capable of expressing Foxp3 expressed Thy1.1. When T reg cells were depleted by administration of anti-Thy1.1 before aerosol infection with Mtb, we observed approximately 1 log less of colony-forming units of Mtb in the lungs. Thus, after aerosol infection, T reg cells proliferate and accumulate at sites of infection, and have the capacity to suppress immune responses that contribute to the control of Mtb.

  10. Essential role of mitochondrial energy metabolism in Foxp3+ T-regulatory cell function and allograft survival

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Ulf H.; Angelin, Alessia; Akimova, Tatiana; Wang, Liqing; Liu, Yujie; Xiao, Haiyan; Koike, Maya A.; Hancock, Saege A.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Han, Rongxiang; Jiao, Jing; Veasey, Sigrid C.; Sims, Carrie A.; Baur, Joseph A.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Hancock, Wayne W.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional T (Tcon) cells and Foxp3+ T-regulatory (Treg) cells are thought to have differing metabolic requirements, but little is known of mitochondrial functions within these cell populations in vivo. In murine studies, we found that activation of both Tcon and Treg cells led to myocyte enhancer factor 2 (Mef2)-induced expression of genes important to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Inhibition of OXPHOS impaired both Tcon and Treg cell function compared to wild-type cells but disproportionally affected Treg cells. Deletion of Pgc1α or Sirt3, which are key regulators of OXPHOS, abrogated Treg-dependent suppressive function and impaired allograft survival. Mef2 is inhibited by histone/protein deacetylase-9 (Hdac9), and Hdac9 deletion increased Treg suppressive function. Hdac9−/− Treg showed increased expression of Pgc1α and Sirt3, and improved mitochondrial respiration, compared to wild-type Treg cells. Our data show that key OXPHOS regulators are required for optimal Treg function and Treg-dependent allograft acceptance. These findings provide a novel approach to increase Treg function and give insights into the fundamental mechanisms by which mitochondrial energy metabolism regulates immune cell functions in vivo.—Beier, U. H., Angelin, A., Akimova, T., Wang, L., Liu, Y., Xiao, H., Koike, M. A., Hancock, S. A., Bhatti, T. R., Han, R., Jiao, J., Veasey, S. C., Sims, C. A., Baur, J. A., Wallace, D. C., Hancock, W. W. Essential role of mitochondrial energy metabolism in Foxp3+ T-regulatory cell function and allograft survival. PMID:25681462

  11. Increased CD8+ T-cell Function following Castration and Immunization Is Countered by Parallel Expansion of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shuai; Moore, Miranda L.; Grayson, Jason M.; Dubey, Purnima

    2013-01-01

    Although androgen ablation therapy is effective in treating primary prostate cancers, a significant number of patients develop incurable castration-resistant disease. Recent studies have suggested a potential synergy between vaccination and androgen ablation, yet the enhanced T-cell function is transient. Using a defined tumor antigen model, UV-8101-RE, we found that concomitant castration significantly increased the frequency and function of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells early after the immunization of wild-type mice. However, at a late time point after immunization, effector function was reduced to the same level as noncastrated mice and was accompanied by a concomitant amplification in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) following immunization. We investigated whether Treg expansion occurred following castration of prostate tumor–bearing mice. In the prostate-specific Pten−/− mouse model of prostate cancer, we observed an accelerated Treg expansion in mice bearing the castration-resistant endogenous prostate tumor, which prevented effector responses to UV-8101-RE. Treg depletion together with castration elicited a strong CD8+ T-cell response to UV-8101-RE in Pten−/− mice and rescued effector function in castrated and immunized wild-type mice. In addition, Treg expansion in Pten−/− mice was prevented by in vivo interleukin (IL)-2 blockade suggesting that increased IL-2 generated by castration and immunization promotes Treg expansion. Our findings therefore suggest that although effector responses are augmented by castration, the concomitant expansion of Tregs is one mechanism responsible for only transient immune potentiation after androgen ablation. PMID:22374980

  12. Reprint of "Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function".

    PubMed

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.2±0.01) pregnant women compared to insufficient (0.34±0.01) and sufficient (0.45±0.02) pregnant women. Similarly, cord blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was also lower (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.63±0.03) pregnant women when compared to insufficient (1.05±0.04) and sufficient (1.75±0.02) pregnant women. Mean (%)±SE of B cells with CD23 and CD21 in maternal blood was higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient pregnant women (0.35±0.02; 1.65±0.04) when compared to insufficient (0.22±0.02; 0.55±0.05) and sufficient (0.15±0.02; 0.21±0.01) pregnant women. Similarly, mean (%)±SE of B cell population with CD23 and CD21 in cord blood was also higher (p<0.05) in 25(OH)D3 deficient (0.41±0.02; 1.2±0.03) when compared to insufficient (0.32±0.01; 0.6±0.05) and sufficient (0.2±0.01; 0.4±0.02) pregnant women. Regulatory cytokines, TGF

  13. HIV Nef expression favors the relative preservation of CD4+ T regulatory cells that retain some important suppressive functions.

    PubMed

    Chrobak, Pavel; Afkhami, Soheila; Priceputu, Elena; Poudrier, Johanne; Meunier, Clémence; Hanna, Zaher; Sparwasser, Tim; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2014-02-15

    HIV-1 infection causes depletion and/or dysfunction of distinct CD4(+) T cell subsets and may affect these differently. Using the CD4C/HIV-1(Nef) transgenic (Tg) mice as a model, we report that HIV-1 Nef causes depletion of total CD4(+) T cells, but preserves and relatively enriches CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). We found that Nef-mediated CD4(+) Treg enrichment is the direct result of Nef expression in CD4(+) T cells, occurs independently of Nef-induced lymphopenia, and most likely results from multiple mechanisms: lower apoptosis, enhanced cell division, and increased generation from precursors. Interestingly, Tg Treg relative enrichment could be reversed by enhancing Lck activity. Most importantly, we show that, in contrast to Tg helper CD4(+) T cells that have lost their function, Nef-expressing CD4(+) Treg retain their regulatory function in vitro and also in vivo, under some settings. In particular, we found that Treg prevent expansion of Tg B and non-Treg T cells in vivo. Our study reveals that Nef affects distinct CD4(+) T cell subsets differently and uncovers the high proliferative potential of B and non-Treg T cells in this mouse model.

  14. Regulatory T cells in B-cell-deficient and wild-type mice differ functionally and in expression of cell surface markers

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason S; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2015-01-01

    NOD.H-2h4 mice develop spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT) with chronic inflammation of thyroids by T and B cells. B-cell deficient (B–/–) mice are resistant to SAT but develop SAT if regulatory T (Treg) cells are transiently depleted. We established a transfer model using splenocytes from CD28–/– B–/– mice (effector cells and antigen-presenting cells) cultured with or without sorted Treg cells from Foxp3-GFP wild-type (WT) or B–/– mice. After transfer to mice lacking T cells, mice given Treg cells from B–/– mice had significantly lower SAT severity scores than mice given Treg cells from WT mice, indicating that Treg cells in B–/– mice are more effective suppressors of SAT than Treg cells in WT mice. Treg cells from B–/– mice differ from WT Treg cells in expression of CD27, tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) II p75, and glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR). After transient depletion using anti-CD25 or diphtheria toxin, the repopulating Treg cells in B–/– mice lack suppressor function, and expression of CD27, GITR and p75 is like that of WT Treg cells. If B–/– Treg cells develop with B cells in bone marrow chimeras, their phenotype is like that of WT Treg cells. Addition of B cells to cultures of B–/– Treg and T effector cells abrogates their suppressive function and their phenotype is like that of WT Treg cells. These results establish for the first time that Treg cells in WT and B–/– mice differ both functionally and in expression of particular cell surface markers. Both properties are altered after transient depletion and repopulation of B–/– Treg cells, and by the presence of B cells during Treg cell development or during interaction with effector T cells. PMID:25318356

  15. Functional implications of regulatory B cells in human IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y-Y; Zhang, L; Zhao, P-W; Ma, L; Li, C; Zou, H-B; Jiang, Y-F

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) diagnosis remains largely based upon immunohistologic detection of IgA- and IgG-containing glomerular deposits in renal mesangial cells, and little is known about the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. This study examines the putative contribution of B cell types, including the Breg type, to IgAN pathogenesis. Twenty-four patients with IgAN and proteinuria (Group A: <3.5 g/24 h, n = 13; Group B: >3.5 g/24 h, n = 11) and 10 healthy controls were enrolled. The frequencies of B cell subtypes in venous blood were measured by flow cytometry. Galactose-deficient IgA1 was measurement by ELISA. Needle biopsies were analysed by histology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Correlation between clinical features and B cell subtypes, including the regulatory B (Breg) cells, and Breg cell-derived immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 was assessed by Spearman's rank correlation test. IgAN patients had significantly higher frequencies of CD27(+) CD19(+) , CD38(+) CD19(+) , CD86(+) CD19(+) and CD5(+) CD19(+) B cells than the healthy controls, but significantly lower levels of Breg cells and intracellular expression of IL-10 protein in the Breg subtype. Serum IgA concentration positively correlated with CD27(+) CD19(+) B cell frequency and negatively correlated with IL-10(+) Breg cell frequency in IgAN patients, and the percentage of CD19(+) CD5(+) CD1d(+) in CD19(+) cells was negatively correlated with the level of serum Gd-IgA1. Furthermore, the frequencies of CD19(+) CD38(+) and CD19(+) CD86(+) in the CD19(+) subpopulation negatively correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate of IgAN patients. Several of the CD19(+) B cell subtypes and the IL-10(+) Breg cells are differentially expressed in IgAN patients and may contribute to the disease pathogenesis.

  16. Inhibition of cell adhesion by xARVCF indicates a regulatory function at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Reintsch, Wolfgang E; Mandato, Craig A; McCrea, Pierre D; Fagotto, François

    2008-09-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of cadherins is thought to regulate the strength and dynamics of cell-cell adhesion. Part of its regulatory activity has been attributed to a membrane-proximal region, the juxtamembrane domain (JMD), and its interaction with members of the p120 catenin subfamily. We show that titration of xARVCF, a member of this family, to the plasma membrane disrupts adhesion in the early embryo. Adhesion can be restored by coexpression of constitutively active Rac, suggesting that intracellular signaling is the primary cause in the loss of adhesion phenotype. Our observations suggest that the recruitment of p120 type catenins to the plasma membrane by the cadherin cytoplasmic tail may create protein complexes, which actively modulate the adhesion "status" of embryonic cells.

  17. Imbalance in distribution of functional autologous regulatory T cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Frank; Himsel, Andrea; Rehart, Stefan; Stanczyk, Joanna; Beutel, Björn; Zimmermann, Stefanie Y; Koehl, Ulrike; Möller, Burkhard; Gay, Steffen; Kaltwasser, Joachim P; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Radeke, Heinfried H

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Regulatory T cells (Tregs) exert their anti‐inflammatory activity predominantly by cell contact‐dependent mechanisms. A study was undertaken to investigate the regulatory capacity of autologous peripheral blood Tregs in contact with synovial tissue cell cultures, and to evaluate their presence in peripheral blood, synovial tissue and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods 44 patients with RA and 5 with osteoarthritis were included in the study. The frequency of interferon (IFN)γ‐secreting cells was quantified in synovial tissue cell cultures, CD3‐depleted synovial tissue cell cultures, synovial tissue cultures co‐cultured with autologous CD4+ and with CD4+CD25+ peripheral blood T cells by ELISPOT. Total CD3+, Th1 polarised and Tregs were quantified by real‐time PCR for CD3ε, T‐bet and FoxP3 mRNA, and by immunohistochemistry for FoxP3 protein. Results RA synovial tissue cell cultures exhibited spontaneous expression of IFNγ which was abrogated by depletion of CD3+ T cells and specifically reduced by co‐culture with autologous peripheral blood Treg. The presence of Treg in RA synovitis was indicated by FoxP3 mRNA expression and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The amount of FoxP3 transcripts, however, was lower in the synovial membrane than in peripheral blood or synovial fluid. The T‐bet/FoxP3 ratio correlated with both a higher grade of synovial tissue lymphocyte infiltration and higher disease activity. Conclusion This study has shown, for the first time in human RA, the efficacy of autologous Tregs in reducing the inflammatory activity of synovial tissue cell cultures ex vivo, while in the synovium FoxP3+ Tregs of patients with RA are reduced compared with peripheral blood and synovial fluid. This local imbalance of Th1 and Treg may be responsible for repeated rheumatic flares and thus will be of interest as a target for future treatments. PMID:17392348

  18. Intrinsic Toll-like receptor signalling drives regulatory function in B cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ping; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Stervbo, Ulrik; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Mecqinion, Aurelie; Fillatreau, Simon

    2013-01-01

    B cells can contribute to immunity through production of antibodies, presentation of antigen to T cells, and secretion of cytokines. B cell activation can result in various outcomes for the host. In general B cell responses are beneficial during infections, and deleterious during autoimmune diseases. However, B cells can also limit host defence against pathogens, and protect from autoimmune pathologies. B cells can therefore act both as drivers and as regulators of immunity. Understanding how these opposite functions are mediated shall stimulate the elaboration of novel approaches for manipulating the immune system. B cells might acquire distinct functional properties depending on their mode of activation. Antigen-specific B cell responses require triggering of B cell receptor (BCR) by antigen, and provision of helper signals by T cells. B cells also express various innate immune receptors, and can directly respond to microbial products. Here, we discuss how intrinsic signalling via Toll-like receptors contributes to the suppressive functions of B cells during autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  19. The core regulatory network in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sun; Kim, Dongsan; Kang, Nam Sook; Kim, Jeong-Rae

    2017-03-04

    In order to discover the common characteristics of various cell types in the human body, many researches have been conducted to find the set of genes commonly expressed in various cell types and tissues. However, the functional characteristics of a cell is determined by the complex regulatory relationships among the genes rather than by expressed genes themselves. Therefore, it is more important to identify and analyze a core regulatory network where all regulatory relationship between genes are active across all cell types to uncover the common features of various cell types. Here, based on hundreds of tissue-specific gene regulatory networks constructed by recent genome-wide experimental data, we constructed the core regulatory network. Interestingly, we found that the core regulatory network is organized by simple cascade and has few complex regulations such as feedback or feed-forward loops. Moreover, we discovered that the regulatory links from genes in the core regulatory network to genes in the peripheral regulatory network are much more abundant than the reverse direction links. These results suggest that the core regulatory network locates at the top of regulatory network and plays a role as a 'hub' in terms of information flow, and the information that is common to all cells can be modified to achieve the tissue-specific characteristics through various types of feedback and feed-forward loops in the peripheral regulatory networks. We also found that the genes in the core regulatory network are evolutionary conserved, essential and non-disease, non-druggable genes compared to the peripheral genes. Overall, our study provides an insight into how all human cells share a common function and generate tissue-specific functional traits by transmitting and processing information through regulatory network.

  20. The lysine deacetylase Sirtuin 1 modulates the localization and function of the Notch1 receptor in regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Marcel, Nimi; Perumalsamy, Lakshmi R; Shukla, Sanjay K; Sarin, Apurva

    2017-04-04

    The ability to tune cellular functions in response to nutrient availability has important consequences for immune homeostasis. The activity of the receptor Notch in regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress the functions of effector T cells, is indispensable for Treg cell survival under conditions of diminished nutrient supply. Anti-apoptotic signaling induced by the Notch1 intracellular domain (NIC) originates from the cytoplasm and is spatially decoupled from the nuclear, largely transcriptional functions of NIC. We showed that Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), which is an NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide)-dependent lysine deacetylase that inhibits NIC-dependent gene transcription, stabilized NIC proximal to the plasma membrane to promote the survival and function of activated Treg cells. Sirt1 was required for NIC-dependent protection from apoptosis in cell lines but not for the activity of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL. In addition, a variant NIC protein in which four lysines were mutated to arginines (NIC4KR) retained anti-apoptotic activity, but was not regulated by Sirt1, and reconstituted the functions of nonnuclear NIC in Notch1-deficient Treg cells. Loss of Sirt1 compromised Treg cell survival, resulting in antigen-induced T cell proliferation and inflammation in two mouse models. Thus, the Sirt1-Notch interaction may constitute an important checkpoint that tunes noncanonical Notch1 signaling. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Regulatory B cells in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Rui, Ke; Wang, Shengjun; Lu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    B cells are generally considered to be positive regulators of the immune response because of their capability to produce antibodies, including autoantibodies. The production of antibodies facilitates optimal CD4+ T-cell activation because B cells serve as antigen-presenting cells and exert other modulatory functions in immune responses. However, certain B cells can also negatively regulate the immune response by producing regulatory cytokines and directly interacting with pathogenic T cells via cell-to-cell contact. These types of B cells are defined as regulatory B (Breg) cells. The regulatory function of Breg cells has been demonstrated in mouse models of inflammation, cancer, transplantation, and particularly in autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the recent advances that lead to the understanding of the development and function of Breg cells and the implications of B cells in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23292280

  2. IL-4 production by group 2 innate lymphoid cells promotes food allergy by blocking regulatory T-cell function.

    PubMed

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Burton, Oliver T; Oettgen, Hans C; Chatila, Talal

    2016-09-01

    Food allergy is a major health issue, but its pathogenesis remains obscure. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) promote allergic inflammation. However their role in food allergy is largely unknown. We sought to investigate the role of ILC2s in food allergy. Food allergy-prone mice with a gain-of-function mutation in the IL-4 receptor α chain (Il4raF709) were orally sensitized with food allergens, and the ILC2 compartment was analyzed. The requirement for ILC2s in food allergy was investigated by using Il4raF709, IL-33 receptor-deficient (Il1rl1(-/-)), IL-13-deficient (Il13(-/-)), and IL-4-deficient (Il4(-/-)) mice and by adoptive transfer of in vitro-expanded ILC2s. Direct effects of ILC2s on regulatory T (Treg) cells and mast cells were analyzed in coculture experiments. Treg cell control of ILC2s was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Il4raF709 mice with food allergy exhibit increased numbers of ILC2s. IL-4 secretion by ILC2s contributes to the allergic response by reducing allergen-specific Treg cell and activating mast cell counts. IL-33 receptor deficiency in Il4raF709 Il1rl1(-/-) mice protects against allergen sensitization and anaphylaxis while reducing ILC2 induction. Adoptive transfer of wild-type and Il13(-/-) but not Il4(-/-) ILC2s restored sensitization in Il4raF709 Il1rl1(-/-) mice. Treg cells suppress ILC2s in vitro and in vivo. IL-4 production by IL-33-stimulated ILC2s blocks the generation of allergen-specific Treg cells and favors food allergy. Strategies to block ILC2 activation or the IL-33/IL-33 receptor pathway can lead to innovative therapies in the treatment of food allergy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thiol-Based Potent and Selective HDAC6 Inhibitors Promote Tubulin Acetylation and T-Regulatory Cell Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Segretti, Mariana C F; Vallerini, Gian Paolo; Brochier, Camille; Langley, Brett; Wang, Liqing; Hancock, Wayne W; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2015-11-12

    Several new mercaptoacetamides were synthesized and studied as HDAC6 inhibitors. One compound, 2b, bearing an aminoquinoline cap group, was found to show 1.3 nM potency at HDAC6, with >3000-fold selectivity over HDAC1. 2b also showed excellent efficacy at increasing tubulin acetylation in rat primary cortical cultures, inducing a 10-fold increase in acetylated tubulin at 1 μM. To assess possible therapeutic effects, compounds were assayed for their ability to increase T-regulatory (Treg) suppressive function. Some but not all of the compounds increased Treg function, and thereby decreased conventional T cell activation and proliferation in vitro.

  4. Thiol-Based Potent and Selective HDAC6 Inhibitors Promote Tubulin Acetylation and T-Regulatory Cell Suppressive Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several new mercaptoacetamides were synthesized and studied as HDAC6 inhibitors. One compound, 2b, bearing an aminoquinoline cap group, was found to show 1.3 nM potency at HDAC6, with >3000-fold selectivity over HDAC1. 2b also showed excellent efficacy at increasing tubulin acetylation in rat primary cortical cultures, inducing a 10-fold increase in acetylated tubulin at 1 μM. To assess possible therapeutic effects, compounds were assayed for their ability to increase T-regulatory (Treg) suppressive function. Some but not all of the compounds increased Treg function, and thereby decreased conventional T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. PMID:26617971

  5. The ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8(+) T cells and regulatory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Teh, Hung-Sia

    2014-03-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor ThPOK plays a crucial role in CD4 T-cell development and CD4/CD8 lineage decision. In ThPOK-deficient mice, developing T cells expressing MHC class II-restricted T-cell receptors are redirected into the CD8 T-cell lineage. In this study, we investigated whether the ThPOK transgene affected the development and function of two additional types of T cells, namely self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells. Self-specific CD8 T cells are characterized by high expression of CD44, CD122, Ly6C, 1B11 and proliferation in response to either IL-2 or IL-15. The ThPOK transgene converted these self-specific CD8 T cells into CD4 T cells. The converted CD4(+) T cells are no longer self-reactive, lose the characteristics of self-specific CD8 T cells, acquire the properties of conventional CD4 T cells and survive poorly in peripheral lymphoid organs. By contrast, the ThPOK transgene promoted the development of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells resulting in an increased recovery of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells that expressed higher transforming growth factor-β-dependent suppressor activity. These studies indicate that the ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells.

  6. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Tang, Elizabeth I; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Will M; John, Constance M; Turek, Paul J; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-06-01

    Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB)? Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5-20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4-200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by mislocalization of actin filament barbed end capping and bundling protein Eps8, and branched actin polymerization protein Arp3. Besides impeding actin dynamics

  7. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  8. Viewing immune regulation as it happens: in vivo imaging for investigation of regulatory T-cell function.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Michael J; Chow, Zachary

    2017-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play indispensable roles in the immune system, in limiting excessive or inappropriate immune and inflammatory responses. They achieve this function via effects on other immune cells in the secondary lymphoid system, and in peripheral locations such as skin, gut and bone marrow. As for the more extensively studied cellular players in the immune system, particularly dendritic cells and conventional T cells, in vivo imaging of Tregs via two-photon (or multiphoton) microscopy (MPM) has been central to the development of understanding how these cells function. In this brief review, we will describe the studies that have utilised MPM to examine Treg behaviour in vivo. These studies have investigated Treg behaviour in lymph nodes and spleen, as well as in peripheral organs such as skin, small intestine and bone marrow. The findings from these experiments underline how assumptions made about Treg function based on results of in vitro experiments are often not supported by direct visualisation of these cells in their normal in vivo settings. Together this work reveals that only via MPM analysis can Treg function be investigated in the complicated multicellular environments where conventional T cells, antigen-presenting cells and other potential cellular targets of Tregs are present with each undergoing their own specific actions.

  9. An IL-27/Lag3 axis enhances Foxp3+ regulatory T cell-suppressive function and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Do, J-S; Visperas, A; Sanogo, Y O; Bechtel, J J; Dvorina, N; Kim, S; Jang, E; Stohlman, S A; Shen, B; Fairchild, R L; Baldwin, W M; Vignali, D A A; Min, B

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) are central regulators of immune homeostasis and tolerance. As it has been suggested that proper Treg function is compromised under inflammatory conditions, seeking for a pathway that enhances or stabilizes Treg function is a subject of considerable interest. We report that interleukin (IL)-27, an IL-12 family cytokine known to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in T cells, plays a pivotal role in enhancing Treg function to control T cell-induced colitis, a model for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in humans. Unlike wild-type (WT) Tregs capable of inhibiting colitogenic T-cell expansion and inflammatory cytokine expression, IL-27R-deficient Tregs were unable to downregulate inflammatory T-cell responses. Tregs stimulated with IL-27 expressed substantially improved suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. IL-27 stimulation of Tregs induced expression of Lag3, a surface molecule implicated in negatively regulating immune responses. Lag3 expression in Tregs was critical to mediate Treg function in suppressing colitogenic responses. Human Tregs also displayed enhanced suppressive function and Lag3 expression following IL-27 stimulation. Collectively, these results highlight a novel function for the IL-27/Lag3 axis in modulating Treg regulation of inflammatory responses in the intestine.

  10. Blockade of CTLA-4 on CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells abrogates their function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Read, Simon; Greenwald, Rebecca; Izcue, Ana; Robinson, Nicholas; Mandelbrot, Didier; Francisco, Loise; Sharpe, Arlene H; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-10-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+ regulatory T cells (T(R)) that express CD25 and the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in immune homeostasis, preventing immune pathological responses to self and foreign Ags. CTLA-4 is expressed by a high percentage of these cells, and is often considered as a marker for T(R) in experimental and clinical analysis. However, it has not yet been proven that CTLA-4 has a direct role in T(R) function. In this study, using a T cell-mediated colitis model, we demonstrate that anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment inhibits T(R) function in vivo via direct effects on CTLA-4-expressing T(R), and not via hyperactivation of colitogenic effector T cells. Although anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment completely inhibits T(R) function, it does not reduce T(R) numbers or their homing to the GALT, suggesting the Ab mediates its function by blockade of a signal required for T(R) activity. In contrast to the striking effect of the Ab, CTLA-4-deficient mice can produce functional T(R), suggesting that under some circumstances other immune regulatory mechanisms, including the production of IL-10, are able to compensate for the loss of the CTLA-4-mediated pathway. This study provides direct evidence that CTLA-4 has a specific, nonredundant role in the function of normal T(R). This role has to be taken into account when targeting CTLA-4 for therapeutic purposes, as such a strategy will not only boost effector T cell responses, but might also break T(R)-mediated self-tolerance.

  11. Frequently Increased but Functionally Impaired CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Leilei; Cao, Tianyi; Wang, Yufeng; Yao, Hui; Du, Guanhuan; Chen, Guangjie; Niu, Xiaoyin; Tang, Guoyao

    2016-06-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a T cell-mediated chronic inflammatory mucosal disease, and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. In this study, to investigate whether there are intrinsic factors that might cause functional changes in Tregs in this disease, we evaluated the frequency of Tregs in peripheral blood and oral lesions and the expression levels of function-related transcription factors, forkhead/winged-helix transcription factor box P3 (FOXP3), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and TGF-β receptors (TβRI and TβRII) mRNAs in Tregs of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP). We also investigated the frequency of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17A) producing Foxp3(+) regulatory cells. Increased proportions of Tregs were found in OLP patients. The expression of FOXP3 on mRNA and protein level was elevated in the Tregs of OLP. The expression of TGF-β was lower both on the mRNA and serum level, whereas the expression of IL-10 showed no significant difference between the OLP patients and normal controls. The percentages of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)IL-17(+) T cells were significantly higher than that of normal controls, whereas the percentages of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells did not differ significantly. Furthermore, impaired suppressive function of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells was demonstrated in OLP patients by in vitro proliferation assay. These data indicate that Tregs in OLP are frequently expanded but functionally deficient. This could explain, at least in part, why the increased Tregs in OLP fail to control the pathogenesis and development of this autoimmune disease.

  12. Downregulated regulatory T cell function is associated with increased peptic ulcer in Helicobacter pylori-infection.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nader; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Elahi, Shokrollah; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Shafigh, Mohammedhadi; Rashidii, Reza; Sarafnejad, Abdulfatah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Faridani, Rana; Tahmasbi, Kamran; Kheiri, Soleiman; Razavi, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes gastric/duodenal mucosa and induces gastroduodenal disease such as gastritis and peptic ulcer and induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection is not removed, a state of chronic active gastritis persists for life if untreated. The objective of this study was to determine the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in gastric mucosa of patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer and determined the relationship between main virulence factor of H. pylori and Tregs. A total of 89 patients with gastritis, 63 patients with peptic ulcer and 40 healthy, H. pylori-negative subjects were enrolled in this study. Expression of CD4 and Foxp3 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, bacterial virulence factors and histopathological assessments. TGF-β1, IL-10 and FOXP3 expressions were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The numbers of CD4(+) and Foxp3(+) T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3, INF-γ and IL-17A in infected patients were significantly higher than the ones in uninfected patients. Also, the number of CD4(+) T cells was independent on the vacuolating cytotoxin A (vacA) and outer inflammatory protein A (oipA), but it was positively correlated with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). Instead, the number of Foxp3(+) T cells was dependent on the vacA and oipA, but it was independent on cagA. The number of Foxp3(+) T cells and the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1 and FOXP3 in infected patients with gastritis were significantly higher than the ones in infected patients with peptic ulcer. Moreover, the number of CD4(+) T cells and the expression of IL-17A and INF-γ was the lowest in the gastritis patients, however, increased progressively in the peptic ulcer patients. Additionally, the numbers of CD4(+) and Foxp3(+) T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3 and INF-γ were

  13. Immunometabolism of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan; Priyadharshini, Bhavana; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    The bidirectional interaction between the immune system and whole-body metabolism has been well recognized for many years. Via effects on adipocytes and hepatocytes, immune cells can modulate whole-body metabolism (in metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes and obesity) and, reciprocally, host nutrition and commensal-microbiota-derived metabolites modulate immunological homeostasis. Studies demonstrating the metabolic similarities of proliferating immune cells and cancer cells have helped give birth to the new field of immunometabolism, which focuses on how the cell-intrinsic metabolic properties of lymphocytes and macrophages can themselves dictate the fate and function of the cells and eventually shape an immune response. We focus on this aspect here, particularly as it relates to regulatory T cells. PMID:27196520

  14. Adipocytes as immune regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Silvana A.; Klein, Richard L.; Levingston, Corinne A.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state and adipocytes are capable of contributing to this inflammation by their production of inflammatory mediators. The present study used fibroblast-derived adipocytes and normal spleen cells as a model to determine if adipocytes can also serve as immune regulatory cells by modulating the functions of conventional immune cells. Media conditioned by the adipocytes stimulated release of the Th1-type cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ and GM-CSF from cultures of normal spleen cells. The adipocytes also stimulated spleen cell release of inhibitory cytokines, although to varying degrees. This included IL-10, IL-13 and, to a lesser extent, IL-4. Spleen cell production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and IL-9 was stimulated by adipocytes, although production of the Th17-derived cytokine, IL-17, was not stimulated. The adipocyte-conditioned medium did not stimulate production of predominantly monocytes-derived chemokines CXCL9, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, but stimulated production of the predominantly T-cell-derived chemokine CCL5. In all cases where cytokine/chemokine production from spleen cells was stimulated by adipocytes, it was to a far greater level than was produced by the adipocytes themselves. Studies initiated to determine the identity of the adipocyte-derived mediators showed that the spleen cell modulation could not be attributed to solely adiponectin or leptin. Studies to determine the source of some of the cytokines whose production was stimulated by adipocytes showed that expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was not increased in either CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell. When the splenic T-cells were examined for IFN-γ, the adipocyte stimulation of IFN-γ was within CD8+ T-cells, not CD4+ T-cells. These studies show that adipocytes may be able to serve as immune regulatory cells to stimulate conventional immune cells to release a spectrum of immune mediators. PMID:23587489

  15. IL-15 promotes regulatory T cell function and protects against diabetes development in NK-depleted NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jinxing; Liu, Wentao; Hu, Biliang; Tian, Zhigang; Yang, Yongguang

    2010-02-01

    IL-15, an anti-apoptotic cytokine, has been reported to promote the survival and function of NK cells and T cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we examined the effect of repeated injections of IL-15 on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. Injection of recombinant murine IL-15, once a day for 2 weeks, neither inhibited nor accelerated diabetes development in untreated NOD mice. However, treatment with IL-15 significantly reduced the incidence and delayed the onset of diabetes in NOD mice that were depleted of NK cells, while NK cell depletion alone had no protection against the disease development. The protective effect in IL-15-treated, NK cell-depleted NOD mice was associated with an increase in immunosuppressive activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs. IL-15 also enhanced Foxp3 expression in CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in an in vitro culture system, and such an effect of IL-15 was abrogated by IL-15-activated NK cells. Inhibition of IL-15-induced Foxp3 expression by IL-15-activated NK cells likely resulted from their IFN-gamma production, as recombinant IFN-gamma, or the culture supernatant of IL-15-activated wild-type mouse NK cells but not of IL-15-activated IFN-gamma-deficient NK cells, mediated a similar inhibition. IFN-gamma also diminished the stimulatory effect of IL-15 on Treg function in vitro. These results indicate that IL-15 has the potential to promote Treg function and protect against diabetes development in NOD mice, but such an activity can be eliminated by simultaneous activation of NK cells in IL-15-treated mice.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated expression and function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Mariusz P; Dyson, Matthew T; Boos, Alois; Stocco, Douglas M

    2010-10-26

    VIP is a peptide hormone capable of activating the cAMP/PKA pathway and modifying gonadal steroidogenic capacity. Less is known about the molecular mechanisms of VIP-mediated steroidogenesis and its role in regulating the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR). We examined the impact of VIP on STAR expression and function in immortalized (KK1) and primary mouse granulosa cells, where VIP strongly upregulated STAR expression and steroidogenesis. Inhibitors of the PKA and PKC pathways suggested that both are activated by VIP. VIP did not efficiently phosphorylate STAR (P-STAR); however, VIP together with cAMP-analogs that activate Type II PKA increased P-STAR and further increased steroidogenesis. Our results suggest that VIP-induced STAR expression and function in granulosa cells result from the preferential activation of Type I PKA. Furthermore, the PKA and PKC pathways appear to converge at regulating VIP-mediated Star transcription and translation.

  17. Mechanisms for Development and Function of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-04

    recognize self-antigens that are presented on MHC class II molecules by stromal cells in a process that is known as “altered negative selection”, after...BALB/c and B10D2, but sharing the same H-2d MHC class II haplotype. Differential development of CD4+25hiFoxp3+ T-regs in these mouse strains led to...emphasis on a multifarious genetic control on the thymic differentiation and function of T-reg cells independently of the MHC class II -peptide

  18. Human natural regulatory T cell development, suppressive function and post-thymic maturation in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Takashi; Kalscheuer, Hannes; Danzl, Nichole; Chittenden, Meredith; Zhao, Guiling; Yang, Yong-Guang; Sykes, Megan

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells control adaptive immune responses and promote self-tolerance. Various humanized mouse models have been developed in efforts to reproduce and study a human immune system. However, in models that require T cell differentiation in the recipient murine thymus, only low numbers of T cells populate the peripheral immune systems. T cells are positively selected by mouse MHC and therefore do not function well in an HLA-restricted manner. In contrast, cotransplantation of human fetal thymus/liver and i.v. injection of CD34+ cells from the same donor achieves multilineage human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution, including dendritic cells (DCs) and formation of secondary lymphoid organs, in NOD/SCID mice. Strong antigen-specific immune responses and homeostatic expansion of human T cells that is dependent on peripheral human APCs occurs. We now demonstrate that FoxP3+ Helios+ “natural” Tregs develop normally in human fetal thymic grafts and are present in peripheral blood, spleen and lymph nodes of these humanized mice. Humanized mice exhibit normal reversal of CD45 isoform expression in association with thymic egress, post-thymic “naïve” to “activated” phenotypic conversion, and suppressive function. These studies demonstrate the utility of this humanized mouse model for the study of human Treg ontogeny, immunobiology and therapy. PMID:21876039

  19. Circulating gluten-specific FOXP3(+)CD39(+) regulatory T cells have impaired suppressive function in patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Cook, Laura; Munier, C Mee Ling; Seddiki, Nabila; van Bockel, David; Ontiveros, Noé; Hardy, Melinda Y; Gillies, Jana K; Levings, Megan K; Reid, Hugh H; Petersen, Jan; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P; Zaunders, John J; Tye-Din, Jason A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2017-03-08

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by dietary gluten. Although the effector T-cell response in patients with celiac disease has been well characterized, the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the loss of tolerance to gluten remains poorly understood. We sought to define whether patients with celiac disease have a dysfunction or lack of gluten-specific forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) Treg cells. Treated patients with celiac disease underwent oral wheat challenge to stimulate recirculation of gluten-specific T cells. Peripheral blood was collected before and after challenge. To comprehensively measure the gluten-specific CD4(+) T-cell response, we paired traditional IFN-γ ELISpot with an assay to detect antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that does not rely on tetramers, antigen-stimulated cytokine production, or proliferation but rather on antigen-induced coexpression of CD25 and OX40 (CD134). Numbers of circulating gluten-specific Treg cells and effector T cells both increased significantly after oral wheat challenge, peaking at day 6. Surprisingly, we found that approximately 80% of the ex vivo circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells were FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells, which reside within the pool of memory CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)CD45RO(+) Treg cells. Although we observed normal suppressive function in peripheral polyclonal Treg cells from patients with celiac disease, after a short in vitro expansion, the gluten-specific FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells exhibited significantly reduced suppressive function compared with polyclonal Treg cells. This study provides the first estimation of FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cell frequency within circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells after oral gluten challenge of patients with celiac disease. FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells comprised a major proportion of all circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells but had impaired suppressive function, indicating that Treg cell dysfunction might

  20. Characterization and functional studies of forkhead box protein 3− lymphocyte activation gene 3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells induced by mucosal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K-H; Chiang, B-L

    2015-01-01

    The induction of mucosal tolerance has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. Our previous study demonstrated that Peyer's patch B cells could convert naive T cells into regulatory T cells (so-called Treg-of-B(P) cells); however, it is important to characterize this particular subset of Treg-of-B cells for future applications. This study aimed to investigate the role of lymphocyte activating gene 3 (LAG3) in mediating the regulatory function of Treg-of-B(P) cells induced by mucosal follicular B (FOB) cells. Microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to assess the gene expression pattern of Treg-of-B(P) cells. To evaluate the role of LAG3, the in-vitro suppressive function and the alleviation of airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma was assessed. Our data indicated that FOB cells isolated from Peyer's patches had the ability to generate more suppressive Treg-of-B cells with LAG3 expression, compared with CD23loCD21lo B cells. LAG3 is not only a marker for Treg-of-B(P) cells, but also participate in the suppressive ability. Moreover, CCR4 and CCR6 could be detected on the LAG3+, not LAG3−, Treg-of-B(P) cells and would help cells homing to allergic lung. In the murine model of asthma, the adoptive transfer of LAG3+ Treg-of-B(P) cells was able to sufficiently suppress T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production, eosinophil infiltration and alleviate asthmatic symptoms. LAG3 was expressed in Treg-of-B(P) cells and was also involved in the function of Treg-of-B(P) cells. In the future, this particular subset of Treg-of-B cells might be used to alleviate allergic symptoms. PMID:25581421

  1. Targeting CD38 Suppresses Induction and Function of T Regulatory Cells to Mitigate Immunosuppression in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Acharya, Chirag; An, Gang; Wen, Kenneth; Qiu, Lugui; Munshi, Nikhil C; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: We study CD38 levels in immunosuppressive CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) and further define immunomodulating effects of a therapeutic CD38 mAb isatuximab/SAR650984 in multiple myeloma.Experimental Design: We evaluated percentages of CD38-expressing subsets in Tregs from normal donors and multiple myeloma patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were then treated with isatuximab with or without lenalidomide or pomalidomide to identify their impact on the percentage and immunosuppressive activity of Tregs on CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells (Tcons). We investigated the mechanism of increased Tregs in multiple myeloma patients in ex vivo cocultures of multiple myeloma cells with PBMCs or Tcons.Results: CD38 expression is higher on Tregs than Tcons from multiple myeloma patients versus normal donors. CD38 levels and the percentages of CD38(high) Tregs are increased by lenalidomide and pomalidomide. Isatuximab preferentially decreases Treg and increases Tcon frequencies, which is enhanced by pomalidomide/lenalidomide. Isatuximab reduces Foxp3 and IL10 in Tregs and restores proliferation and function of Tcons. It augments multiple myeloma cell lysis by CD8(+) T and natural killer cells. Coculture of multiple myeloma cells with Tcons significantly induces Tregs (iTregs), which express even higher CD38, CD25, and FoxP3 than natural Tregs. This is associated with elevated circulating CD38(+) Tregs in multiple myeloma patients versus normal donors. Conversely, isatuximab decreases multiple myeloma cell- and bone marrow stromal cell-induced iTreg by inhibiting both cell-cell contact and TGFβ/IL10. Finally, CD38 levels correlate with differential inhibition by isatuximab of Tregs from multiple myeloma versus normal donors.Conclusions: Targeting CD38 by isatuximab can preferentially block immunosuppressive Tregs and thereby restore immune effector function against multiple myeloma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4290-300. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American

  2. Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: proteome analysis identifies galectin-10 as a novel marker essential for their anergy and suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Kubach, Jan; Lutter, Petra; Bopp, Tobias; Stoll, Sabine; Becker, Christian; Huter, Eva; Richter, Christoph; Weingarten, Petra; Warger, Tobias; Knop, Jürgen; Müllner, Stefan; Wijdenes, John; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2007-09-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (CD25(+) Treg cells) direct the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance by active suppression of autoaggressive T-cell populations. However, the molecules mediating the anergic state and regulatory function of CD25(+) Treg cells are still elusive. Using differential proteomics, we identified galectin-10, a member of the lectin family, as constitutively expressed in human CD25(+) Treg cells, while they are nearly absent in resting and activated CD4(+) T cells. These data were confirmed on the mRNA and protein levels. Single-cell staining and flow cytometry showed a strictly intracellular expression of galectin-10 in CD25(+) Treg cells. Specific inhibition of galectin-10 restored the proliferative capacity of CD25(+) Treg cells and abrogated their suppressive function. Notably, first identified here as expressed in human T lymphocytes, galectin-10 is essential for the functional properties of CD25(+) Treg cells.

  3. Sodium chloride inhibits the suppressive function of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Amanda L.; Kitz, Alexandra; Wu, Chuan; Lowther, Daniel E.; Rodriguez, Donald M.; Vudattu, Nalini; Deng, Songyan; Herold, Kevan C.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Hafler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    FOXP3+ Tregs are central for the maintenance of self-tolerance and can be defective in autoimmunity. In multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes, dysfunctional self-tolerance is partially mediated by a population of IFNγ-secreting Tregs. It was previously reported that increased NaCl concentrations promote the induction of proinflammatory Th17 cells and that high-salt diets exacerbate experimental models of autoimmunity. Here, we have shown that increasing NaCl, either in vitro or in murine models via diet, markedly impairs Treg function. NaCl increased IFNγ secretion in Tregs, and reducing IFNγ — either by neutralization with anti-IFNγ antibodies or shRNA-mediated knockdown — restored suppressive activity in Tregs. The heightened IFNγ secretion and loss of Treg function were mediated by the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK1). A high-salt diet also impaired human Treg function and was associated with the induction of IFNγ-secreting Tregs in a xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease model and in adoptive transfer models of experimental colitis. Our results demonstrate a putative role for an environmental factor that promotes autoimmunity by inducing proinflammatory responses in CD4 effector cells and Treg pathways. PMID:26524592

  4. Sodium chloride inhibits the suppressive function of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Amanda L; Kitz, Alexandra; Wu, Chuan; Lowther, Daniel E; Rodriguez, Donald M; Vudattu, Nalini; Deng, Songyan; Herold, Kevan C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Hafler, David A

    2015-11-02

    FOXP3+ Tregs are central for the maintenance of self-tolerance and can be defective in autoimmunity. In multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes, dysfunctional self-tolerance is partially mediated by a population of IFNγ-secreting Tregs. It was previously reported that increased NaCl concentrations promote the induction of proinflammatory Th17 cells and that high-salt diets exacerbate experimental models of autoimmunity. Here, we have shown that increasing NaCl, either in vitro or in murine models via diet, markedly impairs Treg function. NaCl increased IFNγ secretion in Tregs, and reducing IFNγ - either by neutralization with anti-IFNγ antibodies or shRNA-mediated knockdown - restored suppressive activity in Tregs. The heightened IFNγ secretion and loss of Treg function were mediated by the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK1). A high-salt diet also impaired human Treg function and was associated with the induction of IFNγ-secreting Tregs in a xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease model and in adoptive transfer models of experimental colitis. Our results demonstrate a putative role for an environmental factor that promotes autoimmunity by inducing proinflammatory responses in CD4 effector cells and Treg pathways.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus in the light of the regulatory effects of galectin-1 on T-cell function.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Á; Monostori, É; Kovács, L

    2017-04-01

    Galectin-1 is an endogenous immunoregulatory lectin-type protein. Its most important effects are the inhibition of the differentiation and cytokine production of Th1 and Th17 cells, and the induction of apoptosis of activated T-cells. Galectin-1 has been identified as a key molecule in antitumor immune surveillance, and data are accumulating about the pathogenic role of its deficiency, and the beneficial effects of its administration in various autoimmune disease models. Initial animal and human studies strongly suggest deficiencies in both galectin-1 production and responsiveness in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) T-cells. Since lupus features widespread abnormalities in T-cell activation, differentiation and viability, in this review the authors wished to highlight potential points in T-cell signalling processes that may be influenced by galectin-1. These points include GM-1 ganglioside-mediated lipid raft aggregation, early activation signalling steps involving p56Lck, the exchange of the CD3 ζ-ZAP-70 to the FcRγ-Syk pathway, defective mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation, impaired regulatory T-cell function, the failure to suppress the activity of interleukin 17 (IL-17) producing T-cells, and decreased suppression of the PI3K-mTOR pathway by phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). These findings place galectin-1 into the group of potential pathogenic molecules in SLE.

  6. The Essential Role of Circulating Thyroglobulin in Maintaining Dominance of Natural Regulatory T Cell Function to Prevent Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y M; Brown, N K; Morris, G P; Flynn, J C

    2015-09-01

    Several key findings from the late 1960s to mid-1970s regarding thyroid hormone metabolism and circulating thyroglobulin composition converged with studies pertaining to the role of T lymphocytes in autoimmune thyroiditis. These studies cemented the foundation for subsequent investigations into the existence and antigenic specificity of thymus-derived natural regulatory T cells (nTregs). These nTregs prevented the development of autoimmune thyroiditis, despite the ever-present genetic predisposition, autoantigen (thyroglobulin), and thyroglobulin-reactive T cells. Guided by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis as a fixed set-point regulator in thyroid hormone metabolism, we used a murine model and compared at key junctures the capacity of circulating thyroglobulin level (raised by thyroid-stimulating hormone or exogenous thyroglobulin administration) to strengthen self-tolerance and resist autoimmune thyroiditis. The findings clearly demonstrated an essential role for raised circulating thyroglobulin levels in maintaining the dominance of nTreg function and inhibiting thyroid autoimmunity. Subsequent identification of thyroglobulin-specific nTregs as CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) in the early 2000s enabled the examination of probable mechanisms of nTreg function. We observed that whenever nTreg function was perturbed by immunotherapeutic measures, opportunistic autoimmune disorders invariably surfaced. This review highlights the step-wise progression of applying insights from endocrinologic and immunologic studies to advance our understanding of the clonal balance between natural regulatory and autoreactive T cells. Moreover, we focus on how tilting the balance in favor of maintaining peripheral tolerance could be achieved. Thus, murine autoimmune thyroiditis has served as a unique model capable of closely simulating natural physiologic conditions.

  7. Distinctive Surface Glycosylation Patterns Associated With Mouse and Human CD4(+) Regulatory T Cells and Their Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Joana; Hanley, Shirley A; Gerlach, Jared Q; O'Leary, Neil; Cunningham, Stephen; Ritter, Thomas; Ceredig, Rhodri; Joshi, Lokesh; Griffin, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Treg) are essential for maintaining immune homeostasis and tolerance. Surface glycosylation is ubiquitous on mammalian cells and regulates diverse biological processes. While it is currently well accepted that surface glycan expression influences multiple aspects of T-cell function, little is known about the relevance of glycosylation to Treg biology. This study aimed to profile the surface glycosylation characteristics of Treg in various lymphoid compartments of mouse and in human peripheral blood with comparison to non-regulatory, conventional CD4(+) T-cells (Tconv). It also sought to determine the relationship between the surface glycosylation characteristics and suppressive potency of Treg. Lectin-based flow cytometric profiling demonstrated that Treg surface glycosylation differs significantly from that of Tconv in the resting state and is further modified by activation stimuli. In mouse, the surface glycosylation profiles of FoxP3(+) Treg from spleen and lymph nodes were closely comparable but greater variability was observed for Treg in thymus, bone marrow, and blood. Surface levels of tri/tetra-antennary N-glycans correlated with expression of proteins known to be involved in Treg suppressive functions, including GITR, PD-1, PD-L1, CD73, CTLA-4, and ICOS. In coculture experiments involving purified Treg subpopulations and CD4(+) or CD8(+) Tconv, higher surface tri/tetra-antennary N-glycans was associated with greater Treg suppressive potency. Enzymatic manipulation of mouse Treg surface glycosylation resulting in a temporary reduction of surface N-glycans significantly reduced Treg capacity to suppress Tconv activation through contact-dependent mechanisms. Overall, these findings demonstrate that Treg have distinctive surface glycan characteristics that show variability across anatomical locations and are modulated by activation events. They also provide evidence of an important role for surface glycosylation in determining Treg

  8. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Lee, Will M.; John, Constance M.; Turek, Paul J.; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood–testis barrier (BTB)? SUMMARY ANSWER Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5–20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4–200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by

  9. Programmable chemical reaction networks: emulating regulatory functions in living cells using a bottom-up approach.

    PubMed

    van Roekel, Hendrik W H; Rosier, Bas J H M; Meijer, Lenny H H; Hilbers, Peter A J; Markvoort, Albert J; Huck, Wilhelm T S; de Greef, Tom F A

    2015-11-07

    Living cells are able to produce a wide variety of biological responses when subjected to biochemical stimuli. It has become apparent that these biological responses are regulated by complex chemical reaction networks (CRNs). Unravelling the function of these circuits is a key topic of both systems biology and synthetic biology. Recent progress at the interface of chemistry and biology together with the realisation that current experimental tools are insufficient to quantitatively understand the molecular logic of pathways inside living cells has triggered renewed interest in the bottom-up development of CRNs. This builds upon earlier work of physical chemists who extensively studied inorganic CRNs and showed how a system of chemical reactions can give rise to complex spatiotemporal responses such as oscillations and pattern formation. Using purified biochemical components, in vitro synthetic biologists have started to engineer simplified model systems with the goal of mimicking biological responses of intracellular circuits. Emulation and reconstruction of system-level properties of intracellular networks using simplified circuits are able to reveal key design principles and molecular programs that underlie the biological function of interest. In this Tutorial Review, we present an accessible overview of this emerging field starting with key studies on inorganic CRNs followed by a discussion of recent work involving purified biochemical components. Finally, we review recent work showing the versatility of programmable biochemical reaction networks (BRNs) in analytical and diagnostic applications.

  10. Uncovering regulatory pathways that affect hematopoietic stem cell function using 'genetical genomics'.

    PubMed

    Bystrykh, Leonid; Weersing, Ellen; Dontje, Bert; Sutton, Sue; Pletcher, Mathew T; Wiltshire, Tim; Su, Andrew I; Vellenga, Edo; Wang, Jintao; Manly, Kenneth F; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Alberts, Rudi; Jansen, Ritsert C; Williams, Robert W; Cooke, Michael P; de Haan, Gerald

    2005-03-01

    We combined large-scale mRNA expression analysis and gene mapping to identify genes and loci that control hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. We measured mRNA expression levels in purified HSCs isolated from a panel of densely genotyped recombinant inbred mouse strains. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with variation in expression of thousands of transcripts. By comparing the physical transcript position with the location of the controlling QTL, we identified polymorphic cis-acting stem cell genes. We also identified multiple trans-acting control loci that modify expression of large numbers of genes. These groups of coregulated transcripts identify pathways that specify variation in stem cells. We illustrate this concept with the identification of candidate genes involved with HSC turnover. We compared expression QTLs in HSCs and brain from the same mice and identified both shared and tissue-specific QTLs. Our data are accessible through WebQTL, a web-based interface that allows custom genetic linkage analysis and identification of coregulated transcripts.

  11. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4+ Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10–producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4+ T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP+ LV-IL-10–transduced human CD4+ T (CD4LV-IL-10) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4LV-IL-10 T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4LV-IL-10 T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4+ T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells. PMID:22692497

  12. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4(+) Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10-producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4(+) T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP(+) LV-IL-10-transduced human CD4(+) T (CD4(LV-IL-10)) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4(+) T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells.

  13. Enforced IL-10 expression confers type 1 regulatory T cell (Tr1) phenotype and function to human CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4(+) Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10-producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4(+) T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP(+) LV-IL-10-transduced human CD4(+) T (CD4(LV-IL-10)) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4(+) T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells.

  14. CTCF binding site sequence differences are associated with unique regulatory and functional trends during embryonic stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Plasschaert, Robert N.; Vigneau, Sébastien; Tempera, Italo; Gupta, Ravi; Maksimoska, Jasna; Everett, Logan; Davuluri, Ramana; Mamorstein, Ronen; Lieberman, Paul M.; Schultz, David; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2014-01-01

    CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) is a highly conserved multifunctional DNA-binding protein with thousands of binding sites genome-wide. Our previous work suggested that differences in CTCF’s binding site sequence may affect the regulation of CTCF recruitment and its function. To investigate this possibility, we characterized changes in genome-wide CTCF binding and gene expression during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. After separating CTCF sites into three classes (LowOc, MedOc and HighOc) based on similarity to the consensus motif, we found that developmentally regulated CTCF binding occurs preferentially at LowOc sites, which have lower similarity to the consensus. By measuring the affinity of CTCF for selected sites, we show that sites lost during differentiation are enriched in motifs associated with weaker CTCF binding in vitro. Specifically, enrichment for T at the 18th position of the CTCF binding site is associated with regulated binding in the LowOc class and can predictably reduce CTCF affinity for binding sites. Finally, by comparing changes in CTCF binding with changes in gene expression during differentiation, we show that LowOc and HighOc sites are associated with distinct regulatory functions. Our results suggest that the regulatory control of CTCF is dependent in part on specific motifs within its binding site. PMID:24121688

  15. [Function of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells in Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis in children].

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Chao; Li, Yuhong; Jiang, Xinhui; Xu, Haixia; Ying, Pei; Qiu, Jie; Lin, Jun; Zheng, Shasha; Chang, Ling; Huang, Yan

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the levels and functions of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells and specific transcription factor Foxp3 and Th17 cells related cytokine in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and renal tissues, and explore their roles in pathogenesis of Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephropathy (HSPN) in children. From March, 2011 to March, 2013, 30 cases of HSPN children underwent renal biopsy and were treated in Guiyang Children's Hospital were enrolled into this study. Ten healthy children who underwent health check up were enrolled as blood sample control group. The normal kidney tissue specimens were taken from 5 children who underwent surgery for urologic disorders were used as renal sample control group. The circulating proportions of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in PBMC of 30 cases of HSPN children and 10 cases of control group were determined by flow cytometry, respectively.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to analyze the mRNA expressions of IL-17, IL-1β and Foxp3 in PBMC. The expression of IL-17 and IL-1β in renal tissue of HSPN and control group were measured by immunohistochemistry. CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, Foxp3, IL-17, IL-1β expression were analyzed and compared in HSPN group and control groups respectively. Thirty cases of HSPN pathological classification were as follows: type I was found in 0 case; type II in 9 cases; type III in 16 cases; type IV in 5 cases; type V in 0 case. The circulating proportions of CD4(+)CD25(+)/CD4(+)T cells and the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg/CD4(+)T cells level were (5.84 ± 0.78)%, (1.01 ± 0.46) % in HSPN groups were substantially lower than those in control group. All these two differences had statistical significance (t = 27.200, 33.260, P < 0.05). The mRNA levels of IL-17, IL-1β in HSPN groups (0.86 ± 0.01,0.71 ± 0.01) were higher than those in control group (t = 25.000, 31.840, all P < 0.05). Foxp3 mRNA expression in HSPN groups (0.24 ± 0.02) were significantly lower

  16. Regulatory T cells and COPD.

    PubMed

    Dancer, Rachel; Sansom, David M

    2013-12-01

    While the innate immune system has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD, a role for the acquired immune system is less well studied. The increasing recognition that COPD shares features with autoimmune disease has led to interest in a potential role for regulatory T cells, which are intimately involved in the control of autoimmunity. The suggestion that regulatory T cell numbers are increased in patients with COPD may indicate their dysfunction or resistance to suppression by target cells. Investigation of regulatory T cells may therefore be of importance in understanding the inflammation and tissue damage that occurs in patients with COPD who cease smoking.

  17. Exposure to cigarette smoke impacts myeloid-derived regulatory cell function and exacerbates airway hyper-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Jin, Tong Huan; Farhana, Aisha; Freeman, Jason; Estell, Kim; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J; Schwiebert, Lisa M; Steyn, Adrie JC; Deshane, Jessy S

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking enhances oxidative stress and airway inflammation in asthma, the mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Myeloid-derived regulatory cells (MDRC) are free radical producing immature myeloid cells with immunoregulatory properties which have recently been demonstrated as critical regulators of allergic airway inflammation. NO (nitric oxide)-producing immunosuppressive MDRC suppress T cell proliferation and airway-hyper responsiveness (AHR), while the O2•− (superoxide)-producing MDRC are proinflammatory. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) exposure may impact MDRC function and contribute to exacerbations in asthma. Exposure of bone marrow (BM) derived NO-producing MDRC to CS reduced the production of NO and its metabolites and inhibited their potential to suppress T cell proliferation. Production of immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly inhibited, while proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-33 were enhanced in CS exposed BMMDRC. Additionally, CS exposure increased NF-κB activation and induced BM-MDRC-mediated production of O2•−, via NF-κB dependent pathway. Intratracheal transfer of smoke exposed MDRC producing proinflammatory cytokines increased NF-κB activation, reactive oxygen species and mucin production in vivo and exacerbated AHR in C57BL/6 mice, mice deficient in Type I IFNR and MyD88, both with reduced numbers of endogenous MDRC. Thus, CS exposure modulates MDRC function and contributes to asthma exacerbation and identifies MDRC as potential targets for asthma therapy. PMID:25365203

  18. [Changes in proportion and function of peripheral CD4(+)LAP(+) regulatory T cells in children with asthma].

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing-Hua; Yang, Liang-An; Li, Guo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the changes in the proportion and function of peripheral CD4(+)LAP(+)regulatory T cells (CD4(+)LAP(+)Treg cells) in children with asthma, as well as the role of CD4(+)LAP(+)Treg cells in the pathogenesis of asthma. A total of 75 children who were diagnosed with asthma from March 2014 to September 2015 were enrolled as study subjects, and according to their conditions, they were divided into acute-stage asthma group (40 children) and remission-stage asthma group (35 patients). Another 30 children who underwent physical examination were enrolled as the healthy control group. Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentage of peripheral CD4(+)LAP(+)Treg cells, and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay was performed to analyze the immunosuppression of CD4(+)LAP(+)Treg cells in each group. The acute-stage asthma group showed significant reductions in the proportion of CD4(+)LAP(+)Treg cells compared with the remission-stage asthma group and the healthy control group (2.0%±1.0% vs 4.1%±2.4%/4.6%±3.0%; P<0.05). The acute-stage asthma group also showed a significant reduction in the immunosuppression rate of CD4(+)LAP(+)Treg cells compared with the remission-stage asthma group and the healthy control group (21%±4% vs 55%±9%/62%±11%; P<0.05). In children with asthma, the reduction in the number and inhibitory function of peripheral CD4(+)LAP(+)Treg cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma.

  19. Special regulatory T cell review: How I became a T suppressor/regulatory cell maven

    PubMed Central

    Shevach, Ethan M

    2008-01-01

    I have briefly reviewed the factors that motivated me to change my views about the existence and importance of suppressor/regulatory T cells and to devote the majority of my laboratory efforts to this newly revitalized area of immunologic research. I am optimistic that manipulation of regulatory T-cell function will shortly be applicable to the clinic. PMID:18154610

  20. Percentage of Peripheral CD19+CD24hiCD38hi Regulatory B Cells in Neonatal Sepsis Patients and Its Functional Implication.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao; Ji, Zuoquan; Xue, Jiang

    2016-07-07

    BACKGROUND As a major cause of mortality in neonates, neonatal sepsis is often accompanied by immune dysfunctions, which are frequently caused by dysregulated T cell sub-populations. The role of regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis, however, remains unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the percentage and functional variation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in peripheral blood of neonatal sepsis patients in an attempt to elucidate the role of these regulatory B cells in pathogenesis of sepsis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Flow cytometry was used to quantify the percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells from peripheral blood samples. The correlation between B cell percentage and C reactive protein (CRP) level was analyzed. Secretion level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and effects on the proliferation of naïve CD4+ T cells were further analyzed. RESULTS The percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis patients was significantly higher compared to healthy controls (p<0.05), and was positively correlated with serum CRP level. The percentage of IL-10+ CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells was also higher in sepsis patients, and also had more potent inhibition on naïve CD4+ T cells (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS The elevation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis can inhibit body immune function and thus may participate in the pathogenesis of sepsis.

  1. Anti-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-04-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells-termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)-that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells, including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), tryptophan 2,6-dioxygenase (TDO), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3). These proteins are highly expressed in professional antigen-presenting cells under various physiological conditions, such as inflammation and stress. Therefore, self-reactive T cells that recognize such targets may be activated due to the strong activation signal given by their cognate targets. The current review describes the existing knowledge regarding these self-reactive anti-Tregs, providing examples of antigen-specific anti-Tregs and discussing their possible roles in immune homeostasis and their potential future clinical applications.

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 controls expansion and function of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sutmuller, Roger P.M.; den Brok, Martijn H.M.G.M.; Kramer, Matthijs; Bennink, Erik J.; Toonen, Liza W.J.; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Joosten, Leo A.; Akira, Shizuo; Netea, Mihai G.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2006-01-01

    Tregs play a central role in the suppression of immune reactions and prevention of autoimmune responses harmful to the host. During acute infection, however, Tregs might hinder effector T cell activity directed toward the elimination of the pathogenic challenge. Pathogen recognition receptors from the TLR family expressed by innate immune cells are crucial for the generation of effective immunity. We have recently shown the CD4+CD25+ Treg subset in TLR2–/– mice to be significantly reduced in number compared with WT littermate control mice, indicating a link between Tregs and TLR2. Here, we report that the TLR2 ligand Pam3Cys, but not LPS (TLR4) or CpG (TLR9), directly acts on purified Tregs in a MyD88-dependent fashion. Moreover, when combined with TCR stimulation, TLR2 triggering augmented Treg proliferation in vitro and in vivo and resulted in a temporal loss of the suppressive Treg phenotype in vitro by directly affecting Tregs. Importantly, WT Tregs adoptively transferred into TLR2–/– mice were neutralized by systemic administration of TLR2 ligand during the acute phase of a Candida albicans infection, resulting in a 100-fold reduced C. albicans outgrowth. This demonstrates that in vivo TLR2 also controls the function of Tregs and establishes a direct link between TLRs and the control of immune responses through Tregs. PMID:16424940

  3. Conserved regulatory mechanism controls the development of cells with rooting functions in land plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Thomas Ho Yuen; Catarino, Bruno; Dolan, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Land plants develop filamentous cells—root hairs, rhizoids, and caulonemata—at the interface with the soil. Members of the group XI basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors encoded by LOTUS JAPONICUS ROOTHAIRLESS1-LIKE (LRL) genes positively regulate the development of root hairs in the angiosperms Lotus japonicus, Arabidopsis thaliana, and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that auxin promotes rhizoid and caulonema development by positively regulating the expression of PpLRL1 and PpLRL2, the two LRL genes in the Physcomitrella patens genome. Although the group VIII bHLH proteins, AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 and AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1, promote root-hair development by positively regulating the expression of AtLRL3 in A. thaliana, LRL genes promote rhizoid development independently of PpROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1 and PpROOT HAIR DEFECITVE SIX-LIKE2 (PpRSL1 and PpRSL2) gene function in P. patens. Together, these data demonstrate that both LRL and RSL genes are components of an ancient auxin-regulated gene network that controls the development of tip-growing cells with rooting functions among most extant land plants. Although this network has diverged in the moss and the angiosperm lineages, our data demonstrate that the core network acted in the last common ancestor of the mosses and angiosperms that existed sometime before 420 million years ago. PMID:26150509

  4. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cattenoz, Pierre B.; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D.; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H.; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain–containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades. PMID:26567182

  5. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cattenoz, Pierre B; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades.

  6. Infarcted Myocardium-Primed Dendritic Cells Improve Remodeling and Cardiac Function After Myocardial Infarction by Modulating the Regulatory T Cell and Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Choo, Eun Ho; Lee, Jun-Ho; Park, Eun-Hye; Park, Hyo Eun; Jung, Nam-Chul; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Koh, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Eunmin; Seung, Ki-Bae; Park, Cheongsoo; Hong, Kwan-Soo; Kang, Kwonyoon; Song, Jie-Young; Seo, Han Geuk; Lim, Dae-Seog; Chang, Kiyuk

    2017-04-11

    Inflammatory responses play a critical role in left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs) can modulate immune responses, inducing regulatory T cells in a number of inflammatory diseases. We generated tDCs by treating bone marrow-derived dendritic cells with tumor necrosis factor-α and cardiac lysate from MI mice. We injected MI mice, induced by a ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in C57BL/6 mice, twice with tDCs within 24 hours and at 7 days after the ligation. In vivo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo histology confirmed the beneficial effect on postinfarct left ventricular remodeling in MI mice treated with tDCs. Subcutaneously administered infarct lysate-primed tDCs near the inguinal lymph node migrated to the regional lymph node and induced infarct tissue-specific regulatory T-cell populations in the inguinal and mediastinal lymph nodes, spleen, and infarcted myocardium, indicating that a local injection of tDCs induces a systemic activation of MI-specific regulatory T cells. These events elicited an inflammatory-to-reparative macrophage shift. The altered immune environment in the infarcted heart resulted in a better wound remodeling, preserved left ventricular systolic function after myocardial tissue damage, and improved survival. This study showed that tDC therapy in a preclinical model of MI was potentially translatable into an antiremodeling therapy for ischemic tissue repair. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Engagement of TLR2 does not reverse the suppressor function of mouse regulatory T cells, but promotes their survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Davidson, Todd S; Huter, Eva N; Shevach, Ethan M

    2009-10-01

    TLRs are a class of conserved pattern recognition receptors that are used by cells of the innate immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression of TLRs on both human and mouse T cells raising the possibility that TLRs play a direct role in adaptive immunity. TLR2 is activated primarily by bacterial wall components including peptidoglycan and lipoproteins. Several studies have shown that mouse regulatory T (Treg) cells express TLR2 and claimed that engagement of TLR2 by synthetic ligands reversed their suppressive function. In contrary, enhancement of Treg function was observed following engagement of TLR2 on human Treg. We have reexamined the expression and function of TLR2 on mouse Treg purified from Foxp3-GFP knock-in mice. TLR2 ligation by TLR2 agonist, the synthetic bacterial lipoprotein Pam3CSK4, enhanced the proliferative responses of both conventional T cells and Treg in response to TLR stimulation in the absence of APC. Treatment of Foxp3+ Treg with Pam3CSK4 did not alter their suppressive function in vitro or in vivo and did not reduce their level of Foxp3 expression. An additional effect of TLR2 stimulation of Treg was induction of Bcl-x(L) resulting in enhanced survival in vitro. Treatment of mice with the TLR2 agonist enhanced the Ag-driven proliferation of Treg in vivo, but did not abolish their ability to suppress the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Development of methods to selectively stimulate TLR2 on Treg may lead to a novel approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Attenuation of experimental colitis in glutathione peroxidase 1 and catalase double knockout mice through enhancing regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Lee, Anbok; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Hyeon Kook; Moon, Byung-In; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Meanwhile, several studies suggested the protective role of ROS in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and it was recently reported that dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was attenuated in mice with an elevated level of ROS due to deficiency of peroxiredoxin II. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical in the prevention of IBD and Treg function was reported to be closely associated with ROS level, but it has been investigated only in lowered levels of ROS so far. In the present study, in order to clarify the relationship between ROS level and Treg function, and their role in the pathogenesis of IBD, we investigated mice with an elevated level of ROS due to deficiency of both glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and catalase (Cat) for the susceptibility of DSS-induced colitis in association with Treg function. The results showed that DSS-induced colitis was attenuated and Tregs were hyperfunctional in GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. In vivo administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) aggravated DSS-induced colitis and decreased Treg function to the level comparable to WT mice. Attenuated Th17 cell differentiation from naïve CD4+ cells as well as impaired production of IL-6 and IL-17A by splenocytes upon stimulation suggested anti-inflammatory tendency of GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. Suppression of Stat3 activation in association with enhancement of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and FoxP3 expression might be involved in the immunosuppressive mechanism of GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. Taken together, it is implied that ROS level is critical in the regulation of Treg function, and IBD may be attenuated in appropriately elevated levels of ROS.

  9. Regulatory T cells are recruited in the infarcted mouse myocardium and may modulate fibroblast phenotype and function

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Amit; Dobaczewski, Marcin; Rai, Vikrant; Haque, Zaffar; Chen, Wei; Li, Na

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in suppressing immune responses regulating behavior and gene expression in effector T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Tregs infiltrate the infarcted myocardium; however, their role the inflammatory and reparative response after myocardial infarction remains poorly understood. We used FoxP3EGFP reporter mice to study Treg trafficking in the infarcted heart and examined the effects of Treg depletion on postinfarction remodeling using an anti-CD25 antibody. Moreover, we investigated the in vitro effects of Tregs on cardiac fibroblast phenotype and function. Low numbers of Tregs infiltrated the infarcted myocardium after 24–72 h of reperfusion. Treg depletion had no significant effects on cardiac dysfunction and scar size after reperfused myocardial infarction but accelerated ventricular dilation and accentuated apical remodeling. Enhanced myocardial dilation in Treg-depleted animals was associated with increased expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 and accentuated macrophage infiltration. In vitro, Tregs modulated the cardiac fibroblast phenotype, reducing expression of α-smooth muscle actin, decreasing expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3, and attenuating contraction of fibroblast-populated collagen pads. Our findings suggest that endogenous Tregs have modest effects on the inflammatory and reparative response after myocardial infarction. However, the anti-inflammatory and matrix-preserving properties of Tregs may suggest a role for Treg-based cell therapy in the attenuation of adverse postinfarction remodeling. PMID:25128167

  10. Functional and regulatory conservation of the soybean ER stress-induced DCD/NRP-mediated cell death signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Reis, Pedro A B; Carpinetti, Paola A; Freitas, Paula P J; Santos, Eulálio G D; Camargos, Luiz F; Oliveira, Igor H T; Silva, José Cleydson F; Carvalho, Humberto H; Dal-Bianco, Maximiller; Soares-Ramos, Juliana R L; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2016-07-12

    The developmental and cell death domain (DCD)-containing asparagine-rich proteins (NRPs) were first identified in soybean (Glycine max) as transducers of a cell death signal derived from prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, osmotic stress, drought or developmentally-programmed leaf senescence via the GmNAC81/GmNAC30/GmVPE signaling module. In spite of the relevance of the DCD/NRP-mediated signaling as a versatile adaptive response to multiple stresses, mechanistic knowledge of the pathway is lacking and the extent to which this pathway may operate in the plant kingdom has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrated that the DCD/NRP-mediated signaling also propagates a stress-induced cell death signal in other plant species with features of a programmed cell death (PCD) response. In silico analysis revealed that several plant genomes harbor conserved sequences of the pathway components, which share functional analogy with their soybean counterparts. We showed that GmNRPs, GmNAC81and VPE orthologs from Arabidopsis, designated as AtNRP-1, AtNRP-2, ANAC036 and gVPE, respectively, induced cell death when transiently expressed in N. benthamiana leaves. In addition, loss of AtNRP1 and AtNRP2 function attenuated ER stress-induced cell death in Arabidopsis, which was in marked contrast with the enhanced cell death phenotype displayed by overexpressing lines as compared to Col-0. Furthermore, atnrp-1 knockout mutants displayed enhanced sensitivity to PEG-induced osmotic stress, a phenotype that could be complemented with ectopic expression of either GmNRP-A or GmNRP-B. In addition, AtNRPs, ANAC036 and gVPE were induced by osmotic and ER stress to an extent that was modulated by the ER-resident molecular chaperone binding protein (BiP) similarly as in soybean. Finally, as putative downstream components of the NRP-mediated cell death signaling, the stress induction of AtNRP2, ANAC036 and gVPE was dependent on the AtNRP1 function. BiP overexpression also conferred

  11. Abdominal {gamma}-Radiation Induces an Accumulation of Function-Impaired Regulatory T Cells in the Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Billiard, Fabienne; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Linard, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and the functional characteristics of one major component of immune tolerance, the CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) in a mouse model of abdominal irradiation. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to a single abdominal dose of {gamma}-radiation (10 Gy). We evaluated small intestine Treg infiltration by Foxp3 immunostaining and the functional suppressive activity of Tregs isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. Results: Foxp3 immunostaining showed that radiation induced a long-term infiltration of the intestine by Tregs (levels 5.5 times greater than in controls). Co-culture of Tregs from mesenteric lymph nodes with CD4{sup +} effector cells showed that the Tregs had lost their suppressive function. This loss was associated with a significant decrease in the levels of Foxp3, TGF-{beta}, and CTLA-4 mRNA, all required for optimal Treg function. At Day 90 after irradiation, Tregs regained their suppressive activity as forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-{beta}), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression returned to normal. Analysis of the secretory function of mesenteric lymph node Tregs, activated in vitro with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Abs, showed that this dysfunction was independent of a defect in interleukin-10 secretion. Conclusion: Radiation caused a long-term accumulation of function-impaired Foxp3{sup +}CD4{sup +} Tregs in the intestine. Our study provides new insights into how radiation affects the immune tolerance in peripheral tissues.

  12. Autologous stem cell transplantation aids autoimmune patients by functional renewal and TCR diversification of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Delemarre, Eveline M; van den Broek, Theo; Mijnheer, Gerdien; Meerding, Jenny; Wehrens, Ellen J; Olek, Sven; Boes, Marianne; van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; Broere, Femke; van Royen, Annet; Wulffraat, Nico M; Prakken, Berent J; Spierings, Eric; van Wijk, Femke

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly considered for patients with severe autoimmune diseases whose prognosis is poor with standard treatments. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are thought to be important for disease remission after HSCT. However, eliciting the role of donor and host Tregs in autologous HSCT is not possible in humans due to the autologous nature of the intervention. Therefore, we investigated their role during immune reconstitution and re-establishment of immune tolerance and their therapeutic potential following congenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in a proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PGIA) mouse model. In addition, we determined Treg T-cell receptor (TCR) CDR3 diversity before and after HSCT in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and juvenile dermatomyositis. In the PGIA BMT model, after an initial predominance of host Tregs, graft-derived Tregs started dominating and displayed a more stable phenotype with better suppressive capacity. Patient samples revealed a striking lack of diversity of the Treg repertoire before HSCT. This ameliorated after HSCT, confirming reset of the Treg compartment following HSCT. In the mouse model, a therapeutic approach was initiated by infusing extra Foxp3(GFP+) Tregs during BMT. Infusion of Foxp3(GFP+) Tregs did not elicit additional clinical improvement but conversely delayed reconstitution of the graft-derived T-cell compartment. These data indicate that HSCT-mediated amelioration of autoimmune disease involves renewal of the Treg pool. In addition, infusion of extra Tregs during BMT results in a delayed reconstitution of T-cell compartments. Therefore, Treg therapy may hamper development of long-term tolerance and should be approached with caution in the clinical autologous setting. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Tim-1(+) B cells suppress T cell interferon-gamma production and promote Foxp3 expression, but have impaired regulatory function in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao-Long; He, Huan; Lin, Lin; Luo, Guo-Xin; Wen, Yan-Fei; Xiang, Ding-Cheng; Qiu, Jian

    2017-10-01

    Atherosclerosis and its associated coronary artery disease (CAD) represent another chronic low-grade inflammatory disorder. Regulatory B cells (Bregs) possess essential functions in maintaining peripheral tolerance and inhibiting pathogenic inflammation through IL-10. Here, we investigated one subset of Bregs, Tim-1(+) B cell, and its role in atherosclerosis and CAD patients. In healthy individuals, IL-10-producing B cells were predominantly found in the Tim-1(+) B cells. Upon stimulation of the B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) by anti-BCR antibodies and CpG, respectively, the Tim-1(+) B cells could further upregulate IL-10 expression. In contrast, the Tim-1(+) B cells were present at normal frequency in CAD patients, but showed impaired capacity to upregulate IL-10 with or without BCR + CpG stimulation. The stimulated Tim-1(+) B cells from healthy individuals also suppressed expression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), an atherogenic cytokine in T cells, in an IL-10-dependent fashion, and strongly promoted the expression of Foxp3 in naive CD4(+) CD45RO(-) T cells. In contrast, the Tim-1(+) B cells from CAD patients were unable to suppress IFN-γ secretion, and only minimally increased the expression of Foxp3 in naive CD4(+) CD45RO(-) T cells. Despite this, the frequency of Tim-1(+) B cells in the atherosclerotic lesions from CAD patients was inversely correlated with the frequency of IFN-γ-expressing T cells. Together, these results demonstrated that CAD patients presented an inflammatory disorder in regulatory B cells, which could be used as a therapeutic target. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Engagement of TLR2 Does not Reverse the Suppressor Function of Mouse Regulatory T Cells, but Promotes Their Survival1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Davidson, Todd S.; Huter, Eva N.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2009-01-01

    TLRs are a class of conserved pattern recognition receptors that are used by cells of the innate immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression of TLRs on both human and mouse T cells raising the possibility that TLRs play a direct role in adaptive immunity. TLR2 is activated primarily by bacterial wall components including peptidoglycan and lipoproteins. Several studies have shown that mouse regulatory T (Treg) express TLR2 and claimed that engagement of TLR2 by synthetic ligands reversed their suppressive function. In contrary, enhancement of Treg function was observed following engagement of TLR2 on human Treg. We have re-examined the expression and function of TLR2 on mouse Treg purified from Foxp3-GFP knock in mice. TLR2 ligation by TLR2 agonist, the synthetic bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) Pam3CSK4, enhanced the proliferative responses of both conventional T cells and Treg in response to TLR stimulation in the absence of APC. Treatment of Foxp3+ Treg with Pam3CSK4 did not alter their suppressive function in vitro or in vivo and did not reduce their level of Foxp3 expression. An additional effect of TLR2 stimulation of Treg was induction of Bcl-xL resulting in enhanced survival in vitro. Treatment of mice with the TLR2 agonist enhanced the antigen-driven proliferation of Treg in vivo, but did not abolish their ability to suppress the development of EAE. Development of methods to selectively stimulate TLR2 on Treg may lead to a novel approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:19748987

  15. [In vitro amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and identification of amplified T cell immunosuppressive function].

    PubMed

    Weng, Wen-Jun; Pan, Li; Fang, Jian-Pei; Xu, Lv-Hong

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to compare the effect of 3 different cell components for expanding CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg in vitro, and identify their immunosuppressive function. CD4(+) T cells, CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+)T cells were isolated from mouse splenocytes by MACS and then expanded in vitro. Phenotype of the T cell lines and expression of the FOXP3 was determined by flow cytometry. The inhibitory effect of expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells on CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells was tested by MLR method. The results showed that the Treg cells from all the three groups were expanded significantly after culture for 2 weeks. In the CD4(+) T cells group, the proliferation rate was (77.8 ± 5.32) folds with a percentage of Treg cells increasing from (6.61 ± 1.00)% to (15.33 ± 1.31)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells group was (95.20 ± 7.67) folds, with the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells raising from (0.37 ± 0.13)% to (9.84 ± 0.98)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group was (41.20 ± 6.92) folds, the proportion of Treg cells decreased from (86.75 ± 1.25)% to (85.32 ± 1.62)%, and the expression of Foxp3 decreased from (76.92 ± 1.72)% to (75.33 ± 2.11)% during the culture, there were not significant differences in the cell purity and the expression of Foxp3, compared with pre-amplification. The inhibitory test showed that the expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells could inhibit the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells in vitro in a cell dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cells is successful in vitro, especially in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group, the cell purity and Foxp3 gene is not obviously changes after amplification.

  16. Interleukin-10 deficiency impairs regulatory T cell-derived neuropilin-1 functions and promotes Th1 and Th17 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shimin; Gao, Xiang; Shen, Guobo; Wang, Wei; Li, Jingyu; Zhao, Jingyi; Wei, Yu-Quan; Edwards, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) expand in peripheral lymphoid organs and can produce immunosuppressive cytokines to support tumor growth. IL-10 abrogation efficiently induces Treg formation but dampens tumoral neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1) Treg signaling, which simultaneously augments Th1 and Th17 immunity. These effects are associated with the plasticity and stability of Tregs and effector T cell functions that can limit tumorigenesis. Within the tumor microenvironment, there appears to be a “mutual antagonism” between immunoenhancement and immunosuppression mechanisms, eventually leading to decreased metastasis. In contrast, tumor progression is paralleled by a reduction in Nrp-1-producing Tregs controlled by the IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels. However, Th1, Th17 and Treg immunity is primarily regulated by IL-10 or Nrp-1 and not TGF-β1 except when combined with IL-10. These results emphasize the important implications for the therapeutic use of Tregs. The number of Treg cells must be maintained in a healthy and dynamic homeostatic range to prevent malignant diseases. Moreover, Treg-mediated immunosuppression can be limited by reducing tumor-derived Treg Nrp-1 levels. PMID:27075020

  17. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  18. Eos is redundant for T regulatory cell function, but plays an important role in IL-2 and Th17 production by CD4+ T conventional cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Metidji, Amina; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Thornton, Angela M.; Ikeda, Tohru; Morgan, Bruce A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Eos is a transcription factor that belongs to the Ikaros family of transcription factors. Eos has been reported to be a T regulatory cell (Treg) signature gene, to play a critical role in Treg suppressor functions, and to maintain Treg stability. We have utilized mice with a global deficiency of Eos to re-examine the role of Eos expression in both Treg and T conventional (Tconv) cells. Treg from Eos deficient (Eos−/−) mice developed normally, displayed a normal Treg phenotype, and exhibited normal suppressor function in vitro. Eos−/− Treg were as effective as Treg from wild type (WT) mice in suppression of inflammation in a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Bone marrow (BM) from Eos−/− mice was as effective as BM from WT mice in controlling T cell activation when used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice in the presence of Scurfy fetal liver cells. Surprisingly, Eos was expressed in activated Tconv cells and was required for IL-2 production, CD25 expression and proliferation in vitro by CD4+ Tconv cells. Eos−/− mice developed more severe Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than WT mice, displayed increased numbers of effector T cells in the periphery and CNS, and amplified IL-17 production. In conclusion, our studies are not consistent with a role for Eos in Treg development and function, but demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of Tconv cells. PMID:26062998

  19. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  20. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN–expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallejo, J.J.; Ilarregui, J.M.; Kalay, H.; Chamorro, S.; Koning, N.; Unger, W.W.; Ambrosini, M.; Montserrat, V.; Fernandes, R.J.; Bruijns, S.C.M.; van Weering, J.R.T.; Paauw, N.J.; O’Toole, T.; van Horssen, J.; van der Valk, P.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Bajramovic, J.; Dijkstra, C.D.; ’t Hart, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated N-glycans that support recognition by the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) on microglia and DCs. The interaction of MOG with DC-SIGN in the context of simultaneous TLR4 activation resulted in enhanced IL-10 secretion and decreased T cell proliferation in a DC-SIGN-, glycosylation-, and Raf1-dependent manner. Exposure of oligodendrocytes to proinflammatory factors resulted in the down-regulation of fucosyltransferase expression, reflected by altered glycosylation at the MS lesion site. Indeed, removal of fucose on myelin reduced DC-SIGN–dependent homeostatic control, and resulted in inflammasome activation, increased T cell proliferation, and differentiation toward a Th17-prone phenotype. These data demonstrate a new role for myelin glycosylation in the control of immune homeostasis in the healthy human brain through the MOG–DC-SIGN homeostatic regulatory axis, which is comprised by inflammatory insults that affect glycosylation. This phenomenon should be considered as a basis to restore immune tolerance in MS. PMID:24935259

  1. A Common Functional Regulatory Variant at a Type 2 Diabetes Locus Upregulates ARAP1 Expression in the Pancreatic Beta Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kulzer, Jennifer R.; Stitzel, Michael L.; Morken, Mario A.; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 70 loci associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but for most, the underlying causal variants, associated genes, and functional mechanisms remain unknown. At a T2D- and fasting-proinsulin-associated locus on 11q13.4, we have identified a functional regulatory DNA variant, a candidate target gene, and a plausible underlying molecular mechanism. Fine mapping, conditional analyses, and exome array genotyping in 8,635 individuals from the Metabolic Syndrome in Men study confirmed a single major association signal between fasting proinsulin and noncoding variants (p = 7.4 × 10−50). Measurement of allele-specific mRNA levels in human pancreatic islet samples heterozygous for rs11603334 showed that the T2D-risk and proinsulin-decreasing allele (C) is associated with increased ARAP1 expression (p < 0.02). We evaluated four candidate functional SNPs for allelic effects on transcriptional activity by performing reporter assays in rodent pancreatic beta cell lines. The C allele of rs11603334, located near one of the ARAP1 promoters, exhibited 2-fold higher transcriptional activity than did the T allele (p < 0.0001); three other candidate SNPs showed no allelic differences. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated decreased binding of pancreatic beta cell transcriptional regulators PAX6 and PAX4 to the rs11603334 C allele. Collectively, these data suggest that the T2D-risk allele of rs11603334 could abrogate binding of a complex containing PAX6 and PAX4 and thus lead to increased promoter activity and ARAP1 expression in human pancreatic islets. This work suggests that increased ARAP1 expression might contribute to T2D susceptibility at this GWAS locus. PMID:24439111

  2. A role for impaired regulatory T cell function in adverse responses to aluminum adjuvant-containing vaccines in genetically susceptible individuals.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Todd D; Deth, Richard C

    2014-09-08

    Regulatory T cells play a critical role in the immune response to vaccination, but there is only a limited understanding of the response of regulatory T cells to aluminum adjuvants and the vaccines that contain them. Available studies in animal models show that although induced T regulatory cells may be induced concomitantly with effector T cells following aluminum-adjuvanted vaccination, they are unable to protect against sensitization, suggesting that under the Th2 immune-stimulating effects of aluminum adjuvants, Treg cells may be functionally compromised. Allergic diseases are characterized by immune dysregulation, with increases in IL-4 and IL-6, both of which exert negative effects on Treg function. For individuals with a genetic predisposition, the beneficial influence of adjuvants on immune responsiveness may be accompanied by immune dysregulation, leading to allergic diseases. This review examines aspects of the regulatory T cell response to aluminum-adjuvanted immunization and possible genetic susceptibility factors related to that response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  4. Positive and Negative Regulatory Mechanisms for Fine-Tuning Cellularity and Functions of Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Taishin; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Nobuko; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.

    2015-01-01

    Self-tolerant T cells and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus. A wide variety of cell–cell interactions in the thymus is required for the differentiation, proliferation, and repertoire selection of T cells. Various secreted and cell surface molecules expressed in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) mediate these processes. Moreover, cytokines expressed by cells of hematopoietic origin regulate the cellularity of TECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family RANK ligand, lymphotoxin, and CD40 ligand, expressed in T cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), promote the differentiation and proliferation of medullary TECs (mTECs) that play critical roles in the induction of immune tolerance. A recent study suggests that interleukin-22 (IL-22) produced by ILCs promotes regeneration of TECs after irradiation. Intriguingly, tumor growth factor-β and osteoprotegerin limit cellularity of mTECs, thereby attenuating regulatory T cell generation. We will review recent insights into the molecular basis for cell–cell interactions regulating differentiation and proliferation of mTECs and also discuss about a perspective on use of mathematical models for understanding this complicated system. PMID:26441966

  5. [THE BIOLOGICAL FUNCTION OF NUTRITION, BIOLOGICAL REACTION OF EXOTROPHY, DEPOSITING AND ENDOTROPHY. THE VISCERAL FATTY CELLS AND ADIPOCYTES - PHYLOGENETICALLY, FUNCTIONALLY AND REGULATORY DIFFERENT POOLS OF FATTY TISSUE].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2015-08-01

    For billions years, two phylogenetically, functionally and regulatory different pools of fatty cells - visceral fatty acids and adipocytes coexist in vivo. Their becoming occurred at different degrees of phylogenesis. The phylogenetically earlier pool of visceral fatty acids is meant to supply with fatty acids-substrates for gaining energy by those cells which implement biological function of nutrition (trophology), homeostasis, endoecology biological function of adaptation and continuation of species. They have no receptors to phylogenetically later insulin. The adipocytes, later in phylogenesis, implement one biological function - the function of locomotion and they are as insulin-dependent as skeletal myocytes, cardiomyocytes, adipocytes and periportal hepatocytes. The difference in regulation is traced on all levels of "biological perfection " - autocrine (cellular) level, in humoral regulated paracrin cenosises of cells and on the level of organism. In biological function of trophology, paracrin cenosises of visceral fatty acids and adipocytes implement subsequently three biological reactions: exotrophy, deposit of fatty acids and endotrophy. In conditions of humoral regulation of three functionally different biological reactions in paracrin cenosises synthesis of so many humoral mediators is required. The humoral mediators of mechanism of feedback at autocrine level, in paracrin cenosises and at the level of organism are leptin of visceral fatty acids and adiponectin of adipocytes. At the level of organism, phylogenetically earlier paracrin cenosises of fatty cells are regulated by endocrine system. The phylogenetically later paracrin cenosises are regulated by insulin and nuclei of hypothalamus. The metabolic syndrome is a pathology of phylogenetically earlier insulin-independent visceral fatty acids. The obesity is a pathology of phylogenetically later pool of insulin-dependent adipocytes.

  6. Eos Is Redundant for Regulatory T Cell Function but Plays an Important Role in IL-2 and Th17 Production by CD4+ Conventional T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Metidji, Amina; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Thornton, Angela M; Ikeda, Tohru; Morgan, Bruce A; Shevach, Ethan M

    2015-07-15

    Eos belongs to the Ikaros family of transcription factors. It was reported to be a regulatory T cell (Treg) signature gene, to play a critical role in Treg suppressor functions, and to maintain Treg stability. We used mice with a global deficiency in Eos to re-examine the role of Eos expression in both Tregs and conventional T cells (Tconvs). Tregs from Eos-deficient (Eos(-/-)) mice developed normally, displayed a normal Treg phenotype, and exhibited normal suppressor function in vitro. Eos(-/-) Tregs were as effective as Tregs from wild-type (WT) mice in suppressing inflammation in a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Bone marrow (BM) from Eos(-/-) mice was as effective as that from WT mice in controlling T cell activation when used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice in the presence of scurfy fetal liver cells. Surprisingly, Eos was expressed in activated Tconvs and was required for IL-2 production, CD25 expression, and proliferation in vitro by CD4(+) Tconvs. Eos(-/-) mice developed more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis than WT mice, displayed increased numbers of effector T cells in the periphery and CNS, and amplified IL-17 production. In conclusion, our studies are not consistent with a role for Eos in Treg development and function but demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of Tconvs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Murine Melanoma-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells Are Defective in Antigen Presenting Function Regardless of the Presence of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ataera, Haley; Hyde, Evelyn; Price, Kylie M.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Ronchese, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells are often ineffective at presenting tumor-derived antigen in vivo, a defect usually ascribed to the suppressive tumor environment. We investigated the effects of depleting CD4+CD25+ “natural” regulatory T cells (Treg) on the frequency, phenotype and function of total dendritic cell populations in B16.OVA tumors and in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody PC61 reduced Treg frequency in blood and tumors, but did not affect the frequency of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells, or their expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells from PC61-treated or untreated mice induced the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, but could not induce proliferation of OVA-specific OTI and OTII T cells unless specific peptide antigen was added in culture. Some proliferation of naïve, OVA-specific OTI T cells, but not OTII T cells, was observed in the tumor-draining LN of mice carrying B16.OVA tumors, however, this was not improved by PC61 treatment. Experiments using RAG1−/− hosts adoptively transferred with OTI and CD25-depleted OTII cells also failed to show improved OTI and OTII T cell proliferation in vivo compared to C57BL/6 hosts. We conclude that the defective presentation of B16.OVA tumor antigen by tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells and in the tumor-draining lymph node is not due to the presence of “natural” CD4+CD25+ Treg. PMID:21390236

  8. Interleukin 2 and interleukin 10 function synergistically to promote CD8(+) T cell cytotoxicity, which is suppressed by regulatory T cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaogang; Lu, Ping; Li, Bo; Zhang, Wanfu; Yang, Rong; Chu, Yan; Luo, Kaiyuan

    2017-03-06

    The precise role of interleukin (IL)-10 in breast cancer is not clear. Previous studies suggested a tumor-promoting role of IL-10 in breast cancer, whereas recent discoveries that IL-10 activated and expanded tumor-resident CD8(+) T cells challenged the traditional view. Here, we investigated the role of IL-10 in HLA-A2-positive breast cancer patients with Grade III, Stage IIA or IIB in-situ and invasive ductal carcinoma, and compared it with that of IL-2, the canonical CD8(+) T cell growth factor. We first observed that breast cancer patients presented higher serum levels of IL-2 and IL-10 than healthy controls. Upon prolonged TCR stimulation, peripheral blood CD8(+) T cells from breast cancer patients tended to undergo apoptosis, which could be prevented by the addition of IL-2 and/or IL-10. The cytotoxicity of TCR-activated CD8(+) T cells was also enhanced by exogenous IL-2 and/or IL-10. Interestingly, IL-2 and IL-10 demonstrated synergistic effects, since the enhancement in CD8(+) T cell function when both cytokines were added was greater than the sum of the improvements mediated by each individual cytokine. IL-10 by itself could not promote the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells but could significantly enhance IL-2-mediated promotion of CD8(+) T cell proliferation. In addition, the cytotoxicity of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in breast tumor was elevated when both IL-2 and IL-10 were present but not when either one was absent. This synergistic effect was stopped by CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which depleted IL-2 in a cell number-dependent manner. Together, these results demonstrated that IL-2 and IL-10 could work synergistically to improve the survival, proliferation, and cytotoxicity of activated CD8(+) T cells, an effect suppressible by CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells.

  9. The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex regulatory protein exhibits an impaired functionality in human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamaia, S; Cassé, H; Gazzolo, L; Duc Dodon, M

    1997-01-01

    The Rex protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) intervenes in the posttranscriptional regulation of proviral gene expression. Its binding to the Rex response element (XRE) present in the 3' long terminal repeat ensures the coordinate cytoplasmic accumulation of spliced and unspliced forms of viral messengers. Consequently, synthesis of viral structural and enzymatic proteins is strictly dependent on the Rex posttranscriptional activity. Here we report that synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins by Jurkat T cells could be detected only when they were regulated in a Rex-independent manner. Indeed, Jurkat T cells transfected with a Rex-dependent env expression vector (encompassing both the env and pX open reading frames) do not produce significant levels of envelope glycoproteins despite the production of significant amounts of Rex protein. The analysis of levels and distribution patterns of the unspliced env and of the singly spliced tax/rex transcripts suggests that the failure in envelope glycoprotein synthesis may be ascribed to a deficiency of Rex in mediating the nucleocytoplasmic transport of unspliced env RNAs in these cells. Furthermore, despite the synthesis of regulatory proteins, HTLV-1 structural proteins were not detected in Jurkat T cells transfected with an HTLV-1 infectious provirus. Conversely, and as expected, structural proteins were produced by Jurkat cells transfected by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectious provirus. This phenotype appeared to be linked to a specific dysfunction of Rex, since the functionally equivalent Rev protein of HIV-1 was shown to be fully efficient in promoting the synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins in Jurkat cells. Therefore, it seems likely that the block to Rex function in these lymphoblastoid T cells is determined by inefficient Rex-XRE interactions. These observations suggest that the acquisition of this Rex-deficient phenotype by in vivo-infected HTLV-1 T cells may

  10. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 plays an essential role in the function of CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory cells that control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Read, S; Malmström, V; Powrie, F

    2000-07-17

    It is now clear that functionally specialized regulatory T (Treg) cells exist as part of the normal immune repertoire, preventing the development of pathogenic responses to both self- and intestinal antigens. Here, we report that the Treg cells that control intestinal inflammation express the same phenotype (CD25(+)CD45RB(low)CD4(+)) as those that control autoimmunity. Previous studies have failed to identify how CD25(+) Treg cells function in vivo. Our studies reveal that the immune-suppressive function of these cells in vivo is dependent on signaling via the negative regulator of T cell activation cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), as well as secretion of the immune-suppressive cytokine transforming growth factor beta. Strikingly, constitutive expression of CTLA-4 among CD4(+) cells was restricted primarily to Treg cells, suggesting that CTLA-4 expression by these cells is involved in their immune-suppressive function. These findings raise the possibility that Treg cell function contributes to the immune suppression characteristic of CTLA-4 signaling. Identification of costimulatory molecules involved in the function of Treg cells may facilitate further characterization of these cells and development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  11. Functional and Developmental Analysis of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells under the Influence of Streptococcal M Protein in Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Auhaimena, Nidhal; Al-Kaabi, Zaman I. L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of streptococcal M protein in naturally-occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs) function and development in rheumatic heart disease in Iraqi patients. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated for subsequent M protein extraction. Also, peripheral blood nTregs and CD4+ T cells were isolated by using Magnetic Cell Separation System. Tissue culture for isolated cells was performed in the presence and absence of M protein. Cell count was performed, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) were determined in culture supernatant using ELISA system. There was a significant positive correlation (P<0.01) between the number of proliferated nTregs and CD4+ T cells in the presence as well as the absence of streptococcal M protein. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between the mean number of nTregs and CD4+ T cells in mixed culture system in the absence of M protein (r=-0.995). There was also a positive, but not significant (P>0.05), association (r=0.353) between the mean number of nTregs and CD4+ T cells in the presence of M protein. The M protein stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce IL-4 in very little amount (<4 pg/ml) in all samples. Compared to the production of IL4, TNF-α was produced in higher concentrations in the culture supernatants. The findings of the study indicate that streptococcal M protein has an important role in increasing the proliferation of D4+CD25+regulatory T cells and CD4+ T cells. However, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells have lower suppressive activity against CD4+ T cells in the presence of M protein. PMID:23359747

  12. Regulatory T cells in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Magali Noval; Chatila, Talal A.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of allergic diseases entails an ineffective tolerogenic immune response towards allergens. Regulatory T cells (TReg) cells play a key role in sustaining immune tolerance to allergens, yet mechanisms by which TReg cells fail to maintain tolerance in allergic diseases are not well understood. We review current concepts and established mechanisms regarding how TReg cells regulate different components of allergen-triggered immune responses to promote and maintain tolerance. We will also discuss more recent advances that emphasize the “dual” functionality of TReg cells in allergic diseases: how TReg cells are essential in promoting tolerance to allergens but also how a pro-allergic inflammatory environment can skew TReg cells towards a pathogenic phenotype that aggravates and perpetuates disease. These advances highlight opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies that aim to re-establish tolerance in chronic allergic diseases by promoting TReg cell and stability function. PMID:27596705

  13. Regulatory B Cell Function Is Suppressed by Smoking and Obesity in H. pylori-Infected Subjects and Is Correlated with Elevated Risk of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanggang; Wulan, Hasi; Song, Zongchang; Paik, Paul A; Tsao, Ming L; Goodman, Gary M; MacEachern, Paul T; Downey, Robert S; Jankowska, Anna J; Rabinowitz, Yaron M; Learch, Thomas B; Song, David Z; Yuan, Ji J; Zheng, Shihang; Zheng, Zhendong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in more than half of the world's population and is the main cause for gastric cancer. A series of lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as tobacco smoking and obesity, have been found to elevate the risk for cancer development. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological aspects during H. pylori infection and gastric cancer development. We found that B cells from H. pylori-infected patients presented altered composition and function compared to uninfected patients. IL-10-expressing CD24+CD38+ B cells were upregulated in H. pylori-infected patients, contained potent regulatory activity in inhibiting T cell pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and responded directly to H. pylori antigen stimulation. Interestingly, in H. pylori-infected smoking subjects and obese subjects, the number of IL-10+ B cells and CD24+CD38+ B cells were reduced compared to H. pylori-infected asymptomatic subjects. Regulatory functions mediated by CD24+CD38+ B cells were also impaired. In addition, gastric cancer positive patients had reduced IL-10-producing B cell frequencies after H. pylori-stimulation. Altogether, these data suggest that in H. pylori-infection, CD24+CD38+ B cell is upregulated and plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory responses, possibly through IL-10 production, a feature that was not observed in smoking and obese patients.

  14. Similar disturbances in B cell activity and regulatory T cell function in Henoch-Schonlein purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, M.G.; Nash, G.S.; Bertovich, M.J.; MacDermott, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The immunoglobulin synthesizing activities of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from five patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) and eight patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were compared. Cumulative amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesized and secreted by unstimulated and PWM-stimulated patient cells over a 12-day period were determied in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. In unstimulated control cultures mean rates of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesis were less than 250 ng/ml. The synthetic activities of patient MNC were markedly increased. In HSP cultures IgA was the major immunoglobulin class produced (2810 x/divide 1.33 ng/ml) followed by IgG (1754 x/divide 1.32 ng/ml) and IgM (404 x/divide 1.16 ng/ml). In SLE cultures IgA and IgG syntheses were equally elevated (4427 x/divide 1.20 and 4438 x/divide 1.49 ng/ml, respectively) whereas IgM synthesis averaged 967 x/divide 1.66 ng/ml. PWM stimulation of pateient MNC caused a sharp decline in the synthesis of all three immunoglobulin classes. After T cell depletion B cell-enriched fractions from HSP and SLE patients maintained high levels of IgA and IgG synthesis that were inhibited by PWM and by normal allogeneic but not autologous T cells. In PWM-stimulted co-cultures, patient T cells nonspecifically suppressed the synthetic activities of autologous and control B cells. in contrast patient B cells achieved normal levels of immunoglobulin synthesis when cultured with control T cells plus PWM. In longitudinal studies patient B and T cell disturbances persisted despite clinical improvement.

  15. Targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 Costimulation Differentially Controls Immune Synapses and Function of Human Regulatory and Conventional T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulin, Philippe; Coulon, Flora; Mary, Caroline; Ville, Simon; Vie, Henri; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, the three identified ligands for CD80/86, are pivotal positive and negative costimulatory molecules that, among other functions, control T cell motility and formation of immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). What remains incompletely understood is how CD28 leads to the activation of effector T cells (Teff) but inhibition of suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs), while CTLA-4 and PD-L1 inhibit Teff function but are crucial for the suppressive function of Tregs. Using alloreactive human T cells and blocking antibodies, we show here by live cell dynamic microscopy that CD28, CTLA-4, and PD-L1 differentially control velocity, motility and immune synapse formation in activated Teff versus Tregs. Selectively antagonizing CD28 costimulation increased Treg dwell time with APCs and induced calcium mobilization which translated in increased Treg suppressive activity, in contrast with the dampening effect on Teff responses. The increase in Treg suppressive activity after CD28 blockade was also confirmed with polyclonal Tregs. Whereas CTLA-4 played a critical role in Teff by reversing TCR-induced STOP signals, it failed to affect motility in Tregs but was essential for formation of the Treg immune synapse. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for PD-L1-CD80 interactions in suppressing motility specifically in Tregs. Thus, our findings reveal that the three identified ligands of CD80/86, CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1, differentially control immune synapse formation and function of the human Teff and Treg cells analyzed here. Individually targeting CD28, CTLA-4 and PD-L1 might therefore represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat immune disorders where effector and regulatory T cell functions need to be differentially targeted. PMID:24376655

  16. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    PubMed

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum soluble extracts potentiate the suppressive function of polyclonal T regulatory cells through activation of TGFβ-mediated signals.

    PubMed

    Clemente, AnnMaria; Caporale, Roberto; Sannella, Anna Rosa; Majori, Giancarlo; Severini, Carlo; Fadigati, Giulia; Cirelli, Domenico; Bonini, Paolo; Garaci, Enrico; Cozzolino, Federico; Torcia, Maria Gabriella

    2011-09-01

    Increased numbers of T regulatory cells (Tregs), key mediators of immune homeostasis, were reported in human and murine malaria and it is current opinion that these cells play a role in balancing protective immunity and pathogenesis during infection. However, the mechanisms governing their expansion during malaria infection are not completely defined. In this article we show that soluble extracts of Plasmodium falciparum (PfSEs), but not equivalent preparation of uninfected erythrocytes, induce the differentiation of polyclonally activated CD4(+) cells in Tregs endowed with strong suppressive activity. PfSEs activate latent TGFβ bound on the membrane of Treg cells, thus allowing the cytokine interaction with TGFβ receptor, and inducing Foxp3 gene expression and TGFβ production. The activation of membrane-bound latent TGFβ by PfSEs is significantly reduced by a broad-spectrum metalloproteinases inhibitor with Zn(++) -chelating activity, and completely inhibited by the combined action of such inhibitor and antibodies to a P. falciparum thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (PfTRAP). We conclude that Pf-Zn(++) -dependent proteinases and, to a lesser extent, PfTRAP molecules are involved in the activation of latent TGFβ bound on the membrane of activated Treg cells and suggest that, in malaria infection, this mechanism could contribute to the expansion of Tregs with different antigen specificity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Novel vaccines targeting dendritic cells by coupling allergoids to nonoxidized mannan enhance allergen uptake and induce functional regulatorycells through programmed death ligand 1.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Sofía; Soria, Irene; Cirauqui, Cristina; Cases, Bárbara; Manzano, Ana I; Diez-Rivero, Carmen M; Reche, Pedro A; López-Relaño, Juan; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Subiza, Javier; Casanovas, Miguel; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Subiza, José Luis; Palomares, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative treatment for allergy. AIT faces pitfalls related to efficacy, security, duration, and patient compliance. Novel vaccines overcoming such inconveniences are in demand. We sought to study the immunologic mechanisms of action for novel vaccines targeting dendritic cells (DCs) generated by coupling glutaraldehyde-polymerized grass pollen allergoids to nonoxidized mannan (PM) compared with glutaraldehyde-polymerized allergoids (P) or native grass pollen extracts (N). Skin prick tests and basophil activation tests with N, P, or PM were performed in patients with grass pollen allergy. IgE-blocking experiments, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, cocultures, suppression assays, real-time quantitative PCR, ELISAs, and ELISpot assays were performed to assess allergen capture by human DCs and T-cell responses. BALB/c mice were immunized with PM, N, or P. Antibody levels, cytokine production by splenocytes, and splenic forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells were quantified. Experiments with oxidized PM were also performed. PM displays in vivo hypoallergenicity, induces potent blocking antibodies, and is captured by human DCs much more efficiently than N or P by mechanisms depending on mannose receptor- and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin-mediated internalization. PM endorses human DCs to generate functional FOXP3(+) Treg cells through programmed death ligand 1. Immunization of mice with PM induces a shift to nonallergic responses and increases the frequency of splenic FOXP3(+) Treg cells. Mild oxidation impairs these effects in human subjects and mice, demonstrating the essential role of preserving the carbohydrate structure of mannan. Allergoids conjugated to nonoxidized mannan represent suitable vaccines for AIT. Our findings might also be of the utmost relevance to development of therapeutic interventions in other immune tolerance-related diseases. Copyright

  19. T regulatory cells in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Yannick D; Golshayan, Déla; Ehirchiou, Driss; Wekerle, Thomas; Seebach, Jörg D; Bühler, Leo H

    2009-01-01

    The role of T regulatory cells (Treg) in the induction and maintenance of allograft tolerance is being studied to a great extent. In contrast, little is known on their potential to prevent graft rejection in the field of xenotransplantation, where acute vascular rejection mediated by cellular and humoral mechanisms and thrombotic microangiopathy still prevents long-term graft survival. In this regard, the induction of donor-specific tolerance through isolation and expansion of xenoantigen-specific recipient Treg is currently becoming a focus of interest. This review will summarize the present knowledge concerning Treg and their potential use in xenotransplantation describing in particular CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, CD8(+)CD28(-) Treg, double negative CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, and natural killer Treg. Although only studied in vitro so far, human CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg is currently the best characterized subpopulation of regulatory cells in xenotransplantation. CD8(+)CD28(-) Treg and double negative CD4(-)CD8(-) Treg also seem to be implicated in tolerance maintenance of xenografts. Finally, one study revealing a role for natural killer CD4(+)Valpha14(+) Treg in the prolongation of xenograft survival needs further confirmation. To our opinion, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg are a promising candidate to protect xenografts. In contrast to cadaveric allotransplantation, the donor is known prior to xenotransplantation. This advantage allows the expansion of recipient Treg in a xenoantigen specific manner before transplantation.

  20. Selective ORAI1 inhibition ameliorates autoimmune CNS inflammation by suppressing effector but not regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Ulrike; Shaw, Patrick J.; Kozhaya, Lina; Subramanian, Raju; Gaida, Kevin; Unutmaz, Derya; McBride, Helen J.; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The function of CD4+ T cells is dependent on Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels formed by ORAI proteins. To investigate the role of ORAI1 in pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells and autoimmune diseases, we genetically and pharmacologically modulated ORAI1 function. Immunization of mice lacking Orai1 in T cells with MOG peptide resulted in attenuated severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The numbers of T cells and innate immune cells in the CNS of ORAI1-deficient animals were strongly reduced along with almost completely abolished production of IL-17, IFN-γ and GM-CSF despite only partially reduced Ca2+ influx. In Th1 and Th17 cells differentiated in vitro, ORAI1 was required for cytokine production but not the expression of Th1- and Th17-specific transcription factors T-bet and RORγt. The differentiation and function of induced iTreg cells, by contrast, was independent of ORAI1. Importantly, induced genetic deletion of Orai1 in adoptively transferred, MOG-specific T cells was able to halt EAE progression after disease onset. Likewise, treatment of wild-type mice with a selective CRAC channel inhibitor after EAE onset ameliorated disease. Genetic deletion of Orai1 and pharmacological ORAI1 inhibition reduced the leukocyte numbers in the CNS and attenuated Th1/Th17 cell-mediated cytokine production. In human CD4+ T cells, CRAC channel inhibition reduced the expression of IL-17, IFN-γ and other cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings support the conclusion that Th1 and Th17 cell function is particularly dependent on CRAC channels, which could be exploited as a therapeutic approach to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26673135

  1. CCR10 regulates balanced maintenance and function of resident regulatory and effector T cells to promote immune homeostasis in the skin.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mingcan; Hu, Shaomin; Fu, Yaoyao; Jin, Wensen; Yi, Qiyi; Matsui, Yurika; Yang, Jie; McDowell, Mary Ann; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana; Xiong, Na

    2014-09-01

    CCR10 and CCL27 make up the most skin-specific chemokine receptor/ligand pair implicated in skin allergy and inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This pair is thought to regulate the migration, maintenance, or both of skin T cells and is suggested to be therapeutic targets for treatment of skin diseases. However, the functional importance of CCR10/CCL27 in vivo remains elusive. We sought to determine the expression and function of CCR10 in different subsets of skin T cells under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions to gain a mechanistic insight into the potential roles of CCR10 during skin inflammation. Using heterozygous and homozygous CCR10 knockout/enhanced green fluorescent protein knockin mice, we assessed the expression of CCR10 on regulatory and effector T cells of healthy and inflamed skin induced by chemicals, pathogens, and autoreactive T cells. In addition, we assessed the effect of CCR10 knockout on the maintenance and functions of different T cells and inflammatory status in the skin during different phases of the immune response. CCR10 expression is preferentially induced on memory-like skin-resident T cells and their progenitors for their maintenance in homeostatic skin but not expressed on most skin-infiltrating effector T cells during inflammation. In CCR10 knockout mice the imbalanced presence and dysregulated function of resident regulatory and effector T cells result in over-reactive and prolonged innate and memory responses in the skin, leading to increased clearance of Leishmania species infection in the skin. CCR10 is a critical regulator of skin immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PD-1 and Tim-3 pathways are associated with regulatory CD8+ T-cell function in decidua and maintenance of normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-C; Li, Y-H; Piao, H-L; Hong, X-W; Zhang, D; Xu, Y-Y; Tao, Y; Wang, Y; Yuan, M-M; Li, D-J; Du, M-R

    2015-05-07

    CD8+ T cells are critical in the balance between fetal tolerance and antiviral immunity. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) are important negative immune regulatory molecules involved in viral persistence and tumor metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells from decidua greatly outnumbered those from peripheral blood during human early pregnancy. Co-culture of trophoblasts with CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1+ and/or Tim-3+ immune cells. Furthermore, the population of CD8+ T cells co-expressing PD-1 and Tim-3 was enriched within the intermediate memory subset in decidua. This population exhibited high proliferative activity and Th2-type cytokine producing capacity. Blockade of Tim-3 and PD-1 resulted in decreased in vitro proliferation and Th2-type cytokine production while increased trophoblast killing and IFN-γ producing capacities of CD8+ T cells. Pregnant CBA/J females challenged with Tim-3 and/or PD-1 blocking antibodies were more susceptible to fetal loss, which was associated with CD8+ T-cell dysfunction. Importantly, the number and function of Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells in decidua were significantly impaired in miscarriage. These findings underline the important roles of Tim-3 and PD-1 pathways in regulating decidual CD8+ T-cell function and maintaining normal pregnancy.

  3. Phenotype and function of B cells and dendritic cells from interferon regulatory factor 5-deficient mice with and without a mutation in DOCK2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5-deficient (IRF5 −/−) mice have been used for many studies of IRF5 biology. A recent report identifies a mutation in dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) as being responsible for the abnormal B-cell development phenotype observed in the IRF5 −/− line. Both dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) and IRF5 play important roles in immune cell function, raising the issue of whether immune effects previously associated with IRF5 are due to IRF5 or DOCK2. Here, we defined the insertion end-point of the DOCK2 mutation and designed a novel PCR to detect the mutation in genomic DNA. We confirmed the association of the DOCK2 mutation and the abnormal B-cell phenotype in our IRF5 −/− line and also established another IRF5 −/− line without the DOCK2 mutation. These two lines were used to compare the role of IRF5 in dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells in the presence or absence of the DOCK2 mutation. IRF5 deficiency reduces IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-6 production by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)- and TLR7-stimulated DCs and reduces TLR7- and TLR9-induced IL-6 production by B cells to a similar extent in the two lines. Importantly however, IRF5 −/− mice with the DOCK2 mutation have higher serum levels of IgG1 and lower levels of IgG2b, IgG2a/c and IgG3 than IRF5 −/− mice without the DOCK2 mutation, suggesting that the DOCK2 mutation confers additional Th2-type effects. Overall, these studies help clarify the function of IRF5 in B cells and DCs in the absence of the DOCK2 mutation. In addition, the PCR described will be useful for other investigators using the IRF5−/− mouse line. PMID:23291967

  4. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    PubMed

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  5. Regulatory function of cytomegalovirus-specific CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tovar-Salazar, Adriana; Patterson-Bartlett, Julie; Jesser, Renee; Weinberg, Adriana

    2010-03-15

    CMV infection is characterized by high of frequencies of CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T cells. Here we demonstrate that CMV-specific CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} cells are regulatory T cells (T{sub R}). CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} cells sorted from CMV-stimulated PBMC of CMV-seropositive donors inhibited de novo CMV-specific proliferation of autologous PBMC in a dose-dependent fashion. Compared with the entire CMV-stimulated CD4{sup +} T-cell population, higher proportions of CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} expressed FoxP3, TGFbeta, granzyme B, perforin, GITR and PD-1, lower proportions expressed CD127 and PD1-L and similar proportions expressed CD25, CTLA4, Fas-L and GITR-L. CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} expanded in response to IL-2, but not to CMV antigenic restimulation. The anti-proliferative effect of CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} significantly decreased after granzyme B or TGFbeta inhibition. The CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} of HIV-infected and uninfected donors had similar phenotypes and anti-proliferative potency, but HIV-infected individuals had higher proportions of CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R}. The CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} may contribute to the downregulation of CMV-specific and nonspecific immune responses of CMV-infected individuals.

  6. Differential impact of high and low penetrance TNFRSF1A gene mutations on conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cell functions in TNFR1-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Valentina; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Perna, Francesco; Obici, Laura; Merlini, Giampaolo; Cattalini, Marco; La Torre, Francesco; Maggio, Maria Cristina; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Magnotti, Flora; Galgani, Mario; Galeazzi, Mauro; Marone, Gianni; De Rosa, Veronica; Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    TNFR-associated periodic syndrome is an autoinflammatory disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in TNFRSF1A, the gene encoding for TNFR superfamily 1A. The lack of knowledge in the field of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome biology is clear, particularly in the context of control of immune self-tolerance. We investigated how TNF-α/TNFR superfamily 1A signaling can affect T cell biology, focusing on conventional CD4(+)CD25(-) and regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell functions in patients with TNFR-associated periodic syndrome carrying either high or low penetrance TNFRSF1A mutations. Specifically, we observed that in high penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, at the molecular level, these alterations were secondary to a hyperactivation of the ERK1/2, STAT1/3/5, mammalian target of rapamycin, and NF-κB pathways in conventional T cells. In addition, these patients had a lower frequency of peripheral regulatory T cells, which also displayed a defective suppressive phenotype. These alterations were partially found in low penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, suggesting a specific link between the penetrance of the TNFRSF1A mutation and the observed T cell phenotype. Taken together, our data envision a novel role for adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome involving both CD4(+) conventional T cells and Tregs, suggesting a novel mechanism of inflammation in the context of autoinflammatory disorders.

  7. Deep sequencing of RNA from immune cell-derived vesicles uncovers the selective incorporation of small non-coding RNA biotypes with potential regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Nolte-’t Hoen, Esther N. M.; Buermans, Henk P. J.; Waasdorp, Maaike; Stoorvogel, Willem; Wauben, Marca H. M.; ’t Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Cells release RNA-carrying vesicles and membrane-free RNA/protein complexes into the extracellular milieu. Horizontal vesicle-mediated transfer of such shuttle RNA between cells allows dissemination of genetically encoded messages, which may modify the function of target cells. Other studies used array analysis to establish the presence of microRNAs and mRNA in cell-derived vesicles from many sources. Here, we used an unbiased approach by deep sequencing of small RNA released by immune cells. We found a large variety of small non-coding RNA species representing pervasive transcripts or RNA cleavage products overlapping with protein coding regions, repeat sequences or structural RNAs. Many of these RNAs were enriched relative to cellular RNA, indicating that cells destine specific RNAs for extracellular release. Among the most abundant small RNAs in shuttle RNA were sequences derived from vault RNA, Y-RNA and specific tRNAs. Many of the highly abundant small non-coding transcripts in shuttle RNA are evolutionary well-conserved and have previously been associated to gene regulatory functions. These findings allude to a wider range of biological effects that could be mediated by shuttle RNA than previously expected. Moreover, the data present leads for unraveling how cells modify the function of other cells via transfer of specific non-coding RNA species. PMID:22821563

  8. Regulatory T cells and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Paust, Silke; Cantor, Harvey

    2005-04-01

    Although T-cell clones bearing T-cell receptors with high affinity for self-peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) products are generally eliminated in the thymus (recessive tolerance), the peripheral T-cell repertoire remains strongly biased toward self-peptide MHC complexes and includes autoreactive T cells. A search for peripheral T cells that might exert dominant inhibitory effects on autoreactivity has implicated a subpopulation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells called regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here, we discuss the role of cytokines and costimulatory molecules in the generation, maintenance, and function of Tregs. We also summarize evidence for the involvement of Tregs in controlling autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Last, we discuss our recent definition of the potential role of B7 expressed on activated T-effector cells as a target molecule for Treg-dependent suppression. These observations suggest that the engagement of B7 on effector T cells transmits an inhibitory signal that blocks or attenuates effector T-cell function. We restrict our comments to the suppression mediated by cells within the CD4 lineage; the impact of the cells within the CD8 lineage that may suppress via engagement of Qa-1 on effector T cells is not addressed in this review.

  9. BDC12-4.1 T-cell receptor transgenic insulin-specific CD4 T cells are resistant to in vitro differentiation into functional Foxp3+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Fousteri, Georgia; Sachithanantham, Sowbarnika; Miller, Jacqueline F; Dave, Amy; Juntti, Therese; Coppieters, Ken T; von Herrath, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The infusion of ex vivo-expanded autologous T regulatory (Treg) cells is potentially an effective immunotherapeutic strategy against graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and several autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, in vitro differentiation of antigen-specific T cells into functional and stable Treg (iTreg) cells has proved challenging. As insulin is the major autoantigen leading to T1D, we tested the capacity of insulin-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic CD4(+) T cells of the BDC12-4.1 clone to convert into Foxp3(+) iTreg cells. We found that in vitro polarization toward Foxp3(+) iTreg was effective with a majority (>70%) of expanded cells expressing Foxp3. However, adoptive transfer of Foxp3(+) BDC12-4.1 cells did not prevent diabetes onset in immunocompetent NOD mice. Thus, in vitro polarization of insulin-specific BDC12-4.1 TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells toward Foxp3+ cells did not provide dominant tolerance in recipient mice. These results highlight the disconnect between an in vitro acquired Foxp3(+) cell phenotype and its associated in vivo regulatory potential.

  10. Overexpression of HO-1 Contributes to Sepsis-Induced Immunosuppression by Modulating the Th1/Th2 Balance and Regulatory T-Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seong-Jin; Kim, So-Jin; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2017-05-15

    Countervailing anti-inflammatory response and immunosuppression can cause death in late sepsis. Depletion and dysfunction of T cells are critical for developing sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has a regulatory effect on differentiation and function of T cells and anti-inflammatory properties. We therefore investigated the immunosuppressive role of HO-1 in sepsis with a focus on its effects on helper T-cell (Th) differentiation and regulatory T cells (Treg). Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mice were intraperitoneally injected with zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP; 25 mg/kg), an HO-1 inhibitor, or hemin (20 mg/kg), an HO-1 inducer, at 24 and 36 hours post-CLP. Splenocytes were isolated 48 hours post-CLP. Mice were intranasally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4 days post-CLP as a secondary pneumonia infection model. ZnPP improved survival and bacterial clearance, whereas hemin had the opposite effect in septic mice. CLP induced lymphocyte apoptosis and a proinflammatory Th1 to anti-inflammatory Th2 shift, which was attenuated by ZnPP. ZnPP attenuated the CLP-induced Treg population and protein expression of inhibitory costimulatory molecules. Furthermore, ZnPP improved survival in the secondary pneumonia infection model. Our findings suggest that HO-1 overexpression contributes to sepsis-induced immunosuppression during late phase sepsis by promoting Th2 polarization and Treg function.

  11. Evaluation of the expression and function of the P2X7 receptor and ART1 in human regulatory T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Garcia, Juan D; López-López, Cintya; Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; García-Hernández, Mariana H; Guzmán-Flores, Juan M; Layseca-Espinosa, Esther; Portales-Cervantes, Liliana; Portales-Pérez, Diana P

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells that express CD39 (CD39+ Treg) exhibit specific immunomodulatory properties. Ectonucleotidase CD39 hydrolyses ATP and ADP. ATP is a ligand of the P2X7 receptor and induces the shedding of CD62L and apoptosis. However, the role of ATP in CD39+ Treg cells has not been defined. Furthermore, NAD can activate the P2X7 receptor via ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) enzymes and cause cell depletion in murine models. We evaluated the expression and function of P2X7 and ART1 in CD39+ Treg and CD39- Treg cells in the presence or absence of ATP and NAD. We isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects and purified CD4+ T cells, CD4+ CD25+ T cells and CD4+ CD25+ CD39+ T cells. P2X7 and ART1 expression was assessed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Our results showed low P2X7 expression on CD39+ Treg cells and higher levels of ART1 expression in CD4+ CD39+ T cells than the other subtypes studied. Neither shedding of CD62L nor cell death of CD39+ Treg or CD39- Treg cells was observed by 1mM ATP or 60μM NAD. In contrast, P2Xs receptor-dependent proliferation with 300μM ATP, was inhibited by NAD in the different cell types analysed. The NAD proliferation-inhibition was increased with P2Xs and A2a agonist and was reversed with P2Xs and A2a antagonist, therefore NAD inhibits P2Xs-dependent proliferation and A2a activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that the altered function and expression of P2X7 and ART1 in the human CD39+ Treg or CD39- Treg cells could participate in the resistance against cell death induced by ATP or NAD.

  12. Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Larson, Ryan P; Shafiani, Shahin; Urdahl, Kevin B

    2013-01-01

    The immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) must be tightly regulated to mount a sufficient response to limit bacterial growth and dissemination while avoiding excessive inflammation that could damage host tissues. A wide variety of cell types, cell surface molecules, and cytokines are likely to contribute to this regulation, but recent studies have revealed that a subset of CD4 T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3, called regulatory T (reg) cells, play a critical role [1-3]. Although the first reports of T reg cells in tuberculosis (TB) occurred only recently (i.e., 2006) [4, 5], we have already gained many insights into their activity during TB. While it is likely that T reg cells do play some beneficial roles by preventing inflammation-mediated damage to host tissues during TB, this aspect of their function has not been well studied to date. What is clear, however, is that during the initial T cell response to Mtb infection, Mtb induces the expansions of T reg cells that delay the onset of adaptive immunity, suggesting that Mtb has hijacked T reg cell-mediated immune suppression to allow it to replicate unabated in the lung until T cells finally arrive [6]. In this chapter, we will first provide an overview of the delayed T cell response to Mtb and a brief introduction to regulatory T cells. We will then review what is known about T reg cells from observations in human populations, discuss mechanistic insights revealed in the mouse model, and speculate about the relevance of this understanding for future efforts to prevent and treat TB.

  13. CD44 co-stimulation promotes FoxP3+ regulatory T-cell persistence and function via production of IL-2, IL-10 and TGF-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bollyky, Paul L.; Falk, Ben A.; Long, Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Braun, Kathy R.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Evanko, Stephen P.; Buckner, Jane H.; Wight, Thomas N.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2011-01-01

    Work by our group and others has demonstrated a role for the extracellular matrix receptor CD44 and it's ligand hyaluronan in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) function. Herein we explore the mechanistic basis for this observation. Using mouse FoxP3/GFP+ Treg we find that CD44 co-stimulation promotes expression of FoxP3, in part through production of IL-2. This promotion of IL-2 production was also resistant to Cyclosporine A treatment, suggesting that CD44 costimulation may promote IL-2 production through bypassing FoxP3-mediated suppression of NFAT. CD44 co-stimulation increased production of IL-10 in a partially Il-2 dependant manner and also promoted cell-surface TGF-β expression. Consistent with these findings, Treg from CD44 knock-out mice demonstrated impaired regulatory function ex vivo and depressed production of IL-10 and cell-surface TGF-β. These data reveal a novel role for CD44 cross-linking in the production of regulatory cytokines. Similar salutary effects on FoxP3 expression were observed upon co-stimulation with hyaluronan, the primary natural ligand for CD44. This effect is dependent upon CD44 cross-linking; while both high molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA) and plate-bound anti-CD44 Ab promoted FoxP3 expression, neither low-molecular weight HA (LMW-HA) nor soluble anti-CD44 Ab did so. The implication is that intact HMW-HA can cross-link CD44 only in those settings where it predominates over fragmentary LMW-HA, namely in un-inflamed tissue. We propose that intact but not fragmented ECM is capable of cross-linking CD44 and thereby maintains immunologic tolerance in uninjured or healing tissue. PMID:19635906

  14. Apoptotic cell-mediated suppression of streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis is associated with alteration of macrophage function and local regulatory T-cell increase: a potential cell-based therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Perruche, Sylvain; Saas, Philippe; Chen, Wanjun

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Experimental streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis is characterized by two successive phases of the disease. The acute phase occurs early and is associated with an inflammatory process and neutrophil infiltration into the synovium. The second chronic phase is related to effector T-cell activation and the dysregulation of macrophage function. Creation of an immunomodulatory environment has been attributed to apoptotic cells themselves, apoptotic cell uptake by phagocytes as well as a less sensibility of phagocytes capturing apoptotic bodies to activation. Therefore we evaluated the potential of apoptotic cell injection to influence the course of inflammation in SCW-induced arthritis in rats. Methods Rat apoptotic thymocytes were injected intraperitoneally (2 × 108) in addition to an arthritogenic dose of systemic SCW in LEW female rats. Control rats received SCW immunization and PBS. Rats were then followed for arthritis occurrence and circulating cytokine detection. At sacrifice, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and macrophages were analyzed. Results Apoptotic cell injection profoundly suppressed joint swelling and destruction typically observed during the acute and chronic phases of SCW-induced arthritis. Synovial inflammatory cell infiltration and bone destruction were also markedly suppressed. Ex vivo experiments revealed reduced levels of TNF in cultures of macrophages from rats challenged with SCW in the presence of apoptotic thymocytes as well as reduced macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, apoptotic cell injection induced higher Foxp3+ Tregs in the lymphoid organs, especially in the draining lymph nodes. Conclusions Our data indicate that apoptotic cells modulate macrophage function and result in Treg generation/increase. This may be involved in inhibition of inflammation and amelioration of arthritis. This highlights and confirms previous studies showing that in vivo generation of Tregs using apoptotic cell injection may be

  15. Program death-1 signaling and regulatory T cells collaborate to resist the function of adoptively transferred cytotoxic T lymphocytes in advanced acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Munger, Meghan E.; Highfill, Steven L.; Tolar, Jakub; Weigel, Brenda J.; Riddle, Megan; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Vallera, Daniel A.; Azuma, Miyuki; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Murphy, William J.; Munn, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-induced immune defects can weaken host immune response and permit tumor cell growth. In a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML), tumor progression resulted in increased regulatory T cells (Treg) and elevation of program death-1 (PD-1) expression on CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) at the tumor site. PD-1 knockout mice were more resistant to AML despite the presence of similar percentage of Tregs compared with wild type. In vitro, intact Treg suppression of CD8+ T-cell responses was dependent on PD-1 expression by T cells and Tregs and PD-L1 expression by antigen-presenting cells. In vivo, the function of adoptively transferred AML-reactive CTLs was reduced by AML-associated Tregs. Anti–PD-L1 monoclonal antibody treatment increased the proliferation and function of CTLs at tumor sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors. Treg depletion followed by PD-1/PD-L1 blockade showed superior efficacy for eradication of established AML. These data demonstrated that interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 can facilitate Treg-induced suppression of T-effector cells and dampen the antitumor immune response. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade coupled with Treg depletion represents an important new approach that can be readily translated into the clinic to improve the therapeutic efficacy of adoptive AML-reactive CTLs in advanced AML disease. PMID:20570856

  16. Hepatic stellate cells increase the immunosuppressive function of natural Foxp3+ regulatory T cells via IDO-induced AhR activation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Thomson, Angus W; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2017-02-01

    Immunosuppressive, naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)forkhead box p3(+) (Foxp3(+)) regulatory T cells (nTregs) offer potential for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. However, potential instability of ex vivo-expanded nTregs following their adoptive transfer may be a significant limitation. LPS-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) induce expansion and enhance the suppressive function and stability of allogeneic nTregs We aimed to delineate mechanisms underlying HSC-induced expansion and increased potency of nTregs HSCs and nTregs were isolated from mouse livers and spleens, respectively. Following coculture with LPS-pretreated allogeneic HSCs (LPS/HSCs), proliferation of nTregs was measured by CFSE dilution, and Foxp3 expression and acetylation were determined by immunoprecipitation (IP) and Western blotting analysis. Expression of various genes associated with immunologic tolerance was determined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). LPS stimulation increased the expression and activity of the immunoregulatory enzyme IDO1 in HSCs, and LPS/HSCs stimulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling in cocultured nTregs Reciprocally, Tregs increased IDO1 expression in HSCs. IDO1(-/-) LPS/HSCs were inferior to WT LPS/HSCs in stimulating nTreg expansion. Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO1 in HSCs by 1-methyltryptophan (1MT) inhibited LPS/HSC-induced AhR signaling in nTregs, which was responsible for their expansion, Foxp3 expression, and stabilization of Foxp3 by increasing acetylation of lysine residues. Finally, HSCs cryopreserved, following 2-3 passages, were as potent as primary-cultured HSCs in expanding nTregs In conclusion, LPS/HSCs expand allogeneic nTregs through an IDO-dependent, AhR-mediated mechanism and increase their stability through lysine-acetylation of Foxp3. nTregs expanded by cryopreserved HSCs may have potential for clinical use.

  17. CD4(+)  CD25(+)  GARP(+) regulatory T cells display a compromised suppressive function in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuzhen; Yu, Kunwu; Wei, Hui; Su, Xin; Zhu, Ruirui; Shi, Huairui; Sun, Haitao; Luo, Quan; Xu, Wenbin; Xiao, Junhui; Zhong, Yucheng; Zeng, Qiutang

    2017-07-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a lethal inflammatory heart disease and closely connected with dysfunction of the immune system. Glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP) expressed on activated CD4(+) T cells with suppressive activity has been established. This study aimed to investigate the frequency and function of circulating CD4(+)  CD25(+)  GARP(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells in DCM. Forty-five DCM patients and 46 controls were enrolled in this study. There was a significant increase in peripheral T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 number and their related cytokines [interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL-17)], and an obvious decrease in Treg number, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 ) levels and the expression of forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) and GARP in patients with DCM compared with controls. In addition, the suppressive function of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  GARP(+) Treg cells was impaired in DCM patients upon T-cell receptor stimulation detected using CFSE dye. Lower level of TGF-β1 and higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-17 detected using ELISA were found in supernatants of the cultured CD4(+)  CD25(+)  GARP(+) Treg cells in DCM patients compared with controls. Together, our results indicate that CD4(+)  CD25(+)  GARP(+) Treg cells are defective in DCM patients and GARP seems to be a better molecular definition of the regulatory phenotype. Therefore, it might be an attractive stategy to pay more attention to GARP in DCM patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. T follicular regulatory cells in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Maceiras, Ana Raquel; Fonseca, Valter R; Agua-Doce, Ana; Graca, Luis

    2017-09-01

    It has long been known that CD4 T cells are necessary to provide help to B cells, triggering a germinal centre (GC) reaction where affinity maturation and isotype switching occur. However, the nature of the dedicated CD4 helper T cells, known as T follicular helper (Tfh), was only recently described. Here, we review the biology and function of the recently described T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells, another CD4 T-cell population also found within GCs but with regulatory function and characteristics. Tfr cells have been identified in mice and humans as simultaneously presenting characteristics of T follicular cells (namely CXCR5 expression) and regulatory T cells (including Foxp3 expression). These Tfr cells have been implicated in the regulation of the magnitude of the GC reaction, as well as in protection from immune-mediated pathology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Interleukin 35-Producing B Cells (i35-Breg): A New Mediator of Regulatory B-Cell Functions in CNS Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Egwuagu, Charles E; Yu, Cheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to neuronal deficits in neurodegenerative CNS (central nervous system) autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and uveitis. The major goal of most treatment modalities for CNS autoimmune diseases is to limit inflammatory responses in the CNS; immune-suppressive drugs are the therapy of choice. However, lifelong immunosuppression increases the occurrence of infections, nephrotoxicity, malignancies, cataractogenesis, and glaucoma, which can greatly impair quality of life for the patient. Biologics that target pathogenic T cells is an alternative approach that is gaining wide acceptance as indicated by the popularity of a variety of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anti-inflammatory compounds and humanized antibodies such as Zenapax, Etanercept, Remicade, anti-ICAM, rapamycin, or tacrolimus. B cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they provide costimulatory signals that activate pathogenic T cells and secrete cytokines that promote autoimmune pathology. B cells also produce autoreactive antibodies implicated in several organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases including lupus erythematosus, Graves' disease, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. On the other hand, recent studies have led to the discovery of several regulatory B-cell (Breg) populations that suppress immune responses and autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present a brief overview of Breg phenotypes and in particular, the newly discovered IL35-producing regulatory B cell (i35-Breg). We discuss the critical roles played by i35-Bregs in regulating autoimmune diseases and the potential use of adoptive Breg therapy in CNS autoimmune diseases.

  20. Harnessing Regulatory T cells to Suppress Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, Alison N.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role in maintaining the homeostatic balance of immune responses. Asthma is an inflammatory condition of the airways that is driven by dysregulated immune responses toward normally innocuous antigens. Individuals with asthma have fewer and less functional Tregs, which may lead to uncontrolled effector cell responses and promote proasthmatic responses of T helper type 2, T helper 17, natural killer T, antigen-presenting, and B cells. Tregs have the capacity to either directly or indirectly suppress these responses. Hence, the induced expansion of functional Tregs in predisposed or individuals with asthma is a potential approach for the prevention and treatment of asthma. Infection by a number of micro-organisms has been associated with reduced prevalence of asthma, and many infectious agents have been shown to induce Tregs and reduce allergic airways disease in mouse models. The translation of the regulatory and therapeutic properties of infectious agents for use in asthma requires the identification of key modulatory components and the development and trial of effective immunoregulatory therapies. Further translational and clinical research is required for the induction of Tregs to be harnessed as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:20097830

  1. Regulatory T cells and vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24h of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12-16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at 7 months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic "balance" between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance.

  2. REGULATORY T CELLS AND VASECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24 hours of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12–16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at seven months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic “balance” between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

  3. Enhancement of regulatory T cell-like suppressive function in MT-2 by long-term and low-dose exposure to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chen; Maeda, Megumi; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Yoshitome, Kei; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-12-02

    Asbestos exposure causes lung fibrosis and various malignant tumors such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. The effects of asbestos on immune cells have not been thoroughly investigated, although our previous reports showed that asbestos exposure reduced anti-tumor immunity. The effects of continuous exposure of regulatory T cells (Treg) to asbestos were examined using the HTLV-1 immortalized human T cell line MT-2, which possesses a suppressive function and expresses the Treg marker protein, Foxp3. Sublines were generated by the continuous exposure to low doses of asbestos fibers for more than one year. The sublines exposed to asbestos showed enhanced suppressive Treg function via cell-cell contact, and increased production of soluble factors such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. These results also indicated that asbestos exposure induced the reduction of anti-tumor immunity, and efforts to develop substances to reverse this reduction may be helpful in preventing the occurrence of asbestos-induced tumors.

  4. Regulatory T Cells in Skin Facilitate Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Rodriguez, Robert Sanchez; Pauli, Mariela L; Truong, Hong-An; Lai, Kevin; Ahn, Richard; Corbin, Kaitlin; Lowe, Margaret M; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Taravati, Keyon; Tan, Madeleine R; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bertolini, Marta; Liao, Wilson; Nestle, Frank O; Paus, Ralf; Cotsarelis, George; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critically dependent on the function of tissue-resident immune cells and the differentiation capacity of tissue-resident stem cells (SCs). How immune cells influence the function of SCs is largely unknown. Regulatorycells (Tregs) in skin preferentially localize to hair follicles (HFs), which house a major subset of skin SCs (HFSCs). Here, we mechanistically dissect the role of Tregs in HF and HFSC biology. Lineage-specific cell depletion revealed that Tregs promote HF regeneration by augmenting HFSC proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional and phenotypic profiling of Tregs and HFSCs revealed that skin-resident Tregs preferentially express high levels of the Notch ligand family member, Jagged 1 (Jag1). Expression of Jag1 on Tregs facilitated HFSC function and efficient HF regeneration. Taken together, our work demonstrates that Tregs in skin play a major role in HF biology by promoting the function of HFSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel regulatory function of sweet taste-sensing receptor in adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Yosuke; Nakagawa, Yuko; Ma, Jinhui; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Kurose, Hitoshi; Kojima, Itaru; Shibata, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Sweet taste receptor is expressed not only in taste buds but also in nongustatory organs such as enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic beta-cells, and may play more extensive physiological roles in energy metabolism. Here we examined the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in 3T3-L1 cells. In undifferentiated preadipocytes, both T1R2 and T1R3 were expressed very weakly, whereas the expression of T1R3 but not T1R2 was markedly up-regulated upon induction of differentiation (by 83.0 and 3.8-fold, respectively at Day 6). The α subunits of Gs (Gαs) and G14 (Gα14) but not gustducin were expressed throughout the differentiation process. The addition of sucralose or saccharin during the first 48 hours of differentiation considerably reduced the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα at Day 2, the expression of aP2 at Day 4 and triglyceride accumulation at Day 6. These anti-adipogenic effects were attenuated by short hairpin RNA-mediated gene-silencing of T1R3. In addition, overexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of Gαs but not YM-254890, an inhibitor of Gα14, impeded the effects of sweeteners, suggesting a possible coupling of Gs with the putative sweet taste-sensing receptor. In agreement, sucralose and saccharin increased the cyclic AMP concentration in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells and also in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing T1R3. Furthermore, the anti-adipogenic effects of sweeteners were mimicked by Gs activation with cholera toxin but not by adenylate cyclase activation with forskolin, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Gαs had the opposite effects. 3T3-L1 cells express a functional sweet taste-sensing receptor presumably as a T1R3 homomer, which mediates the anti-adipogenic signal by a Gs-dependent but cAMP-independent mechanism.

  6. A Novel Regulatory Function of Sweet Taste-Sensing Receptor in Adipogenic Differentiation of 3T3-L1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Yosuke; Nakagawa, Yuko; Ma, Jinhui; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Kurose, Hitoshi; Kojima, Itaru; Shibata, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Sweet taste receptor is expressed not only in taste buds but also in nongustatory organs such as enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic beta-cells, and may play more extensive physiological roles in energy metabolism. Here we examined the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in 3T3-L1 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In undifferentiated preadipocytes, both T1R2 and T1R3 were expressed very weakly, whereas the expression of T1R3 but not T1R2 was markedly up-regulated upon induction of differentiation (by 83.0 and 3.8-fold, respectively at Day 6). The α subunits of Gs (Gαs) and G14 (Gα14) but not gustducin were expressed throughout the differentiation process. The addition of sucralose or saccharin during the first 48 hours of differentiation considerably reduced the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα at Day 2, the expression of aP2 at Day 4 and triglyceride accumulation at Day 6. These anti-adipogenic effects were attenuated by short hairpin RNA-mediated gene-silencing of T1R3. In addition, overexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of Gαs but not YM-254890, an inhibitor of Gα14, impeded the effects of sweeteners, suggesting a possible coupling of Gs with the putative sweet taste-sensing receptor. In agreement, sucralose and saccharin increased the cyclic AMP concentration in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells and also in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing T1R3. Furthermore, the anti-adipogenic effects of sweeteners were mimicked by Gs activation with cholera toxin but not by adenylate cyclase activation with forskolin, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Gαs had the opposite effects. Conclusions 3T3-L1 cells express a functional sweet taste-sensing receptor presumably as a T1R3 homomer, which mediates the anti-adipogenic signal by a Gs-dependent but cAMP-independent mechanism. PMID:23336004

  7. Treatment with IP-10 induces host-protective immune response by regulating the T regulatory cell functioning in Leishmania donovani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Majumdar, Saikat; Adhikari, Anupam; Bhattacharya, Parna; Mukherjee, Asok Kumar; Majumdar, Suchandra Bhattacharyya; Majumdar, Subrata

    2011-11-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by the protozoan parasite, Leishmania donovani, is characterized by an infection in the liver and spleen. The failure of the first-line drugs has led to the development of new strategies for combating VL. Recently, our group has shown that interferon-γ-inducible protein (IP)-10, a CXC chemokine, renders protection against VL. In the present study, we have elucidated the mechanism by which IP-10 renders protection in in vivo L. donovani infection. We observed that IP-10-treated parasitized BALB/c mice showed a strong host-protective T helper cell (Th) 1 immune response along with marked decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines, tumor growth factor (TGF)-β, and interleukin (IL)-10 secreting CD4(+) T cells. This IP-10-mediated decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines was correlated with the reduction in the elevated frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells along with the reduced TFG-β production from these Treg cells in Leishmania-infected mice. This reduction in TGF-β production was due to effective modulation of TGF-β signaling by IP-10, which reduced the immunosuppressive activity of Treg cells. Thus, these findings put forward a detailed mechanistic insight into IP-10-mediated regulation of the Treg cell functioning during experimental VL, which might be helpful in combating Leishmania-induced pathogenesis.

  8. Regulatory T cells: history and perspective.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    Despite the skepticism that once prevailed among immunologists, it is now widely accepted that the normal immune system harbors a T-cell population, called regulatory T cells (Treg cells), specialized for immune suppression. It was first shown that depletion of a T-cell subpopulation from normal rodents produced autoimmune disease. Search for a molecular marker specific for such autoimmune-preventive Treg cells has revealed that the majority, if not all, of them constitutively express the CD25 molecule as depletion of CD25(+)CD4(+) T cells spontaneously evokes autoimmune disease in otherwise normal rodents. The expression of CD25 by Treg cells has made it possible to delineate their developmental pathways, in particular their thymic development, and establish simple in vitro assay for assessing their suppressive activity. The marker and the in vitro assay have helped to identify human Treg cells with similar functional and phenotypic characteristics. Recent efforts have shown that natural Treg cells specifically express the transcription factor Foxp3 and that mutations of the Foxp3 gene produce a variety of immunological diseases in humans and rodents. Specific expression of Foxp3 in natural Treg cells has enabled their functional and developmental characterization by genetic approach. These studies altogether have provided firm evidence for Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+) Treg cells as an indispensable cellular constituent of the normal immune system for establishing and maintaining immunologic self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Treg cells are now within the scope of clinical use to treat immunological diseases and control physiological and pathological immune responses.

  9. Regulatory T cells: present facts and future hopes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christian; Stoll, Sabine; Bopp, Tobias; Schmitt, Edgar; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2006-09-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and several subsets of induced suppressor T cells are key players of the immune tolerance network and control the induction and effector phase of our immunological defense system. These T cell populations actively control the properties of other immune cells by suppressing their functional activity to prevent autoimmunity and transplant rejection but also influence the immune response to allergens as well as against tumor cells and pathogens. Even though we are far from completely understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that manage the different regulatory T cell populations, increasing evidence exists about their functional importance. The knowledge on their induction and activation opens the possibility for their selective manipulation in vivo as an attractive approach for an immunotherapy of unwanted immune responses. This review summarizes this knowledge and discusses the potential of regulatory T cells for novel immunointervention strategies in the future.

  10. Regulatory T cells in experimental autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Fritzsching, Benedikt

    2006-08-01

    During the past 10 years, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) have been extensively studied for their function in autoimmune disease. This review summarizes the evidence for a role of Treg in suppression of innate and adaptive immune responses in experimental models of autoimmunity including arthritis, colitis, diabetes, autoimmune encephalomyelitis, lupus, gastritis, oophoritis, prostatitis, and thyroiditis. Antigen-specific activation of Treg, but antigen-independent suppressive function, emerges as a common paradigm derived from several disease models. Treg suppress conventional T cells (Tcon) by direct cell contact in vitro. However, downmodulation of dendritic cell function and secretion of inhibitory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta might underlie Treg function in vivo. The final outcome of autoimmunity vs tolerance depends on the balance between stimulatory signals (Toll-like receptor engagement, costimulation, and antigen dose) and inhibitory signals from Treg. Whereas most experimental settings analyze the capacity of Treg to prevent onset of autoimmune disease, more recent efforts indicate successful treatment of ongoing disease. Thus, Treg are on the verge of moving from experimental animal models into clinical applications in humans.

  11. Ribavirin exerts differential effects on functions of Cd4+ Th1, Th2, and regulatory T cell clones in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Bettina; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Arndt, Simone; Braunschweiger, Ingrid; Nattermann, Jacob; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Ribavirin improves outcomes of therapy in chronic hepatitis C but its mode of action has still remained unclear. Since ribavirin has been proposed to modulate the host's T cell responses, we studied its direct effects on CD4(+) T cell clones with diverse functional polarization which had been generated from patients with chronic hepatitis C. We analysed in vitro proliferation ([(3)H] thymidine uptake) and cytokine responses (IL-10, IFN-gamma) at varying concentrations of ribavirin (0-10 µg/ml) in 8, 9 and 7 CD4(+) TH1, TH2 and regulatory T cell (Treg) clones, respectively. In co-culture experiments, we further determined effects of ribarivin on inhibition of TH1 and TH2 effector cells by Treg clones. All clones had been generated from peripheral blood of patients with chronic hepatitis C in the presence of HCV core protein. Ribavirin enhanced proliferation of T effector cells and increased production of IFN-gamma in TH1 clones, but had only little effect on IL-10 secretion in TH2 clones. However, ribavirin markedly inhibited IL-10 release in Treg clones in a dose dependent fashion. These Treg clones suppressed proliferation of T effector clones by their IL-10 secretion, and in co-culture assays ribavirin reversed Treg-mediated suppression of T effector cells. Our in vitro data suggest that--in addition to its immunostimulatory effects on TH1 cells--ribavirin can inhibit functions of HCV-specific Tregs and thus reverses Treg-mediated suppression of T effector cells in chronic hepatitis C.

  12. Functional Characterization of Rpn3 Uncovers a Distinct 19S Proteasomal Subunit Requirement for Ubiquitin-Dependent Proteolysis of Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Eric; Reed, Steven I.

    1999-01-01

    By selectively eliminating ubiquitin-conjugated proteins, the 26S proteasome plays a pivotal role in a large variety of cellular regulatory processes, particularly in the control of cell cycle transitions. Access of ubiquitinated substrates to the inner catalytic chamber within the 20S core particle is mediated by the 19S regulatory particle (RP), whose subunit composition in budding yeast has been recently elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the cell cycle defects resulting from conditional inactivation of one of these RP components, the essential non-ATPase Rpn3/Sun2 subunit. Using temperature-sensitive mutant alleles, we show that rpn3 mutations do not prevent the G1/S transition but cause a metaphase arrest, indicating that the essential Rpn3 function is limiting for mitosis. rpn3 mutants appear severely compromised in the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of several physiologically important proteasome substrates. Thus, RPN3 function is required for the degradation of the G1-phase cyclin Cln2 targeted by SCF; the S-phase cyclin Clb5, whose ubiquitination is likely to involve a combination of E3 (ubiquitin protein ligase) enzymes; and anaphase-promoting complex targets, such as the B-type cyclin Clb2 and the anaphase inhibitor Pds1. Our results indicate that the Pds1 degradation defect of the rpn3 mutants most likely accounts for the metaphase arrest phenotype observed. Surprisingly, but consistent with the lack of a G1 arrest phenotype in thermosensitive rpn3 strains, the Cdk inhibitor Sic1 exhibits a short half-life regardless of the RPN3 genotype. In striking contrast, Sic1 turnover is severely impaired by a temperature-sensitive mutation in RPN12/NIN1, encoding another essential RP subunit. While other interpretations are possible, these data strongly argue for the requirement of distinct RP subunits for efficient proteolysis of specific cell cycle regulators. The potential implications of these data are discussed in the context of possible Rpn3

  13. Cord blood CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells fail to inhibit cord blood NK cell functions due to insufficient production and expression of TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liqing; Tanaka, Shigeki; Bonno, Motoki; Ido, Masaru; Kawai, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Hatsumi; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2014-07-01

    Although CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg (Treg) cells are known to modulate NK cell functions, the modulation mechanism of these cells in cord blood has not been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanism whereby cord blood Treg cells modulate cord NK cells. By performing various cultures of purified NK cells with or without autologous Treg cells, diminished inhibitory effects of cord Treg cells towards cord NK cell functions, including activation, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity, were observed. We also observed lower secretion of sTGF-beta1 and lower expression of mTGF-beta1 by cord Treg cells than by adult Treg cells. These data revealed the capability of adult Treg cells to suppress rhIL-2-stimulated NK cell function by TGF-beta1, both membrane-bound and soluble types. The reduced inhibitory capabilities of cord Treg cells compared with adult Treg cells is thought to be due to insufficient expression of TGF-beta1.

  14. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Enhances the Suppressive Function of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Mainly through Axl Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang-ju; Zheng, Jia-yi; Bian, Jia-lan; Chen, Long-wang; Dong, Ning; Yu, Yan; Hong, Guang-liang; Chandoo, Arvine

    2017-01-01

    Background. Growth arrest-specific (Gas) 6 is one of the endogenous ligands of TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk), and its role as an immune modulator has been recently emphasized. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for the active suppression of autoimmunity. The present study was designed to investigate whether Tregs express TAM receptors and the potential role of Gas6-TAM signal in regulating the suppressive function of Tregs. Methods. The protein and mRNA levels of TAM receptors were determined by using Western blot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR. Then, TAM receptors were silenced using targeted siRNA or blocked with specific antibody. The suppressive function of Tregs was assessed by using a CFSE-based T cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of Foxp3 and CTLA4 whereas cytokines secretion levels were measured by ELISA assay. Results. Tregs express both Axl and Mertk receptors. Gas6 increases the suppressive function of Tregs in vitro and in mice. Both Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression on Tregs are enhanced after Gas6 stimulation. Gas6 enhances the suppressive activity of Tregs mainly through Axl receptor. Conclusion. Gas6 has a direct effect on the functions of CD4+CD25+Tregs mainly through its interaction with Axl receptor. PMID:28270700

  15. DR3 signaling modulates the function of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and the severity of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nishikii, Hidekazu; Kim, Byung-Su; Yokoyama, Yasuhisa; Chen, Yan; Baker, Jeanette; Pierini, Antonio; Alvarez, Maite; Mavers, Melissa; Maas-Bauer, Kristina; Pan, Yuqiong; Chiba, Shigeru; Negrin, Robert S

    2016-12-15

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subpopulation of T cells, which regulate the immune system and enhance immune tolerance after transplantation. Donor-derived Treg prevent the development of lethal acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in murine models of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a single treatment of the agonistic antibody to DR3 (death receptor 3, αDR3) to donor mice resulted in the expansion of donor-derived Treg and prevented acute GVHD, although the precise role of DR3 signaling in GVHD has not been elucidated. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the immunophenotype of Treg after DR3 signal activation, demonstrating that DR3-activated Treg (DR3-Treg) had an activated/mature phenotype. Furthermore, the CD25(+)Foxp3(+) subpopulation in DR3-Treg showed stronger suppressive effects in vivo. Prophylactic treatment of αDR3 to recipient mice expanded recipient-derived Treg and reduced the severity of GVHD, whereas DR3 activation in mice with ongoing GVHD further promoted donor T-cell activation/proliferation. These data suggest that the function of DR3 signaling was highly dependent on the activation status of the T cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that DR3 signaling affects the function of Treg and T-cell activation after alloantigen exposure in a time-dependent manner. These observations provide important information for future clinical testing using human DR3 signal modulation and highlight the critical effect of the state of T-cell activation on clinical outcomes after activation of DR3. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Resveratrol preserves mitochondrial function, stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, and attenuates oxidative stress in regulatory T cells of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Jin; Ma, Yuhua; Wu, Guirong; Tian, Yingjie; Shi, Yonghui; Le, Guowei

    2014-09-01

    Consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) is related with increased oxidative stress and dysfunctional mitochondria in many organs. The effects of resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) that can protect T lymphocytes in various disease conditions on the HFD-induced apoptosis of CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low/-) regulatory T cells (Tregs) were studied, and the possible mechanism was postulated. Resveratrol significantly decreased Tregs death induced by 20-wk HFD, being associated with the reduction of reactive oxygen species production and the alleviation of HFD-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in Tregs. Furthermore, resveratrol increased the expression of factors that regulated mitochondrial biogenesis in Tregs. Finally, resveratrol recovered the HFD-induced activation of apoptotic markers in Tregs. Resveratrol protected Tregs against HFD-induced apoptosis by reducing oxidative stress, restoring mitochondrial functional activities, and stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. The Spatiotemporal Pattern of Glis3 Expression Indicates a Regulatory Function in Bipotent and Endocrine Progenitors during Early Pancreatic Development and in Beta, PP and Ductal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hong Soon; Takeda, Yukimasa; Jeon, Kilsoo

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Glis-similar 3 (Glis3) has been implicated in the development of neonatal, type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined the spatiotemporal expression of Glis3 protein during embryonic and neonatal pancreas development as well as its function in PP cells. To obtain greater insights into the functions of Glis3 in pancreas development, we examined the spatiotemporal expression of Glis3 protein in a knockin mouse strain expressing a Glis3-EGFP fusion protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that Glis3-EGFP was not detectable during early pancreatic development (E11.5 and E12.5) and at E13.5 and 15.5 was not expressed in Ptf1a+ cells in the tip domains indicating that Glis3 is not expressed in multipotent pancreatic progenitors. Glis3 was first detectable at E13.5 in the nucleus of bipotent progenitors in the trunk domains, where it co-localized with Sox9, Hnf6, and Pdx1. It remained expressed in preductal and Ngn3+ endocrine progenitors and at later stages becomes restricted to the nucleus of pancreatic beta and PP cells as well as ductal cells. Glis3-deficiency greatly reduced, whereas exogenous Glis3, induced Ppy expression, as reported for insulin. Collectively, our study demonstrates that Glis3 protein exhibits a temporal and cell type-specific pattern of expression during embryonic and neonatal pancreas development that is consistent with a regulatory role for Glis3 in promoting endocrine progenitor generation, regulating insulin and Ppy expression in beta and PP cells, respectively, and duct morphogenesis. PMID:27270601

  19. Engineered regulatory T cells coexpressing MHC class II:peptide complexes are efficient inhibitors of autoimmune T cell function and prevent the development of autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhaohui; Latham, Kary A; Whittington, Karen B; Miller, David C; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F

    2013-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical homeostatic components in preventing the development of autoimmunity, and are a major focus for their therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases. To enhance the efficacy of Tregs in adoptive therapy, we developed a strategy for generating engineered Tregs that have the capacity to target autoimmune T cells in an Ag-specific manner. Using a retroviral expression system encoding Foxp3 and HLA-DR1 covalently linked to the immunodominant peptide of the autoantigen type II collagen (DR1-CII), naive T cells were engineered to become Tregs that express DR1-CII complexes on their surface. When these cells were tested for their ability to prevent the development of collagen induced arthritis, both the engineered DR1-CII-Foxp3 and Foxp3 only Tregs significantly reduced the severity and incidence of disease. However, the mechanism by which these two populations of Tregs inhibited disease differed significantly. Disease inhibition by the DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs was accompanied by significantly lower numbers of autoimmune CII-specific T cells in vivo and lower levels of autoantibodies in comparison with engineered Tregs expressing Foxp3 alone. In addition, the numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-17-expressing T cells in mice treated with DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs were also significantly reduced in comparison with mice treated with Foxp3 engineered Tregs or vector control cells. These data indicate that the coexpression of class II autoantigen-peptide complexes on Tregs provides these cells with a distinct capacity to regulate autoimmune T cell responses that differs from that used by conventional Tregs.

  20. Histone Deacetylases 6 and 9 and Sirtuin-1 Control Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Function Through Shared and Isotype-Specific Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Ulf H.; Wang, Liqing; Han, Rongxiang; Akimova, Tatiana; Liu, Yujie; Hancock, Wayne W.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of histone/protein deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), HDAC9, or the sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) augments the suppressive functions of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that contain the transcription factor Foxp3. However, it is unclear whether distinct mechanisms are involved or whether combined inhibition of these targets would be more beneficial. We compared the suppressive functions of Tregs from wild-type C57BL/6 mice with those from mice with either global (HDAC6−/−, HDAC9−/−, and HDAC6−/−HDAC9−/−), or conditional (fl-Sirt1/CD4-Cre or fl-Sirt1/Foxp3-Cre) HDAC deletion, as well as treatment with isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors. We found that the heat shock response was important for the improvement of Treg suppressive function mediated by HDAC6 inhibition, but not Sirt1 inhibition. Furthermore, although HDAC6, HDAC9, and Sirt1 all deacetylated Foxp3, each protein had diverse effects on transcription factors controlling Foxp3 gene expression. For example, loss of HDAC9 was associated with stabilization of the acetylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and of its transcriptional activity. Hence, targeting different HDACs increased Treg function by multiple and additive mechanisms, which indicates the therapeutic potential for combinations of HDAC inhibitors in the management of autoimmunity and organ transplantation. PMID:22715468

  1. Generation of regulatory dendritic cells after treatment with paeoniflorin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yingxi; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Keqiu; Jing, Yaqing; He, Jinghua; Qiang, Zhaoyan; Tong, Jingzhi; Sun, Ke; Ding, Wen; Kang, Yi; Li, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory dendritic cells are a potential therapeutic tool for assessing a variety of immune overreaction diseases. Paeoniflorin, a bioactive glucoside extracted from the Chinese herb white paeony root, has been shown to be effective at inhibiting the maturation and immunostimulatory function of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. However, whether paeoniflorin can program conventional dendritic cells toward regulatory dendritic cells and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. Here, our study demonstrates that paeoniflorin can induce the production of regulatory dendritic cells from human peripheral blood monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not from mature dendritic cells, thereby demonstrating the potential of paeoniflorin as a specific immunosuppressive drug with fewer complications and side effects. These regulatory dendritic cells treated with paeoniflorin exhibited high CD11b/c and low CD80, CD86 and CD40 expression levels as well as enhanced abilities to capture antigen and promote the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and reduced abilities to migrate and promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, which is associated with the upregulation of endogenous transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-mediated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression. Collectively, paeoniflorin could program immature dendritic cells (imDCs) and imDCs stimulated with LPS toward a regulatory DC fate by upregulating the endogenous TGF-β-mediated IDO expression level, thereby demonstrating its potential as a specific immunosuppressive drug.

  2. Soluble OX40L and JAG1 Induce Selective Proliferation of Functional Regulatory T-Cells Independent of canonical TCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prabhakaran; Alharshawi, Khaled; Bhattacharya, Palash; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Haddad, Christine; Sun, Zuoming; Chiba, Shigeru; Epstein, Alan L.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in maintaining peripheral tolerance. Increasing Treg numbers/functions has been shown to ameliorate autoimmune diseases. However, common Treg expansion approaches use T-Cell Receptor (TCR)-mediated stimulation which also causes proliferation of effector T-cells (Teff). To overcome this limitation, purified patient-specific Tregs are expanded ex vivo and transfused. Although promising, this approach is not suitable for routine clinical use. Therefore, an alternative approach to selectively expand functional Tregs in vivo is highly desired. We report a novel TCR-independent strategy for the selective proliferation of Foxp3+Tregs (without Teff proliferation), by co-culturing CD4+ T-cells with OX40 L+Jagged(JAG)-1+ bone marrow-derived DCs differentiated with GM-CSF or treating them with soluble OX40 L and JAG1 in the presence of exogenous IL-2. Tregs expanded using soluble OX40 L and JAG1 were of suppressive phenotype and delayed the onset of diabetes in NOD mice. Ligation of OX40 L and JAG1 with their cognate-receptors OX40 and Notch3, preferentially expressed on Tregs but not on Teff cells, was required for selective Treg proliferation. Soluble OX40L-JAG1-induced NF-κB activation as well as IL-2-induced STAT5 activation were essential for the proliferation of Tregs with sustained Foxp3 expression. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the utility of soluble OX40 L and JAG1 to induce TCR-independent Treg proliferation. PMID:28045060

  3. Invariant and Noninvariant Natural Killer T Cells Exert Opposite Regulatory Functions on the Immune Response during Murine Schistosomiasis▿

    PubMed Central

    Mallevaey, Thierry; Fontaine, Josette; Breuilh, Laetitia; Paget, Christophe; Castro-Keller, Alexandre; Vendeville, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Trottein, François; Faveeuw, Christelle

    2007-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells represent a heterogeneous population of innate memory immune cells expressing both NK and T-cell markers distributed into two major subsets, i.e., invariant NKT (iNKT) cells, which express exclusively an invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) α chain (Vα14Jα18 in mice), and non-iNKT cells, which express more diverse TCRs. NKT cells quickly produce Th1- and/or Th2-type cytokines following stimulation with glycolipid antigen (Ag) and, through this property, play potent immunoregulatory roles in autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infection. No study has addressed the role of NKT cells in metazoan parasite infections so far. We show that during murine schistosomiasis, the apparent frequency of both iNKT cells and non-iNKT cells decreased in the spleen as early as 3 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and that both populations expressed a greater amount of the activation marker CD69 at 6 weeks p.i., suggesting an activated phenotype. Two different NKT-cell-deficient mouse models, namely, TCR Jα18−/− (exclusively deficient in iNKT cells) and CD1d−/− (deficient in both iNKT and non-iNKT cells) mice, were used to explore the implication of these subsets in infection. We show that whereas both iNKT and non-iNKT cells do not have a major impact on the immune response during the early phase (1 and 4 weeks) of infection, they exert important, although opposite, effects on the immune response during the acute phase of the disease (7 and 12 weeks), after schistosome egg production. Indeed, iNKT cells contribute to Th1 cell differentiation whereas non-iNKT cells might be mostly implicated in Th2 cell differentiation in response to parasite Ag. Our findings suggest, for the first time, that helminths activate both iNKT and non-iNKT cells in vivo, enabling them to differentially influence the Th1/Th2 balance of the immune response. PMID:17353286

  4. Regulatory B cell frequency correlates with markers of HIV disease progression and attenuates anti-HIV CD8⁺ T cell function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Stapleton, Jack T; Martinson, Jeffrey; Keshavarzian, Ali; Kazmi, Nazia; Demarais, Patricia M; French, Audrey L; Landay, Alan

    2013-05-01

    HIV infection is associated with elevated expression of IL-10 and PD-L1, contributing to impairment of T cell effector functions. In autoimmunity, tumor immunology, and some viral infections, Bregs modulate T cell function via IL-10 production. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that during HIV infection, Bregs attenuate CD8(+) T cell effector function, contributing to immune dysfunction. We determined that in vitro, TLR2-, TLR9-, and CD40L-costimulated Bregs from HIV(-) individuals exhibited a high frequency of cells expressing IL-10 and PD-L1. Compared with Bregs from HIV(-) individuals, a significantly higher percentage of Bregs from HIV(+) individuals spontaneously expressed IL-10 (P=0.0218). After in vitro stimulation with HIV peptides, Breg-depleted PBMCs from HIV(+) individuals exhibited a heightened frequency of cytotoxic (CD107a(+); P=0.0171) and HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with total PBMCs. Furthermore, Breg depletion led to enhanced proliferation of total CD8(+) and CD107a(+)CD8(+) T cells (P=0.0280, and P=0.0102, respectively). In addition, augmented CD8(+) T cell effector function in vitro was reflected in a 67% increased clearance of infected CD4(+) T cells. The observed Breg suppression of CD8(+) T cell proliferation was IL-10-dependent. In HIV(+) individuals, Breg frequency correlated positively with viral load (r=0.4324; P=0.0095), immune activation (r=0.5978; P=0.0005), and CD8(+) T cell exhaustion (CD8(+)PD-1(+); r=0.5893; P=0.0101). Finally, the frequency of PD-L1-expressing Bregs correlated positively with CD8(+)PD-1(+) T cells (r=0.4791; P=0.0443). Our data indicate that Bregs contribute to HIV-infection associated immune dysfunction by T cell impairment, via IL-10 and possibly PD-L1 expression.

  5. CD25 signaling regulates the function and stability of peripheral Foxp3+ regulatory T cells derived from the spleen and lymph nodes of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunpeng; Gu, Jian; Ni, Xuhao; Ding, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Haoming; Zheng, SongGuo; Li, Bin; Lu, Ling

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in sustaining immune tolerance and maintaining immune balance to alloantigen after transplatation. However, the functions of peripheral Tregs in different organs have not been fully characterized. Here, we showed that spleen-derived Tregs exhibited higher expression of Foxp3, greater suppressive capacity, and lower levels of IL-17A secretion than lymph node-derived Tregs in vitro in the presence or absence of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. We found a higher percentage of CD25(bright) Tregs among spleen-derived Tregs than among lymph node-derived Tregs. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that adoptive transfer of spleen-derived Tregs, but not lymph node-derived Tregs, alleviated ischemia-reperfusion injury. These results reveal novel functions of Tregs derived from peripheral organs. In particular, spleen-derived Tregs, primarily consisting of CD25(bright) cells, may provide a more significant contribution to the suppression of immune-mediated autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  6. Higher frequencies of GARP(+)CTLA-4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in hepatocellular carcinoma patients are associated with impaired T-cell functionality.

    PubMed

    Kalathil, Suresh; Lugade, Amit A; Miller, Austin; Iyer, Renuka; Thanavala, Yasmin

    2013-04-15

    The extent to which T-cell-mediated immune surveillance is impaired in human cancer remains a question of major importance, given its potential impact on the development of generalized treatments of advanced disease where the highest degree of heterogeneity exists. Here, we report the first global analysis of immune dysfunction in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using multi-parameter fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, we quantified the cumulative frequency of regulatory T cells (Treg), exhausted CD4(+) helper T cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) to gain concurrent views on the overall level of immune dysfunction in these inoperable patients. We documented augmented numbers of Tregs, MDSC, PD-1(+)-exhausted T cells, and increased levels of immunosuppressive cytokines in patients with HCC, compared with normal controls, revealing a network of potential mechanisms of immune dysregulation in patients with HCC. In dampening T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity, we hypothesized that these processes may facilitate HCC progression and thwart the efficacy of immunotherapeutic interventions. In testing this hypothesis, we showed that combined regimens to deplete Tregs, MDSC, and PD-1(+) T cells in patients with advanced HCC restored production of granzyme B by CD8(+) T cells, reaching levels observed in normal controls and also modestly increased the number of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cells. These clinical findings encourage efforts to restore T-cell function in patients with advanced stage disease by highlighting combined approaches to deplete endogenous suppressor cell populations that can also expand effector T-cell populations.

  7. Regulatory T cells - a brief history and perspective.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shimon; Wing, Kajsa; Miyara, Makoto

    2007-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that the normal immune system harbors a regulatory T-cell population specialized for immune suppression. It was found initially that some CD4(+) T cells in normal animals were capable of suppressing autoimmunity. Characterization of this autoimmune-suppressive CD4(+) T cell population revealed that they constitutively expressed the CD25 molecule, which made it possible to distinguish them from other T cells, delineate their developmental pathways, in particular their thymic development, and characterize their potent in vivo and in vitro immunosuppressive activity. The marker also helped to identify human regulatory T cells with similar functional and phenotypic characteristics. Recent studies have shown that CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells specifically express the transcription factor Foxp3. Genetic anomaly of Foxp3 causes autoimmune and inflammatory disease in rodents and humans through affecting the development and function of CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells. These findings at the cellular and molecular levels altogether provide firm evidence for Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells as an indispensable cellular constituent of the normal immune system and for their crucial roles in establishing and maintaining immunologic self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. They can be exploited for clinical use to treat immunological diseases and control physiological and pathological immune responses.

  8. The molecular makeup and function of regulatory and effector synapses.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Peter; Dornbach, Bastian; Gunzer, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    Physical interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) form the basis of any specific immune response. Upon cognate contacts, a multimolecular assembly of receptors and adhesion molecules on both cells is created, termed the immunological synapse (IS). Very diverse structures of ISs have been described, yet the functional importance for T-cell differentiation is largely unclear. Here we discuss the principal structure and function of ISs. We then focus on two characteristic T-cell-APC pairs, namely T cells contacting dendritic cells (DCs) or naive B cells, for which extremely different patterns of the IS have been observed as well as fundamentally different effects on the function of the activated T cells. We provide a model on how differences in signaling and the involvement of adhesion molecules might lead to diverse interaction kinetics and, eventually, diverse T-cell differentiation. We hypothesize that the preferred activation of the adhesion molecule leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and of the negative regulator for T-cell activation, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), through contact with naive B cells, lead to prolonged cell-cell contacts and the generation of T cells with regulatory capacity. In contrast, DCs might have evolved mechanisms to avoid LFA-1 overactivation and CTLA-4 triggering, thereby promoting more dynamic contacts that lead to the preferential generation of effector cells.

  9. Exploring a regulatory role for mast cells: 'MCregs'?

    PubMed

    Frossi, Barbara; Gri, Giorgia; Tripodo, Claudio; Pucillo, Carlo

    2010-03-01

    Regulatory cells can mould the fate of the immune response by direct suppression of specific subsets of effector cells, or by redirecting effectors against invading pathogens and infected or neoplastic cells. These functions have been classically, although not exclusively, ascribed to different subsets of T cells. Recently, mast cells have been shown to regulate physiological and pathological immune responses, and thus to act at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity assuming different functions and behaviors at discrete stages of the immune response. Here, we focus on these poorly defined, and sometimes apparently conflicting, functions of mast cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Detailed map of a cis-regulatory input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Y.; Mayo, A. E.; Surette, M. G.; Alon, U.

    2003-06-01

    Most genes are regulated by multiple transcription factors that bind specific sites in DNA regulatory regions. These cis-regulatory regions perform a computation: the rate of transcription is a function of the active concentrations of each of the input transcription factors. Here, we used accurate gene expression measurements from living cell cultures, bearing GFP reporters, to map in detail the input function of the classic lacZYA operon of Escherichia coli, as a function of about a hundred combinations of its two inducers, cAMP and isopropyl -D-thiogalactoside (IPTG). We found an unexpectedly intricate function with four plateau levels and four thresholds. This result compares well with a mathematical model of the binding of the regulatory proteins cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and LacI to the lac regulatory region. The model is also used to demonstrate that with few mutations, the same region could encode much purer AND-like or even OR-like functions. This possibility means that the wild-type region is selected to perform an elaborate computation in setting the transcription rate. The present approach can be generally used to map the input functions of other genes.

  11. T-bet Expression by Foxp3+ T Regulatory Cells is Not Essential for Their Suppressive Function in CNS Autoimmune Disease or Colitis

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Rhoanne C.; Turner, Darryl G.; Mair, Iris; O’Connor, Richard A.; Anderton, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of T regulatory (Treg) cells within the central nervous system (CNS) during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is essential for the resolution of disease. CNS Treg cells have been shown to uniformly express the Th1-associated molecules, T-bet and CXCR3. Here, we report that the expression of T-bet is not required for the function of these Treg within the CNS. Using mice that lacked T-bet expression specifically within the Treg compartment, we demonstrate that there was no deficit in Treg recruitment into the CNS during EAE and no difference in the resolution of disease compared to control mice. T-bet deficiency did not impact on the in vitro suppressive capacity of Treg. Transfer of T-bet-deficient Treg was able to suppress clinical signs of either EAE or colitis. These observations demonstrate that, although Treg can acquire characteristics associated with pathogenic T effector cells, this process is not necessarily required for their suppressive capacity and the resolution of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:25741342

  12. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Economou, James S.; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Doerthe

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  13. Regulatory T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tower, Clare; Mathen, Stephy; Crocker, Ian; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects women of reproductive age. As clinical outcomes improve, pregnancy in these women is becoming more common. Although epidemiological data have documented an improvement in the prognosis of pregnancy in these women over recent years, they are still at significantly increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, pre-eclampsia and impaired foetal growth. The pathogenesis of SLE involves marked immune dysfunction, and in particular, the function of immunosuppressive elements of the immune system is impaired, including regulatory T-cell function. Because regulatory T cells are likely to be the key cell-modulating feto-maternal tolerance, this review overviews the possibility that regulatory T-cell impairments contribute to pregnancy pathology in women with SLE and contribute to the clinical challenge of managing these women during pregnancy.

  14. Regulation of murine lymphokine production in vivo. III. The lymphoid tissue microenvironment exerts regulatory influences over T helper cell function

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of murine T lymphocytes, isolated from various lymphoid organs of normal or antigen-primed donors, to produce IL-2 or IL-4 after activation with anti-CD3 or specific antigen. Our results established that T cells resident within lymphoid organs being drained by nonmucosal tissue sites (e.g., axillary, inguinal, brachial lymph nodes, or spleen) produced IL-2 as the predominant T cell growth factor (TCGF) after activation. Conversely, activated T cells from lymphoid organs being drained by mucosal tissues (Peyer's patches, and cervical, periaortic, and parathymic lymph nodes) produced IL-4 as the major species of TCGF. Analysis of the lymphoid tissues obtained from adoptive recipients of antigen-primed lymphocytes provided by syngeneic donors provided evidence that direct influences were being exerted on T cells during their residence within defined lymphoid compartments. These lymphoid tissue influences appeared to be responsible for altering the potential of resident T cells to produce distinct species of TCGF. Steroid hormones, known transcriptional enhancers and repressors of specific cellular genes, were implicated in the controlling mechanisms over TCGF production. Glucocorticoids (GCs) were found to exert a systemic effect on all recirculating T cells, evidenced by a marked dominance in IL-4 production by T cells obtained from all lymphoid organs of GC-treated mice, or after a direct exposure of normal lymphoid cells to GCs in vitro before cellular activation with T cell mitogens. Further, the androgen steroid DHEA appeared to be responsible for providing an epigenetic influence to T cells trafficking through peripheral lymphoid organs. This steroid influence resulted in an enhanced potential for IL-2 secretion after activation. Anatomic compartmentalization of the DHEA-facilitated influence appears to be mediated by differential levels of DHEA-sulfatase in lymphoid tissues. DHEA-sulfatase is an enzyme capable of converting DHEA

  15. The cis-regulatory code of Hox function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Sebastian; Ha, Nati; Polychronidou, Maria; Friedrich, Jana; Bezdan, Daniela; Kaspar, Petra; Schaefer, Martin H; Ossowski, Stephan; Henz, Stefan R; Mundorf, Juliane; Rätzer, Jenny; Papagiannouli, Fani; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Precise gene expression is a fundamental aspect of organismal function and depends on the combinatorial interplay of transcription factors (TFs) with cis-regulatory DNA elements. While much is known about TF function in general, our understanding of their cell type-specific activities is still poor. To address how widely expressed transcriptional regulators modulate downstream gene activity with high cellular specificity, we have identified binding regions for the Hox TF Deformed (Dfd) in the Drosophila genome. Our analysis of architectural features within Hox cis-regulatory response elements (HREs) shows that HRE structure is essential for cell type-specific gene expression. We also find that Dfd and Ultrabithorax (Ubx), another Hox TF specifying different morphological traits, interact with non-overlapping regions in vivo, despite their similar DNA binding preferences. While Dfd and Ubx HREs exhibit comparable design principles, their motif compositions and motif-pair associations are distinct, explaining the highly selective interaction of these Hox proteins with the regulatory environment. Thus, our results uncover the regulatory code imprinted in Hox enhancers and elucidate the mechanisms underlying functional specificity of TFs in vivo. PMID:22781127

  16. The cis-regulatory code of Hox function in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sorge, Sebastian; Ha, Nati; Polychronidou, Maria; Friedrich, Jana; Bezdan, Daniela; Kaspar, Petra; Schaefer, Martin H; Ossowski, Stephan; Henz, Stefan R; Mundorf, Juliane; Rätzer, Jenny; Papagiannouli, Fani; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2012-08-01

    Precise gene expression is a fundamental aspect of organismal function and depends on the combinatorial interplay of transcription factors (TFs) with cis-regulatory DNA elements. While much is known about TF function in general, our understanding of their cell type-specific activities is still poor. To address how widely expressed transcriptional regulators modulate downstream gene activity with high cellular specificity, we have identified binding regions for the Hox TF Deformed (Dfd) in the Drosophila genome. Our analysis of architectural features within Hox cis-regulatory response elements (HREs) shows that HRE structure is essential for cell type-specific gene expression. We also find that Dfd and Ultrabithorax (Ubx), another Hox TF specifying different morphological traits, interact with non-overlapping regions in vivo, despite their similar DNA binding preferences. While Dfd and Ubx HREs exhibit comparable design principles, their motif compositions and motif-pair associations are distinct, explaining the highly selective interaction of these Hox proteins with the regulatory environment. Thus, our results uncover the regulatory code imprinted in Hox enhancers and elucidate the mechanisms underlying functional specificity of TFs in vivo.

  17. Functional specializations of intestinal dendritic cell and macrophage subsets that control Th17 and regulatory T cell responses are dependent on the T cell/APC ratio, source of mouse strain, and regional localization.

    PubMed

    Denning, Timothy L; Norris, Brian A; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Geem, Duke; Madan, Rajat; Karp, Christopher L; Pulendran, Bali

    2011-07-15

    Although several subsets of intestinal APCs have been described, there has been no systematic evaluation of their phenotypes, functions, and regional localization to date. In this article, we used 10-color flow cytometry to define the major APC subsets in the small and large intestine lamina propria. Lamina propria APCs could be subdivided into CD11c(+)CD11b(-), CD11c(+)CD11b(+), and CD11c(dull)CD11b(+) subsets. CD11c(+)CD11b(-) cells were largely CD103(+)F4/80(-) dendritic cells (DCs), whereas the CD11c(+)CD11b(+) subset comprised CD11c(+)CD11b(+)CD103(+)F4/80(-) DCs and CD11c(+)CD11b(+)CD103(-)F4/80(+) macrophage-like cells. The majority of CD11c(dull)CD11b(+) cells were CD103(-)F4/80(+) macrophages. Although macrophages were more efficient at inducing Foxp3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells than DCs, at higher T cell/APC ratios, all of the DC subsets efficiently induced Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells. In contrast, only CD11c(+)CD11b(+)CD103(+) DCs efficiently induced Th17 cells. Consistent with this, the regional distribution of CD11c(+)CD11b(+)CD103(+) DCs correlated with that of Th17 cells, with duodenum > jejunum > ileum > colon. Conversely, CD11c(+)CD11b(-)CD103(+) DCs, macrophages, and Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells were most abundant in the colon and scarce in the duodenum. Importantly, however, the ability of DC and macrophage subsets to induce Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells versus Th17 cells was strikingly dependent on the source of the mouse strain. Thus, DCs from C57BL/6 mice from Charles River Laboratories (that have segmented filamentous bacteria, which induce robust levels of Th17 cells in situ) were more efficient at inducing Th17 cells and less efficient at inducing Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells than DCs from B6 mice from The Jackson Laboratory. Thus, the functional specializations of APC subsets in the intestine are dependent on the T cell/APC ratio, regional localization, and source of the mouse strain.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 Suppresses Antifungal Immunity by Inhibiting Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Function and Interleukin-17 Expression in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Patricia A.; Vithayathil, Paul J.; Janelsins, Brian M.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Williamson, Peter R.; Datta, Sandip K.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in mucosal host defense through production of the signature cytokines IL-17 and IL-22. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to enhance IL-17 production by mature Th17 cells. However, when present during Th17 differentiation, we found that PGE2 inhibited the transcription factor IRF4 and suppressed production of IL-17 but not IL-22. We show that IRF4 was required for IL-17 expression but inhibited IL-22 expression, highlighting the potential for discordant regulation of these two cytokines in Th17 cells. The pathogenic fungus, Cryptococcus neoformans, produces PGE2 and we found that it uses PGE2- and IRF4-dependent mechanisms to specifically inhibit induction of IL-17 during Th17 differentiation. Blockade of host PGE2 during infection led to increased IL-17 production from CD4+T cells and increased survival of mice. These findings suggest that host- or pathogen-derived PGE2 can act directly on Th17 cells during differentiation to inhibit IL-17-dependent anti-microbial responses. PMID:22464170

  19. Additive Functions in Boolean Models of Gene Regulatory Network Modules

    PubMed Central

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H.; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in Boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a Boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred Boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  20. Additive functions in boolean models of gene regulatory network modules.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  1. [Regulatory functions of Pax gene family in Drosophila development].

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Yang; Xue, Lei

    2010-02-01

    The Pax gene family encodes a group of important transcription factors that have been evolutionary conserved from Drosophila to human. Pax genes play pivotal roles in regulating diverse signal transduction pathways and organogenesis during embryonic development through modulating cell proliferation and self-renewal, embryonic precursor cell migration, and the coordination of specific differentiation programs. Ten members of the Pax gene family, which perform crucial regulatory functions during embryonic and postembryonic development, have been identified in Drosophila. In this report, we described the protein structures, expression patterns, and main functions of Drosophila Pax genes.

  2. Functional Islet-Specific Regulatory T Cells Can Be Generated from CD4+CD25− T cells of Healthy and Type 1 Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Long, S. Alice; Walker, Mindi R.; Rieck, Mary; James, Eddie; Kwok, William W.; Sanda, Srinath; Pihoker, Catherine; Greenbaum, Carla; Nepom, Gerald T; Buckner, Jane H

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells require TCR engagement for suppressive function, thus ensuring that suppression only occurs in the presence of specific antigens, however, to date no studies have addressed the function of self antigen-specific Treg in humans. These studies were designed to determine whether peripheral generation and function of islet antigen-specific adaptive Treg are defective in human subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Islet antigen-specific adaptive Treg were induced in vitro by activation of CD4+FOXP3− T cells with GAD and IGRP peptides in the context of T1D associated HLA-DRβ alleles. Antigen-specific Treg were characterized using flow cytometry for FOXP3 and class II tetramer (Tmr) and assessed for the ability to inhibit proliferation. These adaptive Treg were then compared to influenza-specific Treg from the same study population. The function of Tmr+ cells that expressed FOXP3 was similar for both influenza and islet antigens generated from control and T1D subjects. In fact, potency of suppression correlated with FOXP3 expression, not antigen specificity. Thus, these data suggest that development of functional adaptive Treg can occur in response to islet antigens and activation of islet-specific Treg may potentially be used as a targeted immunotherapy in T1D. PMID:19180473

  3. Human leukocyte antigen-G5 secretion by human mesenchymal stem cells is required to suppress T lymphocyte and natural killer function and to induce CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Selmani, Zohair; Naji, Abderrahim; Zidi, Ines; Favier, Benoit; Gaiffe, Emilie; Obert, Laurent; Borg, Christophe; Saas, Philippe; Tiberghien, Pierre; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Carosella, Edgardo D; Deschaseaux, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that are the subject of intense investigation in regenerative medicine. In addition, MSCs possess immunomodulatory properties with therapeutic potential to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Indeed, MSCs can inhibit natural killer (NK) function, modulate dendritic cell maturation, and suppress allogeneic T-cell response. Here, we report that the nonclassic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecule HLA-G is responsible for the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs. Our data show that MSCs secrete the soluble isoform HLA-G5 and that such secretion is interleukin-10-dependent. Moreover, cell contact between MSCs and allostimulated T cells is required to obtain a full HLA-G5 secretion and, as consequence, a full immunomodulation from MSCs. Blocking experiments using neutralizing anti-HLA-G antibody demonstrate that HLA-G5 contributes first to the suppression of allogeneic T-cell proliferation and then to the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in addition to their action on the adaptive immune system, MSCs, through HLA-G5, affect innate immunity by inhibiting both NK cell-mediated cytolysis and interferon-gamma secretion. Our results provide evidence that HLA-G5 secreted by MSCs is critical to the suppressive functions of MSCs and should contribute to improving clinical therapeutic trials that use MSCs to prevent GvHD.

  4. Conjugated Bilirubin Differentially Regulates CD4+ T Effector Cells and T Regulatory Cell Function through Outside-In and Inside-Out Mechanisms: The Effects of HAV Cell Surface Receptor and Intracellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Corral-Jara, Karla F.; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F.; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Roman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported an immune-modulatory role of conjugated bilirubin (CB) in hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. During this infection the immune response relies on CD4+ T lymphocytes (TLs) and it may be affected by the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor (HAVCR1/TIM-1) on T cell surface. How CB might affect T cell function during HAV infection remains to be elucidated. Herein, in vitro stimulation of CD4+ TLs from healthy donors with CB resulted in a decrease in the degree of intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation and an increase in the activity of T regulatory cells (Tregs) expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1. A comparison between CD4+ TLs from healthy donors and HAV-infected patients revealed changes in the TCR signaling pathway relative to changes in CB levels. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ TLs increased in patients with low CB serum levels and an increase in the percentage of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in HAV-infected patients relative to controls. A low frequency of 157insMTTTVP insertion in the viral receptor gene HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in patients and controls. Our data revealed that, during HAV infection, CB differentially regulates CD4+ TLs and Tregs functions by modulating intracellular pathways and by inducing changes in the proportion of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1. PMID:27578921

  5. Conjugated Bilirubin Differentially Regulates CD4+ T Effector Cells and T Regulatory Cell Function through Outside-In and Inside-Out Mechanisms: The Effects of HAV Cell Surface Receptor and Intracellular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Corral-Jara, Karla F; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Realpe, Mauricio; Panduro, Arturo; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported an immune-modulatory role of conjugated bilirubin (CB) in hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. During this infection the immune response relies on CD4+ T lymphocytes (TLs) and it may be affected by the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor (HAVCR1/TIM-1) on T cell surface. How CB might affect T cell function during HAV infection remains to be elucidated. Herein, in vitro stimulation of CD4+ TLs from healthy donors with CB resulted in a decrease in the degree of intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation and an increase in the activity of T regulatory cells (Tregs) expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1. A comparison between CD4+ TLs from healthy donors and HAV-infected patients revealed changes in the TCR signaling pathway relative to changes in CB levels. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ TLs increased in patients with low CB serum levels and an increase in the percentage of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in HAV-infected patients relative to controls. A low frequency of 157insMTTTVP insertion in the viral receptor gene HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in patients and controls. Our data revealed that, during HAV infection, CB differentially regulates CD4+ TLs and Tregs functions by modulating intracellular pathways and by inducing changes in the proportion of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1.

  6. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  7. Regulatory influence of germ cells on sertoli cell function in the pre-pubertal rat after acute irradiation of the testis.

    PubMed

    Guitton, N; Touzalin, A M; Sharpe, R M; Cheng, C Y; Pinon-Lataillade, G; Méritte, H; Chenal, C; Jégou, B

    2000-12-01

    While germ cell regulation of Sertoli cells has been extensively explored in adult rats in vivo, in contrast, very little is known about germ cell influence on Sertoli cell function at the time when spermatogenesis begins and develops. In the present study various Sertoli cell parameters (number, testicular androgen binding protein (ABP) and testin, serum inhibin-B and, indirectly, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)) were investigated after the exposure of 19-day-old rats to a low dose of 3 Grays of gamma-rays. Differentiated spermatogonia were the primary testicular targets of the gamma-rays, which resulted in progressive maturation depletion, sequentially and reversibly affecting all germ cell classes. Testicular weight declined to a nadir when pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids were depleted from the seminiferous epithelium and complete or near complete recovery of spermatogenesis and testicular weight was observed at the end of the experiment. Blood levels of FSH and ABP were normal during the first 11 days after irradiation, when spermatogonia and early spermatocytes were depleted. While the number of Sertoli cells was not significantly affected by the irradiation, from days 11-66 after gamma-irradiation, ABP production declined and FSH levels increased when pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids were depleted and the recovery of these parameters was only observed when spermatogenesis was fully restored. Comparison of the pattern of change in serum levels of inhibin-B and testicular levels of testin and of germ cell numbers strongly suggest a relationship between the disappearance of spermatocytes and spermatids from the seminiferous epithelium and the decrease in levels of inhibin-B and increase in levels of testin from 7 to 36 days post-irradiation. Levels of testin and inhibin-B were restored before spermatogenesis had totally returned to normal. In conclusion, this in vivo study shows that pre-pubertal Sertoli cell function is under the complex control

  8. T Regulatory Cells and Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gorantla, Vijay S.; Schneeberger, Stefan; Brandacher, Gerald; Sucher, Robert; Zhang, Dong; Lee, Andrew; Zheng, Xin Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Despite the development of successful immunosuppression protocols and tremendous improvement in short-term graft survival rates, the problem of chronic graft loss remains the bane of clinical transplantation. The induction and maintenance of transplantation tolerance is the “Holy grail” of transplantation. The recent identification and characterization of regulatory T cells (T regs) has opened up exciting opportunities for tolerance induction, immunotherapy and immunomodulation in transplantation. This review focuses on current understanding of regulatory T cells and their role in transplantation tolerance. PMID:20541385

  9. Interleukin 10 acts on regulatory T cells to maintain expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 and suppressive function in mice with colitis.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masako; Turovskaya, Olga; Kim, Gisen; Madan, Rajat; Karp, Christopher L; Cheroutre, Hilde; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 suppress the activity of other cells. Here we show that interleukin 10 (IL-10) produced by CD11b(+) myeloid cells in recombination-activating gene 1-deficient (Rag1(-/-)) recipient mice was needed to prevent the colitis induced by transferred CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells. In Il10(-/-)Rag1(-/-) mice, T(reg) cells failed to maintain Foxp3 expression and regulatory activity. The loss of Foxp3 expression occurred only in recipients with colitis, which indicates that the requirement for IL-10 is manifested in the presence of inflammation. IL-10 receptor-deficient (Il10rb(-/-)) T(reg) cells also failed to maintain Foxp3 expression, which suggested that host IL-10 acted directly on the T(reg) cells. Our data indicate that IL-10 released from myeloid cells acts in a paracrine manner on T(reg) cells to maintain Foxp3 expression.

  10. The pioneer factor OCT4 requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1 to support gene regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    King, Hamish W; Klose, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Pioneer transcription factors recognise and bind their target sequences in inaccessible chromatin to establish new transcriptional networks throughout development and cellular reprogramming. During this process, pioneer factors establish an accessible chromatin state to facilitate additional transcription factor binding, yet it remains unclear how different pioneer factors achieve this. Here, we discover that the pluripotency-associated pioneer factor OCT4 binds chromatin to shape accessibility, transcription factor co-binding, and regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells. Chromatin accessibility at OCT4-bound sites requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1, which is recruited to these sites by OCT4 to support additional transcription factor binding and expression of the pluripotency-associated transcriptome. Furthermore, the requirement for BRG1 in shaping OCT4 binding reflects how these target sites are used during cellular reprogramming and early mouse development. Together this reveals a distinct requirement for a chromatin remodeller in promoting the activity of the pioneer factor OCT4 and regulating the pluripotency network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22631.001 PMID:28287392

  11. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  12. Abatacept (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4-immunoglobulin) improves B cell function and regulatory T cell inhibitory capacity in rheumatoid arthritis patients non-responding to anti-tumour necrosis factor-α agents.

    PubMed

    Picchianti Diamanti, A; Rosado, M M; Scarsella, M; Germano, V; Giorda, E; Cascioli, S; Laganà, B; D'Amelio, R; Carsetti, R

    2014-09-01

    The use of biological agents combined with methotrexate (MTX) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients has strongly improved disease outcome. In this study, the effects of abatacept on the size and function of circulating B and T cells in RA patients not responding to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α have been analysed, with the aim of identifying immunological parameters helpful to choosing suitable tailored therapies. We analysed the frequency of peripheral B and T cell subsets, B cell function and T regulatory cell (Treg ) inhibitory function in 20 moderate/severe RA patients, according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, primary non-responders to one TNF-α blocking agent, who received abatacept + MTX. Patients were studied before and 6 months after therapy. We found that abatacept therapy significantly reduced disease activity score on 44 joints (DAS)/erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values without causing severe side effects. The size of the circulating B and T cell compartments in RA patients was not significantly different from healthy donors, but B cell proliferation and plasma cell differentiation was impaired before therapy and restored by abatacept. While Treg cell frequency was normal, its inhibitory function was absent before therapy and was partially recovered 6 months after abatacept. B and Treg cell function is impaired in RA patients not responding to the first anti-TNF-α agent. Abatacept therapy was able to rescue immune function and led to an effective and safe clinical outcome, suggesting that RA patients, in whom anti-TNF-α failed, are immunologically prone to benefit from an agent targeting a different pathway.

  13. Baicalin, a natural compound, promotes regulatory T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji; Yang, Xue; Li, Ming

    2012-05-16

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells inhibit autoimmunity and protect against tissue injury. The development of these T(reg) cells is controlled by the regulator protein Foxp3, which can be enhanced by the in vitro activation of Foxp3 in the presence of transforming growth factor-beta. However, little is known about alternative methods, such as the use of natural products, for controlling Foxp3-mediated T(reg) cell differentiation. HEK 293 T cells were transfected with Foxp3 expression plasmid, and then treated with different compounds, Foxp3 mRNA expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR. CD4(+)CD25(-)T cells were stimulated with Baicalin, Foxp3 protein expression were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the regulatory function of T cells stimulated with Baicalin was detected by the carboxyfluorescien succinimidyl ester. We demonstrated that Baicalin, a compound isolated from the Chinese herb Huangqin, induced Foxp3 protein expression in cultured T cells, promoted T(reg) cell differentiation and regulatory activity. Our data also indicated that Baicalin restored Foxp3 expression following its initial interleukin-6-mediated inhibition and induced Foxp3 expression in vitro. These data suggest that Baicalin may promote T(reg) cell differentiation and regulatory activity and may serve as a promising natural immunosuppressive compound for treating autoimmune inflammatory diseases.

  14. Baicalin, a natural compound, promotes regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibit autoimmunity and protect against tissue injury. The development of these Treg cells is controlled by the regulator protein Foxp3, which can be enhanced by the in vitro activation of Foxp3 in the presence of transforming growth factor-beta. However, little is known about alternative methods, such as the use of natural products, for controlling Foxp3-mediated Treg cell differentiation. Method HEK 293 T cells were transfected with Foxp3 expression plasmid, and then treated with different compounds, Foxp3 mRNA expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR. CD4+CD25-T cells were stimulated with Baicalin, Foxp3 protein expression were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the regulatory function of T cells stimulated with Baicalin was detected by the carboxyfluorescien succinimidyl ester. Results We demonstrated that Baicalin, a compound isolated from the Chinese herb Huangqin, induced Foxp3 protein expression in cultured T cells, promoted Treg cell differentiation and regulatory activity. Our data also indicated that Baicalin restored Foxp3 expression following its initial interleukin-6-mediated inhibition and induced Foxp3 expression in vitro. Conclusions These data suggest that Baicalin may promote Treg cell differentiation and regulatory activity and may serve as a promising natural immunosuppressive compound for treating autoimmune inflammatory diseases. PMID:22591709

  15. Structural and regulatory functions of keratins

    SciTech Connect

    Magin, Thomas M. . E-mail: t.magin@uni-bonn.de; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Leube, Rudolf E. . E-mail: leube@uni-mainz.de

    2007-06-10

    The diversity of epithelial functions is reflected by the expression of distinct keratin pairs that are responsible to protect epithelial cells against mechanical stress and to act as signaling platforms. The keratin cytoskeleton integrates these functions by forming a supracellular scaffold that connects at desmosomal cell-cell adhesions. Multiple human diseases and murine knockouts in which the integrity of this system is destroyed testify to its importance as a mechanical stabilizer in certain epithelia. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the precise mechanisms responsible for assembly and disease pathology. In addition to these structural aspects of keratin function, experimental evidence accumulating in recent years has led to a much more complex view of the keratin cytoskeleton. Distinct keratins emerge as highly dynamic scaffolds in different settings and contribute to cell size determination, translation control, proliferation, cell type-specific organelle transport, malignant transformation and various stress responses. All of these properties are controlled by highly complex patterns of phosphorylation and molecular associations.

  16. The expanding universe of regulatory T cell subsets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Thomas F

    2007-08-01

    Evidence has indicated that failed antitumor immunity is dominated by immunosuppressive mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment. In this issue of Immunity, Peng et al. (2007) add to this list by describing tumor-infiltrating gammadelta T cells that have regulatory function.

  17. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    PubMed Central

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Economou, James S.; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Dörthe

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Immunotherapy (IT) could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease although successful integration of IT into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of anti-tumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. MATERIALS and METHODS Tregs were identified as a CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ lymphocyte subset and their fate followed in a murine TRAMP-C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without radiation therapy. RESULTS CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Treg cells increased in immune organs following local leg or whole body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase following leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Tregs being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Tregs, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that Tregs are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation. PMID:21093169

  18. Functional studies of regulatory genes in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Di Bernardo, Maria; Spinelli, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Sea urchin embryos are characterized by an extremely simple mode of development, rapid cleavage, high transparency, and well-defined cell lineage. Although they are not suitable for genetic studies, other approaches are successfully used to unravel mechanisms and molecules involved in cell fate specification and morphogenesis. Microinjection is the elective method to study gene function in sea urchin embryos. It is used to deliver precise amounts of DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides, peptides, or antibodies into the eggs or even into blastomeres. Here we describe microinjection as it is currently applied in our laboratory and show how it has been used in gene perturbation analyses and dissection of cis-regulatory DNA elements.

  19. Functional Studies of Regulatory Genes in the Sea Urchin Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Bernardo, Maria Di; Spinelli, Giovanni

    Sea urchin embryos are characterized by an extremely simple mode of development, rapid cleavage, high transparency, and well-defined cell lineage. Although they are not suitable for genetic studies, other approaches are successfully used to unravel mechanisms and molecules involved in cell fate specification and morphogenesis. Microinjection is the elective method to study gene function in sea urchin embryos. It is used to deliver precise amounts of DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides, peptides, or antibodies into the eggs or even into blastomeres. Here we describe microinjection as it is currently applied in our laboratory and show how it has been used in gene perturbation analyses and dissection of cis-regulatory DNA elements.

  20. T Regulatory Cell Biology in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Alroqi, Fayhan J; Chatila, Talal A

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the transcription factor forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) play an essential role in enforcing immune tolerance to self tissues, regulating host-commensal flora interaction, and facilitating tissue repair. Their deficiency and/or dysfunction trigger unbridled autoimmunity and inflammation. A growing number of monogenic defects have been recognized that adversely impact Treg cell development, differentiation, and/or function, leading to heritable diseases of immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. In this article, we review recent insights into Treg cell biology and function, with particular attention to lessons learned from newly recognized clinical disorders of Treg cell deficiency.

  1. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  2. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-12-24

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting.

  3. Controlling the frontier: regulatory T-cells and intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bollrath, Julia; Powrie, Fiona M

    2013-11-30

    The intestine represents one of the most challenging sites for the immune system as immune cells must be able to mount an efficient response to invading pathogens while tolerating the large number and diverse array of resident commensal bacteria. Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a non-redundant role at maintaining this balance. At the same time Treg cell differentiation and function can be modulated by the intestinal microbiota. In this review, we will discuss effector mechanisms of Treg cells in the intestine and how these cells can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The two faces of regulatory T cells in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blatner, Nichole R; Gounari, Fotini; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that expand in human colon cancer express retinoid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and exert potent T-cell suppressive functions while mediating pro-inflammatory effects. Similar Tregs expand and drive a vicious cycle of inflammation in murine polyposis. Targeting RORγt in Tregs interrupts such a cycle and protects mice against polyposis, suggesting that a similar intervention may provide therapeutic benefits to colon cancer patients. PMID:23762787

  5. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  6. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R

    2016-09-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa.

  7. Antigen-Pulsed CpG-ODN-Activated Dendritic Cells Induce Host-Protective Immune Response by Regulating the T Regulatory Cell Functioning in Leishmania donovani-Infected Mice: Critical Role of CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Saikat; Bhattacharjee, Amrita; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Bhattacharyya Majumdar, Suchandra; Majumdar, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by Leishmania donovani, is a systemic infection of reticulo-endothelial system. There is currently no protective vaccine against VL and chemotherapy is increasingly limited due to appearance of drug resistance to first line drugs such as antimonials and amphotericin B. In the present study, by using a murine model of leishmaniasis we evaluated the function played by soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA)-pulsed CpG-ODN-stimulated dendritic cells (SLA–CpG–DCs) in restricting the intracellular parasitic growth. We establish that a single dose of SLA–CpG–DC vaccination is sufficient in rendering complete protection against L. donovani infection. In probing the possible mechanism, we observe that SLA–CpG–DCs vaccination results in the significant decrease in Foxp3+GITR+CTLA4+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) cell population in Leishmania-infected mice. Vaccination with these antigen-stimulated dendritic cells results in the decrease in the secretion of TGF-β by these Treg cells by possible regulation of the SMAD signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that a CXC chemokine, IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10; CXCL10), has a direct role in the regulation of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in SLA–CpG–DC-vaccinated parasitized mice as Treg cells isolated from IP-10-depleted vaccinated mice showed significantly increased TGF-β production and suppressive activity. PMID:24926293

  8. How tolerogenic dendritic cells induce regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Roberto A.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery by Steinman and Cohn in 1973, dendritic cells (DCs) have become increasingly recognized for their crucial role as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are exquisitely adept at acquiring, processing and presenting antigens to T cells. They also adjust the context (and hence the outcome) of antigen presentation in response to a plethora of environmental inputs that signal the occurence of pathogens or tissue damage. Such signals generally boost DC maturation, which promotes their migration from peripheral tissues into and within secondary lymphoid organs and their capacity to induce and regulate effector T cell responses. Conversely, more recent observations indicate that DCs are also crucial to ensure immunological peace. Indeed, DCs constantly present innocuous self and non-self antigens in a fashion that promotes tolerance, at least in part, through the control of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are specialized T cells that exert their immuno-suppressive function through a variety of mechanisms affecting both DCs and effector cells. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between tolerogenic DCs and Tregs. PMID:21056730

  9. Splenic CD4+ T Cells in Progressive Visceral Leishmaniasis Show a Mixed Effector-Regulatory Phenotype and Impair Macrophage Effector Function through Inhibitory Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Elvia Y.; Saldarriaga, Omar A.; Travi, Bruno L.; Kong, Fanping; Spratt, Heidi; Soong, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by infection with the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani, is a chronic progressive disease with a relentlessly increasing parasite burden in the spleen, liver and bone marrow. The disease is characterized by fever, splenomegaly, cachexia, and pancytopenia, and progresses to death if not treated. Control of Leishmania infection is mediated by Th1 (IFNγ-producing) CD4+ T cells, which activate macrophages to produce nitric oxide and kill intracellular parasites. However, despite expansion of CD4+ T cells and increased IFNγ expression in the spleen, humans with active VL do not control the infection. We used an experimental model of chronic progressive VL in hamsters, which mimics clinical and pathological features seen in humans, to better understand the mechanisms that lead to progressive disease. Transcriptional profiling of the spleen during chronic infection revealed expression of markers of both T cell activation and inhibition. CD4+ T cells isolated from the spleen during chronic progressive VL showed mixed expression of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and chemokines, and were marginally effective in controlling infection in an ex vivo T cell-macrophage co-culture system. Splenic CD4+ T cells and macrophages from hamsters with VL showed increased expression of inhibitory receptors and their ligands, respectively. Blockade of the inhibitory receptor PD-L2 led to a significant decrease in parasite burden, revealing a pathogenic role for the PD-1 pathway in chronic VL. PD-L2 blockade was associated with a dramatic reduction in expression of host arginase 1, but no change in IFNγ and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the expression of counter-regulatory molecules on splenic CD4+ T cells and macrophages promotes a more permissive macrophage phenotype and attenuates intracellular parasite control in chronic progressive VL. Host-directed adjunctive therapy targeting the PD-1 regulatory pathway may be efficacious for VL. PMID

  10. Dietary Vitamin D Increases Percentages and Function of Regulatory T Cells in the Skin-Draining Lymph Nodes and Suppresses Dermal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Geldenhuys, Sian; Judge, Melinda; Weeden, Clare E.; Waithman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Skin inflammatory responses in individuals with allergic dermatitis may be suppressed by dietary vitamin D through induction and upregulation of the suppressive activity of regulatory T (TReg) cells. Vitamin D may also promote TReg cell tropism to dermal sites. In the current study, we examined the capacity of dietary vitamin D3 to modulate skin inflammation and the numbers and activity of TReg cells in skin and other sites including lungs, spleen, and blood. In female BALB/c mice, dietary vitamin D3 suppressed the effector phase of a biphasic ear swelling response induced by dinitrofluorobenzene in comparison vitamin D3-deficient female BALB/c mice. Vitamin D3 increased the percentage of TReg (CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) cells in the skin-draining lymph nodes (SDLN). The suppressive activity of TReg cells in the SDLN, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and blood was upregulated by vitamin D3. However, there was no difference in the expression of the naturally occurring TReg cell marker, neuropilin, nor the expression of CCR4 or CCR10 (skin-tropic chemokine receptors) on TReg cells in skin, SDLN, lungs, and airway-draining lymph nodes. These data suggest that dietary vitamin D3 increased the percentages and suppressive activity of TReg cells in the SDLN, which are poised to suppress dermal inflammation. PMID:27672666

  11. Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Maturation of Serotonin Neuron Identity and Function.

    PubMed

    Spencer, William C; Deneris, Evan S

    2017-01-01

    The brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system has been extensively studied for its role in normal physiology and behavior, as well as, neuropsychiatric disorders. The broad influence of 5-HT on brain function, is in part due to the vast connectivity pattern of 5-HT-producing neurons throughout the CNS. 5-HT neurons are born and terminally specified midway through embryogenesis, then enter a protracted period of maturation, where they functionally integrate into CNS circuitry and then are maintained throughout life. The transcriptional regulatory networks controlling progenitor cell generation and terminal specification of 5-HT neurons are relatively well-understood, yet the factors controlling 5-HT neuron maturation are only recently coming to light. In this review, we first provide an update on the regulatory network controlling 5-HT neuron development, then delve deeper into the properties and regulatory strategies governing 5-HT neuron maturation. In particular, we discuss the role of the 5-HT neuron terminal selector transcription factor (TF) Pet-1 as a key regulator of 5-HT neuron maturation. Pet-1 was originally shown to positively regulate genes needed for 5-HT synthesis, reuptake and vesicular transport, hence 5-HT neuron-type transmitter identity. It has now been shown to regulate, both positively and negatively, many other categories of genes in 5-HT neurons including ion channels, GPCRs, transporters, neuropeptides, and other transcription factors. Its function as a terminal selector results in the maturation of 5-HT neuron excitability, firing characteristics, and synaptic modulation by several neurotransmitters. Furthermore, there is a temporal requirement for Pet-1 in the control of postmitotic gene expression trajectories thus indicating a direct role in 5-HT neuron maturation. Proper regulation of the maturation of cellular identity is critical for normal neuronal functioning and perturbations in the gene regulatory networks controlling

  12. Robust and cost effective expansion of human regulatory T cells highly functional in a xenograft model of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Rikhia; Mahendravada, Aruna; Perna, Serena K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Vera, Juan F; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2013-04-01

    The low frequency of naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs) in peripheral blood and the suboptimal protocols available for their ex vivo expansion limit the development of clinical trials based on the adoptive transfer of these cells. We have, therefore, generated a simplified, robust and cost-effective platform for the large-scale expansion of nTregs using a gas permeable static culture flask (G-Rex) in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice. More than 10(9) putative Tregs co-expressing CD25 and CD4 molecules (92 ± 5%) and FoxP3 (69 ± 19%) were obtained within 21 days of culture. Expanded Tregs showed potent regulatory activity in vitro (80 ± 13% inhibition of CD8(+) cell division) and in vivo (suppression or delay of graft-versus-host disease in a xenograft mouse model) indicating that the cost-effective and simplified production of nTregs we propose will facilitate the implementation of clinical trials based on their adoptive transfer.

  13. Function does not follow form in gene regulatory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory circuits are to the cell what arithmetic logic units are to the chip: fundamental components of information processing that map an input onto an output. Gene regulatory circuits come in many different forms, distinct structural configurations that determine who regulates whom. Studies that have focused on the gene expression patterns (functions) of circuits with a given structure (form) have examined just a few structures or gene expression patterns. Here, we use a computational model to exhaustively characterize the gene expression patterns of nearly 17 million three-gene circuits in order to systematically explore the relationship between circuit form and function. Three main conclusions emerge. First, function does not follow form. A circuit of any one structure can have between twelve and nearly thirty thousand distinct gene expression patterns. Second, and conversely, form does not follow function. Most gene expression patterns can be realized by more than one circuit structure. And third, multifunctionality severely constrains circuit form. The number of circuit structures able to drive multiple gene expression patterns decreases rapidly with the number of these patterns. These results indicate that it is generally not possible to infer circuit function from circuit form, or vice versa. PMID:26290154

  14. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  15. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; He, C; Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-09-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  16. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:26080708

  17. The potential role of functional inhibition of T regulatory cells by anti-TGFβ antibody in photodynamic therapy of renal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of inducing tumor-directed immune response. We hypothesized that PDT could be combined with anti-transforming growth factor (TGF) beta antibody that does not significantly affect the population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) but at the same time, has the potential to decrease the immunosuppressive effects of regulatory T-cells (Treg) mediated by TGF beta. This hypothesis was tested with aTGF-beta antibody combined with BPD-mediated PDT in a BALB/c renal cell carcinoma model. Evidence of positive benefits of the combination therapy over individual treatments alone was obtained.

  18. Therapeutic Immunization with HIV-1 Tat Reduces Immune Activation and Loss of Regulatory T-Cells and Improves Immune Function in Subjects on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Ensoli, Barbara; Bellino, Stefania; Tripiciano, Antonella; Longo, Olimpia; Francavilla, Vittorio; Marcotullio, Simone; Cafaro, Aurelio; Picconi, Orietta; Paniccia, Giovanni; Scoglio, Arianna; Arancio, Angela; Ariola, Cristina; Ruiz Alvarez, Maria J.; Campagna, Massimo; Scaramuzzi, Donato; Iori, Cristina; Esposito, Roberto; Mussini, Cristina; Ghinelli, Florio; Sighinolfi, Laura; Palamara, Guido; Latini, Alessandra; Angarano, Gioacchino; Ladisa, Nicoletta; Soscia, Fabrizio; Mercurio, Vito S.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Visintini, Raffaele; Mazzotta, Francesco; Di Pietro, Massimo; Galli, Massimo; Rusconi, Stefano; Carosi, Giampiero; Torti, Carlo; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Garaci, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Although HAART suppresses HIV replication, it is often unable to restore immune homeostasis. Consequently, non-AIDS-defining diseases are increasingly seen in treated individuals. This is attributed to persistent virus expression in reservoirs and to cell activation. Of note, in CD4+ T cells and monocyte-macrophages of virologically-suppressed individuals, there is continued expression of multi-spliced transcripts encoding HIV regulatory proteins. Among them, Tat is essential for virus gene expression and replication, either in primary infection or for virus reactivation during HAART, when Tat is expressed, released extracellularly and exerts, on both the virus and the immune system, effects that contribute to disease maintenance. Here we report results of an ad hoc exploratory interim analysis (up to 48 weeks) on 87 virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals enrolled in a phase II randomized open-label multicentric clinical trial of therapeutic immunization with Tat (ISS T-002). Eighty-eight virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals, enrolled in a parallel prospective observational study at the same sites (ISS OBS T-002), served for intergroup comparison. Immunization with Tat was safe, induced durable immune responses, and modified the pattern of CD4+ and CD8+ cellular activation (CD38 and HLA-DR) together with reduction of biochemical activation markers and persistent increases of regulatory T cells. This was accompanied by a progressive increment of CD4+ T cells and B cells with reduction of CD8+ T cells and NK cells, which were independent from the type of antiretroviral regimen. Increase in central and effector memory and reduction in terminally-differentiated effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were accompanied by increases of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against Env and recall antigens. Of note, more immune-compromised individuals experienced greater therapeutic effects. In contrast, these changes were opposite, absent or partial in the

  19. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Teeples, M.; Lin, L.; de Lucas, M.; Turco, G.; Toal, T. W.; Gaudinier, A.; Young, N. F.; Trabucco, G. M.; Veling, M. T.; Lamothe, R.; Handakumbura, P. P.; Xiong, G.; Wang, C.; Corwin, J.; Tsoukalas, A.; Zhang, L.; Ware, D.; Pauly, M.; Kliebenstein, D. J.; Dehesh, K.; Tagkopoulos, I.; Breton, G.; Pruneda-Paz, J. L.; Ahnert, S. E.; Kay, S. A.; Hazen, S. P.; Brady, S. M.

    2014-12-24

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. In this paper, we present a protein–DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. Finally, these interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.

  20. Regulatory T cells as therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Esensten, Jonathan H.; Wofsy, David; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TREG) are a subset of CD4+ T cells with a critical role in the prevention of autoimmunity. Whether defects in TREG contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unclear. However, a variety of approved and experimental drugs for RA may work, in part, by promoting the function or increasing numbers of TREG. Furthermore, animal studies demonstrate that direct injection of TREG ameliorates a wide range of experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, cell-based therapy with TREG has the potential to produce durable disease remission in patients with RA. PMID:19798031

  1. [Regulatory T cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Limón-Camacho, Leonardo; Solleiro-Villavicencio, Helena; Pupko-Sissa, Ilana; Lascurain, Ricardo; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés

    2013-01-01

    Exposition to tobacco smoke has been established as the main risk factor to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), by inducing inflammation of the airways. Several cell populations participate in this inflammatory process. It has been accepted that a maladaptive modulation of inflammatory responses plays a critical role in the development of the disease. Regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subset of T CD4(+) lymphocytes that modulate the immune response through secretion of cytokines. The role of the Treg cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is not clearly known, that is why it is important to focus in understanding their participation in the pathogenesis of the disease. To elaborate a systematic review of original articles in which we could describe Treg cells (their ontogeny, mechanisms of action) and their role in COPD, we made a systematic literature search in some data bases (MEDLINE, AMED, PubMed and Scielo) looking through the next keywords: "COPD and Regulatory T cells/EPOC y células T reguladoras", «Inflammation and COPD/Inflamación y EPOC», «Regulatory T cells/Células T reguladoras». We included basic science articles, controlled and non-controlled clinical trials, meta-analysis and guides. From this search we conclude that Treg cells are a subpopulation of T CD4(+) lymphocytes and their major functions are the suppression of immune responses and the maintenance of tolerance to self-antigens. A disruption in the regulatory mechanisms of the Treg cells leads to the development and perpetuation of inflammation in COPD. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple functions of nucleosomes and regulatory factors in transcription.

    PubMed

    Workman, J L; Buchman, A R

    1993-03-01

    The in vivo packaging of DNA with histone proteins to form chromatin makes its transcription a difficult process. Biochemical and genetic studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic details of how transcriptional regulatory factors confront at least two hurdles created by nucleosomes, the primary structural unit of chromatin. Regulatory factors must gain access to their respective binding sites and activate the formation of transcription complexes at core promoter elements. Distinct regulatory factors may be specialized to perform these functions.

  3. Subsets of human natural killer cells and their regulatory effects

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Binqing; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2014-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells have distinct functions as NKtolerant, NKcytotoxic and NKregulatory cells and can be divided into different subsets based on the relative expression of the surface markers CD27 and CD11b. CD27+ NK cells, which are abundant cytokine producers, are numerically in the minority in human peripheral blood but constitute the large population of NK cells in cord blood, spleen, tonsil and decidua tissues. Recent data suggest that these NK cells may have immunoregulatory properties under certain conditions. In this review, we will focus on these new NK cell subsets and discuss how regulatory NK cells may serve as rheostats or sentinels in controlling inflammation and maintaining immune homeostasis in various organs. PMID:24303897

  4. Functional Evolution of a cis-Regulatory Module

    PubMed Central

    Palsson, Arnar; Alekseeva, Elena; Bergman, Casey M; Nathan, Janaki; Kreitman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Lack of knowledge about how regulatory regions evolve in relation to their structure–function may limit the utility of comparative sequence analysis in deciphering cis-regulatory sequences. To address this we applied reverse genetics to carry out a functional genetic complementation analysis of a eukaryotic cis-regulatory module—the even-skipped stripe 2 enhancer—from four Drosophila species. The evolution of this enhancer is non-clock-like, with important functional differences between closely related species and functional convergence between distantly related species. Functional divergence is attributable to differences in activation levels rather than spatiotemporal control of gene expression. Our findings have implications for understanding enhancer structure–function, mechanisms of speciation and computational identification of regulatory modules. PMID:15757364

  5. Treating arthritis by immunomodulation: is there a role for regulatory T cells?

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Femke; Roord, Sarah T.; Albani, Salvatore; Prakken, Berent J.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory T cells almost 15 years ago initiated a new and exciting research area. The growing evidence for a critical role of these cells in controlling autoimmune responses has raised expectations for therapeutic application of regulatory T cells in patients with autoimmune arthritis. Here, we review recent studies investigating the presence, phenotype and function of these cells in patients with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and consider their therapeutic potential. Both direct and indirect methods to target these cells will be discussed. Arguably, a therapeutic approach that combines multiple regulatory T-cell-enhancing strategies could be most successful for clinical application. PMID:20463189

  6. Regulatory networks and connected components of the neutral space. A look at functional islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldhaus, G.; Klemm, K.

    2010-09-01

    The functioning of a living cell is largely determined by the structure of its regulatory network, comprising non-linear interactions between regulatory genes. An important factor for the stability and evolvability of such regulatory systems is neutrality - typically a large number of alternative network structures give rise to the necessary dynamics. Here we study the discretized regulatory dynamics of the yeast cell cycle [Li et al., PNAS, 2004] and the set of networks capable of reproducing it, which we call functional. Among these, the empirical yeast wildtype network is close to optimal with respect to sparse wiring. Under point mutations, which establish or delete single interactions, the neutral space of functional networks is fragmented into ≈ 4.7 × 108 components. One of the smaller ones contains the wildtype network. On average, functional networks reachable from the wildtype by mutations are sparser, have higher noise resilience and fewer fixed point attractors as compared with networks outside of this wildtype component.

  7. Regulatory T cells and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Pereira, Marcelo G; Ciciliot, Stefano; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration results from the activation and differentiation of myogenic stem cells, called satellite cells, located beneath the basal lamina of the muscle fibers. Inflammatory and immune cells have a crucial role in the regeneration process. Acute muscle injury causes an immediate transient wave of neutrophils followed by a more persistent infiltration of M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory/proregenerative) macrophages. New studies show that injured muscle is also infiltrated by a specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells, which control both the inflammatory response, by promoting the M1-to-M2 switch, and the activation of satellite cells. Treg cells accumulate in injured muscle in response to specific cytokines, such as IL-33, and promote muscle growth by releasing growth factors, such as amphiregulin. Muscle repair during aging is impaired due to reduced number of Treg cells and can be enhanced by IL-33 supplementation. Migration of Treg cells could also contribute to explain the effect of heterochronic parabiosis, whereby muscle regeneration of aged mice can be improved by a parabiotically linked young partners. In mdx dystrophin-deficient mice, a model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle injury, and inflammation is mitigated by expansion of the Treg-cell population but exacerbated by Treg-cell depletion. These findings support the notion that immunological mechanisms are not only essential in the response to pathogenic microbes and tumor cells but also have a wider homeostatic role in tissue repair, and open new perspectives for boosting muscle growth in chronic muscle disease and during aging.

  8. Regulatory role of rpL3 in cell response to nucleolar stress induced by Act D in tumor cells lacking functional p53

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Pagliara, Valentina; Albano, Francesco; Esposito, Davide; Sagar, Vinay; Loreni, Fabrizio; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Russo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many chemotherapeutic drugs cause nucleolar stress and p53-independent pathways mediating the nucleolar stress response are emerging. Here, we demonstrate that ribosomal stress induced by Actinomycin D (Act D) is associated to the up-regulation of ribosomal protein L3 (rpL3) and its accumulation as ribosome-free form in lung and colon cancer cell lines devoid of p53. Free rpL3 regulates p21 expression at transcriptional and post-translational levels through a molecular mechanism involving extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2 (ERK1/2) and mouse double minute-2 homolog (MDM2). Our data reveal that rpL3 participates to cell response acting as a critical regulator of apoptosis and cell migration. It is noteworthy that silencing of rpL3 abolishes the cytotoxic effects of Act D suggesting that the loss of rpL3 makes chemotherapy drugs ineffective while rpL3 overexpression associates to a strong increase of Act D-mediated inhibition of cell migration. Taking together our results show that the efficacy of Act D chemotherapy depends on rpL3 status revealing new specific targets involved in the molecular pathways activated by Act D in cancers lacking of p53. Hence, the development of treatments aimed at upregulating rpL3 may be beneficial for the treatment of these cancers. PMID:26636733

  9. Implications of functional similarity for gene regulatory interactions

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kimberly; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang; Girvan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    If one gene regulates another, those two genes are likely to be involved in many of the same biological functions. Conversely, shared biological function may be suggestive of the existence and nature of a regulatory interaction. With this in mind, we develop a measure of functional similarity between genes based on annotations made to the Gene Ontology in which the magnitude of their functional relationship is also indicative of a regulatory relationship. In contrast to other measures that have previously been used to quantify the functional similarity between genes, our measure scales the strength of any shared functional annotation by the frequency of that function's appearance across the entire set of annotations. We apply our method to both Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene annotations and find that the strength of our scaled similarity measure is more predictive of known regulatory interactions than previously published measures of functional similarity. In addition, we observe that the strength of the scaled similarity measure is correlated with the structural importance of links in the known regulatory network. By contrast, other measures of functional similarity are not indicative of any structural importance in the regulatory network. We therefore conclude that adequately adjusting for the frequency of shared biological functions is important in the construction of a functional similarity measure aimed at elucidating the existence and nature of regulatory interactions. We also compare the performance of the scaled similarity with a high-throughput method for determining regulatory interactions from gene expression data and observe that the ontology-based approach identifies a different subset of regulatory interactions compared with the gene expression approach. We show that combining predictions from the scaled similarity with those from the reconstruction algorithm leads to a significant improvement in the accuracy of the reconstructed

  10. Genomic definition of multiple ex vivo regulatory T cell subphenotypes.

    PubMed

    Feuerer, Markus; Hill, Jonathan A; Kretschmer, Karsten; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2010-03-30

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the Foxp3 transcription factor are essential for lymphoid homeostasis and immune tolerance to self. Other nonimmunological functions of Treg cells, such as controlling metabolic function in adipose tissue, are also emerging. Treg cells originate primarily in the thymus, but can also be elicited from conventional T cells by in vivo exposure to low-dose antigen or homeostatic expansion or by activation in the presence of TGFbeta in vitro. Treg cells are characterized by a distinct transcriptional signature controlled in part, but not solely, by Foxp3. For a better perspective on transcriptional control in Treg cells, we compared gene expression profiles of a broad panel of Treg cells from various origins or anatomical locations. Treg cells generated by different means form different subphenotypes and were identifiable by particular combinations of transcripts, none of which fully encompassed the entire Treg signature. Molecules involved in Treg cell effector function, chemokine receptors, and the transcription factors that control them were differentially represented in these subphenotypes. Treg cells from the gut proved dissimilar to cells elicited by exposure to TGFbeta in vitro, but instead they resembled a CD103(+)Klrg1(+) subphenotype preferentially generated in response to lymphopenia.

  11. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  12. Role of Regulatory Cells in Oral Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Marcin; O'Mahony, Liam

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is continuously exposed to great amounts of different antigens from both food and intestinal microbes. Immune tolerance to these antigens is very important for intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis. Oral tolerance is a specific type of peripheral tolerance induced by exposure to antigen via the oral route. Investigations on the role of intestinal immune system in preventing hypersensitivity reactions to innocuous dietary and microbial antigens have been intensively performed during the last 2 decades. In this review article, we discuss how food allergens are recognized by the intestinal immune system and draw attention to the role of regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells in the establishment of oral tolerance and tolerogenic features of intestinal dendritic cells. We also emphasize the potential role of tonsils in oral tolerance induction because of their anatomical location, cellular composition, and possible usage to develop novel ways of specific immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:28102055

  13. SHARPIN controls the development of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Redecke, Vanessa; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kuriakose, Jeeba; Häcker, Hans

    2016-06-01

    SHARPIN is an essential component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) complex that controls signalling pathways of various receptors, including the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and antigen receptor, in part by synthesis of linear, non-degrading ubiquitin chains. Consistent with SHARPIN's function in different receptor pathways, the phenotype of SHARPIN-deficient mice is complex, including the development of inflammatory systemic and skin diseases, the latter of which depend on TNFR signal transduction. Given the established function of SHARPIN in primary and malignant B cells, we hypothesized that SHARPIN might also regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thereby control T-cell biology. Here, we focus primarily on the role of SHARPIN in T cells, specifically regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that SHARPIN-deficient (Sharpin(cpdm/cpdm) ) mice have significantly reduced numbers of FOXP3(+) Treg cells in lymphoid organs and the peripheral blood. Competitive reconstitution of irradiated mice with mixed bone marrow from wild-type and SHARPIN-deficient mice revealed an overall reduced thymus population with SHARPIN-deficient cells with almost complete loss of thymic Treg development. Consistent with this cell-intrinsic function of SHARPIN in Treg development, TCR stimulation of SHARPIN-deficient thymocytes revealed reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, establishing a function of SHARPIN in TCR signalling, which may explain the defective Treg development. In turn, in vitro generation and suppressive activity of mature SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells were comparable to wild-type cells, suggesting that maturation, but not function, of SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells is impaired. Taken together, these findings show that SHARPIN controls TCR signalling and is required for efficient generation of Treg cells in vivo, whereas the inhibitory function of mature Treg cells appears to be

  14. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  15. T Cells: Soldiers and Spies--The Surveillance and Control of Effector T Cells by Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bruce M

    2015-11-06

    Traditionally, T cells were CD4+ helper or CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and with antibodies, they were the soldiers of immunity. Now, many functionally distinct subsets of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been described, each with distinct cytokine and transcription factor expression. For CD4+ T cells, these include Th1 cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet and cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-β; Th2 cells expressing GATA-3 and the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13; and Th17 cells expressing RORγt and cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22. The cytokines produced determine the immune inflammation that they mediate. T cells of the effector lineage can be naïve T cells, recently activated T cells, or memory T cells that can be distinguished by cell surface markers. T regulatory cells or spies were characterized as CD8+ T cells expressing I-J in the 1970s. In the 1980s, suppressor cells fell into disrepute when the gene for I-J was not present in the mouse MHC I region. At that time, a CD4+ T cell expressing CD25, the IL-2 receptor-α, was identified to transfer transplant tolerance. This was the same phenotype of activated CD4+ CD25+ T cells that mediated rejection. Thus, the cells that could induce tolerance and undermine rejection had similar badges and uniforms as the cells effecting rejection. Later, FOXP3, a transcription factor that confers suppressor function, was described and distinguishes T regulatory cells from effector T cells. Many subtypes of T regulatory cells can be characterized by different expressions of cytokines and receptors for cytokines or chemokines. In intense immune inflammation, T regulatory cells express cytokines characteristic of effector cells; for example, Th1-like T regulatory cells express T-bet, and IFN-γ-like Th1 cells and effector T cells can change sides by converting to T regulatory cells. Effector T cells and T regulatory cells use similar molecules to be activated and mediate their function, and thus, it can be

  16. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  17. Follicular regulatory T cells impair follicular T helper cells in HIV and SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Miller, Shannon M.; Folkvord, Joy M.; Kimball, Abigail; Chamanian, Mastooreh; Meditz, Amie L.; Arends, Tessa; McCarter, Martin D.; Levy, David N.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Skinner, Pamela J.; Connick, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) exploit follicular lymphoid regions by establishing high levels of viral replication and dysregulating humoral immunity. Follicular regulatory T cells (TFR) are a recently characterized subset of lymphocytes that influence the germinal centre response through interactions with follicular helper T cells (TFH). Here, utilizing both human and rhesus macaque models, we show the impact of HIV and SIV infection on TFR number and function. We find that TFR proportionately and numerically expand during infection through mechanisms involving viral entry and replication, TGF-β signalling, low apoptosis rates and the presence of regulatory dendritic cells. Further, TFR exhibit elevated regulatory phenotypes and impair TFH functions during HIV infection. Thus, TFR contribute to inefficient germinal centre responses and inhibit HIV and SIV clearance. PMID:26482032

  18. Transcriptional Regulatory Network for the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chao; Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have expanded our knowledge about the innate arm of the immune system. Helper-like ILCs share both the “innate” feature of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells and the “helper” feature of CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. With this combination, helper-like ILCs are capable of initiating early immune responses similar to cNK cells, but via secretion of a set of effector cytokines similar to those produced by Th cells. Although many studies have revealed the functional similarity between helper-like ILCs and Th cells, some aspects of ILCs including the development of this lineage remain elusive. It is intriguing that the majority of transcription factors involved in multiple stages of T cell development, differentiation, and function also play critical roles during ILC development. Regulators such as Id2, GATA-3, Nfil3, TOX, and TCF-1 are expressed and function at various stages of ILC development. In this review, we will summarize the expression and functions of these transcription factors shared by ILCs and Th cells. We will also propose a complex transcriptional regulatory network for the lineage commitment of ILCs. PMID:26379372

  19. PDGF upregulates CLEC-2 to induce T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Ganguly, Sreerupa; Hajian, Pega; Cao, Jia-Ning; Agrawal, Anshu

    2015-10-06

    The effect of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) on immune cells is not elucidated. Here, we demonstrate PDGF inhibited the maturation of human DCs and induced IL-10 secretion. Culture of PDGF-DCs with T cells induced the polarization of T cells towards FoxP3 expressing T regulatory cells that secreted IL-10. Gene expression studies revealed that PDGF induced the expression of C-type lectin like receptor member 2, (CLEC-2) receptor on DCs. Furthermore, DCs transfected with CLEC-2 induced T regulatory cells in DC-T cell co-culture. CLEC-2 is naturally expressed on platelets. Therefore, to confirm whether CLEC-2 is responsible for inducing the T regulatory cells, T cells were cultured with either CLEC-2 expressing platelets or soluble CLEC-2. Both conditions resulted in the induction of regulatory T cells. The generation of T regulatory cells was probably due to the binding of CLEC-2 with its ligand podoplanin on T cells, since crosslinking of podoplanin on the T cells also resulted in the induction of T regulatory cells. These data demonstrate that PDGF upregulates the expression of CLEC-2 on cells to induce T regulatory cells.

  20. Control of experimental inflammatory bowel disease by regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Asseman, C; Fowler, S; Powrie, F

    2000-10-01

    A helper T cell type 1-mediated colitis driven by enteric bacteria develops in severe combined immunodeficient mice after transfer of CD45RB(high)CD4(+) T cells. Development of disease can be prevented by cotransfer of the reciprocal CD45RB(low) subset. Analysis of the mechanism of immune suppression transferred by CD45RB(low)CD4(+) cells revealed essential roles for both IL-10 and TGF-beta. These data indicate that a functionally specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells exists in normal mice and that these can prevent the development of pathogenic responses toward commensal bacteria. The role of Treg cells in the control of the immune response is discussed.

  1. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks for CD4 T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response by secreting cytokines to activate target cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into at least four subsets, Th1, Th2, Th17, and inducible regulatory T cells, each with unique functions for pathogen elimination. The differentiation of these subsets is induced in response to cytokine stimulation, which is translated into Stat activation, followed by induction of master regulator transcription factors. In addition to these factors, multiple other transcription factors, both subset specific and shared, are also involved in promoting subset differentiation. This review will focus on the network of transcription factors that control CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:24839135

  2. Controlling the fire--tissue-specific mechanisms of effector regulatory T-cell homing.

    PubMed

    Chow, Zachary; Banerjee, Ashish; Hickey, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have essential roles in regulating immune responses and limiting inappropriate inflammation. Evidence now indicates that to achieve this function, regulatory T cells must be able to migrate to the most appropriate locations within both lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. This function is achieved via the spatiotemporally controlled expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, varying according to the developmental stage of the regulatory T cell and the location and environment where they undergo activation. In this Review, we summarise information on the roles of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors in mediating regulatory T-cell migration and function throughout the body under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. In addition, we review recent studies that have used in vivo imaging to examine the actions of regulatory T cells in vivo, in lymph nodes, in the microvasculature and in the interstitium of peripheral organs. These studies reveal that the capacity of regulatory T cells to undergo selective migration serves a critical role in their ability to suppress immune responses. As such, the cellular and molecular requirements of regulatory T-cell migration need to be completely understood to enable the most effective use of these cells in clinical settings.

  3. A role for the transcription factor Helios in human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Goldberg, Monica V.; Harris, Timothy J.; Yen, Hung-Rong; Bruno, Tullia C.; Durham, Nicholas M.; Hipkiss, Edward L.; Pyle, Kristin J.; Wada, Satoshi; Pan, Fan; Pardoll, Drew M.; Drake, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Relative up-regulation of the Ikaros family transcription factor Helios in natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been reported by several groups. However, a role for Helios in regulatory T cells has not yet been described. Here, we show that Helios is upregulated in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments indicated that Helios binds to the FoxP3 promoter. These data were further corroborated by experiments showing that knocking-down Helios with siRNA oligonucleotides results in down-regulation of FoxP3. Functionally, we found that suppression of Helios message in CD4+CD25+ T cells significantly attenuates their suppressive function. Taken together, these data suggest that Helios may play an important role in regulatory T cell function and support the concept that Helios may be a novel target to manipulate Treg activity in a clinical setting. PMID:20226531

  4. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  5. Regulatory Networks:. Inferring Functional Relationships Through Co-Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanke, Dierk; Hahn, Achim; Kilian, Joachim; Harter, Klaus; Berendzen, Kenneth W.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression data not only provide us insights into discrete transcript abundance of specific genes, but contain cryptic information that can not readily be assessed without interpretation. We again used data of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana as our reference organism, yet the analysis presented herein can be performed with any organism with various data sources. Within the cell, information is transduced via different signaling cascades and results in differential gene expression responses. The incoming signals are perceived from upstream signaling components and handed to downstream messengers that further deliver the signals to effector proteins which can directly influence gene expression. In most cases, we can assume that proteins, which are connected to other signaling components within such a regulatory network, exhibit similar expression trajectories. Thus, we extracted a known functional network from literature and demonstrated that it is possible to superimpose microarray expression data onto the pathways. Thereby, we could follow the information flow through time reflected by gene expression changes. This allowed us to predict, whether the upstream signal was transmitted from known elements contained in the network or relayed from outside components. We next conducted the vice versa approach and used large scale microarray expression data to build a co-expression matrix for all genes present on the array. From this, we computed a regulatory network, which allowed us to deduce known and novel signaling pathways.

  6. A Systematic Analysis of Drosophila Regulatory Peptide Expression in Enteroendocrine Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Kim, Seol-Min; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-04-30

    The digestive system is gaining interest as a major regulator of various functions including immune defense, nutrient accumulation, and regulation of feeding behavior, aside from its conventional function as a digestive organ. The Drosophila midgut epithelium is completely renewed every 1-2 weeks due to differentiation of pluripotent intestinal stem cells in the midgut. Intestinal stem cells constantly divide and differentiate into enterocytes that secrete digestive enzymes and absorb nutrients, or enteroendocrine cells that secrete regulatory peptides. Regulatory peptides have important roles in development and metabolism, but study has mainly focused on expression and functions in the nervous system, and not much is known about the roles in endocrine functions of enteroendocrine cells. We systemically examined the expression of 45 regulatory peptide genes in the Drosophila midgut, and verified that at least 10 genes are expressed in the midgut enteroendocrine cells through RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, antisera, and 25 regulatory peptide-GAL transgenes. The Drosophila midgut is highly compartmentalized, and individual peptides in enteroendocrine cells were observed to express in specific regions of the midgut. We also confirmed that some peptides expressed in the same region of the midgut are expressed in mutually exclusive enteroendocrine cells. These results indicate that the midgut enteroendocrine cells are functionally differentiated into different subgroups. Through this study, we have established a basis to study regulatory peptide functions in enteroendocrine cells as well as the complex organization of enteroendocrine cells in the Drosophila midgut.

  7. STATE-OF-THE-ART OF REGULATORY DENDRITIC CELLS IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic Cells (DCs) with robust immunosuppressive activity are commonly found in the microenvironment of advanced solid tumors. These innate immune cells are generically termed regulatory DCs and include various subsets such as plasmacytoid, conventional and monocyte-derived/inflammatory populations whose normal function is subverted by tumor-derived signals. This review summarizes recent findings on the nature and function of regulatory DCs, their relationship with other myeloid subsets and unique therapeutic opportunities to abrogate malignant progression through their targeting. PMID:27118338

  8. Functional Characterization of a Novel Pro-Apoptotic Transcription Regulatory Protein in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    of establishing stable cell lines in ovarian cancer as stated above, this project awaits the establishment of tetracycline -inducible ovarian cancer ...W81XWH-04-1-0085 TITLE: Functional Characterization of a Novel Pro-Apoptotic Transcription Regulatory Protein in Ovarian Cancer ...Transcription Regulatory Protein in Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0085 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  9. The generation and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Taams, Leonie S; Curnow, S John; Vukmanovic-Stejic, M; Akbar, Arne N

    2006-09-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are essential components of the immune system. They help to maintain immune tolerance by exerting suppressive effects on cells of the adaptive and innate immune system. In the last few years there has been an abundance of papers addressing the suppressive effects of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and their putative role in various experimental disease models and human diseases. Despite the enormous amounts of data on these cells a number of controversial issues still exists. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were originally described as thymus-derived anergic/suppressive T cells. Recent papers however indicate that these cells might also be generated in the periphery. Due to the thymic development of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells it was thought that these cells were specific for self-antigens. Indeed it was shown that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells could be positively selected upon high affinity interaction with self-antigens. However, evidence is accumulating that these cells might also interact with non-self antigens. Finally, in the literature there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of soluble factors versus cell-contact in the mechanism of suppression. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting these opposing viewpoints and to combine them into a general model for the origin, function and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

  10. Transcriptome-Guided Functional Analyses Reveal Novel Biological Properties and Regulatory Hierarchy of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Ventricular Cardiomyocytes Crucial for Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Ellen; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Shaohong; Rushing, Stephanie; Keung, Wendy; Ren, Lihuan; Lieu, Deborah K.; Geng, Lin; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Jiaxian; Wong, Hau San; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Li, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human (h) embryonic stem cells (ESC) represent an unlimited source of cardiomyocytes (CMs); however, these differentiated cells are immature. Thus far, gene profiling studies have been performed with non-purified or non-chamber specific CMs. Here we took a combinatorial approach of using systems biology to guide functional discoveries of novel biological properties of purified hESC-derived ventricular (V) CMs. We profiled the transcriptomes of hESCs, hESC-, fetal (hF) and adult (hA) VCMs, and showed that hESC-VCMs displayed a unique transcriptomic signature. Not only did a detailed comparison between hESC-VCMs and hF-VCMs confirm known expression changes in metabolic and contractile genes, it further revealed novel differences in genes associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism, migration and cell cycle, as well as potassium and calcium ion transport. Following these guides, we functionally confirmed that hESC-VCMs expressed IKATP with immature properties, and were accordingly vulnerable to hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis. For mechanistic insights, our coexpression and promoter analyses uncovered a novel transcriptional hierarchy involving select transcription factors (GATA4, HAND1, NKX2.5, PPARGC1A and TCF8), and genes involved in contraction, calcium homeostasis and metabolism. These data highlight novel expression and functional differences between hESC-VCMs and their fetal counterparts, and offer insights into the underlying cell developmental state. These findings may lead to mechanism-based methods for in vitro driven maturation. PMID:24204964

  11. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  12. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-02-26

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions.

  13. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed.

  14. Interactomics profiling of the negative regulatory function of carbon monoxide on RANKL-treated RAW 264.7 cells during osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During osteoclastogenesis, the maturation of osteoclast (OC) progenitors is stimulated by the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Excess OC production plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bone disorders. Conversely, the inhibition of abnormal OC proliferation reduces inflammation-induced bone loss. Low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) are known to decrease inflammation and OC-mediated bone erosion but the molecular mechanism is unknown. Results To obtain insight into the biological function of CO, cultured RANKL-treated RAW 264.7 cells were used in an in vitro experimental model of osteoclastogenesis. The results showed that CO inhibited: 1) tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cell formation; 2) F-actin ring production; 3) c-fos pathway activation; 4) the expression of cathepsin K, TRAP, calcitonin receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 mRNAs; 5) the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 in translation. Protein-protein interaction analysis predicted mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 as the controlling hub. Conclusions Low-concentrations of CO (250 ppm) may inhibit osteoclastogenesis. Data from STRING- and IPA-based interactome analyses suggested that the expression of proteins with the functions of signal transduction, enzymes, and epigenetic regulation are significantly altered by CO during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Our study provides the first interactome analysis of osteoclastogenesis, the results of which supported the negative regulation of OC differentiation by CO. PMID:24886323

  15. Functional and regulatory profiling of energy metabolism in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Malecki, Michal; Bitton, Danny A; Rodríguez-López, Maria; Rallis, Charalampos; Calavia, Noelia Garcia; Smith, Graeme C; Bähler, Jürg

    2016-11-25

    The control of energy metabolism is fundamental for cell growth and function and anomalies in it are implicated in complex diseases and ageing. Metabolism in yeast cells can be manipulated by supplying different carbon sources: yeast grown on glucose rapidly proliferates by fermentation, analogous to tumour cells growing by aerobic glycolysis, whereas on non-fermentable carbon sources metabolism shifts towards respiration. We screened deletion libraries of fission yeast to identify over 200 genes required for respiratory growth. Growth media and auxotrophic mutants strongly influenced respiratory metabolism. Most genes uncovered in the mutant screens have not been implicated in respiration in budding yeast. We applied gene-expression profiling approaches to compare steady-state fermentative and respiratory growth and to analyse the dynamic adaptation to respiratory growth. The transcript levels of most genes functioning in energy metabolism pathways are coherently tuned, reflecting anticipated differences in metabolic flows between fermenting and respiring cells. We show that acetyl-CoA synthase, rather than citrate lyase, is essential for acetyl-CoA synthesis in fission yeast. We also investigated the transcriptional response to mitochondrial damage by genetic or chemical perturbations, defining a retrograde response that involves the concerted regulation of distinct groups of nuclear genes that may avert harm from mitochondrial malfunction. This study provides a rich framework of the genetic and regulatory basis of energy metabolism in fission yeast and beyond, and it pinpoints weaknesses of commonly used auxotroph mutants for investigating metabolism. As a model for cellular energy regulation, fission yeast provides an attractive and complementary system to budding yeast.

  16. Movement of regulatory RNA between animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies suggest that RNA can move from one cell to another and regulate genes through specific base-pairing. Mechanisms that modify or select RNA for secretion from a cell are unclear. Secreted RNA can be stable enough to be detected in the extracellular environment and can enter the cytosol of distant cells to regulate genes. Mechanisms that import RNA into the cytosol of an animal cell can enable uptake of RNA from many sources including other organisms. This role of RNA is akin to that of steroid hormones, which cross cell membranes to regulate genes. The potential diagnostic use of RNA in human extracellular fluids has ignited interest in understanding mechanisms that enable the movement of RNA between animal cells. Genetic model systems will be essential to gain more confidence in proposed mechanisms of RNA transport and to connect an extracellular RNA with a specific biological function. Studies in the worm C. elegans and in other animals have begun to reveal parts of this novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Here, I summarize the current state of this nascent field, highlight the many unknowns, and suggest future directions. PMID:26138457

  17. Effect of ATRA and ATO on the expression of tissue factor in NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and regulatory function of the inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Dunoyer-Geindre, Sylvie; Rivier-Cordey, Anne-Sophie; Tsopra, Olga; Lecompte, Thomas; Kruithof, Egbert K O

    2017-03-25

    The characteristic hemorrhages of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) are caused in part by the high expression of tissue factor (TF) on leukemic cells, which also produce TNF and IL-1β, proinflammatory cytokines known to increase TF in various cell types. Exposure of NB4 cells, an APL cell line, to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or arsenic trioxide (ATO) rapidly and strongly reduced TF mRNA. Both drugs also reduced TNF mRNA, but later, and moreover increased IL-1β mRNA. The effect on procoagulant activity of cells and microparticles, as measured with calibrated automated thrombography, was delayed and only partial at 24 h. TNF and IL-1β inhibition reduced TF mRNA and activity only partially. Inhibition of the inflammatory signaling intermediate p38 reduced TF mRNA by one third but increased TNF and IL-1β mRNA. NF-κB inhibition reduced, within 1 h, TF and TNF mRNA but did not change IL-1β mRNA, and rapidly and markedly reduced cell survival, with procoagulant properties still being present. In conclusion, although we provide evidence that TNF, IL-1β, and their signaling intermediates have a regulatory function on TF expression by NB4 APL cells, the effect of ATRA and ATO on TF can only partially be accounted for by their impact on these cytokines.

  18. The split personality of regulatory T cells in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-03

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) participate in responses to various chronic infections including HIV. HIV infection is associated with a progressive CD4 lymphopenia and defective HIV-specific CD8 responses known to play a key role in the control of viral replication. Persistent immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection and is involved in disease progression independent of viral load. The consequences of Treg expansion, observed in HIV infection, could be either beneficial, by suppressing generalized T-cell activation, or detrimental, by weakening HIV-specific responses and thus contributing to viral persistence. The resulting balance between Tregs contrasting outcomes might have critical implications in pathogenesis. Topics covered in this review include HIV-induced alterations of Tregs, Treg cell dynamics in blood and tissues, Treg-suppressive function, and the relationship between Tregs and immune activation. This review also provides a focus on the role of CD39(+) Tregs and other regulatory cell subsets. All these issues will be explored in different situations including acute and chronic infection, antiretroviral treatment-mediated viral control, and spontaneous viral control. Results must be interpreted with regard to both the Treg definition used in context and to the setting of the disease in an attempt to draw clearer conclusions from the apparently conflicting results.

  19. Immunoevasive Pericytes From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Preferentially Modulate Induction of Allogeneic Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Domev, Hagit; Milkov, Irina; Dar, Ayelet

    2014-01-01

    Isolated microvessel-residing pericytes and pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) exhibit mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics and therapeutic properties. Despite growing interest in pericyte-based stem cell therapy, their immunogenicity and immunomodulatory effects on nonactivated T cells are still poorly defined, in particular those of vasculogenic hPSC pericytes. We found that tissue-embedded and unstimulated cultured hPSC- or tissue-derived pericytes constitutively expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the inhibitory programmed cell death-ligand 1/2 (PD-L1/2) molecules but not MHC class II or CD80/CD86 costimulatory molecules. Pretreatment with inflammatory mediators failed to induce an antigen-presenting cell-like phenotype in stimulated pericytes. CD146+ pericytes from hPSCs did not induce activation and proliferation of allogeneic resting T cells independent of interferon (IFN)-γ prestimulation, similarly to pericytes from human brain or placenta. Instead, pericytes mediated a significant increase in the frequency of allogeneic CD25highFoxP3+ regulatory T cells when cocultured with nonactivated peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, when peripheral blood CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) were depleted from isolated CD3+ T cells, pericytes preferentially induced de novo formation of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127−, suppressive regulatory T cells. Constitutive expression of PD-L1/2 and secretion of transforming growth factor-β by hPSC pericytes directly regulated generation of pericyte-induced Tregs. Pericytes cotransplanted into immunodeficient mice with allogeneic CD25− T cells maintained a nonimmunogenic phenotype and mediated the development of functional regulatory T cells. Together, these findings reveal a novel feature of pericyte-mediated immunomodulation distinguished from immunosuppression, shared by native tissue pericytes and hPSC pericytes, and support the notion that pericytes can be applied for

  20. Biomolecular Cell-Signaling Mechanisms and Dental Implants: A Review on the Regulatory Molecular Biologic Patterns Under Functional and Immediate Loading.

    PubMed

    Romanos, Georgios E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue adapts its structure and mass to the stresses of mechanical loading. The purpose of this review article was to summarize recent advances on cell signaling relating to the phenomenon of bone remodeling, focused on bone ossification and healing at the interface of dental implants and bone under loading conditions. When a dental implant is placed within an osteotomy, osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts are all present. As functional loads are imposed, the remodeling processes adapt the peri-implant bony tissues to mechanical stimuli over time and reestablish a steady state. Based on the current literature, this article demonstrates fundamental information to these remodeling processes, such as the conversion of mechanical cues to electrical or biochemical signals. Multiple intracellular signals are involved in cellular mechanotransduction; the two Wnt signaling pathways (the canonical, β-catenin-dependent and the noncanonical, β-catenin-independent Wnt pathway) are particularly significant. Knowledge of how these molecular signaling pathways are translated into intracellular signals that regulate cell behavior may provide new therapeutic approaches to enhancing osteogenesis, especially around implants with immediate function or placed in areas of poor bone quality. New knowledge about the primary cilia as an organelle and bone cellular mechanosensor is critical for endochondral ossification and proper signal transduction. Other mechanisms, such as the expression of sclerostin as a negative regulator of bone formation (due to deactivation of the Wnt receptor) and downregulation of sclerostin under loading conditions, also present new understanding of the cellular and pericellular mechanics of bone. The complexity of the cell signaling pathways and the mechanisms involved in the mechanoregulation of the bone formation provide new technologies and perspectives for mechanically induced cellular response. Future novel therapeutic approaches based on the

  1. Regulatory T Cell Immunotherapy in Immune-Mediated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pierini, Antonio; Schneidawind, Dominik; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Negrin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Broad clinical interest rapidly followed the recent discovery of different subpopulations of T cells that have immune regulatory properties and a number of studies have been conducted aiming to dissect the translational potential of these promising cells. In this review we will focus on forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) positive regulatory T cells, T regulatory type 1 cells and invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT). We will analyze their ability to correct immune dysregulation in animal models of immune mediated diseases and we will examine the first clinical approaches where these cells have been directly or indirectly employed. We will discuss successes, challenges and limitations that rose in the road to the clinical use of regulatory T cells. PMID:26779417

  2. Immune Suppression in Premalignant Respiratory Papillomas: Enriched Functional CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T-cells And PD-1/PD-L1/L2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hatam, Lynda J.; DeVoti., James A; Rosenthal, David W.; Lam, Fung; Abramson, Allan L.; Steinberg, Bettie M; Bonagura, Vincent R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Respiratory papillomas, caused by human papillomaviruses types 6 and 11 (HPV6/11), are premalignant lesions with potential for malignant conversion. The cytokine and chemokine micromilieu of papillomas is TH2-like with a marked absence of IFN-γ expression. To illuminate why patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) fail to effectively control their disease, we further investigated the suppressive cellular microenvironment in papillomas. Experimental Design CD4+CD25+CD127low/−Foxp3+ Tregs, and CD4+CD25−CD127low/−Foxp3− T-cells within papillomas were characterized and isolated. Their suppressor function was measured by inhibition of PBMC proliferation. Expression of PD-1, CD69, and Helios was identified on these T-cells. PD-L1, PD-L2, CCL17, and CCL22 mRNA was also identified in papillomas. by QPCR. Results Functional Tregs were markedly enriched in papillomas and strongly inhibited anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody activated PBMC proliferation. The natural Treg marker Helios was reduced on Tregs from papillomas, indicating that the majority of Tregs in papillomas are adaptive. The majority of the papilloma-derived CD4+ T-cells expressed the CD4+CD25−CD127low/−Foxp3−PD1+CD69+ phenotype and failed to suppress PBMC proliferation, suggesting that they are chronically activated and exhausted. The Treg-attracting chemokine CCL22 was equally expressed by all laryngeal tissues examined. However CCL17 was robustly expressed by papillomas compared to unaffected laryngeal tissues from RRP patients and individuals without RRP. PD-L1 was elevated in papillomas compared to control laryngeal tissues. Conclusions Papilloma CD4+ T-cells are enriched with functional Tregs, and the adaptive Helios− Treg fraction was increased within the TH2-like papilloma micromilieu. CD4+CD25−CD127low/−Foxp3− T-cells failed to suppress PBMC proliferation and may be exhausted. The PD-1/PDL-1 pathway may represent an additional immunosuppressive mechanism

  3. Hypoxic culture conditions enhance the generation of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Bigot, Jérémy; Da Rocha, Sylvie; Corre, Guillaume; Boisgerault, Florence; Paldi, Andràs; Galy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The generation of large amounts of induced CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (iTreg) cells is of great interest for several immunotherapy applications, therefore a better understanding of signals controlling iTreg cell differentiation and expansion is required. There is evidence that oxidative metabolism may regulate several key signalling pathways in T cells. This prompted us to investigate the effects of oxygenation on iTreg cell generation by comparing the effects of atmospheric (21%) or of low (5%) O2 concentrations on the phenotype of bead-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells from Foxp3-KI-GFP T-cell receptor transgenic mice. The production of intracellular reactive oxygen species was shown to play a major role in the generation of iTreg cells, a process characterized by increased levels of Sirt1, PTEN and Glut1 on the committed cells, independently of the level of oxygenation. The suppressive function of iTreg cells generated either in atmospheric or low oxygen levels was equivalent. However, greater yields of iTreg cells were obtained under low oxygenation, resulting from a higher proliferative rate of the committed Treg cells and higher levels of Foxp3, suggesting a better stability of the differentiation process. Higher expression of Glut1 detected on iTreg cells generated under hypoxic culture conditions provides a likely explanation for the enhanced proliferation of these cells as compared to those cultured under ambient oxygen. Such results have important implications for understanding Treg cell homeostasis and developing in vitro protocols for the generation of Treg cells from naive T lymphocytes. PMID:25243909

  4. Regulatory Single-Nucleotide Variant Predictor Increases Predictive Performance of Functional Regulatory Variants.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Thomas A; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Radivojac, Predrag; Kann, Maricel G; Mooney, Sean D

    2016-11-01

    In silico methods for detecting functionally relevant genetic variants are important for identifying genetic markers of human inherited disease. Much research has focused on protein-coding variants since coding regions have well-defined physicochemical and functional properties. However, many bioinformatics tools are not applicable to variants outside coding regions. Here, we increase the classification performance of our regulatory single-nucleotide variant predictor (RSVP) for variants that cause regulatory abnormalities from an AUC of 0.90-0.97 by incorporating genomic regions identified by the ENCODE project into RSVP. RSVP is comparable to a recently published tool, Genome-Wide Annotation of Variants (GWAVA); both RSVP and GWAVA perform better on regulatory variants than a traditional variant predictor, combined annotation-dependent depletion (CADD). However, our method outperforms GWAVA on variants located at similar distances to the transcription start site as the positive set (AUC: 0.96) as compared with GWAVA (AUC: 0.71). Much of this disparity is due to RSVP's incorporation of features pertaining to the nearest gene (expression, GO terms, etc.), which are not included in GWAVA. Our findings hold out the promise of a framework for the assessment of all functional regulatory variants, providing a means to predict which rare or de novo variants are of pathogenic significance. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Heterogeneity and Stability in Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Booki

    2017-09-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in controlling tolerance and immunity against self- and foreign antigens. The failure of Tregs to properly function is the direct cause of systemic and chronic inflammation as well as immune suppression. It is now evident that Tregs are highly heterogeneous populations depending on the surface phenotypes, cytokine profiles, and anatomical locations. Yet, our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying such heterogeneity is very limited. Furthermore, some Tregs lose the phenotype (and suppressive functions) and instead acquire pathogenicity. Since utilizing Tregs as a tool for immunotherapy is being implemented in many clinical settings, it is of utmost importance to understand the precise mechanisms by which the loss of Treg phenotype (and function) is prevented. In this review, both cellular and molecular factors involved in Treg heterogeneity and stability are discussed.

  6. Functional domains of interferon regulatory factor I (IRF-1).

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, F; Kirchhoff, S; Posern, G; Köster, M; Oumard, A; Sharf, R; Levi, B Z; Hauser, H

    1998-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors among which are IRF-1, IRF-2, and IFN consensus sequence binding protein (ICSBP). These factors share sequence homology in the N-terminal DNA-binding domain. IRF-1 and IRF-2 are further related and have additional homologous sequences within their C-termini. Whereas IRF-2 and ICSBP are identified as transcriptional repressors, IRF-1 is an activator. In the present work, the identification of functional domains in murine IRF-1 with regard to DNA-binding, nuclear translocation, heterodimerization with ICSBP and transcriptional activation are demonstrated. The minimal DNA-binding domain requires the N-terminal 124 amino acids plus an arbitrary C-terminal extension. By using mutants of IRF-1 fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein and monitoring their distribution in living cells, a nuclear location signal (NLS) was identified and found to be sufficient for nuclear translocation. Heterodimerization was confirmed by a two-hybrid system adapted to mammalian cells. The heterodimerization domain in IRF-1 was defined by studies in vitro and was shown to be homologous with a sequence in IRF-2, suggesting that IRF-2 also heterodimerizes with ICSBP through this sequence. An acidic domain in IRF-1 was found to be required and to be sufficient for transactivation. Epitope mapping of IRF-1 showed that regions within the NLS, the heterodimerization domain and the transcriptional activation domain are exposed for possible contacts with interacting proteins. PMID:9742224

  7. Regulatory mechanisms of helper T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Bhanu P.; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) family consists of six cytokines in mammals. Among them, IL-17 and IL-17F are expressed by a novel subset of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells and play critical function in inflammation and autoimmunity. On the other hand, IL-17E, also called IL-25, has been associated with allergic responses. Here we summarize recent work by us as well as other investigators in understanding the regulation and function of these three cytokines. From these studies, IL-17 family cytokines may serve as novel targets for pharmaceutical intervention of immune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:18280574

  8. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor-Teeples, M.; Lin, L.; de Lucas, M.; ...

    2014-12-24

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. In this paper, we present a protein–DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated bymore » a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. Finally, these interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.« less

  9. Regulatory Eosinophils Suppress T Cells Partly through Galectin-10.

    PubMed

    Lingblom, Christine; Andersson, Jennie; Andersson, Kerstin; Wennerås, Christine

    2017-06-15

    Eosinophils have the capacity to regulate the function of T cell subsets. Our aim was to test the hypothesis of the existence of a regulatory subset of eosinophils. Human eosinophils were incubated with T cells that were stimulated with allogeneic leukocytes or CD3/CD28 cross-linking. After 2 d of coculture, 11% of the eosinophils gained CD16 expression. A CD16(hi) subset of eosinophils, encompassing 1-5% of all eosinophils, was also identified in the blood of healthy subjects. FACS sorting showed that these CD16(hi) eosinophils were significantly stronger suppressors of T cell proliferation than were conventional CD16(neg) eosinophils. Human eosinophils contain stores of the immunoregulatory protein galectin-10. We found that Ab-mediated neutralization of galectin-10 partially abrogated the suppressive function of the eosinophils. Moreover, recombinant galectin-10 by itself was able to suppress T cell proliferation. Finally, we detected galectin-10-containing immune synapses between eosinophils and lymphocytes. To conclude, we describe a subset of suppressive eosinophils expressing CD16 that may escape detection because CD16-based negative selection is the standard procedure for the isolation of human eosinophils. Moreover, we show that galectin-10 functions as a T cell-suppressive molecule in eosinophils. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-01-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4+ T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4low CD25high), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4low CD25high phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4low Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4+ and CD4− lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin. PMID:19016909

  11. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-09-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4(+) T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4(low) CD25(high)), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4(low) CD25(high) phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4(low) Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4(+) and CD4(-) lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin.

  12. Exacerbation of Endometriosis Due To Regulatory T-Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukiko; Mori, Taisuke; Ito, Fumitake; Koshiba, Akemi; Takaoka, Osamu; Kataoka, Hisashi; Maeda, Eiko; Okimura, Hiroyuki; Mori, Takahide; Kitawaki, Jo

    2017-09-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with altered immune response to endometrial cells facilitating the implantation and proliferation of ectopic endometrial tissues. Although regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in T cell-mediated immune response and development of immune disorders, their significance in endometriosis remains to be elucidated. Recently, CD4+CD45RA- forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3)hi T cells, activated Treg cells, have been identified as a functionally true suppressive population of Treg cells. To investigate the role of Treg cells in endometriosis. Three Treg cell fractions (resting Treg cells, activated Treg cells, and non-Treg cells) were examined using flow cytometry in the endometrioma, endometrium, peritoneal fluid, and peripheral blood obtained from women with (n = 27) and without (n = 28) endometriosis. A mouse model of endometriosis was made in Foxp3tm3Ayr/J (Foxp3DTR) C57BL/6 Treg cell-depleted mice (n = 28). In women with endometrioma, the proportion of activated Treg cells in the endometrioma and the endometrium, but not in the peritoneal fluid or peripheral blood, was significantly decreased compared with that in women without endometriosis. In Foxp3DTR/diphtheria toxin mice, the number and weight of endometriotic lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels and angiogenetic factors were significantly increased compared with those in control mice. Treg cell deficiency exaggerates local inflammation and angiogenesis and simultaneously facilitates the attachment and growth of endometrial implants. The findings provide an insight into dysregulated immune response for the pathogenesis and development.

  13. Regulatory T cell-based therapies for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Benjamine; Graber, David J; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune disorders are long-term diseases that adversely affect the quality of life for patients, and they are one of the top ten leading causes of death. While each autoimmune disorder is unique, they all are caused by a breakdown of tolerance against endogenous proteins. This leads to auto-inflammatory events that promote the destruction of organs in a humoral and cellular immune mediated manner. Treatment options for autoimmunity can involve the use of chemical and biologic agents that suppress inflammation. While these treatment options for patients have shown to be beneficial in autoimmunity, they can result in patients being vulnerable to opportunistic infections. Newer therapies aim to identify methods to specifically block auto-inflammatory immune cells while allowing for an intact immune response to other antigens. T regulatory (Treg) cells are a subtype of the adoptive immune cell that is capable of suppressing inflammatory events in an antigen-specific manner, but they are often poorly functioning within autoimmune patients. Treg cells have been well characterized for their immune modulating capabilities and preclinical and early clinical studies support their therapeutic potential for antigen-specific immune suppression. This review will examine the current understanding of Treg cell function and the therapeutic potential of enhancing Treg cells in patients with inflammatory disorders.

  14. The regulatory role of B cells in autoimmunity, infections and cancer: Perspectives beyond IL10 production.

    PubMed

    Gorosito Serrán, Melisa; Fiocca Vernengo, Facundo; Beccaria, Cristian G; Acosta Rodriguez, Eva V; Montes, Carolina L; Gruppi, Adriana

    2015-11-14

    The term regulatory B cells (B regs) is ascribed to a heterogeneous population of B cells with the function of suppressing inflammatory responses. They have been described mainly during the last decade in the context of different immune-mediated diseases. Most of the work on B regs has been focused on IL-10-producing B cells. However, B cells can exert regulatory functions independently of IL-10 production. Here we discuss the phenotypes, development and effector mechanisms of B regs and advances in their role in autoimmunity, infections and cancer. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Regulatory T Cells in Autoimmune and Viral Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In both autoimmune liver disease and chronic viral hepatitis, the injury results from an immune-mediated cytotoxic T cell response to liver cells. As such, it is not surprising that CD4(+) regulatory T cells, a key regulatory population of T cells able to curb immune responses, could be involved in both autoimmune hepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis. The liver can induce the conversion of naïve CD4(+) T cells to CD4(+) regulatory T cells and induce tolerance to locally expressed antigens. This tolerance mechanism is carefully regulated in physiological conditions but any imbalance could be pathological. An overly tolerant immune response can lead to chronic infections while an overreactive and unbridled immune response can lead to autoimmune hepatitis. With the recent advent of monoclonal antibodies able to target regulatory T cells (daclizumab) and improve immune responses and several ongoing clinical trials analysing the impact of regulatory T cell infusion on autoimmune liver disease or liver transplant tolerance, modulation of immunological tolerance through CD4(+) regulatory T cells could be a key element of future immunotherapies for several liver diseases allowing restoring the balance between proper immune responses and tolerance.  .

  17. Proceedings: international regulatory considerations on development pathways for cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Feigal, Ellen G; Tsokas, Katherine; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Zhang, Jiwen; Priest, Catherine; Pearce, Jonathan; Mount, Natalie

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving field that faces novel scientific and regulatory challenges. In September 2013, the International Workshop on Regulatory Pathways for Cell Therapies was convened to discuss the nature of these challenges and potential solutions and to highlight opportunities for potential convergence between different regulatory bodies that might assist the field's development. The workshop discussions generated potentially actionable steps in five main areas that could mitigate cell therapy development pathway risk and accelerate moving promising therapies to patients. These included the need for convergence of regulatory guidelines on donor eligibility and suitability of lines for use in clinical trials and subsequent commercialization for cell therapies to move forward on a global basis; the need to challenge and encourage investigators in the regenerative medicine field to share information and provide examples of comparability studies related to master cell banks; the need for convergence of guidelines across regulatory jurisdictions on requirements for tumorigenicity studies, based on particular cell types and on biodistribution studies; the need to increase transparency in sharing clinical trial information more broadly and disseminating results more rapidly; and the need to establish a forum for sharing the experiences of various approaches being developed to expedite regulatory approvals and access for patients to innovative cell and regenerative therapies in the different regulatory jurisdictions and to assess their potential strengths and weaknesses. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Proceedings: International Regulatory Considerations on Development Pathways for Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Tsokas, Katherine; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Zhang, Jiwen; Priest, Catherine; Pearce, Jonathan; Mount, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving field that faces novel scientific and regulatory challenges. In September 2013, the International Workshop on Regulatory Pathways for Cell Therapies was convened to discuss the nature of these challenges and potential solutions and to highlight opportunities for potential convergence between different regulatory bodies that might assist the field’s development. The workshop discussions generated potentially actionable steps in five main areas that could mitigate cell therapy development pathway risk and accelerate moving promising therapies to patients. These included the need for convergence of regulatory guidelines on donor eligibility and suitability of lines for use in clinical trials and subsequent commercialization for cell therapies to move forward on a global basis; the need to challenge and encourage investigators in the regenerative medicine field to share information and provide examples of comparability studies related to master cell banks; the need for convergence of guidelines across regulatory jurisdictions on requirements for tumorigenicity studies, based on particular cell types and on biodistribution studies; the need to increase transparency in sharing clinical trial information more broadly and disseminating results more rapidly; and the need to establish a forum for sharing the experiences of various approaches being developed to expedite regulatory approvals and access for patients to innovative cell and regenerative therapies in the different regulatory jurisdictions and to assess their potential strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25038248

  19. Induction of colonic regulatory T cells by indigenous Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Imaoka, Akemi; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Momose, Yoshika; Cheng, Genhong; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Ohba, Yusuke; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Hori, Shohei; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Itoh, Kikuji; Honda, Kenya

    2011-01-21

    CD4(+) T regulatory cells (T(regs)), which express the Foxp3 transcription factor, play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Here, we show that in mice, T(regs) were most abundant in the colonic mucosa. The spore-forming component of indigenous intestinal microbiota, particularly clusters IV and XIVa of the genus Clostridium, promoted T(reg) cell accumulation. Colonization of mice by a defined mix of Clostridium strains provided an environment rich in transforming growth factor-β and affected Foxp3(+) T(reg) number and function in the colon. Oral inoculation of Clostridium during the early life of conventionally reared mice resulted in resistance to colitis and systemic immunoglobulin E responses in adult mice, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to autoimmunity and allergy.

  20. Unifying roles for regulatory T cells and inflammation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Rao, Varada P.; Olipitz, Werner; Taylor, Christie L.; Jackson, Erin A.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Lee, Chung-Wei; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Fox, James G.; Ge, Zhongming; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Activities of CD4+ regulatory (TREG) cells restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. Roles for TREG cells in inflammation-associated cancers, however, are paradoxical. It is widely believed that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer responses. However, we demonstrate here that TREG cells also function to reduce cancer risk throughout the body by efficiently downregulating inflammation arising from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Building on a “hygiene hypothesis” model in which GI infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce immune-mediated diseases, here we show that gut bacteria-triggered TREG may function to inhibit cancer even in extraintestinal sites. Ability of bacteria-stimulated TREG to suppress cancer depends on interleukin (IL)-10, which serves to maintain immune homeostasis within bowel and support a protective antiinflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under proinflammatory conditions, TREG may fail to provide antiinflammatory protection and instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process; a cancer state that is reversible by downregulation of inflammation. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10 and TREG-mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated IL-6 and IL-17 and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data unify seemingly divergent disease processes such as autoimmunity and cancer and help explain the paradox of TREG and inflammation in cancer. Enhancing protective TREG functions may promote healthful longevity and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:19795459

  1. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  2. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Simon G; Shen, Howard C; Hazelett, Dennis J; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10(-30)), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10(-23)) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10(-15)) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. CD4+ T cell anergy prevents autoimmunity and generates regulatory T cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kalekar, Lokesh A.; Schmiel, Shirdi E.; Nandiwada, Sarada L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Barsness, Laura O.; Zhang, Na; Stritesky, Gretta L.; Malhotra, Deepali; Pauken, Kristen E.; Linehan, Jonathan L.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Fife, Brian T.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Mueller, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The role that anergy, an acquired state of T cell functional unresponsiveness, plays in natural peripheral tolerance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that anergy is selectively induced in fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells during pregnancy. A naturally occurring subpopulation of anergic polyclonal CD4+ T cells, enriched in self antigen-specific T cell receptors, is also observed in healthy hosts. Neuropilin-1 expression in anergic conventional CD4+ T cells is associated with thymic regulatory T cell (Treg cell)-related gene hypomethylation, and this correlates with their capacity to differentiate into Foxp3+ Treg cells that suppress immunopathology. Thus, our data suggest that not only is anergy induction important in preventing autoimmunity, but it also generates the precursors for peripheral Treg cell differentiation. PMID:26829766

  4. The Molecular Mechanisms of Regulatory T Cell Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Zheng, Lixin; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T lymphocytes, known as regulatory T cells or Tregs, have been proposed to be a lineage of professional immune suppressive cells that exclusively counteract the effects of the immunoprotective “helper” and “cytotoxic” lineages of T lymphocytes. Here we discuss new concepts on the mechanisms and functions of Tregs. There are several key points we emphasize: 1. Tregs exert suppressive effects both directly on effector T cells and indirectly through antigen-presenting cells; 2. Regulation can occur through a novel mechanism of cytokine consumption to regulate as opposed to the usual mechanism of cytokine/chemokine production; 3. In cases where CD4+ effector T cells are directly inhibited by Tregs, it is chiefly through a mechanism of lymphokine withdrawal apoptosis leading to polyclonal deletion; and 4. Contrary to the current view, we discuss new evidence that Tregs, similar to other T-cells lineages, can promote protective immune responses in certain infectious contexts (Chen et al., 2011; Pandiyan et al., 2011). Although these points are at variance to varying degrees with the standard model of Treg behavior, we will recount developing findings that support these new concepts. PMID:22566849

  5. Identification of the Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Binding Site on the B55α and Cdc55 Regulatory Subunits of PP2A: Implications for PP2A Function, Tumor Cell Killing and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Mui, Melissa Z.; Kucharski, Michael; Miron, Marie-Joëlle; Hur, Woosuk Steve; Berghuis, Albert M.; Blanchette, Paola; Branton, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus E4orf4 protein induces the death of human cancer cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding of E4orf4 to the B/B55/Cdc55 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is required, and such binding inhibits PP2AB55 activity leading to dose-dependent cell death. We found that E4orf4 binds across the putative substrate binding groove predicted from the crystal structure of B55α such that the substrate p107 can no longer interact with PP2AB55α. We propose that E4orf4 inhibits PP2AB55 activity by preventing access of substrates and that at high E4orf4 levels this inhibition results in cell death through the failure to dephosphorylate substrates required for cell cycle progression. However, E4orf4 is expressed at much lower and less toxic levels during a normal adenovirus infection. We suggest that in this context E4orf4 largely serves to recruit novel substrates such as ASF/SF2/SRSF1 to PP2AB55 to enhance adenovirus replication. Thus E4orf4 toxicity probably represents an artifact of overexpression and does not reflect the evolutionary function of this viral product. PMID:24244166

  6. T follicular helper and T follicular regulatory cells have different TCR specificity

    PubMed Central

    Maceiras, Ana Raquel; Almeida, Silvia Cristina Paiva; Mariotti-Ferrandiz, Encarnita; Chaara, Wahiba; Jebbawi, Fadi; Six, Adrien; Hori, Shohei; Klatzmann, David; Faro, Jose; Graca, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Immunization leads to the formation of germinal centres (GCs) that contain both T follicular helper (Tfh) and T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells. Whether T-cell receptor (TCR) specificity defines the differential functions of Tfh and Tfr cells is unclear. Here we show that antigen-specific T cells after immunization are preferentially recruited to the GC to become Tfh cells, but not Tfr cells. Tfh cells, but not Tfr cells, also proliferate efficiently on restimulation with the same immunizing antigen in vitro. Ex vivo TCR repertoire analysis shows that immunization induces oligoclonal expansion of Tfh cells. By contrast, the Tfr pool has a TCR repertoire that more closely resembles that of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Our data thus indicate that the GC Tfh and Tfr pools are generated from distinct TCR repertoires, with Tfh cells expressing antigen-responsive TCRs to promote antibody responses, and Tfr cells expressing potentially autoreactive TCRs to suppress autoimmunity. PMID:28429709

  7. The regulatory sciences for stem cell-based medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bao-Zhu; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-06-01

    Over the past few years, several new achievements have been made from stem cell studies, many of which have moved up from preclinical stages to early, or from early to middle or late, stages thanks to relatively safe profile and preliminary evidence of effectiveness. Moreover, some stem cell-based products have been approved for marketing by different national regulatory authorities. However, many critical issues associated mainly with incomplete understanding of stem cell biology and the relevant risk factors, and lack of effective regulations still exist and need to be urgently addressed, especially in countries where establishment of appropriate regulatory system just commenced. More relevantly, the stem cell regulatory sciences need to be established or improved to more effectively evaluate quality, safety and efficacy of stem cell products, and for building up the appropriate regulatory framework. In this review, we summarize some new achievements in stem cell studies, especially the preclinical and clinical studies, the existing regulations, and the associated challenges, and we then propose some considerations for improving stem cell regulatory sciences with a goal of promoting the steadfast growth of the well-regulated stem cell therapies abreast of evolvement of stem cell sciences and technologies.

  8. Visualizing regulatory T cell control of autoimmune responses in nonobese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qizhi; Adams, Jason Y; Tooley, Aaron J; Bi, Mingying; Fife, Brian T; Serra, Pau; Santamaria, Pere; Locksley, Richard M; Krummel, Matthew F; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo mechanism of regulatory T cell (Treg cell) function in controlling autoimmunity remains controversial. Here we have used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy to analyze lymph node priming of diabetogenic T cells and to delineate the mechanisms of Treg cell control of autoimmunity in vivo. Islet antigen–specific CD4+CD25− T helper cells (TH cells) and Treg cells swarmed and arrested in the presence of autoantigens. These TH cell activities were progressively inhibited in the presence of increasing numbers of Treg cells. There were no detectable stable associations between Treg and TH cells during active suppression. In contrast, Treg cells directly interacted with dendritic cells bearing islet antigen. Such persistent Treg cell–dendritic cell contacts preceded the inhibition of TH cell activation by dendritic cells, supporting the idea that dendritic cells are central to Treg cell function in vivo. PMID:16311599

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and myeloid regulatory cells in cancer and autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barnie, Prince Amoah; Zhang, Pan; Lv, Hongxiang; Wang, Dan; Su, Xiaolian; Su, Zhaoliang; Xu, Huaxi

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were originally described as a heterogeneous population of immature cells derived from myeloid progenitors with immune-suppressive functions in tumor-bearing hosts. In recent years, increasing number of studies have described various populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of cancer and autoimmune diseases. These studies have observed that the populations of MDSCs are increased during inflammation and autoimmune conditions. In addition, MDSCs can effectively suppress T cell responses and modulate the activity of natural killer cells and other myeloid cells. MDSCs have also been implicated in the induction of regulatory T cell production. Furthermore, these cells have the potential to suppress the autoimmune response, thereby limiting tissue injury. Myeloid regulatory cells (Mregs) are recently attracting increasing attention, since they function in proinflammatory and immune suppression in autoimmune diseases, as well as in various types of cancer. Currently, research focus is directed from MDSCs to Mregs in cancer and autoimmune diseases. The present study reviewed the suppressive roles of MDSCs in various autoimmune murine models, the immune modulation of MDSCs to T helper 17 lymphocytes, as well as the proinflammatory and immunosuppressive roles of Mregs in various types of cancer and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28352304

  10. A Functional and Regulatory Network Associated with PIP Expression in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Debily, Marie-Anne; Marhomy, Sandrine El; Boulanger, Virginie; Eveno, Eric; Mariage-Samson, Régine; Camarca, Alessandra; Auffray, Charles; Piatier-Tonneau, Dominique; Imbeaud, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    Background The PIP (prolactin-inducible protein) gene has been shown to be expressed in breast cancers, with contradictory results concerning its implication. As both the physiological role and the molecular pathways in which PIP is involved are poorly understood, we conducted combined gene expression profiling and network analysis studies on selected breast cancer cell lines presenting distinct PIP expression levels and hormonal receptor status, to explore the functional and regulatory network of PIP co-modulated genes. Principal Findings Microarray analysis allowed identification of genes co-modulated with PIP independently of modulations resulting from hormonal treatment or cell line heterogeneity. Relevant clusters of genes that can discriminate between [PIP+] and [PIP−] cells were identified. Functional and regulatory network analyses based on a knowledge database revealed a master network of PIP co-modulated genes, including many interconnecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, half of which were detected as differentially expressed through high-precision measurements. The network identified appears associated with an inhibition of proliferation coupled with an increase of apoptosis and an enhancement of cell adhesion in breast cancer cell lines, and contains many genes with a STAT5 regulatory motif in their promoters. Conclusions Our global exploratory approach identified biological pathways modulated along with PIP expression, providing further support for its good prognostic value of disease-free survival in breast cancer. Moreover, our data pointed to the importance of a regulatory subnetwork associated with PIP expression in which STAT5 appears as a potential transcriptional regulator. PMID:19262752

  11. Extracellular NAD(+): a danger signal hindering regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Adriouch, Sahil; Haag, Friedrich; Boyer, Olivier; Seman, Michel; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2012-11-01

    Endogenous danger signals released during cell damage contribute to alert the immune system. Typically, their release results in the activation and maturation of innate immune cells, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, extracellular NAD(+) stimulates immune responses by hindering regulatory T cells (Tregs), and could, therefore, represent the prototype of a new category of danger signals.

  12. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Buckner, Jane H.; Fitch, Mark; Gitelman, Stephen E.; Gupta, Shipra; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Herold, Kevan C.; Lares, Angela; Lee, Michael R.; Li, Kevin; Liu, Weihong; Long, S. Alice; Masiello, Lisa M.; Nguyen, Vinh; Putnam, Amy L.; Rieck, Mary; Sayre, Peter; Tang, Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust technique has been developed to isolate and expand Tregs from patients with T1D. The expanded Tregs retained their T cell receptor diversity and demonstrated enhanced functional activity. We report on a phase 1 trial to assess safety of Treg adoptive immunotherapy in T1D. Fourteen adult subjects with T1D, in four dosing cohorts, received ex vivo–expanded autologous CD4+CD127lo/−CD25+ polyclonal Tregs (0.05 × 108 to 26 × 108 cells). A subset of the adoptively transferred Tregs was long-lived, with up to 25% of the peak level remaining in the circulation at 1 year after transfer. Immune studies showed transient increases in Tregs in recipients and retained a broad Treg FOXP3+CD4+CD25hiCD127lo phenotype long-term. There were no infusion reactions or cell therapy–related high-grade adverse events. C-peptide levels persisted out to 2+ years after transfer in several individuals. These results support the development of a phase 2 trial to test efficacy of the Treg therapy. PMID:26606968

  13. Skin-derived TSLP systemically expands regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Leichner, Theresa M; Satake, Atsushi; Harrison, Victor Sanoe; Tanaka, Yukinori; Archambault, Angela S; Kim, Brian S; Siracusa, Mark C; Leonard, Warren J; Naji, Ali; Wu, Gregory F; Artis, David; Kambayashi, Taku

    2017-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4(+) T cells with suppressive function and are critical for limiting inappropriate activation of T cells. Hence, the expansion of Tregs is an attractive strategy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the skin possesses the remarkable capacity to systemically expand Treg numbers by producing thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in response to vitamin D receptor stimulation. An ∼2-fold increase in the proportion and absolute number of Tregs was observed in mice treated topically but not systemically with the Vitamin D3 analog MC903. This expansion of Tregs was dependent on TSLP receptor signaling but not on VDR signaling in hematopoietic cells. However, TSLP receptor expression by Tregs was not required for their proliferation. Rather, skin-derived TSLP promoted Treg expansion through dendritic cells. Importantly, treatment of skin with MC903 significantly lowered the incidence of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice and attenuated disease score in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Together, these data demonstrate that the skin has the remarkable potential to control systemic immune responses and that Vitamin D-mediated stimulation of skin could serve as a novel strategy to therapeutically modulate the systemic immune system for the treatment of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    PubMed

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Delayed thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may exacerbate blood-brain barrier breakdown after ischaemic stroke and lead to lethal haemorrhagic transformation. The immune system is a dynamic modulator of stroke response, and excessive immune cell accumulation in the cerebral vasculature is associated with compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported that regulatory T cells, which function to suppress excessive immune responses, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage after cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the impact of regulatory T cells in the context of tPA-induced brain haemorrhage and investigated the underlying mechanisms of action. The number of circulating regulatory T cells in stroke patients was dramatically reduced soon after stroke onset (84 acute ischaemic stroke patients with or without intravenous tPA treatment, compared to 115 age and gender-matched healthy controls). Although stroke patients without tPA treatment gradually repopulated the numbers of circulating regulatory T cells within the first 7 days after stroke, post-ischaemic tPA treatment led to sustained suppression of regulatory T cells in the blood. We then used the murine suture and embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion models of stroke to investigate the therapeutic potential of adoptive regulatory T cell transfer against tPA-induced haemorrhagic transformation. Delayed administration of tPA (10 mg/kg) resulted in haemorrhagic transformation in the ischaemic territory 1 day after ischaemia. When regulatory T cells (2 × 106/mouse) were intravenously administered immediately after delayed tPA treatment in ischaemic mice, haemorrhagic transformation was significantly decreased, and this was associated with improved sensorimotor functions. Blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction damages were observed in the presence of delayed tPA after stroke, but were mitigated by regulatory T cell transfer. Mechanistic

  15. IL-10-producing NKT10 cells are a distinct regulatory invariant NKT cell subset.

    PubMed

    Sag, Duygu; Krause, Petra; Hedrick, Catherine C; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Wingender, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells rapidly produce copious amounts of multiple cytokines after activation, thereby impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. However, strong activation of iNKT cells with α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) reportedly induces a hyporeactive state that resembles anergy. In contrast, we determined here that iNKT cells from mice pretreated with αGalCer retain cytotoxic activity and maintain the ability to respond to TCR-dependent as well as TCR-independent cytokine-mediated stimulation. Additionally, αGalCer-pretreated iNKT cells acquired characteristics of regulatory cells, including production and secretion of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10. Through the production of IL-10, αGalCer-pretreated iNKT cells impaired antitumor responses and reduced disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of autoimmune disease. Furthermore, a subset of iNKT cells with a similar inhibitory phenotype and function were present in mice not exposed to αGalCer and were enriched in mouse adipose tissue and detectable in human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that IL-10-producing iNKT cells with regulatory potential (NKT10 cells) represent a distinct iNKT cell subset.

  16. IL-10–producing NKT10 cells are a distinct regulatory invariant NKT cell subset

    PubMed Central

    Sag, Duygu; Krause, Petra; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Wingender, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells rapidly produce copious amounts of multiple cytokines after activation, thereby impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. However, strong activation of iNKT cells with α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) reportedly induces a hyporeactive state that resembles anergy. In contrast, we determined here that iNKT cells from mice pretreated with αGalCer retain cytotoxic activity and maintain the ability to respond to TCR-dependent as well as TCR-independent cytokine-mediated stimulation. Additionally, αGalCer-pretreated iNKT cells acquired characteristics of regulatory cells, including production and secretion of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10. Through the production of IL-10, αGalCer-pretreated iNKT cells impaired antitumor responses and reduced disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of autoimmune disease. Furthermore, a subset of iNKT cells with a similar inhibitory phenotype and function were present in mice not exposed to αGalCer and were enriched in mouse adipose tissue and detectable in human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that IL-10–producing iNKT cells with regulatory potential (NKT10 cells) represent a distinct iNKT cell subset. PMID:25061873

  17. The role of regulatory B cells in digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenyu; Gong, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyun; Hu, Zhen; Wu, Gaojue; Tang, Xuejun; Peng, Xiaobin; Tang, Shuan; Meng, Miao; Feng, Hui

    2017-04-01

    The past decade has provided striking insights into a newly identified subset of B cells known as regulatory B cells (Bregs). In addition to producing antibody, Bregs also regulate diseases via cytokine production and antigen presentation. This subset of B cells has protective and potentially therapeutic effects. However, the particularity of Bregs has caused some difficulties in conducting research on their roles. Notably, human B10 cells, which are Bregs that produce interleukin 10, share phenotypic characteristics with other previously defined B cell subsets, and currently, there is no known surface phenotype that is unique to B10 cells. An online search was performed in the PubMed and Web of Science databases for articles published providing evidences on the role of regulatory B cells in digestive system diseases. Abundant evidence has demonstrated that Bregs play a regulatory role in inflammatory, autoimmune, and tumor diseases, and regulatory B cells play different roles in different diseases, but future work needs to determine the mechanisms by which Bregs are activated and how these cells affect their target cells.

  18. Transcriptional regulatory programs underlying barley germination and regulatory functions of Gibberellin and abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Seed germination is a complex multi-stage developmental process, and mainly accomplished through concerted activities of many gene products and biological pathways that are often subjected to strict developmental regulation. Gibberellins (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) are two key phytohormones regulating seed germination and seedling growth. However, transcriptional regulatory networks underlying seed germination and its associated biological pathways are largely unknown. Results The studies examined transcriptomes of barley representing six distinct and well characterized germination stages and revealed that the transcriptional regulatory program underlying barley germination was composed of early, late, and post-germination phases. Each phase was accompanied with transcriptional up-regulation of distinct biological pathways. Cell wall synthesis and regulatory components including transcription factors, signaling and post-translational modification components were specifically and transiently up-regulated in early germination phase while histone families and many metabolic pathways were up-regulated in late germination phase. Photosynthesis and seed reserve mobilization pathways were up-regulated in post-germination phase. However, stress related pathways and seed storage proteins were suppressed through the entire course of germination. A set of genes were transiently up-regulated within three hours of imbibition, and might play roles in initiating biological pathways involved in seed germination. However, highly abundant transcripts in dry barley and Arabidopsis seeds were significantly conserved. Comparison with transcriptomes of barley aleurone in response to GA and ABA identified three sets of germination responsive genes that were regulated coordinately by GA, antagonistically by ABA, and coordinately by GA but antagonistically by ABA. Major CHO metabolism, cell wall degradation and protein degradation pathways were up-regulated by both GA and seed

  19. Rapidly inducible changes in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate levels influence multiple regulatory functions of the lipid in intact living cells.

    PubMed

    Varnai, Peter; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Rohacs, Tibor; Balla, Tamas

    2006-11-06

    Rapamycin (rapa)-induced heterodimerization of the FRB domain of the mammalian target of rapa and FKBP12 was used to translocate a phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase (5-ptase) enzyme to the plasma membrane (PM) to evoke rapid changes in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) levels. Rapa-induced PM recruitment of a truncated type IV 5-ptase containing only the 5-ptase domain fused to FKBP12 rapidly decreased PM PtdIns(4,5)P(2) as monitored by the PLCdelta1PH-GFP fusion construct. This decrease was paralleled by rapid termination of the ATP-induced Ca(2+) signal and the prompt inactivation of menthol-activated transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channels. Depletion of PM PtdIns(4,5)P(2) was associated with a complete blockade of transferrin uptake and inhibition of epidermal growth factor internalization. None of these changes were observed upon rapa-induced translocation of an mRFP-FKBP12 fusion protein that was used as a control. These data demonstrate that rapid inducible depletion of PM PtdIns(4,5)P(2) is a powerful tool to study the multiple regulatory roles of this phospholipid and to study differential sensitivities of various processes to PtdIns(4,5)P(2) depletion.

  20. Regulatory T Cells Suppress Natural Killer Cell Immunity in Patients With Human Cervical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chun; Li, Chao-Hsu; Chu, Ling-Hui; Huang, Pei-Shen; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Huang, Su-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    To determine the functional attributes of CD4 CD25 regulatory T (Treg) cells by suppressing natural killer (NK) cell activity in human cervical cancer (CC). Triple-color flow cytometry was used to study the phenotypic expression of CD4 CD25 Treg cells and NK cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In vitro coculture assays were performed to illustrate the cytokine immunoregulations between Treg cells and NK cells. Significantly lower expression ratio of NK cells and higher expression ratio of Treg cells in TILs than PBLs were found. The NK cells displayed significantly higher expression ratio of inhibitory NK receptors (CD158a, CD158b, and NKG2A) and lower expression ratio of activating NK receptors (NKG2D, NKp46, and NKp30) as well as perforin in TILs than PBLs, suggesting the suppressed cytotoxicity of the NK cells in the CC tumor milieu. The expression ratio of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on Treg cells as well as TGF-βRII on Treg cells and NK cells was significantly higher in TILs than PBLs. Further functional in vitro assays demonstrated that NK cell function was suppressed by Treg cells, mimicking the inhibition of TGF-β on NK cells, and interleukin-2/interleukin-15 stimulation was able to restore the NK cell activity. These findings indicate that Treg cells in TILs may abrogate NK cell cytotoxicity through TGF-β pathway, and therefore, Treg cell elimination may enhance NK cell activity and be a novel therapeutic strategy for CC.

  1. Invasive Surgery Impairs the Regulatory Function of Human CD56 bright Natural Killer Cells in Response to Staphylococcus aureus. Suppression of Interferon-γ Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Renate; Pohlmann, Stephanie; Kleinertz, Holger; Hepner-Schefczyk, Monika; Paul, Andreas; Flohé, Stefanie B

    2015-01-01

    Major surgery increases the risk for infectious complications due to the development of immunosuppression. CD56 bright NK cells play a key role in the defense against bacterial infections through the release of Interferon (IFN) γ upon stimulation with monocyte-derived Interleukin (IL) 12. We investigated whether invasive visceral surgery interferes with the IFN-γ synthesis of human NK cells in response to Staphylococcus aureus. In a prospective pilot study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from 53 patients before and 1 to 7 d after elective visceral surgery. The release of IL-12 and IFN-γ from PBMC upon exposure to S. aureus in vitro was quantified. The expression of the IL-12 receptor β1 chain on the surface, the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 4, and the synthesis of IFN-γ on/in individual CD56 bright NK cells were investigated using flow cytometry. The modulatory effect of IL-12 on the S. aureus-induced IFN-γ production in CD56 bright NK cells was analyzed. The IFN-γ secretion from purified CD56 bright NK cells was quantified after stimulation with IL-12 and IL-18. After surgery, CD56 bright NK cells among total PBMC were impaired in the release of IFN-γ for at least 5 d. Likewise, the IL-12-induced release of IFN-γ from purified CD56 bright NK cells was abolished. Upon stimulation with S. aureus, PBMC secreted less IL-12 but supplementation with recombinant IL-12 did not restore the capacity of CD56 bright NK cells to produce IFN-γ. CD56 bright NK cells displayed reduced levels of the IL-12Rβ1 chain whereas the phosphorylation of STAT4, the key transcription factor for the Ifng gene was not diminished. In summary, after invasive visceral surgery, CD56 bright NK cells are impaired in S. aureus-induced IFN-γ production and might contribute to the enhanced susceptibility to opportunistic infections.

  2. Community Structure Reveals Biologically Functional Modules in MEF2C Transcriptional Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Corona, Sergio A.; Velázquez-Caldelas, Tadeo E.; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks are useful to understand the activity behind the complex mechanisms in transcriptional regulation. A main goal in contemporary biology is using such networks to understand the systemic regulation of gene expression. In this work, we carried out a systematic study of a transcriptional regulatory network derived from a comprehensive selection of all potential transcription factor interactions downstream from MEF2C, a human transcription factor master regulator. By analyzing the connectivity structure of such network, we were able to find different biologically functional processes and specific biochemical pathways statistically enriched in communities of genes into the network, such processes are related to cell signaling, cell cycle and metabolism. In this way we further support the hypothesis that structural properties of biological networks encode an important part of their functional behavior in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27252657

  3. Genetic and epigenetic variation in the lineage specification of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvey, Aaron; van der Veeken, Joris; Plitas, George; Rich, Stephen S; Concannon, Patrick; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoimmunity and other inflammatory states, are characterized by a distinct set of genetic elements controlling their gene expression. However, the extent of genetic and associated epigenetic variation in the Treg cell lineage and its possible relation to disease states in humans remain unknown. We explored evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements and natural human inter-individual epigenetic variation in Treg cells to identify the core transcriptional control program of lineage specification. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in core lineage-specific enhancers revealed disease associations, which were further corroborated by high-resolution genotyping to fine map causal polymorphisms in lineage-specific enhancers. Our findings suggest that a small set of regulatory elements specify the Treg lineage and that genetic variation in Treg cell-specific enhancers may alter Treg cell function contributing to polygenic disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07571.001 PMID:26510014

  4. Regulatory T cells protect from autoimmune arthritis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Suano, Alba; Kallikourdis, Marinos; Sarris, Milka; Betz, Alexander G

    2012-05-01

    Pregnancy frequently has a beneficial effect on the autoimmune disease Rheumatoid Arthritis, ranging from improvement in clinical symptoms to complete remission. Despite decades of study, a mechanistic explanation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that an analogous pregnancy-induced remission can be observed in a mouse model of arthritis. We demonstrate that during pregnancy mice are protected from collagen-induced arthritis, but are still capable of launching normal immune responses to influenza infections. We examine the role of regulatory T (T(R)) cells in this beneficial effect. T(R) cells are essential for many aspects of immune tolerance, including the suppression of autoimmune responses. Remarkably, transfer of regulatory T cells from pregnant 'protected' mice was sufficient to confer protection to non-pregnant mice. These results suggest that regulatory T cells are responsible for the pregnancy-induced amelioration of arthritis.

  5. CCR6 Recruits Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells to the Kidney in Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jan-Eric; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Erhardt, Annette; Wegscheid, Claudia; Velden, Joachim; Fehr, Susanne; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Tiegs, Gisa; Stahl, Rolf A.K.

    2010-01-01

    T cells recruited to the kidney contribute to tissue damage in crescentic and proliferative glomerulonephritides. Chemokines and their receptors regulate T cell trafficking, but the expression profile and functional importance of chemokine receptors for renal CD4+ T cell subsets are incompletely understood. In this study, we observed that renal FoxP3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and IL-17–producing CD4+ T (Th17) cells express the chemokine receptor CCR6, whereas IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are CCR6−. Induction of experimental glomerulonephritis (nephrotoxic nephritis) in mice resulted in upregulation of the only CCR6 ligand, CCL20, followed by T cell recruitment, renal tissue injury, albuminuria, and loss of renal function. CCR6 deficiency aggravated renal injury and increased mortality (from uremia) among nephritic mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, CCR6 deficiency reduced infiltration of Tregs and Th17 cells but did not affect recruitment of Th1 cells in the setting of glomerulonephritis. Adoptive transfer of WT but not CCR6-deficient Tregs attenuated morphologic and functional renal injury in nephritic mice. Furthermore, reconstitution with WT Tregs protected CCR6−/− mice from aggravated nephritis. Taken together, these data suggest that CCR6 mediates renal recruitment of both Tregs and Th17 cells and that the reduction of anti-inflammatory Tregs in the presence of a fully functional Th1 response aggravates experimental glomerulonephritis. PMID:20299360

  6. Type 1 regulatory T cells: a new mechanism of peripheral immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hanyu; Zhang, Rong; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    The lack of immune response to an antigen, a process known as immune tolerance, is essential for the preservation of immune homeostasis. To date, two mechanisms that drive immune tolerance have been described extensively: central tolerance and peripheral tolerance. Under the new nomenclature, thymus-derived regulatory T (tT(reg)) cells are the major mediators of central immune tolerance, whereas peripherally derived regulatory T (pT(reg)) cells function to regulate peripheral immune tolerance. A third type of T(reg) cells, termed iT(reg), represents only the in vitro-induced T(reg) cells(1). Depending on whether the cells stably express Foxp3, pT(reg), and iT(reg) cells may be divided into two subsets: the classical CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells and the CD4(+)Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells(2). This review focuses on the discovery, associated biomarkers, regulatory functions, methods of induction, association with disease, and clinical trials of Tr1 cells.

  7. The Role of Regulatory T Cells in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There has been an explosion of literature focusing on the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells in cancer immunity. It is becoming increasingly clear that Treg cells play an active and significant role in the progression of cancer, and have an important role in suppressing tumor-specific immunity. Thus, there is a clear rationale for developing clinical strategies to diminish their regulatory influences, with the ultimate goal of augmenting antitimor immunity. Therefore, manipulation of Treg cells represent new strategies for cancer treatment. In this Review, I will summarize and review the explosive recent studies demonstrating that Treg cells are increased in patients with malignancies and restoration of antitumor immunity in mice and humans by depletion or reduction of Treg cells. In addition, I will discuss both the prognostic value of Treg cells in tumor progression in tumor-bearing hosts and the rationale for strategies for therapeutic vaccination and immunotherapeutic targeting of Treg cells with drugs and microRNA. PMID:20157609

  8. Critical evaluation of regulatory T cells in autoimmunity: are the most potent regulatory specificities being ignored?

    PubMed

    Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2008-09-01

    The identification of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells as natural regulators of immunity in the periphery and tissues has stimulated tremendous interest in developing therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases. In this review, the site of origin, antigen specificity, homing markers and cytokine profiles of Treg cells were evaluated in autoimmune colitis and type 1 diabetes, two examples in which Treg cells were effective as therapy. These studies were compared with studies of Treg cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis, where successful therapy has not yet been achieved. Antigen-specific Treg cells appear to have more potent activity than polyclonal Treg cells and therefore hold more promise as therapeutic agents. However, Treg cells specific for the pathogenic T effector cells themselves have largely been overlooked and deserve consideration in future studies.

  9. Emerging role of regulatory T cells in gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ou; Furlan-Freguia, Christian; Arruda, Valder R; Herzog, Roland W

    2007-10-01

    Induction and maintenance of immune tolerance to therapeutic transgene products are key requirements for successful gene replacement therapies. Gene transfer may also be used to specifically induce immune tolerance and thereby augment other types of therapies. Similarly, gene therapies for treatment of autoimmune diseases are being developed in order to restore tolerance to self-antigens. Regulatory T cells have emerged as key players in many aspects of immune tolerance, and a rapidly increasing body of work documents induction and/or activation of regulatory T cells by gene transfer. Regulatory T cells may suppress antibody formation and cytotoxic T cell responses and may be critical for immune tolerance to therapeutic proteins. In this regard, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells have been identified as important components of tolerance in several gene transfer protocols, including hepatic in vivo gene transfer. Augmentation of regulatory T cell responses should be a promising new tool to achieve tolerance and avoid immune-mediated rejection of gene therapy. During the past decade, it has become obvious that immune regulation is an important and integral component of tolerance to self-antigens and of many forms of induced tolerance. Gene therapy can only be successful if the immune system does not reject the therapeutic transgene product. Recent studies provide a rapidly growing body of evidence that regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are involved and often play a crucial role in tolerance to proteins expressed by means of gene transfer. This review seeks to provide an overview of these data and their implications for gene therapy.

  10. Cell cycle regulatory E3 ubiquitin ligases as anticancer targets.

    PubMed

    Pray, Todd R; Parlati, Francesco; Huang, Jianing; Wong, Brian R; Payan, Donald G; Bennett, Mark K; Issakani, Sarkiz Daniel; Molineaux, Susan; Demo, Susan D

    2002-12-01

    Disregulation of the cell cycle and proliferation play key roles in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Such processes are intimately tied to the concentration, localization and activity of enzymes, adapters, receptors, and structural proteins in cells. Ubiquitination of these cellular regulatory proteins, governed by specific enzymes in the ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation cascade, has profound effects on their various functions, most commonly through proteasome targeting and degradation. This review will focus on a variety of E3 Ub ligases as potential oncology drug targets, with particular emphasis on the role of these molecules in the regulation of stability, localization, and activity of key proteins such as tumor suppressors and oncoproteins. E3 ubiquitin ligases that have established roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, such as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), the Skp-1-Cul1-F-box class, and the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) protein, in addition to more recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases which may be similarly important in tumorigenesis, (e.g. Smurf family, CHFR, and Efp), will be discussed. We will present evidence to support E3 ligases as good biological targets in the development of anticancer therapeutics and address challenges in drug discovery for these targets.

  11. Naturally occurring regulatory T cells: markers, mechanisms, and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Schmetterer, Klaus G; Neunkirchner, Alina; Pickl, Winfried F

    2012-06-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(high) forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) are key mediators of immunity, which orchestrate and maintain tolerance to self and foreign antigens. In the recent 1.5 decades, a multitude of studies have aimed to define the phenotype and function of nTregs and to assess their therapeutic potential for modulating immune mediated disorders such as autoimmunity, allergy, and episodes of transplant rejection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of nTregs. We address the exact definition of nTregs by specific markers and combinations thereof, which is a prerequisite for the state-of-the-art isolation of defined nTreg populations. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism by which nTregs mediate immunosuppression and how this knowledge might translate into novel therapeutic modalities. With first clinical studies of nTreg-based therapies being finished, questions concerning the reliable sources of nTregs are becoming more and more eminent. Consequently, approaches allowing conversion of CD4(+) T cells into nTregs by coculture with antigen-presenting cells, cytokines, and/or pharmacological agents are discussed. In addition, genetic engineering approaches for the generation of antigen-specific nTregs are described.

  12. Cell-type specific cis-regulatory networks: insights from Hox transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Polychronidou, Maria; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Hox proteins are a prominent class of transcription factors that specify cell and tissue identities in animal embryos. In sharp contrast to tissue-specifically expressed transcription factors, which coordinate regulatory pathways leading to the differentiation of a selected tissue, Hox proteins are active in many different cell types but are nonetheless able to differentially regulate gene expression in a context-dependent manner. This particular feature makes Hox proteins ideal candidates for elucidating the mechanisms employed by transcription factors to achieve tissue-specific functions in multi-cellular organisms. Here we discuss how the recent genome-wide identification and characterization of Hox cis-regulatory elements has provided insight concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying the high spatiotemporal specificity of Hox proteins. In particular, it was shown that Hox transcriptional outputs depend on the cell-type specific interplay of the different Hox proteins with co-regulatory factors as well as with epigenetic modifiers. Based on these observations it becomes clear that cell-type specific approaches are required for dissecting the tissue-specific Hox regulatory code. Identification and comparative analysis of Hox cis-regulatory elements driving target gene expression in different cell types in combination with analyses on how cofactors, epigenetic modifiers and protein-protein interactions mediate context-dependent Hox function will elucidate the mechanistic basis of tissue-specific gene regulation.

  13. Enhancing human regulatory T cells in vitro for cell therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Milward, Kate F; Wood, Kathryn J; Hester, Joanna

    2017-08-18

    Adoptive cellular therapies are gaining popularity as a means to treat clinical conditions, with potentially fewer risks and greater efficacy than traditional pharmacological strategies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are currently undergoing clinical trials in various immune-mediated pathologies, including transplant rejection and autoimmune conditions. In general, cell therapy relies upon ex vivo expansion of the cell product, in order to administer more cells than can be isolated from one person. In vitro manipulation of cell therapy products, prior to administration to patients, offers the opportunity to enhance the efficacy of the final cell therapy product in other ways. For example, cells can be exposed to reagents that enhance their longevity or functional potency after transfer into the patient. Genetic modification strategies can even permit the design of cells with bespoke functionality. Crucially, in vitro manipulation of therapeutic cells in isolation can exert these influences upon the biology of the therapeutic cells, without systemic exposure of the patient to the reagents being used. Quality control assessments can be integrated into the procedure prior to administration, to protect the patient from the risk of adverse events, should the procedure produce undesirable results. With a particular focus on Tregs, this review surveys the diverse strategies that are being employed to enhance the efficacy of cell therapy via in vitro manipulation of cells, and highlights some emerging technologies that may propel this endeavour in the future. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Peripheral blood regulatory T cell counts as a predictive biomarker for the outcome of kidney transplant: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Gómez, Francisco; Vásquez-Seoane, Mónica; Del Aguila, Waldo; Martín-García, Débora; Maurtua-Briseño Meiggs, Álvaro; González-López, Anunciación; Andrés-Martín, Beatriz; Nava-Rebollo, Álvaro; Casquero-Fernández, Fernando; Pascual-Núñez, Pilar; Grande-Villoria, Jesús; Bustamante-Bustamante, Jesús; Ochoa-Sangrador, Carlos; Lambert, Claude; Mendiluce-Herrero, Alicia

    2017-06-19

    Circulating regulatory T cells could become a suitable biomarker for kidney recipients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors on regulatory T cell numbers, and the clinical interest of this effect. Systematic review of published and unpublished studies. Worldwide databases or repositories. Randomised controlled trials and cohort studies comparing regulatory T cell counts and rejection episodes between patients with and without mTOR inhibitors were searched. Correlation of regulatory T cells-glomerular filtration rate might be supplied. Co-dependency regulatory T cells-mTOR inhibitors efficacy was evaluated. Five trials and 9 studies were included. Clinical differences made it difficult to obtain quantitative estimates of the effect of immunosuppression on regulatory T cell numbers. Nevertheless, we found that there are higher regulatory T cell numbers under treatment with sirolimus or everolimus. Rejection episodes were similar under calcineurin inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors despite different regulatory T cell numbers. Pooled correlation regulatory T cells-glomerular filtration rate was, prospectively 0.114 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.062-0.406), and retrospectively 0.13 (95% CI 0.0-0.361). There is direct evidence although of low level (biomarker-stratified randomisation) on the co-dependency regulatory T cells-mTOR inhibitors efficacy. Regulatory T cells counts may be associated with better outcomes under treatment with mTOR inhibitors (anti-rejection efficacy), considering that there is a relationship between these cells and kidney graft function. PROSPERO (CRD42016046285). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Overcoming the hurdles of tumor immunity by targeting regulatory pathways in innate and adaptive immune cells.

    PubMed

    Zwirner, Norberto W; Croci, Diego O; Domaica, Carolina I; Rabinovich, Gabriel A

    2010-01-01

    The improved understanding of the biochemical nature of tumor antigens and the identification of cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have been of paramount importance in the progress of tumor immunology. Studies on the intricate network of interactions between tumor and immune cells have revealed novel regulatory signals, including cell surface inhibitory receptors and costimulatory molecules, intracellular regulatory pathways, immunosuppressive cytokines and proapoptotic mediators, which may operate in concert to orchestrate tumor-immune escape. This emerging portfolio of inhibitory checkpoints can influence the physiology of innate immune cells including dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells, as well as different subsets of T cells to fine tune their effector function. The synergistic combination of strategies aimed at overcoming regulatory signals and/or stimulating effector pathways, may offer therapeutic advantage as adjuvants of conventional anticancer therapies. Based on this premise, we will discuss here how the control of the effector functions of innate and adaptive immune cells and the manipulation of regulatory pathways, either alone or in combination, could be exploited for therapeutic purposes in cancer patients.

  16. Exacerbated experimental arthritis in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficiency: modulatory role of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Gerben; Carter, Natalie A; Recher, Mike; Malinova, Dessislava; Adriani, Marsilio; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Burns, Siobhan O; Mauri, Claudia; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    Patients deficient in the cytoskeletal regulator Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) are predisposed to varied autoimmunity, suggesting it has an important controlling role in participating cells. IL-10-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells are emerging as important mediators of immunosuppressive activity. In experimental, antigen-induced arthritis WASp-deficient (WASp knockout [WAS KO]) mice developed exacerbated disease associated with decreased Breg cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells, but increased Th17 cells in knee-draining LNs. Arthritic WAS KO mice showed increased serum levels of B-cell-activating factor, while their B cells were unresponsive in terms of B-cell-activating factor induced survival and IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of WT Breg cells ameliorated arthritis in WAS KO recipients and restored a normal balance of Treg and Th17 cells. Mice with B-cell-restricted WASp deficiency, however, did not develop exacerbated arthritis, despite exhibiting reduced Breg- and Treg-cell numbers during active disease, and Th17 cells were not increased over equivalent WT levels. These findings support a contributory role for defective Breg cells in the development of WAS-related autoimmunity, but demonstrate that functional competence in other regulatory populations can be compensatory. A properly regulated cytoskeleton is therefore important for normal Breg-cell activity and complementation of defects in this lineage is likely to have important therapeutic benefits. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Roles for Inflammation and Regulatory T Cells in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Risk for developing cancer rises substantially as a result of poorly regulated inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacterial infections. Anti-inflammatory CD4+ regulatory cells (TREG) function to restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. It seems logical that TREG cells would function to reduce risk of inflammation-associated cancer in the bowel by down-regulating inflammation. It is widely believed, however, that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer inflammatory responses. Thus roles for inflammation, TREG cells, and gut bacteria in cancer are paradoxical and are the subject of controversy. Our accumulated data build upon the “hygiene hypothesis” model in which gastrointestinal (GI) infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce inflammation-associated diseases. Ability of TREG to inhibit or suppress cancer depends upon gut bacteria and IL-10, which serve to maintain immune balance and a protective anti-inflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under poorly regulated pro-inflammatory conditions, TREG fail to inhibit and may instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process, a cancer state that is reversible by down-regulation of inflammation and interleukin (IL)-6. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10– and TREG–mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated inflammation and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data help explain the paradox of inflammation and TREG in cancer and indicate that targeted stimulation of TREG may promote health and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:20019355

  18. Regulatory T-cell cytokines in patients with nonsegmental vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kidir, Mehtap; Karabulut, Ayse A; Ercin, Mustafa E; Atasoy, Pınar

    2017-05-01

    In the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo, the role of suppressor cytokines, such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), associated with regulatory T-cells (Treg) is not completely known. In this study, the role of Treg-cell functions in the skin of patients with nonsegmental vitiligo was investigated. Lesional and nonlesional skin samples from 30 adult volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 36 years with nonsegmental vitiligo were compared with normal skin area excision specimens of 30 benign melanocytic nevus cases as controls. All samples were evaluated staining for forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), TGF-β, and IL-10 using the standardized streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase immunohistochemistry method. Foxp3 expression was lower in lesional vitiligo skin specimens compared to controls; it was also lower in lesional vitiligo specimens than nonlesional vitiligo specimens. IL-10 levels were lower in lesional vitiligo specimens compared to the controls, whereas IL-10 expression was significantly lower in lesional specimens compared with nonlesional specimens. TGF-β expression was higher in both lesional and nonlesional skin specimens of patients with vitiligo compared to controls. TGF-β expression was lower in lesional skin specimens than nonlesional skin specimens. In addition, there was no significant correlation between Foxp3 expression with TGF-β and IL-10 expressions in lesional skin specimens in the vitiligo group. In this study, results supporting the contribution of Treg cells and IL-10 deficiency to the autoimmune process were obtained. Therefore, future studies are necessary to demonstrate the definitive role of Treg-cell functions in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo.

  19. The impact of regulatory T cells on T-cell immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu H.; Shashidhar, Sumana; Chang, Daisy S.; Ho, Lena; Kambham, Neeraja; Bachmann, Michael; Brown, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) by inhibiting the proliferation and function of conventional T cells (Tcons). However, the impact of Tregs on T-cell development and immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. Using a murine GvHD model induced by Tcons, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of Tregs leads to (1) abrogration of GvHD, (2) preservation of thymic and peripheral lymph node architecture, and (3) an accelerated donor lymphoid reconstitution of a diverse TCR-Vβ repertoire. The resultant enhanced lymphoid reconstitution in Treg recipients protects them from lethal cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. By contrast, mice that receive Tcons alone have disrupted lymphoid organs from GvHD and remain lymphopenic with a restricted TCR-Vβ repertoire and rapid death on MCMV challenge. Lymphocytes from previously infected Treg recipients generate secondary response specific to MCMV, indicating long-term protective immunity with transferred Tregs. Thymectomy significantly reduces survival after MCMV challenge in Treg recipients compared with euthymic controls. Our results indicate that Tregs enhance immune reconstitution by preventing GvHD-induced damage of the thymic and secondary lymphoid microenvironment. These findings provide new insights into the role of Tregs in affording protection to lymphoid stromal elements important for T-cell immunity. PMID:17916743

  20. Drivers of structural features in gene regulatory networks: From biophysical constraints to biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, O. C.; Krzywicki, A.; Zagorski, M.

    2016-07-01

    Living cells can maintain their internal states, react to changing environments, grow, differentiate, divide, etc. All these processes are tightly controlled by what can be called a regulatory program. The logic of the underlying control can sometimes be guessed at by examining the network of influences amongst genetic components. Some associated gene regulatory networks have been studied in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, unveiling various structural features ranging from broad distributions of out-degrees to recurrent ;motifs;, that is small subgraphs having a specific pattern of interactions. To understand what factors may be driving such structuring, a number of groups have introduced frameworks to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks. In that context, we review here such in silico approaches and show how selection for phenotypes, i.e., network function, can shape network structure.

  1. The role of dendritic cells and regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of morphea

    PubMed Central

    Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Kowalczyk, Michał; Żaba, Ryszard; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Morphea is one of diseases characterised by fibrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. It is a chronic disease that does not shorten the life of the patient, yet significantly affects its quality. The group of factors responsible for its pathogenesis is thought to include disturbed functioning of endothelial cells as well as immune disturbances leading to chronic inflammatory conditions, accompanied by increased production of collagen and of other extracellular matrix components. Dendritic cells (DC) are a type of professional antigen-presenting cells and can be found in almost all body tissues. Individual investigations have demonstrated high numbers of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) in morphoeic skin lesions, within deeper dermal layers, around blood vessels, and around collagen fibres in subcutaneous tissue. It appears that DC has a more pronounced role in the development of inflammation and T cell activation in morphea, as compared to systemic sclerosis (SSc). Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent a subpopulation of T cells with immunosuppressive properties. Recent studies have drawn attention to the important role played by Treg in the process of autoimmunisation. Just a few studies have demonstrated a decrease in the number and activity of Treg in patients with SSc, and only such studies involve morphea. This article reviews recent studies on the role of DC and regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of morphea. Moreover, mechanisms of phototherapy and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of morphea are discussed in this context. PMID:26155191

  2. Regulatory role of estrogen-induced reactive oxygen species in the modulatory function of UCP 2 in papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hima, Sithul; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress is postulated as one of the mechanisms underlying the estrogen's carcinogenic effect in thyroid cancer. But the fundamental mechanisms behind this carcinogenic effect remain elusive. Physiologically attainable concentrations of estrogen or estrogen metabolites have been made known to cause reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is envisioned that estrogen-induced ROS mediated signaling is a key congruent mechanism that drives the modulation of uncoupled proteins in papillary thyroid carcinoma cells. The present study investigates that estrogens may increase mitochondrial ROS production by repressing uncoupling proteins, which offers a new perspective on the understanding of why thyroid cancer occurs three times more often in females than in males, and the occurrence decreases after menopause. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. Regulatory T Cells in Hepatitis B and C Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are hepatotropic viruses that establish chronic persistent infection by effectively escaping the host immune response and can cause immune-mediated liver injury. It has recently become apparent that regulatory T (Treg) cells, specifically CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, modulate viral diseases by suppressing antiviral immune responses and regulating inflammatory host injury. The roles of Treg cells in HBV and HCV infections range from suppressing antiviral T cell responses to protecting the liver from immune-mediated damage. This review describes Treg cells and subpopulations and focuses on the roles of these cells in HBV and HCV infections. PMID:28035208

  4. Regulatory insight into the European human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Andreas; Stacey, Glyn; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Stachelscheid, Harald; Veiga, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The European pluripotent stem cell registry aims at listing qualified pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines that are available globally together with relevant information for each cell line. Specific emphasis is being put on documenting ethical procurement of the cells and providing evidence of pluripotency. The report discusses the tasks and challenges for a global PSC registry as an instrument to develop collaboration, to access cells from diverse resources and banks, and to implement standards, and as a means to follow up usage of cells and support adherence to regulatory and scientific standards and transparency for stakeholders.

  5. Cutting edge: regulatory T cells do not mediate suppression via programmed cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Delgoffe, Greg M; Green, Douglas R; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the immune system to regulate peripheral tolerance and prevent autoimmunity. However, the relative importance of different mechanisms of Treg function remains obscure. In this article, we reveal a limited role for programmed cell death pathways in mediating Treg suppression of conventional T cells. We show that Tregs are able to suppress the proliferation of conventional T cells that are resistant to apoptosis (Bim(-/-), Bim(-/-)Puma(-/-), Bcl-2 transgenic) or receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis (also referred to as regulated necrosis or necroptosis) (Ripk3(-/-)) in several in vitro and in vivo assays. These data suggest that programmed cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis, are not required for Treg-mediated suppression.

  6. Functional genomics identifies negative regulatory nodes controlling phagocyte oxidative burst

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel B.; Becker, Christine E.; Doan, Aivi; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J.; Knights, Dan; Mok, Amanda; Ng, Aylwin C.Y.; Doench, John G.; Root, David E.; Clish, Clary B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    The phagocyte oxidative burst, mediated by Nox2 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, confers host defense against a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss-of-function mutations that impair function of the Nox2 complex result in a life-threatening immunodeficiency, and genetic variants of Nox2 subunits have been implicated in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, alterations in the oxidative burst can profoundly impact host defense, yet little is known about regulatory mechanisms that fine-tune this response. Here we report the discovery of regulatory nodes controlling oxidative burst by functional screening of genes within loci linked to human inflammatory disease. Implementing a multi-omics approach, we define transcriptional, metabolic and ubiquitin-cycling nodes controlled by Rbpj, Pfkl and Rnf145, respectively. Furthermore, we implicate Rnf145 in proteostasis of the Nox2 complex by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Consequently, ablation of Rnf145 in murine macrophages enhances bacterial clearance, and rescues the oxidative burst defects associated with Ncf4 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26194095

  7. Functional implications of local DNA structures in regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA has been proposed to be a major determinant for functional transcription factors (TFs) and DNA interaction. Here, we use hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern as a measure of local DNA structure. We compared the conservation between DNA sequence and structure in terms of information content and attempted to assess the functional implications of DNA structures in regulatory motifs. We used statistical methods to evaluate the structural divergence of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. The following are our major observations: (i) we observed more information in structural alignment than in the corresponding sequence alignment for most of the transcriptional factors; (ii) for each TF, majority of positions have more information in the structural alignment as compared to the sequence alignment; (iii) we further defined a DNA structural divergence score (SD score) for each wild-type and mutant pair that is distinguished by single-base mutation. The SD score for benign mutations is significantly lower than that of switch mutations. This indicates structural conservation is also important for TFBS to be functional and DNA structures will provide previously unappreciated information for TF to realize the binding specificity.

  8. Interleukin-35 induces regulatory B cells that suppress autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M; Mahdi, Rashid M; Dolinska, Monika B; Sergeev, Yuri V; Wingfield, Paul T; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells suppress autoimmune disease, and increased numbers of Breg cells prevent host defense to infection and promote tumor growth and metastasis by converting resting CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T (Treg) cells. The mechanisms mediating the induction and development of Breg cells remain unclear. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg cells and promotes their conversion to a Breg subset that produces IL-35 as well as IL-10. Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), and mice lacking IL-35 (p35 knockout (KO) mice) or defective in IL-35 signaling (IL-12Rβ2 KO mice) produced less Breg cells endogenously or after treatment with IL-35 and developed severe uveitis. Adoptive transfer of Breg cells induced by recombinant IL-35 suppressed EAU when transferred to mice with established disease, inhibiting pathogenic T helper type 17 (TH17) and TH1 cells while promoting Treg cell expansion. In B cells, IL-35 activates STAT1 and STAT3 through the IL-35 receptor comprising the IL-12Rβ2 and IL-27Rα subunits. As IL-35 also induced the conversion of human B cells into Breg cells, these findings suggest that IL-35 may be used to induce autologous Breg and IL-35(+) Breg cells and treat autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  9. [The Role of Regulatory T-cells in Antitumor Immune Response].

    PubMed

    Klabusay, M

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-lymphocytes (Treg) are essential for regulation of immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmune disease development. Regulatory T-cells prevent the onset of autoimmune diseases; they keep immune homeostasis and modulate immune response during infection. Their activity is precisely controlled. Regulatory T-cells belong to one group of immune cells, which can support tumor survival and growth. They realize their function through inhibition of effector T-cells and by regulation of tumor microenvironment through production of various soluble factors. Many publications have proven that the amount of Treg cells is elevated in both solid tumors and in hematologic malignancies. Nevertheless, little is known about mechanisms, which allow increase and maintenance of elevated Treg cells in cancer patients. In this review, we will focus, among others, on the description of function and phenotype of Treg cells, their modulation of humoral immune response and interaction with cancer stem cells. Current development of modern tumor immunotherapy allows new possibilities of influencing Treg cells function.

  10. Bath-PUVA therapy improves impaired resting regulatory T cells and increases activated regulatory T cells in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Ryoji; Muramatsu, Shinnosuke; Sagawa, Yoko; Saito, Chiyo; Kasuya, Saori; Nishioka, Akiko; Nishida, Emi; Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2017-04-01

    Bath-psoralen plus ultraviolet light A (PUVA) therapy is an effective, safe, and inexpensive treatment for psoriasis. Psoriasis might be due to an unbalanced ratio of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells (Treg). The Treg functional ratio is significantly lower in patients with psoriasis compared with controls and is inversely correlated with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score. We previously reported that bath-PUVA therapy significantly increases the number of Treg and restores Treg function to almost normal in most patients with psoriasis. We examined the effects of bath-PUVA therapy on three distinct Foxp3(+) subsets: activated Treg (aTreg), resting Treg (rTreg), and cytokine-secreting non-suppressive T cells. We enrolled 15 patients with psoriasis and 11 healthy controls. We examined aTreg, rTreg, and cytokine-secreting non-suppressive T cells in peripheral blood obtained from the psoriasis patients before and after every fifth bath-PUVA therapy session. Levels of aTreg, which are considered to have the strongest suppressive activity in patients with psoriasis, were significantly increased in the early bath-PUVA therapy sessions, and then diminished. Levels of rTreg were lower in psoriasis patients than in healthy controls, and increased during bath-PUVA therapy. Bath-PUVA therapy induced aTreg and rTreg concomitantly with an improvement in the psoriatic lesions, suggesting a mechanism for the effectiveness of bath-PUVA therapy for psoriasis patients. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-01-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells. DO11·10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2–/– background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA323−339) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4+ cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4+ T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA323−339 peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. PMID:17490400

  12. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-08-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells. DO11.10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2(-/-) background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA(323-339)) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4(+) cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4(+) T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA(323-339) peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells.

  13. Molecular Determinants of Regulatory T Cell Development: The Essential Roles of Epigenetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Yohko; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a distinct T cell subset, which plays a key role in immune tolerance and homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxp3 controls a substantial part of Treg cell development and function. Yet its expression alone is insufficient for conferring developmental and functional characteristics of Treg cells. There is accumulating evidence that concurrent induction of Treg-specific epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression is crucial for lineage specification and functional stability of Treg cells. This review discusses recent progress in our understanding of molecular features of Treg cells, in particular, the molecular basis of how a population of developing T cells is driven to the Treg cell lineage and how its function is stably maintained. PMID:23675373

  14. Molecular determinants of regulatory T cell development: the essential roles of epigenetic changes.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yohko; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a distinct T cell subset, which plays a key role in immune tolerance and homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxp3 controls a substantial part of Treg cell development and function. Yet its expression alone is insufficient for conferring developmental and functional characteristics of Treg cells. There is accumulating evidence that concurrent induction of Treg-specific epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression is crucial for lineage specification and functional stability of Treg cells. This review discusses recent progress in our understanding of molecular features of Treg cells, in particular, the molecular basis of how a population of developing T cells is driven to the Treg cell lineage and how its function is stably maintained.

  15. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Katayama, Akiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki; Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Ohmori, Naoya; Aki, Tsunehiro; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Goto, Shigeru; Chen, Chao-Long; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  16. Cutting Edge: Human Latency-Associated Peptide+ T Cells: A Novel Regulatory T Cell Subset

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Roopali; Farez, Mauricio F.; Wang, Yue; Kozoriz, Deneen; Quintana, Francisco J.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Several molecules including TGF-β have been linked to the function and differentiation of Tregs. In this study, we describe a unique population of T cells expressing a membrane bound form of TGF-β, the latency-associated peptide (LAP), and having regulatory properties in human peripheral blood. These CD4+LAP+ T cells lack Foxp3 but express TGF-βR type II and the activation marker CD69. CD4+LAP+ T cells are hypoproliferative compared with CD4+LAP− T cells, secrete IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TGF-β upon activation, and exhibit TGF-β– and IL-10–dependent suppressive activity in vitro. The in vitro activation of CD4+LAP− T cells results in the generation of LAP+ Tregs, which is further amplified by IL-8. In conclusion, we have characterized a novel population of human LAP+ Tregs that is different from classic CD4+Foxp3+CD25high natural Tregs. PMID:20368276

  17. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L; Landolin, Jane M; Bristow, Christopher A; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L; Di Stefano, Luisa; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W; Brooks, Angela N; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A; Duff, Michael O; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K; Riddle, Nicole C; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E; Schwartz, Yuri B; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E; Brent, Michael R; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C R; Gingeras, Thomas R; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J; Celniker, Susan E; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H; Lai, Eric C; MacAlpine, David M; Stein, Lincoln D; White, Kevin P; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-24

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation.

  18. Identification of Functional Elements and Regulatory Circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Di Stefano, Luisa; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. PMID:21177974

  19. [THE FATTY CELL. THE VISCERAL FATTY TISSUE, EFFECT OF HUMORAL MEDIATOR LEPTIN IN AUTOCRINE WAY AND IN PARACRIN CENOSISES OF CELLS. TWO PHYLOGENETICALLY, FUNCTIONALLY AND REGULATORY DIFFERENT POOLS OF FATTY TISSUE IN VIVO].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2015-08-01

    Every cell reserves fatty acids in cytozol in drops of lipids in the form of non-polar triglycerides for itself andfor oxidation in mitochondria. The specialized visceral fatty cells ofomentum and adipocytes ofsubcutaneous fat are the cells absorbing saturated and mono unsaturated fatty acids in form of triglycerides in apoB-48 chylomicrons, apoB-100 lipoproteins of low and very low density. They deposit their physiological time and liberate fatty acids in intercellular medium in the form ofpolar unesterified fatty acids bound by albumin. According phylogenetic theory of general pathology, in biological function of trophology (nutrition) fatty cells sequentially implement biological reaction of exotrophy (external nutrition), deposition and endotrophy (internal nutrition). The humoral regulator offeedback in visceral fatty cells is leptin acting in autocrine way, in paracrin cenosises of cells and on the level of organism. The biological role of leptin is in preventing a) deposition of surplus amount of non-polar triglycerides in fatty cells; b) formation of endoplasmic "stress"; c) death of fatty cells in apoptosis way, formation of corpuscles of apoptosis and failure of biological function of endoecology; d) formation of biological reaction of inflammation in visceral fatty tissue; e) high level of unsaturated fatty acids in intercellular medium and f) development of metabolic syndrome. The leptin prevents aphysiological deposit ofnon-polar triglycerides in insulin-dependent cells that are not intended to deposit non-polar triglycerides and also in β-cells of islands. The main cause of high level ofleptin in blood plasma is overeating offood physiological by content of nutrients.

  20. Dynamic expression of T-bet and GATA3 by regulatory T cells maintains immune tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fang; Sharma, Suveena; Edwards, Julie; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells can express the transcription factors T-bet and GATA3 but the function of this expression and whether such cells represent stable subsets is still unknown. By using multiple reporter tools, we show that the expression of T-bet and GATA3 in Treg cells is dynamically influenced by the cytokine environment. Treg cell-specific deletion of either Tbx21 or Gata3 genes singly did not result in loss of Treg cell functions; however, mice with combined deficiency of both genes in Treg cells developed severe autoimmune-like diseases. Loss of Treg cell function was correlated with RORγt transcription factor upregulation and reduced Foxp3 expression. Thus, in the steady state, activated Treg cells transiently upregulate either T-bet or GATA3 to maintain T cell homeostasis. PMID:25501630

  1. Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells inhibit endogenous cytotoxic T cell responses to lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Anusha-Preethi; Johansson, Magnus; Ruffell, Brian; Beltran, Adam; Lau, Jonathan; Jablons, David M.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Immune cells comprise a substantial proportion of the tumor mass in human non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), but the precise composition and significance of this infiltration is unclear. Herein we examined immune complexity of human NSCLC as well as NSCLC developing in CC10-TAg transgenic mice, and revealed that CD4+ T lymphocytes represent the dominant population of CD45+ immune cells, and relative to normal lung tissue, CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were significantly increased as a proportion of total CD4+ cells. To assess the functional significance of increased Treg cells, we evaluated CD8+ T cell-deficient/CC10-TAg mice and revealed that CD8+ T cells significantly controlled tumor growth with anti-tumor activity that was partially repressed by Treg cells. However, while treatment with anti-CD25 depleting mAb as monotherapy preferentially depleted Tregs and improved CD8+ T cell-mediated control of tumor progression during early tumor development, similar monotherapy was ineffective at later stages. Since mice bearing early NSCLC treated with anti-CD25 mAb exhibited increased tumor cell death associated with infiltration by CD8+ T cells expressing elevated levels of granzyme A, granzyme B, perforin and interferon-γ, we therefore evaluated carboplatin combination therapy resulting in a significantly extended survival beyond that observed with chemotherapy alone, indicating that Treg depletion in combination with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial as a treatment strategy for advanced NSCLC. PMID:23851682

  2. Immunopathogenesis In Autism: Regulatory T Cells and Autoimmunity In Neurodevelopment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    which suggests impacts to regulatory T cells (Tregs). Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sultanate (PFOS) are widespread environmental...The emerging contaminants perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are environmentally pervasive and have been associated...Specific Aim #2: To determine the effects of developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) or perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on

  3. Finding Balance: T cell Regulatory Receptor Expression during Aging.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Mary M; Qi, Qian; Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2011-10-01

    Aging is associated with a variety of changes to immune responsiveness. Reduced protection against infection, reduced responses to vaccination and increased risk of autoimmunity are all hallmarks of advanced age. Here we consider how changes in the expression of regulatory receptors on the T cell surface contribute to altered immunity during aging.

  4. Characterization of peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent diabetes onset in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lepault, F; Gagnerault, M C

    2000-01-01

    The period that precedes onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus corresponds to an active dynamic state in which pathogenic autoreactive T cells are kept from destroying beta cells by regulatory T cells. In prediabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, CD4+ splenocytes were shown to prevent diabetes transfer in immunodeficient NOD recipients. We now demonstrate that regulatory splenocytes belong to the CD4+ CD62Lhigh T cell subset that comprises a vast majority of naive cells producing low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma and no IL-4 and IL-10 upon in vitro stimulation. Consistently, the inhibition of diabetes transfer was not mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Regulatory cells homed to the pancreas and modified the migration of diabetogenic to the islets, which resulted in a decreased insulitis severity. The efficiency of CD62L+ T cells was dose dependent, independent of sex and disease prevalence. Protection mechanisms did not involve the CD62L molecule, an observation that may relate to the fact that CD4+ CD62Lhigh lymph node cells were less potent than their splenic counterparts. Regulatory T cells were detectable after weaning and persist until disease onset, sustaining the notion that diabetes is a late and abrupt event. Thus, the CD62L molecule appears as a unique marker that can discriminate diabetogenic (previously shown to be CD62L-) from regulatory T cells. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of protective CD4+ CD62L+ cells suggest they are different from Th2-, Tr1-, and NK T-type cells, reported to be implicated in the control of diabetes in NOD mice, and may represent a new immunoregulatory population.

  5. Biochemical Features and Functional Implications of the RNA-Based T-Box Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Preciado, Ana; Henkin, Tina M.; Grundy, Frank J.; Yanofsky, Charles; Merino, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The T-box mechanism is a common regulatory strategy used for modulating the expression of genes of amino acid metabolism-related operons in gram-positive bacteria, especially members of the Firmicutes. T-box regulation is usually based on a transcription attenuation mechanism in which an interaction between a specific uncharged tRNA and the 5′ region of the transcript stabilizes an antiterminator structure in preference to a terminator structure, thereby preventing transcription termination. Although single T-box regulatory elements are common, double or triple T-box arrangements are also observed, expanding the regulatory range of these elements. In the present study, we predict the functional implications of T-box regulation in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, proteins of amino acid biosynthetic pathways, transporters, and regulatory proteins. We also consider the global impact of the use of this regulatory mechanism on cell physiology. Novel biochemical relationships between regulated genes and their corresponding metabolic pathways were revealed. Some of the genes identified, such as the quorum-sensing gene luxS, in members of the Lactobacillaceae were not previously predicted to be regulated by the T-box mechanism. Our analyses also predict an imbalance in tRNA sensing during the regulation of operons containing multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes or biosynthetic genes involved in pathways common to more than one amino acid. Based on the distribution of T-box regulatory elements, we propose that this regulatory mechanism originated in a common ancestor of members of the Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Actinobacteria and was transferred into the Deltaproteobacteria by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:19258532

  6. Tr1-Like T Cells – An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3− CD4+ T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4+ memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10+ and IL-10− T cells. However, CD4+IL-10+ T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3+ and PD-1+ cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells. PMID:27683580

  7. Regulatory B cells present in lymph nodes draining a murine tumor.

    PubMed

    Maglioco, Andrea; Machuca, Damián G; Camerano, Gabriela; Costa, Héctor A; Ruggiero, Raúl; Dran, Graciela I

    2014-01-01

    In cancer, B cells have been classically associated with antibody secretion, antigen presentation and T cell activation. However, a possible role for B lymphocytes in impairing antitumor response and collaborating with tumor growth has been brought into focus. Recent reports have described the capacity of B cells to negatively affect immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The highly immunogenic mouse tumor MCC loses its immunogenicity and induces systemic immune suppression and tolerance as it grows. We have previously demonstrated that MCC growth induces a distinct and progressive increase in B cell number and proportion in the tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLN), as well as a less prominent increase in T regulatory cells. The aim of this research was to study B cell characteristics and function in the lymph node draining MCC tumor and to analyze whether these cells may be playing a role in suppressing antitumor response and favoring tumor progression. Results indicate that B cells from TDLN expressed increased CD86 and MHCII co-stimulatory molecules indicating activated phenotype, as well as intracellular IL-10, FASL and Granzyme B, molecules with regulatory immunosuppressive properties. Additionally, B cells showed high inhibitory upon T cell proliferation ex vivo, and a mild capacity to secrete antibodies. Our conclusion is that even when evidence of B cell-mediated activity of the immune response is present, B cells from TDLN exhibit regulatory phenotype and inhibitory activity, probably contributing to the state of immunological tolerance characteristic of the advanced tumor condition.

  8. Generation and identification of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Biragyn, Arya; Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Bregs in cancer remains poorly understood despite their well-documented regulation of responses to the self and protection from harmful autoimmunity. We recently discovered a unique regulatory B cell subset evoked by breast cancer to mediate protection of metastasizing cancer cells. These results together with the wealth of findings of the last 40 years on B cells in tumorigenesis suggest the existence of additional cancer Bregs modulating anticancer responses. To facilitate the search for them, here we provide our detailed protocol for the characterization and generation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells. Wherever applicable, we also discuss nuances and uniqueness of a Breg study in cancer to warn potential pitfalls. PMID:25015287

  9. Functional Alignment of Regulatory Networks: A Study of Temperate Phages

    PubMed Central

    Trusina, Ala; Sneppen, Kim; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E; Egan, J. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the design and functionality of molecular networks is now a key issue in biology. Comparison of regulatory networks performing similar tasks can provide insights into how network architecture is constrained by the functions it directs. Here, we discuss methods of network comparison based on network architecture and signaling logic. Introducing local and global signaling scores for the difference between two networks, we quantify similarities between evolutionarily closely and distantly related bacteriophages. Despite the large evolutionary separation between phage λ and 186, their networks are found to be similar when difference is measured in terms of global signaling. We finally discuss how network alignment can be used to pinpoint protein similarities viewed from the network perspective. PMID:16477325

  10. Thymic B cells promote thymus-derived regulatory T cell development and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang-Ting; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yin-Hu; Ma, Hong-Di; Tang, Wei; Yang, Jing-Bo; Li, Liang; Ansari, Aftab A; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Thymic CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are critical for the development of immunological tolerance and immune homeostasis and requires contributions of both thymic dendritic and epithelial cells. Although B cells have been reported to be present within the thymus, there has not hitherto been a definition of their role in immune cell development and, in particular, whether or how they contribute to the Treg cellular thymic compartment. Herein, using both phenotypic and functional approaches, we demonstrate that thymic B cells