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Sample records for cell selection devices

  1. 76 FR 51038 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Cell Selection Devices for Point of Care Production of Minimally...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Cell Selection Devices for Point of Care Production of Minimally Manipulated Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cells; Withdrawal of... Guidance for Industry: Cell Selection Devices for Point of Care Production of Minimally...

  2. Multiband selection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, H. L.; Mika, A. M.; Davis, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Current science projections for future earth-imaging instruments indicate the need for as many as 25 spectral bands, with bandwidths as narrow as 20 nanometers. The desire for a multiplicity of bands has led researchers to study various spectrally dispersive instrument designs as a means of providing the desired future capability. These instrument designs, however, are costly, complex, and of high technical risk. This paper describes a 'multiband selection device' containing several spectral filters that can be placed at the exit faces of a broadband multiport beam splitter and thereby provide a multiplicity of spectral bands with a high degree of spatial coregistration while utilizing state-of-the-art linear array detectors. Fabrication of the multiband selection device has been successfully accomplished, and the design and test results are described.

  3. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  4. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  5. Development of a device for selective removal of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hirokazu; Ninomiya, Kasumi; Yoshida, Makoto; Matsuo, Hidenori; Shibuya, Noritoshi

    2003-06-01

    To control antigen (Ag)-specific immune cells is important in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In particular, controlling the immune response of autoimmune T cells is effective in the treatment of these diseases. The development of a device that can remove CD4+ T cells specifically by extracorporeal circulation is now in progress, with the aim to deplete autoimmune T cells. We developed a removal material made of polypropylene non-woven fabrics with anti human CD4 monoclonal antibody immobilized on the surface. Using a column packed with the removal material, we succeeded in removing CD4+ T cells specifically from peripheral whole blood by direct perfusion. Moreover, CD4+ T cells can be specifically removed even from blood with lower surface antigen density by in vitro activation.

  6. Strategies for increasing the efficiency of heterojunction organic solar cells: material selection and device architecture.

    PubMed

    Heremans, Paul; Cheyns, David; Rand, Barry P

    2009-11-17

    Thin-film blends or bilayers of donor- and acceptor-type organic semiconductors form the core of heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells. Researchers measure the quality of photovoltaic cells based on their power conversion efficiency, the ratio of the electrical power that can be generated versus the power of incident solar radiation. The efficiency of organic solar cells has increased steadily in the last decade, currently reaching up to 6%. Understanding and combating the various loss mechanisms that occur in processes from optical excitation to charge collection should lead to efficiencies on the order of 10% in the near future. In organic heterojunction solar cells, the generation of photocurrent is a cascade of four steps: generation of excitons (electrically neutral bound electron-hole pairs) by photon absorption, diffusion of excitons to the heterojunction, dissociation of the excitons into free charge carriers, and transport of these carriers to the contacts. In this Account, we review our recent contributions to the understanding of the mechanisms that govern these steps. Starting from archetype donor-acceptor systems of planar small-molecule heterojunctions and solution-processed bulk heterojunctions, we outline our search for alternative materials and device architectures. We show that non-planar phthalocynanines have appealing absorption characteristics but also have reduced charge carrier transport. As a result, the donor layer needs to be ultrathin, and all layers of the device have to be tuned to account for optical interference effects. Using these optimization techniques, we illustrate cells with 3.1% efficiency for the non-planar chloroboron subphthalocyanine donor. Molecules offering a better compromise between absorption and carrier mobility should allow for further improvements. We also propose a method for increasing the exciton diffusion length by converting singlet excitons into long-lived triplets. By doping a polymer with a

  7. Selective Deposition of Insulating Metal Oxide in Perovskite Solar Cells with Enhanced Device Performance.

    PubMed

    Yue, Youfeng; Yang, Xudong; Wu, Yongzhen; Salim, Noviana Tjitra; Islam, Ashraful; Noda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan

    2015-08-24

    We report a simple methodology for the selective deposition of an insulating layer on the nanoparticulate TiO2 (np-TiO2) mesoporous layer of perovskite solar cells. The deposited MgO insulating layer mainly covered the bottom part of the np-TiO2 layer with less coverage at the top. The so-called quasi-top-open structure is introduced to act as an efficient hole-blocking layer to prevent charge recombination at the physical contact of the transparent conducting oxide with the perovskite. This leads to an open-circuit voltage higher than that of the reference cell with a compact TiO2 hole-blocking layer. Moreover, such a quasi-top-open structure can facilitate the electron injection from perovskite into the np-TiO2 mesoporous layer and improve the spectral response at longer wavelength because of the less covered insulating layer at the top. This work provides an alternative way to fabricate perovskite solar cells without the need to use a conventional compact TiO2 layer.

  8. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  9. A multi-channel device for high-density target-selective stimulation and long-term monitoring of cells and subcellular features in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Shin Ae; Coakley, Sean; Mugno, Paula; Hammarlund, Marc; Hilliard, Massimo A; Lu, Hang

    2014-12-07

    Selective cell ablation can be used to identify neuronal functions in multicellular model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. The optogenetic tool KillerRed facilitates selective ablation by enabling light-activated damage of cell or subcellular components in a temporally and spatially precise manner. However, the use of KillerRed requires stimulating (5 min-1 h), culturing (~24 h) and imaging (often repeatedly) a large number of individual animals. Current manual manipulation methods are limited by their time-consuming, labor-intensive nature, and their usage of anesthetics. To facilitate large-scale selective ablation, culturing, and repetitive imaging, we developed a densely-packed multi-channel device and used it to perform high-throughput neuronal ablation on KillerRed-expressing animals. The ability to load worms in identical locations with high loading efficiency allows us to ablate selected neurons in multiple worms simultaneously. Our device also enables continuous observation of animals for 24 h following KillerRed activation, and allows the animals to be recovered for behavioural assays. We expect this multi-channel device to facilitate a broad range of long-term imaging and selective illumination experiments in neuroscience.

  10. CD34 cell selection of peripheral blood progenitor cells using the CliniMACS device for allogeneic transplantation: clinical results in 102 patients.

    PubMed

    Ringhoffer, Mark; Wiesneth, Markus; Harsdorf, Stephanie; Schlenk, Richard F; Schmitt, Anita; Reinhardt, Peter P; Moessner, Margit; Grimminger, Wolfgang; Mertens, Thomas; Reske, Sven N; Döhner, Hartmut; Bunjes, Donald

    2004-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of CD34(+) cell selection in 102 patients using the CliniMACS device. Patients were at high risk for the development of graft versus host disease (GvHD) because of age, or the use of a haploidentical, mismatched or unrelated donor (UD). The median age of the patients was 44 years. The CliniMACS procedure yielded 8.0 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg and the number of residual T cells was 1.3 x 10(4)/kg (median). The median follow up was 20.6 months. The probability of graft failure was 7%. The rate of acute GvHD was low (compatible family donors 10%, UDs 17%, and haploidentical donors 26%) with no patient enduring more than grade II disease. The cumulative incidence of chronic GvHD at the median follow up after transplant was 15% for the compatible family donor group, 40% for the UD group and 78% in the group transplanted from a haploidentical donor Treatment failure was mainly because of transplant-related mortality, especially aspergillus infection, and not due to relapse. The probability of disease-free survival, stratified for the risk of treatment failure, was 27% for the high risk, 46% for the intermediate risk and 83% for the low risk group.

  11. Variable wavelength selection devices: Physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianyu, Haiqing

    Variable wavelength selection (VWS) achieved by implementing tunability to wavelength discriminating devices has generated great interest in basic science, applied physics, and technology. This thesis focuses on the underlying physics and application of several novel wavelength discriminating devices. Holographical polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) are switchable volume gratings formed by exposing a photopolymerizable monomer and liquid crystal mixture to interfering monochromatic light beams. An HPDLCs wavelength discriminating ability along with its switchability, allow it to be utilized in VWS devices. A novel mode HPDLC, total internal reflection (TIR) HPDLC, has been developed as a wavelength selective filter. The grating planes in this device are tilted so that the diffracted light experiences total internal reflection at the glass-air interface and is trapped in the cell until it eventually escapes from an edge. A VWS device is demonstrated by stacking TIR HPDLCs operating at different wavelengths. Converging or diverging recording beams are employed to fabricate chirped reflection HPDLCs with a pitch gradient along the designated direction, creating chirped switchable reflection gratings (CSRGs). A pixelated version of the CSRG is developed herein, and a dynamic spectral equalizer is presented by combining the pixelated CSRG with a prism (for wavelength discrimination). A switchable circular to point converter (SCPC), which enables the random selection of the wavelength bands divided by the Fabry-Perot interferometer utilizing the controllable beam steering capability of transmission HPDLCs, is demonstrated. A random optical cross-switch (TIROL) can be created by integrating a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a stack of SCPC units. The in-plane electric field generated by the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to elongate the helical pitch of a cholesteric liquid crystal and thereby induces a red shift of the transmission reflection peak

  12. Considerations in insulin delivery device selection.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Virginia; Kruger, Davida F

    2010-06-01

    Recent guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes promote the use of insulin sooner rather than later in patients with type 2 diabetes to achieve goal range glucose control (< 7%) but remain silent on a recommendation for delivery system. Even though there is widespread consensus among experts and payers that people with type 2 diabetes should use insulin earlier to achieve tight control, it still remains an elusive goal. Benefits of pen-type delivery devices include accurate dosing, faster and easier setting of dose and injection times, and increased patient acceptance and adherence. Before healthcare professionals can recommend a delivery device, it is critical they understand not only the medication in the device but also the various features and benefits to the different devices available and how those impact the patient. We will present considerations to assist in making appropriate device selection, to optimize patient success.

  13. It Takes Two to Tango-Double-Layer Selective Contacts in Perovskite Solar Cells for Improved Device Performance and Reduced Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Kegelmann, Lukas; Wolff, Christian M; Awino, Celline; Lang, Felix; Unger, Eva L; Korte, Lars; Dittrich, Thomas; Neher, Dieter; Rech, Bernd; Albrecht, Steve

    2017-05-24

    Solar cells made from inorganic-organic perovskites have gradually approached market requirements as their efficiency and stability have improved tremendously in recent years. Planar low-temperature processed perovskite solar cells are advantageous for possible large-scale production but are more prone to exhibiting photocurrent hysteresis, especially in the regular n-i-p structure. Here, a systematic characterization of different electron selective contacts with a variety of chemical and electrical properties in planar n-i-p devices processed below 180 °C is presented. The inorganic metal oxides TiO2 and SnO2, the organic fullerene derivatives C60, PCBM, and ICMA, as well as double-layers with a metal oxide/PCBM structure are used as electron transport materials (ETMs). Perovskite layers deposited atop the different ETMs with the herein applied fabrication method show a similar morphology according to scanning electron microscopy. Further, surface photovoltage spectroscopy measurements indicate comparable perovskite absorber qualities on all ETMs, except TiO2, which shows a more prominent influence of defect states. Transient photoluminescence studies together with current-voltage scans over a broad range of scan speeds reveal faster charge extraction, less pronounced hysteresis effects, and higher efficiencies for devices with fullerene compared to those with metal oxide ETMs. Beyond this, only double-layer ETM structures substantially diminish hysteresis effects for all performed scan speeds and strongly enhance the power conversion efficiency up to a champion stabilized value of 18.0%. The results indicate reduced recombination losses for a double-layer TiO2/PCBM contact design: First, a reduction of shunt paths through the fullerene to the ITO layer. Second, an improved hole blocking by the wide band gap metal oxide. Third, decreased transport losses due to an energetically more favorable contact, as implied by photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The

  14. Uterine metrology devices for IUD selection.

    PubMed

    1981-11-01

    Accurate measurements of the length of the uterine cavity would make it feasible to select an IUD that is compatible with a given cavity size. Considerable evidence exists to indicate that selecting an IUD on the basis of accurate longitudinal measurements of the uterine cavity improves IUD performance. There are study findings to suggest that as more data are available, specific IUDs can be prescribed for defined ranges of uterine cavity length. Metrology (uterine measuring) devices improve the ability of the clinican to measure accurately longitudinal and, in some instances, lateral dimensions of the uterine cavity. Longitudinal measurements depend on identifying the location of the internal os in order to determine the total length of the cervical canal. Lateral metrology devices also provide a measurement of uterine cavity width. Pain and discomfort associated with the use of the prototype lateral measurement instruments developed thus far is a major deterrent to their wide-scale use. 2 metrology devices -- the Crochet Hook Sound and the Hasson Wing Sound -- are designed to obtain longitudinal measurements of total uterine cavity length and of the length of the cervical canel. 2 new instruments -- the Cavimeter and the Hasson Wing Sound 2 -- designed to obtain both lateral and longitudinal measurements are now available for evaluation. The Hasson Wing Sound appears to be the only uterine metrology device available for service programs that could affect continuation rates of IUD users. It can measure the length of the uterine cavity directly, thus permitting improved IUD selection of individual women or the ability to exclude women who should not be IUD users because of small uterine size. An illustration of the prescriptive approach is included in a table.

  15. Microstructure devices generation by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Juergen J.; Hansjosten, Edgar; Anurjew, Eugen; Pfleging, Wilhelm; Schubert, Klaus

    2007-02-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a generative manufacturing procedure mainly known for the application with metal powders. From these, metallic structures are produced in a layer-by-layer way. This layer-related procedure is comparable to the stereolithographic manufacturing of polymer devices. On a base plate, a thin layer of metal powder is spread. The powder is locally completely melted by the application of a focused laser beam. The base plate is then lowered by a value defined by the thickness of the metal layer, metal powder is spread again, and the local melting process is re-initiated. The complete procedure is continued as described, until the device is manufactured in the defined way. Commercially available metal powder can be used as base material. In principle, the SLM process should be suitable for the generation of metallic microstructures. The main precondition for the generation of microstructures by SLM is that the spatial resolution of the laser focus is small and precise enough to generate microstructure walls of around 100μm thickness in a reproducible way by melting metal powder. The walls should be gas- and leak-tight. In this publication, experimental results of the generation of metallic microstructure devices by SLM will be given. The process will be described in details. Process parameters for the generation of stainless steel devices having wall thicknesses in the range of about 100μm will be given. Examples for microstructure devices made by SLM will be shown. The devices can be manufactured in a reproducible way. Moreover, very first preliminary results on the use of ceramic powder as base material will be presented.

  16. Device for monitoring cell voltage

    DOEpatents

    Doepke, Matthias [Garbsen, DE; Eisermann, Henning [Edermissen, DE

    2012-08-21

    A device for monitoring a rechargeable battery having a number of electrically connected cells includes at least one current interruption switch for interrupting current flowing through at least one associated cell and a plurality of monitoring units for detecting cell voltage. Each monitoring unit is associated with a single cell and includes a reference voltage unit for producing a defined reference threshold voltage and a voltage comparison unit for comparing the reference threshold voltage with a partial cell voltage of the associated cell. The reference voltage unit is electrically supplied from the cell voltage of the associated cell. The voltage comparison unit is coupled to the at least one current interruption switch for interrupting the current of at least the current flowing through the associated cell, with a defined minimum difference between the reference threshold voltage and the partial cell voltage.

  17. Exercise Device Would Exert Selectable Constant Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus called the resistive exercise device (RED) has been proposed to satisfy a requirement for exercise equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that could passively exert a selectable constant load on both the outward and return strokes. The RED could be used alone; alternatively, the RED could be used in combination with another apparatus called the treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization (TVIS), in which case the combination would be called the subject load device (SLD). The basic RED would be a passive device, but it could incorporate an electric motor to provide eccentric augmentation (augmentation to make the load during inward movement greater than the load during outward movement). The RED concept represents a unique approach to providing a constant but selectable resistive load for exercise for the maintenance and development of muscles. Going beyond the original ISS application, the RED could be used on Earth as resistive weight training equipment. The advantage of the RED over conventional weight-lifting equipment is that it could be made portable and lightweight.

  18. Integrated Colony Imaging, Analysis, and Selection Device for Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Edward; Herderick, Edward E; Adams, Thomas; Dunn, James; Germanowski, Robert; Krakosh, Frank; Boehm, Cynthia; Monnich, James; Powell, Kimerly; Muschler, George

    2017-04-01

    Stem and progenitor cells derived from human tissues are being developed as cell sources for cell-based assays and therapies. However, tissue-derived stem and progenitor cells are heterogeneous. Differences in observed clones of stem cells likely reflect important aspects of the underlying state of the source cells, as well as future potency for cell therapies. This paper describes a colony analysis and picking device that provides quantitative analysis of heterogeneous cell populations and precise tools for cell picking for research or biomanufacturing applications. We describe an integrated robotic system that enables image acquisition and automated image analysis to be coupled with rapid automated selection of individual colonies in adherent cell cultures. Other automated systems have demonstrated feasibility with picking from semisolid media or off feeder layers. We demonstrate the capability to pick adherent bone-derived stem cells from tissue culture plastic. Cells are efficiently picked from a target site and transferred to a recipient well plate. Cells demonstrate viability and adherence and maintain biologic potential for surface markers CD73 and CD90 based on phase contrast and fluorescence imaging 6 days after transfer. Methods developed here can be applied to the study of other stem cell types and automated culture of cells.

  19. Nanoscale selective area epitaxy for optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elarde, V. C.; Coleman, J. J.

    Self-assembled quantum dots have been heavily researched in recent years because of the potential applications to quantum electronic and optoelectronic devices they present. The non-uniformity and random ordering resulting from the self-assembly processes, however, are detrimental to potential applications, prohibiting the type of engineering control necessary for complex systems. The work presented in this document has sought to overcome the limitations of self-assembly by combining selective area epitaxy via MOCVD with high-resolution electron beam lithography to achieve lateral control over semiconductor structures at the nanometer scale. Two different structures are presented. The first is patterned quantum dots which improve on the uniformity and order of similar self-assembled quantum dots. The second is an entirely novel structure, the nanopore active layer, which demonstrates the potential for this process to extend beyond the constraints of self-assembly. Experimental and theoretical results for both structures are presented.

  20. Development of magnetic device for cell separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haik, Yousef; Pai, Vinay; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1999-04-01

    A magnetic device that separates red blood cells from the whole blood on a continuous basis is presented. The device utilizes permanent magnets in alternating spatial arrangements. Red blood cells are coupled with magnetic microspheres to facilitate the magnetic separation. Effectiveness of red blood cells separation and purity of plasma solution was improved using the device over conventional centrifugal methods.

  1. Whole Blood Cell Staining Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Clift, Vaughan L.; McDonald, Kelly E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for staining particular cell markers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a flexible tube that is reversibly pinched into compartments with one or more clamps. Each compartment of the tube contains a separate reagent and is in selective fluid communication with adjoining compartments.

  2. Assembly For Moving a Robotic Device Along Selected Axes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlin, Brentley Craig (Inventor); Koch, Lisa Danielle (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An assembly for moving a robotic device along selected axes includes a programmable logic controller (PLC) for controlling movement of the device along selected axes to effect movement of the device to a selected disposition. The PLC includes a plurality of single axis motion control modules, and a central processing unit (CPU) in communication with the motion control modules. A human-machine interface is provided for operator selection of configurations of device movements and is in communication with the CPU. A motor drive is in communication with each of the motion control modules and is operable to effect movement of the device along the selected axes to obtain movement of the device to the selected disposition.

  3. Assembly For Moving a Robotic Device Along Selected Axes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlin, Brentley Craig (Inventor); Koch, Lisa Danielle (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An assembly for moving a robotic device along selected axes includes a programmable logic controller (PLC) for controlling movement of the device along selected axes to effect movement of the device to a selected disposition. The PLC includes a plurality of single axis motion control modules, and a central processing unit (CPU) in communication with the motion control modules. A human-machine interface is provided for operator selection of configurations of device movements and is in communication with the CPU. A motor drive is in communication with each of the motion control modules and is operable to effect movement of the device along the selected axes to obtain movement of the device to the selected disposition.

  4. Medical Device Recalls: Examination of Selected Cases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    accelerator Device class: 2 Medical specialty: Radiology Brand: Therac - 25 Linear Accelerator Use: Used in clinical (cancer) radiotherapy Premarketing...design recalls.- As wouldl Ne exp~ected, becaulse all (lass 8 (high-risk) dev.ices require prenmarket ap)1O1lmtSt PNMA-dCSigfl r-ecalls ( 25 , or 89...Table 11.4 PMA-Design Recalls by Device Class, Fiscal Years 1983-88 No. oi Device class recalls Percent 2 (medium risk) 3 1 100 3 (high risk) 25 89

  5. Selected Endoscopic Gastric Devices for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Kartik; Rothstein, Richard I

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on the stomach target devices that are currently in various stages of development. Approved intragastric balloons, devices targeting small bowel and aspiration techniques, are described in other contributions to this issue. Bariatric endoscopic devices targeting the stomach directly alter gastric physiology and promote weight loss by potentially changing functional gastric volume, gastric emptying, gastric wall compliance, neurohormonal signaling, and, thereby, satiety. Many stomach-targeting devices are on the horizon for clinical use, and further study will determine the safety and efficacy for clinical use.

  6. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  7. Using benchmarking data to determine vascular access device selection.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Margy

    2002-01-01

    Benchmarking data has validated that patients with planned vascular access device (VAD) placement have fewer device placements, less difficulty with device insertions, fewer venipunctures, earlier assessment for placement of central VADs, and shorter hospital stays. This article will discuss VAD program planning, early assessment for VAD selection, and benchmarking of program data used to achieve positive infusion-related outcomes.

  8. Acoustophoretic Sorting of Viable Mammalian Cells in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Allen H. J.; Soh, H. Tom

    2013-01-01

    We report the first use of ultrasonic acoustophoresis for the label-free separation of viable and nonviable mammalian cells within a microfluidic device. Cells that have undergone apoptosis are physically smaller than viable cells, and our device exploits this fact to achieve efficient sorting based on the strong size dependence of acoustic radiation forces within a microchannel. As a model, we have selectively enriched viable MCF-7 breast tumor cells from heterogeneous mixtures of viable and nonviable cells. We found that this mode of separation is gentle and enables efficient, label-free isolation of viable cells from mixed samples containing 106 cells/mL at flow rates of up to 12 mL/h. We have extensively characterized the device, and we report the effects of piezoelectric voltage and sample flow rate on device performance and describe how these parameters can be tuned to optimize recovery, purity, or throughput. PMID:23157478

  9. The Utility of the Assessment Center as a Selection Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascio, Wayne F.; Silbey, Val

    Psychometric evaluations of the assessment center method of personnel selection have consistently shown positive results. However, this approach ignores certain external parameters (e.g., selection ratio, cost of the procedure) which largely determine the overall utility of a selection device. Moreover, the psychometric evaluation approach ignores…

  10. Rare Cell Capture in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Erica D.; Huang, Chao; Hawkins, Benjamin G.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews existing methods for the isolation, fractionation, or capture of rare cells in microfluidic devices. Rare cell capture devices face the challenge of maintaining the efficiency standard of traditional bulk separation methods such as flow cytometers and immunomagnetic separators while requiring very high purity of the target cell population, which is typically already at very low starting concentrations. Two major classifications of rare cell capture approaches are covered: (1) non-electrokinetic methods (e.g., immobilization via antibody or aptamer chemistry, size-based sorting, and sheath flow and streamline sorting) are discussed for applications using blood cells, cancer cells, and other mammalian cells, and (2) electrokinetic (primarily dielectrophoretic) methods using both electrode-based and insulative geometries are presented with a view towards pathogen detection, blood fractionation, and cancer cell isolation. The included methods were evaluated based on performance criteria including cell type modeled and used, number of steps/stages, cell viability, and enrichment, efficiency, and/or purity. Major areas for improvement are increasing viability and capture efficiency/purity of directly processed biological samples, as a majority of current studies only process spiked cell lines or pre-diluted/lysed samples. Despite these current challenges, multiple advances have been made in the development of devices for rare cell capture and the subsequent elucidation of new biological phenomena; this article serves to highlight this progress as well as the electrokinetic and non-electrokinetic methods that can potentially be combined to improve performance in future studies. PMID:21532971

  11. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2006-06-27

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  12. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2004-11-16

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  13. The Steerable Microcatheter: A New Device for Selective Catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Soyama, Takeshi; Yoshida, Daisuke; Sakuhara, Yusuke; Morita, Ryo; Abo, Daisuke; Kudo, Kohsuke

    2017-01-30

    The steerable microcatheter (SwiftNINJA, Sumitomo Bakelite, Tokyo, Japan), which has a remote-controlled flexible tip manipulated using a dial in the handgrip, was recently developed and delivered to the market. This device enables the user to change the angle of the microcatheter tip manually, and potentially makes selective catheterisation easier. We evaluated its unique characteristics and utility in selective catheterisation and coil embolization. This article describes: (1) the advantages of this device in catheterisations involving acute angle branches, and (2) a new technique of compact coil packing with the use of intentional folding by the bendable tip of the catheter.

  14. Selective W for coating and releasing MEMS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, S.S.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Boer, M.P. de; Irwin, L.W.; Walraven, J.A.; Tanner, D.M.; Lavan, D.A.

    2000-01-04

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process that selectively coats MEMS devices with tungsten and significantly enhances device durability. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable. This selective deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially address both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through the silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}. The self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. The tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize stress and process integration problems. Tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. The wear resistance of selectively coated W parts has been shown to be significantly improved on microengine test structures.

  15. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  16. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  17. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  18. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  19. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  20. Carotid endovascular interventions: patient selection, devices, techniques and tips.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Peeters, P

    2010-02-01

    The optimal treatment of patients with asymptomatic or symptomatic carotid artery disease (CAD) has been a long-lasting debate. The choice between carotid endarterectomy (CEA), carotid artery stenting (CAS) and/or optimal medical therapy to treat patients with CAD, depends on their risk profile. Recent data from EVA-3S, SPACE randomized trials failed to demonstrate non-inferiority for CAS over CEA. However, other publications suggest that with growing experience and the development of dedicated CAS technology, CAS can be performed safely and efficiently. The success of carotid stenting does not solely depend on the operator's skills and experience, but also on the adequate selection of carotid stents and cerebral protection devices. Currently, CAS practitioners are confronted with a large number of dedicated CAS devices (stents and embolic protection devices). This wide array of products makes individual treatment strategies difficult to generalise as no single device possesses all of the optimal features to treat all types of carotid plaques and patients. This article reviews the principles of patient selection and device selection in contemporary CAS practice.

  1. Multiple cell photoresponsive amorphous alloys and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Adler, D.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes an improved photoresponsive tandem multiple solar cell device. The device comprising: at least a first and second superimposed cell of various materials. The first cell being formed of a silicon alloy material. The second cell including an amorphous silicon alloy semiconductor cell body having an active photoresponsive region in which radiation can impinge to produce charge carriers, the amorphous cell body including at least one density of states reducing element. The element being fluorine. The amorphous cell body further including a band gap adjusting element therein at least in the photoresponsive region to enhance the radiation absorption thereof, the adjusting element being germanium: the second cell being a multi-layer body having deposited semiconductor layers of opposite (p and n) conductivity type; and the first cell being formed with the second cell in substantially direct Junction contact therebetween. The first and second cells designed to generate substantially matched currents from each cell from a light source directed through the first cell and into the second cell.

  2. 21 CFR 864.5260 - Automated cell-locating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated cell-locating device. 864.5260 Section... § 864.5260 Automated cell-locating device. (a) Identification. An automated cell-locating device is a device used to locate blood cells on a peripheral blood smear, allowing the operator to identify and...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5260 - Automated cell-locating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated cell-locating device. 864.5260 Section... § 864.5260 Automated cell-locating device. (a) Identification. An automated cell-locating device is a device used to locate blood cells on a peripheral blood smear, allowing the operator to identify and...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5260 - Automated cell-locating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated cell-locating device. 864.5260 Section... § 864.5260 Automated cell-locating device. (a) Identification. An automated cell-locating device is a device used to locate blood cells on a peripheral blood smear, allowing the operator to identify and...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5260 - Automated cell-locating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated cell-locating device. 864.5260 Section... § 864.5260 Automated cell-locating device. (a) Identification. An automated cell-locating device is a device used to locate blood cells on a peripheral blood smear, allowing the operator to identify and...

  6. Power selective optical filter devices and optical systems using same

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2014-10-07

    In an embodiment, a power selective optical filter device includes an input polarizer for selectively transmitting an input signal. The device includes a wave-plate structure positioned to receive the input signal, which includes at least one substantially zero-order, zero-wave plate. The zero-order, zero-wave plate is configured to alter a polarization state of the input signal passing in a manner that depends on the power of the input signal. The zero-order, zero-wave plate includes an entry and exit wave plate each having a fast axis, with the fast axes oriented substantially perpendicular to each other. Each entry wave plate is oriented relative to a transmission axis of the input polarizer at a respective angle. An output polarizer is positioned to receive a signal output from the wave-plate structure and selectively transmits the signal based on the polarization state.

  7. Probing cell mechanical properties with microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowat, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting flow on the micron-scale is emerging as a method to probe cell mechanical properties with 10-1000x advances in throughput over existing technologies. The mechanical properties of cells and the cell nucleus are implicated in a wide range of biological contexts: for example, the ability of white blood cells to deform is central to immune response; and malignant cells show decreased stiffness compared to benign cells. We recently developed a microfluidic device to probe cell and nucleus mechanical properties: cells are forced to deform through a narrow constrictions in response to an applied pressure; flowing cells through a series of constrictions enables us to probe the ability of hundreds of cells to deform and relax during flow. By tuning the constriction width so it is narrower than the width of the cell nucleus, we can specifically probe the effects of nuclear physical properties on whole cell deformability. We show that the nucleus is the rate-limiting step in cell passage: inducing a change in its shape to a multilobed structure results in cells that transit more quickly; increased levels of lamin A, a nuclear protein that is key for nuclear shape and mechanical stability, impairs the passage of cells through constrictions. We are currently developing a new class of microfluidic devices to simultaneously probe the deformability of hundreds of cell samples in parallel. Using the same soft lithography techniques, membranes are fabricated to have well-defined pore distribution, width, length, and tortuosity. We design the membranes to interface with a multiwell plate, enabling simultaneous measurement of hundreds of different samples. Given the wide spectrum of diseases where altered cell and nucleus mechanical properties are implicated, such a platform has great potential, for example, to screen cells based on their mechanical phenotype against a library of drugs.

  8. Biomicrofluidic lab-on-chip device for cancer cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. H.; Reboud, J.; Ji, H.; Zhang, L.; Long, Y.; Lee, C.

    2008-12-01

    A lab-on-a-chip microfluidic device was designed, fabricated, and tested to be used in cancer cell or disease cell detection in body fluids. Mixtures of breast cancer cells MCF-7 and control cells MCF-10A were captured by meandering weir filters in microfluidic channels. A selective fluorescent complex 17β-estradiol-bovine serum albumin-fluorescein isothiocyanate enabled to specifically detect MCF-7 after only 4 min of contact. These signals are about seven times stronger than that of a labeling performed on conventional glass slides following the same protocol. The simple method could have the potential to replace complex existing cancer or disease detection schemes.

  9. Designing Passivating, Carrier-Selective Contacts for Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Matthieu; Koswatta, Priyaranga; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "The first step towards building a high-efficiency solar cell is to develop an absorber with few recombination-active defects. Many photovoltaic technologies have already achieved this (monocrystalline Si, III-V materials grown on lattice-matched substrates, perovskites, polycrystalline CdTe and CIGS); those that have not (a-Si:H, organics) have been limited to low open-circuit voltage. The second step is to develop contacts that both inhibit surface recombination and allow for low-resistance collection of either only electrons or only holes. For most photovoltaic technologies, this step is both more difficult and less explored than the first, and we are unaware of a prescribed methodology for selecting materials for contacts to solar cells. We elucidate a unified, conceptual understanding of contacts within which existing contacting schemes can be interpreted and future contacting schemes can be imagined. Whereas a split of the quasi-Fermi levels of holes and electrons is required in the absorber of any solar cell to generate a voltage, carriers are eventually collected through a metallic wire in which no such quasi-Fermi-level split exists. We define a contact to be all layers between the bulk of the absorber and the recombination-active interface through which carriers are extracted. The quasi-Fermi levels must necessarily collapse at this interface, and thus the transition between maximal quasi-Fermi-level splitting (in the absorber) and no splitting occurs entirely in the contact. Depending on the solar cell architecture, the contact will usually extend from the surface of the absorber to the surface of a metal or transparent conductive oxide layer, and may include deposited or diffused doped layers (e.g., as in crystalline and thin-film Si cells) and heterostructure buffer layers (e.g., the CdS layer in a CdTe device). We further define a passivating contact as one that enables high quasi-Fermi-level splitting in the absorber (large “internal” voltage

  10. Microfabricated devices for single cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanfang

    BioMEMS or lab-on-a-chip technology is promising technology and enables the possibility of microchip devices with higher throughput or better performance for single cell analysis. We have designed and fabricated microdevices for single cell analysis, with impedance based device for fast cell screening and microchannel based flow systems for high throughput, high time resolution quantal exocytosis measurement with automatic cell positioning and reusability. The automatic cell positioning is realized by differential forces of fluidic dynamics. Microelectrodes are patterned at automatic trap positions for electrochemical detection quantal release of hormones like catecholamines secreted by cells. We also developed diamond-like carbon (DLC) microelectrodes onto chip device for low noise exocytosis measurement. The DLC microelectrodes were deposited by magnetron sputtering process with nitrogen doping and a bottom ITO conductive layer. Test results show the developed DLC can detect exocytosis with low noise and a stable background current which are comparable to that of carbon-fiber electrodes. They are batch producible at low cost and can realize high-throughput on-chip measurement of quantal exocytosis. The technology developed in this research can have wide ranging applications in fields such as electrophysiology, cell based sensors, high throughput screening of new drug development.

  11. Microfluidic device for acoustic cell lysis

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Cooley, Erika Jane; Smith, Gennifer Tanabe; James, Conrad D.; McClain, Jaime L.

    2015-08-04

    A microfluidic acoustic-based cell lysing device that can be integrated with on-chip nucleic acid extraction. Using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array, acoustic waves can be coupled into microfluidic cartridges resulting in the lysis of cells contained therein by localized acoustic pressure. Cellular materials can then be extracted from the lysed cells. For example, nucleic acids can be extracted from the lysate using silica-based sol-gel filled microchannels, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, or Nafion-coated electrodes. Integration of cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction on-chip enables a small, portable system that allows for rapid analysis in the field.

  12. Novel Hydrogen Purification Device Integrated with PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Schwartz; Hankwon Lim; Raymond Drnevich

    2010-12-31

    A prototype device containing twelve membrane tubes was designed, built, and demonstrated. The device produced almost 300 scfh of purified hydrogen at 200 psig feed pressure. The extent of purification met the program target of selectively removing enough impurities to enable industrial-grade hydrogen to meet purity specifications for PEM fuel cells. An extrusion process was developed to produce substrate tubes. Membranes met several test objectives, including completing 20 thermal cycles, exceeding 250 hours of operating life, and demonstrating a flux of 965 scfh/ft2 at 200 psid and 400 C.

  13. Aluminum infrared plasmonic perfect absorbers for wavelength selective devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Chen, Kai; Yokoyama, Takahiro; Nabatame, Toshihide; Nagao, Tadaaki

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the development of colloidal lithography technique to fabricate large-area plasmonic perfect absorbers using Al, which is an earth abundant low-cost plasmonic material in contrast to Au and Ag. Using numerical electromagnetic simulations, we optimize the geometrical parameters of Al perfect absorbers (AlPAs) with resonances at desired wavelengths depending on the applications. The fabricated AlPAs exhibit narrowband absorptions with high efficiency up to 98 %. By tuning AlPAs parameters, the resonance of AlPAs can be tuned from the visible to the middle infrared region. The AlPAs can be applied for spectrally selective infrared devices such as selective thermal emitters, selective surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy (SEIRA) for molecular sensing and selective IR detectors. In this report, we demonstrate applications of AlPAs for selective thermal emitters and SEIRA. The results obtained here reveal a simple technique to fabricate scalable plasmonic perfect absorbers as well as their potential applications in optoelectronic and photonic devices.

  14. Integrated optoelectronic devices by selective-area epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. M.; Coleman, James J.

    1997-01-01

    The development of a simulation model for selective-area epitaxy and the fabrication of semiconductor lasers monolithically integrated with electroabsorption modulators by this technique are presented. Diffusion equations and boundary conditions from selective-area MOCVD theory are applied in a computational model to predict column III reactant concentrations, and self-consistent solutions for reaction parameters are found using the finite element method. Data are presented to demonstrate accurate predictions of the thickness and composition of selectively grown ternary InGaAs quantum wells. This model was utilized to design the selective growth mask for Fabry-Perot lasers integrated with intracavity electroabsorption modulators. These devices, with modulator lengths of 290, 620, and 1020 micrometer, exhibit cw threshold currents of 9, 7.5, and 7.5 mA, respectively. Also, extinction ratios of 16.5, 19.5, and 20.5 dB, respectively, are measured at a modulator reverse bias of 2 V. Distributed Bragg reflector lasers with monolithically integrated external cavity modulators are also fabricated, and the selective-area MOCVD simulation was employed to design the growth mask dimensions and the location of the gratings. Cw threshold currents of 10.5 mA, slope efficiencies of 0.21 W/A, and extinction ratios of 18 dB at a modulator reverse bias of 1.0 V are achieved for these devices.

  15. Cell lysis and DNA extraction in microfabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2002-03-01

    We are developing a microfabricated device to lyse single cells and extract the DNA. The chip consists of two parts: a diffuse mixer combined with a dielectrophoretic trap. We are working with E. coli which have been made osmoticaly unstable before loading into the chip. The cells are lysed by osmotic shock in the mixer. The lysate is then passed to the dielectrophoretic trap. Attempts to separate the genomic DNA from the lysate fragments by selectively trapping the DNA using dielectrophoresis have been made. We have encountered cell sticking problems and are investingating surface modifications using Polyethylene glycol to solve this problem.

  16. Cell Biology Apps for Apple Devices

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Louisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score. PMID:22949420

  17. Cell biology apps for Apple devices.

    PubMed

    Stark, Louisa A

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score.

  18. Microfluidic devices for cell cultivation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tehranirokh, Masoomeh; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Francis, Paul S.; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technology provides precise, controlled-environment, cost-effective, compact, integrated, and high-throughput microsystems that are promising substitutes for conventional biological laboratory methods. In recent years, microfluidic cell culture devices have been used for applications such as tissue engineering, diagnostics, drug screening, immunology, cancer studies, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and neurite guidance. Microfluidic technology allows dynamic cell culture in microperfusion systems to deliver continuous nutrient supplies for long term cell culture. It offers many opportunities to mimic the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions of tissues by creating gradient concentrations of biochemical signals such as growth factors, chemokines, and hormones. Other applications of cell cultivation in microfluidic systems include high resolution cell patterning on a modified substrate with adhesive patterns and the reconstruction of complicated tissue architectures. In this review, recent advances in microfluidic platforms for cell culturing and proliferation, for both simple monolayer (2D) cell seeding processes and 3D configurations as accurate models of in vivo conditions, are examined. PMID:24273628

  19. Game theory-based mode cooperative selection mechanism for device-to-device visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxin; Huang, Zhitong; Li, Wei; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-03-01

    Various patterns of device-to-device (D2D) communication, from Bluetooth to Wi-Fi Direct, are emerging due to the increasing requirements of information sharing between mobile terminals. This paper presents an innovative pattern named device-to-device visible light communication (D2D-VLC) to alleviate the growing traffic problem. However, the occlusion problem is a difficulty in D2D-VLC. This paper proposes a game theory-based solution in which the best-response dynamics and best-response strategies are used to realize a mode-cooperative selection mechanism. This mechanism uses system capacity as the utility function to optimize system performance and selects the optimal communication mode for each active user from three candidate modes. Moreover, the simulation and experimental results show that the mechanism can attain a significant improvement in terms of effectiveness and energy saving compared with the cases where the users communicate via only the fixed transceivers (light-emitting diode and photo diode) or via only D2D.

  20. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  1. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  2. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  4. Photonic crystal cavities for spectrally-selective optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongjun

    Photonic crystal (PC) structures exhibit unconventional dispersion and refractive properties making possible hitherto not realizable optical and optoelectronic devices with high spectral selectivity. Functional PC devices (e.g., optical filters, reflectors, and photo detectors and light emitters) on both Si and III-V semiconductor material systems were fabricated via E-Beam lithography (EBL). The device layer can be further transferred onto foreign substrates such as glass or plastic (PET), using a low-cost "wet nanomembrane transfer technique" developed in this study. The broadband membrane reflectors (MR) based on Fano resonances in patterned silicon nanomembranes have been demonstrated. Resonance control of the reflectors was realized either by partially removing buried oxide layer underneath the device layer, or by controlled SiO2 film deposition on the top of the devices. Both blue- and red-shifts were demonstrated with a turning range of 50 nm for a center wavelength at 1550 nm. These results demonstrate practical post-process means for Fano resonance engineering for both narrow band filters and ultra-compact broadband reflectors. An optically pumped resonance cavity light emitting device (RCLED) with Si based membrane reflectors (MR) has been demonstrated experimentally. The stimulated cavity mode at 1545 nm was observed at room temperature with a pulsed green pumping laser light source. We observed significant spectral narrowing in RCLEDs with linewidth reduced from 50 nm down to <4 nm, owing to the presence of top and bottom MR reflectors. The measured photoluminescence efficiency also increased by a factor of 100 in RCLEDs, as compared to the value measured from as-grown InGaAsP QW structures on InP substrate. The mode shifts were also investigated over different temperatures and different pumping power levels. An InGaAsP QW LED array device was also fabricated and transferred onto flexible PET substrate. The devices showed very good electrical and

  5. Selective etchant for oxide sacrificial material in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Clews, Peggy J.; Mani, Seethambal S.

    2005-05-17

    An etching composition and method is disclosed for removing an oxide sacrificial material during manufacture of semiconductor devices including micromechanical, microelectromechanical or microfluidic devices. The etching composition and method are based on the combination of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4). These acids can be used in the ratio of 1:3 to 3:1 HF:H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 to remove all or part of the oxide sacrificial material while providing a high etch selectivity for non-oxide materials including polysilicon, silicon nitride and metals comprising aluminum. Both the HF and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 can be provided as "semiconductor grade" acids in concentrations of generally 40-50% by weight HF, and at least 90% by weight H.sub.2 SO.sub.4.

  6. Defibrillators: Selecting the Right Device for the Right Patient.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Sana M; Friedman, Paul; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2016-11-01

    Advances in the field of defibrillation have brought to practice different types of devices that include the transvenous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) with or without cardiac resynchronization therapy, the subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD), and the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator. To ensure optimal use of these devices and to achieve best patient outcomes, clinicians need to understand how these devices work, learn the characteristics of patients who qualify them for one type of device versus another, and recognize the remaining gaps in knowledge surrounding these devices. The transvenous ICD has been shown in several randomized clinical trials to improve the survival of patients resuscitated from near-fatal ventricular fibrillation and those with sustained ventricular tachycardia with syncope or systolic heart failure as a result of ischemic or nonischemic cardiomyopathy despite receiving guideline-directed medical therapy. Important gaps in knowledge regarding the transvenous ICD involve the role of the ICD in patient subgroups not included, or not well represented, in clinical trials and the need to refine the selection criteria for the ICD in patients who are indicated for it. S-ICDs were recently introduced into the clinical arena as another option for many patients who have an approved indication for a transvenous ICD. The main advantage of the S-ICD is a lower risk of infection and lead-related complications; however, the S-ICD does not offer bradycardia or antitachycardia pacing. The S-ICD may be ideal for patients with limited vascular access, high infection risk, or some congenital heart diseases. However, more data are needed regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of the S-ICD in comparison to transvenous ICDs, the extent of defibrillation testing required, and the use of the S-ICD with other novel technologies, including leadless pacemakers. Cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillators are indicated in patients with a left ventricular

  7. Challenges in patient selection for the parachute device implantation.

    PubMed

    Bozdag-Turan, Ilkay; Bermaoui, Benjamin; Paranskaya, Liliya; GökmenTuran, R; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Kische, Stephan; Birkemeyer, Ralph; Jovanovic, Bojan; Schuetz, Jan; Akin, Ibrahim; Turan, Cem Hakan; Ortak, Jasmin; Hauenstein, K; Nienaber, Cristoph Anton; Ince, Hueseyin

    2013-11-01

    A novel percutaneous ventricular restoration therapy (PVRT) has been recently proposed to treat patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF) and antero-apical regional wall motion abnormalities after myocardial infarction (MI). In this prospective, single center, non-randomized study, we herein propose safety and feasibility evaluation of the device, in which a different patient selection strategy was used. A three-stage evaluation was adopted in a series of patients referred for a Parachute Ventricular Partitioning Device (Parachute™). After an initial clinical evaluation, a secondary screening step was performed according to echocardiographic functional (LVEF<40%, apical/anterior akinesia/dyskinesia) and anatomical criteria [diameter of LV-apex (LVAD) = 4.0 × 5.0 cm, left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD)>56 mm, left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD)>38 mm]. Patients encountering the echocardiographic criteria were selected for 3D cardiac CT (architecture, geometry, and trabeculation of the left ventricle) and eventually treated with the Parachute™. Fifty patients were screened according to the echocardiographic criteria. Twenty-seven of those that met the echo inclusion criteria underwent further cardiac CT imaging. After CT imaging, eight patients were scheduled for Parachute™ implantation. The device was successfully implanted in all eight patients with no in-hospital mortality. A 3-month follow-up echocardiography showed LV-volume reduction [95% CI; LVEDV: -76.5 (-116; -36.8), P = 0.002 and LVESV: -47.4 (-63.8; -30.9), P = 0.003] and improvement of global EF [95% CI; global EF: 6.87 (5.36; 8.39), P = 0.008]. Selection criteria for Parachute™ placement should include left ventricular functional and anatomical parameters. When preprocedural echocardiography and cardiac CT are adequately implemented, satisfactory periprocedural and short term follow-up results may be achieved after Parachute™ implantation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley

  8. Material and Device Stability in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Seon; Seo, Ja-Young; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-09-22

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have attracted great attention because of their superb efficiency reaching 22 % and low-cost, facile fabrication processing. Nevertheless, stability issues in perovskite solar cells seem to block further advancements toward commercialization. Thus, device stability is one of the important topics in perovskite solar cell research. In the beginning, the poor moisture resistivity of the perovskite layer was considered as a main problem that hindered further development of perovskite solar cells, which encouraged engineering of the perovskite or protection of the perovskite by a buffer layer. Soon after, other parameters affecting long-term stability were sequentially found and various attempts have been made to enhance intrinsic and extrinsic stability. Here we review the recent progresses addressing stability issues in perovskite solar cells. In this report, we investigated factors affecting stability from material and device points of view. To gain a better understanding of the stability of the bulk perovskite material, decomposition mechanisms were investigated in relation to moisture, photons, and heat. Stability of full device should also be carefully examined because its stability is dependent not only on bulk perovskite but also on the interfaces and selective contacts. In addition, ion migration and current-voltage hysteresis were found to be closely related to stability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Optimization of spectrally selective Si/SiO2 based filters for thermophotovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroshahi, Farhad Kazemi; Ertürk, Hakan; Pınar Mengüç, M.

    2017-08-01

    Design of a spectrally selective filter based on one-dimensional Si/SiO2 layers is considered for improved performance of thermo-photovoltaic devices. Spectrally selective filters transmit only the convertible radiation from the emitter as non-convertible radiation leads to a reduction in cell efficiency due to heating. The presented Si/SiO2 based filter concept reflects the major part of the undesired range back to the emitter to minimize energy required for the process and it is adaptable to different types of cells and emitters with different temperatures since its cut-off wavelength can be tuned. While this study mainly focuses on InGaSb based thermo-photovoltaic cell, Si, GaSb, and Ga0.78In0.22As0.19Sb0.81 based cells are also examined. Transmittance of the structure is predicted by rigorous coupled wave approach. Genetic algorithm, which is a global optimization method, is used to find the best possible filter structure by considering the overall efficiency as an objective function that is maximized. The simulations show that significant enhancement in the overall system and device efficiency is possible by using such filters with TPV devices. The methodology described in this paper allows for an improved filter design procedure for selected applications.

  10. Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

    1999-06-01

    Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are feasible. Safety

  11. Perovskite solar cells: from materials to devices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-01-07

    Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halide light absorbers have been considered a promising photovoltaic technology due to their superb power conversion efficiency (PCE) along with very low material costs. Since the first report on a long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, a PCE as high as 19.3% was demonstrated in 2014, and a certified PCE of 17.9% was shown in 2014. Such a high photovoltaic performance is attributed to optically high absorption characteristics and balanced charge transport properties with long diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, there are lots of puzzles to unravel the basis for such high photovoltaic performances. The working principle of perovskite solar cells has not been well established by far, which is the most important thing for understanding perovksite solar cells. In this review, basic fundamentals of perovskite materials including opto-electronic and dielectric properties are described to give a better understanding and insight into high-performing perovskite solar cells. In addition, various fabrication techniques and device structures are described toward the further improvement of perovskite solar cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Device Physics of Nanoscale Interdigitated Solar Cells (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W.; Levi, D.

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale interdigitated solar cell device architectures are being investigated for organic and inorganic solar cell devices. Due to the inherent complexity of these device designs quantitative modeling is needed to understand the device physics. Theoretical concepts have been proposed that nanodomains of different phases may form in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells. These theories propose that the nanodomains may form complex 3D intertwined p-n networks that enhance device performance.Recent experimental evidence offers some support for the existence of nanodomains in CIGS thin films. This study utilizes CIGS solar cells to examine general and CIGS-specific concepts in nanoscale interdigitated solar cells.

  13. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  14. Differential Medical Aerosol Device and Interface Selection in Patients during Spontaneous, Conventional Mechanical and Noninvasive Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu; Fink, James B

    2016-04-01

    Many aerosol delivery devices are available on the market that have different features, characteristics, and operating requirements that need to be considered for the effective treatment of patients with pulmonary diseases. Device selection in aerosol medicine is largely patient dependent. Since there is no aerosol device that suits all patient populations, device selection and successful integration of the prescribed aerosol device to patients is essential. This article explores key issues in differential device selection in spontaneously breathing adults with or without artificial airways, as well as critically ill patients receiving invasive and noninvasive ventilation, with discussion of considerations for integration of aerosol devices to each of these patient populations.

  15. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  16. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160 Section 864.6160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6160...

  17. Methods and devices based on brillouin selective sideband amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Opto-electronic devices and techniques using Brillouin scattering to select a sideband in a modulated optical carrier signal for amplification. Two lasers respectively provide a carrier signal beam and a Brillouin pump beam which are fed into an Brillouin optical medium in opposite directions. The relative frequency separation between the lasers is adjusted to align the frequency of the backscattered Brillouin signal with a desired sideband in the carrier signal to effect a Brillouin gain on the sideband. This effect can be used to implement photonic RF signal mixing and conversion with gain, conversion from phase modulation to amplitude modulation, photonic RF frequency multiplication, optical and RF pulse generation and manipulation, and frequency-locking of lasers.

  18. Nanolaminate microfluidic device for mobility selection of particles

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2006-10-10

    A microfluidic device made from nanolaminate materials that are capable of electrophoretic selection of particles on the basis of their mobility. Nanolaminate materials are generally alternating layers of two materials (one conducting, one insulating) that are made by sputter coating a flat substrate with a large number of layers. Specific subsets of the conducting layers are coupled together to form a single, extended electrode, interleaved with other similar electrodes. Thereby, the subsets of conducting layers may be dynamically charged to create time-dependent potential fields that can trap or transport charge colloidal particles. The addition of time-dependence is applicable to all geometries of nanolaminate electrophoretic and electrochemical designs from sinusoidal to nearly step-like.

  19. Local doping of graphene devices by selective hydrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min; Park, Yung Woo E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr; Yun, Yong Ju; Jun, Yongseok; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Kim, Byung Hoon E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr

    2015-01-15

    N-type graphene fabricated by exposure to hydrogen gas has been previously studied. Based on this property of graphene, herein, we demonstrate local doping in single-layer graphene using selective adsorption of dissociative hydrogen at 350 K. A graphene field effect transistor was produced covered with PMMA on half of the graphene region. The charge neutrality point of the PMMA-window region shifted to a negative gate voltage (V{sub G}) region prominently compared with that of the PMMA-covered region. Consequently, a single graphene p-n junction was obtained by measuring the V{sub G}-dependent resistance of the whole graphene region. This method presents opportunities for developing and controlling the electronic structure of graphene and device applications.

  20. Programmable Metallization Cell Devices for Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliga, Sunil

    Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology is based on an electrochemical phenomenon in which a metallic electrodeposit can be grown or dissolved between two electrodes depending on the voltage applied between them. Devices based on this phenomenon exhibit a unique, self-healing property, as a broken metallic structure can be healed by applying an appropriate voltage between the two broken ends. This work explores methods of fabricating interconnects and switches based on PMC technology on flexible substrates. The objective was the evaluation of the feasibility of using this technology in flexible electronics applications in which reliability is a primary concern. The re-healable property of the interconnect is characterized for the silver doped germanium selenide (Ag-Ge-Se) solid electrolyte system. This property was evaluated by measuring the resistances of the healed interconnect structures and comparing these to the resistances of the unbroken structures. The reliability of the interconnects in both unbroken and healed states is studied by investigating the resistances of the structures to DC voltages, AC voltages and different temperatures as a function of time. This work also explores replacing silver with copper for these interconnects to enhance their reliability. A model for PMC-based switches on flexible substrates is proposed and compared to the observed device behavior with the objective of developing a formal design methodology for these devices. The switches were subjected to voltage sweeps and their resistance was investigated as a function of sweep voltage. The resistance of the switches as a function of voltage pulse magnitude when placed in series with a resistance was also investigated. A model was then developed to explain the behavior of these devices. All observations were based on statistical measurements to account for random errors. The results of this work demonstrate that solid electrolyte based interconnects display self

  1. Devices for stem cell isolation and delivery: current need for drug discovery and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Martin; Bader, Augustinus; Giri, Shibashish

    2015-05-01

    Isolation and purification of stem cells and their delivery into diseased or aged tissues or organs need special devices for proper transplantation of stem cells in order to achieve high cell retention at transplant site for repair or regeneration of tissues and organs. The clinical and preclinical importance of special devices such as Celution System, Isolex cell separation device, magnetic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic dots, microfluidic devices, immunomagnetic cell separation for stem cell separation and isolation are the main focus in this paper. Further, devices like trans-coronary delivery, trans-endocardial delivery, intracoronary delivery devices for stem cell application to the heart are described. Devices for stem cell application to the brain, the spinal cord and other tissues are also explained. We highlighted scaffolds with incorporated stem cells and other encapsulation devices used to transplant stem cells. Current needs of devices for stem cells isolation, purification and delivery for drug discovery and cell therapy are discussed.

  2. Oxygen Levels in Thermoplastic Microfluidic Devices during Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Christopher J.; Kasuya, Junichi; Pavesi, Andrea; Kamm, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a computational model to predict oxygen levels in microfluidic plastic devices during cell culture. This model is based on experimental evaluation of oxygen levels. Conditions are determined that provide adequate oxygen supply to two cell types, hepatocytes and endothelial cells, either by diffusion through the plastic device, or by supplying a low flow rate of medium. PMID:24302467

  3. Oxygen levels in thermoplastic microfluidic devices during cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Christopher J; Kasuya, Junichi; Pavesi, Andrea; Kamm, Roger D

    2014-02-07

    We developed a computational model to predict oxygen levels in microfluidic plastic devices during cell culture. This model is based on experimental evaluation of oxygen levels. Conditions are determined that provide adequate oxygen supply to two cell types, hepatocytes and endothelial cells, either by diffusion through the plastic device, or by supplying a low flow rate of medium.

  4. Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Aselage, Terrence L.; Emin, David

    2002-01-01

    A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15

  5. Lateral Programmable Metallization Cell Devices And Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Minghan

    2011-12-01

    Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) is a technology platform which utilizes mass transport in solid or liquid electrolyte coupled with electrochemical (redox) reactions to form or remove nanoscale metallic electrodeposits on or in the electrolyte. The ability to redistribute metal mass and form metallic nanostructure in or on a structure in situ, via the application of a bias on laterally placed electrodes, creates a large number of promising applications. A novel PMC-based lateral microwave switch was fabricated and characterized for use in microwave systems. It has demonstrated low insertion loss, high isolation, low voltage operation, low power and low energy consumption, and excellent linearity. Due to its non-volatile nature the switch operates with fewer biases and its simple planar geometry makes possible innovative device structures which can be potentially integrated into microwave power distribution circuits. PMC technology is also used to develop lateral dendritic metal electrodes. A lateral metallic dendritic network can be grown in a solid electrolyte (GeSe) or electrodeposited on SiO2 or Si using a water-mediated method. These dendritic electrodes grown in a solid electrolyte (GeSe) can be used to lower resistances for applications like self-healing interconnects despite its relatively low light transparency; while the dendritic electrodes grown using water-mediated method can be potentially integrated into solar cell applications, like replacing conventional Ag screen-printed top electrodes as they not only reduce resistances but also are highly transparent. This research effort also laid a solid foundation for developing dendritic plasmonic structures. A PMC-based lateral dendritic plasmonic structure is a device that has metallic dendritic networks grown electrochemically on SiO2 with a thin layer of surface metal nanoparticles in liquid electrolyte. These structures increase the distribution of particle sizes by connecting pre-deposited Ag

  6. IDEA. VOCES: A Mnemonic Device to Cue Mood Selection after Impersonal Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Paul Michael

    1996-01-01

    Providing language learners with mnemonic devices assists retention and recall of vocabulary and structural items. This idea provides one such memory device to assist beginning and intermediate students who struggle with mood selection after impersonal expressions. (five references) (Author)

  7. 21 CFR 864.5260 - Automated cell-locating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated cell-locating device. 864.5260 Section 864.5260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  8. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    DOEpatents

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  9. Selecting Cells for Bioartificial Liver Devices and the Importance of a 3D Culture Environment: A Functional Comparison between the HepaRG and C3A Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    van Wenum, Martien; Adam, Aziza A.A.; Hakvoort, Theodorus B.M.; Hendriks, Erik J.; Shevchenko, Valery; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Chamuleau, Robert A.F.M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first clinical trials on Bioartificial Livers (BALs) loaded with a proliferative human hepatocyte cell source have started. There are two cell lines that are currently in an advanced state of BAL development; HepaRG and HepG2/C3A. In this study we aimed to compare both cell lines on applicability in BALs and to identify possible strategies for further improvement. We tested both cell lines in monolayer- and BAL cultures on growth characteristics, hepatic differentiation, nitrogen-, carbohydrate-, amino acid- and xenobiotic metabolism. Interestingly, both cell lines adapted the hepatocyte phenotype more closely when cultured in BALs; e.g. monolayer cultures produced lactate, while BAL cultures showed diminished lactate production (C3A) or conversion to elimination (HepaRG), and urea cycle activity increased upon BAL culturing in both cell lines. HepaRG-BALs outperformed C3A-BALs on xenobiotic metabolism, ammonia elimination and lactate elimination, while protein synthesis was comparable. In BAL cultures of both cell lines ammonia elimination correlated positively with glutamine production and glutamate consumption, suggesting ammonia elimination was mainly driven by the balance between glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activity. Both cell lines lacked significant urea cycle activity and both required multiple culture weeks before reaching optimal differentiation in BALs. In conclusion, culturing in BALs enhanced hepatic functionality of both cell lines and from these, the HepaRG cells are the most promising proliferative cell source for BAL application. PMID:27489500

  10. On-Demand Cell Internal Short Circuit Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A device implantable in Li-ion cells that can generate a hard internal short circuit on-demand by exposing the cell to 60?C has been demonstrated to be valuable for expanding our understanding of cell responses. The device provides a negligible impact to cell performance and enables the instigation of the 4 general categories of cell internal shorts to determine relative severity and cell design susceptibility. Tests with a 18650 cell design indicates that the anode active material short to the aluminum cathode current collector tends to be more catastrophic than the 3 other types of internal shorts. Advanced safety features (such as shutdown separators) to prevent or mitigate the severity of cell internal shorts can be verified with this device. The hard short success rate achieved to date in 18650 cells is about 80%, which is sufficient for using these cells in battery assemblies for field-failure-relevant, cell-cell thermal runaway propagation verification tests

  11. A porous 3D cell culture micro device for cell migration study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zhou, Changchun; Lin, Biaoyang; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Cell migration under chemoattractant is an important biological step in cancer metastasis that causes the spread of malignant tumor cells. Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as three dimensional (3D) cell culturing and tissue engineering. In this paper we report a novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material to study cancer migration. We fabricated a porous channel on a polymeric chip using a selective ultrasonic foaming method. We demonstrate that a chemical concentration gradient could be established through the porous channel due to the slow diffusion process. We show that significant cell migration could be observed through the porous channel within 1-2 weeks of cell culturing when metastatic M4A4-GFP breast cancer cells were induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS).We also developed a mathematical model to evaluate the diffusivity and concentration gradient through the fabricated porous structure.

  12. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, M.; Schroll, C.R.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention relates to a device for preventing the electrical shorting of a stack of electrolytic cells during an extended period of operation. The device has application to fuel cell and other electrolytic cell stacks operating in low or high temperature corrosive environments. It is of particular importance for use in a stack of fuel cells operating with molten metal carbonate electrolyte for the production of electric power. Also, the device may have application in similar technology involving stacks of electrolytic cells for electrolysis to decompose chemical compounds.

  13. Fluid technology (selected components, devices, and systems): A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Developments in fluid technology and hydraulic equipment are presented. The subjects considered are: (1) the use of fluids in the operation of switches, amplifiers, and servo devices, (2) devices and data for laboratory use in the study of fluid dynamics, and (3) the use of fluids as controls and certain methods of controlling fluids.

  14. Modeling Emerging Solar Cell Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongprong, Non

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and perovskite solar cells are emerging classes of solar cell that are promising for clean energy alternatives to fossil fuels. Understanding fundamental physics of these materials is crucial for improving their energy conversion efficiencies and promoting them to practical applications. Current density-voltage (JV) curves; which are important indicators of OPV efficiency, have direct connections to many fundamental properties of solar cells. They can be described by the Shockley diode equation, resulting in fitting parameters; series and parallel resistance (Rs and Rp), diode saturation current ( J0) and ideality factor (n). However, the Shockley equation was developed specifically for inorganic p-n junction diodes, so it lacks physical meanings when it is applied to OPVs. Hence, the puRposes of this work are to understand the fundamental physics of OPVs and to develop new diode equations in the same form as the Shockley equation that are based on OPV physics. We develop a numerical drift-diffusion simulation model to study bilayer OPVs, which will be called the drift-diffusion for bilayer interface (DD-BI) model. The model solves Poisson, drift-diffusion and current-continuity equations self-consistently for charge densities and potential profiles of a bilayer device with an organic heterojunction interface described by the GWWF model. We also derive new diode equations that have JV curves consistent with the DD-BI model and thus will be called self-consistent diode (SCD) equations. Using the DD-BI and the SCD model allows us to understand working principles of bilayer OPVs and physical definitions of the Shockley parameters. Due to low carrier mobilities in OPVs, space charge accumulation is common especially near the interface and electrodes. Hence, quasi-Fermi levels (i.e. chemical potentials), which depend on charge densities, are modified around the interface, resulting in a splitting of quasi-Fermi levels that works as a driving

  15. Performance of selected flow-restricting infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Capes, D F; Asiimwe, D

    1998-02-15

    The flow rate accuracy and flow continuity of the Homepump, Infusor, Intermate, Paragon, Sidekick, and Springfusor 10 flow-restricting infusion devices were studied. Three of each device were tested in a temperature-controlled cabinet at the manufacturer-specified operating temperature and at 20 and 30 degrees C. The flow rates used were 100 ml/hr and the rate that would provide a 24-hour delivery of fluid, except in the case of the Springfusor 10, which was tested at the maximum and minimum flow rates. Flow rate was measured gravimetrically at 30-second intervals. The endopoint of infusion was defined as the start of the terminal-phase decline. The effect of refrigerated storage was studied by using the Intermate as an example of the elastomeric devices tested. All devices exhibited a variable flow profile during infusion except for the Paragon, which had a near-constant flow throughout. The average error in flow rate was within the manufacturer's specifications when the devices were used under the manufacturer-specified operating conditions for all devices except for the Sidekick. The definition of the endopoint made little difference in the flow rate results for the Infusor and Springfusor 10 but significantly affected the flow rate results for the other devices, for which there was a substantial terminal phase with a prolonged period of reduced flow rate. The mean flow rate, error, and coefficient of variation for the Intermate devices stored under refrigeration were significantly different from those for the devices not refrigerated before use. When operated as recommended by the manufacturer, five of six devices had a flow rate error within the manufacturer's specifications; the results were affected by endpoint definition.

  16. Advantages and challenges of microfluidic cell culture in polydimethylsiloxane devices.

    PubMed

    Halldorsson, Skarphedinn; Lucumi, Edinson; Gómez-Sjöberg, Rafael; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2015-01-15

    Culture of cells using various microfluidic devices is becoming more common within experimental cell biology. At the same time, a technological radiation of microfluidic cell culture device designs is currently in progress. Ultimately, the utility of microfluidic cell culture will be determined by its capacity to permit new insights into cellular function. Especially insights that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to obtain with macroscopic cell culture in traditional polystyrene dishes, flasks or well-plates. Many decades of heuristic optimization have gone into perfecting conventional cell culture devices and protocols. In comparison, even for the most commonly used microfluidic cell culture devices, such as those fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), collective understanding of the differences in cellular behavior between microfluidic and macroscopic culture is still developing. Moving in vitro culture from macroscopic culture to PDMS based devices can come with unforeseen challenges. Changes in device material, surface coating, cell number per unit surface area or per unit media volume may all affect the outcome of otherwise standard protocols. In this review, we outline some of the advantages and challenges that may accompany a transition from macroscopic to microfluidic cell culture. We focus on decisive factors that distinguish macroscopic from microfluidic cell culture to encourage a reconsideration of how macroscopic cell culture principles might apply to microfluidic cell culture.

  17. Continuous separation of blood cells in spiral microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Nivedita, Nivedita; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Blood cell sorting is critical to sample preparation for both clinical diagnosis and therapeutic research. The spiral inertial microfluidic devices can achieve label-free, continuous separation of cell mixtures with high throughput and efficiency. The devices utilize hydrodynamic forces acting on cells within laminar flow, coupled with rotational Dean drag due to curvilinear microchannel geometry. Here, we report on optimized Archimedean spiral devices to achieve cell separation in less than 8 cm of downstream focusing length. These improved devices are small in size (<1 in.2), exhibit high separation efficiency (∼95%), and high throughput with rates up to 1 × 106 cells per minute. These device concepts offer a path towards possible development of a lab-on-chip for point-of-care blood analysis with high efficiency, low cost, and reduced analysis time. PMID:24404064

  18. Device research task (processing and high-efficiency solar cells)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This task has been expanded since the last 25th Project Integration Meeting (PIM) to include process research in addition to device research. The objective of this task is to assist the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project in meeting its near- and long-term goals by identifying and implementing research in the areas of device physics, device structures, measurement techniques, material-device interactions, and cell processing. The research efforts of this task are described and reflect the deversity of device research being conducted. All of the contracts being reported are either completed or near completion and culminate the device research efforts of the FSA Project. Optimazation methods and silicon solar cell numerical models, carrier transport and recombination parameters in heavily doped silicon, development and analysis of silicon solar cells of near 20% efficiency, and SiN sub x passivation of silicon surfaces are discussed.

  19. Wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device for cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-ki; Min, Junghong; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2010-04-07

    A wireless induction heating system in a microfluidic device was devised for cell lysis to extract DNA and RNA from Escherichia coli. The thermal responses of nickel, iron and copper heating units were studied by applying an alternating magnetic field as a function of geometry of unit, strength of magnetic field, and kind of metal. Heating units were prepared by cutting metal film using a fiber laser, and the units were integrated into a microchannel system using a soft lithographic process. Variation and distribution of temperature on the surface of the heating units was observed using a thermographic camera and temperature labels. The amount of protein released from E. coli by thermal lysis was determined by protein concentration measurement. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells was observed using colorimetric intensity measurement. Extracted DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the profile was compared with that of a positive control of ultrasonically disrupted E. coli. The stability of RNA extracted by induction heating was quantified by the measurement of 23S/16S rRNA ratio and comparison with that by normal RNA extraction kit as a gold standard. A solid-shaped nickel structure was selected as the induction heating element in the microfluidic device because of the relatively small influence of geometries and faster thermal response.The amount of protein extracted from E. coli and hemoglobin released from red blood cells by induction heating of the nickel unit in the microfluidic device was proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The lysis of E. coli by induction heating was as effective as lysis of DNA by the ultrasonication method because the threshold cycle values of the sample were compatible with those of the positive control as measured by ultrasonication. Thermal lysis of E. coli by induction heating represents a reasonable alternative to a commercial RNA extraction method as shown by the comparative

  20. Selective pharmacological manipulation of cortical-thalamic co-cultures in a dual-compartment device.

    PubMed

    Kanagasabapathi, Thirukumaran T; Franco, Maria; Barone, Rocco Andrea; Martinoia, Sergio; Wadman, Wytse J; Decré, Michel M J

    2013-03-30

    In this study, we demonstrate capabilities to selectively manipulate dissociated co-cultures of neurons plated in dual-compartment devices. Synaptic receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin solutions were used to selectively control and study the network-wide burst propagation and cell firing in cortical-cortical and cortical-thalamic co-culture systems. The results show that in cortical-thalamic dissociated co-cultures, burst events initiate in the cortical region and propagate to the thalamic region and the burst events in thalamic region can be controlled by blocking the synaptic receptors in the cortical region. Whereas, in cortical-cortical co-culture system, one of the region acts as a site of burst initiation and facilitate propagation of bursts in the entire network. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, when applied to either of the regions blocks the firing of neurons in that particular region with significant influence on the firing of neurons in the other region. The results demonstrate selective pharmacological manipulation capabilities of co-cultures in a dual compartment device and helps understand the effects of neuroactive compounds on networks derived from specific CNS tissues and the dynamic interaction between them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Non PN junction solar cells using carrier selective contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Stuart; Ghosh, Kunal; Honsberg, Christiana

    2013-03-01

    A novel device concept utilizing the approach of selectively extracting carriers at the respective contacts is outlined in the work. The dominant silicon solar cell technology is based on a diffused, top-contacted p-n junction on a relatively thick silicon wafer for both commercial and laboratory solar cells. The VOC and hence the efficiency of a diffused p-n junction solar cell is limited by the emitter recombination current and a value of 720 mV is considered to be the upper limit. The value is more than 100 mV smaller than the thermodynamic limit of VOC as applicable for silicon based solar cells. Also, in diffused junction the use of thin wafers (< 50 um) are problematic because of the requirement of high temperature processing steps. But a number of roadmaps have identified solar cells manufactured on thinner silicon wafers to achieve lower cost and higher efficiency. The carrier selective contact device provides a novel alternative to diffused p-n junction solar cells by eliminating the need for complementary doping to form the emitter and hence it allows the solar cells to achieve a VOC of greater than 720 mV. Also, the complete device structure can be fabricated with low temperature thin film deposition or organic coating on silicon substrates and thus epitaxially grown silicon or kerfless silicon, in addition to standard silicon wafers can be utilized.

  2. Microfluidic devices for modeling cell-cell and particle-cell interactions in the microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Pant, Kapil; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-fluid and cell-cell interactions are critical components of many physiological and pathological conditions in the microvasculature. Similarly, particle-cell interactions play an important role in targeted delivery of therapeutics to tissue. Development of in vitro fluidic devices to mimic these microcirculatory processes has been a critical step forward in our understanding of the inflammatory process, development of nano-particulate drug carriers, and developing realistic in vitro models of the microvasculature and its surrounding tissue. However, widely used parallel plate flow based devices and assays have a number of important limitations for studying the physiological conditions in vivo. In addition, these devices are resource hungry and time consuming for performing various assays. Recently developed, more realistic, microfluidic based devices have been able to overcome many of these limitations. In this review, an overview of the fluidic devices and their use in studying the effects of shear forces on cell-cell and cell-particle interactions is presented. In addition, use of mathematical models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based models for interpreting the complex flow patterns in the microvasculature are highlighted. Finally, the potential of 3D microfluidic devices and imaging for better representing in vivo conditions under which cell-cell and cell-particle interactions take place are discussed. PMID:21763328

  3. Intracavity Microfluidic Laser Device for Single Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul

    2015-03-01

    An intracavity microfluidic laser device has been developed to study bioparticles ranging in size from 50 nm to 20 μm (virons to organelles to whole cells). The versatile device can be operated used in several modes including static or flowing fluids, with or without molecular labels, and microscopic imaging and/or spectroscopy. It enables advantageous new ways to perform analyses of bioparticles for applications including cell biology, detection of disease and pathogens, environmental monitoring, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, and food processing. This talk will briefly summarize the physics of the device including its laser optics, fluid dynamics, and intracavity light interaction with cells. The talk will then focus on results of a study of mitochondria in normal and cancer liver cells. The study examines the transformation of intracellular and isolated mitochondria from the normal to disease state. The results highlight the unique utility of the device to rapidly assess biophysical changes arising from altered biomolecular states of cells and organelles.

  4. Emerging Semitransparent Solar Cells: Materials and Device Design.

    PubMed

    Tai, Qidong; Yan, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Semitransparent solar cells can provide not only efficient power-generation but also appealing images and show promising applications in building integrated photovoltaics, wearable electronics, photovoltaic vehicles and so forth in the future. Such devices have been successfully realized by incorporating transparent electrodes in new generation low-cost solar cells, including organic solar cells (OSCs), dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and organometal halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs). In this review, the advances in the preparation of semitransparent OSCs, DSCs, and PSCs are summarized, focusing on the top transparent electrode materials and device designs, which are all crucial to the performance of these devices. Techniques for optimizing the efficiency, color and transparency of the devices are addressed in detail. Finally, a summary of the research field and an outlook into the future development in this area are provided. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Live cell refractometry using microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lue, Niyom; Popescu, Gabriel; Ikeda, Takahiro; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Badizadegan, Kamran; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-15

    Using Hilbert phase microscopy for extracting quantitative phase images, we measured the average refractive index associated with live cells in culture. To decouple the contributions to the phase signal from the cell refractive index and thickness, we confined the cells in microchannels. The results are confirmed by comparison with measurements of spherical cells in suspension.

  6. Evaluation of selected information on splitting devices for water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Four devices for splitting water samples into representative aliquots are used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division. A thorough evaluation of these devices (14-liter churn, 8-liter churn, plastic cone, and Teflon cone) encompasses a wide variety of concerns, based on both chemical and physical considerations. This report surveys the existing data (as of April 1994) on cleaning efficiency and splitting capability of these devices and presents the data in a systematic framework for evaluation. From the existing data, some of these concerns are adequately or partially addressed, but the majority of concerns could not be addressed because of the lack of data. In general, the existing cleaning and transport protocols are adequate at the milligram per liter level, but the adequacy is largely unknown for trace elements and organic chemicals at lower concen- trations. The existing data indicate that better results are obtained when the splitters are cleaned in the laboratory rather than in the field. Two conclusions that can be reached on the splitting capability of solids are that more work must be done with all four devices to characterize and quantify their limitations and range of usefulness, and that the 14-liter churn (and by association, the 8-liter churn) is not useful in obtaining representative splits of sand-sized particles.

  7. Investigation of electronic noise in selected mesoscopic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino, Fernando Enrique

    In the last few years, several experiments and theoretical works have confirmed the importance of shot-noise measurements as a source of information about the charge transport in electronic devices, information that is not in all cases accessible from conductance measurements. The use of shot-noise for the direct confirmation of the fractional charge in the fractional quantum Hall effect or the identification of the transport mechanism in negative differential resistance devices are a few examples of its importance. In this thesis, we have performed shot-noise measurements on two semiconductor-based systems in which shot noise is different from the Poissonian value 2eI The first one is a superconductor/semiconductor/superconductor (sp/sm/sp) junction where the superconducting electrodes are 0.5 um apart and the semiconductor bridge between them is composed of a two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG). The second system is a 2-DEG in the hopping conduction regime. The fabrication of sp/sm/sp junctions is explained in detail in this work as so are the noise measurements of two devices that show enhancement from the Poissonian value. These devices present the signatures of the phenomenon of Andreev reflections and supercurrent at 1.2K; therefore, we tentatively attribute the enhancement to this phenomenon, which has been predicted to give giant noise enhancement for superconducting quantum point contacts (SQPC). On the other hand, in the hoping conduction device, we have observed shot-noise suppression from its classical value, confirming in a different material system a previous experimental result that was explained by percolation theory. In addition, we have driven the system to a region where percolation theory seems to fail, signaling a reconstruction of the hopping trajectories.

  8. Transversal and longitudinal mode selections in double-corrugation coaxial slow-wave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Xingjun; Zhong Huihuang; Qian Baoliang; Liu Lie; Liu Yonggui; Li Limin; Shu Ting; Zhang Jiande

    2009-06-15

    To reduce the dimensions of relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs) operating in the low frequency regime of less than 2 GHz, the theory of transversal and longitudinal mode selections are introduced in this paper. The transversal mode selection is achieved using the property of ''surface wave'' of the coaxial slow-wave structure (SWS) to excite the quasi transverse electromagnetic (quasi-TEM) mode without the higher transverse magnetic (TM) modes and it is proved that the coaxial SWS may decrease the transversal dimension of the SWS sections. In addition, the S-parameter method is employed to investigate the longitudinal resonant characteristic of the finite-length SWS, and the scheme of longitudinal mode selection is put forward. It is proposed that the introduction of a well-designed coaxial extractor to slow-wave devices can help to achieve the longitudinal mode selection and reduce the period number of the SWS, which not only can make the devices more compact, but also can avoid the destructive competition between various longitudinal modes, therefore can enhance the efficiency and stabilize the frequency. To sum up, the physical mechanisms of transversal and longitudinal mode selections ensure that the microwave is produced with a single mode and a narrow band. Based on the above discussion, a compact L-band coaxial RBWO is investigated and optimized in detail with the particle-in-cell KARAT code (V. P. Tarakanov, Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., 1992). In simulation, the L-band coaxial RBWO, driven by a 700 kV, 11 kA electron beam, comes to a nonlinear steady state in 20 ns. High-power microwave of quasi-TEM mode is generated with an average power of 2.66 GW, a frequency of 1.6 GHz, and power conversion efficiency of 34.5% in durations of 30-60 ns.

  9. Provision Of Carbon Nanotube Bucky Paper Cages For Immune Shielding Of Cells, Tissues, and Medical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    System and method for enclosing cells and/or tissue, for purposes of growth, cell differentiation, suppression of cell differentiation, biological processing and/or transplantation of cells and tissues (biological inserts), and for secretion, sensing and monitoring of selected chemical substances and activation of gene expression of biological inserts implanted into a human body. Selected cells and/or tissue are enveloped in a "cage" that is primarily carbon nanotube Bucky paper, with a selected thickness and porosity. Optionally, selected functional groups, proteins and/or peptides are attached to the carbon nanotube cage, or included within the cage, to enhance the growth and/or differentiation of the cells and/or tissue, to select for certain cellular sub-populations, to optimize certain functions of the cells and/or tissue and/or to optimize the passage of chemicals across the cage surface(s). A cage system is also used as an immuns shield and to control operation of a nano-device or macroscopic device, located within the cage, to provide or transform a selected chemical and/or a selected signal.

  10. Cell structure for electrochemical devices and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    An electrochemical device comprises a plurality of cells, each cell including a laminate cell membrane, made up of a separator/electrolyte means interposed between alternating positive and negative electrodes, each type of electrode being respectively in common contact to a single current collector.

  11. Long-term central venous access device selection.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    Infusion therapy is often viewed as a means to an end - a way to administer medications and fluids. It is one of the few specialties that affect almost all areas of healthcare. Safe, effective and reliable vascular access should be the goal of every health professional who is starting a patient on a prescribed course of intravenous therapy, especially if that patient is undergoing a prolonged course. This article aims to refresh and update nurses' clinical knowledge of the detailed patient assessment required before choosing a central venous access device, as well as supporting a reduction in complications and earlier recognition of potential problems. It discusses clinical indications for devices, the range of long-term intravenous therapies that can be used, and patient assessment.

  12. Microfluidic Device for Capture and Isolation of Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Alexander P.; Barbee, Kristopher D.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic device capable of trapping, isolating, and lysing individual cells in parallel using dielectrophoretic forces and a system of PDMS channels and valves. The device consists of a glass substrate patterned with electrodes and two PDMS layers comprising of the microfluidic channels and valve control channels. Individual cells are captured by positive dielectrophoresis using the microfabricated electrode pairs. The cells are then isolated into nanoliter compartments using pneumatically actuated PDMS valves. Following isolation, the cells are lysed open by applying an electric field using the same electrode pairs. With the ability to capture and compartmentalize single cells our device may be combined with analytical methods for in situ molecular analysis of cellular components from single cells in a highly parallel manner. PMID:21614137

  13. Microfluidic device for capture and isolation of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Alexander P.; Barbee, Kristopher D.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic device capable of trapping, isolating, and lysing individual cells in parallel using dielectrophoretic forces and a system of PDMS channels and valves. The device consists of a glass substrate patterned with electrodes and two PDMS layers comprising of the microfluidic channels and valve control channels. Individual cells are captured by positive dielectrophoresis using the microfabricated electrode pairs. The cells are then isolated into nanoliter compartments using pneumatically actuated PDMS valves. Following isolation, the cells are lysed open by applying an electric field using the same electrode pairs. With the ability to capture and compartmentalize single cells our device may be combined with analytical methods for in situ molecular analysis of cellular components from single cells in a highly parallel manner.

  14. A microfluidic device enabling high-efficiency single cell trapping

    PubMed Central

    Jin, D.; Deng, B.; Cai, W.; Tu, L.; Chen, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Single cell trapping increasingly serves as a key manipulation technique in single cell analysis for many cutting-edge cell studies. Due to their inherent advantages, microfluidic devices have been widely used to enable single cell immobilization. To further improve the single cell trapping efficiency, this paper reports on a passive hydrodynamic microfluidic device based on the “least flow resistance path” principle with geometry optimized in line with corresponding cell types. Different from serpentine structure, the core trapping structure of the micro-device consists of a series of concatenated T and inverse T junction pairs which function as bypassing channels and trapping constrictions. This new device enhances the single cell trapping efficiency from three aspects: (1) there is no need to deploy very long or complicated channels to adjust flow resistance, thus saving space for each trapping unit; (2) the trapping works in a “deterministic” manner, thus saving a great deal of cell samples; and (3) the compact configuration allows shorter flowing path of cells in multiple channels, thus increasing the speed and throughput of cell trapping. The mathematical model of the design was proposed and optimization of associated key geometric parameters was conducted based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. As a proof demonstration, two types of PDMS microfluidic devices were fabricated to trap HeLa and HEK-293T cells with relatively significant differences in cell sizes. Experimental results showed 100% cell trapping and 90% single cell trapping over 4 × 100 trap sites for these two cell types, respectively. The space saving is estimated to be 2-fold and the cell trapping speed enhancement to be 3-fold compared to previously reported devices. This device can be used for trapping various types of cells and expanded to trap cells in the order of tens of thousands on 1-cm2 scale area, as a promising tool to pattern large-scale single cells on

  15. Method for fabricating pixelated silicon device cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nelson, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2015-08-18

    A method, apparatus and system for flexible, ultra-thin, and high efficiency pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array fabrication is disclosed. A structure and method of creation for a pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array with interconnects is described using a manufacturing method that is simplified compared to previous versions of pixelated silicon photovoltaic cells that require more microfabrication steps.

  16. Microfluidic device for high-yield pairing and fusion of stem cells with somatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gel, Murat; Hirano, Kunio; Oana, Hidehiro; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Tada, Takashi; Washizu, Masao

    2011-12-01

    Electro cell fusion has significant potential as a biotechnology tool with applications ranging from antibody production to cellular reprogramming. However due to low fusion efficiency of the conventional electro fusion methodology the true potential of the technique has not been reached. In this paper, we report a new method which takes cell fusion efficiency two orders magnitude higher than the conventional electro fusion method. The new method, based on one-toone pairing, fusion and selection of fused cells was developed using a microfabricated device. The device was composed of two microfluidic channels, a micro slit array and a petri dish integrated with electrodes. The electrodes positioned in each channel were used to generate electric field lines concentrating in the micro slits. Cells were introduced into channels and brought in to contact through the micro slit array using dielectrophoresis. The cells in contact were fused by applying a DC pulse to electrodes. As the electric field lines were concentrated at the micro slits the membrane potential was induced only at the vicinity of the micro slits, namely only at the cell-cell contact point. This mechanism assured the minimum damage to cells in the fusion as well as the ability to control the strength and location of induced membrane potential. We introduced mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts to the microfluidic channels and demonstrated high-yield fusion (> 80%). Post-fusion study showed the method can generate viable hybrids of stem cells and embryonic fibroblasts. Multinucleated hybrid cells adhering on the chip surface were routinely obtained by using this method and on-chip culturing.

  17. Wireless Communication of Intraoral Devices and Its Optimal Frequency Selection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hangue; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores communication methods and frequencies for wireless intraoral electronic devices, by using an intraoral tongue drive system (iTDS) as a practical example. Because intraoral devices do not meet the operating conditions of the body channel communication, we chose radio frequency communication. We evaluated and compared three frequencies in industrial, scientific, and medical bands (27 MHz, 433.9 MHz, and 2.48 GHz) in terms of their data link performance based on path loss and radiation patterns over horizontal and vertical planes. To do so, we dynamically minimize the impedance mismatch caused by the varying oral environment by applying the adaptive impedance matching technique to 433.9 MHz and 2.48 GHz bands. Experimental results showed that 27 MHz has the smallest path loss in the near-field up to 39 cm separation between transmitter and receiver antennas. However, 433.9 MHz shows the best performance beyond 39 cm and offers a maximum operating distance of 123 cm with 0 dBm transmitter output power. These distances were obtained by a bit error rate test and verified by a link budget analysis and full functionality test of the iTDS with computer access. PMID:26236039

  18. Wireless Communication of Intraoral Devices and Its Optimal Frequency Selection.

    PubMed

    Park, Hangue; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-12-01

    This paper explores communication methods and frequencies for wireless intraoral electronic devices, by using an intraoral tongue drive system (iTDS) as a practical example. Because intraoral devices do not meet the operating conditions of the body channel communication, we chose radio frequency communication. We evaluated and compared three frequencies in industrial, scientific, and medical bands (27 MHz, 433.9 MHz, and 2.48 GHz) in terms of their data link performance based on path loss and radiation patterns over horizontal and vertical planes. To do so, we dynamically minimize the impedance mismatch caused by the varying oral environment by applying the adaptive impedance matching technique to 433.9 MHz and 2.48 GHz bands. Experimental results showed that 27 MHz has the smallest path loss in the near-field up to 39 cm separation between transmitter and receiver antennas. However, 433.9 MHz shows the best performance beyond 39 cm and offers a maximum operating distance of 123 cm with 0 dBm transmitter output power. These distances were obtained by a bit error rate test and verified by a link budget analysis and full functionality test of the iTDS with computer access.

  19. A Two-Stage Microfluidic Device for the Isolation and Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew; Belsare, Sayali; Giorgio, Todd; Mu, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be critical for studying how tumors grow and metastasize, in addition to personalizing treatment for cancer patients. CTCs are rare events in blood, making it difficult to remove CTCs from the blood stream. Two microfluidic devices have been developed to separate CTCs from blood. The first is a double spiral device that focuses cells into streams, the positions of which are determined by cell diameter. The second device uses ligand-coated magnetic nanoparticles that selectively attach to CTCs. The nanoparticles then pull CTCs out of solution using a magnetic field. These two devices will be combined into a single 2-stage microfluidic device that will capture CTCs more efficiently than either device on its own. The first stage depletes the number of blood cells in the sample by size-based separation. The second stage will magnetically remove CTCs from solution for study and culturing. Thus far, size-based separation has been achieved. Research will also focus on understanding the equations that govern fluid dynamics and magnetic fields in order to determine how the manipulation of microfluidic parameters, such as dimensions and flow rate, will affect integration and optimization of the 2-stage device. NSF-CREST: Center for Physics and Chemistry of Materials. HRD-0420516; Department of Defense, Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program Award W81XWH-13-1-0397.

  20. A Strip Cell in Pyroelectric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Siao, An-Shen; Chao, Ching-Kong; Hsiao, Chun-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The pyroelectric effect affords the opportunity to convert temporal temperature fluctuations into usable electrical energy in order to develop abundantly available waste heat. A strip pyroelectric cell, used to enhance temperature variation rates by lateral temperature gradients and to reduce cell capacitance to further promote the induced voltage, is described as a means of improving pyroelectric energy transformation. A precision dicing saw was successfully applied in fabricating the pyroelectric cell with a strip form. The strip pyroelectric cell with a high-narrow cross section is able to greatly absorb thermal energy via the side walls of the strips, thereby inducing lateral temperature gradients and increasing temperature variation rates in a thicker pyroelectric cell. Both simulation and experimentation show that the strip pyroelectric cell improves the electrical outputs of pyroelectric cells and enhances the efficiency of pyroelectric harvesters. The strip-type pyroelectric cell has a larger temperature variation when compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by about 1.9 and 2.4 times, respectively. The measured electrical output of the strip type demonstrates a conspicuous increase in stored energy as compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by of about 15.6 and 19.8 times, respectively. PMID:26999134

  1. Space Radiation Effects in Advanced Solar Cell Materials and Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    after irradiation to high fluence levels, these results also highlight the influence that the solar cell structure can have on the device radiation...response. This will be important in the discussion of multijunction solar cell response below. BASIC MULTIJUNCTION SOLAR CELL STRUCTURE A multijunction...MJ) solar cell is a structure , which consists of a monolithic stack of several semiconductor materials with different bandgaps. The layers are

  2. Blindness and Selective Mutism: One Student's Response to Voice-Output Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Mary; Johnson, Ashli; Herzberg, Tina

    2014-01-01

    This case study was designed to measure the response of one student with blindness and selective mutism to the intervention of voice-output devices across two years and two different teachers in two instructional settings. Before the introduction of the voice output devices, the student did not choose to communicate using spoken language or…

  3. Feeding Devices Design for Selective Laser Melting Formation of Heterogeneous Powder Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinin, O. I.; Valdaytseva, E. A.; Lasota, I. T.; Pevzner, Ya B.; Somonov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the principles of selective laser melting technology for manufacturing of polymetallic products. The results of theoretical investigations of heat and mass transfer at the border of materials are shown. Types of feeding devices design have been demonstrated.

  4. Selection of mammalian cells based on their cell-cycle phase using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Unyoung; Shu, Chih-Wen; Dane, Karen Y.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Wang, Jean Y. J.; Soh, H. T.

    2007-01-01

    An effective, noninvasive means of selecting cells based on their phase within the cell cycle is an important capability for biological research. Current methods of producing synchronous cell populations, however, tend to disrupt the natural physiology of the cell or suffer from low synchronization yields. In this work, we report a microfluidic device that utilizes the dielectrophoresis phenomenon to synchronize cells by exploiting the relationship between the cell's volume and its phase in the cell cycle. The dielectrophoresis activated cell synchronizer (DACSync) device accepts an asynchronous mixture of cells at the inlet, fractionates the cell populations according to the cell-cycle phase (G1/S and G2/M), and elutes them through different outlets. The device is gentle and efficient; it utilizes electric fields that are 1–2 orders of magnitude below those used in electroporation and enriches asynchronous tumor cells in the G1 phase to 96% in one round of sorting, in a continuous flow manner at a throughput of 2 × 105 cells per hour per microchannel. This work illustrates the feasibility of using laminar flow and electrokinetic forces for the efficient, noninvasive separation of living cells. PMID:18093921

  5. Phosphoglycerides of Trichophyton terrestre and one phenotype selected from the Apollo 16 microbial ecology evaluation device.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Deskins, D C; Volz, P A

    1975-05-01

    Total lipid extracted from wild-type Trichophyton terrestre CDC-X285 was found to be 2.0 percent of the dry cell weight. The total lipid contained the following phospholipid components identified by silicic acid-impregnated thin-layer and paper chromatography: phosphatidyl inositol, phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidic acid. The total lipid extracted from the phenotype T. terrestre 7048-1 isolated from the Apollo 16 Microbial Ecology Evaluation Device (MEED) was found to vary according to the time at which the phospholipids were extracted. The Trichophyton phenotype was selected from a cuvette housed in the MEED exposed to specific space parameters including ultraviolet light of known wavelengths and energy levels in deep space. The phospholipid components, identified in the phenotype were phosphatidyl ethanolamine and cardiolipin. The major lipid fraction was composed of digalactosyl diglyceride and monogalactosyl diglyceride. An unusual lipid was detected in the phenotype, which appeared to be sterol glycoside.

  6. Phosphoglycerides of Trichophyton terrestre and One Phenotype Selected from the Apollo 16 Microbial Ecology Evaluation Device

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R. T.; Deskins, D. C.; Volz, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Total lipid extracted from wild-type Trichophyton terrestre CDC-X285 was found to be 2.0% of the dry cell weight. The total lipid contained the following phospholipid components identified by silicic acid-impregnated thin-layer and paper chromatography: phosphatidyl inositol, phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidic acid. The total lipid extracted from the phenotype T. terrestre 7048-1 isolated from the Apollo 16 Microbial Ecology Evaluation Device (MEED) was found to vary according to the time at which the phospholipids were extracted. The Trichophyton phenotype was selected from a cuvette housed in the MEED exposed to specific space parameters including ultraviolet light of known wavelengths and energy levels in deep space. The phospholipid components identified in the phenotype were phosphatidyl ethanolamine and cardiolipin. The major lipid fraction was composed of digalactosyl diglyceride and monogalactosyl diglyceride. An unusual lipid was detected in the phenotype, which appeared to be sterol glycoside. Images PMID:1147604

  7. Microbial Fuel Cells for Powering Navy Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-20

    the anode is generated by fermentation of glucose by other microorganisms in the sediment represented by clostridium in Fig. 4. The products of the...MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS (ADAPTED FROM REF. A1) INTRODUCTION Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) are a class of microorganisms that...anode catalysts in microbial fuel cells. In the case of Geobacter spp., which are Deltaproteobacteria, a group of bacteria that share many similar

  8. Thoracoscopic cell sheet transplantation with a novel device.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Kanzaki, Masato; Iseki, Hiroshi; Okano, Teruo

    2009-06-01

    Regenerative medicine with transplantable cell sheets fabricated on temperature-responsive culture surfaces has been successfully achieved in clinical applications, including skin and cornea treatment. Previously, we reported that transplantation of fibroblast cell sheets to wounded lung had big advantages for sealing intraoperative air leaks compared with conventional materials. Here, we report a novel device for minimally invasive transplantation of cell sheets in endoscopic surgery, such as video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The novel device was designed with a computer-aided design (CAD) system, and the three-dimensional (3D) data were transferred to a 3D printer. With this rapid prototyping system, the cell sheet transplantation device was fabricated using a commercially available photopolymer approved for clinical use. Square cell sheets (24 x 24 mm) were successfully transplanted onto wound sites of porcine lung placed in a human body model, with the device inserted through a 12 mm port. Such a device would enable less invasive transplantation of cell sheets onto a wide variety of internal organs.

  9. The NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell migration studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Waseem K.; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Castracane, James; Gligorijevic, Bojana; van Rheenen, Jacobus W.; Condeelis, John S.

    2008-02-01

    Cancerous tumors are dynamic microenvironments that require unique analytical tools for their study. Better understanding of tumor microenvironments may reveal mechanisms behind tumor progression and generate new strategies for diagnostic marker development, which can be used routinely in histopathological analysis. Previous studies have shown that cell invasion and intravasation are related to metastatic potential and have linked these activities to gene expression patterns seen in migratory and invasive tumor cells in vivo. Existing analytical methods for tumor microenvironments include collection of tumor cells through a catheter needle loaded with a chemical or protein attractant (chemoattractant). This method has some limitations and restrictions, including time constraints of cell collection, long term anesthetization, and in vivo imaging inside the catheter. In this study, a novel implantable device was designed to replace the catheter-based method. The 1.5mm x 0.5mm x 0.24mm device is designed to controllably release chemoattractants for stimulation of tumor cell migration and subsequent cell capture. Devices were fabricated using standard microfabrication techniques and have been shown to mediate controlled release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Optically transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes have been incorporated into the device for impedance-based measurement of cell density and have been shown to be compatible with in vivo multi-photon imaging of cell migration.

  10. Microfluidic whole genome amplification device for single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilong; Lu, Sijia; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-10-07

    We developed a microfluidic device to perform multiplex single-cell whole-genome amplification (WGA) using multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). This device, made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), allows us to monitor the whole process of cell loading and single-cell WGA for sequencing. We show that the genome coverage of MALBAC amplifications is reproducible between chambers on a single chip and between different chips, which enables data normalization using standard samples to accurately identify copy number variations (CNVs). This device provides an easy-to-operate approach to perform single cell sequencing library preparation with minimum hands-on time. It reduces the requirement of manual expertise as well as the risk of contamination, which is essential in future applications especially the medical diagnosis.

  11. Cell culture device using spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Chung-Jen; Shen, Ching-I.; Ou, Chung-Ming

    2009-07-01

    Spatial light modulator is introduced for cell culturing and related illumination experiment. Two kinds of designs were used. The first type put the cell along with the bio-medium directly on top of the analyzer of the microdisplay and set a cover glass on it to retain the medium environment, which turned the microdisplay into a bio-container. The second type introduced an optical lens system placed below the spatial light modulator to focus the light spots on specific position. Details of the advantages and drawbacks for the two different approaches are discussed, and the human melanocyte cell (HMC) is introduced to prove the feasibility of the concept. Results indicate that the second type is much more suitable than the first for precision required application.

  12. Single cell array impedance analysis in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altinagac, Emre; Taskin, Selen; Kizil, Huseyin

    2016-10-01

    Impedance analysis of single cells is presented in this paper. Following the separation of a target cell type by dielectrophoresis in our previous work, this paper focuses on capturing the cells as a single array and performing impedance analysis to point out the signature difference between each cell type. Lab-on-a-chip devices having a titanium interdigitated electrode layer on a glass substrate and a PDMS microchannel are fabricated to capture each cell in a single form and perform impedance analysis. HCT116 (homosapiens colon colorectal carcin) and HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) cells are used in our experiments.

  13. Aptamer-based microfluidic device for enrichment, sorting, and detection of multiple cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Phillips, Joseph A; Yan, Jilin; Li, Qingge; Fan, Z Hugh; Tan, Weihong

    2009-09-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer based on the detection of rare cancer cells in blood or other bodily fluids is a significant challenge. To address this challenge, we have developed a microfluidic device that can simultaneously sort, enrich, and then detect multiple types of cancer cells from a complex sample. The device, which is made from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), implements cell-affinity chromatography based on the selective cell-capture of immobilized DNA-aptamers and yields a 135-fold enrichment of rare cells in a single run. This enrichment is achieved because the height of the channel is on the order of a cell diameter. The sorted cells grow at the comparable rate as cultured cells and are 96% pure based on flow cytometry determination. Thus, by using our aptamer based device, cell capture is achieved simply and inexpensively, with no sample pretreatment before cell analysis. Enrichment and detection of multiple rare cancer cells can be used to detect cancers at the early stages, diagnose metastatic relapse, stratify patients for therapeutic purposes, monitor response to drugs and therapies, track tumor progression, and gain a deeper understanding of the biology of circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

  14. Aptamer-based microfluidic device for enrichment, sorting, and detection of multiple cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Phillips, Joseph A.; Yan, Jilin; Li, Qingge

    2011-01-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer based on the detection of rare cancer cells in blood or other bodily fluids is a significant challenge. To address this challenge, we have developed a microfluidic device that can simultaneously sort, enrich, and then detect multiple types of cancer cells from a complex sample. The device, which is made from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), implements cell-affinity chromatography based on the selective cell-capture of immobilized DNA-aptamers and yields a 135-fold enrichment of rare cells in a single run. This enrichment is achieved because the height of the channel is on the order of a cell diameter. The sorted cells grow at the comparable rate as cultured cells and are 96% pure based on flow cytometry determination. Thus, by using our aptamer based device, cell capture is achieved simply and inexpensively, with no sample pretreatment before cell analysis. Enrichment and detection of multiple rare cancer cells can be used to detect cancers at the early stages, diagnose metastatic relapse, stratify patients for therapeutic purposes, monitor response to drugs and therapies, track tumor progression, and gain a deeper understanding of the biology of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). PMID:19715365

  15. Evaluating Varied Label Designs for Use with Medical Devices: Optimized Labels Outperform Existing Labels in the Correct Selection of Devices and Time to Select

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Do Chan; Ladoni, Moslem; Brunk, Eric; Becker, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Effective standardization of medical device labels requires objective study of varied designs. Insufficient empirical evidence exists regarding how practitioners utilize and view labeling. Objective Measure the effect of graphic elements (boxing information, grouping information, symbol use and color-coding) to optimize a label for comparison with those typical of commercial medical devices. Design Participants viewed 54 trials on a computer screen. Trials were comprised of two labels that were identical with regard to graphics, but differed in one aspect of information (e.g., one had latex, the other did not). Participants were instructed to select the label along a given criteria (e.g., latex containing) as quickly as possible. Dependent variables were binary (correct selection) and continuous (time to correct selection). Participants Eighty-nine healthcare professionals were recruited at Association of Surgical Technologists (AST) conferences, and using a targeted e-mail of AST members. Results Symbol presence, color coding and grouping critical pieces of information all significantly improved selection rates and sped time to correct selection (α = 0.05). Conversely, when critical information was graphically boxed, probability of correct selection and time to selection were impaired (α = 0.05). Subsequently, responses from trials containing optimal treatments (color coded, critical information grouped with symbols) were compared to two labels created based on a review of those commercially available. Optimal labels yielded a significant positive benefit regarding the probability of correct choice ((P<0.0001) LSM; UCL, LCL: 97.3%; 98.4%, 95.5%)), as compared to the two labels we created based on commercial designs (92.0%; 94.7%, 87.9% and 89.8%; 93.0%, 85.3%) and time to selection. Conclusions Our study provides data regarding design factors, namely: color coding, symbol use and grouping of critical information that can be used to significantly enhance

  16. Material selection for climbing hardware using the example of a belay device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, E.; Schwanitz, S.; Odenwald, S.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the research project was to design a novel climbing belay device. The present article describes the details of the therefor performed material selection. Literature research on the materials used in commercially available belay devices revealed a lack of definite information. Thus, a pilot x-ray fluorescence (XRF) test was performed on a small sample of common aluminium belay devices. It revealed the use of a variety of different alloy systems. The selection process continued by compiling a thorough list of constraints and objectives for this safety related piece of sports equipment. Different material options including non-aluminium-materials were discussed. The final material choice was a high strength aluminium alloy with a T6 thermal treatment. The device was designed and calculated by use of CAD and FEM software respectively, aiming to reduce weight. After manufacturing the strength, usability and friction properties of the device have been successfully tested.

  17. Vascular smooth muscle cell culture in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y. C.; Chen, F.; Zhang, T.; Chen, D. Y.; Jia, X.; Wang, J. B.; Guo, W.; Chen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device enabling culture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) where extracellular matrix coating, VSMC seeding, culture, and immunostaining are demonstrated in a tubing-free manner. By optimizing droplet volume differences between inlets and outlets of micro channels, VSMCs were evenly seeded into microfluidic devices. Furthermore, the effects of extracellular matrix (e.g., collagen, poly-l-Lysine (PLL), and fibronectin) on VSMC proliferation and phenotype expression were explored. As a platform technology, this microfluidic device may function as a new VSMC culture model enabling VSMC studies. PMID:25379109

  18. Emerging medical devices for minimally invasive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D; Ng, Kelvin S; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    The past decade has seen the first wave of cell-based therapeutics undergo clinical trials with varying degrees of success. Although attention is increasingly focused on clinical trial design, owing to spiraling regulatory costs, tools used in delivering cells and sustaining the cells' viability and functions in vivo warrant careful scrutiny. While the clinical administration of cell-based therapeutics often requires additional safeguarding and targeted delivery compared with traditional therapeutics, there is significant opportunity for minimally invasive device-assisted cell therapy to provide the physician with new regenerative options at the point of care. Herein we detail exciting recent advances in medical devices that will aid in the safe and efficacious delivery of cell-based therapeutics.

  19. Hot cell facility design for large fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R.J.; Bussell, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Large hot cell facilities will be necessary to support the operation of large fusion devices. The supporting hot cells will be needed to serve a variety of different functions and tasks, which include reactor component maintenance, tool and maintenance equipment repair, and preparation of radioactive material for shipment and disposal. This paper discusses hot cell facility functions, requirements, and design issues and techniques. Suggested solutions and examples are given.

  20. Cell-Based Biosensors: Electrical Sensing in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based biosensors provide new horizons for medical diagnostics by adopting complex recognition elements such as mammalian cells in microfluidic devices that are simple, cost efficient and disposable. This combination renders possible a new range of applications in the fields of diagnostics and personalized medicine. The review looks at the most recent developments in cell-based biosensing microfluidic systems with electrical and electrochemical transduction, and relevance to medical diagnostics. PMID:26859401

  1. Electrochemical Device Comprising an Electrically-Conductive, Selectively-Permeable Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. (Inventor); Laicer, Castro S. T. (Inventor); Harrison, Katherine E. (Inventor); McPheeters, Bryn M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An electrochemical device, such as a fuel cell or an electrolyzer. In one embodiment, the electrochemical device includes a membrane electrode assembly (MEA), an anodic gas diffusion medium in contact with the anode of the MEA, a cathodic gas diffusion medium in contact with the cathode, a first bipolar plate in contact with the anodic gas diffusion medium, and a second bipolar plate in contact with the cathodic gas diffusion medium. Each of the bipolar plates includes an electrically-conductive, non-porous, liquid-permeable, substantially gas-impermeable membrane in contact with its respective gas diffusion medium, the membrane including a solid polymer electrolyte and a non-particulate, electrically-conductive material, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and/or metal nanowires. In addition, each bipolar plate also includes an electrically-conductive fluid chamber in contact with the electrically-conductive, selectively-permeable membrane and further includes a non-porous and electrically-conductive plate in contact with the fluid chamber.

  2. Flexible micro spring array device for high-throughput enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Harouaka, Ramdane A; Zhou, Ming-Da; Yeh, Yin-Ting; Khan, Waleed J; Das, Avisnata; Liu, Xin; Christ, Christine C; Dicker, David T; Baney, Tara S; Kaifi, Jussuf T; Belani, Chandra P; Truica, Cristina I; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Allerton, Jeffrey P; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-02-01

    The dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that cause metastases in distant organs accounts for the majority of cancer-related deaths. CTCs have been established as a cancer biomarker of known prognostic value. The enrichment of viable CTCs for ex vivo analysis could further improve cancer diagnosis and guide treatment selection. We designed a new flexible micro spring array (FMSA) device for the enrichment of viable CTCs independent of antigen expression. Unlike previous microfiltration devices, flexible structures at the micro scale minimize cell damage to preserve viability, while maximizing throughput to allow rapid enrichment directly from whole blood with no need for sample preprocessing. Device performance with respect to capture efficiency, enrichment against leukocytes, viability, and proliferability was characterized. CTCs and CTC microclusters were enriched from clinical samples obtained from breast, lung, and colorectal cancer patients. The FMSA device enriched tumor cells with 90% capture efficiency, higher than 10(4) enrichment, and better than 80% viability from 7.5-mL whole blood samples in <10 min on a 0.5-cm(2) device. The FMSA detected at least 1 CTC in 16 out of 21 clinical samples (approximately 76%) compared to 4 out of 18 (approximately 22%) detected with the commercial CellSearch® system. There was no incidence of clogging in over 100 tested fresh whole blood samples. The FMSA device provides a versatile platform capable of viable enrichment and analysis of CTCs from clinically relevant volumes of whole blood.

  3. Sickle Cell: A Selected Resource Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This annotated, selective bibliography lists the following types of educational and informational material on both sickle cell disease and trait: (1) professional education materials; (2) fact sheets, pamphlets, and brochures; and (3) audiovisual material. A selected list of references is provided for the following topic areas: (1) genetic…

  4. Nanostructured photovoltaic devices for next generation solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin

    2008-10-01

    As the search for alternative sources of energy other than petroleum continues to expand, solar energy conversion has already been identified as one of the most promising technologies. In the past few years there has been extensive research focused on the next generation solar cells that can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit (a model that predicts the maximum achievable efficiency for a given material with a given bandgap). Moreover, nanoengineering approaches to enhance solar power conversion efficiency have started to receive considerable interest. Even in the most efficient commercially available solar devices utilizing crystalline silicon, a major portion of the absorbed ultraviolet photon energy is wasted as heat. Furthermore, this heat is detrimental to device reliability. Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) offer the exciting prospect of simultaneously manipulating device and material structures and processes to enable more efficient solar energy conversion. Most importantly, these colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots are amenable to inexpensive fabrication techniques such as dip coating or spray coating of the constituent nanoscale materials onto various substrates. This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured photovoltaic devices, that exhibit multiple exciton generation, and that exploit the wide absorption spectra enabled by the quantum dots for next generation highly efficient, low cost, solar cells. Firstly, multiple exciton generation and subsequent electrical extraction from a thin film photoconductive device constructed from PbSe NQDs is demonstrated. As an extension of this work, this PbSe NQD photoconductor was used in a tandem structure with a polymer solar cell to demonstrate multiple carrier extraction the application of an external electric field. This structure exhibited improved device durability from UV irradiation due to the self-passivating effect provided by the PbSe layer. In order to achieve better exciton

  5. Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing.

    PubMed

    Comina, Germán; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2016-03-15

    Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices-conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones-underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones' ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones' resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanostructured cavity devices for extracellular stimulation of HL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Czeschik, Anna; Rinklin, Philipp; Derra, Ulrike; Ullmann, Sabrina; Holik, Peter; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and well established field. However, combining single-cell resolution with sufficient signal coupling remains challenging due to poor cell-electrode sealing. Furthermore, electrodes with diameters below 20 µm often suffer from a high electrical impedance affecting the noise during voltage recordings. In this study, we report on a nanocavity sensor array for voltage-controlled stimulation and extracellular action potential recordings on cellular networks. Nanocavity devices combine the advantages of low-impedance electrodes with small cell-chip interfaces, preserving a high spatial resolution for recording and stimulation. A reservoir between opening aperture and electrode is provided, allowing the cell to access the structure for a tight cell-sensor sealing. We present the well-controlled fabrication process and the effect of cavity formation and electrode patterning on the sensor's impedance. Further, we demonstrate reliable voltage-controlled stimulation using nanostructured cavity devices by capturing the pacemaker of an HL-1 cell network.

  7. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  8. Pruning a decision tree for selecting computer-related assistive devices for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chia-Fen; Tseng, Li-Kai; Jang, Yuh

    2012-07-01

    Many disabled individuals lack extensive knowledge about assistive technology, which could help them use computers. In 1997, Denis Anson developed a decision tree of 49 evaluative questions designed to evaluate the functional capabilities of the disabled user and choose an appropriate combination of assistive devices, from a selection of 26, that enable the individual to use a computer. In general, occupational therapists guide the disabled users through this process. They often have to go over repetitive questions in order to find an appropriate device. A disabled user may require an alphanumeric entry device, a pointing device, an output device, a performance enhancement device, or some combination of these. Therefore, the current research eliminates redundant questions and divides Anson's decision tree into multiple independent subtrees to meet the actual demand of computer users with disabilities. The modified decision tree was tested by six disabled users to prove it can determine a complete set of assistive devices with a smaller number of evaluative questions. The means to insert new categories of computer-related assistive devices was included to ensure the decision tree can be expanded and updated. The current decision tree can help the disabled users and assistive technology practitioners to find appropriate computer-related assistive devices that meet with clients' individual needs in an efficient manner.

  9. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  10. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules. PMID:26180576

  11. Practical, Microfabrication-Free Device for Single-Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-I; Chao, Shih-hui; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA) as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrophilic areas across a relatively more hydrophobic substrate. The number of randomly seeded Escherichia coli bacteria in each discrete droplet approaches single-cell levels. The cell distribution on MOCCA is well-fit with Poisson distribution. In this pioneer study, we created an array of 900-picoliter droplets. The total time needed to seed cells in ∼3000 droplets was less than 10 minutes. Compared to traditional microfabrication techniques, MOCCA dramatically lowers the cost of microscale cell arrays, yet enhances the fabrication and operational efficiency for single-cell analysis. PMID:19696926

  12. Thermophotovoltaic conversion using selective infrared line emitters and large band gap photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Brandhorst, Jr., Henry W.; Chen, Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Efficient thermophotovoltaic conversion can be performed using photovoltaic devices with a band gap in the 0.75-1.4 electron volt range, and selective infrared emitters chosen from among the rare earth oxides which are thermally stimulated to emit infrared radiation whose energy very largely corresponds to the aforementioned band gap. It is possible to use thermovoltaic devices operating at relatively high temperatures, up to about 300.degree. C., without seriously impairing the efficiency of energy conversion.

  13. Transport Mechanisms of Circulating Tumor Cells in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangharajan, Kaushik; Conlisk, A. T.; Prakash, Shaurya

    2014-11-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LoC) devices are becoming an essential tool for several emerging point-of-care healthcare needs and applications. Among the plethora of challenging problems in the personalized healthcare domain, early detection of cancer continues to be a challenge. For instance, identification of most tumors occurs by the time the tumor comprises approximately 1 billion cells, with poor prognosis for metastatic disease. The key obstacle in identifying and subsequent capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is that the amount of CTCs in the blood stream is ~1 in 109 cells. The fundamental challenge in design and fabrication of microfluidic devices arises due to lack of information on suitable sorting needed for sample preparation before any labeling or capture scheme can be employed. Moreover, the ability to study these low concentration cells relies on knowledge of their physical and chemical properties, of which the physical properties are poorly understood. Also, nearly all existing microfluidic mixers were developed for aqueous electrolyte solutions to enhance mixing in traditional low Re flows. However, no systematic studies have developed design rules for particle mixing. Therefore, we present a numerical model to discuss design rules for microscale mixers and sorters for particle sorting for high efficiency antibody labeling of CTCs along with presenting a pathway for a device to capture CTCs without the need for labeling based on particle electrical properties. NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) for the Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices EEC-0914790.

  14. Micromechanical Devices for Control of Cell-Cell Interaction, and Methods of Use Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N. (Inventor); Hui, Elliot (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The development and function of living tissues depends largely on interactions between cells that can vary in both time and space; however, temporal control of cell-cell interaction is experimentally challenging. By employing a micromachined silicon substrate with moving parts, herein is disclosed the dynamic regulation of cell-cell interactions via direct manipulation of adherent cells with micron-scale precision. The inventive devices and methods allow mechanical control of both tissue composition and spatial organization. The inventive device and methods enable the investigation of dynamic cell-cell interaction in a multitude of applications, such as intercellular communication, spanning embryogenesis, homeostasis, and pathogenic processes.

  15. [Wearable Medical Devices' MCU Selection Analysis Based on the ARM Cortex-MO+ Architecture].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zaoquan; Liu, Mengxing; Qin, Liping; Ye, Shuming; Chen, Hang

    2015-03-01

    According to the characteristics of low cost, high performance, high integration and long battery life of wearable medical devices, the mainstream low-power microcontroller(MCU) series were compared, and came to the conclusion that the MCU series based on ARM Cortex-M0+ architecture were suitable for the development of wearable medical devices. In aspects of power consumption, operational performance, integrated peripherals and cost, the MCU series based on Cortex-M0+ architecture of primary semiconductor companies were compared, aimed at providing the guides of MCU selection for wearable medical devices.

  16. Single vegetal cell handling and fixing in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoual, Matthieu J.; Koh, Aoki; Mita-Tixier, Agnes; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2003-04-01

    The basic advantage of the microfluidic systems is that they enable reducing consumption of biological material and chemicals. But another major advantage of the microfluidic systems, not widely explored so far, is that with feature sizes reduced toward the size of cells, one can easily handle and fix a single cell. The interest of single cell handling and fixing appears when one wants to study biochemical exchanges between single cells or internal biochemical reactions inside an isolated cell. This work uses the shape of the microfluidc device to control the migration and placement of single vegetal cells. Three-dimensional micro-molding and poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) patterning techniques have been used to realize device prototypes. Double-height micro-molds are made of thick negative photoresist (SU8) Experiments have been undergone to optimize fluid rate flow and cell concentration regarding to right cell placement percentage. The PDMS prototypes systems confirm the good operation of the design to migrate cells, place and fix them. The placement rate, even if it is enough for statistical biochemical experiments, will be improved by the use of new material. New material will allow to get rid of air bubbles due to PDMS long-term hydrophobicity that render up to 25% settlement places unserviceable.

  17. Improved selectivity from a wavelength addressable device for wireless stimulation of neural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Elif Ç.; Freedman, David S.; Gökkavas, Mutlu; Özbay, Ekmel; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2014-01-01

    Electrical neural stimulation with micro electrodes is a promising technique for restoring lost functions in the central nervous system as a result of injury or disease. One of the problems related to current neural stimulators is the tissue response due to the connecting wires and the presence of a rigid electrode inside soft neural tissue. We have developed a novel, optically activated, microscale photovoltaic neurostimulator based on a custom layered compound semiconductor heterostructure that is both wireless and has a comparatively small volume (<0.01 mm3). Optical activation provides a wireless means of energy transfer to the neurostimulator, eliminating wires and the associated complications. This neurostimulator was shown to evoke action potentials and a functional motor response in the rat spinal cord. In this work, we extend our design to include wavelength selectivity and thus allowing independent activation of devices. As a proof of concept, we fabricated two different microscale devices with different spectral responsivities in the near-infrared region. We assessed the improved addressability of individual devices via wavelength selectivity as compared to spatial selectivity alone through on-bench optical measurements of the devices in combination with an in vivo light intensity profile in the rat cortex obtained in a previous study. We show that wavelength selectivity improves the individual addressability of the floating stimulators, thus increasing the number of devices that can be implanted in close proximity to each other. PMID:24600390

  18. Microfluidic device for cell capture and impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Wang, Min-How

    2007-10-01

    This work presents a microfluidic device to capture physically single cells within microstructures inside a channel and to measure the impedance of a single HeLa cell (human cervical epithelioid carcinoma) using impedance spectroscopy. The device includes a glass substrate with electrodes and a PDMS channel with micro pillars. The commercial software CFD-ACE+ is used to study the flow of the microstructures in the channel. According to simulation results, the probability of cell capture by three micro pillars is about 10%. An equivalent circuit model of the device is established and fits closely to the experimental results. The circuit can be modeled electrically as cell impedance in parallel with dielectric capacitance and in series with a pair of electrode resistors. The system is operated at low frequency between 1 and 100 kHz. In this study, experiments show that the HeLa cell is successfully captured by the micro pillars and its impedance is measured by impedance spectroscopy. The magnitude of the HeLa cell impedance declines at all operation voltages with frequency because the HeLa cell is capacitive. Additionally, increasing the operation voltage reduces the magnitude of the HeLa cell because a strong electric field may promote the exchange of ions between the cytoplasm and the isotonic solution. Below an operating voltage of 0.9 V, the system impedance response is characteristic of a parallel circuit at under 30 kHz and of a series circuit at between 30 and 100 kHz. The phase of the HeLa cell impedance is characteristic of a series circuit when the operation voltage exceeds 0.8 V because the cell impedance becomes significant.

  19. Organic electrical bistable devices and rewritable memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. P.; Liu, J.; Yang, Y.

    2002-04-01

    Electrical bistability is a phenomenon in which a device exhibits two states of different conductivities, at the same applied voltage. We report an organic electrical bistable device (OBD) comprising of a thin metal layer embedded within the organic material, as the active medium [L. P. Ma, J. Liu, and Y. Yang, US Patent Pending, (2001)]. The performance of this device makes it attractive for memory-cell type of applications. The two states of the OBD differ in their conductivity by several orders in magnitude and show remarkable stability, i.e., once the device reaches either state, it tends to remain in that state for a prolonged period of time. More importantly, the high and low conductivity states of an OBD can be precisely controlled by the application of a positive voltage pulse (to write) or a negative voltage pulse (to erase), respectively. One million writing-erasing cycles for the OBD have been tested in ambient conditions without significant device degradation. These discoveries pave the way for newer applications, such as low-cost, large-area, flexible, high-density, electrically addressable data storage devices.

  20. Selectivity and mixed reactant fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed reactant fuel cells (MR-FCs), are aimed at using a uniform mixture of fuel and oxygen applied to both the anode and the cathode. This allows redesign of fuel cells with a significantly simpler construction, having potentially a higher power density, better fuel utilization and be less expensive. The challenge in realizing MR-FCs is finding selective electrodes that can enhance oxygen reduction at the cathode, fuel oxidation at the anode while inhibiting the chemical reaction between the fuel and oxygen in the gas mixture. This task is in particular challenging in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), as they operate at elevated temperatures, where many reactions are easily activated and selectivity is difficult to achieve. As a result no true MR-FC of the SOFC type were reported while some were found for low temperature fuel cells (FCs). The so-called single-chamber-SOFC are not true MR-FCs as they do not contain two selective electrodes, as required. We shall discuss potential ways to search for and develop selective anodes and cathodes for SOFC type MR-FCs. We first consider material properties which should contribute to that goal. This refers to electronic properties of the bulk, band banding under adsorbed specie, point defects in the bulk and on the surface. We then proceed to show how cell design, in particular electrode structure, can contribute to selectivity. Finally operation conditions are considered and it is shown that they also can contribute to selectivity. The operation condition considered are gas mixture composition, gas mixture residence time in the hot zone, hence gas flow rate, current density and temperature. The topics discussed hold for all FC types but are crucial for the SOFC type because of the difficulty to achieve selectivity at elevated temperatures. It is suggested that a concerted effort taking advantage of all those options should allow development of a true SOFC type MR-FC.

  1. Highly Multiplexed RNA Aptamer Selection using a Microplate-based Microcolumn Device

    PubMed Central

    Reinholt, Sarah J.; Ozer, Abdullah; Lis, John T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed RNA aptamer selection to 19 different targets simultaneously using a microcolumn-based device, MEDUSA (Microplate-based Enrichment Device Used for the Selection of Aptamers), as well as a modified selection process, that significantly reduce the time and reagents needed for selections. We exploited MEDUSA’s reconfigurable design between parallel and serially-connected microcolumns to enable the use of just 2 aliquots of starting library, and its 96-well microplate compatibility to enable the continued use of high-throughput techniques in downstream processes. Our modified selection protocol allowed us to perform the equivalent of a 10-cycle selection in the time it takes for 4 traditional selection cycles. Several aptamers were discovered with nanomolar dissociation constants. Furthermore, aptamers were identified that not only bound with high affinity, but also acted as inhibitors to significantly reduce the activity of their target protein, mouse decapping exoribonuclease (DXO). The aptamers resisted DXO’s exoribonuclease activity, and in studies monitoring DXO’s degradation of a 30-nucleotide substrate, less than 1 μM of aptamer demonstrated significant inhibition of DXO activity. This aptamer selection method using MEDUSA helps to overcome some of the major challenges with traditional aptamer selections, and provides a platform for high-throughput selections that lends itself to process automation. PMID:27432610

  2. Acoustic Devices for Particle and Cell Manipulation and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yongqiang; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Hughes, David A.; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Gebhardt, Sylvia; Bolhovitins, Aleksandrs; Poltarjonoks, Romans; Weijer, Kees; Schönecker, Andreas; Hill, Martyn; Cochran, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed. PMID:25123465

  3. A Stretching Device for High Resolution Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Mathieu, Pattie S.; Helmke, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Several custom-built and commercially available devices are available to investigate cellular responses to substrate strain. However, analysis of structural dynamics by microscopy in living cells during stretch is not readily feasible. We describe a novel stretch device optimized for high-resolution live-cell imaging. The unit assembles onto standard inverted microscopes and applies constant magnitude or cyclic stretch at physiological magnitudes to cultured cells on elastic membranes. Interchangeable modular indenters enable delivery of equibiaxial and uniaxial stretch profiles. Strain analysis performed by tracking fluorescent microspheres adhered onto the substrate demonstrated reproducible application of stretch profiles. In endothelial cells transiently expressing EGFP-vimentin and paxillin-DsRed2 and subjected to constant magnitude equibiaxial stretch, the 2-D strain tensor demonstrated efficient transmission through the extracellular matrix and focal adhesions. Decreased transmission to the intermediate filament network was measured, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of maximum stretch magnitude revealed discrete sites of strain focusing. Spatial correlation of vimentin and paxillin displacement vectors provided an estimate of the extent of mechanical coupling between the structures. Interestingly, switching the spatial profile of substrate strain reveals that actin-mediated edge ruffling is not desensitized to repeated mechano-stimulation. These initial observations show that the stretch device is compatible with live-cell microscopy and is a novel tool for measuring dynamic structural remodeling under mechanical strain. PMID:20195762

  4. Acoustic devices for particle and cell manipulation and sensing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yongqiang; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E M; Hughes, David A; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Gebhardt, Sylvia; Bolhovitins, Aleksandrs; Poltarjonoks, Romans; Weijer, Kees; Schönecker, Andreas; Hill, Martyn; Cochran, Sandy

    2014-08-13

    An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed.

  5. Controllable design of solid-state perovskite solar cells by SCAPS device simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kai; Lin, Peng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Yan; Xu, Zongchang; Lin, Yixin

    2016-12-01

    The highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of solid-state perovskite solar cells (ssPSCs) has achieved 20.1% recently. There is reason to believe that ssPSCs is a strong competitor with silicon and CIGS solar cells in photovoltaic field. The deep understanding of operation mechanism of ssPSCs is essential and required to furtherly improve device performance. The configuration and excition type are similar to inorganic semiconductor solar cells. Therefore, Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator (SCAPS), a device simulator widely using in inorganic solar cells, was employed to controllably design ssPSCs. The validity of device simulation was verified by comparing with real devices from reported literatures. The influence of absorber thickness on device property was discussed, which indicate that it exists an optimal thickness range. Two hypothetical interface layers, TiO2/perovskite layer and perovskite/HTM layer, were introduced into the construction model to consider the effects of interfaces defect density on device performance. It revealed TiO2/perovskite has stronger impact than perovskite/HTM, because higher excess carrier density existing at TiO2/perovskite will cause more recombination rate. In addition, hole transport materials (HTM) parameters, hole mobility and acceptor density, were chosen to study the impact of HTM characteristics on PCE. The analysis illuminate that the design of HTM layer should balance hole mobility and acceptor density. Meanwhile, different HTM candidates were selected and replaced typical HTM layer. The discussion about the function of candidates on solar cells performance demonstrated that a thiophene group hole-transporting polymer (PTAA) and a copper-based conductor (CuI) both have relatively high PCE, which is due to their wide bandgap, high conductivity, and better chemical interaction with perovskite absorber.

  6. A Mechanically Tunable Microfluidic Cell-Trapping Device

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Shang, Junyi; Olsen, Timothy; Liu, Kun; Brenner, David; Lin, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation, such as isolation, positioning and trapping of cells, is important in basic biological research and clinical diagnostics. Micro/nanotechnologies have been enabling more effective and efficient cell trapping than possible with conventional platforms. Currently available micro/nanoscale methods for cell trapping, however, still lack flexibility in precisely controlling the number of trapped cells. We exploited the large compliance of elastomers to create an array of cell-trapping microstructures, whose dimensions can be mechanically modulated by inducing uniformly distributed strain via application of external force on the chip. The device consists of two elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets, one of which bears dam-like, cup-shaped geometries to physically capture cells. The mechanical modulation is used to tune the characteristics of cell trapping to capture a predetermined number of cells, from single cells to multiple cells. Thus, enhanced utility and flexibility for practical applications can be attained, as demonstrated by tunable trapping of MCF-7 cells, a human breast cancer cell line. PMID:25821347

  7. Adult enteral device selection: which is the best for the patient?

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Enteral feeding is considered to be a safe and effective way of providing nutrition to patients who are unable to meet their requirements orally. There are a number of enteral feeding devices, including naso-gastric and gastrostomy tubes, that allow access to the stomach for feeding. However, selecting the most appropriate device for a patient depends on a number of factors, including consideration of duration of feeding and the individual patient's clinical condition and social circumstances. In addition, the patient should always be included in decision making where possible. This article explores the decision-making process regarding selection of appropriate enteral feeding devices and applies this process to two patient case studies.

  8. Nanostructured cavity devices for extracellular stimulation of HL-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschik, Anna; Rinklin, Philipp; Derra, Ulrike; Ullmann, Sabrina; Holik, Peter; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and well established field. However, combining single-cell resolution with sufficient signal coupling remains challenging due to poor cell-electrode sealing. Furthermore, electrodes with diameters below 20 µm often suffer from a high electrical impedance affecting the noise during voltage recordings. In this study, we report on a nanocavity sensor array for voltage-controlled stimulation and extracellular action potential recordings on cellular networks. Nanocavity devices combine the advantages of low-impedance electrodes with small cell-chip interfaces, preserving a high spatial resolution for recording and stimulation. A reservoir between opening aperture and electrode is provided, allowing the cell to access the structure for a tight cell-sensor sealing. We present the well-controlled fabrication process and the effect of cavity formation and electrode patterning on the sensor's impedance. Further, we demonstrate reliable voltage-controlled stimulation using nanostructured cavity devices by capturing the pacemaker of an HL-1 cell network.Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and

  9. Endothelial cell polarization and chemotaxis in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, Amir; Ma, Ning; Poo, Mu-Ming; Sohn, Lydia L; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2008-08-01

    The directed migration of endothelial cells is an early and critical step in angiogenesis, or new blood vessel formation. In this study, the polarization and chemotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in response to quantified gradients of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were examined. To accomplish this, a microfluidic device was designed and fabricated to generate stable concentration gradients of biomolecules in a cell culture chamber while minimizing the fluid shear stress experienced by the cells. Finite element simulation of the device geometry produced excellent agreement with the observed VEGF concentration distribution, which was found to be stable across multiple hours. This device is expected to have wide applicability in the study of shear-sensitive cells such as HUVEC and non-adherent cell types as well as in the study of migration through three-dimensional matrices. HUVEC were observed to chemotax towards higher VEGF concentrations across the entire range of concentrations studied (18-32 ng mL(-1)) when the concentration gradient was 14 ng mL(-1) mm(-1). In contrast, shallow gradients (2 ng mL(-1) mm(-1)) across the same concentration range were unable to induce HUVEC chemotaxis. Furthermore, while all HUVEC exposed to elevated VEGF levels (both in steep and shallow gradients) displayed an increased number of filopodia, only chemotaxing HUVEC displayed an asymmetric distribution of filopodia, with enhanced numbers of protrusions present along the leading edge. These results suggest a two-part requirement to induce VEGF chemotaxis: the VEGF absolute concentration enhances the total number of filopodia extended while the VEGF gradient steepness induces filopodia localization, cell polarization, and subsequent directed migration.

  10. Selection of electrical algorithms to treat obesity with intermittent vagal block using an implantable medical device.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Toouli, James; Herrera, Miguel F; Kow, Lilian; Pantoja, Juan Pablo; Billington, Charles J; Tweden, Katherine S; Wilson, Richard R; Moody, Frank G

    2009-01-01

    A laparoscopically implantable electrical device that intermittently blocks both vagi near the esophagogastric junction led to significant excess weight loss (EWL) in an initial clinical trial in obese patients. The study objective was to optimize therapy algorithms and determine the EWL achieved with a second-generation device at university hospitals in Australia, Norway, and Switzerland. Data acquired during the initial clinical trial were analyzed and subsequently used to select alternative electrical algorithms. In the second trial, vagal blocking using one selected therapy algorithm was initiated 2 weeks after implanting the second-generation device. The patients were followed up for 6 months to assess the EWL and safety, including adverse events. In the initial clinical trial, vagal blocking algorithm durations of 90-150 s were associated with greater EWL compared with either shorter or longer algorithm durations (P<.01). The second trial enrolled 27 patients (mean body mass index 39.3+/-.8 kg/m2) to evaluate a 120-s blocking algorithm. At 6 months, greater EWL was achieved (22.7%+/-3.1%, n=24) compared with the initial study and first-generation device (14.2%+/-2.2%, n=29, P=.03). In both trials, an association was found between the number of 90-150-s algorithms delivered daily and greater EWL (P=.03). No deaths, unanticipated device-related adverse events, or medically serious adverse events were associated with the device. This second-generation vagal blocking device, using a therapy algorithm of 120-s duration, resulted in a clinically acceptable safety profile and significantly greater EWL compared with the first-generation device delivering a wider range of therapy algorithm durations.

  11. High-throughput microfluidic device for rare cell isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Daniel; Leong, Serena; Lei, Andy; Sohn, Lydia L.

    2015-06-01

    Enumerating and analyzing circulating tumor cells (CTCs)—cells that have been shed from primary solid tumors—can potentially be used to determine patient prognosis and track the progression of disease. There is a great challenge to create an effective platform that can isolate these cells, as they are extremely rare: only 1-10 CTCs are present in a 7.5mL of a cancer patient's peripheral blood. We have developed a novel microfluidic system that can isolate CTC populations label free. Our system consists of a multistage separator that employs inertial migration to sort cells based on size. We demonstrate the feasibility of our device by sorting colloids that are comparable in size to red blood cells (RBCs) and CTCs.

  12. Single Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Arps, Jennifer; Dwyer, Bo; Kalisky, Beena; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Qian, Lisa C.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Rutt, Brian; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Urbach, Elana; Wang, Yihua

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in numerous biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. There is a need for tools to characterize individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual cells. We use a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to observe the magnetic fields from single mammalian cells loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. We show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism and is capable of resolving cell to cell variations in magnetic dipole moments. We hope to correlate these magnetic images with real space imaging techniques such as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The visualization of single cell magnetism can be used to optimize biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI, by quantifying the strength of magnetic dipole moments of in vitro magnetic labeling. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Gabilan Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  13. High-Efficiency Solar Cell Concepts: Physics, Materials, and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Francoeur, S.; Seong, M. J.; Fluegel, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wanlass, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past three decades, significant progress has been made in the area of high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, with the effort primarily directed at current-matched solar cells in tandem. The key materials issues here have been obtaining semiconductors with the required bandgaps for sequential absorption of light in the solar spectrum and that are lattice matched to readily available substrates. The GaInP/GaAs/Ge cell is a striking example of success achieved in this area. Recently, several new approaches for high-efficiency solar cell design have emerged, that involve novel methods for tailoring alloy bandgaps, as well as alternate technologies for hetero-epitaxy of III-V's on Si. The advantages and difficulties expected to be encountered with each approach will be discussed, addressing both the materials issues and device physics whilst contrasting them with other fourth-generation solar cell concepts.

  14. AC Electrokinetic Cell Separation on a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Zachary; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2009-03-01

    Rapid cell separation and collection is demonstrated through the integration of electrokinetic pumps, dielectrophoretic (DEP) traps and field driven valves into a well designed microfluidic channel loop. We present the ground-up design and analysis of this fully functional microfluidic device for the rapid separation and collection of live and dead yeast cells and malaria red blood cells (RBCs) at low concentrations. DEP cell sorting and concentration schemes are based on the exploitation of cell specific DEP crossover frequencies (cof's). A rigorous DEP study of yeast and RBCs is presented and used to determine optimal conditions for cell separation. By utilizing a glutaraldehyde crosslinking cell fixation reaction that is sensitive to cell membrane protein concentration, we demonstrate the ability to further amplify these differences between healthy and unhealthy cells as well as stabilize their DEP cof's. Pumping is achieved with a new type of electrokinetic flow, AC electrothermal electro-osmosis (ETEO) and is shown to scale inversely with the field induced debye length and drive fluid velocities in excess of 6 mm/sec. The well characterized electrokinetic phenomena are integrated into a microchannel loop with a specifically designed electrode field penetration length for low concentration cell separation and concentration.

  15. Ovarian follicle selection and granulosa cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    2015-04-01

    The reproductive strategy for avian species that produce a sequence (or clutch) of eggs is dependent upon the maintenance of a small cohort of viable, undifferentiated (prehierarchal) follicles. It is from this cohort that a single follicle is selected on an approximate daily basis to initiate rapid growth and final differentiation before ovulation. This review describes a working model in which follicles within this prehierarchal cohort are maintained in an undifferentiated state by inhibitory cell signaling until the time of selection. Ultimately, follicle selection represents a process in which a single undifferentiated follicle per day is predicted to escape such inhibitory mechanisms to begin rapid growth and final maturation before ovulation. Several processes initiated within the granulosa cell layer at selection are dependent upon G protein-coupled receptors signaling via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and several critical processes are described herein. Finally, reference is made to several practical outcomes that can result from understanding the process of selection, including applications within the poultry industry. Proximal factors and processes that mediate follicle selection can either extend or decrease the length of the laying sequence, and thus directly influence overall egg production. In particular, any aberration that results in the selection of more than one follicle per day will result in decreased egg production. More generally, in wild birds these processes are modified by prevailing environmental conditions and by social interactions to influence clutch size. The elucidation of cellular processes that regulate follicle selection can assist in the development of assisted reproductive technologies for application in threatened and endangered avian species. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Annealing of Solar Cells and Other Thin Film Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobar, Hector; Kuhlman, Franz; Dils, D. W.; Lush, G. B.; Mackey, Willie R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Annealing is a key step in most semiconductor fabrication processes, especially for thin films where annealing enhances performance by healing defects and increasing grain sizes. We have employed a new annealing oven for the annealing of CdTe-based solar cells and have been using this system in an attempt to grow US on top of CdTe by annealing in the presence of H2S gas. Preliminary results of this process on CdTe solar cells and other thin-film devices will be presented.

  17. 2-Dimensional MEMS dielectrophoresis device for osteoblast cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zou, H; Mellon, S; Syms, R R A; Tanner, K E

    2006-12-01

    A fixed microelectrode device for cell stimulation has been designed and fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Dielectrophoretic forces obtained from non-uniform electric fields were used for manipulating and positioning osteoblasts. The experiments show that the osteoblasts experience positive dielectrophoresis (p-DEP) when suspended in iso-osmotic culture medium and exposed to AC fields at 5 MHz frequency. Negative dielectrophoresis (n-DEP) is obtained at 0.1 MHz. The viability of osteoblasts under dielectrophoresis has been investigated. The viability values for cells exposed to DEP are nearly three times higher than the control values, indicating that dielectrophoresis may have an anabolic effect on osteoblasts.

  18. Microfluidic chip system for the selection and enrichment of cell binding aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Heidi; Kiessling, Heiko; Stelzle, Martin; Wendel, Hans Peter; Schütte, Julia; Hagmeyer, Britta; Avci-Adali, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are promising cell targeting ligands for several applications such as for the diagnosis, therapy, and drug delivery. Especially, in the field of regenerative medicine, stem cell specific aptamers have an enormous potential. Using the combinatorial chemistry process SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment), aptamers are selected from a huge oligonucleotide library consisting of approximately 1015 different oligonucleotides. Here, we developed a microfluidic chip system that can be used for the selection of cell specific aptamers. The major drawbacks of common cell-SELEX methods are the inefficient elimination of the unspecifically bound oligonucleotides from the cell surface and the unspecific binding/uptake of oligonucleotides by dead cells. To overcome these obstacles, a microfluidic device, which enables the simultaneous performance of dielectrophoresis and electrophoresis in the same device, was designed. Using this system, viable cells can be selectively assembled by dielectrophoresis between the electrodes and then incubated with the oligonucleotides. To reduce the rate of unspecifically bound sequences, electrophoretic fields can be applied in order to draw loosely bound oligonucleotides away from the cells. Furthermore, by increasing the flow rate in the chip during the iterative rounds of SELEX, the selection pressure can be improved and aptamers with higher affinities and specificities can be obtained. This new microfluidic device has a tremendous capability to improve the cell-SELEX procedure and to select highly specific aptamers. PMID:26180568

  19. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    PubMed

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  20. Rheologically biomimetic cell suspensions for decreased cell settling in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Launiere, Cari A; Czaplewski, Gregory J; Myung, Ja Hye; Hong, Seungpyo; Eddington, David T

    2011-06-01

    Many microfluidic devices operate with cells suspended in buffer solutions. Researchers who work with large cell types in such devices often run into problems with gravitational cell settling in the injection equipment and in the device itself. A method for reducing this problematic settling is discussed in this paper using tumor cell lines as an example. Microfluidic circulating tumor cell (CTC) isolation devices (MCIDs) are benchmarked using buffer solutions spiked with in-vitro tumor cell lines prior to validation with clinical samples (i.e. whole blood). However, buffer solutions have different rheological properties than whole blood. Here we describe the use of alginate in PBS buffer solutions to mimic blood rheology and reduce cell settling during preliminary validation experiments. Because alginate increases the viscosity of a solution, it helps to maintain cells in suspension. We report that vertical equipment configurations are important to further mitigate the effects of cell settling for MDA-MB-468 carcinoma cells. We also report that alginate does not disrupt the specific binding interactions that are the basis of carcinoma cell capture in MCIDs. These results indicate that vertical equipment configurations and the addition of alginates can be used to reduce cell settling in buffer based MCID testing and other applications involving large cells suspended in buffer solution.

  1. Graphene devices with bottom-up contacts by area-selective atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, Nick F. W.; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; Mulders, Johannes J. L.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Bol, Ageeth A.

    2017-06-01

    Graphene field-effect transistor devices were fabricated using a bottom-up and resist-free method, avoiding common compatibility issues such as contamination by resist residues. Large-area CVD graphene sheets were structured into device channels by patterning with a focused ion beam. Platinum contacts were then deposited by direct-write atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a combination between electron beam induced deposition (EBID) and bottom-up area-selective ALD. This is a unique approach that enables nucleation of Pt ALD on graphene, and therefore these devices are the first reported graphene devices with contacts deposited by ALD. Electrical characterization of the devices confirms ambipolar transistor behaviour with typical field-effect mobilities in the range of 1000-1800 cm2 V-1 s-1. We observe clear signs of strong Pt-graphene coupling and contact induced hole doping, implying good contact properties in contrast to the conventionally weak bonding between Pt and graphene. We attribute these observations to the reduced amount of resist residue under the contacts, the improved wettability of the Pt due to the use of ALD, and the formation of a graphitic interlayer that bonds the Pt more strongly to the graphene. We conclude that direct-write ALD is a very suitable technique for metallization of graphene devices and to study the intrinsic properties of metal-graphene contacts in more detail. In addition, it offers unique opportunities to control the metal-graphene coupling strength.

  2. Left atrial appendage closure: patient, device and post-procedure drug selection.

    PubMed

    Tzikas, Apostolos; Bergmann, Martin W

    2016-05-17

    Left atrial appendage closure (LAAC), a device-based therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, is considered an alternative to oral anticoagulation therapy, particularly for patients at high risk of bleeding. Proof of concept has been demonstrated by the PROTECT AF and PREVAIL trials which evaluated the WATCHMAN device (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) versus warfarin, showing favourable outcome for the device group. The most commonly used devices for LAAC are the WATCHMAN and its successor, the WATCHMAN FLX (Boston Scientific) and the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug and more recently the AMPLATZER Amulet device (both St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA). The procedure is typically performed via a transseptal puncture under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic guidance. Technically, it is considered quite demanding due to the anatomic variability and fragility of the appendage. Careful material manipulation, adequate operator training, and good cardiac imaging and device sizing allow a safe, uneventful procedure. Post-procedure antithrombotic drug selection is based on the patient's history, indication and quality of LAAC.

  3. 49 CFR 236.311 - Signal control circuits, selection through track relays or devices functioning as track relays...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... at restricted speed” shall be selected through track relays, or through devices that function...

  4. 49 CFR 236.311 - Signal control circuits, selection through track relays or devices functioning as track relays...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... at restricted speed” shall be selected through track relays, or through devices that function...

  5. 49 CFR 236.311 - Signal control circuits, selection through track relays or devices functioning as track relays...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... at restricted speed” shall be selected through track relays, or through devices that function...

  6. 49 CFR 236.311 - Signal control circuits, selection through track relays or devices functioning as track relays...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... at restricted speed” shall be selected through track relays, or through devices that function...

  7. 49 CFR 236.311 - Signal control circuits, selection through track relays or devices functioning as track relays...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... relays or devices functioning as track relays and through signal mechanism contacts and time releases at... at restricted speed” shall be selected through track relays, or through devices that function...

  8. Microfluidic Device for Studying Tumor Cell Extravasation in Cancer Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry K; Thundat, Thomas George; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Datar, Ram H; Reese, Benjamin E; Zheng, Siyang

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is the process by which cancer spreads to form secondary tumors at downstream locations throughout the body. This uncontrolled spreading is the leading cause of death in patients with epithelial cancers and is the main reason that suppressing and targeting cancer has proven to be so challenging. Tumor cell extravasation is one of the key steps in cancer s progression towards a metastatic state. This occurs when circulating tumor cells found within the blood stream are able to transmigrate through the endothelium lining and basement membrane of the vasculature to form metastatic tumors at secondary sites within the body. Predicting the likelihood of this occurrence in patients, or being able to determine specific markers involved in this process could lead to preventative measures targeting these types of cancer; moreover, this may lead to the discovery of novel anti-metastatic drugs. We have developed a microfluidic device that has shown the extravasation of fluorescently labeled tumor cells across an endothelial cell lined membrane coated with matrigel followed by the formation of colonies. This device provides the advantages of combining a controlled environment, mimicking that found within the body, with real-time monitoring capabilities allowing for the study of these biomarkers and cellular interactions along with other potential mechanisms involved in the process of extravasation.

  9. Microfluidic Device for Automated Synchronization of Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madren, Seth M.; Hoffman, Michelle D.; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Kysela, David T.; Brun, Yves V.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of an automated microfluidic “baby machine” to synchronize the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus on-chip and to move the synchronized populations downstream for analysis. The microfluidic device is fabricated from three-layers of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and has integrated pumps and valves to control the movement of cells and media. This synchronization method decreases incubation time and media consumption and improves synchrony quality compared to the conventional plate-release technique. Synchronized populations are collected from the device at intervals as short as 10 min and at any time over four days. Flow cytometry and fluorescence cell tracking are used to determine synchrony quality, and cell populations synchronized in M2G and PYE media contain >70% and >80% swarmer cells, respectively. Our on-chip method overcomes limitations with conventional physical separation methods that consume large volumes of media, require manual manipulations, have lengthy incubation times, are limited to one collection, and lack precise temporal control of collection times. PMID:23030473

  10. Microfluidic device for automated synchronization of bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Madren, Seth M; Hoffman, Michelle D; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2012-10-16

    We report the development of an automated microfluidic "baby machine" to synchronize the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus on-chip and to move the synchronized populations downstream for analysis. The microfluidic device is fabricated from three layers of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and has integrated pumps and valves to control the movement of cells and media. This synchronization method decreases incubation time and media consumption and improves synchrony quality compared to the conventional plate-release technique. Synchronized populations are collected from the device at intervals as short as 10 min and at any time over four days. Flow cytometry and fluorescence cell tracking are used to determine synchrony quality, and cell populations synchronized in minimal growth medium with 0.2% glucose (M2G) and peptone yeast extract (PYE) medium contain >70% and >80% swarmer cells, respectively. Our on-chip method overcomes limitations with conventional physical separation methods that consume large volumes of media, require manual manipulations, have lengthy incubation times, are limited to one collection, and lack precise temporal control of collection times.

  11. Development of a microfluidic device for fluorescence activated cell sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Jan; Singh, Kirat; O'Neill, Alan; Jackson, Carl; Morrison, Alan; O'Brien, Peter

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the development towards a miniaturized analytical system that can perform the major key functions of a flow cytometer. The development aims at diagnostic applications for cell counting and sorting with the ultimate goal of a low-cost portable instrument for point of care diagnosis. The present systems configuration consists of a disposable microfluidic device, that enables injection, single file cell flow through a miniaturized laser induced fluorescence detection system as well as sorting of identified samples. The microfluidic devices were fabricated by means of rapid prototyping technologies based on thick film photo-polymers. This paper reports various approaches on cell sorting and demonstrates sorting of single cells by means of an off-chip valve switching technique. The miniaturized fluorescence detection system employs active and passive micro-optical components, including semiconductor laser and ultra bright LED sources, highly sensitive avalanche photodiodes as well as micro-prism, holographic diffraction gratings and fibre optics for transmission and collection of light. Furthermore we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating solid-state components as part of an on-chip detection system.

  12. Photovoltaic device with specially arranged luminescent collector and cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yerkes, J. W.

    1981-02-17

    A photovoltaic device for collecting solar radiation and converting it to electrical energy has a luminescent collector shaped in a way that maintains collecting area efficiency while allowing the photovoltaic cell to be entirely shadowed or protected from the direct rays of solar energy. The shape of the luminescent collector is also especially suited to air cooling and to placement of insulation between the collector surface and the cell. The collector has a first extension which receives and absorbs the light energy and at least one side extension which extends away from the sun collecting part of the collector. The side extension or extensions conduct the collected light energy to the protected cell or cells. For example, the luminescent collector may have an inverted u-shape or l-shape. A photovoltaic cell is coupled to the side extension, preferably at the end surface of the side extension. Each cell is placed entirely away from surfaces directly heated by the rays of the sun and is entirely shadowed from radiant heating by a part of the photovoltaic device. The underside of the collector may be shaped to form a channel. The channel may be used for air cooling, thermal insulation, or a combination of air cooling and thermal insulation of the sun-receiving part of the collector. The upper outer surface of the collector may be protected by a protective, radiation transmissive cover. Light emissive areas of the edge and lower surfaces of the collector not covered by photovoltaic cells may also be covered by a reflective material.

  13. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  14. Microfluidic device for mechanical dissociation of cancer cell aggregates into single cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaolong; De Jesus, Janice; Pennell, Marissa; Troiani, Marco; Haun, Jered B

    2015-01-07

    Tumors tissues house a diverse array of cell types, requiring powerful cell-based analysis methods to characterize cellular heterogeneity and identify rare cells. Tumor tissue is dissociated into single cells by treatment with proteolytic enzymes, followed by mechanical disruption using vortexing or pipetting. These procedures can be incomplete and require significant time, and the latter mechanical treatments are poorly defined and controlled. Here, we present a novel microfluidic device to improve mechanical dissociation of digested tissue and cell aggregates into single cells. The device design includes a network of branching channels that range in size from millimeters down to hundreds of microns. The channels also contain flow constrictions that generate well-defined regions of high shear force, which we refer to as "hydrodynamic micro-scalpels", to progressively disaggregate tissue fragments and clusters into single cells. We show using in vitro cancer cell models that the microfluidic device significantly enhances cell recovery in comparison to mechanical disruption by pipetting and vortexing after digestion with trypsin or incubation with EDTA. Notably, the device enabled superior results to be obtained after shorter proteolytic digestion times, resulting in fully viable cells in less than ten minutes. The device could also be operated under enzyme-free conditions that could better maintain expression of certain surface markers. The microfluidic format is advantageous because it enables application of well-defined mechanical forces and rapid processing times. Furthermore, it may be possible to directly integrate downstream processing and detection operations to create integrated cell-based analysis platforms. The enhanced capabilities enabled by our novel device may help promote applications of single cell detection and purification techniques to tumor tissue specimens, advancing the current understanding of cancer biology and enabling molecular diagnostics

  15. Microfluidic device for mechanical dissociation of cancer cell aggregates into single cells

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Marissa; Troiani, Marco; Haun, Jered B.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors tissues house a diverse array of cell types, requiring powerful cell-based analysis methods to characterize different cell subtypes. Tumor tissue is dissociated into single cells by treatment with proteolytic enzymes, followed by mechanical disruption using vortexing or pipetting. These procedures can be incomplete and require significant time, and the latter mechanical treatments are poorly defined and controlled. Here, we present a novel microfluidic device to improve mechanical dissociation of digested tissue and cell aggregates into single cells. The device design includes a network of branching channels that range in size from millimeters down to hundreds of microns. The channels also contain flow constrictions that generate well-defined regions of high shear force, which we refer to as “hydrodynamic micro-scalpels,” to progressively disaggregate tissue fragments and clusters into single cells. We show using in vitro cancer cell models that the microfluidic device significantly enhances cell recovery in comparison to mechanical disruption by pipetting and vortexing digestion with trypsin or incubation with EDTA. Notably, the device enabled superior results to be obtained after shorter proteolytic digestion times, resulting in fully viable cells in less than ten minutes. The device could also be operated under enzyme-free conditions that could better maintain expression of certain surface markers. The microfluidic format is advantageous because it enables application of well-defined mechanical forces and rapid processing times. Furthermore, it may be possible to directly integrate downstream processing and detection operations to create integrated cell-based analysis platforms. The enhanced capabilities enabled by our novel device may help promote applications of single cell detection and purification techniques to tumor tissue specimens, advancing the current understanding of cancer biology and enabling molecular diagnostics in clinical settings

  16. 78 FR 27441 - NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... of Justice Programs NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices AGENCY: National...) is soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an... soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an evaluation...

  17. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    DOEpatents

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  18. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  19. Cell structure for electrochemical devices and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    2007-03-27

    An electrochemical device comprising alternating layers of positive and negative electrodes separated from each other by separator layers. The electrode layers extend beyond the periphery of the separator layers providing superior contact between the electrodes and battery terminals, eliminating the need for welding the electrode to the terminal. Electrical resistance within the battery is decreased and thermal conductivity of the cell is increased allowing for superior heat removal from the battery and increased efficiency. Increased internal pressure within the battery can be alleviated without damaging or removing the battery from service while keeping the contents of the battery sealed off from the atmosphere by a pressure release system. Nonoperative cells within a battery assembly can also be removed from service by shorting the nonoperative cell thus decreasing battery life.

  20. Using the Vessel Health and Preservation framework to enhance vein assessment and vascular access device selection.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sally Jane

    2017-07-12

    There is a range of risk factors that can lead to peripheral intravenous (IV) cannula failure, and several failed cannulation attempts can result in the patient experiencing increased pain, discomfort and delays in receiving IV therapy. The Vessel Health and Preservation (VHP) framework is a tool that can be used to improve clinical decision-making and the patient experience in relation to vascular access and IV therapy. Use of the VHP framework can ensure the right vein and right vascular access device (VAD) is selected at the right time for each patient. This article describes how healthcare practitioners can use the VHP framework to support and enhance vein assessment and VAD selection. It outlines the various types of VAD available, focusing on short-term peripheral IV cannulae, which are the most commonly used devices. It also explores the potential benefits of implementing the VHP framework in clinical areas.

  1. Wave-plate structures, power selective optical filter devices, and optical systems using same

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P [San Ramon, CA

    2012-07-03

    In an embodiment, an optical filter device includes an input polarizer for selectively transmitting an input signal. The device includes a wave-plate structure positioned to receive the input signal, which includes first and second substantially zero-order, zero-wave plates arranged in series with and oriented at an angle relative to each other. The first and second zero-wave plates are configured to alter a polarization state of the input signal passing in a manner that depends on the power of the input signal. Each zero-wave plate includes an entry and exit wave plate each having a fast axis, with the fast axes oriented substantially perpendicular to each other. Each entry wave plate is oriented relative to a transmission axis of the input polarizer at a respective angle. An output polarizer is positioned to receive a signal output from the wave-plate structure and selectively transmits the signal based on the polarization state.

  2. Microfluidic Device for Electric Field-Driven Single-Cell Captureand Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Toriello, Nicholas M.; Douglas, Erik S.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-09-20

    A microchip that performs directed capture and chemical activation of surface-modified single-cells has been developed. The cell-capture system is comprised of interdigitated gold electrodes microfabricated on a glass substrate within PDMS channels. The cell surface is labeled with thiol functional groups using endogenous RGD receptors and adhesion to exposed gold pads on the electrodes is directed by applying a driving electric potential. Multiple cell types can thus be sequentially and selectively captured on desired electrodes. Single-cell capture efficiency is optimized by varying the duration of field application. Maximum single-cell capture is attained for the 10 min trial, with 63+-9 percent (n=30) of the electrode pad rows having a single cell. In activation studies, single M1WT3 CHO cells loaded with the calcium-sensitive dye fluo-4 AM were captured; exposure to the muscarinic agonist carbachol increased the fluorescence to 220+-74percent (n=79) of the original intensity. These results demonstrate the ability to direct the adhesion of selected living single cells on electrodes in a microfluidic device and to analyze their response to chemical stimuli.

  3. The linear array multi-band selection device role in remote-sensing instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speaker, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    A figure-of-merit parameter for the scientific utility of multispectral linear array (MLA) instruments for civil remote sensing is presented. The number of spectral band-pair choices available to the user of a given MLA instrument is proposed as a useful measure of the flexibility and overall utility of that particular instrument design. The multiband selection device capability is analyzed mathematically, and a basis for a cost-benefit comparison of alternative multispectral instrument designs is provided.

  4. Biperiodic nanostructured waveguides for wavelength-selectivity of hybrid photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Talneau, A; Pommarède, X; Itawi, A; Pantzas, K; Lupu, A; Benisty, H

    2015-11-15

    A biperiodic nanostructuration consisting of a super-periodicity added to a nanohole lattice of subwavelength pitch is demonstrated to provide both modal confinement and wavelength selectivity within a hybrid III-V on a silicon waveguide. The wavelength-selective behavior stems from finely tuned larger holes. Such biperiodic hybrid waveguides have been fabricated by oxide-free bonding III-V material on silicon and display well-defined stop bands. Such nanostructured waveguides offer the versatility for designing advanced optical functions within hybrid devices. Moreover, keeping the silicon waveguide surface planar, such nanostructured waveguides are compatible with electrical operation across the oxide-free hybrid interface.

  5. A framework for modelling the selection of assistive technology devices (ATDs).

    PubMed

    Scherer, Marcia; Jutai, Jeffrey; Fuhrer, Marcus; Demers, Louise; Deruyter, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The previously published 'Framework for the conceptual modelling of assistive technology device (ATD) outcomes' assumes antecedent factors that inform it and influence its component variables. This paper proposes a model of factors influencing consumer predispositions and provider practices related to procuring a particular ATD, which is the starting point in the framework. The relevant literature on a variety of factors that influence specific ATD selection is summarized. The decision that a particular ATD is an appropriate and desirable support for an individual is the result of a process which is affected by a broader societal climate that determines, in part, unique personal climates which then foster unique provider and consumer perspectives predisposing each to the selection of a particular ATD. The proposed 'Framework for modelling the selection of ATDs' can contribute to clinical practice and outcomes research by highlighting factors important to consider prior to ATD selection.

  6. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  7. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    GUERRERO-PRESTON, RAFAEL; OGAWA, TAKENORI; UEMURA, MAMORU; SHUMULINSKY, GARY; VALLE, BLANCA L.; PIRINI, FRANCESCA; RAVI, RAJANI; SIDRANSKY, DAVID; KEIDAR, MICHAEL; TRINK, BARRY

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min−1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines. PMID:25050490

  8. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  9. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  10. Ultra-thin solid oxide fuel cells: Materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, Kian

    Solid oxide fuel cells are electrochemical energy conversion devices utilizing solid electrolytes transporting O2- that typically operate in the 800 -- 1000 °C temperature range due to the large activation barrier for ionic transport. Reducing electrolyte thickness or increasing ionic conductivity can enable lower temperature operation for both stationary and portable applications. This thesis is focused on the fabrication of free standing ultrathin (<100 nm) oxide membranes of prototypical O 2- conducting electrolytes, namely Y2O3-doped ZrO2 and Gd2O3-doped CeO2. Fabrication of such membranes requires an understanding of thin plate mechanics coupled with controllable thin film deposition processes. Integration of free standing membranes into proof-of-concept fuel cell devices necessitates ideal electrode assemblies as well as creative processing schemes to experimentally test devices in a high temperature dual environment chamber. We present a simple elastic model to determine stable buckling configurations for free standing oxide membranes. This guides the experimental methodology for Y 2O3-doped ZrO2 film processing, which enables tunable internal stress in the films. Using these criteria, we fabricate robust Y2O3-doped ZrO2 membranes on Si and composite polymeric substrates by semiconductor and micro-machining processes, respectively. Fuel cell devices integrating these membranes with metallic electrodes are demonstrated to operate in the 300 -- 500 °C range, exhibiting record performance at such temperatures. A model combining physical transport of electronic carriers in an insulating film and electrochemical aspects of transport is developed to determine the limits of performance enhancement expected via electrolyte thickness reduction. Free standing oxide heterostructures, i.e. electrolyte membrane and oxide electrodes, are demonstrated. Lastly, using Y2O3-doped ZrO2 and Gd2O 3-doped CeO2, novel electrolyte fabrication schemes are explored to develop oxide

  11. Oxygen supply by photosynthesis to an implantable islet cell device.

    PubMed

    Evron, Y; Zimermann, B; Ludwig, B; Barkai, U; Colton, C K; Weir, G C; Arieli, B; Maimon, S; Shalev, N; Yavriyants, K; Goldman, T; Gendler, Z; Eizen, L; Vardi, P; Bloch, K; Barthel, A; Bornstein, S R; Rotem, A

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of islet cells is an effective treatment for type 1 diabetes with critically labile metabolic control. However, during islet isolation, blood supply is disrupted, and the transport of nutrients/metabolites to and from the islet cells occurs entirely by diffusion. Adequate oxygen supply is essential for function/survival of islet cells and is the limiting factor for graft integrity. Recently, we developed an immunoisolated chamber system for transplantation of human islets without immunosuppression. This system depended on daily oxygen supply. To provide independence from this external source, we incorporated a novel approach based on photosynthetically-generated oxygen. The chamber system was packed sandwich-like with a slab of immobilized photosynthetically active microorganisms (Synechococcus lividus) on top of a flat light source (LEDs, red light at 660 nm, intensity of 8 μE/m(2)/s). Islet cells immobilized in an alginate slab (500-1,000 islet equivalents/cm(2)) were mounted on the photosynthetic slab separated by a gas permeable silicone rubber-Teflon membrane, and the complete module was sealed with a microporous polytetrafluorethylene (Teflon) membrane (pore size: 0.4 μm) to protect the contents from the host immune cells. Upon illumination, oxygen produced by photosynthesis diffused via the silicone Teflon membrane into the islet compartment. Oxygen production from implanted encapsulated microorganisms was stable for 1 month. After implantation of the device into diabetic rats, normoglycemia was achieved for 1 week. Upon retrieval of the device, blood glucose levels returned to the diabetic state. Our results demonstrate that an implanted photosynthetic bioreactor can supply oxygen to transplanted islets and thus maintain islet viability/functionality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. High-selectivity cytology via lab-on-a-disc western blotting of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, John J; Sinkala, Elly; Herr, Amy E

    2017-02-28

    Cytology of sparingly available cell samples from both clinical and experimental settings would benefit from high-selectivity protein tools. To minimize cell handling losses in sparse samples, we design a multi-stage assay using a lab-on-a-disc that integrates cell handling and subsequent single-cell western blotting (scWestern). As the two-layer microfluidic device rotates, the induced centrifugal force directs dissociated cells to dams, which in turn localize the cells over microwells. Cells then sediment into the microwells, where the cells are lysed and subjected to scWestern. Taking into account cell losses from loading, centrifugation, and lysis-buffer exchange, our lab-on-a-disc device handles cell samples with as few as 200 cells with 75% cell settling efficiencies. Over 70% of microwells contain single cells after the centrifugation. In addition to cell settling efficiency, cell-size filtration from a mixed population of two cell lines is also realized by tuning the cell time-of-flight during centrifugation (58.4% settling efficiency with 6.4% impurity). Following the upstream cell handling, scWestern analysis detects four proteins (GFP, β-TUB, GAPDH, and STAT3) in a glioblastoma cell line. By integrating the lab-on-a-disc cell preparation and scWestern analysis, our platform measures proteins from sparse cell samples at single-cell resolution.

  13. Microfluidic devices to enrich and isolate circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Myung, J. H.; Hong, S.

    2015-01-01

    Given the potential clinical impact of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood as a clinical biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of various cancers, a myriad of detection methods for CTCs have been recently introduced. Among those, a series of microfluidic devices are particularly promising as these uniquely offer micro-scale analytical systems that are highlighted by low consumption of samples and reagents, high flexibility to accommodate other cutting-edge technologies, precise and well-defined flow behaviors, and automation capability, presenting significant advantages over the conventional larger scale systems. In this review, we highlight the advantages of microfluidic devices and their translational potential into CTC detection methods, categorized by miniaturization of bench-top analytical instruments, integration capability with nanotechnologies, and in situ or sequential analysis of captured CTCs. This review provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the CTC detection achieved through application of microfluidic devices and their challenges that these promising technologies must overcome to be clinically impactful. PMID:26549749

  14. Light induced polaron formation in perovskite solar cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Amanda; Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad; Sfeir, Matthew; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Crochet, Jared; Gupta, Gautum; Mohite, Aditya; Tretiak, Sergei

    The need for a low-cost, clean, and abundant source of energy has generated large amounts of research in solution processed solar cell materials. The lead halide perovskite has rapidly developed as a serious candidate for the active layer of photovoltaic devices. The efficiencies of devices made with this material have increased from 3.5% to over 20% in around 5 years. Despite the remarkable progress associated with perovskite materials, there are still fundamental questions regarding their lack of photo-stability over prolonged solar irradiation that need to be addressed. Recent experiments on photo-degradation under constant illumination have found fast self-healing by resting the device in the dark for less than 1 minute. Density functional theory and symmetry analysis show that localized charge states couple to local structural lattice distortions and methyl ammonium quasistatic configurations. Once translational symmetry is lost, additional bonding configurations become symmetry allowed, triggering localized charges in the vicinity over time under constant illumination, thus seeding the formation of macroscopic charged domains and preventing efficient charge extraction. Here we present an in-depth study of polaron formation and binding energy at the atomistic level.

  15. DNA Translocation and Cell Electroporation in Micro and Nanofluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Cherry

    The cell membrane is made of a thin (˜ 5nm) lipid bilayer which serves as an effective insulator and diffusion barrier for entities external to the cell from entering the cell. However, for research, diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, there is a need to deliver molecules of interest to the interior of live cells. This is usually accomplished by two methods: (a) carrier mediated delivery which consists of encapsulating the gene/molecule of interest either in an empty viral capsid or in chemically formulated lipoplex or polyplex nanoparticles, or (b) physical methods of delivery, which include the use of different kinds of forces to create reversible pores on the cell membrane (sonoporation, electroporation) or directly inject molecules to the cell cytosol (Gene Gun, microinjection). Of the aforementioned techniques, electroporation is the most commonly used due to it simplicity and ease of use. Our group recently demonstrated a nanochannel based electroporation (NEP) technique, in which two microchannels (˜40 m diameter) are connected by a nanochannel (˜ 200-400 mum diameter) in the center. A cell is positioned in one microchannel such that it makes contact with the nanochannel and transfection agents are placed in the other microchannel. An external electric field applied across the device locally porates the cell where it touches the nancohannel and drives the transfection agents into the cell. Besides maintaining high cell viability and achieving dose control, an important feature of NEP is the delivery of large molecules such as plasmids and quantum dots directly into the cell cytosol. In contrast, delivery of large plasmids during bulk electroporation, wherein cells and genes/plasmids are mixed in a buffered medium and an external electric field is applied across the mixture which electroporates the cells, is via formation of cell membrane bound aggregates which get endocytosed post pulsation. Various mechanisms of DNA transport across the membrane have

  16. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  17. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Depietro, Dan; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2011-11-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  18. Microfabricated glass devices for rapid single cell immobilization in mouse zygote microinjection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Sun, Yu

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the design and microfabrication of a vacuum-based cell holding device for single-cell immobilization and the use of the device in mouse zygote microinjection. The device contains many through-holes, constructed via two-sided glass wet etching and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-glass bonding. Experimental results of mouse zygote immobilization and microinjection demonstrate that the device is effective for rapid cell immobilization and does not produce negative effect on embryonic development.

  19. Effect of silicon oxidation on long-term cell selectivity of cell-patterned Au/SiO2 platforms.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Mandana; Zhang, Miqin

    2006-02-01

    Cellular patterning on silicon platforms is the basis for development of integrated cell-based biosensing devices, for which long-term cell selectivity and biostability remain a major challenge. We report the development of a silicon-based platform in a metal-insulator format capable of producing uniform and biostable cell patterns with long-term cell selectivity. Substrates patterned with arrays of gold electrodes were surface-engineered such that the electrodes were activated with fibronectin to mediate cell attachment and the silicon oxide background was passivated with PEG to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Three types of oxide surfaces, i.e., native oxide, dry thermally grown oxide, and wet thermally grown oxide, were produced to illustrate the effect of oxide state of the surface on long-term cell selectivity. Results indicated that the cell selectivity over time differed dramatically among three patterned platforms and the best cell selectivity was found on the dry oxide surface for up to 10 days. Surface analysis results suggested that this enhancement in cell selectivity may be related to the presence of additional, more active oxide states on the dry oxide surface supporting the stability of PEG films and effectively suppressing the cell adhesion. This research offers a new strategy for development of stable and uniform cell-patterned surfaces, which is versatile for immobilization of silane-based chemicals for preparation of biostable interfaces.

  20. Silicon substrate as a novel cell culture device for myoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tissue and organ regeneration via transplantation of cell bodies in-situ has become an interesting strategy in regenerative medicine. Developments of cell carriers to systematically deliver cell bodies in the damage site have fall shorten on effectively meet this purpose due to inappropriate release control. Thus, there is still need of novel substrate to achieve targeted cell delivery with appropriate vehicles. In the present study, silicon based photovoltaic (PV) devices are used as a cell culturing substrate for the expansion of myoblast mouse cell (C2C12 cells) that offers an atmosphere for regular cell growth in vitro. The adherence, viability and proliferation of the cells on the silicon surface were examined by direct cell counting and fluorescence microscopy. Results It was found that on the silicon surface, cells proliferated over 7 days showing normal morphology, and expressed their biological activities. Cell culture on silicon substrate reveals their attachment and proliferation over the surface of the PV device. After first day of culture, cell viability was 88% and cell survival remained above 86% as compared to the seeding day after the seventh day. Furthermore, the DAPI staining revealed that the initially scattered cells were able to eventually build a cellular monolayer on top of the silicon substrate. Conclusions This study explored the biological applications of silicon based PV devices, demonstrating its biocompatibility properties and found useful for culture of cells on porous 2-D surface. The incorporation of silicon substrate has been efficaciously revealed as a potential cell carrier or vehicle in cell growth technology, allowing for their use in cell based gene therapy, tissue engineering, and therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24885347

  1. Inexpensive Attachment Device for Cell Therapy Administration into Injured Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Jesús; Zurita, Mercedes; Fernández, Cecilia; Cotua, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Cell therapy is configured as a promising strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), but it requires reliable systems to achieve microinjections with different rates and volumes, according to the different characteristics of the injured spinal cord tissue and the targets previously selected. We sought to describe an original and inexpensive device for support of microinjection systems in the course of spinal cord surgery. Our attachment device consists of an arch and a system of bars that can be fixed to the operating table and on which a microinjection pump can be displaced and fixed in the course of surgery. This device has been used for therapy administration into injured spinal cords. It is easy to use and permits reproducible results. We have described an original attachment device for the support of a microinjection pump. It is applicable to spinal cord surgery and should be considered as a cheap solution for intralesional administration of cell therapy after spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Manufacturing process and material selection in concurrent collaborative design of MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuan F.; Du, H.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we present knowledge of an intensive approach and system for selecting suitable manufacturing processes and materials for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices in concurrent collaborative design environment. In the paper, fundamental issues on MEMS manufacturing process and material selection such as concurrent design framework, manufacturing process and material hierarchies, and selection strategy are first addressed. Then, a fuzzy decision support scheme for a multi-criteria decision-making problem is proposed for estimating, ranking and selecting possible manufacturing processes, materials and their combinations. A Web-based prototype advisory system for the MEMS manufacturing process and material selection, WebMEMS-MASS, is developed based on the client-knowledge server architecture and framework to help the designer find good processes and materials for MEMS devices. The system, as one of the important parts of an advanced simulation and modeling tool for MEMS design, is a concept level process and material selection tool, which can be used as a standalone application or a Java applet via the Web. The running sessions of the system are inter-linked with webpages of tutorials and reference pages to explain the facets, fabrication processes and material choices, and calculations and reasoning in selection are performed using process capability and material property data from a remote Web-based database and interactive knowledge base that can be maintained and updated via the Internet. The use of the developed system including operation scenario, use support, and integration with an MEMS collaborative design system is presented. Finally, an illustration example is provided.

  3. Measuring Cell Viscoelastic Properties Using a Microfluidic Extensional Flow Device.

    PubMed

    Guillou, Lionel; Dahl, Joanna B; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Barakat, AbduI I; Husson, Julien; Muller, Susan J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of cellular mechanical properties is of tremendous interest in biology and medicine. Recent microfluidic technologies that infer cellular mechanical properties based on analysis of cellular deformations during microchannel traversal have dramatically improved throughput over traditional single-cell rheological tools, yet the extraction of material parameters from these measurements remains quite complex due to challenges such as confinement by channel walls and the domination of complex inertial forces. Here, we describe a simple microfluidic platform that uses hydrodynamic forces at low Reynolds number and low confinement to elongate single cells near the stagnation point of a planar extensional flow. In tandem, we present, to our knowledge, a novel analytical framework that enables determination of cellular viscoelastic properties (stiffness and fluidity) from these measurements. We validated our system and analysis by measuring the stiffness of cross-linked dextran microparticles, which yielded reasonable agreement with previously reported values and our micropipette aspiration measurements. We then measured viscoelastic properties of 3T3 fibroblasts and glioblastoma tumor initiating cells. Our system captures the expected changes in elastic modulus induced in 3T3 fibroblasts and tumor initiating cells in response to agents that soften (cytochalasin D) or stiffen (paraformaldehyde) the cytoskeleton. The simplicity of the device coupled with our analytical model allows straightforward measurement of the viscoelastic properties of cells and soft, spherical objects.

  4. Protein-driven RNA nanostructured devices that function in vitro and control mammalian cell fate.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomonori; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Ohno, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Yuki; Hayashi, Karin; Komatsu, Kaoru R; Kawasaki, Shunsuke; Hidaka, Kumi; Yonehara, Shin; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki; Saito, Hirohide

    2017-09-14

    Nucleic acid nanotechnology has great potential for future therapeutic applications. However, the construction of nanostructured devices that control cell fate by detecting and amplifying protein signals has remained a challenge. Here we design and build protein-driven RNA-nanostructured devices that actuate in vitro by RNA-binding-protein-inducible conformational change and regulate mammalian cell fate by RNA-protein interaction-mediated protein assembly. The conformation and function of the RNA nanostructures are dynamically controlled by RNA-binding protein signals. The protein-responsive RNA nanodevices are constructed inside cells using RNA-only delivery, which may provide a safe tool for building functional RNA-protein nanostructures. Moreover, the designed RNA scaffolds that control the assembly and oligomerization of apoptosis-regulatory proteins on a nanometre scale selectively kill target cells via specific RNA-protein interactions. These findings suggest that synthetic RNA nanodevices could function as molecular robots that detect signals and localize target proteins, induce RNA conformational changes, and programme mammalian cellular behaviour.Nucleic acid nanotechnology has great potential for future therapeutic applications. Here the authors build protein-driven RNA nanostructures that can function within mammalian cells and regulate the cell fate.

  5. Single cell detection using a glass-based optofluidic device fabricated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moosung; Hwang, David J; Jeon, Hojeong; Hiromatsu, Kuniaki; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2009-01-21

    We demonstrate the fabrication of integrated three-dimensional microchannel and optical waveguide structures inside fused silica for the interrogation and processing of single cells. The microchannels are fabricated by scanning femtosecond laser pulses (523 nm) and subsequent selective wet etching process. Optical waveguides are additionally integrated with the fabricated microchannels by scanning the laser pulse train inside the glass specimen. Single red blood cells (RBC) in diluted human blood inside of the manufactured microchannel were detected by two optical schemes. The first involved sensing the intensity change of waveguide-delivered He-Ne laser light (632.8 nm) induced by the refractive index difference of a cell flowing in the channel. The other approach was via detection of fluorescence emission from dyed RBC excited by Ar laser light (488 nm) delivered by the optical waveguide. The proposed device was tested to detect 23 fluorescent particles per second by increasing the flow rate up to 0.5 microl min(-1). The optical cell detection experiments support potential implementation of a new generation of glass-based optofluidic biochip devices in various single cell treatment processes including laser based cell processing and sensing.

  6. Digital cell counting device integrated with a single-cell array.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Tatsuya; Hosokawa, Masahito; Lim, Tae-kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel cell counting method accomplished using a single-cell array fabricated on an image sensor, complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor. The single-cell array was constructed using a microcavity array, which can trap up to 7,500 single cells on microcavities periodically arranged on a plane metallic substrate via the application of a negative pressure. The proposed method for cell counting is based on shadow imaging, which uses a light diffraction pattern generated by the microcavity array and trapped cells. Under illumination, the cell-occupied microcavities are visualized as shadow patterns in an image recorded by the complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor due to light attenuation. The cell count is determined by enumerating the uniform shadow patterns created from one-on-one relationships with single cells trapped on the microcavities in digital format. In the experiment, all cell counting processes including entrapment of non-labeled HeLa cells from suspensions on the array and image acquisition of a wide-field-of-view of 30 mm(2) in 1/60 seconds were implemented in a single integrated device. As a result, the results from the digital cell counting had a linear relationship with those obtained from microscopic observation (r(2)  = 0.99). This platform could be used at extremely low cell concentrations, i.e., 25-15,000 cells/mL. Our proposed system provides a simple and rapid miniaturized cell counting device for routine laboratory use.

  7. Microfabrication of plastic-PDMS microfluidic devices using polyimide release layer and selective adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Lu, Ming; Zuo, Lei

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present an improved method to bond poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with polyimide (PI) to develop flexible substrate microfluidic devices. The PI film was separately fabricated on a silicon wafer by spin coating followed by thermal treatment to avoid surface unevenness of the flexible substrate. In this way, we could also integrate flexible substrate into standard micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication. Meanwhile, the adhesive epoxy was selectively transferred to the PDMS microfluidic device by a stamp-and-stick method to avoid epoxy clogging the microfluidic channels. To spread out the epoxy evenly on the transferring substrate, we used superhydrophilic vanadium oxide film coated glass as the transferring substrate. After the bonding process, the flexible substrate could easily be peeled off from the rigid substrate. Contact angle measurement was used to characterize the hydrophicity of the vanadium oxide film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was conducted to study the surface of the epoxy. We further evaluated the bonding quality by peeling tests, which showed a maximum bonding strength of 100 kPa. By injecting with black ink, the plastic microfluidic device was confirmed to be well bonded with no leakage for a day under 1 atm. This proposed versatile method could bond the microfluidic device and plastic substrate together and be applied in the fabrication of some biosensors and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  8. Microfabrication of plastic-PDMS microfluidic devices using polyimide release layer and selective adhesive bonding

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Lu, Ming; ...

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we present an improved method to bond poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with polyimide (PI) to develop flexible substrate microfluidic devices. The PI film was separately fabricated on a silicon wafer by spin coating followed by thermal treatment to avoid surface unevenness of the flexible substrate. In this way, we could also integrate flexible substrate into standard micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication. Meanwhile, the adhesive epoxy was selectively transferred to the PDMS microfluidic device by a stamp-and-stick method to avoid epoxy clogging the microfluidic channels. To spread out the epoxy evenly on the transferring substrate, we used superhydrophilic vanadium oxide filmmore » coated glass as the transferring substrate. After the bonding process, the flexible substrate could easily be peeled off from the rigid substrate. Contact angle measurement was used to characterize the hydrophicity of the vanadium oxide film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was conducted to study the surface of the epoxy. We further evaluated the bonding quality by peeling tests, which showed a maximum bonding strength of 100 kPa. By injecting with black ink, the plastic microfluidic device was confirmed to be well bonded with no leakage for a day under 1 atm. Finally, this proposed versatile method could bond the microfluidic device and plastic substrate together and be applied in the fabrication of some biosensors and lab-on-a-chip systems.« less

  9. Hydrogen gas sensors from polysilicon nanobelt devices selectively modified with sensing materials.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nhan Ai; Pan, Fu-Ming; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong

    2016-12-16

    Double-junction n(+)/n(-)/n(+) polysilicon nanobelts featuring selectively deposited sensing materials have been investigated for application as H2 gas sensors. The selective modification of the devices was performed through a combination of localized ablation of a resist and lift-off of a previous catalyst material deposited through e-beam evaporation. Four nanobelt devices, differentiated by their doping concentrations at the n(-) region (from 2.5 × 10(13) to 2.5 × 10(14) cm(-2)), were analyzed in terms of the responses to H2 and their self-heating effects. A low doping concentration improved the response at room temperature, owing to a longer Debye length. The variation in the H2-induced surface potential associated with temperature, accounting for degradation in the response of the nanobelts with Joule heating bias, was analyzed in terms of the I-V characteristics of the double-junction device. Among various catalysts (Pt, Pd, Pt/Pd) evaluated for their H2 sensing characteristics, an ultrathin film of Pt/Pd was most favorable.

  10. Evaluation of two Mg2+-selective electrodes by means of a flow-through device.

    PubMed

    Boguschewski, Frank H; Seyfarth, Michael; Heidrich, Jens P

    2002-03-01

    Monitoring the ionized magnesium (Mg2+) concentration in critically ill patients can prevent development of serious and potentially fatal complications. The analyzers KONE Microlyte 6 (KONE Instruments, Espoo, Finland) and NOVA CRT (NOVA Biomedical, Waltham, MA, USA) provide the discontinuous measurement of Mg2+ and were evaluated in several studies. It was our objective to integrate the Mg2+-selective electrodes into a device for continuous on-line measurements. This device is suitable not only for research but also for a specific evaluation of electrode characteristics. It allowed us to compare the genuine electrodes and reference systems independently of their specific analyzers. Precision, accuracy, response time, limit of detection, drift and interferences were assessed by continuous flow-through measurements and discussed in comparison to the results of previous studies. The NOVA electrode proved to be superior regarding accuracy, sensitivity and selectivity, especially with respect to calcium. It was demonstrated that current commercial serum-like control materials were not appropriate for quality control of the assessed Mg2+-electrodes. However, despite the fact that the electrodes are commercially used for discontinuous measurements, both sensor types can be used for continuous on-line measurements in an extracorporeal circulation in a rat model. The NOVA electrode showed superior characteristics with this application as well. This study should also be understood as a contribution to the development of devices for online analyzers used in point-of-care-testing.

  11. Hydrogen gas sensors from polysilicon nanobelt devices selectively modified with sensing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhan Ai; Pan, Fu-Ming; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong

    2016-12-01

    Double-junction n+/n-/n+ polysilicon nanobelts featuring selectively deposited sensing materials have been investigated for application as H2 gas sensors. The selective modification of the devices was performed through a combination of localized ablation of a resist and lift-off of a previous catalyst material deposited through e-beam evaporation. Four nanobelt devices, differentiated by their doping concentrations at the n- region (from 2.5 × 1013 to 2.5 × 1014 cm-2), were analyzed in terms of the responses to H2 and their self-heating effects. A low doping concentration improved the response at room temperature, owing to a longer Debye length. The variation in the H2-induced surface potential associated with temperature, accounting for degradation in the response of the nanobelts with Joule heating bias, was analyzed in terms of the I-V characteristics of the double-junction device. Among various catalysts (Pt, Pd, Pt/Pd) evaluated for their H2 sensing characteristics, an ultrathin film of Pt/Pd was most favorable.

  12. Selective oxidation of AlInN layers for current confinement in III-nitride devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsaz, J.; Bühlmann, H.-J.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Ilegems, M.

    2005-08-01

    Highly selective oxidation of an AlInN interlayer buried in a GaN matrix is demonstrated. This technique was successfully applied to form current apertures in III-nitride light-emitting diodes (LEDs). GaN LEDs were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy with a lattice-matched AlInN layer inserted in the n-doped region of the device. Mesas were etched by Cl2/Ar reactive ion etching to give access to the AlInN sidewalls. The sample was then oxidized anodically in a nitrilotriacetic acid solution. Using this technique, the AlInN layer was oxidized laterally up to 22μm deep while the surrounding GaN layers were kept unaffected. It was subsequently demonstrated that the oxidized AlInN layers are insulating and are therefore suitable for lateral current confinement in optoelectronic devices.

  13. Sorting on the basis of deformability of single cells in a femtosecond laser fabricated optofluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragheri, F.; Paiè, P.; Yang, T.; Nava, G.; Martınez Vázquez, R.; Di Tano, M.; Veglione, M.; Minzioni, P.; Mondello, C.; Cristiani, I.; Osellame, R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical stretching is a powerful technique for the mechanical phenotyping of single suspended cells that exploits cell deformability as an inherent functional marker. Dual-beam optical trapping and stretching of cells is a recognized tool to investigate their viscoelastic properties. The optical stretcher has the ability to deform cells through optical forces without physical contact or bead attachment. In addition, it is the only method that can be combined with microfluidic delivery, allowing for the serial, high-throughput measurement of the optical deformability and the selective sorting of single specific cells. Femtosecond laser micromachining can fabricate in the same chip both the microfluidic channel and the optical waveguides, producing a monolithic device with a very precise alignment between the components and very low sensitivity to external perturbations. Femtosecond laser irradiation in a fused silica chip followed by chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid has been used to fabricate the microfluidic channels where the cells move by pressure-driven flow. With the same femtosecond laser source two optical waveguides, orthogonal to the microfluidic channel and opposing each other, have been written inside the chip. Here we present an optimized writing process that provides improved wall roughness of the micro-channels allowing high-quality imaging. In addition, we will show results on cell sorting on the basis of mechanical properties in the same device: the different deformability exhibited by metastatic and tumorigenic cells has been exploited to obtain a metastasis-cells enriched sample. The enrichment is verified by exploiting, after cells collection, fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Devices for cell transplantation into the central nervous system: Design considerations and emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Potts, Matthew B; Silvestrini, Matthew T; Lim, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Successful use of cell-based therapies for the treatment of neurological diseases is dependent upon effective delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS poses several challenges to the delivery of cell-based therapeutics, including the blood-brain barrier, anatomic complexity, and regional specificity. Targeted delivery methods are therefore required for the selective treatment of specific CNS regions. In addition, CNS tissues are mechanically and physiologically delicate and even minor injury to normal brain or spinal cord can cause devastating neurological deficits. Targeted delivery methods must therefore minimize tissue trauma. At present, direct injection into brain or spinal cord parenchyma promises to be the most versatile and accurate method of targeted CNS therapeutic delivery. While direct injection methods have already been employed in clinical trials of cell transplantation for a wide variety of neurological diseases, there are many shortcomings with the devices and surgical approaches currently used. Some of these technical limitations may hinder the clinical development of cell transplantation therapies despite validity of the underlying biological mechanisms. In this review, we discuss some of the important technical considerations of CNS injection devices such as targeting accuracy, distribution of infused therapeutic, and overall safety to the patient. We also introduce and discuss an emerging technology - radially branched deployment - that may improve our ability to safely distribute cell-based therapies and other therapeutic agents to the CNS. Finally, we speculate on future technological developments that may further enhance the efficacy of CNS therapeutic delivery.

  15. The impact of HTA and procurement practices on the selection and prices of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Callea, Giuditta; Armeni, Patrizio; Marsilio, Marta; Jommi, Claudio; Tarricone, Rosanna

    2017-02-01

    Technological innovation in healthcare yields better health outcomes but also drives healthcare expenditure, and governments are struggling to maintain an appropriate balance between patient access to modern care and the economic sustainability of healthcare systems. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and centralized procurement are increasingly used to govern the introduction and diffusion of new technologies in an effort to make access to innovation financially sustainable. However, little empirical evidence is available to determine how they affect the selection of new technologies and unit prices. This paper focuses on medical devices (MDs) and investigates the combined effect of various HTA governance models and procurement practices on the two steps of the MD purchasing process (i.e., selecting the product and setting the unit price). Our analyses are based on primary data collected through a national survey of Italian public hospitals. The Italian National Health Service is an ideal case study because it is highly decentralized and because regions have adopted different HTA governance models (i.e., regional, hospital-based, double-level or no HTA), often in combination with centralized regional procurement programs. Hence, the Italian case allows us to test the impact of different combinations of HTA models and procurement programs in the various regions. The results show that regional HTA increases the probability of purchasing the costliest devices, whereas hospital-based HTA functions more like a cost-containment unit. Centralized regional procurement does not significantly affect MD selection and is associated with a reduction in the MD unit price: on average, hospitals located in regions with centralized procurement pay 10.1% less for the same product. Hospitals located in regions with active regional HTA programs pay higher prices for the same device (+23.2% for inexpensive products), whereas hospitals that have developed internal HTA programs pay 8

  16. Manufacturing and wetting low-cost microfluidic cell separation devices

    PubMed Central

    Pawell, Ryan S.; Inglis, David W.; Barber, Tracie J.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) is a microfluidic size-based particle separation or filter technology with applications in cell separation and enrichment. Currently, there are no cost-effective manufacturing methods for this promising microfluidic technology. In this fabrication paper, however, we develop a simple, yet robust protocol for thermoplastic DLD devices using regulatory-approved materials and biocompatible methods. The final standalone device allowed for volumetric flow rates of 660 μl min−1 while reducing the manufacturing time to <1 h. Optical profilometry and image analysis were employed to assess manufacturing accuracy and precision; the average replicated post height was 0.48% less than the average post height on the master mold and the average replicated array pitch was 1.1% less than the original design with replicated posts heights of 62.1 ± 5.1 μm (mean ± 6 standard deviations) and replicated array pitches of 35.6 ± 0.31 μm. PMID:24404077

  17. A bioMEMS device for the study of mechanical properties of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Joseph M.; Butt, Logan; Clark, Ashley; Williams, James; Padgen, Michael; Leung, Edison; Keely, Patricia; Condeelis, John S.; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Castracane, James

    2015-03-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex system which is not fully understood. New technologies are needed to provide a better understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in promoting metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, has been developed as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a custom hydrogel blend that contains selected factors for delivery to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel swells and releases these entrapped molecules, forming a sustained concentration gradient. The NANIVID has previously been successful in manipulating the tumor microenvironment both in vitro as well as in vivo. As metastatic cells intravasate, it has been shown that some are able to do so unscathed and reach their new location, while others are cleaved during the process1. There appears to be a correlation between cell migration and the mechanical properties of these cells. It is believed that these properties can be detected in real time by atomic force microscopy. In this study, metastatic MTLn3 rat mammary cells are seeded onto 1-dimensional microfibers and directed up a stable gradient of growth factor. The NANIVID device is placed behind our AFM tip, where it generates a stable chemotactic gradient of epidermal growth factor. Scanning confocal laser microscopy is also used to monitor movement of the cells over time. This experiment will shed light on the mechanical changes in metastatic cells as they undergo directed migration.

  18. Frequency-Selective Photobleaching as a Route to Chromatic Control in Supramolecular OLED Devices.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Tang; Liu, Hsiang-Fang; Peng, Bo-Ji; Tseng, Kuo-Pi; Kuo, Ming-Cheng; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Wantz, Guillaume; Hirsch, Lionel; Raffy, Guillaume; Del Guerzo, Andre; Bassani, Dario M

    2017-10-03

    We report a series of molecules that spontaneously self-organize into small electroluminescent domains of sub-micrometer dimensions when dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. The self-assembled spherical aggregates have an average diameter of 300 nm and exhibit efficient energy transfer from the blue to the green or red component. The aggregates can be chromatically addressed or patterned by selective bleaching of the energy-acceptor component using a laser source. This allows the fabrication of electroluminescence devices by directly photopatterning the active layer without the need of additional steps. Submicron features (700 nm) can be achieved using a collimated light source.

  19. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zebda, A.; Cosnier, S.; Alcaraz, J.-P.; Holzinger, M.; Le Goff, A.; Gondran, C.; Boucher, F.; Giroud, F.; Gorgy, K.; Lamraoui, H.; Cinquin, P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm−2 and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL−1. We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  20. Experimenting with microbial fuel cells for powering implanted biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Roxby, Daniel N; Nham Tran; Pak-Lam Yu; Nguyen, Hung T

    2015-08-01

    Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) technology has the ability to directly convert sugar into electricity by using bacteria. Such a technology could be useful for powering implanted biomedical devices that require a surgery to replace their batteries every couple of years. In steps towards this, parameters such as electrode configuration, inoculation size, stirring of the MFC and single versus dual chamber reactor configuration were tested for their effect on MFC power output. Results indicate that a Top-Bottom electrode configuration, stirring and larger amounts of bacteria in single chamber MFCs, and smaller amounts of bacteria in dual chamber MFCs give increased power outputs. Finally, overall dual chamber MFCs give several fold larger MFC power outputs.

  1. Cancer Cell Analyses at the Single Cell-Level Using Electroactive Microwell Array Device

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Marina; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Nakamura, Hiroko; Kaneda, Shohei; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), shed from primary tumors and disseminated into peripheral blood, are playing a major role in metastasis. Even after isolation of CTCs from blood, the target cells are mixed with a population of other cell types. Here, we propose a new method for analyses of cell mixture at the single-cell level using a microfluidic device that contains arrayed electroactive microwells. Dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, induced by the electrodes patterned on the bottom surface of the microwells, allows efficient trapping and stable positioning of single cells for high-throughput biochemical analyses. We demonstrated that various on-chip analyses including immunostaining, viability/apoptosis assay and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the single-cell level could be conducted just by applying specific reagents for each assay. Our simple method should greatly help discrimination and analysis of rare cancer cells among a population of blood cells. PMID:26558904

  2. NIR-Selective electrochromic heteromaterial frameworks: a platform to understand mesoscale transport phenomena in solid-state electrochemical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, TE; Chang, CM; Rosen, EL; Garcia, G; Runnerstrom, EL; Williams, BL; Koo, B; Buonsanti, R; Milliron, DJ; Helms, BA

    2014-01-01

    We report here the first solid-state, NIR-selective electrochromic devices. Critical to device performance is the arrangement of nanocrystal-derived electrodes into heteromaterial frameworks, where hierarchically porous ITO nanocrystal active layers are infiltrated by an ion-conducting polymer electrolyte with mesoscale periodicity. Enhanced coloration efficiency and transport are realized over unarchitectured electrodes in devices, paving the way towards new smart windows technologies.

  3. Materials, device, and interface engineering to improve polymer-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, Steven Kin

    The continued depletion of fossil fuel resources has lead to the rise in energy production costs which has lead to the search for an economically viable alternative energy source. One alternative of particular interest is solar energy. A promising alternative to inorganic materials is organic semiconductor polymer solar cells due to their advantages of being cheaper, light weight, flexible and made into large areas by roll-to-roll processing. In this dissertation, an integrated approach is taken to improve the overall performance of polymer-based solar cells by the development of new polymer materials, device architectures, and interface engineering of the contacts between layers. First, a new class of metallated conjugated polymers is explored as potential solar cell materials. Systematic modifications to the molecular units on the main chain of amorphous metallated Pt-polymers show a correlation that improving charge carrier mobility also improves solar cell performance leading to mobilities as high as 1 x 10-2 cm2/V·s and efficiencies as high as 4.1%. Second, an inverted device architecture using a more air stable electrode (Ag) is demonstrated to improve the ambient stability of unencapsulated P3HT:PCBM devices showing over 80% efficiency retention after 40 days of exposure. To further demonstrate the potential for roll-to-roll processing of polymer solar cells, solution processed Ag-nanoparticles were used to replace the vacuum deposited Ag anode electrode for inverted solar cells showing efficiencies as high as 3%. In addition, solution processed polymer based electrodes were demonstrated as a replacement to the expensive and brittle indium tin oxide showing efficiencies of 3% on flexible substrate solar cells. Third, interface engineering of the n-type (high temperature sol-gel processed TiO2 or ZnO, low temperature processed ZnO nanoparticles) electron selective metal oxide contacts in inverted solar cells with self-assembled monolayers (SAM) show improved

  4. Novel techniques for selective doping of silicon carbide for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Bharat

    Superior properties of Silicon Carbide (SiC), such as wide bandgap, high breakdown field and high thermal conductivity, have made it the frontrunner to replace Silicon for applications requiring high breakdown strength, mechanical and radiation hardness. Commercial SiC devices are already available, although their expected performance has not yet been realized due to a few problems related to device fabrication technologies, such as selective doping. This work explores non-traditional techniques for SiC doping (and selective doping in particular) based on previously unknown types of defect reactions in SiC and novel epitaxial growth techniques, which offer advantages over currently available technologies. Recent developments in SiC epitaxial growth techniques at MSU have enabled the growth of high quality SiC epitaxial layers at record low temperatures of 1,300°C. Lower growth temperatures have enabled highly doped epilayers for device applications. Prototypes of SiC PiN diodes fabricated, demonstrated low values of the series resistance associated with anodes grown by the low temperature epitaxial growth technique. At room temperature, 100 mum-diameter diodes with a forward voltage of 3.75 V and 3.23V at 1,000 A/cm2 before and after annealing were achieved. The reverse breakdown voltage was more than 680 V on average, even without surface passivation or edge termination. Reduced growth temperatures also enabled the possibility of selective epitaxial growth (SEG) of SiC with traditional masks used in the SEG in Si technology. Previously, SEG of SiC was impossible without high temperature masks. Good quality, defect free, selectively grown 4H-SiC epilayers were obtained using SiO2 mask. Nitrogen doped selectively grown epilayers were also obtained, which were almost completely ohmic, indicating doping exceeding 1x1019 cm-3. Moreover, conductivity modulation via defect reactions in SiC has been reported as a part of this work for the first time. The approach is

  5. Preparation of micro gold devices on poly(dimethylsiloxane) chips with region-selective electroless plating.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhenxia; Chen, Hengwu; Ma, Dan

    2009-10-15

    A novel protocol for fabrication of micro gold devices on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates was developed on the basis of region-selective electroless plating. The layout of a micro gold device was first photochemically patterned onto the PDMS surface through a UV induced poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) grafting process. The carboxylic moieties on the grafted PAA served as the scaffold for a series of wet chemical reactions that led to the immobilization of gold nanoparticles in the UV-exposed region, where electroless plating then occurred under the catalysis of the nanoparticles. Gold devices fabricated with such a protocol could tolerate the Scotch tape test and survive in a repeated bending-straightening test. They also showed good stability in acidic and alkaline solutions, possessed almost the same electrochemical properties as a standard gold disk electrode, and allowed thiol-compounds to form a perfect self-assembled monolayer on their surfaces. The fabricated micro gold electrode was demonstrated to be suitable as the integrated amperometric detection element in a full PDMS micro electrophoresis chip.

  6. A device for simultaneous live cell imaging during uni-axial mechanical strain or compression.

    PubMed

    Gerstmair, Axel; Fois, Giorgio; Innerbichler, Siegfried; Dietl, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2009-08-01

    Mechanical stimuli control multiple cellular processes such as secretion, growth, and differentiation. A widely used method to investigate cell strain ex vivo is stretching an elastic membrane to which cells adhere. However, simultaneous imaging of dynamic signals from single living cells grown on elastic substrates during uni-axial changes of cell length is usually hampered by the movement of the sample along the strain axis out of the narrow optical field of view. We used a thin, prestrained, elastic chamber as growth substrate for the cells and deformed the chamber with a computer-controlled stretch device. An algorithm that compensates the lateral displacement during stretch kept any selected point of the whole chamber at a constant position on the microscope during strain or relaxation (compression). Adherent cells or other materials that adhere to the bottom of the chamber at any given position could be imaged during controlled positive (stretch) or negative (compression) changes of cell length. The system was tested on living alveolar type II cells, in which mechanical effects on secretion have been intensively investigated in the past.

  7. Comparison of rechargeable lithium and nickel/cadmium battery cells for implantable circulatory support devices.

    PubMed

    MacLean, G K; Aiken, P A; Adams, W A; Mussivand, T

    1994-04-01

    Size and weight constraints are critical areas in the design of implantable medical devices. For this reason, a study of different rechargeable lithium and nickel/cadmium (Ni/Cd) battery cell types was undertaken to determine which cell type, when assembled into a multicell battery pack, would provide the smallest and lightest power source for implantation. The discharge rate and cycle life characteristics of 2 different rectangular prismatic Ni/Cd cells and 5 different rechargeable lithium cells were determined at 37 degrees C by charge/discharge cycling, the cells using a constant discharge load of 0.87 A. Using the observed discharge rate and cycle life characteristics of the cells, along with the desired performance criteria of 30 min operating time at the end of a 1-year implant period, the projected weight and volume of the various 12-V battery packs were determined. These results showed that one of the rectangular prismatic Ni/Cd cells would yield the smallest (53 ml) and lightest (189 g) 12-V battery pack that met the performance criteria specified. The results also indicate that, for applications requiring long implant times, cycle life can be more important in the selection of cells for a small, lightweight battery pack than specific energy or energy density.

  8. Selection of the logical model of the intellectual algorithm for dynamic processing of medical data (obtained through portable medical devices)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoytova, V. A.; Taranik, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Portable devices are one of the important emerging areas of modern medicine. This article presents the rationale for the selection of the logical model of the intellectual algorithm for dynamic processing of medical data obtained through portable medical devices. The description of the main criteria for the selection and application of the method of Saaty is provided. And the conclusion about the feasibility of using fuzzy logic as a logical model for the investigated subject area is made.

  9. Optimization of Organic Solar Cells: Materials, Devices and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanjia

    Due to the increasing demand for sustainable clean energy, photovoltaic cells have received intensified attention in the past decade in both academia and industry. Among the types of cells, organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells offer promise as alternatives to conventional inorganic-type solar cells owning to several unique advantages such as low material and fabrication cost. To maximize power conversion efficiencies (PCEs), extensive research efforts focus on frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energy engineering of photoactive materials. Towards this objective, a series of novel donor polymers incorporating a new building block, bithiophene imide (BTI) group are developed, with narrow bandgap and low-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies to increase short circuit current density, Jsc, and open circuit voltage, Voc.. Compared to other PV technologies, OPVs often suffer from large internal recombination loss and relatively low fill factors (FFs) <70%. Through a combination of materials design and device architecture optimization strategies to improve both microscopic and macroscopic thin film morphology, OPVs with PCEs up to 8.7% and unprecedented FF approaching 80% are obtained. Such high FF are close to those typically achieved in amorphous Si solar cells. Systematic variations of polymer chemical structures lead to understanding of structure-property relationships between polymer geometry and the resulting blend film morphology characteristics which are crucial for achieving high local mobilities and long carrier lifetimes. Instead of using fullerene as the acceptors, an alternative type of OPV is developed employing a high electron mobility polymer, P(NDI2OD-T2), as the acceptor. To improve the all-polymer blend film morphology, the influence of basic solvent properties such as solvent boiling point and solubility on polymer phase separation and charge transport properties is investigated, yielding to a high PCE of 2.7% for all-polymer solar cells

  10. Doped Interlayers for Improved Selectivity in Bulk Herterojunction Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Mauger, Scott A.; Glasser, Melodie P.; Tremolet de Villers, Bertrand J.; ...

    2016-01-21

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is less selective for holes in inverted-architecture organic photovoltaic (OPV) than it is in a conventional-architecture OPV device due differences between the interfacial-PSS concentration at the top and bottom of the PEDOT:PSS layer. In this work, thin layers of polysulfonic acids are inserted between the P3HT:ICBA bulk heterojunction (BHJ) active layer and PEDOT:PSS to create a higher concentration of acid at this interface and, therefore, mimic the distribution of materials present in a conventional device. Upon thermal annealing, this acid layer oxidizes P3HT, creating a thin p-type interlayer of P3HT+/acid- on top of the BHJ. Using x-raymore » absorption spectroscopy, Kelvin probe and ellipsometry measurements, this P3HT+/acid- layer is shown to be insoluble in water, indicating it remains intact during the subsequent deposition of PEDOT:PSS. Current density - voltage measurements show this doped interlayer reduces injected dark current while increasing both open-circuit voltage and fill factor through the creation of a more hole selective BHJ-PEDOT:PSS interface.« less

  11. Doped Interlayers for Improved Selectivity in Bulk Herterojunction Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Scott A.; Glasser, Melodie P.; Tremolet de Villers, Bertrand J.; Duong, Vincent V.; Ayzner, Alexander L.; Olson, Dana C.

    2016-01-21

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is less selective for holes in inverted-architecture organic photovoltaic (OPV) than it is in a conventional-architecture OPV device due differences between the interfacial-PSS concentration at the top and bottom of the PEDOT:PSS layer. In this work, thin layers of polysulfonic acids are inserted between the P3HT:ICBA bulk heterojunction (BHJ) active layer and PEDOT:PSS to create a higher concentration of acid at this interface and, therefore, mimic the distribution of materials present in a conventional device. Upon thermal annealing, this acid layer oxidizes P3HT, creating a thin p-type interlayer of P3HT+/acid- on top of the BHJ. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Kelvin probe and ellipsometry measurements, this P3HT+/acid- layer is shown to be insoluble in water, indicating it remains intact during the subsequent deposition of PEDOT:PSS. Current density - voltage measurements show this doped interlayer reduces injected dark current while increasing both open-circuit voltage and fill factor through the creation of a more hole selective BHJ-PEDOT:PSS interface.

  12. Generation of oxygen gradients in microfluidic devices for cell culture using spatially confined chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Ann; King, Andrew D; Shih, Hsiu-Chen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2011-11-07

    This paper reports a microfluidic device capable of generating oxygen gradients for cell culture using spatially confined chemical reactions with minimal chemical consumption. The microfluidic cell culture device is constructed by single-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels, in which the cells can be easily observed by microscopes. The device can control the oxygen gradients without the utilization of bulky pressurized gas cylinders, direct addition of oxygen scavenging agents, or tedious gas interconnections and sophisticated flow control. In addition, due to the efficient transportation of oxygen within the device using the spatially confined chemical reactions, the microfluidic cell culture device can be directly used in conventional cell incubators without altering their gaseous compositions. The oxygen gradients generated in the device are numerically simulated and experimentally characterized using an oxygen-sensitive fluorescence dye. In this paper, carcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial (A549) cells have been cultured in the microfluidic device with a growth medium and an anti-cancer drug (Tirapazamine, TPZ) under various oxygen gradients. The cell experiment results successfully demonstrate the hyperoxia-induced cell death and hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity of TPZ. In addition, the results confirm the great cell compatibility and stable oxygen gradient generation of the developed device. Consequently, the microfluidic cell culture device developed in this paper is promising to be exploited in biological labs with minimal instrumentation to study cellular responses under various oxygen gradients. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  13. A novel closed cell culture device for fabrication of corneal epithelial cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Moriya, Noboru; Mizutani, Manabu; Kan, Kazutoshi; Nozaki, Takayuki; Saitoh, Kazuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-11-01

    Automation technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering would need to optimize the cell sheet fabrication process, stabilize cell sheet quality and reduce biological contamination risks. Biological contamination must be avoided in clinical settings. A closed culture system provides a solution for this. In the present study, we developed a closed culture device called a cell cartridge, to be used in a closed cell culture system for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets. Rabbit limbal epithelial cells were cultured on the surface of a porous membrane with 3T3 feeder cells, which are separate from the epithelial cells in the cell cartridges and in the cell-culture inserts as a control. To fabricate the stratified cell sheets, five different thicknesses of the membranes which were welded to the cell cartridge, were examined. Multilayered corneal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated in cell cartridges that were welded to a 25 µm-thick gas-permeable membrane, which was similar to the results with the cell-culture inserts. However, stratification of corneal epithelial cell sheets did not occur with cell cartridges that were welded to 100-300 µm-thick gas-permeable membranes. The fabricated cell sheets were evaluated by histological analyses to examine the expression of corneal epithelial-specific markers. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that a putative stem cell marker, p63, a corneal epithelial differentiation maker, CK3, and a barrier function marker, Claudin-1, were expressed in the appropriate position in the cell sheets. These results suggest that the cell cartridge is effective for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets.

  14. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  15. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  16. A Novel Counter Sheet-flow Sandwich Cell Culture Device for Mammalian Cell Growth in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shujin; Gao, Yuxin; Shu, Nanjiang; Tang, Zemei; Tao, Zulai; Long, Mian

    2008-08-01

    Cell culture and growth in space is crucial to understand the cellular responses under microgravity. The effects of microgravity were coupled with such environment restrictions as medium perfusion, in which the underlying mechanism has been poorly understood. In the present work, a customer-made counter sheet-flow sandwich cell culture device was developed upon a biomechanical concept from fish gill breathing. The sandwich culture unit consists of two side chambers where the medium flow is counter-directional, a central chamber where the cells are cultured, and two porous polycarbonate membranes between side and central chambers. Flow dynamics analysis revealed the symmetrical velocity profile and uniform low shear rate distribution of flowing medium inside the central culture chamber, which promotes sufficient mass transport and nutrient supply for mammalian cell growth. An on-orbit experiment performed on a recovery satellite was used to validate the availability of the device.

  17. A novel microchannel-based device to capture and analyze circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    RIAHI, REZA; GOGOI, PRIYADARSHINI; SEPEHRI, SAEDEH; ZHOU, YI; HANDIQUE, KALYAN; GODSEY, JIM; WANG, YIXIN

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been shown in many studies as a possible biomarker for metastasis and may be instrumental for the spread of the disease. Despite advances in CTC capturing technologies, the low frequency of CTCs in cancer patients and the heterogeneity of the CTCs have limited the wide application of the technology in clinic. In this study, we investigated a novel microfluidic technology that uses a size- and deformability-based capture system to characterize CTCs. This unique platform not only allows flexibility in the selection of antibody markers but also segregates the CTCs in their own chambers, thus, enabling morphological, immunological and genetic characterization of each CTC at the single cell level. In this study, different breast cancer cell lines including MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and SKBR3, as well as a panel of breast cancer biomarkers were used to test the device. The technology can capture a wide range of cells with high reproducibility. The capturing efficiency of the cells is greater than 80%. In addition, the background of leukocytes is minimized because individual cells are segregated in their own chambers. The device captured both epithelial cancer cells such as MCF7 and SKBR3 and mesenchymal cells such as MDA-MB-231. Immunostaining of the captured cells on the microchannel device suggests that a panel of breast cancer biomarkers can be used to further characterize differential expression of the captured cells. PMID:24676558

  18. Particle compositions with a pre-selected cell internalization mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decuzzi, Paolo (Inventor); Ferrari, Mauro (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of formulating a particle composition having a pre-selected cell internalization mode involves selecting a target cell having surface receptors and obtaining particles that have i) surface moieties, that have an affinity for or are capable of binding to the surface receptors of the cell and ii) a preselected shape, where a surface distribution of the surface moieties on the particles and the shape of the particles are effective for the pre-selected cell internalization mode.

  19. Separation of Cells using a Fluidic MEMS Device and a Quantitative Analysis of Cell Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoda, Takaaki; Ishida, Yasuaki

    Fluidic micro electro mechanical system (fluidic MEMS) devices, composed of a micro pump, mixer, valve, reactor, sensor and an electric circuit on a chip, have been widely applied in biotechnology and medical analyses. This study describes the design and fabrication of a fluidic MEMS device that can separate living leukocyte cells from a single droplet of blood (< 1μl). The chip was constructed from two substrate materials sandwiched together to form a gap with an upper hydrophilic (glass) surface and a lower hydrophobic (acrylic resin) surface. A blood sample was flowed into the gap (40μm) between the two substrates driven by the difference in surface tension of the two materials. Leukocyte cells were left adhered to the lower hydrophobic surface, whereas red corpuscles flowed toward the exit of the fluidic MEMS device. The separation rate of the red corpuscles has been achieved to 91 ± 9% in a unit area of 0.1 mm2. Further, the change in an area of a living leukocyte cell separated in the chip, was quantitatively analyzed. This study proposes a method for separating and measuring living cells in a fluidic MEMS device.

  20. A low-cost thin layer coulometric microfluidic device based on an ion-selective membrane for calcium determination.

    PubMed

    Dorokhin, Denis; Crespo, Gastón A; Afshar, Majid Ghahraman; Bakker, Eric

    2014-01-07

    A prototype of a low-cost and easy-to-use thin layer coulometric microfluidic device based on an ion-selective membrane for calcium detection is described. The microfluidic device was fabricated and consequently assembled with inexpensive materials without using sophisticated and centralized fabrication laboratory facilities. The linear range of the device is found to be 10-100 μM for a 60 s current integration time. Preliminary validations showed that the microfluidic device is suitable for the quantification of calcium in mineral water.

  1. Using Living Radical Polymerization to Enable Facile Incorporation of Materials in Microfluidic Cell Culture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Simms, Helen M.; Bowman, Christopher M.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2008-01-01

    High throughput screening tools are expediting cell culture studies with applications in drug discovery and tissue engineering. This contribution demonstrates a method to incorporate 3D cell culture sites into microfluidic devices and enables the fabrication of high throughput screening tools with uniquely addressable culture environments. Contact Lithographic Photopolymerization (CLiPP) was used to fabricate microfluidic devices with two types of 3D culture sites: macroporous rigid polymer cell scaffolds and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) encapsulated cell matrices. Cells were cultured on-device with both types of culture sites, demonstrating material cytocompatibility. Multilayer microfluidic devices were fabricated with channels passing the top and bottom sides of a series of rigid porous polymer scaffolds. Cells were seeded and cultured on-device, demonstrating the ability to deliver cells and culture cells on multiple scaffolds along the length of a single channel. Flow control through these rigid porous polymer scaffolds was demonstrated. Finally, devices were modified by grafting of PEG methacrylate from surfaces to prevent non-specific protein adsorption and ultimately cell adhesion to channel surfaces. The living radical component of this CLiPP device fabrication platform enables facile incorporation of 3D culture sites into microfluidic cell culture devices, which can be utilized for high throughput screening of cell material interactions. PMID:18294686

  2. Evaluation of cancer stem cell migration using compartmentalizing microfluidic devices and live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Agrawal, Basheal; Clark, Paul A; Williams, Justin C; Kuo, John S

    2011-12-23

    In the last 40 years, the United States invested over 200 billion dollars on cancer research, resulting in only a 5% decrease in death rate. A major obstacle for improving patient outcomes is the poor understanding of mechanisms underlying cellular migration associated with aggressive cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapeutic resistance. Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary malignant adult brain tumor, exemplifies this difficulty. Despite standard surgery, radiation and chemotherapies, patient median survival is only fifteen months, due to aggressive GBM infiltration into adjacent brain and rapid cancer recurrence. The interactions of aberrant cell migratory mechanisms and the tumor microenvironment likely differentiate cancer from normal cells. Therefore, improving therapeutic approaches for GBM require a better understanding of cancer cell migration mechanisms. Recent work suggests that a small subpopulation of cells within GBM, the brain tumor stem cell (BTSC), may be responsible for therapeutic resistance and recurrence. Mechanisms underlying BTSC migratory capacity are only starting to be characterized. Due to a limitation in visual inspection and geometrical manipulation, conventional migration assays are restricted to quantifying overall cell populations. In contrast, microfluidic devices permit single cell analysis because of compatibility with modern microscopy and control over micro-environment. We present a method for detailed characterization of BTSC migration using compartmentalizing microfluidic devices. These PDMS-made devices cast the tissue culture environment into three connected compartments: seeding chamber, receiving chamber and bridging microchannels. We tailored the device such that both chambers hold sufficient media to support viable BTSC for 4-5 days without media exchange. Highly mobile BTSCs initially introduced into the seeding chamber are isolated after migration though bridging microchannels to the parallel

  3. InAlAs photovoltaic cell design for high device efficiency: InAlAs photovoltaic cell design for high device efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Norman, Andrew; Smith, Brittany L.; Bittner, Zachary S.; ...

    2017-04-17

    This study presents a new design for a single-junction InAlAs solar cell, which reduces parasitic absorption losses from the low band-gap contact layer while maintaining a functional window layer by integrating a selective etch stop. The etch stop is then removed prior to depositing an anti-reflective coating. The final cell had a 17.9% efficiency under 1-sun AM1.5 with an anti-reflective coating. Minority carrier diffusion lengths were extracted from external quantum efficiency data using physics-based device simulation software yielding 170 nm in the n-type emitter and 4.6 um in the p-type base, which is more than four times the diffusion lengthmore » previously reported for a p-type InAlAs base. This report represents significant progress towards a high-performance InAlAs top cell for a triple-junction design lattice-matched to InP.« less

  4. Cell pairing using a dielectrophoresis-based device with interdigitated array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Şen, Mustafa; Ino, Kosuke; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2013-09-21

    We present a chip device with an array of 900 gourd-shaped microwells designed to pair single cells of different types. The device consists of interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes and uses positive dielectrophoresis to trap cells within the microwells. Each side of a microwell is on a different comb of the IDA, so that cells of different types are trapped on opposite sides of the microwells, leading to close cell pairing. Using this device, a large number of cell pairs can be formed easily and rapidly, making it a highly attractive tool for controllable cell pairing in a range of biological applications.

  5. Bring-Your-Own-Device: Turning Cell Phones into Forces for Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, classroom response systems (or "clickers") have become increasingly common. Although most systems require students to use a standalone handheld device, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) systems allow students to use devices they already own (e.g., a cell phone, tablet or laptop) to submit responses via text message or…

  6. Bring-Your-Own-Device: Turning Cell Phones into Forces for Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, classroom response systems (or "clickers") have become increasingly common. Although most systems require students to use a standalone handheld device, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) systems allow students to use devices they already own (e.g., a cell phone, tablet or laptop) to submit responses via text message or…

  7. 3D microfilter device for viable circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Siyang; Lin, Henry K; Lu, Bo; Williams, Anthony; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard J; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-02-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells has emerged as a promising minimally invasive diagnostic and prognostic tool for patients with metastatic cancers. We report a novel three dimensional microfilter device that can enrich viable circulating tumor cells from blood. This device consists of two layers of parylene membrane with pores and gap precisely defined with photolithography. The positions of the pores are shifted between the top and bottom membranes. The bottom membrane supports captured cells and minimize the stress concentration on cell membrane and sustain cell viability during filtration. Viable cell capture on device was investigated with scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and immunofluorescent staining using model systems of cultured tumor cells spiked in blood or saline. The paper presents and validates this new 3D microfiltration concept for circulation tumor cell enrichment application. The device provides a highly valuable tool for assessing and characterizing viable enriched circulating tumor cells in both research and clinical settings.

  8. Recognizable-image selection for fingerprint recognition with a mobile-device camera.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongjae; Choi, Kyoungtaek; Choi, Heeseung; Kim, Jaihie

    2008-02-01

    This paper proposes a recognizable-image selection algorithm for fingerprint-verification systems that use a camera embedded in a mobile device. A recognizable image is defined as the fingerprint image which includes the characteristics that are sufficiently discriminating an individual from other people. While general camera systems obtain focused images by using various gradient measures to estimate high-frequency components, mobile cameras cannot acquire recognizable images in the same way because the obtained images may not be adequate for fingerprint recognition, even if they are properly focused. A recognizable image has to meet the following two conditions: First, valid region in the recognizable image should be large enough compared with other nonrecognizable images. Here, a valid region is a well-focused part, and ridges in the region are clearly distinguishable from valleys. In order to select valid regions, this paper proposes a new focus-measurement algorithm using the secondary partial derivatives and a quality estimation utilizing the coherence and symmetry of gradient distribution. Second, rolling and pitching degrees of a finger measured from the camera plane should be within some limit for a recognizable image. The position of a core point and the contour of a finger are used to estimate the degrees of rolling and pitching. Experimental results show that our proposed method selects valid regions and estimates the degrees of rolling and pitching properly. In addition, fingerprint-verification performance is improved by detecting the recognizable images.

  9. The Use of Application Blanks as Pre-Screening Devices in Employee Selection: An Assessment of Practices in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeson, Paul V.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a study of the use of employment application blanks as prescreening devices in public school employee selection. Findings suggest two major areas for further research. The first relates to legal compliance with Equal Opportunity Employment guidelines. The second concerns information relevancy to personnel selection. (JAM)

  10. Battery testing device. [for testing cells of multiple-cell battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boshers, W. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A battery testing device is described for testing the cells of a multiple-cell battery, the battery having a cover plate with access holes to provide access to the connecting straps between cells. A panel of probe assembly receiving holes is located to correspond to the location of the access holes when the panel is positioned on top of the battery. A probe assembly is positioned within each probe assembly receiving hole, with a spring biased electrically conductive plunger to make electrical contact with the connecting strap through the corresponding access hole when the panel is pushed towards the top of the battery.

  11. Purging peripheral blood progenitor cell grafts from lymphoma cells: quantitative comparison of immunomagnetic CD34+ selection systems.

    PubMed

    Paulus, U; Dreger, P; Viehmann, K; von Neuhoff, N; Schmitz, N

    1997-01-01

    Autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation is increasingly being used for treatment of indolent lymphomas. Since involvement of bone marrow and peripheral blood is frequent and methods to reduce the lymphoma cell load of PBPC grafts are thus highly desirable, we have studied purging of PBPC comparing two immunomagnetic CD34+ selection systems (VarioMACS, Miltenyi Biotech; Bergisch Gladbach, Germany, and Isolex50 System, Baxter; Irvine, CA). Samples of freshly collected mobilized PBPCs were contaminated with BALM-3 or KARPAS422 lymphoma cells that had been labeled with the fluorescent DNA stain Hoechst 33342. The mixture was subjected to separation with the two devices and the resulting "CD34+" fractions were screened for lymphoma cells by limiting dilution using fluorescence microscopy and by polymerase chain reaction amplification of t(14;18) or CDRIII-rearrangements. Both devices yielded comparable purities (MACS 97% [87%-99%]; Isolex 97% [84%-99%]) and recoveries of CD34+ cells (MACS 56% [30%-81%]; Isolex 45% [24%-63%]). The overall depletion of lymphoma cells was 3.9 log (2.6-5.9), however, residual contaminating cells were seen in every single experiment. The purging efficacy was dependent on the type of contaminating lymphoma cell (BALM-3: 4.4 log [3.7-4.8]; KARPAS422: 3.2 log [2.6-4.2]; p = 0.018), whereas the type of selection system used or the percentage of CD34+ cells in the starting material had no influence. We conclude that excellent purification of CD34+ cells leading to a vigorous depletion of lymphoma cells can be achieved with both CD34+ selection systems investigated. However, the efficacy of purging may greatly differ between individual lymphomas, and complete eradication of contaminating cells from PBPC grafts may rarely be achieved with CD34+ selection alone.

  12. Nondestructive method for detecting defects in photodetector and solar cell devices

    DOEpatents

    Sawyer, David E.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein is a method for locating semiconductor device defects and for measuring the internal resistance of such devices by making use of the intrinsic distributed resistance nature of the devices. The method provides for forward-biasing a solar cell or other device while it is scanning with an optical spot. The forward-biasing is achieved with either an illuminator light source or an external current source.

  13. Nondestructive method for detecting defects in photodetector and solar cell devices

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    The invention described herein is a method for locating semiconductor device defects and for measuring the internal resistance of such devices by making use of the intrinsic distributed resistance nature of the devices. The method provides for forward-biasing a solar cell or other device while it is scanning with an optical spot. The forward-biasing is achieved with either an illuminator light source or an external current source.

  14. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR.

  15. Stability and compatibility of reconstituted caspofungin in select elastomeric infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, Maria; Ulmer, Marisa; Yurcho, James F; Hooper, Kevin L; Gui, Min

    2010-01-01

    The stability and compatibility of caspofungin acetate reconstituted in 0.9% sodium chloride injection was studied in select elastomeric infusion devices. Caspofungin acetate solutions at three different concentrations, 0.2, 0.28, and 0.5 mg/mL, were stored in three commonly used elastomeric infusion devices at 5 degrees Celsius +/- 3 degrees Celsius and at room temperature. Sample mixtures of the drug were tested for stability every 12 hours (60 hours maximum) at room temperature, every 24 hours (72 hours maximum), and at 8, 9, and 14 days under refrigerated conditions (5 degrees Celsius +/- 3 degrees Celsius). Samples were assayed by using a high-performance liquid chromatographic method. The reconstituted caspofungin solutions maintained (greater than or equal to 90%) of the original active concentration for the duration of this study under both storage conditions. Degradation product levels remained within historical limits throughout the course of this study. Furthermore, the initial concentration of the caspofungin solutions was found to have no effect on the study results.

  16. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Nayak, Pabitra K.; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-01-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials. PMID:26246039

  17. Hole selective MoOx contact for silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Corsin; Yin, Xingtian; Zheng, Maxwell; Sharp, Ian D; Chen, Teresa; McDonnell, Stephen; Azcatl, Angelica; Carraro, Carlo; Ma, Biwu; Maboudian, Roya; Wallace, Robert M; Javey, Ali

    2014-02-12

    Using an ultrathin (∼ 15 nm in thickness) molybdenum oxide (MoOx, x < 3) layer as a transparent hole selective contact to n-type silicon, we demonstrate a room-temperature processed oxide/silicon solar cell with a power conversion efficiency of 14.3%. While MoOx is commonly considered to be a semiconductor with a band gap of 3.3 eV, from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we show that MoOx may be considered to behave as a high workfunction metal with a low density of states at the Fermi level originating from the tail of an oxygen vacancy derived defect band located inside the band gap. Specifically, in the absence of carbon contamination, we measure a work function potential of ∼ 6.6 eV, which is significantly higher than that of all elemental metals. Our results on the archetypical semiconductor silicon demonstrate the use of nm-thick transition metal oxides as a simple and versatile pathway for dopant-free contacts to inorganic semiconductors. This work has important implications toward enabling a novel class of junctionless devices with applications for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and transistors.

  18. Theta phase precession and phase selectivity: a cognitive device description of neural coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalay, Osbert C.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2009-06-01

    Information in neural systems is carried by way of phase and rate codes. Neuronal signals are processed through transformative biophysical mechanisms at the cellular and network levels. Neural coding transformations can be represented mathematically in a device called the cognitive rhythm generator (CRG). Incoming signals to the CRG are parsed through a bank of neuronal modes that orchestrate proportional, integrative and derivative transformations associated with neural coding. Mode outputs are then mixed through static nonlinearities to encode (spatio) temporal phase relationships. The static nonlinear outputs feed and modulate a ring device (limit cycle) encoding output dynamics. Small coupled CRG networks were created to investigate coding functionality associated with neuronal phase preference and theta precession in the hippocampus. Phase selectivity was found to be dependent on mode shape and polarity, while phase precession was a product of modal mixing (i.e. changes in the relative contribution or amplitude of mode outputs resulted in shifting phase preference). Nonlinear system identification was implemented to help validate the model and explain response characteristics associated with modal mixing; in particular, principal dynamic modes experimentally derived from a hippocampal neuron were inserted into a CRG and the neuron's dynamic response was successfully cloned. From our results, small CRG networks possessing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in combination with feedforward excitation exhibited frequency-dependent inhibitory-to-excitatory and excitatory-to-inhibitory transitions that were similar to transitions seen in a single CRG with quadratic modal mixing. This suggests nonlinear modal mixing to be a coding manifestation of the effect of network connectivity in shaping system dynamic behavior. We hypothesize that circuits containing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in the nervous system may be candidates for interpreting upstream rate codes to

  19. Central B-Cell Tolerance: Where Selection Begins

    PubMed Central

    Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an adaptive immune system based on the random generation of antigen receptors requires a stringent selection process that sifts through receptor specificities to remove those reacting with self-antigens. In the B-cell lineage, this selection process is first applied to IgM+ immature B cells. By using increasingly sophisticated mouse models, investigators have identified the central tolerance mechanisms that negatively select autoreactive immature B cells and prevent inclusion of their antigen receptors into the peripheral B-cell pool. Additional studies have uncovered mechanisms that promote the differentiation of nonautoreactive immature B cells and their positive selection into the peripheral B-cell population. These mechanisms of central selection are fundamental to the generation of a naïve B-cell repertoire that is largely devoid of self-reactivity while capable of reacting with any foreign insult. PMID:22378602

  20. CD133+ cell selection is an alternative to CD34+ cell selection for ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobari, L; Giarratana, M C; Pflumio, F; Izac, B; Coulombel, L; Douay, L

    2001-04-01

    CD133 is a new stem cell antigen that may provide an alternative to CD34 for the selection and expansion of hematopoietic cells for transplantation. This study compared the expansion capacities of CD133(+) and CD34(+) cells isolated from the same cord blood (CB) samples. After 14 days culture in stroma-free, serum-free medium in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), Flt3-1, megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the CD133(+) and CD34(+) fractions displayed comparable expansion of the myeloid compartment (CFC, LTC-IC, and E-LTC-IC). The expansion of CD133(+) CB cells was up to 1262-fold for total cells, 99-fold for CD34(+) cells, 109-fold for CD34(+) CD133(+) cells, 133-fold for CFU-GM, 14.5-fold for LTC-IC, and 7.5-fold for E-LTC-IC. Moreover, the expanded population was able to generate lymphoid B (CD19(+)), NK (CD56(+)), and T (CD4(+) CD8(+)) cells in liquid or fetal thymic organ cultures, while expression of the homing antigen CXCR4 was similar on expanded and nonexpanded CD133(+) or CD34(+) cells. Thus, the CD133(+) subset could be expanded in the same manner as the CD34(+) subset and conserved its multilineage capacity, which would support the relevance of CD133 for clinical hematopoietic selection.

  1. The potential and device physics of interdigitated thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2008-05-01

    The device physics of thin-film solar cells with interdigitated p-n junctions is examined for a range of spatial sizes, band offsets, and material parameters. The results are illustrated by focusing on recent nanoscale concepts for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells. Ideally, nanoscale interdigitated junctions can improve solar cell performance relative to planar-junction devices, and make reasonably high solar cell efficiencies (>15%) attainable even with mediocre electro-optical materials.

  2. Adhesion and Interfacial Fracture: From Organic Light Emitting Devices and Photovoltaic Cells to Solar Lanterns for Developing Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Tiffany Michelle

    From that “ah-ha!” moment when a new technology is first conceived until the time that it reaches the hands of consumers, products undergo numerous iterations of research, development, testing, and redesign in order to create an end-product that is relevant, desirable, functional, and affordable. One crucial step, particularly for electronic devices, is a rigorous testing stage to ensure that a product will be able to withstand regular wear-and-tear. An understanding of how, when, and under what conditions a technology will fail is important in improving device performance and creating high quality products that consumers trust. Understanding that success is inherently tied to failure, this thesis focuses on studies of mechanical failure related to two types of electronic devices: solar cells and light emitting devices. By considering the interfaces that are relevant to the next generation of solar cells and light emitting devices that are built using organic conducting polymers, an atomic force microscopy test is introduced to characterize and rank the relative interfacial adhesion between layers at the nano-scale. These results have implications for material selection that can enhance device processing and performance. This method is then linked to fracture mechanics techniques that determine critical loading forces that induce separation and, hence, mechanical failure between layers of these devices. These results demonstrate the effect of nano-scale interactions on macro-scale behavior, and are particularly valuable in product testing as flexible electronics gain interest. Finally, a case study is conducted in Rural Kenya that measures the impact of commercially-available LED lanterns that are charged by solar panels on a community that is disconnected from the power grid. By demonstrating the value of these lanterns for the community, the role of device reliability and lifetime is examined in underscoring the critical need for proper device testing before

  3. "Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca(2+) fluoroimaging".

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-02-16

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca(2+) dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging.

  4. Designing of a Si-MEMS device with an integrated skeletal muscle cell-based bio-actuator.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hideaki; Van Dau, Thanh; Shimizu, Kazunori; Hatsuda, Ranko; Sugiyama, Susumu; Nagamori, Eiji

    2011-02-01

    With the aim of designing a mechanical drug delivery system involving a bio-actuator, we fabricated a Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) device that can be driven through contraction of skeletal muscle cells. The device is composed of a Si-MEMS with springs and ratchets, UV-crosslinked collagen film for cell attachment, and C2C12 muscle cells. The Si-MEMS device is 600 μm x 1000 μm in size and the width of the collagen film is 250 ~ 350 μm, which may allow the device to go through small blood vessels. To position the collagen film on the MEMS device, a thermo-sensitive polymer was used as the sacrifice-layer which was selectively removed with O₂ plasma at the positions where the collagen film was glued. The C2C12 myoblasts were seeded on the collagen film, where they proliferated and formed myotubes after induction of differentiation. When C2C12 myotubes were stimulated with electric pulses, contraction of the collagen film-C2C12 myotube complex was observed. When the edge of the Si-MEMS device was observed, displacement of ~8 μm was observed, demonstrating the possibility of locomotive movement when the device is placed on a track of adequate width. Here, we propose that the C2C12-collagen film complex is a new generation actuator for MEMS devices that utilize glucose as fuel, which will be useful in environments in which glucose is abundant such as inside a blood vessel.

  5. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liberale, C.; Cojoc, G.; Bragheri, F.; Minzioni, P.; Perozziello, G.; La Rocca, R.; Ferrara, L.; Rajamanickam, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Cristiani, I.

    2013-01-01

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses. PMID:23409249

  6. A Hybrid Integrated-Circuit/Microfluidic Device for Positioning, Porating and Fusing Individual Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floryan, Caspar; Issadore, David; Westervelt, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Here we report a hybrid integrated-circuit/microfluidic device which can position, porate and fuse individual cells. Existing electroporation and fusion devices can only act on cells in bulk. Our device consists of a microarray of electrode pixels^1 and a grounded conducting plate. Cells were positioned with dielectrophoretic forces induced by the pixels and porated or fused with voltage pulses which caused a dielectric breakdown of the cell membrane. The device positioned cells with 10μm precision and porated or fused them with high yields. It is programmable and mass-parallelization on a single device enables bulk applications. ^1 T. Hunt, D. Issadore, R. Westervelt, Lab on a Chip, 2008, 8, 81-87.

  7. Uniaxial cell stretching device for live-cell imaging of mechanosensitive cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Tan, Xinyu; Novitski, Roman; Muqaddam, Mishaal; List, Paul; Williamson, Laura; Fu, Jianping; Liu, Allen P.

    2013-01-01

    External mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating cellular behaviors through intracellular mechanosensitive and mechanotransductive machineries such as the F-actin cytoskeleton (CSK) structures and focal adhesions (FAs) anchoring the F-actin CSK to the extracellular environment. Studying the mechanoresponsive behaviors of the F-actin CSK and FAs in response to cell stretch has great importance for further understanding mechanotransduction and mechanobiology. In this work, we developed a novel cell stretching device combining dynamic directional cell stretch with in situ subcellular live-cell imaging. Using a cam and follower mechanism and applying a standard mathematical model for cam design, we generated different dynamic stretch outputs. By examining stretch-mediated FA dynamics under step-function static stretch and the realignment of cell morphology and the F-actin CSK under cyclic stretch, we demonstrated successful applications of our cell stretching device for mechanobiology studies where external stretch plays an important role in regulating subcellular molecular dynamics and cellular phenotypes. PMID:24289415

  8. Nylon-3 polymers that enable selective culture of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2013-11-06

    Substrates that selectively encourage the growth of specific cell types are valuable for the engineering of complex tissues. Some cell-selective peptides have been identified from extracellular matrix proteins; these peptides have proven useful for biomaterials-based approaches to tissue repair or regeneration. However, there are very few examples of synthetic materials that display selectivity in supporting cell growth. We describe nylon-3 polymers that support in vitro culture of endothelial cells but do not support the culture of smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. These materials may be promising for vascular biomaterials applications.

  9. Nylon-3 Polymers that Enable Selective Culture of Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Gellman, Samuel H.; Masters, Kristyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Substrates that selectively encourage the growth of specific cell types are valuable for the engineering of complex tissues. Some cell-selective peptides have been identified from extracellular matrix proteins; these peptides have proven useful for biomaterials-based approaches to tissue repair or regeneration. However, there are very few examples of synthetic materials that display selectivity in supporting cell growth. We describe nylon-3 polymers that support in vitro culture of endothelial cells, but do not support the culture of smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. These materials may be promising for vascular biomaterials applications. PMID:24156536

  10. Femtosecond laser machined microfluidic devices for imaging of cells during chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Costa, L; Terekhov, A; Rajput, D; Hofmeister, W; Jowhar, D; Wright, G; Janetopoulos, C

    2011-11-01

    Microfluidic devices designed for chemotaxis assays were fabricated on fused silica substrates using femtosecond laser micromachining. These devices have built-in chemical concentration gradient forming structures and are ideally suited for establishing passive diffusion gradients over extended periods of time. Multiple gradient forming structures, with identical or distinct gradient forming characteristics, can be integrated into a single device, and migrating cells can be directly observed using an inverted microscope. In this paper, the design, fabrication, and operation of these devices are discussed. Devices with minimal structure sizes ranging from 3 to 7 lm are presented. The use of these devices to investigate the migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells toward the chemoattractant folic acid is presented as an example of the devices' utility.

  11. Optofluidic Cell Selection from Complex Microbial Communities for Single-Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Zachary C.; Giovanonni, Stephen J.; Quake, Stephen R.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of single cells is emerging as a powerful approach for studies of heterogeneous cell populations. Indeed, the notion of homogeneous cell populations is receding as approaches to resolve genetic and phenotypic variation between single cells are applied throughout the life sciences. A key step in single-cell genomic analysis today is the physical isolation of individual cells from heterogeneous populations, particularly microbial populations, which often exhibit high diversity. Here, we detail the construction and use of instrumentation for optical trapping inside microfluidic devices to select individual cells for analysis by methods including nucleic acid sequencing. This approach has unique advantages for analyses of rare community members, cells with irregular morphologies, small quantity samples, and studies that employ advanced optical microscopy. PMID:24060116

  12. Modeling and simulation of speed selection on left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Tzallas, Alexandros T; Katertsidis, Nikolaos S; Karvounis, Evaggelos C; Tsipouras, Markos G; Rigas, George; Goletsis, Yorgos; Zielinski, Krzysztof; Fresiello, Libera; Molfetta, Arianna Di; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Terrovitis, John V; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-08-01

    The control problem for LVADs is to set pump speed such that cardiac output and pressure perfusion are within acceptable physiological ranges. However, current technology of LVADs cannot provide for a closed-loop control scheme that can make adjustments based on the patient's level of activity. In this context, the SensorART Speed Selection Module (SSM) integrates various hardware and software components in order to improve the quality of the patients' treatment and the workflow of the specialists. It enables specialists to better understand the patient-device interactions, and improve their knowledge. The SensorART SSM includes two tools of the Specialist Decision Support System (SDSS); namely the Suction Detection Tool and the Speed Selection Tool. A VAD Heart Simulation Platform (VHSP) is also part of the system. The VHSP enables specialists to simulate the behavior of a patient׳s circulatory system, using different LVAD types and functional parameters. The SDSS is a web-based application that offers specialists with a plethora of tools for monitoring, designing the best therapy plan, analyzing data, extracting new knowledge and making informative decisions. In this paper, two of these tools, the Suction Detection Tool and Speed Selection Tool are presented. The former allows the analysis of the simulations sessions from the VHSP and the identification of issues related to suction phenomenon with high accuracy 93%. The latter provides the specialists with a powerful support in their attempt to effectively plan the treatment strategy. It allows them to draw conclusions about the most appropriate pump speed settings. Preliminary assessments connecting the Suction Detection Tool to the VHSP are presented in this paper.

  13. High-Throughput Selective Capture of Single Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis at a Wireless Electrode Array.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Anand, Robbyn K

    2017-07-05

    We demonstrate continuous high-throughput selective capture of circulating tumor cells by dielectrophoresis at arrays of wireless electrodes (bipolar electrodes, BPEs). The use of BPEs removes the requirement of ohmic contact to individual array elements, thus enabling otherwise unattainable device formats. Capacitive charging of the electrical double layer at opposing ends of each BPE allows an AC electric field to be transmitted across the entire device. Here, two such designs are described and evaluated. In the first design, BPEs interconnect parallel microchannels. Pockets extruding from either side of the microchannels volumetrically control the number of cells captured at each BPE tip and enhance trapping. High-fidelity single-cell capture was achieved when the pocket dimensions were matched to those of the cells. A second, open design allows many non-targeted cells to pass through. These devices enable high-throughput capture of rare cells and single-cell analysis.

  14. Classification of cell types using a microfluidic device for mechanical and electrical measurement on single cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Tan, Qingyuan; Shojaei-Baghini, Ehsan; Zhang, Yan Liang; Li, Jason; Prasad, Preethy; You, Lidan; Wu, Xiao Yu; Sun, Yu

    2011-09-21

    This paper presents a microfluidic system for cell type classification using mechanical and electrical measurements on single cells. Cells are aspirated continuously through a constriction channel with cell elongations and impedance profiles measured simultaneously. The cell transit time through the constriction channel and the impedance amplitude ratio are quantified as cell's mechanical and electrical property indicators. The microfluidic device and measurement system were used to characterize osteoblasts (n=206) and osteocytes (n=217), revealing that osteoblasts, compared with osteocytes, have a larger cell elongation length (64.51 ± 14.98 μm vs. 39.78 ± 7.16 μm), a longer transit time (1.84 ± 1.48 s vs. 0.94 ± 1.07 s), and a higher impedance amplitude ratio (1.198 ± 0.071 vs. 1.099 ± 0.038). Pattern recognition using the neural network was applied to cell type classification, resulting in classification success rates of 69.8% (transit time alone), 85.3% (impedance amplitude ratio alone), and 93.7% (both transit time and impedance amplitude ratio as input to neural network) for osteoblasts and osteocytes. The system was also applied to test EMT6 (n=747) and EMT6/AR1.0 cells (n=770, EMT6 treated by doxorubicin) that have a comparable size distribution (cell elongation length: 51.47 ± 11.33 μm vs. 50.09 ± 9.70 μm). The effects of cell size on transit time and impedance amplitude ratio were investigated. Cell classification success rates were 51.3% (cell elongation alone), 57.5% (transit time alone), 59.6% (impedance amplitude ratio alone), and 70.2% (both transit time and impedance amplitude ratio). These preliminary results suggest that biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters, when used in combination, could provide a higher cell classification success rate than using electrical or mechanical parameter alone.

  15. Device Engineering Towards Improved Tin Sulfide Solar Cell Performance and Performance Reproducibility

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, Vera; Chakraborty, Rupak; Rekemeyer, Paul; Siol, Sebastian; Martinot, Loic; Polizzotti, Alex; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Gradecak, Silvija; Zakutayev, Andriy; Gordon, Roy G.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-11-21

    As novel absorber materials are developed and screened for their photovoltaic (PV) properties, the challenge remains to rapidly test promising candidates in high-performing PV devices. There is a need to engineer new compatible device architectures, including the development of novel transparent conductive oxides and buffer layers. Here, we consider the two approaches of a substrate-style and a superstrate-style device architecture for novel thin-film solar cells. We use tin sulfide as a test absorber material. Upon device engineering, we demonstrate new approaches to improve device performance and performance reproducibility.

  16. An Inverted Dielectrophoretic Device for Analysis of Attached Single Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Rebecca Lownes; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the force induced on a polarizable body by a non-uniform electric field, has been widely used to manipulate single cells in suspension and analyze their stiffness. However, most cell types do not naturally exist in suspension but instead require attachment to the tissue extracellular matrix in vivo. Cells alter their cytoskeletal structure when they attach to a substrate, which impacts cell stiffness. It is therefore critical to be able to measure mechanical properties of cells attached to a substrate. We present a novel inverted quadrupole dielectrophoretic device capable of measuring changes in the mechanics of single cells attached to a micropatterned polyacrylamide gel. The device is positioned over a cell of defined size, a directed DEP pushing force is applied, and cell centroid displacement is dynamically measured by optical microscopy. Using this device, single endothelial cells showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force following actin cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D. In addition, transformed mammary epithelial cell (MCF10A-NeuT) showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force compared to untransformed cells (MCF10A). DEP device measurements were confirmed by showing that the cells with greater centroid displacement also had a lower elastic modulus by atomic force microscopy. The current study demonstrates that an inverted DEP device can determine changes in single attached cell mechanics on varied substrates. PMID:26738543

  17. An inverted dielectrophoretic device for analysis of attached single cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lownes Urbano, Rebecca; Morss Clyne, Alisa

    2016-02-07

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the force induced on a polarizable body by a non-uniform electric field, has been widely used to manipulate single cells in suspension and analyze their stiffness. However, most cell types do not naturally exist in suspension but instead require attachment to the tissue extracellular matrix in vivo. Cells alter their cytoskeletal structure when they attach to a substrate, which impacts cell stiffness. It is therefore critical to be able to measure mechanical properties of cells attached to a substrate. We present a novel inverted quadrupole dielectrophoretic device capable of measuring changes in the mechanics of single cells attached to a micropatterned polyacrylamide gel. The device is positioned over a cell of defined size, a directed DEP pushing force is applied, and cell centroid displacement is dynamically measured by optical microscopy. Using this device, single endothelial cells showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force following actin cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D. In addition, transformed mammary epithelial cell (MCF10A-NeuT) showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force compared to untransformed cells (MCF10A). DEP device measurements were confirmed by showing that the cells with greater centroid displacement also had a lower elastic modulus by atomic force microscopy. The current study demonstrates that an inverted DEP device can determine changes in single attached cell mechanics on varied substrates.

  18. Feasibility study of using a Zener diode as the selection device for bipolar RRAM and WORM memory arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingtao; Fu, Liping; Tao, Chunlan; Jiang, Xinyu; Sun, Pengxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cross-bar arrays are usually used for the high density application of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices. However, cross-talk interference limits an increase in the integration density. In this paper, the Zener diode is proposed as a selection device to suppress the sneak current in bipolar RRAM arrays. Measurement results show that the Zener diode can act as a good selection device, and the sneak current can be effectively suppressed. The readout margin is sufficiently improved compared to that obtained without the selection device. Due to the improvement for the reading disturbance, the size of the cross-bar array can be enhanced to more than 103 × 103. Furthermore, the possibility of using a write-once-read-many-times (WORM) cross-bar array is also demonstrated by connecting the Zener diode and the bipolar RRAM in series. These results strongly suggest that using a Zener diode as a selection device opens up great opportunities to realize high density bipolar RRAM arrays.

  19. Spatial Chemical Stimulation Control in Microenvironment by Microfluidic Probe Integrated Device for Cell-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Horayama, Masayuki; Shinha, Kenta; Kabayama, Kazuya; Fujii, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Cell—cell interactions play an important role in the development and function of multicellular organisms. To investigate these interactions in detail, it is necessary to evaluate the behavior of a cell population when the minimum number of cells in the population is stimulated by some chemical factors. We propose a microfluidic device integrated with microfluidic probe (MFP) functionality; this device is capable of imparting a chemical stimulus to cells within a microenvironment, for cell-based assays. The device contains MFP channels at the walls of the cell culture microchannels, and it can control a localized chemical stimulation area at the scale of a single cell to a few cells using MFP fluid control in a microspace. The results of a finite element method-based simulation indicated that it is possible to control the chemical stimulation area at the scale of a single cell to a few cells by optimizing the MFP channel apex width and the flow ratio. In addition, localized cell staining was demonstrated successfully using a spatial chemical stimulus. We confirmed the device functionality as a novel cell-based assay tool. We succeeded in performing localized cell collection using this method, which suggested that the single cell analysis of a cell monolayer that is subjected to a specific chemical stimulus is possible. The method proposed in this paper can contribute significantly to the fields of cell biology and drug development. PMID:27930750

  20. Early effects of extracorporeal shock wave treatment on osteoblast-like cells: a comparative study between electromagnetic and electrohydraulic devices.

    PubMed

    Martini, Lucia; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Borsari, Veronica; Torricelli, Paola; Giardino, Roberto

    2006-11-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has been increasingly applied to treat orthopedic and musculoskeletal pathologies. ESWT involves mechanical perturbations that, as with other physical therapies, can result in mechanical stimuli to a large number of cells, including bone cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of shock waves on osteoblast-like cells (MG63) when using two different generators of shock waves (electrohydraulic and electromagnetic devices), in terms of cell damage, cell viability, osteogenic phenotype expression, and cytokine production. MG63 cells were suspended in 1.5 mL screw-cap cryotubes (1 x 10 cells/mL), containing phosphate buffer solution (PBS), which were maintained at 37 degrees C during all the experimental times. Two levels of energy flux density (EFD) were evaluated for each device: 0.15 to 0.18 mJ/mm2 and 0.40 mJ/mm2. Cells were then cultivated for 72 hours starting from a concentration of 1 x 10 cells/mL, and biological activity and viability were evaluated 24 and 72 hours after treatment. The results obtained demonstrate that the factors most affecting osteoblast activity involve both the device and the level of EFD selected, and they must be considered all together. The use of the electromagnetic device and a level of EFD lower than 0.40 mJ/mm2 would appear to induce fewer immediate cytodestructive effects and better stimulate subsequent proliferation and the synthetic activity of MG63.

  1. Selection of natural autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Richard R; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies produced by CD5+ B1 B cells include anti-thymocyte autoantibody (ATA). Transgenic mice bearing the Ig-μ heavy chain of a prototypic ATA, V(H)3609Vκ21c, demonstrated a critical requirement for self-antigen in the accumulation of ATA B cells and production of high levels of serum ATA. Further work with ATA-μκ transgenic mice revealed that, while development of most B cells were blocked at an immature stage in spleen, some mature ATA B cells were present. ATA-μκ transgenic mice with varying levels of Thy-1 autoantigen showed a clear relationship between BCR crosslinking and B cell fate, with low levels generating marginal zone ATA B cells and complete antigen absence allowing maturation to follicular ATA B cells. Finally, different fates of developing ATA B cells encountering high levels self-antigen may be accounted for by variations in the response of newly formed B cells arising from foetal and adult development.

  2. Device and morphological engineering of organic solar cells for enhanced charge transport and photovoltaic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Nirmal; Khatiwada, Devendra; Dubey, Ashish; Qiao, Qiquan

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated polymers are potential materials for photovoltaic applications due to their high absorption coefficient, mechanical flexibility, and solution-based processing for low-cost solar cells. A bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure made of donor-acceptor composite can lead to high charge transfer and power conversion efficiency. Active layer morphology is a key factor for device performance. Film formation processes (e.g., spray-coating, spin-coating, and dip-coating), post-treatment (e.g., annealing and UV ozone treatment), and use of additives are typically used to engineer the morphology, which optimizes physical properties, such as molecular configuration, miscibility, lateral and vertical phase separation. We will review electronic donor-acceptor interactions in conjugated polymer composites, the effect of processing parameters and morphology on solar cell performance, and charge carrier transport in polymer solar cells. This review provides the basis for selection of different processing conditions for optimized nanomorphology of active layers and reduced bimolecular recombination to enhance open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and fill factor of BHJ solar cells.

  3. DNA-SMART: Biopatterned Polymer Film Microchannels for Selective Immobilization of Proteins and Cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ann-Kathrin; Nikolov, Pavel M; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2017-02-22

    A novel SMART module, dubbed "DNA-SMART" (DNA substrate modification and replication by thermoforming) is reported, where polymer films are premodified with single-stranded DNA capture strands, microthermoformed into 3D structures, and postmodified with complementary DNA-protein conjugates to realize complex biologically active surfaces within microfluidic devices. As a proof of feasibility, it is demonstrated that microchannels presenting three different proteins on their inner curvilinear surface can be used for selective capture of cells under flow conditions.

  4. Characterization of a poly-epsilon-caprolactone polymeric drug delivery device built by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Leong, K F; Wiria, F E; Chua, C K; Li, S H

    2007-01-01

    Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), an established Rapid Prototyping (RP) process, is investigated for building controlled drug delivery devices (DDD). The drug and its matrix in a powder form were first mixed mechanically before being sintered on the SLS. Each cylindrical DDD is designed with a number of concentric rings separated from each other by a characteristic 'wall' created by the laser of the SLS. These rings act as diffusion obstacles to control the rate of release. Poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) was used as the matrix and Methylene Blue (MB) as the drug model. Samples were built, characterized and tested for homogeneity using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIR). Experimental results show that the matrices fabricated are not affected by sintering and the polymer and drug model are evenly distributed throughout the matrix. The initial burst effect has been reduced by the increase of the numbers of rings. The linear curve using the Higuchi equation confirmed that the DDD matrix release profile is by diffusion. These results show that the DDD matrix design has promising potential for application in controlled release drug delivery.

  5. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. PMID:26941065

  6. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-03-04

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi.

  7. Aberrant B cell selection and activation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kil, Laurens P; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2013-08-01

    The detrimental role of B lymphocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is evident from the high levels of pathogenic antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) found in SLE patients. Affirming this causative role, additional antibody-independent roles of B cells in SLE were appreciated. In recent years, many defects in B cell selection and activation have been identified in murine lupus models and SLE patients that explain the increased emergence and persistence of autoreactive B cells and their lowered activation threshold. Therefore, clinical trials with B cell depletion regimens in SLE patients were initiated but disappointingly the efficacy of B cell depleting agents proved to be limited. Remarkably however, a major breakthrough in SLE therapy was accomplished by blocking B cell survival factors rather then eliminating B cells. This surprising finding indicates that although SLE is a B cell-driven disease, the amplifying crosstalk between B cells and other cells of the immune system likely evokes the observed tolerance breakdown in B cells. Moreover, this implies that intelligent interception of pro-inflammatory loops rather then selectively silencing B cells will be key to the development of new SLE therapies. In this review, we will not only highlight the intrinsic B cell defects that facilitate the persistence of autoreactive B cells and their activation, but in addition we will focus on B cell extrinsic signals derived from T cells and innate immune cells that lower the activation threshold for B cells.

  8. Lessons learned: from dye-sensitized solar cells to all-solid-state hybrid devices.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Pablo; Guldin, Stefan; Leijtens, Tomas; Noel, Nakita K; Steiner, Ullrich; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-06-25

    The field of solution-processed photovoltaic cells is currently in its second spring. The dye-sensitized solar cell is a widely studied and longstanding candidate for future energy generation. Recently, inorganic absorber-based devices have reached new record efficiencies, with the benefits of all-solid-state devices. In this rapidly changing environment, this review sheds light on recent developments in all-solid-state solar cells in terms of electrode architecture, alternative sensitizers, and hole-transporting materials. These concepts are of general applicability to many next-generation device platforms.

  9. Synthetic mRNA devices that detect endogenous proteins and distinguish mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Shunsuke; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Nagaike, Takashi; Tomita, Kozo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Synthetic biology has great potential for future therapeutic applications including autonomous cell programming through the detection of protein signals and the production of desired outputs. Synthetic RNA devices are promising for this purpose. However, the number of available devices is limited due to the difficulty in the detection of endogenous proteins within a cell. Here, we show a strategy to construct synthetic mRNA devices that detect endogenous proteins in living cells, control translation and distinguish cell types. We engineered protein-binding aptamers that have increased stability in the secondary structures of their active conformation. The designed devices can efficiently respond to target proteins including human LIN28A and U1A proteins, while the original aptamers failed to do so. Moreover, mRNA delivery of an LIN28A-responsive device into human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) revealed that we can distinguish living hiPSCs and differentiated cells by quantifying endogenous LIN28A protein expression level. Thus, our endogenous protein-driven RNA devices determine live-cell states and program mammalian cells based on intracellular protein information. PMID:28525643

  10. Synthetic mRNA devices that detect endogenous proteins and distinguish mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Shunsuke; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Nagaike, Takashi; Tomita, Kozo; Saito, Hirohide

    2017-07-07

    Synthetic biology has great potential for future therapeutic applications including autonomous cell programming through the detection of protein signals and the production of desired outputs. Synthetic RNA devices are promising for this purpose. However, the number of available devices is limited due to the difficulty in the detection of endogenous proteins within a cell. Here, we show a strategy to construct synthetic mRNA devices that detect endogenous proteins in living cells, control translation and distinguish cell types. We engineered protein-binding aptamers that have increased stability in the secondary structures of their active conformation. The designed devices can efficiently respond to target proteins including human LIN28A and U1A proteins, while the original aptamers failed to do so. Moreover, mRNA delivery of an LIN28A-responsive device into human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) revealed that we can distinguish living hiPSCs and differentiated cells by quantifying endogenous LIN28A protein expression level. Thus, our endogenous protein-driven RNA devices determine live-cell states and program mammalian cells based on intracellular protein information. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Kwabi, D.; Akogwu, O.; Du, J.; Oyewole, O. K.; Tong, T.; Anye, V. C.; Rwenyagila, E.; Asare, J.; Fashina, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2014-08-21

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices.

  12. Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-07

    Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

  13. Endovascular biopsy: Technical feasibility of novel endothelial cell harvesting devices assessed in a rabbit aneurysm model.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Daniel L; Bauer, Diana; Sun, Zhengda; Stillson, Carol; Nelson, Jeffrey; Barry, David; Hetts, Steven W; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Su, Hua; Saeed, Maythem M

    2015-02-01

    The lack of safe and reliable methods to sample vascular tissue in situ limits discovery of the underlying genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms of many vascular disorders, including aneurysms. We investigated the feasibility and comparable efficacy of in vivo vascular endothelial cell sampling using a spectrum of endovascular devices. Using the rabbit elastase carotid aneurysm model we evaluated the performance of existing aneurysmal coils, intracranial stents, and stent-like devices to collect vascular endothelial cells. Additionally, we modified a subset of devices to assess the effects of alterations to coil pitch, coil wire contour, and stent surface finishing. Device performance was evaluated by (1) the number of viable endothelial cells harvested, (2) the degree of vascular wall damage analyzed using digital subtraction angiography and histopathological analysis, and (3) the ease of device navigability and retrieval. Isolated cells underwent immunohistochemical analysis to confirm cell type and viability. Coil and stent specifications, technique, and endothelial cell counts were tabulated and statistical analysis performed. Using conventional detachable-type and modified aneurysm coils 11 of 14 (78.6%) harvested endothelial cells with a mean of 7.93 (±8.33) cells/coil, while 15 of 15 (100%) conventional stents, stent-like devices and modified stents harvested endothelial cells with a mean of 831.33 (±887.73) cells/device. Coil stiffness was significantly associated with endothelial cell count in univariate analysis (p = 0.044). For stents and stent-like devices univariate analysis demonstrated stent-to-aorta diameter ratios (p = 0.001), stent length (p = 0.049), and the use of a pulling retrieval technique (p = 0.019) significantly predictive of endothelial cell counts, though a multivariate model using these variables demonstrated only the stent-to-aorta diameter ratio (p = 0.029) predictive of endothelial cell counts. Modified

  14. Endovascular biopsy: Technical feasibility of novel endothelial cell harvesting devices assessed in a rabbit aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Diana; Sun, Zhengda; Stillson, Carol; Nelson, Jeffrey; Barry, David; Hetts, Steven W; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Su, Hua; Saeed, Maythem M

    2015-01-01

    The lack of safe and reliable methods to sample vascular tissue in situ limits discovery of the underlying genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms of many vascular disorders, including aneurysms. We investigated the feasibility and comparable efficacy of in vivo vascular endothelial cell sampling using a spectrum of endovascular devices. Using the rabbit elastase carotid aneurysm model we evaluated the performance of existing aneurysmal coils, intracranial stents, and stent-like devices to collect vascular endothelial cells. Additionally, we modified a subset of devices to assess the effects of alterations to coil pitch, coil wire contour, and stent surface finishing. Device performance was evaluated by (1) the number of viable endothelial cells harvested, (2) the degree of vascular wall damage analyzed using digital subtraction angiography and histopathological analysis, and (3) the ease of device navigability and retrieval. Isolated cells underwent immunohistochemical analysis to confirm cell type and viability. Coil and stent specifications, technique, and endothelial cell counts were tabulated and statistical analysis performed. Using conventional detachable-type and modified aneurysm coils 11 of 14 (78.6%) harvested endothelial cells with a mean of 7.93 (±8.33) cells/coil, while 15 of 15 (100%) conventional stents, stent-like devices and modified stents harvested endothelial cells with a mean of 831.33 (±887.73) cells/device. Coil stiffness was significantly associated with endothelial cell count in univariate analysis (p = 0.044). For stents and stent-like devices univariate analysis demonstrated stent-to-aorta diameter ratios (p = 0.001), stent length (p = 0.049), and the use of a pulling retrieval technique (p = 0.019) significantly predictive of endothelial cell counts, though a multivariate model using these variables demonstrated only the stent-to-aorta diameter ratio (p = 0.029) predictive of endothelial cell counts. Modified

  15. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1994-08-09

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  16. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Feikert, John H.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  17. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Feikert, John H.; Kachmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  18. A cost effective 5΄ selective single cell transcriptome profiling approach with improved UMI design

    PubMed Central

    Arguel, Marie-Jeanne; LeBrigand, Kevin; Paquet, Agnès; Ruiz García, Sandra; Zaragosi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Waldmann, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Single cell RNA sequencing approaches are instrumental in studies of cell-to-cell variability. 5΄ selective transcriptome profiling approaches allow simultaneous definition of the transcription start size and have advantages over 3΄ selective approaches which just provide internal sequences close to the 3΄ end. The only currently existing 5΄ selective approach requires costly and labor intensive fragmentation and cell barcoding after cDNA amplification. We developed an optimized 5΄ selective workflow where all the cell indexing is done prior to fragmentation. With our protocol, cell indexing can be performed in the Fluidigm C1 microfluidic device, resulting in a significant reduction of cost and labor. We also designed optimized unique molecular identifiers that show less sequence bias and vulnerability towards sequencing errors resulting in an improved accuracy of molecule counting. We provide comprehensive experimental workflows for Illumina and Ion Proton sequencers that allow single cell sequencing in a cost range comparable to qPCR assays. PMID:27940562

  19. Microfluidic Device for the Selective Chemical Stimulation of Neurons and Characterization of Peptide Release with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are synthesized in and released from neurons and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including temperature homeostasis, learning, memory, and disease. When working with sparse neuronal networks, the ability to collect and characterize small sample volumes is important as neurons often release only a small proportion of their mass-limited content. Microfluidic systems are well suited for the study of neuropeptides. They offer the ability to control and manipulate the extracellular environment and small sample volumes, thereby reducing the dilution of peptides following release. We present an approach for the culture and stimulation of a neuronal network within a microfluidic device, subsequent collection of the released peptides, and their detection via mass spectrometry. The system employs microvalve-controlled stimulation channels to selectively stimulate a low-density neuronal culture, allowing us to determine the temporal onset of peptide release. Released peptides from the well-characterized, peptidergic bag cell neurons of Aplysia californica were collected and their temporal pattern of release was characterized with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We show a robust difference in the timing of release for chemical solutions containing elevated K+ (7 ± 3 min), when compared to insulin (19 ± 7 min) (p < 0.000 01). PMID:23004687

  20. Durable left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure: Patient selection and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sachin P.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing adoption of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) into clinical practice is related to a combination of engineering advances in pump technology and improvements in understanding the appropriate clinical use of these devices in the management of patients with advanced heart failure. This review intends to assist the clinician in identifying candidates for LVAD implantation, to examine long-term outcomes and provide an overview of the common complications related to use of these devices. PMID:27056652

  1. A Microfluidic Device to Sort Cells Based on Dynamic Response to a Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Mathuru, Ajay Sriram; Burkholder, William F.; Jesuthasan, Suresh J.

    2013-01-01

    Single cell techniques permit the analysis of cellular properties that are obscured by studying the average behavior of cell populations. One way to determine how gene expression contributes to phenotypic differences among cells is to combine functional analysis with transcriptional profiling of single cells. Here we describe a microfluidic device for monitoring the responses of single cells to a ligand and then collecting cells of interest for transcriptional profiling or other assays. As a test, cells from the olfactory epithelium of zebrafish were screened by calcium imaging to identify sensory neurons that were responsive to the odorant L-lysine. Single cells were subsequently recovered for transcriptional profiling by qRT-PCR. Responsive cells all expressed TRPC2 but not OMP, consistent with known properties of amino-acid sensitive olfactory neurons. The device can be adapted for other areas in biology where there is a need to sort and analyze cells based on their signaling responses. PMID:24250795

  2. InAlAs photovoltaic cell design for high device efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Brittany L.; Bittner, Zachary S.; Hellstroem, Staffan D.; ...

    2017-04-17

    This study presents a new design for a single-junction InAlAs solar cell, which reduces parasitic absorption losses from the low band-gap contact layer while maintaining a functional window layer by integrating a selective etch stop. The etch stop is then removed prior to depositing an anti-reflective coating. The final cell had a 17.9% efficiency under 1-sun AM1.5 with an anti-reflective coating. Minority carrier diffusion lengths were extracted from external quantum efficiency data using physics-based device simulation software yielding 170 nm in the n-type emitter and 4.6 um in the p-type base, which is more than four times the diffusion lengthmore » previously reported for a p-type InAlAs base. In conclusion, this report represents significant progress towards a high-performance InAlAs top cell for a triple-junction design lattice-matched to InP.« less

  3. Single-cell cloning and expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells by a microfluidic culture device.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Taku; Tatsumi, Kazuya; Noda, Yuichiro; Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Okonogi, Atsuhito; Hirano, Kunio; Li, Liu; Osumi, Takashi; Tada, Takashi; Kotera, Hidetoshi

    2014-10-10

    The microenvironment of cells, which includes basement proteins, shear stress, and extracellular stimuli, should be taken into consideration when examining physiological cell behavior. Although microfluidic devices allow cellular responses to be analyzed with ease at the single-cell level, few have been designed to recover cells. We herein demonstrated that a newly developed microfluidic device helped to improve culture conditions and establish a clonality-validated human pluripotent stem cell line after tracing its growth at the single-cell level. The device will be a helpful tool for capturing various cell types in the human body that have not yet been established in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A cell sorting and trapping microfluidic device with an interdigital channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jing; Qiao, Yi; Xu, Minghua; Li, Junji; Liang, Fupeng; Duan, Mengqin; Ju, An; Lu, Zuhong

    2016-12-01

    The growing interest in cell sorting and trapping is driving the demand for high performance technologies. Using labeling techniques or external forces, cells can be identified by a series of methods. However, all of these methods require complicated systems with expensive devices. Based on inherent differences in cellular morphology, cells can be sorted by specific structures in microfluidic devices. The weir filter is a basic and efficient cell sorting and trapping structure. However, in some existing weir devices, because of cell deformability and high flow velocity in gaps, trapped cells may become stuck or even pass through the gaps. Here, we designed and fabricated a microfluidic device with interdigital channels for cell sorting and trapping. The chip consisted of a sheet of silicone elastomer polydimethylsiloxane and a sheet of glass. A square-wave-like weir was designed in the middle of the channel, comprising the interdigital channels. The square-wave pattern extended the weir length by three times with the channel width remaining constant. Compared with a straight weir, this structure exhibited a notably higher trapping capacity. Interdigital channels provided more space to slow down the rate of the pressure decrease, which prevented the cells from becoming stuck in the gaps. Sorting a mixture K562 and blood cells to trap cells demonstrated the efficiency of the chip with the interdigital channel to sort and trap large and less deformable cells. With stable and efficient cell sorting and trapping abilities, the chip with an interdigital channel may be widely applied in scientific research fields.

  5. Reliability Through Life of Internal Protection Devices in Small-Cell ABSL Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Ng, Ka Lok; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Rao, gopal

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a reliability analysis of small cell protection batteries. The contents include: 1) The s-p Topology; 2) Cell Level Protection Devices; 3) Battery Level Fault Protection; 4) Large Cell Comparison; and 5) Battery Level Testing and Results.

  6. Integrated microfluidic devices for combinatorial cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Takahashi, Hiroko; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Wang, Xiaopu; He, George Wenfu; Silverman, Robert; Radu, Caius G; Witte, Owen N; Lee, Ki-Bum; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-06-01

    The development of miniaturized cell culture platforms for performing parallel cultures and combinatorial assays is important in cell biology from the single-cell level to the system level. In this paper we developed an integrated microfluidic cell-culture platform, Cell-microChip (Cell-microChip), for parallel analyses of the effects of microenvironmental cues (i.e., culture scaffolds) on different mammalian cells and their cellular responses to external stimuli. As a model study, we demonstrated the ability of culturing and assaying several mammalian cells, such as NIH 3T3 fibroblast, B16 melanoma and HeLa cell lines, in a parallel way. For functional assays, first we tested drug-induced apoptotic responses from different cell lines. As a second functional assay, we performed "on-chip" transfection of a reporter gene encoding an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) followed by live-cell imaging of transcriptional activation of cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) expression. Collectively, our Cell-microChip approach demonstrated the capability to carry out parallel operations and the potential to further integrate advanced functions and applications in the broader space of combinatorial chemistry and biology.

  7. Fabrication of porous polymeric matrix drug delivery devices using the selective laser sintering technique.

    PubMed

    Leong, K F; Phua, K K; Chua, C K; Du, Z H; Teo, K O

    2001-01-01

    New techniques in solid freeform fabrication (SFF) have prompted research into methods of manufacturing and controlling porosity. The strategy of this research is to integrate computer aided design (CAD) and the SFF technique of selective laser sintering (SLS) to fabricate porous polymeric matrix drug delivery devices (DDDs). This study focuses on the control of the porosity of a matrix by manipulating the SLS process parameters of laser beam power and scan speed. Methylene blue dye is used as a drug model to infiltrate the matrices via a degassing method; visual inspection of dye penetration into the matrices is carried out. Most notably, the laser power matrices show a two-stage penetration process. The matrices are sectioned along the XZ planes and viewed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphologies of the samples reveal a general increase in channel widths as laser power decreases and scan speed increases. The fractional release profiles of the matrices are determined by allowing the dye to diffuse out in vitro within a controlled environment. The results show that laser power and scan speed matrices deliver the dye for 8-9 days and have an evenly distributed profile. Mercury porosimetry is used to analyse the porosity of the matrices. Laser power matrices show a linear relationship between porosity and variation in parameter values. However, the same relationship for scan speed matrices turns out to be rather inconsistent. Relationships between the SLS parameters and the experimental results are developed using the fractional release rate equation for the infinite slab porous matrix DDD as a basis for correlation.

  8. Selective cytopheretic inhibitory device with regional citrate anticoagulation and portable sorbent dialysis.

    PubMed

    Pino, Christopher J; Farokhrani, Amin; Lou, Liandi; Smith, Peter L; Johnston, Kimberly; Buffington, Deborah A; Humes, H David

    2013-02-01

    Selective cytopheretic inhibitory device (SCD) therapy is an immunomodulatory treatment provided by a synthetic biomimetic membrane in an extracorporeal circuit, which has shown promise in preclinical large animal models of severe sepsis as well as in clinical trials treating patients with acute kidney injury and multiple organ failure. During SCD therapy, citrate is administered to lower ionized calcium levels in blood for anticoagulation and inhibition of leukocyte activation. Historically, citrate has been known to interfere with sorbent dialysis, therefore, posing a potential issue for the use of SCD therapy with a portable dialysis system. This sorbent dialysis SCD (sorbent SCD) would be well suited for battlefield and natural disaster applications where the water supply for standard dialysis is limited, and the types of injuries in those settings would benefit from SCD therapy. In order to explore the compatibility of sorbent and SCD technologies, a uremic porcine model was tested with the Allient sorbent dialysis system (Renal Solutions Incorporated, Fresenius Medical Care, Warrendale, PA, USA) and concurrent SCD therapy with regional citrate anticoagulation. The hypothesis to be assessed was whether the citrate load required by the SCD could be metabolized prior to recirculation from systemic blood back into the therapeutic circuit. Despite the fact that the sorbent SCD maintained urea clearance without any adverse hematologic events, citrate load for SCD therapy caused an interaction with the sorbent column resulting in elevated, potentially toxic aluminum levels in dialysate and in systemic blood. Alternative strategies to implement sorbent-SCD therapy will be required, including development of alternate urease-sorbent column binding chemistry or further changes to the sorbent-SCD therapeutic circuit along with determining the minimum citrate concentration required for efficacious SCD treatment.

  9. Low density cell culture of locust neurons in closed-channel microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Göbbels, Katrin; Thiebes, Anja Lena; van Ooyen, André; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Bräunig, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Microfluidic channel systems were fabricated out of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and used as culture vessels for primary culture of neurons from locust thoracic ganglia. In a biocompatibility study it was shown that cell adhesion and neuronal cell growth of locust neurons on uncoated PDMS was restricted. Coating with concanavalin A improved cell adhesion. In closed-channel microfluidic devices neurons were grown in static-bath culture conditions for more than 15 days. Cell densities of up to 20 cells/channel were not exceeded in low-density cultures but we also found optimal cell growth of single neurons inside individual channels. The first successful cultivation of insect neurons in closed-channel microfluidic devices provides a prerequisite for the development of low density neuronal networks on multi electrode arrays combined with microfluidic devices.

  10. Selectable-Tip Corrosion-Testing Electrochemical Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomness, Janice; Hintze, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts aspects of an electrochemical cell for pitting- corrosion tests of material specimens. The cell is designed to generate a region of corrosion having a pit diameter determined by the diameter of a selectable tip. The average depth of corrosion is controlled by controlling the total electric charge passing through the cell in a test. The cell is also designed to produce minimal artifacts associated with crevice corrosion. There are three selectable tips, having diameters of 0.1 in. (0.254 cm), 0.3 in. (0.762 cm), and 0.6 in. (1.524 cm), respectively.

  11. T cell depleted haploidentical transplantation: positive selection.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco

    2011-06-22

    Interest in mismatched transplantation arises from the fact that a suitable one-haplotype mismatched donor is immediately available for virtually all patients, particularly for those who urgently need an allogenic transplant. Work on one haplotype-mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years all over the world and novel transplant techniques have been developed. Some centres have focused on the conditioning regimens and post transplant immune suppression; others have concentrated on manipulating the graft which may be a megadose of extensively T celldepleted or unmanipulated progenitor cells. Excellent engraftment rates are associated with a very low incidence of acute and chronic GVHD and regimen-related mortality even in patients who are over 50 years old. Overall, event-free survival and transplant-related mortality compare favourably with reports on transplants from sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling.

  12. High-throughput microfluidic device for single cell analysis using multiple integrated soft lithographic pumps.

    PubMed

    Patabadige, Damith E W; Mickleburgh, Tom; Ferris, Lorin; Brummer, Gage; Culbertson, Anne H; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2016-05-01

    The ability to accurately control fluid transport in microfluidic devices is key for developing high-throughput methods for single cell analysis. Making small, reproducible changes to flow rates, however, to optimize lysis and injection using pumps external to the microfluidic device are challenging and time-consuming. To improve the throughput and increase the number of cells analyzed, we have integrated previously reported micropumps into a microfluidic device that can increase the cell analysis rate to ∼1000 cells/h and operate for over an hour continuously. In order to increase the flow rates sufficiently to handle cells at a higher throughput, three sets of pumps were multiplexed. These pumps are simple, low-cost, durable, easy to fabricate, and biocompatible. They provide precise control of the flow rate up to 9.2 nL/s. These devices were used to automatically transport, lyse, and electrophoretically separate T-Lymphocyte cells loaded with Oregon green and 6-carboxyfluorescein. Peak overlap statistics predicted the number of fully resolved single-cell electropherograms seen. In addition, there was no change in the average fluorescent dye peak areas indicating that the cells remained intact and the dyes did not leak out of the cells over the 1 h analysis time. The cell lysate peak area distribution followed that expected of an asynchronous steady-state population of immortalized cells.

  13. The strategic role of the nurse in the selection of IV devices.

    PubMed

    Santolim, Thais Queiroz; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; Giovani, Arlete Mazzini Miranda; Dias, Vanessa Cristina

    Use of vascular devices represents one of the most common procedures used as a complementary measure in the treatment of patients. An indication algorithm was established to serve as a guideline for nurses in choosing the best intravenous device, considering the main variables of drug therapy. A protocol approved by the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (IOT-HCFMUSP), where the authors work, was subsequently established and the nurse carried out the evaluation for the indication of both the peripheral device and the central device, whether a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) or other device inserted by the physician. As a result, there was a decrease in the incidence of phlebitis from 0.77% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2011, with an annual curve of negative tendency. The nursing team also appeared more satisfied, diminishing stress related to puncture failure.

  14. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  15. Development path and current status of the NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Waseem Khan; Padgen, Michael R.; Williams, James K.; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John; Castracane, James

    2011-02-01

    Cancer cells create a unique microenvironment in vivo which enables migration to distant organs. To better understand the tumor microenvironment, special tools and devices are required to monitor the interactions between different cell types and the effects of particular chemical gradients. This study presents the design and optimization of a new, versatile chemotaxis device called the NANIVID (NANo IntraVital Device). The device is fabricated using BioMEMS techniques and consists of etched and bonded Pyrex substrates, a soluble factor reservoir, fluorescent tracking beads and a microelectrode array for cell quantification. The reservoir contains a customized hydrogel blend loaded with EGF which diffuses out of the hydrogel to create a chemotactic gradient. This reservoir sustains a steady release of growth factor into the surrounding environment for many hours and establishes a concentration gradient that attracts specific cells to the device. In addition to a cell collection tool, the NANIVID can be modified to act as a delivery vehicle for the local generation of alternate soluble factor gradients to initiate controlled changes to the microenvironment such as hypoxia, ECM stiffness and etc. The focus of this study is to design and optimize the new device for wide ranging studies of breast cancer cell dynamics in vitro and ultimately, implantation for in vivo work.

  16. The Difficult Airway Society 'ADEPT' guidance on selecting airway devices: the basis of a strategy for equipment evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Popat, M T; Cook, T M; Wilkes, A R; Groom, P; Cooke, H; Kapila, A; O'Sullivan, E

    2011-08-01

    Faced with the concern that an increasing number of airway management devices were being introduced into clinical practice with little or no prior evidence of their clinical efficacy or safety, the Difficult Airway Society formed a working party (Airway Device Evaluation Project Team) to establish a process by which the airway management community within the profession could itself lead a process of formal device/equipment evaluation. Although there are several national and international regulations governing which products can come on to the market and be legitimately sold, there has hitherto been no formal professional guidance relating to how products should be selected (i.e. purchased). The Airway Device Evaluation Project Team's first task was to formulate such advice, emphasising evidence-based principles. Team discussions led to a definition of the minimum level of evidence needed to make a pragmatic decision about the purchase or selection of an airway device. The Team concluded that this definition should form the basis of a professional standard, guiding those with responsibility for selecting airway devices. We describe how widespread adoption of this professional standard can act as a driver to create an infrastructure in which the required evidence can be obtained. Essential elements are that: (i) the Difficult Airway Society facilitates a coherent national network of research-active units; and (ii) individual anaesthetists in hospital trusts play a more active role in local purchasing decisions, applying the relevant evidence and communicating their purchasing decisions to the Difficult Airway Society. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Effect of channel geometry on cell adhesion in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Green, James V; Kniazeva, Tatiana; Abedi, Mehdi; Sokhey, Darshan S; Taslim, Mohammad E; Murthy, Shashi K

    2009-03-07

    Microfluidic channels coated with ligands are a versatile platform for the separation or enrichment of cells from small sample volumes. This adhesion-based mode of separation is mediated by ligand-receptor bonds between the cells and channel surface and also by fluid shear stress. This paper demonstrates how aspects of microchannel geometry can play an additional role in controlling cell adhesion. With a combination of computational fluid dynamics modeling and cell adhesion experiments, channels with sharp turns are shown to have regions with near-zero velocity at the turn regions where large numbers of cells adhere or become collected. The lack of uniform adhesion in the turn regions compared to other regions of these channels, together with the large variability in observed cell adhesion indicates that channels with sharp turns are not optimal for cell-capture applications where predictable cell adhesion is desired. Channels with curved turns, on the other hand are shown to provide more uniform and predictable cell adhesion provided the gap between parallel arms of the channels is sufficiently wide. The magnitude of cell adhesion in these curved channels is comparable to that in straight channels with no turns.

  18. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    examined the ability of each E1A mutant to induce p53. Cells expressing full-length E1A dis - played a 20- to 30-fold increase in steady-state p53...retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, and inac- tivation of both is essential for viral transformation (Lane and Crawford 1979; Linzer and Levine 1979; De- Caprio et al...Western blotting. Despite the fact that wild-type MEFs expressing El A dis - played an -10-fold increase in p53 and Mdm2 levels as compared to their Ai?F

  19. Endothelial Cell Culture Under Perfusion On A Polyester-Toner Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Leão, Paulo Augusto Gomes Carneiro; Souza, Fayene Zeferino Ribeiro de; Afonso, Ana; Vieira Alberice, Juliana; Cappelini, Luciana Teresa Dias; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2017-09-05

    This study presents an inexpensive and easy way to produce a microfluidic device that mimics a blood vessel, serving as a start point for cell culture under perfusion, cardiovascular research, and toxicological studies. Endpoint assays (i.e., MTT reduction and NO assays) were used and revealed that the components making up the microchip, which is made of polyester and toner (PT), did not induce cell death or nitric oxide (NO) production. Applying oxygen plasma and fibronectin improved the adhesion and proliferation endothelial cell along the microchannel. As expected, these treatments showed an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) concentration profiles, which is correlated with adherence and cell proliferation, thus promoting endothelialization of the device for neovascularization. Regardless the simplicity of the device, our "vein-on-a-chip" mimetic has a potential to serve as a powerful tool for those that demand a rapid microfabrication method in cell biology or organ-on-a-chip research.

  20. Highly sensitive and selective odorant sensor using living cells expressing insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Nobuo; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a highly sensitive and selective chemical sensor using living cells (Xenopus laevis oocytes) within a portable fluidic device. We constructed an odorant sensor whose sensitivity is a few parts per billion in solution and can simultaneously distinguish different types of chemicals that have only a slight difference in double bond isomerism or functional group such as ─OH, ─CHO and ─C(═O)─. We developed a semiautomatic method to install cells to the fluidic device and achieved stable and reproducible odorant sensing. In addition, we found that the sensor worked for multiple-target chemicals and can be integrated with a robotic system without any noise reduction systems. Our developed sensor is compact and easy to replace in the system. We believe that the sensor can potentially be incorporated into a portable system for monitoring environmental and physical conditions. PMID:20798064

  1. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yung-Shin

    2016-06-15

    Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading) inlet and the parallel (in-line) inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies.

  2. The C5 Unit: a semi-automatic cell culture device suitable for experiments under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Vens, C; Kump, B; Münstermann, B; Heinlein, U A

    1996-06-27

    This paper presents data on a novel, semi-automatic cell culturing device called 'C5 Unit' (connectable circuit cell culture chamber) which was developed and adapted to the quality and size criteria set by the characteristics of the ESA Biorack. The suitability of the hardware for culturing cells under microgravity conditions was demonstrated by successful culture of primary mouse cells from neonatal cerebellum and testis aboard the Space Shuttle during the IML-2 mission.

  3. Highly selective biomechanical separation of cancer cells from leukocytes using microfluidic ratchets and hydrodynamic concentrator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bill K; McFaul, Sarah M; Jin, Chao; Black, Peter C; Ma, Hongshen

    2013-01-01

    The separation of cells based on their biomechanical properties, such as size and deformability, is important in applications such as the identification of circulating tumor cells, where morphological differences can be used to distinguish target cancer cells from contaminant leukocytes. Existing filtration-based separation processes are limited in their selectivity and their ability to extract the separated cells because of clogging in the filter microstructures. We present a cell separation device consisting of a hydrodynamic concentrator and a microfluidic ratchet mechanism operating in tandem. The hydrodynamic concentrator removes the majority of the fluid and a fraction of leukocytes based on size, while the microfluidic ratchet mechanism separates cancer cells from leukocytes based on a combination of size and deformability. The irreversible ratcheting process enables highly selective separation and robust extraction of separated cells. Using cancer cells spiked into leukocyte suspensions, the complete system demonstrated a yield of 97%, while enriching the concentration of target cancer cells 3000 fold relative to the concentration of leukocytes.

  4. Highly selective biomechanical separation of cancer cells from leukocytes using microfluidic ratchets and hydrodynamic concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bill K.; McFaul, Sarah M.; Jin, Chao; Black, Peter C.; Ma, Hongshen

    2013-01-01

    The separation of cells based on their biomechanical properties, such as size and deformability, is important in applications such as the identification of circulating tumor cells, where morphological differences can be used to distinguish target cancer cells from contaminant leukocytes. Existing filtration-based separation processes are limited in their selectivity and their ability to extract the separated cells because of clogging in the filter microstructures. We present a cell separation device consisting of a hydrodynamic concentrator and a microfluidic ratchet mechanism operating in tandem. The hydrodynamic concentrator removes the majority of the fluid and a fraction of leukocytes based on size, while the microfluidic ratchet mechanism separates cancer cells from leukocytes based on a combination of size and deformability. The irreversible ratcheting process enables highly selective separation and robust extraction of separated cells. Using cancer cells spiked into leukocyte suspensions, the complete system demonstrated a yield of 97%, while enriching the concentration of target cancer cells 3000 fold relative to the concentration of leukocytes. PMID:24404034

  5. Pre-analytical stability of selected benzodiazepines on a polymeric oral fluid sampling device.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Jürgen; Wuske, Thomas; Schubert, Rolf; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2009-04-15

    Oral fluid field tests are designed to provide preliminary results with a high grade of reliability in order to meet analytical and forensic standards. Some test systems additionally offer the possibility of an independent confirmatory analysis of a test sample. The pre-analytical stability of 11 frequently abused benzodiazepines on an oral fluid collecting device (Dräger DCD 5000) has been investigated. The collection device was designed to complement a special mobile testing system (Dräger DrugTest 5000) to be sent to a laboratory for further confirmatory analysis. Blank oral fluid pool was spiked with a mixture of eleven frequently abused benzodiazepines and given onto a collection device. To simulate possible sample shipping, the collection devices were stored in the dark up to 14 days at ambient temperature in a plastic tube. The collection device was simultaneously stored without further treatment after oral fluid collection ('native') and with addition of 950muL of methanol, respectively. At different storage intervals repeat determination was carried out for every sample using a modified version of our standard LC-MS/MS method for the detection of benzodiazepines in serum. Different recoveries of benzodiazepines due to degradation and/or adsorption to the collection device during the 14 days of 'native' storage were found. Major loss of analytes was found for benzodiazepines containing a nitro-group such as flunitrazepam and clonazepam. This could be prevented almost completely by methanolic storage of the collection device after sampling. Therefore, we recommend the centrifugation of the collection device and separation from the polymer unit prior to sample shipping. If this should not be possible, addition of methanol immediately after sample collection can be used to avoid degradation of benzodiazepines during shipment.

  6. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  7. Evaluation of a portable recording device (ApneaLink) for case selection of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lowe, Alan A; Bai, Yuxing; Hamilton, Peter; Fleetham, John A; Almeida, Fernanda R

    2009-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of a portable sleep apnea recording device (ApneaLink) using standard polysomnography (PSG) as a reference and to evaluate the possibility of using the ApneaLink as a case selection technique for patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Fifty patients (mean age 48.7 +/- 12.6 years, 32 males) were recruited during a 4-week period. A simultaneous recording of both the standard in-laboratory PSG and an ambulatory level 4 sleep monitor (ApneaLink) was performed during an overnight study for each patient. PSG sleep and respiratory events were scored manually according to standard criteria. ApneaLink data were analyzed either with the automated computerized algorithm provided by the manufacturer following the American Academy of Sleep Medicine standards (default setting DFAL) or The University of British Columbia Hospital sleep laboratory standards (alternative setting, ATAL). The ApneaLink respiratory disturbance indices (RDI), PSG apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI), and PSG oxygen desaturation index (ODI) were compared. The mean PSG-AHI was 30.0 +/- 25.8 events per hour. The means of DFAL-RDI and ATAL-RDI were 23.8 +/- 21.9 events per hour and 29.5 +/- 22.2 events per hour, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.958 between PSG-AHI and DFAL-RDI and 0.966 between PSG-AHI and ATAL-RDI. Receiver operator characteristic curves were constructed using a variety of PSG-AHI cutoff values (5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 events per hour). Optimal combinations of sensitivity and specificity for the various cutoffs were 97.7/66.7, 95.0/90.0, 87.5/88.9, 88.0/88.0, and 88.2/93.9, respectively for the default setting. The ApneaLink demonstrated the best agreement with laboratory PSG data at cutoffs of AHI >or= 10. There were no significant differences among PSG-AHI, DFAL-RDI, and ATAL-RDI when all subjects were considered as one group. ODI at 2%, 3%, and 4% desaturation levels showed significant

  8. One step antibody-mediated isolation and patterning of multiple cell types in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bavli, Danny; Ezra, Elishai; Kitsberg, Daniel; Murthy, Shashi K.; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions play a key role in regeneration, differentiation, and basic tissue function taking place under physiological shear forces. However, current solutions to mimic such interactions by micro-patterning cells within microfluidic devices have low resolution, high fabrication complexity, and are limited to one or two cell types. Here, we present a microfluidic platform capable of laminar patterning of any biotin-labeled peptide using streptavidin-based surface chemistry. The design permits the generation of arbitrary cell patterns from heterogeneous mixtures in microfluidic devices. We demonstrate the robust co-patterning of α-CD24, α-ASGPR-1, and α-Tie2 antibodies for rapid isolation and co-patterning of mixtures of hepatocytes and endothelial cells. In addition to one-step isolation and patterning, our design permits step-wise patterning of multiple cell types and empty spaces to create complex cellular geometries in vitro. In conclusion, we developed a microfluidic device that permits the generation of perfusable tissue-like patterns in microfluidic devices by directly injecting complex cell mixtures such as differentiated stem cells or tissue digests with minimal sample preparation. PMID:27051469

  9. Device localization and dynamic scan plane selection using a wireless MRI detector array

    PubMed Central

    Riffe, Matthew J.; Yutzy, Stephen R.; Jiang, Yun; Twieg, Michael D.; Blumenthal, Colin J.; Hsu, Daniel P.; Pan, Li; Gilson, Wesley D.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Flask, Christopher A.; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Nakamoto, Dean; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A prototype wireless guidance device using single sideband amplitude modulation (SSB) is presented for a 1.5T MRI system. Methods The device contained three fiducial markers each mounted to an independent receiver coil equipped with wireless SSB technology. Acquiring orthogonal projections of these markers determined the position and orientation of the device, which was used to define the scan plane for a subsequent image acquisition. Device localization and scan plane update required approximately 30 ms, so it could be interleaved with high temporal resolution imaging. Since the wireless device is used for localization and doesn’t require full imaging capability, the design of the SSB wireless system was simplified by allowing an asynchronous clock between the transmitter and receiver. Results When coupled to a high readout bandwidth, the error caused by the lack of a shared frequency reference was quantified to be less than one pixel (0.78 mm) in the projection acquisitions. Image-guidance with the prototype was demonstrated with a phantom where a needle was successfully guided to a target and contrast was delivered. Conclusion The feasibility of active tracking with a wireless detector array is demonstrated. Wireless arrays could be incorporated into devices to assist in image-guided procedures. PMID:23900921

  10. A microwell array device capable of measuring single-cell oxygen consumption rates

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Suchorolski, Martin T.; Strovas, Tim J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Due to interest in cell population heterogeneity, the development of new technology and methodologies for studying single cells has dramatically increased in recent years. The ideal single cell measurement system would be high throughput for statistical relevance, would measure the most important cellular parameters, and minimize disruption of normal cell function. We have developed a microwell array device capable of measuring single cell oxygen consumption rates (OCR). This OCR device is able to diffusionally isolate single cells and enables the quantitative measurement of oxygen consumed by a single cell with fmol/min resolution in a non-invasive and relatively high throughput manner. A glass microwell array format containing fixed luminescent sensors allows for future incorporation of additional cellular parameter sensing capabilities. To demonstrate the utility of the OCR device, we determined the oxygen consumption rates of a small group of single cells (12 to 18) for three different cells lines: murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7, human epithelial lung cancer cell line A549, and human Barrett’s esophagus cell line CP-D. PMID:20084089

  11. Soft fibrin gels promote selection and growth of tumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Tan, Youhua; Zhang, Huafeng; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Pingwei; Chen, Junwei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Tang, Ke; Wang, Ning; Huang, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The identification of stem-cell-like cancer cells through conventional methods that depend on stem cell markers is often unreliable. We developed a mechanical method for selecting tumorigenic cells by culturing single cancer cells in fibrin matrices of ~100 Pa in stiffness. When cultured within these gels, primary human cancer cells or single cancer cells from mouse or human cancer cell lines grew within a few days into individual round colonies that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Subcutaneous or intravenous injection of 10 or 100 fibrin-cultured cells in syngeneic or severe combined immunodeficiency mice led to the formation of solid tumours at the site of injection or at the distant lung organ much more efficiently than control cancer cells selected using conventional surface marker methods or cultured on conventional rigid dishes or on soft gels. Remarkably, as few as ten such cells were able to survive and form tumours in the lungs of wild-type non-syngeneic mice.

  12. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of bioartificial renal tubule devices with lifespan-extended human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sanechika, Noriyuki; Sawada, Kaichiro; Usui, Yukio; Hanai, Kazuya; Kakuta, Takatoshi; Suzuki, Hajime; Kanai, Genta; Fujimura, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Tun Aung; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Terachi, Toshiro; Saito, Akira

    2011-09-01

    The bioartificial renal tubule device is a cell therapy system for renal failure. The major obstacle in the development of the bioartificial renal tubule device is the obtainment of a large number of viable renal tubule cells to seed on the inner surface of hollow fibers. Although our previous studies had used a transformed cell line, they may be dangerous for clinical uses. Therefore, different approaches to amplify renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) in culture without oncogenes, vectors and carcinogens have been required. The limitation of the replicative lifespan of human RPTEC, which is ∼12 population doublings (PDs), was extended by invalidating messenger RNA of cell cycle-related genes with antisense oligonucleotide or small interfering RNA (siRNA). Periodic transfection of siRNA to a tumor suppressor p53 or a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) extended the lifespan by 33 and 63 PDs, respectively, in 3 months of culture. The siRNA-mediated lifespan extension was controllable because cell division ceased within 2 weeks after the transfection was discontinued. Expressions of γ-glutamyltransferase 1 and glucose transporter 1 were recovered in siRNA-transfected RPTEC cultured on porous membranes. Bioartificial renal tubule devices (0.8 m(2)) constructed with these cells showed reabsorption of water (122.3 ± 4.2 mL/30 min), sodium (18.1 ± 0.7 mEq/30 min) and glucose (121.7 ± 4.4 mg/30 min) after 1 week of circulation. Furthermore, β2-microglobulin and pentosidine were metabolized by RPTEC in mini-devices (65 cm(2)) within 48 h of circulation. These approaches enabled us to yield a high enough number of RPTEC for construction of bioartificial renal tubule devices repeatedly. Lifespan-extended RPTEC could recover their specific characteristics by culturing on porous membranes, and bioartificial renal tubule devices constructed with these cells showed good performances of reabsorption and metabolism. A large number of human renal tubular

  14. Application of Silicon Selective Epitaxial Growth and Chemo-Mechanical Polishing to Bipolar and Soi Mosfet Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Cuong Tan

    1994-01-01

    Polished Epitaxy, or the combination of silicon Selective Epitaxial Growth and Chemo-Mechanical Polishing, provides new flexibility in process and device design, including optimized isolation, planar active-area definition, low-capacitance contacts, and SOI thin films. In this work, Polished Epitaxy has been developed with particular effort on overcoming junction leakage problems widely reported in devices fabricated in similar processes. It was found that in addition to careful surface preparation and defect control in the selective epitaxy process, issues such as sidewall orientation, junction passivation, crystal annealing, and surface damage removal were equally important and needed to be addressed. Coupled with the proper processing steps, Polished Epitaxy was able to deliver material of comparable quality to bulk silicon, suitable for device applications. By growing epitaxy laterally over an oxide step followed by polishing, a pedestal structure was created in which a thin film of single-crystal silicon was formed over oxide. Serving as the extrinsic base contact to a T-Pedestal bipolar transistor device, this pedestal helped minimize the parasitic extrinsic-base-collector overlap capacitance. The cut-off frequency (f_ {T}) in a device with a 1.0-mu m wide emitter stripe was found to improve from 17GHz to 22GHz when the contact overlap was reduced from a more conventional, larger size of 1.0 mu m to 0.2 mum. It is expected that the high-frequency performance of this structure can still be improved further in an optimized process with reduced emitter and collector resistances. The same pedestal structure was applied to a Pedestal -SOI (Silicon-On-Insulator) MOSFET device concept. At one extreme, a conventional bulk MOSFET structure is obtained when the pedestal is not utilized; quasi-SOI occurs when the drain and part of the channel overlap with the pedestal over buried oxide; at the other extreme, complete-SOI behavior results when source, channel, and drain

  15. Building-Integrated Solar Energy Devices based on Wavelength Selective Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulavi, Tejas

    A potentially attractive option for building integrated solar is to employ hybrid solar collectors which serve dual purposes, combining solar thermal technology with either thin film photovoltaics or daylighting. In this study, two hybrid concepts, a hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) collector and a hybrid 'solar window', are presented and analyzed to evaluate technical performance. In both concepts, a wavelength selective film is coupled with a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) to reflect and concentrate the infrared portion of the solar spectrum onto a tubular absorber. The visible portion of the spectrum is transmitted through the concentrator to either a thin film Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar panel for electricity generation or into the interior space for daylighting. Special attention is given to the design of the hybrid devices for aesthetic building integration. An adaptive concentrator design based on asymmetrical truncation of CPCs is presented for the hybrid solar window concept. The energetic and spectral split between the solar thermal module and the PV or daylighting module are functions of the optical properties of the wavelength selective film and the concentrator geometry, and are determined using a Monte Carlo Ray-Tracing (MCRT) model. Results obtained from the MCRT can be used in conjugation with meteorological data for specific applications to study the impact of CPC design parameters including the half-acceptance angle thetac, absorber diameter D and truncation on the annual thermal and PV/daylighting efficiencies. The hybrid PV/T system is analyzed for a rooftop application in Phoenix, AZ. Compared to a system of the same area with independent solar thermal and PV modules, the hybrid PV/T provides 20% more energy, annually. However, the increase in total delivered energy is due solely to the addition of the thermal module and is achieved at an expense of a decrease in the annual electrical efficiency from 8.8% to 5.8% due to shading by

  16. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1985-10-22

    Electrical short protection is provided in an electrolytic cell stack by the combination of a thin, nonporous ceramic shield and a noble metal foil disposed on opposite sides of the sealing medium in a gas manifold gasket. The thin ceramic shield, such as alumina, is placed between the porous gasket and the cell stack face at the margins of the negative end plate to the most negative cells to impede ion current flow. The noble metal foil, for instance gold, is electrically coupled to the negative potential of the stack to collect positive ions at a harmless location away from the stack face. Consequently, corrosion products from the stack structure deposit on the foil rather than on the stack face to eliminate electrical shorting of cells at the negative end of the stack.

  17. Blue light effect on retinal pigment epithelial cells by display devices.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jiyoung; Yun, Jieun; Yoon, Yeo Dae; Park, Sang-Il; Seo, Young-Jun; Park, Won-Sang; Chu, Hye Yong; Park, Keun Hong; Lee, Myung Yeol; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Soo Jin; Kwak, Young-Shin; Jang, Young Pyo; Kang, Jong Soon

    2017-04-07

    Blue light has high photochemical energy and induces cell apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Due to its phototoxicity, retinal hazard by blue light stimulation has been well demonstrated using high intensity light sources. However, it has not been studied whether blue light in the displays, emitting low intensity light, such as those used in today's smartphones, monitors, and TVs, also causes apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells. We attempted to examine the blue light effect on human adult retinal epithelial cells using display devices with different blue light wavelength ranges, the peaks of which specifically appear at 449 nm, 458 nm, and 470 nm. When blue light was illuminated on A2E-loaded ARPE-19 cells using these displays, the display with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength resulted in an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, the reduction of cell viability and induction of caspase-3/7 activity were more evident in A2E-loaded ARPE-19 cells after illumination by the display with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength, especially at 449 nm. Additionally, white light was tested to examine the effect of blue light in a mixed color illumination with red and green lights. Consistent with the results obtained using only blue light, white light illuminated by display devices with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength also triggered increased cell death and apoptosis compared to that illuminated by display devices with a blue light peak at longer wavelength. These results show that even at the low intensity utilized in the display devices, blue light can induce ROS production and apoptosis in retinal cells. Our results also suggest that the blue light hazard of display devices might be highly reduced if the display devices contain less short wavelength blue light.

  18. Selective growth of catalyst-free ZnO nanowire arrays on Al:ZnO for device application

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T. F.; Luo, L. B.; He, Z. B.; Leung, Y. H.; Shafiq, I.; Yao, Z. Q.; Lee, S. T.

    2007-12-03

    Vertically aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays have been synthesized selectively on patterned aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) layer deposited on silicon substrates without using any metal catalysts. The growth region was defined by conventional photolithography with an insulating template. Careful control of the types of template materials and growth conditions allows good alignment and growth selectivity for ZnO NW arrays. Sharp ultraviolet band-edge peak observed in the photoluminescence spectra of the patterned ZnO NW arrays reveals good optical qualities. The current-voltage characteristics of ZnO NWs/AZO/p-Si device suggest that patterned and aligned ZnO NW arrays on AZO may be used in optoelectronic devices.

  19. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0 h, 24 h and 48 h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24 h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0 h) and fully differentiated (48 h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population. PMID:26963790

  20. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-07-15

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0h, 24h and 48h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0h) and fully differentiated (48h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population.

  1. MerTK regulates thymic selection of autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Mark A; Flores, Rafael R; Wang, Yaming; Yi, Zuoan; Kroger, Charles J; Mathews, Clayton E; Earp, H Shelton; Matsushima, Glenn; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2009-03-24

    T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) are believed to be the result in part of inefficient negative selection of self-specific thymocytes. However, the events regulating thymic negative selection are not fully understood. In the current study, we demonstrate that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice lacking expression of the Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) have reduced inflammation of the pancreatic islets and fail to develop diabetes. Furthermore, NOD mice deficient in MerTK expression (Mer(-/-)) exhibit a reduced frequency of beta cell-specific T cells independent of immunoregulatory effectors. The establishment of bone marrow chimeric mice demonstrated that the block in beta cell autoimmunity required hematopoietic-derived cells lacking MerTK expression. Notably, fetal thymic organ cultures and self-peptide administration showed increased thymic negative selection in Mer(-/-) mice. Finally, thymic dendritic cells (DC) prepared from Mer(-/-) mice exhibited an increased capacity to induce thymocyte apoptosis in a peptide-specific manner in vitro. These findings provide evidence for a unique mechanism involving MerTK-mediated regulation of thymocyte negative selection and thymic DC, and suggest a role for MerTK in contributing to beta cell autoimmunity.

  2. Effects of glial cells on electrode impedance recorded from neuralprosthetic devices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Frampton, John P; Hynd, Matthew R; Shuler, Michael L; Shain, William

    2010-03-01

    Neural prosthetic devices hold the potential to be used in the treatment of a variety of neurological disorders. However, their long-term clinical success is currently limited by the ability to achieve stable interfaces between devices and the CNS. Immunohistochemical analysis has shown that cellular responses occur in tissue surrounding implanted devices. These cellular responses have been correlated with the impedance measured from device electrodes, leading to the hypothesis that a possible mechanism resulting in inconsistent device performance is the formation of an electrically insulating glial sheath at the implantation site. However, little is known about what cellular and tissue changes affect impedance values and thus contribute to the decreases in electrode performance. We have designed an in vitro system in which cell conditions can be varied within an artificial tissue matrix surrounding a neural prosthetic device. In this study, high-density cultures of glial cells were analyzed by immunohistochemical methods and impedance spectroscopy. Astrocytes and microglia were cultured at various ratios within the matrix surrounding the probes, and were observed over a period of 2 weeks. Cell seeding conditions and confocal images were compared to impedance data to enable the effects of glial cell type on electrode impedance to be determined.

  3. Microfluidic devices for label-free separation of cells through transient interaction with asymmetric receptor patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Singh, R.; Hollatz, M. H.; Lee, C.-H.; Karp, J.; Karnik, R.

    2012-02-01

    Cell sorting serves an important role in clinical diagnosis and biological research. Most of the existing microscale sorting techniques are either non-specific to antigen type or rely on capturing cells making sample recovery difficult. We demonstrate a simple; yet effective technique for isolating cells in an antigen specific manner by using transient interactions of the cell surface antigens with asymmetric receptor patterned surface. Using microfluidic devices incorporating P-selectin patterns we demonstrate separation of HL60 cells from K562 cells. We achieved a sorting purity above 90% and efficiency greater than 85% with this system. We also present a mathematical model incorporating flow mediated and adhesion mediated transport of cells in the microchannel that can be used to predict the performance of these devices. Lastly, we demonstrate the clinical significance of the method by demonstrating single step separation of neutrophils from whole blood. When whole blood is introduced in the device, the granulocyte population gets separated exclusively yielding neutrophils of high purity (<10% RBC contamination). To our knowledge, this is the first ever demonstration of continuous label free sorting of neutrophils from whole blood. We believe this technology will be useful in developing point-of-care diagnostic devices and also for a host of cell sorting applications.

  4. Chemokine gradient formation in microfluidic devices to investigate prostate cancer cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Smitha M. N.; Huggins, Cory; Rahimi, Maham; Nguyen, Kytai; Chiao, J.-C.

    2008-12-01

    Metastasis of cancer requires adhesion and migration of cells. The effect of chemokine gradient on prostate cancer cells (PCC) is not well understood. A poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device that enables time-lapse study of cell migration is presented. Photolithography and soft lithography processes were used to fabricate the PDMS devices from SU-8 molds. The device has two inlets, a cell reservoir and an outlet channel with a depth of 100μm. The microfluidic device is configured to provide fluid mixing leading to a gradient across the outlet channel. The inlets allow for introduction of different chemokines at different concentrations and flow rates. The cell migration in the presence of chemokine gradient and flow rate can thus be monitored in a time-lapse fashion. The gradient formations at different flow rates over different lengths of time have been analyzed. Flow rates of 2, 3, 6, 8, 10, 20 μl/min at 5-minute intervals for over an hour were monitored to determine optimum flow rates and times required to produce desired gradient profiles. Results suggest that gradients formed at lower flow rates have less variation over time. Moreover, lower flow rates do not affect cell movement making observation of cell migration towards gradients possible. Higher flow rates have better gradient definition but cells tend to flow away with the fluid.

  5. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-06

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  6. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  7. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Williams, Lindsay A.; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T.; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Prins, Jan F.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance. PMID:27530426

  8. CD6 modulates thymocyte selection and peripheral T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Consuegra-Fernández, Marta; Girard, Laura; Aranda, Fernando; Martínez, Vanesa-Gabriela; Sarukhan, Adelaida; Malissen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The CD6 glycoprotein is a lymphocyte surface receptor putatively involved in T cell development and activation. CD6 facilitates adhesion between T cells and antigen-presenting cells through its interaction with CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule), and physically associates with the T cell receptor (TCR) at the center of the immunological synapse. However, its precise role during thymocyte development and peripheral T cell immune responses remains to be defined. Here, we analyze the in vivo consequences of CD6 deficiency. CD6−/− thymi showed a reduction in both CD4+ and CD8+ single-positive subsets, and double-positive thymocytes exhibited increased Ca2+ mobilization to TCR cross-linking in vitro. Bone marrow chimera experiments revealed a T cell–autonomous selective disadvantage of CD6−/− T cells during development. The analysis of TCR-transgenic mice (OT-I and Marilyn) confirmed that abnormal T cell selection events occur in the absence of CD6. CD6−/− mice displayed increased frequencies of antigen-experienced peripheral T cells generated under certain levels of TCR signal strength or co-stimulation, such as effector/memory (CD4+TEM and CD8+TCM) and regulatory (T reg) T cells. The suppressive activity of CD6−/− T reg cells was diminished, and CD6−/− mice presented an exacerbated autoimmune response to collagen. Collectively, these data indicate that CD6 modulates the threshold for thymocyte selection and the generation and/or function of several peripheral T cell subpopulations, including T reg cells. PMID:27377588

  9. A simple microfluidic method to select, isolate, and manipulate single-cells in mechanical and biochemical assays.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Versaevel, Marie; Preira, Pascal; Théodoly, Olivier

    2010-06-07

    This article describes a simple and low-tech microfluidic method for single-cell experimentation, which permits cell selection without stress, cell manipulation with fine control, and passive self-exclusion of all undesired super-micronic particles. The method requires only conventional soft lithography microfabrication techniques and is applicable to any microfluidic single-cell circuitry. The principle relies on a bypass plugged in parallel with a single-cell assay device and collecting 97% of the flow rate. Cell selection into the single cell device is performed by moving the cell of interest back and forth in the vicinity of the junction between the bypass and the analysis circuitry. Cell navigation is finely controlled by hydrostatic pressure via centimetre-scale actuation of external macroscopic reservoirs connected to the device. We provide successful examples of biomechanical and biochemical assays on living human leukocytes passing through 4 mum wide capillaries. The blebbing process dynamics are monitored by conventional 24 fps videomicroscopy and subcellular cytoskeleton organization is imaged by on-chip immunostaining.

  10. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  11. Building Cell Selectivity into CPP-Mediated Strategies.

    PubMed

    Martín, Irene; Teixidó, Meritxell; Giralt, Ernest

    2010-05-14

    There is a pressing need for more effective and selective therapies for cancer and other diseases. Consequently, much effort is being devoted to the development of alternative experimental approaches based on selective systems, which are designed to be specifically directed against target cells. In addition, a large number of highly potent therapeutic molecules are being discovered. However, they do not reach clinical trials because of their low delivery, poor specificity or their incapacity to bypass the plasma membrane. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are an open door for cell-impermeable compounds to reach intracellular targets. Putting all these together, research is sailing in the direction of the design of systems with the capacity to transport new drugs into a target cell. Some CPPs show cell type specificity while others require modifications or form part of more sophisticated drug delivery systems. In this review article we summarize several strategies for directed drug delivery involving CPPs that have been reported in the literature.

  12. What makes a cell face selective? The importance of contrast.

    PubMed

    Ohayon, Shay; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y

    2012-05-10

    Faces are robustly detected by computer vision algorithms that search for characteristic coarse contrast features. Here, we investigated whether face-selective cells in the primate brain exploit contrast features as well. We recorded from face-selective neurons in macaque inferotemporal cortex, while presenting a face-like collage of regions whose luminances were changed randomly. Modulating contrast combinations between regions induced activity changes ranging from no response to a response greater than that to a real face in 50% of cells. The critical stimulus factor determining response magnitude was contrast polarity, for example, nose region brighter than left eye. Contrast polarity preferences were consistent across cells, suggesting a common computational strategy across the population, and matched features used by computer vision algorithms for face detection. Furthermore, most cells were tuned both for contrast polarity and for the geometry of facial features, suggesting cells encode information useful both for detection and recognition.

  13. A design handbook for phase change thermal control and energy storage devices. [selected paraffins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Griggs, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Comprehensive survey is given of the thermal aspects of phase change material devices. Fundamental mechanisms of heat transfer within the phase change device are discussed. Performance in zero-g and one-g fields are examined as it relates to such a device. Computer models for phase change materials, with metal fillers, undergoing conductive and convective processes are detailed. Using these models, extensive parametric data are presented for a hypothetical configuration with a rectangular phase change housing, using straight fins as the filler, and paraffin as the phase change material. These data are generated over a range of realistic sizes, material properties, and thermal boundary conditions. A number of illustrative examples are given to demonstrate use of the parametric data. Also, a complete listing of phase change material property data are reproduced herein as an aid to the reader.

  14. Selected fault testing of electronic isolation devices used in nuclear power plant operation

    SciTech Connect

    Villaran, M.; Hillman, K.; Taylor, J.; Lara, J.; Wilhelm, W.

    1994-05-01

    Electronic isolation devices are used in nuclear power plants to provide electrical separation between safety and non-safety circuits and systems. Major fault testing in an earlier program indicated that some energy may pass through an isolation device when a fault at the maximum credible potential is applied in the transverse mode to its output terminals. During subsequent field qualification testing of isolators, concerns were raised that the worst case fault, that is, the maximum credible fault (MCF), may not occur with a fault at the maximum credible potential, but rather at some lower potential. The present test program investigates whether problems can arise when fault levels up to the MCF potential are applied to the output terminals of an isolator. The fault energy passed through an isolated device during a fault was measured to determine whether the levels are great enough to potentially damage or degrade performance of equipment on the input (Class 1E) side of the isolator.

  15. ICAMs support B cell interactions with T follicular helper cells and promote clonal selection.

    PubMed

    Zaretsky, Irina; Atrakchi, Ofir; Mazor, Roei D; Stoler-Barak, Liat; Biram, Adi; Feigelson, Sara W; Gitlin, Alexander D; Engelhardt, Britta; Shulman, Ziv

    2017-09-22

    The germinal center (GC) reaction begins with a diverse and expanded group of B cell clones bearing a wide range of antibody affinities. During GC colonization, B cells engage in long-lasting interactions with T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, a process that depends on antigen uptake and antigen presentation to the Tfh cells. How long-lasting T-B interactions and B cell clonal expansion are regulated by antigen presentation remains unclear. Here, we use in vivo B cell competition models and intravital imaging to examine the adhesive mechanisms governing B cell selection for GC colonization. We find that intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and ICAM-2 on B cells are essential for long-lasting cognate Tfh-B cell interactions and efficient selection of low-affinity B cell clones for proliferative clonal expansion. Thus, B cell ICAMs promote efficient antibody immune response by enhancement of T cell help to cognate B cells. © 2017 Zaretsky et al.

  16. Excellent nonlinearity of a selection device based on anti-series connected Zener diodes for ultrahigh-density bipolar RRAM arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingtao; Li, Rongrong; Fu, Liping; Gao, Xiaoping; Wang, Yang; Tao, Chunlan

    2015-10-01

    A crossbar array is usually used for the high-density application of a resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. However, the cross-talk interference limits the increase in the integration density. In this paper, anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device are proposed for bipolar RRAM arrays. Simulation results show that, by using the anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device, the readout margin is sufficiently improved compared to that obtained without a selection device or with anti-parallel connected diodes as the selection device. The maximum size of the crossbar arrays with anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device over 1 TB is estimated by theoretical simulation. In addition, the feasibility of using the anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device for bipolar RRAM is demonstrated experimentally. These results indicate that anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device opens up great opportunities to realize ultrahigh-density bipolar RRAM arrays.

  17. Conductivity based on selective etch for GaN devices and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  18. Selection and management of central venous access devices in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Cole, D

    1999-01-01

    In the last decade new central venous access devices (CVADs) inserted for long-term therapy have replaced conventional peripheral venous access devices. This shift contributes to the need for additional education as technological advances result in additional options for central venous access. Healthcare's transition from the hospital to a community-based system has increased the use of CVADs in the home setting. Issues that confront the patient with a CVAD in the home setting must be examined more closely than ever before.

  19. Optofluidic device for label-free cell classification from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    A unique optofluidic lab-on-a-chip device that can detect optically encoded forward scattering signals is demonstrated. With a unique design of a spatial mask that patterns the intensity distribution of the illuminating light, the position and velocity of each travelling cell in the flow can be measured with submicrometer resolution, which enables the generation of a cell distribution plot over the cross section of the channel. The distribution of cells is highly sensitive to its size and stiffness, both being important biomarkers for cell classification without cell labelling. The optical-coding technique offers an easy route to classify cells based on their size and stiffness. Because the stiffness and size of neutrophils are distinct from other types of white blood cells, the number of neutrophils can be detected from other white blood cells and red blood cells. Above all, the enumeration of neutrophil concentration can be obtained from only 5 μL of human blood with a simple blood preparation process saving the usual steps of anticoagulation, centrifugation, antibody labelling, or filtering. The optofluidic system is compact, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate and operate. The system uses a commodity laser diode and a Si PIN photoreceiver and digital signal processing to extract vital information about cells and suppress the noise from the encoded optical scattering signals. The optofluidic device holds promise to be a point-of-care and home care device to measure neutrophil concentration, which is the key indicator of the immune functions for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  20. Selective in vivo metabolic cell-labeling-mediated cancer targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Ruibo; Cai, Kaimin; He, Hua; Liu, Yang; Yen, Jonathan; Wang, Zhiyu; Xu, Ming; Sun, Yiwen; Zhou, Xin; Yin, Qian; Tang, Li; Dobrucki, Iwona T; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A; Fan, Timothy M; Lezmi, Stéphane; Chen, Xuesi; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-02-13

    Distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells through surface receptors is vital for cancer diagnosis and targeted therapy. Metabolic glycoengineering of unnatural sugars provides a powerful tool to manually introduce chemical receptors onto the cell surface; however, cancer-selective labeling still remains a great challenge. Herein we report the design of sugars that can selectively label cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, we inhibit the cell-labeling activity of tetraacetyl-N-azidoacetylmannosamine (Ac4ManAz) by converting its anomeric acetyl group to a caged ether bond that can be selectively cleaved by cancer-overexpressed enzymes and thus enables the overexpression of azido groups on the surface of cancer cells. Histone deacetylase and cathepsin L-responsive acetylated azidomannosamine, one such enzymatically activatable Ac4ManAz analog developed, mediated cancer-selective labeling in vivo, which enhanced tumor accumulation of a dibenzocyclooctyne-doxorubicin conjugate via click chemistry and enabled targeted therapy against LS174T colon cancer, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer and 4T1 metastatic breast cancer in mice.

  1. Using a microfluidic device for high-content analysis of cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Raymond; Wang, Chiaochun Joanne; Levchenko, Andre

    2009-06-16

    Quantitative analysis and understanding of signaling networks require measurements of the location and activities of key proteins over time, at the level of single cells, in response to various perturbations. Microfluidic devices enable such analyses to be conducted in a high-throughput and in a highly controlled manner. We describe in detail how to design and use a microfluidic device to perform such information-rich experiments.

  2. System, device, and methods for real-time screening of live cells, biomarkers, and chemical signatures

    DOEpatents

    Sundaram, S Kamakshi [Richland, WA; Riley, Brian J [West Richland, WA; Weber, Thomas J [Richland, WA; Sacksteder, Colette A [West Richland, WA; Addleman, R Shane [Benton City, WA

    2011-06-07

    An ATR-FTIR device and system are described that defect live-cell responses to stimuli and perturbations in real-time. The system and device can monitor perturbations resulting from exposures to various physical, chemical, and biological materials in real-time, as well as those sustained over a long period of time, including those associated with stimuli having unknown modes-of-action (e.g. nanoparticles). The device and system can also be used to identify specific chemical species or substances that profile cellular responses to these perturbations.

  3. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers.

    PubMed

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Candeloro, Patrizio; De Grazia, Antonio; Esposito, Francesco; Allione, Marco; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Tallerico, Rossana; Valpapuram, Immanuel; Tirinato, Luca; Das, Gobind; Giugni, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Veltri, Pierangelo; Kruhne, Ulrich; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2016-01-25

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels- where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm of the each cell. Experiments are performed on red blood cells (RBCs), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and myelogenous leukemia tumor cells (K562).

  4. [The cell phones as devices for the ocular fundus documentation].

    PubMed

    Němčanský, J; Kopecký, A; Timkovič, J; Mašek, P

    2014-12-01

    To present our experience with "smart phones" when examining and documenting human eyes. From September to October 2013 fifteen patients (8 men, 7 women) eye fundus was examined, an average age during the examination was 58 year (ranging from 20-65 years). The photo-documentation was performed with dilated pupils (tropicamid hydrochloridum 1% eye drops) with mobile phone Samsung Galaxy Nexus with the operating system Android 4.3 (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA) and iPhone 4 with the operating system 7.0.4 (Apple Inc., Loop Cupertino, CA, USA), and with 20D lens (Volk Optical Inc., Mentor, OH, USA). The images of the retina taken with a mobile phone and the spherical lens are of a very good quality, precise and reproducible. Learning this technique is easy and fast, the learning curve is steep. Photo-documentation of retina with a mobile phone is a safe, time-saving, easy-to-learn technique, which may be used in a routine ophthalmologic practice. The main advantage of this technique is availability, small size and easy portability of the devices.

  5. Evaluation of transition metal oxide as carrier-selective contacts for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, L.; Boccard, Matthieu; Holman, Zachary; Bertoni, M.

    2015-04-06

    "Reducing light absorption in the non-active solar cell layers, while enabling the extraction of the photogenerated minority carriers at quasi-Fermi levels are two key factors to improve current generation and voltage, and therefore efficiency of silicon heterojunction solar devices. To address these two critical aspects, transition metal oxide materials have been proposed as alternative to the n- and p-type amorphous silicon used as electron and hole selective contacts, respectively. Indeed, transition metal oxides such as molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, nickel oxide or tungsten oxide combine a wide band gap typically over 3 eV with a band structure and theoretical band alignment with silicon that results in high transparency to the solar spectrum and in selectivity for the transport of only one carrier type. Improving carrier extraction or injection using transition metal oxide has been a topic of investigation in the field of organic solar cells and organic LEDs; from these pioneering works a lot of knowledge has been gained on materials properties, ways to control these during synthesis and deposition, and their impact on device performance. Recently, the transfer of some of this knowledge to silicon solar cells and the successful application of some metal oxide to contact heterojunction devices have gained much attention. In this contribution, we investigate the suitability of various transition metal oxide films (molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, and tungsten oxide) deposited either by thermal evaporation or sputtering as transparent hole or electron selective transport layer for silicon solar cells. In addition to systematically characterize their optical and structural properties, we use photoemission spectroscopy to relate compound stoichiometry to band structure and characterize band alignment to silicon. The direct silicon/metal oxide interface is further analyzed by quasi-steady state photoconductance decay method to assess the quality of surface

  6. VEGF and Notch in Tip and Stalk Cell Selection

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Raquel; Gerhardt, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis is a dynamic process in which endothelial cells collectively migrate, shape new lumenized tubes, make new connections, and remodel the nascent network into a hierarchically branched and functionally perfused vascular bed. Endothelial cells in the nascent sprout adopt two distinct cellular phenotypes—known as tip and stalk cells—with specialized functions and gene expression patterns. VEGF and Notch signaling engage in an intricate cross talk to balance tip and stalk cell formation and to regulate directed tip cell migration and stalk cell proliferation. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge and implications of the tip/stalk cell concepts and the quantitative and dynamic integration of VEGF and Notch signaling in tip and stalk cell selection. PMID:23085847

  7. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development.

  8. Dynamic monitoring of single cell lysis in an impedance-based microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest D; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-08-01

    A microfluidic device that is capable of trapping and sensing dynamic variations in the electrical properties of individual cells is demonstrated. The device is applied to the real-time recording of impedance measurements of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) during the process of membrane lysis, with the resulting changes in the electrical properties of cells during this process being quantitatively tracked over time. It is observed that the impedance magnitude decreases dramatically after cell membrane lysis. A significant shift in the phase spectrum is also observed during the time course of this process. By fitting experimental data to physical models, the electrical parameters of cells can be extracted and parameter variations quantified during the process. In the cell lysis experiments, the equivalent conductivity of the cell membrane is found to increase significantly due to pore formation in the membrane during lysis. An increase in the specific capacitance of the membrane is also observed. On the other hand, the conductivity of the cytoplasm is observed to decrease, which may be explained the fact that excess water enters the cell through the gradual permeabilization of the membrane during lysis. Cells can be trapped in the device for periods up to several days, and their electrical response can be monitored by real-time impedance measurements in a label-free and non-invasive manner. Furthermore, due to the highly efficient single cell trapping capacity of the device, a number of cells can be trapped and held in separate wells for concurrent parallel experiments, allowing for the possibility of stepped parametric experiments and studying cell heterogeneity by combining measurements across the array.

  9. Sickle cell vasoocclusion and rescue in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, J. M.; Eddington, D. T.; Bhatia, S. N.; Mahadevan, L.

    2007-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is complicated by the multiscale processes that link the molecular genotype to the organismal phenotype: hemoglobin polymerization occurring in milliseconds, microscopic cellular sickling in a few seconds or less [Eaton WA, Hofrichter J (1990) Adv Protein Chem 40:63–279], and macroscopic vessel occlusion over a time scale of minutes, the last of which is necessary for a crisis [Bunn HF (1997) N Engl J Med 337:762–769]. Using a minimal but robust artificial microfluidic environment, we show that it is possible to evoke, control, and inhibit the collective vasoocclusive or jamming event in sickle cell disease. We use a combination of geometric, physical, chemical, and biological means to quantify the phase space for the onset of a jamming event, as well as its dissolution, and find that oxygen-dependent sickle hemoglobin polymerization and melting alone are sufficient to recreate jamming and rescue. We further show that a key source of the heterogeneity in occlusion arises from the slow collective jamming of a confined, flowing suspension of soft cells that change their morphology and rheology relatively quickly. Finally, we quantify and investigate the effects of small-molecule inhibitors of polymerization and therapeutic red blood cell exchange on this dynamical process. Our experimental study integrates the dynamics of collective processes associated with occlusion at the molecular, polymer, cellular, and tissue level; lays the foundation for a quantitative understanding of the rate-limiting processes; and provides a potential tool for optimizing and individualizing treatment, and identifying new therapies. PMID:18077341

  10. Design and characterization of integrated photonic devices fabricated using selective-area epitaxy and distributed Bragg reflector surface gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Robert Morand

    Two of the main challenges involved with the fabrication of integrated photonic devices are the control of the in-plane band gap and the formation of integrable high-Q cavities. In-plane bandgap control is required to fabricate emitters, passive waveguides, detectors, and modulators all on a single wafer and all optimized for operation at a particular wavelength. The formation of integrable high-Q cavities is needed to integrate the laser source. Selective-area epitaxy (SAE) is a powerful technique which enables the tailoring of the in-plane band gap energy to fabricate numerous optimized photonic devices on a single wafer. In this dissertation, a three-step SAE process in the InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs material system is investigated. This process produced discrete Fabry-Perot lasers with threshold currents as low as 2.65 mA for an uncoated device and 0.97 mA for a coated device. Several integrated photonic devices that utilize the in-plane bandgap control of this SAE process are also investigated. These devices include lasers with nonabsorbing mirrors, dual-channel wavelength division multiplexing sources with integrated coupler, lasers with integrated photodiodes, lasers with integrated intracavity modulators, and lasers with integrated external cavity modulators. The second challenge involved with the fabricating of integrated photonic devices is the formation of integrable high-Q cavities. The optical feedback in most laser diodes is provided by cleaved facets. Unfortunately, cleaved facets are not an option when designing integrated photonic devices. However, optical feedback can be provided in integrated photonic devices using distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). In this dissertation, ridge-waveguide DBR lasers with first-order surface gratings are investigated. These lasers exhibit low thresholds (6 mA), high slope efficiencies (0.46 W/A), and single-frequency operation with narrow linewidths (<25 kHz). By varying the period of the first-order DBR grating, a wide

  11. How to select end user clinical data entry devices. Rush University Medical Center develops tool to identify the quantity of devices needed for the implementation of a new EMR and CPOE system.

    PubMed

    Oder, Karl; Nauseda, Susan; Carlson, Elizabeth; Llewellyn, Jane; Brown, Fred; Catrambone, Cathy; Fogg, Louis; Garcia, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Selecting the right types and quantities of computers to support data entry to an inpatient Electronic Medical Record (EMR) can be challenging. In addition to software and hardware considerations, many other variables affect the decision including staffing levels, hospital workflows, and floor plans. Rush University Medical Center (RUMC) developed a tool to help identify the quantity of devices needed in a Patient Care Unit (PCU). RUMC successfully used the tool in selecting the quantity of devices needed for the implementation of a new EMR and Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) system. This case study describes the use of the tool to determine quantities of PCU devices, the advantages and disadvantages of different types of computing devices for bedside documentation and areas that require special considerations in the selection of devices.

  12. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirana; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect. PMID:23255107

  13. Development of a potent and selective cell penetrant Legumain inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ness, Kerry A; Eddie, Sharon L; Higgins, Catherine A; Templeman, Amy; D'Costa, Zenobia; Gaddale, Kishore K D; Bouzzaoui, Samira; Jordan, Linda; Janssen, Dominic; Harrison, Timothy; Burkamp, Frank; Young, Andrew; Burden, Roberta; Scott, Christopher J; Mullan, Paul B; Williams, Rich

    2015-12-01

    This Letter describes the continued SAR exploration of small molecule Legumain inhibitors with the aim of developing a potent and selective in vitro tool compound. Work continued in this Letter explores the use of alternative P2-P3 linker units and the P3 group SAR which led to the identification of 10t, a potent, selective and cellularly active Legumain inhibitor. We also demonstrate that 10t has activity in both cancer cell viability and colony formation assays.

  14. A microfluidic dual-well device for high-throughput single-cell capture and culture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hui; Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Chang, Hao-Chen; Yeh, Chuan-Feng; He, Cheng-Kun; Salm, Eric M; Chen, Chihchen; Chiu, Ing-Ming; Hsu, Chia-Hsien

    2015-07-21

    In vitro culture of single cells facilitates biological studies by deconvoluting complications from cell population heterogeneity. However, there is still a lack of simple yet high-throughput methods to perform single cell culture experiments. In this paper, we report the development and application of a microfluidic device with a dual-well (DW) design concept for high-yield single-cell loading (~77%) in large microwells (285 and 485 μm in diameter) which allowed for cell spreading, proliferation and differentiation. The increased single-cell loading yield is achieved by using sets of small microwells termed "capture-wells" and big microwells termed "culture-wells" according to their utilities for single-cell capture and culture, respectively. This novel device architecture allows the size of the "culture" microwells to be flexibly adjusted without affecting the single-cell loading efficiency making it useful for cell culture applications as demonstrated by our experiments of KT98 mouse neural stem cell differentiation, A549 and MDA-MB-435 cancer cell proliferation, and single-cell colony formation assay with A549 cells in this paper.

  15. Selective Cell Growth on Fibronectin-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Seon; Park, Sung Young; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Minbaek; Nam, Jwa-Min; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been considered a promising material for biological applications including biosensors, therapeutic application, and nano-structured scaffolds. However, there are still controversies associated with toxicity and biocompatibility of CNTs on live cells. Here, we report general strategy to functionalize CNTs with cell adhesion molecules (fibronectins) for selective and stable adhesion of cells on CNTs. Interestingly, more fibronectins were adsorbed and activated on CNTs rather than on hydrophobic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) or bare substrates (SiO2). We demonstrate the functionality of fibronectins on CNTs with immunofluorescence and molecule-level force measurement study using atomic force microscopy (AFM). These fibronectin-CNT hybrid nanostructures were successfully applied to attract cells selectively onto predefined regions on the substrate. Our strategy was generally available on various cell types including mesenchymal stem cells, KB cells, and NIH3T3 fibroblast cells (Advanced Materials 19, 2530-2534 (2007)). We will also discuss about its impacts on cell biology combined with CNTs.

  16. Investigating the feasibility of symmetric guanidinium based plumbate perovskites in prototype solar cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Sneha A.; Baikie, Tom; Muduli, Subas; Potter, Rob; Chen, Shi; Yanan, Fanan; Bishop, Peter; Sien Lim, Swee; Chien Sum, Tze; Mathews, Nripan; White, Tim J.

    2017-08-01

    In this work we have studied the feasibility of highly symmetric guanidinium (GA; CH6N3 +) cation in perovskite based solar cells. It is an alternative to the methyl ammonium (MA; CH3NH3 +) or formamidinium (FA; CH(NH2)2+) ions commonly utilized in the perovskite solar cells, may bring additional advantages due to its triad rotational symmetry and zero dipole moment (μ). We noticed that due to steric factors, GA preferably forms two-dimensional (2D) layer, where GA2PbI4 is favored monoclinic structure (E g = 2.5 eV) and the obtained device efficiency is η = 0.45%. This study provides a guideline for designing guanidinium based perovskite absorbers for solar cell devices. In addition, through further compositional engineering with mixed organic cations using GA may enhance the device performance.

  17. Efficient selection of Gal-knockout pig cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Luz M; Estrada, Jose L; Ivary, Bess; Sidner, Richard A; Paris, Leela L; Tector, A Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The process of selecting transgenic cells has been one of the bottlenecks in the generation of transgenic animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In particular, selection for the Gal double-knockout (Gal-DKO) genotype has been time consuming and inefficient. The objective of this work was to generate a highly efficient system to select Gal-DKO cells to be used in SCNT without affecting the efficiency in production of Gal-null pigs. Fetal liver-derived cells deficient in Gal-expression were initially selected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using IB4 conjugated to a fluorescent dye. Cells recovered by FACS were cultured and expanded, followed by a second round of selection using streptavidin magnetic beads and IB4 lectin biotin. Recovery efficiency of target cells was 0.04% for the first selection using FACS and 0.3% for the second round by magnetic beads. Full reprogramming was obtained on selected Gal-DKO cells after FACS and magnetic beads selection, when used for SCNT to produce the Gal-null piglets. Cells obtained from magnetic beads developed 48 colonies; the Gal-null genotype was found in 44 of them (91.7%). Three of these colonies were used to generate piglets by SCNT. From three recipients receiving embryos, two became pregnant and produced 17 piglets, all of them DKO. Sequential selection of Gal-DKO cells by FACS/magnetic beads is a highly efficient system to generate null cells. Selected cells were successfully used to generate healthy double-knockout piglets by SCNT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel–elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyue; Tang, Tzu-Chieh; Tham, Eléonore; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Lin, Shaoting; Lu, Timothy K.; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2017-01-01

    Living systems, such as bacteria, yeasts, and mammalian cells, can be genetically programmed with synthetic circuits that execute sensing, computing, memory, and response functions. Integrating these functional living components into materials and devices will provide powerful tools for scientific research and enable new technological applications. However, it has been a grand challenge to maintain the viability, functionality, and safety of living components in freestanding materials and devices, which frequently undergo deformations during applications. Here, we report the design of a set of living materials and devices based on stretchable, robust, and biocompatible hydrogel–elastomer hybrids that host various types of genetically engineered bacterial cells. The hydrogel provides sustainable supplies of water and nutrients, and the elastomer is air-permeable, maintaining long-term viability and functionality of the encapsulated cells. Communication between different bacterial strains and with the environment is achieved via diffusion of molecules in the hydrogel. The high stretchability and robustness of the hydrogel–elastomer hybrids prevent leakage of cells from the living materials and devices, even under large deformations. We show functions and applications of stretchable living sensors that are responsive to multiple chemicals in a variety of form factors, including skin patches and gloves-based sensors. We further develop a quantitative model that couples transportation of signaling molecules and cellular response to aid the design of future living materials and devices. PMID:28202725

  19. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyue; Tang, Tzu-Chieh; Tham, Eléonore; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Lin, Shaoting; Lu, Timothy K; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2017-02-28

    Living systems, such as bacteria, yeasts, and mammalian cells, can be genetically programmed with synthetic circuits that execute sensing, computing, memory, and response functions. Integrating these functional living components into materials and devices will provide powerful tools for scientific research and enable new technological applications. However, it has been a grand challenge to maintain the viability, functionality, and safety of living components in freestanding materials and devices, which frequently undergo deformations during applications. Here, we report the design of a set of living materials and devices based on stretchable, robust, and biocompatible hydrogel-elastomer hybrids that host various types of genetically engineered bacterial cells. The hydrogel provides sustainable supplies of water and nutrients, and the elastomer is air-permeable, maintaining long-term viability and functionality of the encapsulated cells. Communication between different bacterial strains and with the environment is achieved via diffusion of molecules in the hydrogel. The high stretchability and robustness of the hydrogel-elastomer hybrids prevent leakage of cells from the living materials and devices, even under large deformations. We show functions and applications of stretchable living sensors that are responsive to multiple chemicals in a variety of form factors, including skin patches and gloves-based sensors. We further develop a quantitative model that couples transportation of signaling molecules and cellular response to aid the design of future living materials and devices.

  20. Three-dimensional microfiber devices that mimic physiological environments to probe cell mechanics and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Warren C; Pratt, Erica D; Bakhru, Sasha; Sitti, Metin; Zappe, Stefan; Cheng, Chao-Min; Antaki, James F; LeDuc, Philip R

    2012-04-24

    Many physiological systems are regulated by cells that alter their behavior in response to changes in their biochemical and mechanical environment. These cells experience this dynamic environment through an endogenous biomaterial matrix that transmits mechanical force and permits chemical exchange with the surrounding tissue. As a result, in vitro systems that mimic three-dimensional, in vivo cellular environments can enable experiments that reveal the nuanced interplay between biomechanics and physiology. Here we report the development of a minimal-profile, three-dimensional (MP3D) experimental microdevice that confines cells to a single focal plane, while allowing the precise application of mechanical displacement to cells and concomitant access to the cell membrane for perfusion with biochemical agonists. The MP3D device--an ordered microfiber scaffold erected on glass--provides a cellular environment that induces physiological cell morphologies. Small manipulations of the scaffold's microfibers allow attached cells to be mechanically probed. Due to the scaffold's minimal height profile, MP3D devices confine cells to a single focal plane, facilitating observation with conventional epifluorescent microscopy. When examining fibroblasts within MP3D devices, we observed robust cellular calcium responses to both a chemical stimulus as well as mechanical displacement of the cell membrane. The observed response differed significantly from previously reported, mechanically-induced calcium responses in the same cell type. Our findings demonstrate a key link between environment, cell morphology, mechanics, and intracellular signal transduction. We anticipate that this device will broadly impact research in fields including biomaterials, tissue engineering, and biophysics.

  1. Insulin-Producing Endocrine Cells Differentiated In Vitro From Human Embryonic Stem Cells Function in Macroencapsulation Devices In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ambruzs, Dana M.; Moorman, Mark A.; Bhoumik, Anindita; Cesario, Rosemary M.; Payne, Janice K.; Kelly, Jonathan R.; Haakmeester, Carl; Srijemac, Robert; Wilson, Alistair Z.; Kerr, Justin; Frazier, Mauro A.; Kroon, Evert J.; D’Amour, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    The PEC-01 cell population, differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), contains pancreatic progenitors (PPs) that, when loaded into macroencapsulation devices (to produce the VC-01 candidate product) and transplanted into mice, can mature into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells and other pancreatic endocrine cells involved in glucose metabolism. We modified the protocol for making PEC-01 cells such that 73%–80% of the cell population consisted of PDX1-positive (PDX1+) and NKX6.1+ PPs. The PPs were further differentiated to islet-like cells (ICs) that reproducibly contained 73%–89% endocrine cells, of which approximately 40%–50% expressed insulin. A large fraction of these insulin-positive cells were single hormone-positive and expressed the transcription factors PDX1 and NKX6.1. To preclude a significant contribution of progenitors to the in vivo function of ICs, we used a simple enrichment process to remove remaining PPs, yielding aggregates that contained 93%–98% endocrine cells and 1%–3% progenitors. Enriched ICs, when encapsulated and implanted into mice, functioned similarly to the VC-01 candidate product, demonstrating conclusively that in vitro-produced hESC-derived insulin-producing cells can mature and function in vivo in devices. A scaled version of our suspension culture was used, and the endocrine aggregates could be cryopreserved and retain functionality. Although ICs expressed multiple important β cell genes, the cells contained relatively low levels of several maturity-associated markers. Correlating with this, the time to function of ICs was similar to PEC-01 cells, indicating that ICs required cell-autonomous maturation after delivery in vivo, which would occur concurrently with graft integration into the host. Significance Type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects approximately 1.25 million people in the U.S. alone and is deadly if not managed with insulin injections. This paper describes the production of insulin

  2. Selective Label-free Electrokinetic Cell Tracker (SELECT): a novel liquid platform for cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruvai Kalyana Kumar, Rajeshwari; de Mello Gindri, Izabelle; Kinnamon, David; Kanchustambham, Pradyotha; Rodrigues, Danieli; Prasad, Shalini; BiomaterialsOsseointegration; Novel Engineering Lab Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Characterization and analysis of rare cells provide critical cues for early diagnosis of diseases. Electrokinetic cell separation has been previously established to have greater efficiency when compared to traditional flow cytometry methods. It has been shown by many researchers that buffer solutions in which cells are suspended in, have enormous effects on producing required dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to characterize cells. Most commonly used suspension buffers used are deionized water and cell media. However, these solutions exhibit high level of intrinsic noise, which greatly masks the electrokinetic signals from cells under study. Ionic liquids (ILs) show promise towards the creation of conductive fluids with required electrical properties. The goal of this project is to design and test ILs for enhancing DEP forces on cells while creating an environment for preserving their integrity. We analyzed two methylimidazolium based ILs as suspension medium for cell separation. These dicationic ILs possess slight electrical and structural differences with high thermal stability. The two ILs were tested for cytotoxicity using HeLa and bone cells. The effects of electrical neutrality, free charge screening due to ILs towards enhanced electrokinetic signals from cells were studied with improved system resolution and no harmful effects.

  3. Spheroid Formation and Evaluation of Hepatic Cells in a Three-Dimensional Culture Device.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Yagi, Tohru; Hayashi, Shuji

    2015-12-17

    In drug discovery, it is very important to evaluate liver cells within an organism. Compared to 2D culture methods, the development of 3D culture techniques for liver cells has been successful in maintaining long-term liver functionality with the formation of a hepatic-specific structure. The key to performing drug testing is the establishment of a stable in vitro evaluation system. In this article, we report a Tapered Stencil for Cluster Culture (TASCL) device developed to create liver spheroids in vitro. The TASCL device will be applied as a toxicity evaluation system for drug discovery. The TASCL device was created with an overall size of 10 mm × 10 mm, containing 400 microwells with a top aperture (500 µm × 500 µm) and a bottom aperture (300 µm diameter circular) per microwell. We evaluated the formation, recovery, and size of HepG2 spheroids in the TASCL device. The formation and recovery were both nearly 100%, and the size of the HepG2 spheroids increased with an increase in the initial cell seeding density. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the spheroids among the microwells. In addition, the HepG2 spheroids obtained using the TASCL device were alive and produced albumin. The morphology of the HepG2 spheroids was investigated using FE-SEM. The spheroids in the microwells exhibited perfectly spherical aggregation. In this report, by adjusting the size of the microwells of the TASCL device, uniform HepG2 spheroids were created, and the device facilitated more precise measurements of the liver function per HepG2 spheroid. Our TASCL device will be useful for application as a toxicity evaluation system for drug testing.

  4. A microfluidic device for depositing and addressing two cell populations with intercellular population communication capability.

    PubMed

    Lovchik, Robert D; Tonna, Noemi; Bianco, Fabio; Matteoli, Michela; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    We present a method for depositing cells in the microchambers of a sealed microfluidic device and establishing flow across the chambers independently and serially. The device comprises a transparent poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic network (MFN) having 2 cell chambers with a volume of 0.49 microL, 6 microchannels for servicing the chambers, and 1 microchannel linking both chambers. The MFN is sealed with a Si chip having 6 vias and ports that can be left open or connected to high-precision pumps. Liquids are drawn through each chamber in parallel or sequentially at flow rates from 0.1 to 10 microL min(-1). Plugs of liquid as small as 0.5 microL can be passed in one chamber within 5 s to 5 min. Plugs of liquid can also be introduced into a chamber for residence times of up to 30 min. By injecting different liquids into 3 ports, 3 adjacent laminar streams of liquid can be drawn inside one chamber with lateral concentration gradients between the streams ranging from 20 to 500 microm. The flexibility of this device for depositing cells and exposing them to liquids in parallel or serially is illustrated by depositing two types of cells, murine N9 microglia and human SH-S5Y5 neuroblastoma. Microfluidic communication between the chambers is illustrated by stimulating N9 microglia using ATP to induce these cells to release plasma membrane vesicles. The vesicles are drawn through the second chamber containing neuroblastoma and collected in a port of the device for off-chip analysis using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Cells in the MFN can also be fixed using a solution of formaldehyde for further analysis after disassembly of the MFN and Si lid. This microfluidic device offers a simple, flexible, and powerful method for depositing two cell populations in separate chambers and may help investigating pathways between the cells populations.

  5. An open-chamber flow-focusing device for focal stimulation of micropatterned cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tim C.; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Folch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices can deliver soluble factors to cell and tissue culture microenvironments with precise spatiotemporal control. However, enclosed microfluidic environments often have drawbacks such as the need for continuous culture medium perfusion which limits the duration of experiments, incongruity between microculture and macroculture, difficulty in introducing cells and tissues, and high shear stress on cells. Here, we present an open-chamber microfluidic device that delivers hydrodynamically focused streams of soluble reagents to cells over long time periods (i.e., several hours). We demonstrate the advantage of the open chamber by using conventional cell culture techniques to induce the differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes, a process that occurs in 7–10 days and is difficult to achieve in closed chamber microfluidic devices. By controlling the flow rates and altering the device geometry, we produced sharp focal streams with widths ranging from 36 μm to 187 μm. The focal streams were reproducible (∼12% variation between units) and stable (∼20% increase in stream width over 10 h of operation). Furthermore, we integrated trenches for micropatterning myoblasts and microtraps for confining single primary myofibers into the device. We demonstrate with finite element method (FEM) simulations that shear stresses within the cell trench are well below values known to be deleterious to cells, while local concentrations are maintained at ∼22% of the input concentration. Finally, we demonstrated focused delivery of cytoplasmic and nuclear dyes to micropatterned myoblasts and myofibers. The open-chamber microfluidic flow-focusing concept combined with micropatterning may be generalized to other microfluidic applications that require stringent long-term cell culture conditions. PMID:27158290

  6. Temporary Mechanical Circulatory Support in Cardiac Critical Care: A State of the Art Review and Algorithm for Device Selection.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, A Dave; Singal, Rohit K; Arora, Rakesh C; Lamarche, Yoan

    2017-01-01

    With more than 60 years of continuous development and improvement, a variety of temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices and implantation strategies exist, each with unique advantages and disadvantages. A thorough understanding of each available device is essential for optimizing patient outcomes in a fiscally responsible manner. In this state of the art review we examine the entire range of commonly available peripheral and centrally cannulated temporary MCS devices, including intra-aortic balloon pumps, the Impella (Abiomed, Danvers, MA) family of microaxial pumps, the TandemHeart (CardiacAssist Inc, Pittsburg, PA) pump and percutaneous cannulas, centrally cannulated centrifugal pumps such as the CentriMag (Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, CA/St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN/Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) and Rotaflow (Maquet Holding BV & Co KG, Rastatt Germany), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Several factors need detailed consideration when contemplating MCS in any given patient, mandating a balanced, algorithmic approach for these sick patients. In this review we describe our approach to MCS, and emphasize the need for multidisciplinary input to consider patient-related, logistical, and institutional factors. Evidence is summarized and referenced where available, but because of the lack of high-quality evidence, current best practice is described. Future directions for investigation are discussed, which will better define patient and device selection, and optimize MCS-specific patient care protocols. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Medical quality standards for selected urological aids and devices : Consensus for patients with neurogenic urinary bladder dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Bremer, J; Domurath, B; Böthig, R; Kaufmann, A; Geng, V

    2017-07-13

    Using the CE mark of therapeutic appliances is, on its own, not sufficient enough for their appropriate and effective application. In order to treat the patient successfully, not jeopardizing the success of the treatment, medical quality criteria for therapeutic appliances care are necessary to acceptably compensate for a patient's disabilities. Medical quality criteria are formulated for the most frequently used urological aids and devices, considering hygienic requirements, international literature and the practical experience of physicians and nurses with regard to the care of patients with neurogenic urinary bladder dysfunction. An expert group of urologists, surgeons, rehabilitation physicians and nurses has developed medical quality criteria via a structured consensus procedure. Developing these criteria, the group has taken into account current jurisprudence, the current resource directory of neurourological relevant aids, data from international literature and hygiene requirements. Medical quality requirements are discussed and defined for selected groups of urological devices (single use catheters, indwelling catheters, external catheters, urine bags, templates and diapers as well as devices for the electrostimulation of nerves). The presented quality requirements offer the possibility to stabilize quality of care with neurourological relevant therapeutic appliances. The catalogue of therapeutic appliances must be urgently updated. Urinal catheters for single use must be classified as an individual product group. Devices for anterior root stimulation and neuromodulation must be included in the resource directory. The incontinence severity classification needs to be reviewed.

  8. Selectively-grown InGaP/GaAs on silicon heterostructures for application to photovoltaic photoelectrolysis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Michael G.; Tata, Anthony N.; Feyock, Bryan W.

    2001-05-01

    Photovoltaic-photoelectrochemical (PV-PEC) cells based on InGaP/GaAs show excellent prospects for efficient production of hydrogen by electrolysis of water using solar energy. We describe a combined close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT)/liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) process to produce arrays of selectively-grown mesas of InGaP/GaAs on silicon substrates. Unlike other semiconductor devices, the PV-PEC cell is well suited for such selectively-grown, discontinuous heteroepitaxial films. Thus, this device application affords exploiting the potential advantages of selective epitaxy, namely, the substantial reduction of stress and defects caused by thermal expansion and lattice mismatch between the silicon substrate and III-V epilayers.

  9. Selective transgene expression for detection and elimination of contaminating carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell sources.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Pulsipher, M; Chen, D; Sieff, C; Elias, A; Fine, H A; Kufe, D W

    1996-01-01

    Tumor contamination of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) may affect the outcome of patients receiving high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell products. In this report, we demonstrate that replication defective adenoviral vectors containing the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or DF3/MUC1 carcinoma-selective promoter can be used to selectively transduce contaminating carcinoma cells. Adenoviral-mediated reporter gene expression in breast cancer cells was five orders of magnitude higher than that found in BM, PB, and CD34+ cells. Our results demonstrate that CD34+ cells have low to undetectable levels of integrins responsible for adenoviral internalization. We show that adenoviral-mediated transduction of a reporter gene can detect one breast cancer cell in 5 x 10(5) BM or PB cells with a vector containing the DF3/MUC1 promoter. We also show that transduction of the HSV-tk gene for selective killing by ganciclovir can be exploited for purging cancer cells from hematopoietic stem cell populations. The selective expression of TK followed by ganciclovir treatment resulted in the elimination of 6-logs of contaminating cancer cells. By contrast, there was little effect on CFU-GM and BFU-E formulation or on long term culture initiating cells. These results indicate that adenoviral vectors with a tumor-selective promoter provide a highly efficient and effective approach for the detection and purging of carcinoma cells in hematopoietic stem cell preparations. PMID:8958216

  10. Optimising a vortex fluidic device for controlling chemical reactivity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Lyzu; Chen, Xianjue; Stubbs, Keith A.; Raston, Colin L.

    2013-07-01

    A vortex fluidic device (VFD) involving a rapidly rotating tube open at one end forms dynamic thin films at high rotational speed for finite sub-millilitre volumes of liquid, with shear within the films depending on the speed and orientation of the tube. Continuous flow operation of the VFD where jet feeds of solutions are directed to the closed end of the tube provide additional tuneable shear from the viscous drag as the liquid whirls along the tube. The versatility of this simple, low cost microfluidic device, which can operate under confined mode or continuous flow is demonstrated in accelerating organic reactions, for model Diels-Alder dimerization of cyclopentadienes, and sequential aldol and Michael addition reactions, in accessing unusual 2,4,6-triarylpyridines. Residence times are controllable for continuous flow processing with the viscous drag dominating the shear for flow rates >0.1 mL/min in a 10 mm diameter tube rotating at >2000 rpm.

  11. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kachmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1995-02-28

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device is described, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  12. Automatic detection of selective arterial devices for advanced visualization during abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Simon; Kauffmann, Claude; Pfister, Marcus; Cloutier, Guy; Thérasse, Éric; de Guise, Jacques A; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Here we address the automatic segmentation of endovascular devices used in the endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that deform vascular tissues. Using this approach, the vascular structure is automatically reshaped solving the issue of misregistration observed on 2D/3D image fusion for EVAR guidance. The endovascular devices we considered are the graduated pigtail catheter (PC) used for contrast injection and the stent-graft delivery device (DD). The segmentation of the DD was enhanced using an asymmetric Frangi filter. The segmented geometries were then analysed using their specific features to remove artefacts. The radiopaque markers of the PC were enhanced using a fusion of Hessian and newly introduced gradient norm shift filters. Extensive experiments were performed using a database of images taken during 28 AAA-EVAR interventions. This dataset was divided into two parts: the first half was used to optimize parameters and the second to compile performances using optimal values obtained. The radiopaque markers of the PC were detected with a sensitivity of 88.3% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 96%. The PC can therefore be positioned with a majority of its markers localized while the artefacts were all located inside the vessel lumen. The major parts of the DD, the dilatator tip and the pusher surfaces, were detected accurately with a sensitivity of 85.9% and a PPV of 88.7%. The less visible part of the DD, the stent enclosed within the sheath, was segmented with a sensitivity of 63.4% because the radiopacity of this region is low and uneven. The centreline of the DD in this stent region was alternatively traced within a 0.74 mm mean error. The automatic segmentation of endovascular devices during EVAR is feasible and accurate; it could be useful to perform elastic registration of the vascular lumen during endovascular repair. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  14. Directional summation in non-direction selective retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Y; Hamade, Khaldoun C; Yang, Ellen J; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G; Pettit, Diana L

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network.

  15. Directional Summation in Non-direction Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Y.; Hamade, Khaldoun C.; Yang, Ellen J.; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G.; Pettit, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  16. Comparative analysis of selected exhaled breath biomarkers obtained with two different temperature-controlled devices

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a suitable and non-invasive method for evaluation of airway inflammation. Several studies indicate that the composition of the condensate and the recovery of biomarkers are affected by physical characteristics of the condensing device and collecting circumstances. Additionally, there is an apparent influence of the condensing temperature, and often the level of detection of the assay is a limiting factor. The ECoScreen2 device is a new, partly single-use disposable system designed for studying different lung compartments. Methods EBC samples were collected from 16 healthy non-smokers by using the two commercially available devices ECoScreen2 and ECoScreen at a controlled temperature of -20°C. EBC volume, pH, NOx, LTB4, PGE2, 8-isoprostane and cys-LTs were determined. Results EBC collected with ECoScreen2 was less acidic compared to ECoScreen. ECoScreen2 was superior concerning condensate volume and detection of biomarkers, as more samples were above the detection limit (LTB4 and PGE2) or showed higher concentrations (8-isoprostane). However, NOx was detected only in EBC sampled by ECoScreen. Conclusion ECoScreen2 in combination with mediator specific enzyme immunoassays may be suitable for measurement of different biomarkers. Using this equipment, patterns of markers can be assessed that are likely to reflect the complex pathophysiological processes in inflammatory respiratory disease. PMID:19948050

  17. Comparative analysis of selected exhaled breath biomarkers obtained with two different temperature-controlled devices.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Harth, Volker; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2009-11-30

    The collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a suitable and non-invasive method for evaluation of airway inflammation. Several studies indicate that the composition of the condensate and the recovery of biomarkers are affected by physical characteristics of the condensing device and collecting circumstances. Additionally, there is an apparent influence of the condensing temperature, and often the level of detection of the assay is a limiting factor. The ECoScreen2 device is a new, partly single-use disposable system designed for studying different lung compartments. EBC samples were collected from 16 healthy non-smokers by using the two commercially available devices ECoScreen2 and ECoScreen at a controlled temperature of -20 degrees C. EBC volume, pH, NOx, LTB4, PGE2, 8-isoprostane and cys-LTs were determined. EBC collected with ECoScreen2 was less acidic compared to ECoScreen. ECoScreen2 was superior concerning condensate volume and detection of biomarkers, as more samples were above the detection limit (LTB4 and PGE2) or showed higher concentrations (8-isoprostane). However, NOx was detected only in EBC sampled by ECoScreen. ECoScreen2 in combination with mediator specific enzyme immunoassays may be suitable for measurement of different biomarkers. Using this equipment, patterns of markers can be assessed that are likely to reflect the complex pathophysiological processes in inflammatory respiratory disease.

  18. Fuel cell crimp-resistant cooling device with internal coil

    DOEpatents

    Wittel, deceased, Charles F.

    1986-01-01

    A cooling assembly for fuel cells having a simplified construction whereby coolant is efficiently circulated through a conduit arranged in serpentine fashion in a channel within a member of such assembly. The channel is adapted to cradle a flexible, chemically inert, conformable conduit capable of manipulation into a variety of cooling patterns without crimping or otherwise restricting of coolant flow. The conduit, when assembled with the member, conforms into intimate contact with the member for good thermal conductivity. The conduit is non-corrodible and can be constructed as a single, manifold-free, continuous coolant passage means having only one inlet and one outlet. The conduit has an internal coil means which enables it to be bent in small radii without crimping.

  19. Selective killing of cancer cells by nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kosheleva, Olga K; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Chen, Nelson G; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-06-14

    Intense ultrasound, such as that used for tumor ablation, does not differentiate between cancerous and normal cells. A method combining ultrasound and biocompatible gold or magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) was developed under in vitro conditions using human breast and lung epithelial cells, which causes ultrasound to preferentially destroy cancerous cells. Co-cultures of BEAS-2B normal lung cells and A549 cancerous lung cells labeled with green and red fluorescent proteins, respectively, were treated with focused ultrasound beams with the addition of gold and magnetic nanoparticles. There were significantly more necrotic A549 cells than BEAS-2 cells when gold nanoparticles were added to the culture medium [(50.6 ± 15.1) vs. (7.4 ± 2.9) %, respectively, P < 0.01]. This selective damage to cancer cells was also observed for MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells relative to MCF-10A normal breast cells after treatment with magnetic nanoparticles. The data obtained for different cell lines indicate that nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound therapy (NAUT) could be an effective new tool for cancer-specific treatment and could potentially be combined with conventional methods of cancer diagnosis and therapy to further increase the overall cancer cure rate.

  20. Best practices for media selection for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Price, Paul J

    2017-07-19

    Cell culture medium is a complex mixture of nutrients and growth factors that, along with the physical environment, can either help or destroy your experiment or production run. Nutritional requirements differ with different cell types and functions, as do optimal pH and osmolality. As cell growth proceeds, different cells will utilize amino acids and other components at different rates. By controlling for ammonia, free radicals, heavy metal toxicity, pH shifts, fluctuations in osmolality, nutrient depletion, and chemical and biological contaminants, you will optimize the chances of success. The contribution of each component of the medium is essential for the maintenance of the cell type of interest. While some cell types, such as established human cancer cell lines, may be quite able to tolerate a range of media and supplements, many normal cells and stems cells are not. Optimization of each component may be required to successfully maintain the latter cell types. The procedures for selecting and optimizing cell culture media and supplements are presented.

  1. Microtube device for selectin-mediated capture of viable circulating tumor cells from blood.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew D; Mattison, Jeff; Western, Laura T; Powderly, John D; Greene, Bryan T; King, Michael R

    2012-05-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used clinically to treat cancer. As a diagnostic tool, the CTC count can be used to follow disease progression, and as a treatment tool, CTCs can be used to rapidly develop personalized therapeutic strategies. To be effectively used, however, CTCs must be isolated at high purity without inflicting cellular damage. We designed a microscale flow device with a functionalized surface of E-selectin and antibody molecules against epithelial markers. The device was additionally enhanced with a halloysite nanotube coating. We created model samples in which a known number of labeled cancer cells were suspended in healthy whole blood to determine device capture efficiency. We then isolated and cultured primary CTCs from buffy coat samples of patients diagnosed with metastatic cancer. Approximately 50% of CTCs were captured from model samples. Samples from 12 metastatic cancer patients and 8 healthy participants were processed in nanotube-coated or smooth devices to isolate CTCs. We isolated 20-704 viable CTCs per 3.75-mL sample, achieving purities of 18%-80% CTCs. The nanotube-coated surface significantly improved capture purities (P = 0.0004). Experiments suggested that this increase in purity was due to suppression of leukocyte spreading. The device successfully isolates viable CTCs from both blood and buffy coat samples. The approximately 50% capture rate with purities >50% with the nanotube coating demonstrates the functionality of this device in a clinical setting and opens the door for personalized cancer therapies.

  2. A high-throughput, quantitative cell-based screen for efficient tailoring of RNA device activity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Joe C.; Chang, Andrew L.; Kennedy, Andrew B.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances have demonstrated the use of RNA-based control devices to program sophisticated cellular functions; however, the efficiency with which these devices can be quantitatively tailored has limited their broader implementation in cellular networks. Here, we developed a high-efficiency, high-throughput and quantitative two-color fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based screening strategy to support the rapid generation of ribozyme-based control devices with user-specified regulatory activities. The high-efficiency of this screening strategy enabled the isolation of a single functional sequence from a library of over 106 variants within two sorting cycles. We demonstrated the versatility of our approach by screening large libraries generated from randomizing individual components within the ribozyme device platform to efficiently isolate new device sequences that exhibit increased in vitro cleavage rates up to 10.5-fold and increased in vivo activation ratios up to 2-fold. We also identified a titratable window within which in vitro cleavage rates and in vivo gene-regulatory activities are correlated, supporting the importance of optimizing RNA device activity directly in the cellular environment. Our two-color fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based screen provides a generalizable strategy for quantitatively tailoring genetic control elements for broader integration within biological networks. PMID:22810204

  3. Biopolymer as an electron selective layer for inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin Tan, Mein; Zhong, Shu; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhongxing; Chellappan, Vijila; Chen, Wei

    2013-08-01

    In this work, a solution-processable electron selective layer is introduced for inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Cationic biopolymer poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) is used as a solution-processable work function modifier of indium-tin-oxide transparent conducting electrode to yield efficient inverted PSCs of 3.3% under AM1.5G illumination, with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester as the active layer. Devices using PDMAEMA exhibit greater stability in ambient "working conditions" as compared to devices using ZnO, retaining 90% of peak power conversion efficiency after 8 weeks. Therefore, PDMAEMA has great potential as a universal work function modifier material with high robustness.

  4. Electromechanical cell lysis using a portable audio device: enabling challenging sample preparation at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Buser, J R; Wollen, A; Heiniger, E K; Byrnes, S A; Kauffman, P C; Ladd, P D; Yager, P

    2015-05-07

    Audio sources are ubiquitously available on portable electronic devices, including cell phones. Here we demonstrate lysis of Mycobacterium marinum and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria utilizing a portable audio device coupled with a simple and inexpensive electromagnetic coil. The resulting alternating magnetic field rotates a magnet in a tube with the sample and glass beads, lysing the cells and enabling sample preparation for these bacteria anywhere there is a cell phone, mp3 player, laptop, or other device with a headphone jack.

  5. Influences of device structures on microstructure-correlated photovoltaic characteristics of organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yang, Cheng-Chi; Tseng, Po-Tsung; Chou, Wei-Yang; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2017-02-01

    Photovoltaic characteristics of organic solar cells (OSCs) are correlated with microstructural qualities of active layers (ALs). Numerous efforts focused on improving process conditions of ALs to attain effective microstructures to achieve high-efficiency OSCs. Aside from AL process conditions, layer properties under AL can also influence microstructural qualities of AL. In this study, we adopted poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) mixture as AL, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as hole extraction layer, and branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) as electron extraction layer to prepare OSCs with different device structures, that is, normal type (PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/BPEI) and inverted type (BPEI/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS) structures. We discovered that although devices have similar layer components, they have different photovoltaic characteristics. Inverted devices demonstrated higher power conversion efficiency than normal devices. Various methods, including absorption spectroscopy and microscopy, were used to study AL microstructures of different devices. We observed that P3HT crystallites grown on BPEI had longer vertical size and shorter horizontal size compared with those grown on PEDOT:PSS; these properties could result from larger interfacial tension of P3HT with BPEI than with PEDOT:PSS. Observed shape of P3HT crystallites in inverted devices facilitated efficient charge transport to electrodes and suppressed current leakage. As a result, inverted devices generated improved photovoltaic performance.

  6. Ligand-Driven T Cell Receptor Selection in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant K; Baker, Brian M

    2016-10-04

    Recognition of antigens by T cell receptors (TCRs) underlies cellular immunity. By comparing how different TCRs recognize the key antigens associated with celiac disease, Petersen et al. (2016), in this issue of Structure, show how celiac antigen properties select immunologically distinct yet structurally and physically compatible TCRs, ultimately driving autoimmunity.

  7. Cell Selection as Driving Force in Lung and Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schöllnberger, Helmut; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Hoogenveen, Rudolf; Vineis, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is the result of mutations and subsequent clonal expansions of mutated, selectively advantageous cells. To investigate the relative contributions of mutation versus cell selection in tumorigenesis, we compared two mathematical models of carcinogenesis in two different cancer types: lung and colon. One approach is based on a population genetics model, the Wright-Fisher process, whereas the other approach is the two-stage clonal expansion model. We compared the dynamics of tumorigenesis predicted by the two models in terms of the time period until the first malignant cell appears, which will subsequently form a tumor. The mean waiting time to cancer has been calculated approximately for the evolutionary colon cancer model. Here, we derive new analytic approximations to the median waiting time for the two-stage lung cancer model and for a multistage approximation to the Wright-Fisher process. Both equations show that the waiting time to cancer is dominated by the selective advantage per mutation and the net clonal expansion rate, respectively, whereas the mutation rate has less effect. Our comparisons support the idea that the main driving force in lung and colon carcinogenesis is Darwinian cell selection. PMID:20656803

  8. Selective chemical imaging of static actin in live cells.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Rizzo, Stefano; Calderon, Abram; Ellinger, Bernhard; Erdmann, Silke; Mondry, Justine; Verveer, Peter; Bastiaens, Philippe; Waldmann, Herbert; Dehmelt, Leif; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2012-05-23

    We have characterized rationally designed and optimized analogues of the actin-stabilizing natural products jasplakinolide and chondramide C. Efficient actin staining was achieved in fixed permeabilized and non-permeabilized cells using different combinations of dye and linker length, thus highlighting the degree of molecular flexibility of the natural product scaffold. Investigations into synthetically accessible, non-toxic analogues have led to the characterization of a powerful cell-permeable probe to selectively image static, long-lived actin filaments against dynamic F-actin and monomeric G-actin populations in live cells, with negligible disruption of rapid actin dynamics.

  9. Cell descent caused by boundary curvature of a high topographical structure for a device that changes cell density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutani, Chihiro; Wagatsuma, Akira; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    Noninvasive techniques of controlling cell migration on substrates are widely useful for tissue engineering. However, the cell migration controls of previous studies were not enough for collecting cells locally. To solve this problem, in this work, we report the C2C12 mouse myoblast cell migration difference (descend or be repelled) by changing the curvature of the boundary of a topographical structure when the cells move from a flat surface to the boundary. 69% of the cells coming across a round boundary — the curvature radius of which was 50 µm — descended into the hole. In contrast, no cells descended into a groove with a linear boundary. Moreover, we demonstrated the cell spatial density change from the difference at the boundary. This finding will provide a new device that will enable us to manipulate spatial cell density noninvasively for tissue engineering.

  10. Solution-processed carrier selective layers for high efficiency organic/nanostructured-silicon hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Ying-Shu; Yang, Song-Ting; Thiyagu, Subramani; Liu, Chien-Ting; Wu, Jia-Wei; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2016-02-01

    The reduction of interface minority carrier recombination is regarded as a key performance indicator in improving the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. In this study, we chose two kinds of carrier-selective layers to be applied in a hybrid solar cell device. A hole selective transporting layer of N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) was added to the interface between Si nanohole structures and PEDOT:PSS, and the electron selective layer cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) was added to the interface between the backside Si wafer and the rear Ti/Ag electrode. The main process used a clean and low-cost solution process, and the annealed temperature was under 140 °C. In addition, after we inserted these two carrier selective layers, the minority carrier lifetime was prolonged from 29.98 μs to 140.81 μs, indicating its significance in reducing the recombination rate. Eventually, we demonstrated that the PCE of Si/organic heterojunction solar cells can be improved to 13.23%.

  11. Nanostructured Electron-Selective Interlayer for Efficient Inverted Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiyun; Lim, Jaehoon; Lee, Donggu; Thambidurai, M; Kim, Jun Young; Park, Myeongjin; Song, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Seonghoon; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Changhee

    2015-08-26

    We report a unique nanostructured electron-selective interlayer comprising of In-doped ZnO (ZnO:In) and vertically aligned CdSe tetrapods (TPs) for inverted polymer:fullerene bulkheterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. With dimension-controlled CdSe TPs, the direct inorganic electron transport pathway is provided, resulting in the improvement of the short circuit current and fill factor of devices. We demonstrate that the enhancement is attributed to the roles of CdSe TPs that reduce the recombination losses between the active layer and buffer layer, improve the hole-blocking as well as electron-transporting properties, and simultaneously improve charge collection characteristics. As a result, the power conversion efficiency of PTB7:PC70BM based solar cell with nanostructured CdSe TPs increases to 7.55%. We expect this approach can be extended to a general platform for improving charge extraction in organic solar cells.

  12. In vitro analysis of cell salvage blood collection with a laparoscopic suction device.

    PubMed

    Nagarsheth, Nimesh P; Fenske, Suzanne Silverman; Shah, Apurva; Moshier, Erin; Stahl, Rosalyn; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether cell salvage blood collection with a laparoscopic suction device is inferior to use of a traditional Yankauer suction device. Prospective, in vitro study. Academic teaching hospital. Individual units of donated packed red blood cells were diluted with normal saline solution to a hematocrit level of 21%. The blood was divided into 2 equal parts and then suctioned with either a laparoscopic suction device or a Yankauer plastic suction catheter tip connected to double-lumen cell salvage tubing with a diluted heparin drip and a vacuum pressure of 100 mm Hg. Collected blood was processed with a cell salvage device. Red blood cell volume was calculated by multiplying the hematocrit level by the total volume of blood product at the time of testing. Mean hemolysis indexes were compared between the laparoscopic and Yankauer method of blood collection by use of a 2-sample t test. Assuming a clinically acceptable limit of loss to be 7%, percent loss in red blood cell volume was tested with a 95% one-sided confidence limit to assess noninferiority. The mean hemolysis index was 43.33 with laparoscopic suction method and 34.67 with the Yankauer suction method. The mean difference was 8.67 and was not considered significant (p = .074). The percent loss in red blood cell volume after collection and cell salvage processing was 33.2% with the laparoscopic suction method and 29.57% with the Yankauer method. The mean difference was 3.63% and was within the acceptable 7% loss limit for noninferiority (p = .0278). Laparoscopic blood collection is not inferior to the standard Yankauer method for cell salvage collection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Grating light modulators for use as de-multiplexer and switching device in wavelength-selective switching systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothisorn, Araya; Hariz, Alex J.

    2007-12-01

    All optical switches have been used with measured success in response to a high demand in all optical networks, and a dramatic increase in the Internet and communication needs over the last decade. The wavelength-selective switch is the mechanism used in various switching applications. MEMS-based wavelength-selective switches (WSS) are the most promising technology to bring all-optical switches into wide implementation by providing reasonable cost, excellent performance, and most reliable use of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Optical-MEMS devices, often referred to as micro-opto-electromechanical systems or MOEMS; have been used successfully in optical network systems and particularly in switching devices such as waveguide and free-space switches. Free-space switching devices are more popular than waveguide switches, because they offer faster switching time and are more scalable. 1D MEMS-based WSSs, using free-space approach, require the use of integrated multiplexer/de-multiplexer and micro-mirror arrays for their operations [1, 2]. The switching time depends primarily on the time it takes for the scanning micro-mirrors to steer de-multiplexed beams to the desired output ports. This is due to the fact that the mirrors are the main inertial components in free-space switching systems. Grating Light Modulators (GLM) were introduced a decade ago for use in diffraction optics. Research has begun to investigate their use in communication optics. Unlike other 1D MEMS-based WSS, GLM promises to offer very low loss for the whole system and fast switching time of as low as 20 ns with no integrated micro-mirrors [3-5]. We propose the development of a switching system incorporating a GLM as the central unit acting as both de-multiplexer and switching device in one spot, and which does not require any moving micro-mirror arrays. Therefore, the switching time is entirely dependent on the GLM device which is relatively fast. GLMs use diffraction principles to

  14. Clinical Usefulness of a Mobile Application for the Appropriate Selection of the Antiarrhythmic Device in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Antonio; DE Rosa, Salvatore; Sabatino, Jolanda; DE Luca, Simona; Bochicchio, Angela; Polimeni, Alberto; Santarpia, Giuseppe; Ricci, Pietrantonio; Indolfi, Ciro

    2016-07-01

    Appropriate selection of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device can be challenging in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. In this setting, limited information exists about the role of medical applications in helping physicians to choose the most useful device. We developed a medical application that provides guidelines-based algorithms for helping doctors in decision process using the Apache Cordova application programming interface. e-CRTD App was tested in 36 consecutive patients (age 66.4 ± 8.5 years, 31 males) with diagnosis of heart failure (HF) addressed to electrophysiology laboratory for evaluation of ICD (N = 18) or CRT with defibrillator device (CRT-D; N = 18) implantation. Two separate teams evaluated each patient independently: expert electrophysiologists (Group A); cardiologists in training using the App (Group B). The outcomes of the clinical evaluation performed by Groups A and B were similar in 100% of patients in terms of classes of recommendations to device (Class I in eight cases, Class IIa in seven cases, Class III in the remaining 21). Surprisingly, the majority of indications from the general practitioners to cardiac device were inappropriate (N = 17 ICD, and N = 4 CRT-D, Class III); nevertheless, e-CRTD App helped Group B (nonexpert cardiologists) in excluding all these cases. This study describes and validates a mobile application realized to help the decision-making process in HF patients candidate to ICD/CRT-D. This application supports physicians to assess the eligibility for ICD or CRT-D according to current guidelines in patients with LV dysfunction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Direction selectivity and spatiotemporal separability in simple cortical cells.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, M A

    1999-01-01

    Simple cells in mammalian visual cortex are quasi-linear mechanisms whose behavior departs from true linearity in a very consistent manner. Empirical research on direction selectivity (DS) clearly illustrates these characteristics. A linear DS cell will be DS for all stimuli, whereas a linear non-DS cell will not be DS for any stimuli. However, many simple cells have opposite preferred directions for stimuli of reversed polarity, and some cells are DS for some stimuli (e.g., moving bars) but not for others (e.g., drifting gratings). Also, linear non-DS cells must have separable spatiotemporal receptive fields (RFs), and linear DS cells must have inseparable RFs. Yet many actual DS cells have separable RFs. Here we present a nonlinear model of simple-cell behavior that reproduces all of these empirical behaviors. The model is a variant of the current linear model, amended to include an interleaved nonlinearity (half-wave rectification) that allows it to mimic the (im)balance of push-pull mechanisms. We present simulation results showing that balanced push-pull mechanisms result in linear behavior, while imbalanced push-pull arrangements produce all of the incongruent DS-related behaviors that have been reported for simple cells.

  16. End-faced waveguide mediated optical propulsion of microspheres and single cells in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Lilge, Lothar; Shah, Duoaud; Charron, Luc

    2013-07-07

    Single cell transport in microfluidic devices is a topic of interest as their utility is becoming appreciated by cell and molecular biologist. Cell transport should minimize mechanical stress due to friction or pressure gradients. Optical forces have the advantage of applying their forces across the cell volume and not only at the cell membrane and are thus preferable. Optical pushing by scattering force is a suitable candidate so highly dependent on the photon irradiance field inside the propagation capillary which in turn is determined by the waveguide properties delivering the radiation pressure. Here we present a numerical approach to predict the optical scattering force, speed and trajectory of cells as a function of waveguide and propagation capillary geometry. Experimental verification of the simulation approach is demonstrated using polystyrene microspheres and leukemia cells. Effects of optical fibre to waveguide alignment, capillary wall angle and temperature on the dynamic viscosity on speed and position of the microspheres and cells inside the propagation capillary are demonstrated.

  17. Device modeling of perovskite solar cells based on structural similarity with thin film inorganic semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minemoto, Takashi; Murata, Masashi

    2014-08-01

    Device modeling of CH3NH3PbI3-xCl3 perovskite-based solar cells was performed. The perovskite solar cells employ a similar structure with inorganic semiconductor solar cells, such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2, and the exciton in the perovskite is Wannier-type. We, therefore, applied one-dimensional device simulator widely used in the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells. A high open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V reported experimentally was successfully reproduced in the simulation, and also other solar cell parameters well consistent with real devices were obtained. In addition, the effect of carrier diffusion length of the absorber and interface defect densities at front and back sides and the optimum thickness of the absorber were analyzed. The results revealed that the diffusion length experimentally reported is long enough for high efficiency, and the defect density at the front interface is critical for high efficiency. Also, the optimum absorber thickness well consistent with the thickness range of real devices was derived.

  18. Continuously expanding CAR NK-92 cells display selective cytotoxicity against B-cell leukemia and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Oelsner, Sarah; Friede, Miriam E; Zhang, Congcong; Wagner, Juliane; Badura, Susanne; Bader, Peter; Ullrich, Evelyn; Ottmann, Oliver G; Klingemann, Hans; Tonn, Torsten; Wels, Winfried S

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can rapidly respond to transformed and stressed cells and represent an important effector cell type for adoptive immunotherapy. In addition to donor-derived primary NK cells, continuously expanding cytotoxic cell lines such as NK-92 are being developed for clinical applications. To enhance their therapeutic utility for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, we engineered NK-92 cells by lentiviral gene transfer to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target CD19 and contain human CD3ζ (CAR 63.z), composite CD28-CD3ζ or CD137-CD3ζ signaling domains (CARs 63.28.z and 63.137.z). Exposure of CD19-positive targets to CAR NK-92 cells resulted in formation of conjugates between NK and cancer cells, NK-cell degranulation and selective cytotoxicity toward established B-cell leukemia and lymphoma cells. Likewise, the CAR NK cells displayed targeted cell killing of primary pre-B-ALL blasts that were resistant to parental NK-92. Although all three CAR NK-92 cell variants were functionally active, NK-92/63.137.z cells were less effective than NK-92/63.z and NK-92/63.28.z in cell killing and cytokine production, pointing to differential effects of the costimulatory CD28 and CD137 domains. In a Raji B-cell lymphoma model in NOD-SCID IL2R γ(null) mice, treatment with NK-92/63.z cells, but not parental NK-92 cells, inhibited disease progression, indicating that selective cytotoxicity was retained in vivo. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to generate CAR-engineered NK-92 cells with potent and selective antitumor activity. These cells may become clinically useful as a continuously expandable off-the-shelf cell therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic selection of glycosylation defects in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Kevin J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-01

    Changes in glycosylation are often associated with disease progression, but the genetic and metabolic basis of these events is rarely understood in detail at a molecular level. This report describes a novel metabolism-based approach to the selection of mutants in glycoconjugate biosynthesis that has provided insight into regulatory mechanisms for oligosaccharide expression and metabolic flux. Unnatural intermediates are used to challenge a specific pathway and cell-surface expression of their metabolic products provides a readout of flux in that pathway and a basis for selecting genetic mutants. The approach was applied to the sialic acid metabolic pathway in human cells, yielding novel mutants with phenotypes related to the inborn metabolic defect sialuria and metastatic tumor cells.

  20. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective cell cycle transcription requires membrane synthesis in Caulobacter

    PubMed Central

    Brassinga, Ann Karen C.; Gorbatyuk, Boris; Ouimet, Marie–Claude; Marczynski, Gregory T.

    2000-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically and creates distinct polar membrane surfaces that partition during the cell cycle to distinct cell progeny. Blocking membrane synthesis prevented transcription from selective promoters involved in asymmetric cell division. Transcription from sigma-54-dependent flagellar promoters was blocked completely; however, transcription from the CtrA response regulator-dependent flagellar promoters was activated but reduced. Transcription from the ccrM (DNA methylation) promoter and the che (chemosensory) promoter was also blocked completely. Transcription from a strong promoter at the chromosome replication origin was first stopped then induced by blocked membrane synthesis. We propose a feedback control coupling membrane synthesis to transcription that selectively supports membrane-associated processes such as flagellar assembly, chemosensory biogenesis and chromosome replication. PMID:10675339

  2. Small molecule selectively suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bouvard, Claire; Lim, Sang Min; Ludka, John; Yazdani, Nahid; Woods, Ashley K; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Zhu, Shoutian

    2017-03-28

    Stauprimide is a staurosporine analog that promotes embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation by inhibiting nuclear localization of the MYC transcription factor NME2, which in turn results in down-regulation of MYC transcription. Given the critical role the oncogene MYC plays in tumor initiation and maintenance, we explored the potential of stauprimide as an anticancer agent. Here we report that stauprimide suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cell lines derived from distinct tissues. Using renal cancer cells, we confirmed that stauprimide inhibits NME2 nuclear localization. Gene expression analysis also confirmed the selective down-regulation of MYC target genes by stauprimide. Consistent with this activity, administration of stauprimide inhibited tumor growth in rodent xenograft models. Our study provides a unique strategy for selectively targeting MYC transcription by pharmacological means as a potential treatment for MYC-dependent tumors.

  3. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype.

  4. Contact devices for extraction towers in units for selective solvent treatment of lube stocks

    SciTech Connect

    Yaushev, R.G.; Vyazovkin, E.S.

    1987-11-01

    A method of improving contact devices through the use of sieve trays, to provide the proper conditions for coalescence of the emulsion drops, was investigated. A tray was developed which has two diametrically opposite perforation zones for the continuous and disperse phases. A figure is shown. The larger part of the tray is a settler for the emulsion that has formed. A baffle is installed at the outlet from each settler, separating the light and heavy phases into two streams. Thus, by using such tray designs which provide a forced coalescence of the disperse phase, solvent treatment for an oil/phenol system can be improved.

  5. Halo and spillover effect illustrations for selected beneficial medical devices and drugs.

    PubMed

    Kerger, Brent D; Bernal, Autumn; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Huntley-Fenner, Gavin

    2016-09-15

    Negative news media reports regarding potential health hazards of implanted medical devices and pharmaceuticals can lead to a 'negative halo effect,' a phenomenon whereby judgments about a product or product type can be unconsciously altered even though the scientific support is tenuous. To determine how a 'negative halo effect' may impact the rates of use and/or explantation of medical products, we analyzed the occurrence of such an effect on three implanted medical devices and one drug: 1) intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs); 2) silicone gel-filled breast implants (SGBI); 3) metal-on-metal hip implants (MoM); and 4) the drug Tysabri. Data on IUD use from 1965 to 2008 were gathered from the Department of Health and Human Services Vital and Health Statistics and peer-reviewed publications. Data regarding SGBI implant and explantation rates from 1989 to 2012 were obtained from the Institute of Medicine and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. MoM implant and explantation data were extracted from the England and Wales National Joint Registry and peer-reviewed publications. Tysabri patient data were reported by Elan Corporation or Biogen Idec Inc. Data trends for all products were compared with historical recall or withdrawal events and discussed in the context of public perceptions following such events. We found that common factors altered public risk perceptions and patterns of continued use. First, a negative halo effect may be driven by continuing patient anxiety despite positive clinical outcomes. Second, negative reports about one product can spill over to affect the use of dissimilar products in the same category. Third, a negative halo effect on an entire category of medical devices can be sustained regardless of the scientific findings pertaining to safety. Fourth, recovery of a product's safety reputation and prevalent use may take decades in the U.S., even while these products may exhibit widespread use and good safety records in other countries

  6. Optical manipulation of hot nanoparticles can mediate selected cell fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddershede, Lene B.; Bahadori, Azra; Bendix, Poul M.

    2017-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles with diameters from 10 nm to 250 nm can be optically trapped and manipulated in 3D using a single tightly focused near infrared laser beam. This will result in a significant heating of the particle and its vicinity, with temperature increases easily reaching hundreds degrees Celsius. If such a hot metallic nanoparticle is brought into the contact zone between two cells or vesicles, this local temperature increase can cause a total fusion of the selected cells or vesicles. Upon fusion, both the membrane and the cargos become completely mixed and we also show that the cells remain viable after fusion. The presented method has potential for single-cell targeted drug delivery and for the creation of hybrid cells.

  7. A selective inhibitor of cell proliferation from normal serum.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, W N; Godman, G C

    1980-01-01

    A factor in normal serum that selectively and reversibly inhibits proliferation of cells in culture has been enriched 160-fold from calf serum by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and lectin-affinity chromatography. DNA synthesis of normal (but not transformed) rat hepatocytes, human lymphoblast lines, and mitogen-stimulated murine spleen cells is inhibited by greater than 90%, and Vero, murine myeloma, MELC, and a human colon carcinoma cell line to a lesser extent. Growth of other cell lines tested was not affected. Responsive cells are arrested apparently in G1 by this inhibitor, the effect of which is maximal by 24 hr and is spontaneously reversible thereafter unless it is renewed. The active fraction is a protein that migrates with the alpha 2-globulins; it is not a lipoprotein, and it is of high apparent molecular weight. PMID:6928635

  8. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Koren, John; Miyata, Yoshinari; Kiray, Janine; O'Leary, John C; Nguyen, Lana; Guo, Jianping; Blair, Laura J; Li, Xiaokai; Li, Xiokai; Jinwal, Umesh K; Cheng, Jin Q; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2012-01-01

    MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB). Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  9. Aptamer Cell-Based Selection: Overview and Advances.

    PubMed

    Catuogno, Silvia; Esposito, Carla Lucia

    2017-08-14

    Aptamers are high affinity single-stranded DNA/RNA molecules, produced by a combinatorial procedure named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment), that are emerging as promising diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Among selection strategies, procedures using living cells as complex targets (referred as "cell-SELEX") have been developed as an effective mean to generate aptamers for heavily modified cell surface proteins, assuring the binding of the target in its native conformation. Here we give an up-to-date overview on cell-SELEX technology, discussing the most recent advances with a particular focus on cancer cell targeting. Examples of the different protocol applications and post-SELEX strategies will be briefly outlined.

  10. Tunable Microfluidic Devices for Hydrodynamic Fractionation of Cells and Beads: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    The adjustable microfluidic devices that have been developed for hydrodynamic-based fractionation of beads and cells are important for fast performance tunability through interaction of mechanical properties of particles in fluid flow and mechanically flexible microstructures. In this review, the research works reported on fabrication and testing of the tunable elastomeric microfluidic devices for applications such as separation, filtration, isolation, and trapping of single or bulk of microbeads or cells are discussed. Such microfluidic systems for rapid performance alteration are classified in two groups of bulk deformation of microdevices using external mechanical forces, and local deformation of microstructures using flexible membrane by pneumatic pressure. The main advantage of membrane-based tunable systems has been addressed to be the high capability of integration with other microdevice components. The stretchable devices based on bulk deformation of microstructures have in common advantage of simplicity in design and fabrication process. PMID:26610519

  11. Operando XPS Characterization of Selective Contacts: The Case of Molybdenum Oxide for Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Laura; Harvey, Stephen P.; Teeter, Glenn; Bertoni, Mariana I.

    2016-11-21

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to characterize new carrier-selective contacts (CSC) for solar cell application. We show that XPS not only provides information about the surface chemical properties of the CSC material, but that operando XPS, i.e. under light bias condition, can also directly measure the photovoltage that develops at the CSC/absorber interface, revealing device relevant information without the need of assembling a full solar cell. We present the application of the technique to molybdenum oxide hole-selective contact films on a crystalline silicon absorber.

  12. Cell membrane-inspired phospholipid polymers for developing medical devices with excellent biointerfaces

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    This review article describes fundamental aspects of cell membrane-inspired phospholipid polymers and their usefulness in the development of medical devices. Since the early 1990s, polymers composed of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) units have been considered in the preparation of biomaterials. MPC polymers can provide an artificial cell membrane structure at the surface and serve as excellent biointerfaces between artificial and biological systems. They have also been applied in the surface modification of some medical devices including long-term implantable artificial organs. An MPC polymer biointerface can suppress unfavorable biological reactions such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion – in other words, specific biomolecules immobilized on an MPC polymer surface retain their original functions. MPC polymers are also being increasingly used for creating biointerfaces with artificial cell membrane structures. PMID:27877525

  13. Modulating chemotaxis of lung cancer cells by using electric fields in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Chiu; Hsieh, Meng-Hua; Liu, Chung-Chun; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Liao, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Kuo, Po-Ling; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2014-03-01

    We employed direct-current electric fields (dcEFs) to modulate the chemotaxis of lung cancer cells in a microfluidic cell culture device that incorporates both stable concentration gradients and dcEFs. We found that the chemotaxis induced by a 0.5 μM/mm concentration gradient of epidermal growth factor can be nearly compensated by a 360 mV/mm dcEF. When the effect of chemical stimulation was balanced by the electrical drive, the cells migrated randomly, and the path lengths were largely reduced. We also demonstrated electrically modulated chemotaxis of two types of lung cancer cells with opposite directions of electrotaxis in this device.

  14. Directional migration of mesenchymal stem cells under an SDF-1α gradient on a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Park, Siwan; Jang, Hwanseok; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Changmo; Jeong, Gi Seok; Park, Yongdoo

    2017-01-01

    Homing of peripheral stem cells is regulated by one of the most representative homing factors, stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α), which specifically binds to the plasma membrane receptor CXCR4 of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in order to initiate the signaling pathways that lead to directional migration and homing of stem cells. This complex homing process and directional migration of stem cells have been mimicked on a microfluidic device that is capable of generating a chemokine gradient within the collagen matrix and embedding endothelial cell (EC) monolayers to mimic blood vessels. On the microfluidic device, stem cells showed directional migration toward the higher concentration of SDF-1α, whereas treatment with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 caused loss of directionality of stem cells. Furthermore, inhibition of stem cell’s main migratory signaling pathways, Rho-ROCK and Rac pathways, caused blockage of actomyosin and lamellipodia formation, decreasing the migration distance but maintaining directionality. Stem cell homing regulated by SDF-1α caused directional migration of stem cells, while the migratory ability was affected by the activation of migration-related signaling pathways. PMID:28886159

  15. Development of microarray device for functional evaluation of PC12D cell axonal extension ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Yanagimoto, Junpei; Murakami, Shinya; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we developed a microarray bio-MEMS device that could trap PC12D (rat pheochromocytoma cells) cells to examine the intercellular interaction effect on the cell activation and the axonal extension ability. This is needed to assign particular patterns of PC12D cells to establish a cell functional evaluation technique. This experimental observation-based technique can be used for design of the cell sheet and scaffold for peripheral and central nerve regeneration. We have fabricated a micropillar-array bio-MEMS device, whose diameter was approximately 10 μm, by using thick photoresist SU-8 on the glass slide substrate. A maximum trapped PC12D cell ratio, 48.5%, was achieved. Through experimental observation of patterned PC12D "bi-cells" activation, we obtained the following results. Most of the PC12D "bi-cells" which had distances between 40 and 100 μm were connected after 24 h with a high probability. On the other hand, "bi-cells" which had distances between 110 and 200 μm were not connected. In addition, we measured axonal extension velocities in cases where the intercellular distance was between 40 and 100 μm. A maximum axonal extension velocity, 86.4 μm/h, was obtained at the intercellular distance of 40 μm.

  16. Using Microfluidic Devices to Measure Lifespan and Cellular Phenotypes in Single Budding Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ke; Ren, Diana S; Ou-Yang, Qi; Li, Hao; Zheng, Jiashun

    2017-03-30

    Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important model organism in aging research. Genetic studies have revealed many genes with conserved effects on the lifespan across species. However, the molecular causes of aging and death remain elusive. To gain a systematic understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying yeast aging, we need high-throughput methods to measure lifespan and to quantify various cellular and molecular phenotypes in single cells. Previously, we developed microfluidic devices to track budding yeast mother cells throughout their lifespan while flushing away newborn daughter cells. This article presents a method for preparing microfluidic chips and for setting up microfluidic experiments. Multiple channels can be used to simultaneously track cells under different conditions or from different yeast strains. A typical setup can track hundreds of cells per channel and allow for high-resolution microscope imaging throughout the lifespan of the cells. Our method also allows detailed characterization of the lifespan, molecular markers, cell morphology, and the cell cycle dynamics of single cells. In addition, our microfluidic device is able to trap a significant amount of fresh mother cells that can be identified by downstream image analysis, making it possible to measure the lifespan with higher accuracy.

  17. Incorporation of wavelength selective devices into waveguides with applications to a miniature spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B. R.; Kaushik, S.; Hadley, G. R.; Fritz, I. J.; Howard, A. J.; Vawter, G. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Corless, R

    1996-02-01

    This report pertains to a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project which was funded for FY94 and FY95. The goal was to develop building blocks for small, cheap sensors that use optical spectroscopy as a means of detecting chemical analytes. Such sensors can have an impact on a wide variety of technologies, such as: industrial process control, environmental monitors, chemical analysis in medicine, and automotive monitors. We describe work in fabricating and demonstrating a waveguide/grating device that can serve as the wavelength dispersive component in a miniature spectrometer. Also, we describe the invention and modeling of a new way to construct an array of optical interference filters using sub-wavelength lithography to tune the index of refraction of a fixed Fabry-Perot cavity. Next we describe progress in more efficiently calculating the fields in grating devices. Finally we present the invention of a new type of near field optical probe, applicable to scanning microscopy or optical data storage, which is based on a circular grating constructed in a waveguide. This result diverges from the original goal of the project but is quite significant in that it promises to increase the data storage capacity of CD-ROMs by 10 times.

  18. AEA Technologies Battery Cell By-pass Device Activation: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Denney; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Sullivan, David; Wannemacher, Harry; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objectives are to: (1) Verify the Performance of AEA Cell Bypass Protection Device (CBPD) under simulated EOS-Aqua/Aura flight hardware configuration; (2) Assess the Safety of the hardware under an inadvertent firing of CBPD switch, as well as the closing of CBPD switch under simulated high cell impedance; and (3) Confirm that the mode of operation of CBPD switch is the formation of a continuous low impedance path (a homogeneous low melting point alloy).

  19. Predicting therapy response in live tumor cells isolated with the flexible micro spring array device

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Jean-Nicolas; Matthew, Elizabeth M; Cheng, Hairong; Harouaka, Ramdane; Lamparella, Nicholas E.; Kunkel, Miriam; Yang, Zhaohai; Harvey, Harold A.; Cream, Leah V.; Kumar, Suresh M.; Robertson, Gavin P.; Zheng, Siyang; Drabick, Joseph J.; Truica, Cristina I.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2013-01-01

    Cells disseminated from primary epithelial tumors into peripheral blood, called circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can be monitored to assess metastases and to provide a surrogate marker of treatment response. Here, we demonstrate how the flexible micro spring array (FMSA) device—a novel microfluidic device that enriches CTCs by two physical parameters: size and deformability—could be used in the rational development of treatment intervention and as a method to study the fundamental biology of CTCs. Cancer cells of different origins were spiked into healthy samples of donor blood to mimic blood samples of metastatic cancer patients. This spiked human blood was filtered using the FMSA device, and the recovered cells were successfully expanded in vitro and in a novel in vivo system. A series of experiments were performed to characterize these cells and to investigate the effect of chemotherapy on the resulting cultures. As few as 20 colon cancer cells in 7.5 mL blood could be isolated with the FMSA device, expanded both in vitro and in vivo and used at 25 cells per well to obtain significant and reliable chemosensitivity data. We also show that isolating a low number of viable patient CTCs and maintaining them in culture for a few weeks is possible. The isolation of viable cancer cells from human blood using the FMSA device provides a novel and realistic means for studying the biology of viable CTCs and for testing drug efficacy on these rare cells—a hypothesis that can be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:23759587

  20. A comparison of 2 white blood cell count devices to aid judicious antibiotic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Casey, Janet R; Pichichero, Michael E

    2009-04-01

    A low or normal white blood cell (WBC) count is usually associated with viral illnesses. This study evaluated the reliability of a new point-of-care, inexpensive, WBC count device which requires only 10 microL (1 drop) of whole blood from a finger stick to an automated Cell-Dyn counter in a busy office practice setting and assessed its reliability to assist in avoiding antibiotic prescribing. A total of 120 acutely ill children and potential antibiotic recipients were studied from October 2007 to March 2008. The mean WBC count was 7.4x10(9)/L and 8.1x10( 9)/L for the new WBC device and the automated Cell-Dyn counter, respectively. The correlation between the 2 devices was high (r=.988, P=.005). A total of 88 children (73%) did not receive antibiotics and mean WBC was 7.2x10(9)/L. In all, 32 children (27%) received an antibiotic and 1 (3%) returned for a follow-up office visit for the same or a related illness. Of the 88 children with a low blood count who did not receive an antibiotic, 3 (3%) had return visit within 30 days and received an antibiotic. A simple and quick point-of-care WBC count device produces similar results as achievable with a Cell-Dyn counter for total WBCs and may assist in judicious antibiotic prescribing.

  1. Digital Devices, Distraction, and Student Performance: Does In-Class Cell Phone Use Reduce Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, Angel R.; Wilcox, Bethany R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in use of digital devices such as laptop computers, iPads, and web-enabled cell phones has generated concern about how technologies affect student performance. Combining observation, survey, and interview data, this research assesses the effects of technology use on student attitudes and learning. Data were gathered in eight…

  2. Digital Devices, Distraction, and Student Performance: Does In-Class Cell Phone Use Reduce Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, Angel R.; Wilcox, Bethany R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in use of digital devices such as laptop computers, iPads, and web-enabled cell phones has generated concern about how technologies affect student performance. Combining observation, survey, and interview data, this research assesses the effects of technology use on student attitudes and learning. Data were gathered in eight…

  3. A microfluidic device for simultaneous electrical and mechanical measurements on single cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Tan, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yan Liang; Li, Jason; Geddie, William R.; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Sun, Yu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device for simultaneous mechanical and electrical characterization of single cells. The device performs two types of cellular characterization (impedance spectroscopy and micropipette aspiration) on a single chip to enable cell electrical and mechanical characterization. To investigate the performance of the device design, electrical and mechanical properties of MC-3T3 osteoblast cells were measured. Based on electrical models, membrane capacitance of MC-3T3 cells was determined to be 3.39±1.23 and 2.99±0.82 pF at the aspiration pressure of 50 and 100 Pa, respectively. Cytoplasm resistance values were 110.1±37.7 kΩ (50 Pa) and 145.2±44.3 kΩ (100 Pa). Aspiration length of cells was found to be 0.813±0.351 μm at 50 Pa and 1.771±0.623 μm at 100 Pa. Quantified Young’s modulus values were 377±189 Pa at 50 Pa and 344±156 Pa at 100 Pa. Experimental results demonstrate the device’s capability for characterizing both electrical and mechanical properties of single cells. PMID:21523251

  4. Carrier-selective contacts for Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, F.; Simon, M.; Bivour, M.; Reichel, C.; Hermle, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-05-01

    Carrier-selective contacts (i.e., minority carrier mirrors) are one of the last remaining obstacles to approaching the theoretical efficiency limit of silicon solar cells. In the 1980s, it was already demonstrated that n-type polysilicon and semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon emitters form carrier-selective emitters which enabled open-circuit voltages (Voc) of up to 720 mV. Albeit promising, to date a polysilicon emitter solar cell having a high fill factor (FF) has not been demonstrated yet. In this work, we report a polysilicon emitter related solar cell achieving both a high Voc = 694 mV and FF = 81%. The passivation mechanism of these so-called tunnel oxide passivated contacts will be outlined and the impact of TCO (transparent conductive oxide) deposition on the injection-dependent lifetime characteristic of the emitter as well as its implications on FF will be discussed. Finally, possible transport paths across the tunnel oxide barrier will be discussed and it will be shown that the passivating oxide layer does not lead to a relevant resistive loss and thus does not limit the solar cell's carrier transport. Contrary to amorphous silicon-based heterojunction solar cells, this structure also shows a good thermal stability and, thus, could be a very appealing option for next generation high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  5. Novel concepts for improved communication between nerve cells and silicon electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huys, Roeland; Braeken, Dries; Van Meerbergen, Bart; Winters, Kurt; Eberle, Wolfgang; Loo, Josine; Tsvetanova, Diana; Chen, Chang; Severi, Simone; Yitzchaik, S.; Spira, M.; Shappir, J.; Callewaert, Geert; Borghs, Gustaaf; Bartic, Carmen

    2008-04-01

    Hybrid integration of living cells and electronic circuits on a chip requires a high-density matrix of sensors and actuators. This matrix must be processable on top of CMOS devices and must be bio-compatible in order to support living cells. Recent studies have shown that the use of nail structures combined with a phagocytosis-like event of the cell can be exploited to improve the electrical coupling between a cell and a sensor. In this paper, two CMOS-compatible fabrication methods for sub-micron nails will be presented. The biocompatibility and proof-of-concept is demonstrated by the culturing of PC12 neuroblastoma cells. Electrical functionality is shown by simultaneous stimulation and recording of pig cardiomyocyte cells. Biocompatibility aspects for more demanding cortical cell cultures have been addressed in a preliminary assessment.

  6. Integration of Biological Specificity with Solid-State Devices for Selective Chemical Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-29

    chemical interactions including hydrogen bonding (H- bonding ), dipolarity, polarizability, and dispersion. Selectivity for analytes originates from... chemical interactions and biomolecular recognition. For example, the exact placement of a H- bond center in a molecule can determine whether that chemical ... chemical interactions were miss-matched, then there would be a small product and weak contribution to binding. Besides H- bonding , LSER also

  7. A microfluidic device for continuous white blood cell separation and lysis from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myounggon; Mo Jung, Seung; Lee, Kyeong-Hwan; Jun Kang, Yang; Yang, Sung

    2010-11-01

    A microfluidic device, which is composed of a blood inlet, a cell lysis solution inlet, a bifurcation outlet containing six microchannels, and a white blood cell (WBC)-lysed solution outlet, is proposed in this study to separate WBCs from whole blood and lyse the WBCs in a continuous and near real-time fashion. The geometry of the microfluidic device is determined based on the bifurcation law and a cell crossover method. The microflow patterns of blood cells in the microfluidic channels are simulated by computational fluid dynamics. The simulation results agree with the experiment results by considering the reduction of blood viscosity in the microfluidic channels. The performance of the microfluidic device is evaluated by investigating the WBC recovery efficiency and the ratio of spectrophotometric absorbance of the blood sample at 260 to that at 280nm. The WBC recovery efficiency at the main channel outlet is 97.2%. The measured spectrophotometric absorbance ratio of 1.82 indicates that the separated WBCs are completely lysed, leaving only pure DNA in the WBC-lysed solution. The continuous cell separation and lysis is completed within only 0.5s. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed microfluidic device is promising for separating WBCs from whole blood without any pretreatment and lysing the WBCs in a continuous and near real-time fashion. The proposed microfluidic device may be applicable to a lab-on-a-chip for blood analysis. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Passive safety device and internal short tested method for energy storage cells and systems

    DOEpatents

    Keyser, Matthew; Darcy, Eric; Long, Dirk; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-09-22

    A passive safety device for an energy storage cell for positioning between two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage cell. The safety device also comprising a separator and a non-conductive layer. A first electrically conductive material is provided on the non-conductive layer. A first opening is formed through the separator between the first electrically conductive material and one of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. A second electrically conductive material is provided adjacent the first electrically conductive material on the non-conductive layer, wherein a space is formed on the non-conductive layer between the first and second electrically conductive materials. A second opening is formed through the non-conductive layer between the second electrically conductive material and another of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. The first and second electrically conductive materials combine and exit at least partially through the first and second openings to connect the two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device at a predetermined temperature.

  9. Optimizing design and fabrication of microfluidic devices for cell cultures: An effective approach to control cell microenvironment in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, G.; Ventre, M.; Iannone, M.; Greco, F.; Maffettone, P. L.; Netti, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of gradients of bioactive molecules on the cell microenvironment are crucial in several biological processes, such as chemotaxis, angiogenesis, and tumor progression. The elucidation of the basic mechanisms regulating cell responses to gradients requires a tight control of the spatio-temporal features of such gradients. Microfluidics integrating 3D gels are useful tools to fulfill this requirement. However, even tiny flaws in the design or in the fabrication process may severely impair microenvironmental control, thus leading to inconsistent results. Here, we report a sequence of actions aimed at the design and fabrication of a reliable and robust microfluidic device integrated with collagen gel for cell culturing in 3D, subjected to a predetermined gradient of biomolecular signals. In particular, we developed a simple and effective solution to the frequently occurring technical problems of gas bubble formation and 3D matrix collapsing or detaching from the walls. The device here proposed, in Polydimethylsiloxane, was designed to improve the stability of the cell-laden hydrogel, where bubble deprived conditioning media flow laterally to the gel. We report the correct procedure to fill the device with the cell populated gel avoiding the entrapment of gas bubbles, yet maintaining cell viability. Numerical simulations and experiments with fluorescent probes demonstrated the establishment and stability of a concentration gradient across the gel. Finally, chemotaxis experiments of human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under the effects of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 gradients were performed in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the system in controlling cell microenvironment. The proposed procedure is sufficiently versatile and simple to be used also for different device geometries or experimental setups. PMID:25379108

  10. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Larisa M.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical “activate-and-kill” strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV–GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime. PMID:26138068

  11. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells.

    PubMed

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wong, Victor C; Chavali, Arvind K; Gearhart, Larisa M; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical "activate-and-kill" strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV-GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime.

  12. Scalable graphene synthesised by plasma-assisted selective reaction on silicon carbide for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Lai, Chih-Chung; Medina, Henry; Lin, Shih-Ming; Shih, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Ze; Liang, Jenq-Horng; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-10-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional material with honeycomb arrays of carbon atoms, has shown outstanding physical properties that make it a promising candidate material for a variety of electronic applications. To date, several issues related to the material synthesis and device fabrication need to be overcome. Despite the fact that large-area graphene films synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can be grown with relatively few defects, the required transfer process creates wrinkles and polymer residues that greatly reduce its performance in device applications. Graphene synthesised on silicon carbide (SiC) has shown outstanding mobility and has been successfully used to develop ultra-high frequency transistors; however, this fabrication method is limited due to the use of costly ultra-high vacuum (UHV) equipment that can reach temperatures over 1500 °C. Here, we show a simple and novel approach to synthesise graphene on SiC substrates that greatly reduces the temperature and vacuum requirements and allows the use of equipment commonly used in the semiconductor processing industry. In this work, we used plasma treatment followed by annealing in order to obtain large-scale graphene films from bulk SiC. After exposure to N2 plasma, the annealing process promotes the reaction of nitrogen ions with Si and the simultaneous condensation of C on the surface of SiC. Eventually, a uniform, large-scale, n-type graphene film with remarkable transport behaviour on the SiC wafer is achieved. Furthermore, graphene field effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities on SiC were also demonstrated in this study.Graphene, a two-dimensional material with honeycomb arrays of carbon atoms, has shown outstanding physical properties that make it a promising candidate material for a variety of electronic applications. To date, several issues related to the material synthesis and device fabrication need to be overcome. Despite the fact that large-area graphene films

  13. External circuit integration with electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of plasma focus devices

    SciTech Connect

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-15

    The pinch performance of a plasma focus (PF) device is sensitive to the physical conditions of the breakdown phase. It is therefore essential to model and study the initial phase in order to optimize device performance. An external circuit is self consistently coupled to the electromagnetic particle in cell code to model the breakdown and initial lift phase of the United Nations University/International Centre for Theoretical Physics (UNU-ICTP) plasma focus device. Gas breakdown during the breakdown phase is simulated successfully, following a drop in the applied voltage across the device and a concurrent substantial rise in the circuit current. As a result, the plasma becomes magnetized, with the growing value of the magnetic field over time leading to the gradual lift off of the well formed current sheath into the axial acceleration phase. This lifting off, with simultaneous outward sheath motion along the anode and vertical cathode, and the strong magnetic fields in the current sheath region, was demonstrated in this work, and hence validates our method of coupling the external circuit to PF devices. Our method produces voltage waveforms that are qualitatively similar to the observed experimental voltage profiles of the UNU-ICTP device. Values of the mean electron energy before and after voltage breakdown turned out to be different, with the values after breakdown being much lower. In both cases, the electron energy density function turned out to be non-Maxwellian.

  14. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-07-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm-2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  15. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  16. Microchip device with 64-site electrode array for multiplexed immunoassay of cell surface antigens based on electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mei-Sheng; Shi, Hai-Wei; He, Li-Jing; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes a novel on-chip microarray platform based on an electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) strategy for rapid assay of cancer cell surface biomarkers. This platform consists of 64 antigen-decorated CdS nanorod spots with the diameter of 1.0 cm uniformly distributed on 16 indium tin oxide (ITO) strips, which is coated with a multichannel decorated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) slice to realize multiplexed determination of antigens. To shorten the immune reaction time in the microchannels and simplify the device, magnetic stirring and four-channel universal serial bus (USB) ports for plug-and-play were used. When Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) labeled antibodies were selectively captured by the corresponding antigens on the CdS nanorod spot array, ECL-RET from the CdS nanorod (donor) by cathodic emission in the presence of K(2)S(2)O(8) to Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) (acceptor) occurred. With signal amplification of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and competitive immunoassay, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), α-fetoprotein (AFP), and prostate specific antigen (PSA) as models were detected on this microfluidic device via recording the increased ECL-RET signals on electrode surfaces. Furthermore, this multiplexed competitive immunoassay was successfully used for detecting cancer cell surface antigens via the specific antibody-cell interactions and cell counting via cell surface receptors and antigens on the CdS nanorod surface. This platform provides a rapid and simple but sensitive approach with microliter-level sample volume and holds great promise for multiplexed detection of antigens and antigen-specific cells.

  17. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  18. Selective cell adhesion on femtosecond laser-microstructured polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, A M; Hadjiantoniou, S; Hickey, R J; Al-Rekabi, Z; Harden, J L; Pelling, A E; Bhardwaj, V R

    2016-02-19

    We show that femtosecond laser irradiation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) enables selective and patterned cell growth by altering the wetting properties of the surface associated with chemical and/or topographical changes. In the low pulse energy regime, the surface becomes less hydrophobic and exhibits a low water contact angle compared to the pristine material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also reveals an increased oxygen content in the irradiated regions, to which the C2C12 cells and rabbit anti-mouse protein were found to attach preferentially. In the high pulse energy regime, the laser-modified regions exhibit superhydrophobicity and were found to inhibit cell adhesion, whereas cells were found to attach to the surrounding regions due to the presence of nanoscale debris generated by the ablation process.

  19. Centrifugal sedimentation for selectively packing channels with silica microbeads in three-dimensional micro/nanofluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maojun; Bohn, Paul W; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2009-03-01

    Incorporation of nanofluidic elements into microfluidic channels is one approach for adding filtration and partition functionality to planar microfluidic devices, as well as providing enhanced biomolecular separations. Here we introduce a strategy to pack microfluidic channels with silica nanoparticles and microbeads, thereby indirectly producing functional nanostructures; the method allows selected channels to be packed, here demonstrated so that a separation channel is packed while keeping an injection channel unpacked. A nanocapillary array membrane is integrated between two patterned microfluidic channels that cross each other in vertically separated layers. The membrane serves both as a frit for bead packing and as a fluid communication conduit between microfluidic channels. Centrifugal force-assisted sedimentation is then used to selectively pack the microfluidic channels using an aqueous silica bead suspension loaded into the appropriate inlet reservoirs. This packing approach may be used to simultaneously pack multiple channels with silica microbeads having different sizes and surface properties. The chip design and packing method introduced here are suitable for packing silica particles in sizes ranging from nanometers to micrometers and allow rapid (approximately 10 min) packing with high quality. The liquid/analyte transport characteristics of these packed micro/nanofluidic devices have potential utility in a wide range of applications, including electroosmotic pumping, liquid chromatographic separations, and electrochromatography.

  20. Separation of biological cells in a microfluidic device using surface acoustic waves (SAWs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Ye; Marrone, Babetta L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based microfluidic device has been developed to separate heterogeneous particle or cell mixtures in a continuous flow using acoustophoresis. The microfluidic device is comprised of two components, a SAW transducer and a microfluidic channel made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The SAW transducer was fabricated by patterning two pairs of interdigital electrodes on a lithium niobate (LiN