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Sample records for cell surface n-linked

  1. Cell Surface Proteomics of N-Linked Glycoproteins for Typing of Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Haverland, Nicole A; Waas, Matthew; Ntai, Ioanna; Keppel, Theodore; Gundry, Rebekah L; Kelleher, Neil L

    2017-08-18

    Lymphocytes are immune cells that are critical for the maintenance of adaptive immunity. Differentiation of lymphoid progenitors yields B-, T-, and NK-cell subtypes that individually correlate with specific forms of leukemia or lymphoma. Therefore, it is imperative a precise method of cell categorization is utilized to detect differences in distinct disease states present in patients. One viable means of classification involves evaluation of the cell surface proteome of lymphoid malignancies. Specifically, this manuscript details the use of an antibody independent approach known as Cell Surface Capture Technology, to assess N-glycoproteome of four human lymphocyte cell lines. Altogether, 404 cell surface N-glycoproteins as markers for specific cell types involved in lymphocytic malignancies, including 82 N-glycoproteins that had not been previously been described for B- or T-cells within the Cell Surface Protein Atlas. Comparative analysis, hierarchical clustering techniques, and label free quantitation was used to reveal proteins most informative for each cell type. Undoubtedly, the characterization of the cell surface proteome of lymphoid malignancies is a first step towards improving personalized diagnosis and treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of ecotropic murine retroviruses by N-linked glycosylation of the cell surface receptor/amino acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Klamo, E; Kuhmann, S E; Kozak, S L; Kavanaugh, M P; Kabat, D

    1996-01-01

    The cell surface receptor for ecotropic host-range (infection limited to mice or rats) murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) is the widely expressed system y+ transporter for cationic amino acids (CAT-1). Like other retroviruses, ecotropic MuLV infection eliminates virus-binding sites from cell surfaces and results in complete interference to superinfection. Surprisingly, infection causes only partial (ca 40 to 60%) loss of mouse CAT-1 transporter activity. The NIH/Swiss mouse CAT-1 (mCAT-1) contains 622 amino acids with 14 hydrophobic potential membrane-spanning sequences, and it is known that the third extracellular loop from the amino terminus is required for virus binding. Although loop 3 is hypervariable in different species and mouse strains, consistent with its proposed role in virus-host coevolution, loop 3 sequences of both susceptible and resistant species contain consensus sites for N-linked glycosylation. Both of the consensus sites in loop 3 of mCAT-1 are known to be glycosylated and to contain oligosaccharides with diverse sizes (J. W. Kim and J. M. Cunningham, J. Biol. Chem. 268:16316-16320, 1993). We confirmed by several lines of evidence that N-linked glycosylation occludes a potentially functional virus-binding site in the CAT-1 protein of hamsters, thus contributing to resistance of that species. To study the role of receptor glycosylation in animals susceptible to infection, we eliminated loop 3 glycosylation sites by mutagenesis of an mCAT-1 cDNA clone, and we expressed wild-type and mutant receptors in mink fibroblasts and Xenopus oocytes. These receptors had indistinguishable transport properties, as determined by kinetic and voltage-jump electrophysiological studies of arginine uptake in oocytes and by analyses Of L-[3H]arginine uptake in mink cells. Bindings of ecotropic envelope glycoprotein gp7O to the accessible receptor sites on surfaces of mink cells expressing wild-type or mutant mCAT-1 were not significantly different in kinetics or in

  3. N-linked Glycosylation Enrichment for In-depth Cell Surface Proteomics of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma Subtypes*

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Sally J.; Cox, Juergen; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Mann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Global analysis of lymphoma genome integrity and transcriptomes tremendously advanced our understanding of their biology. Technological advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics promise to complete the picture by allowing the global quantification of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here we use N-glyco FASP, a recently developed mass spectrometric approach using lectin-enrichment, in conjunction with a super-SILAC approach to quantify N-linked glycoproteins in lymphoma cells. From patient-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines, we mapped 2383 glycosites on 1321 protein groups, which were highly enriched for cell membrane proteins. This N-glyco subproteome alone allowed the segregation of the ABC from the GCB subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which before gene expression studies had been considered one disease entity. Encouragingly, many of the glycopeptides driving the segregation belong to proteins previously characterized as segregators in a deep proteome study of these subtypes (S. J. Deeb et al. MCP 2012 PMID 22442255). This conforms to the high correlation that we observed between the expression level of the glycosites and their corresponding proteins. Detailed examination of glycosites and glycoprotein expression levels uncovered, among other interesting findings, enrichment of transcription factor binding motifs, including known NF-kappa-B related ones. Thus, enrichment of a class of post-translationally modified peptides can classify cancer types as well as reveal cancer specific mechanistic changes. PMID:24190977

  4. A genome-wide CRISPR screen reconciles the role of N-linked glycosylation in galectin-3 transport to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; Menzies, Sam A; Popa, Stephanie J; Savinykh, Natalia; Petrunkina Harrison, Anna; Lehner, Paul J; Moreau, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Galectins are a family of lectin binding proteins expressed both intracellularly and extracellularly. Galectin-3 (Gal-3, also known as LGALS3) is expressed at the cell surface; however, Gal-3 lacks a signal sequence, and the mechanism of Gal-3 transport to the cell surface remains poorly understood. Here, using a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 forward genetic screen for regulators of Gal-3 cell surface localization, we identified genes encoding glycoproteins, enzymes involved in N-linked glycosylation, regulators of ER-Golgi trafficking and proteins involved in immunity. The results of this screening approach led us to address the controversial role of N-linked glycosylation in the transport of Gal-3 to the cell surface. We find that N-linked glycoprotein maturation is not required for Gal-3 transport from the cytosol to the extracellular space, but is important for cell surface binding. Additionally, secreted Gal-3 is predominantly free and not packaged into extracellular vesicles. These data support a secretion pathway independent of N-linked glycoproteins and extracellular vesicles. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Cell surface glycoproteins from Thermoplasma acidophilum are modified with an N-linked glycan containing 6-C-sulfofucose.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Deschatelets, Lise; Lamoureux, Marc; Patel, Girishchandra B; Tremblay, Tammy-Lynn; Robotham, Anna; Goneau, Marie-France; Cummings-Lorbetskie, Cathy; Watson, David C; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Kelly, John F; Gilbert, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Thermoplasma acidophilum is a thermoacidophilic archaeon that grows optimally at pH 2 and 59°C. This extremophile is remarkable by the absence of a cell wall or an S-layer. Treating the cells with Triton X-100 at pH 3 allowed the extraction of all of the cell surface glycoproteins while keeping cells intact. The extracted glycoproteins were partially purified by cation-exchange chromatography, and we identified five glycoproteins by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry of in-gel tryptic digests. These glycoproteins are positive for periodic acid-Schiff staining, have a high content of Asn including a large number in the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon and have apparent masses that are 34-48% larger than the masses deduced from their amino acid sequences. The pooled glycoproteins were digested with proteinase K and the purified glycopeptides were analyzed by NMR. Structural determination showed that the carbohydrate part was represented by two structures in nearly equal amounts, differing by the presence of one terminal mannose residue. The larger glycan chain consists of eight residues: six hexoses, one heptose and one sugar with an unusual residue mass of 226 Da which was identified as 6-deoxy-6-C-sulfo-D-galactose (6-C-sulfo-D-fucose). Mass spectrometry analyses of the peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion confirmed the principal structures to be those determined by NMR and identified 14 glycopeptides derived from the main glycoprotein, Ta0280, all containing the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Thermoplasma acidophilum appears to have a "general" protein N-glycosylation system that targets a number of cell surface proteins.

  6. N-linked glycosylation of platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor is essential for signal transduction but not for ligand binding or cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaotian; Kriz, Ron; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra

    2004-03-26

    P(2)Y(12) receptor is a G(i)-coupled adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor with a critical role in platelet aggregation. It contains two potential N-linked glycosylation sites at its extra cellular amino-terminus, which may modulate its activity. Studies of both tunicamycin treatment and site-directed mutagenesis have revealed a dispensable role of the N-linked glycosylation in the receptor's surface expression and ligand binding activity. However, the non-glycosylated P(2)Y(12) receptor is defective in the P(2)Y(12)-mediated inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase activity. Thus the study uncovers an unexpected vital role of N-linked glycans in receptor's signal transducing step but not in surface expression or ligand binding.

  7. N-linked glycan profiling in neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunli; Mayampurath, Anoop; Khan, Saira; Cohen, Joanna K; Mechref, Yehia; Volchenboum, Samuel L

    2015-05-01

    Although MYCN amplification has been associated with aggressive neuroblastoma, the molecular mechanisms that differentiate low-risk, MYCN-nonamplified neuroblastoma from high-risk, MYCN-amplified disease are largely unknown. Genomic and proteomic studies have been limited in discerning differences in signaling pathways that account for this heterogeneity. N-Linked glycosylation is a common protein modification resulting from the attachment of sugars to protein residues and is important in cell signaling and immune response. Aberrant N-linked glycosylation has been routinely linked to various cancers. In particular, glycomic markers have often proven to be useful in distinguishing cancers from precancerous conditions. Here, we perform a systematic comparison of N-linked glycomic variation between MYCN-nonamplified SY5Y and MYCN-amplified NLF cell lines with the aim of identifying changes in sugar abundance linked to high-risk neuroblastoma. Through a combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis, we identified 16 glycans that show a statistically significant change in abundance between NLF and SY5Y samples. Closer examination revealed the preference for larger (in terms of total monosaccharide count) and more sialylated glycan structures in the MYCN-amplified samples in comparison to smaller, nonsialylated glycans that are more dominant in the MYCN-nonamplified samples. These results offer clues for deriving marker candidates for accurate neuroblastoma risk diagnosis.

  8. Biosynthesis and Role of N-Linked Glycosylation in Cell Surface Structures of Archaea with a Focus on Flagella and S Layers

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, Ken F.; Jones, Gareth M.; Nair, Divya B.

    2010-01-01

    The genetics and biochemistry of the N-linked glycosylation system of Archaea have been investigated over the past 5 years using flagellins and S layers as reporter proteins in the model organisms, Methanococcus voltae, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Haloferax volcanii. Structures of archaeal N-linked glycans have indicated a variety of linking sugars as well as unique sugar components. In M. voltae, M. maripaludis, and H. volcanii, a number of archaeal glycosylation genes (agl) have been identified by deletion and complementation studies. These include many of the glycosyltransferases and the oligosaccharyltransferase needed to assemble the glycans as well as some of the genes encoding enzymes required for the biosynthesis of the sugars themselves. The N-linked glycosylation system is not essential for any of M. voltae, M. maripaludis, or H. volcanii, as demonstrated by the successful isolation of mutants carrying deletions in the oligosaccharyltransferase gene aglB (a homologue of the eukaryotic Stt3 subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex). However, mutations that affect the glycan structure have serious effects on both flagellation and S layer function. PMID:20976295

  9. N-Linked Glycosylation Is Required for Vacuolar H(+) -ATPase (V-ATPase) a4 Subunit Stability, Assembly, and Cell Surface Expression.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Sally; Yao, Yeqi; Kartner, Norbert; Li, Jing; Reithmeier, Reinhart A F; Manolson, Morris F

    2016-12-01

    The a subunit is the largest of 14 different subunits that make up the V-ATPase complex. In mammalian species this membrane protein has four paralogous isoforms, a1-a4. Clinically, a subunit isoforms are implicated in diverse diseases; however, little is known about their structure and function. The subunit has conserved, predicted N-glycosylation sites, and the a3 isoform has been directly shown to be N-glycosylated. Here we ask if human a4 (ATP6V0A4) is N-glycosylated at the predicted site, Asn489. We transfected HEK 293 cells, using the pCDNA3.1 expression-vector system, to express cDNA constructs of epitope-tagged human a4 subunit, with or without mutations to eliminate the putative glycosylation site. Glycosylation was characterized also by treatment with endoglycosidases; expression and localization were assessed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Endoglycosidase-treated wild type (WT) a4 showed increased relative mobility on immunoblots, compared with untreated WT a4. This relative mobility was identical to that of unglycosylated mutant a4(N489D) , demonstrating that the a4 subunit is glycosylated. Cycloheximide pulse-chase experiments showed that the unglycosylated subunit degraded at a higher rate than the N-glycosylated form. Unglycosylated a4 was degraded mostly in the proteasomal pathway, but also, in part, through the lysosomal pathway. Immunofluorescence colocalization data showed that unglycosylated a4 was mostly retained in the ER, and that plasma membrane trafficking was defective. Co-immunoprecipitation studies suggested that a4(N489D) does not assemble with the V-ATPase V1 domain. Taken together, these data show that N-glycosylation plays a crucial role in a4 stability, and in V-ATPase assembly and trafficking to the plasma membrane. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2757-2768, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Recombinant sialidase NanA (rNanA) cleaves α2-3 linked sialic acid of host cell surface N-linked glycoprotein to promote Edwardsiella tarda infection.

    PubMed

    Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Tabata, Mutsumi; Shinyoshi, Sayaka; Oishi, Kazuki; Araki, Kyosuke; Komatsu, Masaharu; Itakura, Takao; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is one of the major pathogenic bacteria affecting both marine and freshwater fish species. Sialidase NanA expressed endogenously in E. tarda is glycosidase removing sialic acids from glycoconjugates. Recently, the relationship of NanA sialidase activity to E. tarda infection has been reported, however, the mechanism with which sialidase NanA aids the pathogenicity of E. tarda remained unclear. Here, we comprehensively determined the biochemical properties of NanA towards various substrates in vitro to provide novel insights on the potential NanA target molecule at the host cell. GAKS cell pretreated with recombinant NanA showed increased susceptibility to E. tarda infection. Moreover, sialidase inhibitor treated E. tarda showed a significantly reduced ability to infect GAKS cells. These results indicate that NanA-induced desialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates is essential for the initial step of E. tarda infection. Among the natural substrates, NanA exhibited the highest activity towards 3-sialyllactose, α2-3 linked sialic acid carrying sialoglycoconjugates. Supporting this finding, intact GAKS cell membrane exposed to recombinant NanA showed changes of glycoconjugates only in α2-3 sialo-linked glycoproteins, but not in glycolipids and α2-6 sialo-linked glycoproteins. Lectin staining of cell surface glycoprotein provided further evidence that α2-3 sialo-linkage of the N-linked glycoproteins was the most plausible target of NanA sialidase. To confirm the significance of α2-3 sialo-linkage desialylation for E. tarda infection, HeLa cells which possessed lower amount of α2-3 sialo-linkage glycoprotein were used for infection experiment along with GAKS cells. As a result, infection of HeLa cells by E. tarda was significantly reduced when compared to GAKS cells. Furthermore, E. tarda infection was significantly inhibited by mannose pretreatment suggesting that the bacterium potentially recognizes and binds to mannose or mannose containing

  11. Modulation and modeling of monoclonal antibody N-linked glycosylation in mammalian cell perfusion reactors.

    PubMed

    Karst, Daniel J; Scibona, Ernesto; Serra, Elisa; Bielser, Jean-Marc; Souquet, Jonathan; Stettler, Matthieu; Broly, Hervé; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Villiger, Thomas K

    2017-09-01

    Mammalian cell perfusion cultures are gaining renewed interest as an alternative to traditional fed-batch processes for the production of therapeutic proteins, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb). The steady state operation at high viable cell density allows the continuous delivery of antibody product with increased space-time yield and reduced in-process variability of critical product quality attributes (CQA). In particular, the production of a confined mAb N-linked glycosylation pattern has the potential to increase therapeutic efficacy and bioactivity. In this study, we show that accurate control of flow rates, media composition and cell density of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell perfusion bioreactor allowed the production of a constant glycosylation profile for over 20 days. Steady state was reached after an initial transition phase of 6 days required for the stabilization of extra- and intracellular processes. The possibility to modulate the glycosylation profile was further investigated in a Design of Experiment (DoE), at different viable cell density and media supplement concentrations. This strategy was implemented in a sequential screening approach, where various steady states were achieved sequentially during one culture. It was found that, whereas high ammonia levels reached at high viable cell densities (VCD) values inhibited the processing to complex glycan structures, the supplementation of either galactose, or manganese as well as their synergy significantly increased the proportion of complex forms. The obtained experimental data set was used to compare the reliability of a statistical response surface model (RSM) to a mechanistic model of N-linked glycosylation. The latter outperformed the response surface predictions with respect to its capability and reliability in predicting the system behavior (i.e., glycosylation pattern) outside the experimental space covered by the DoE design used for the model parameter estimation. Therefore, we can

  12. N-Linked glycans on dengue viruses grown in mammalian and insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Kari; White, Laura; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the ability of mosquito and mammalian cell-derived dengue virus (DENV) to infect human dendritic cell-specific ICAM3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN)-expressing cells and characterized the structure of envelope (E) protein N-linked glycans on DENV derived from the two cell types. DENVs derived from both cell types were equally effective at infecting DC-SIGN-expressing human monocytes and dendritic cells. The N-linked glycans on mosquito cell-derived virus were a mix of high-mannose and paucimannose glycans. In virus derived from mammalian cells, the N-linked glycans were a mix of high-mannose and complex glycans. These results indicate that N-linked glycans are incompletely processed during DENV egress from cells, resulting in high-mannose glycans on viruses derived from both cell types. Studies with full-length and truncated E protein demonstrated that incomplete processing was most likely a result of the poor accessibility of glycans on the membrane-anchored protein. PMID:19494052

  13. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity: possible role of N-linked glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oeltmann, T.N.; Chambers, W.H.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the role of N-linked glycoproteins in natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) by treating effector cells or target cells with swainsonine, a specific inhibitor of golgi mannosidase II which is critical for N-linked glycoprotein processing. They have also examined the effects of alpha-mannosidase, an exoglycosidase specific for alpha-linked mannose residues, on both target and effector cells. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with swainsonine (18 hr) resulted in an inhibition of lysis of K-562 target cells as measured by LDH release. Protein synthesis was not inhibited as measured by incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acids. However, oligosaccharide processing was altered as measured by incorporation of 2(/sup 3/H)-mannose. Similar treatment did not inhibit target cell-effector cell conjugation. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with alpha-mannosidase (1 hr) did not result in a reduction in NK cell function. However, alpha-mannosidase did cause a release of mannose from treated cells. These results suggest that N-linked glycoproteins may play a role in NCMC, but not at the level of recognition and binding.

  14. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity: possible role of N-linked glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, W.H.; Oeltmann, T.N.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the role of N-linked glycoproteins in natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) by treating effector cells or target cells with swainsonine, a specific inhibitor of golgi mannosidase II which is critical for N-linked glycoprotein processing. They have also examined the effects of alpha-mannosidase, an exoglycosidase specific for alpha-linked mannose residues, on both target and effector cells. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with swainsonine (18 hr) resulted in an inhibition of lysis of K-562 target cells as measured by LDH release. Protein synthesis was not inhibited as measured by incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acids. However, oligosaccharide processing was altered as measured by incorporation of 2(/sup 3/H)-mannose. Similar treatment did not inhibit target cell-effector cell conjugation. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with alpha-mannosidase (1 hr) did not result in a reduction in NK cell function. However, alpha-mannosidase did cause a release of mannose from treated cells. These results suggest that N-linked glycoproteins may play a role in NCMC, but not at the level of recognition and binding.

  15. Archaeal surface appendages: their function and the critical role of N-linked glycosylation in their assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, Ken F.; Nair, Divya B.; Jones, Gareth M.; Aizawa, S.-I.; Chong, James J. P.; Stark, Meg; Logan, Susan M.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Kelly, John F.

    2011-10-01

    Many cultivated archaea are extremophiles and, as such, various archaea inhabit some of the most inhospitable niches on the planet in terms of temperature, pH, salinity and anaerobiosis. Different archaeal species have been shown to produce a number of unusual and sometimes unique surface structures. The best studied of these are flagella which are fundamentally different from bacterial flagella and instead bear numerous similarities to bacterial type IV pili in their structure and likely assembly. The major structural proteins, flagellins, are made as preproteins with type IV pilin-like signal peptides processed by a specific signal peptidase. In addition, the flagellins are glycoproteins with attached N-linked glycans. Both of these posttranslational modifications have been studied in the anaerobic archaeon, Methanococcus maripaludis, an organism which also possesses other surface appendages, an unusual version of type IV pili, whose major constituents are also glycoproteins. Analysis of mutants unable to make either or both of flagella and pili demonstrated that both are essential for attachment to surfaces. A number of mutants defective in the assembly and biosynthesis of the tetrasaccharide N-linked to the flagellins have been isolated. Investigations of these mutants by electron microscopy, mass spectrometry and motility assays have demonstrated that flagellins possessing no attached glycan or a glycan truncated to a single sugar cannot assemble flagella on their surface. Mutants which can attach a glycan of 2 or 3 sugars to flagellins assemble flagella but they are impaired in their swimming compared with wildtype cells which attach the tetrasaccharide to their flagellins.

  16. N-linked glycosylation is required for plasma membrane localization of D5, but not D1, dopamine receptors in transfected mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Karpa, K D; Lidow, M S; Pickering, M T; Levenson, R; Bergson, C

    1999-11-01

    We have analyzed the role of N-linked glycosylation in functional cell surface expression of the D1 and D5 dopamine receptor subtypes. Treatment of transfected HEK 293 cells with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked oligosaccharide addition, was found to prevent localization of D5 receptors in the plasma membrane. In contrast, tunicamycin treatment had no effect on the plasma membrane localization of the D1 receptor. Polymerase chain reaction mutagenesis was used to generate a panel of D5 receptors containing mutations in the three predicted sites of N-linked glycosylation. Expression of mutant receptors indicated that glycosylation of residue N7 was the major determinant of D5 receptor plasma membrane localization. Mutation of a comparable site in the D1 receptor at position N5 had no effect on the delivery of the D1 receptor to the cell surface. Tunicamycin treatment during receptor biosynthesis, but not N-glycosidase F digestion of mature receptors, abrogated binding of the D5 receptor antagonist [(3)H]SCH23390, suggesting that while oligosaccharide moieties play a key role in the cell surface expression of D5 receptors, they do not appear to contribute to the receptor's ligand binding properties. Together, our data indicate a differential requirement for N-linked glycosylation in functional cell surface expression of D1 and D5 dopamine receptors.

  17. Inhibition of N-linked glycosylation by tunicamycin enhances sensitivity to cisplatin in human head-and-neck carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Noda, I; Fujieda, S; Seki, M; Tanaka, N; Sunaga, H; Ohtsubo, T; Tsuzuki, H; Fan, G K; Saito, H

    1999-01-18

    Tunicamycin (TM), a naturally occurring antibiotic, blocks the first step in the biosynthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides in cells. In this study, we investigated whether changes in N-linked glycosylation affect the sensitivity of head-and-neck carcinoma cell lines to cis-diaminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro treatment of the IMC-3 and KB cell lines with TM significantly decreased the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of cisplatin, as determined by the MTT assay (24.15 to 10.97 microg/ml, p < 0.05). In addition, TM significantly decreased the IC50 of cisplatin against established cisplatin-resistant IMC-3/CR cells (>100 to 14.4 microg/ml, p < 0.05) to levels similar to those against parental IMC-3 cells. TM treatment decreased the number of Con A- and L-PHA-binding sites on the surface of tumor cells but had no effect on the intracellular platinum concentration. Induction of apoptosis in vitro by TM plus cisplatin in combination was increased compared with that by cisplatin alone. Furthermore, in vivo administration of TM plus cisplatin in combination significantly inhibited local tumor growth in the cisplatin-resistant in vivo C3H/He mouse model as compared with the control group (p < 0.05) and increased in vivo apoptosis of tumor cells. Our results suggest that the manipulation of glycosylation by TM in tumor cells might be a useful therapeutic strategy for successful chemotherapy using cisplatin against head-and-neck cancer.

  18. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sukun; Hu, Kai; He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin; Du, Tao; Zheng, Chunfu; Liu, Yalan; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry.

  19. Glucosamine Modulates T Cell Differentiation through Down-regulating N-Linked Glycosylation of CD25*

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ming-Wei; Lin, Ming-Hong; Huang, Shing-Hwa; Fu, Shin-Huei; Hsu, Chao-Yuan; Yen, B. Lin-Ju; Chen, Jiann-Torng; Chang, Deh-Ming; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Glucosamine has immunomodulatory effects on autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanism(s) through which glucosamine modulates different T cell subsets and diseases remain unclear. We demonstrate that glucosamine impedes Th1, Th2, and iTreg but promotes Th17 differentiation through down-regulating N-linked glycosylation of CD25 and subsequently inhibiting its downstream Stat5 signaling in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of glucosamine on T helper cell differentiation was similar to that induced by anti-IL-2 treatment, further supporting an IL-2 signaling-dependent modulation. Interestingly, excess glucose rescued this glucosamine-mediated regulation, suggesting a functional competition between glucose and glucosamine. High-dose glucosamine significantly decreased Glut1 N-glycosylation in Th1-polarized cells. This finding suggests that both down-regulated IL-2 signaling and Glut1-dependent glycolytic metabolism contribute to the inhibition of Th1 differentiation by glucosamine. Finally, glucosamine treatment inhibited Th1 cells in vivo, prolonged the survival of islet grafts in diabetic recipients, and exacerbated the severity of EAE. Taken together, our results indicate that glucosamine interferes with N-glycosylation of CD25, and thereby attenuates IL-2 downstream signaling. These effects suggest that glucosamine may be an important modulator of T cell differentiation and immune homeostasis. PMID:26468284

  20. Effect of silkworm hemolymph on N-linked glycosylation in two Trichoplusia ni insect cell lines.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Christoph E; Park, Tai Hyun; Shuler, Michael L

    2003-09-20

    A recombinant N-linked glycoprotein, secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), was produced in two Trichoplusia ni insect cell lines using the baculovirus expression vector. Silkworm hemolymph (SH) was added to TNMFH + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) medium to a concentration of 2.5% or 5%, and SEAP production and glycosylation in the presence of SH were compared with controls devoid of hemolymph. Growing Tn-4s cells in 5% SH-supplemented medium required progressive adaptation of the cells to SH, and adapted cells had a SEAP specific yield decreased by 2.5-fold compared with control cells not exposed to SH. Although SEAP produced in the control possessed little complex glycosylation (<1%), SEAP produced by SH-adapted cells in the presence of 5% SH possessed 8.7% sialylated structures, as well as unusual, asialylated, agalactosylated structures with a high degree of polymerization (DP). On the basis of enzymatic and mass-spectrometric analyses, we propose that these structures are glucosylated, high-mannose oligosaccharides. SEAP was also produced by Tn-4s cells without adaptation to SH when SH was added just prior to baculovirus infection, but SEAP specific yield was adversely affected (approximately fourfold reduction compared with control devoid of hemolymph), and glycosylation of SEAP produced under these conditions was characterized by large amounts of high-mannose and high-DP structures and an absence of complex structures. Similarly, Tn5B1-4 cells that were not adapted to SH had a SEAP specific yield reduced by approximately fivefold in SH-containing medium; however, these cells were able to produce 13.5% sialylated SEAP in the presence of 2.5% SH, whereas complex structures were not produced in the absence of SH. We propose that SH improves glycosylation either directly or indirectly by decreasing SEAP specific yield. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 83: 695-705, 2003.

  1. Mapping N-linked Glycosylation Sites in the Secretome and Whole Cells of Aspergillus niger Using Hydrazide Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Aryal, Uma K.; Dai, Ziyu; Mason, Alisa C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Tian, Zhixin; Zhou, Jianying; Su, Dian; Weitz, Karl K.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Scott E.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is known to play an essential role in both cellular functions and the secretory pathways; however, little information is available on the dynamics of glycosylated N-linked glycosites of fungi. Herein we present the first extensive mapping of glycosylated N-linked glycosites in industrial strain Aspergillus niger by applying an optimized solid phase enrichment of glycopeptide protocol using hydrazide modified magnetic beads. The enrichment protocol was initially optimized using mouse plasma and A. niger secretome samples, which was then applied to profile N-linked glycosites from both the secretome and whole cell lysates of A. niger. A total of 847 unique N-linked glycosites and 330 N-linked glycoproteins were confidently identified by LC-MS/MS. Based on gene ontology analysis, the identified N-linked glycoproteins in the whole cell lysate were primarily localized in the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, lysosome, and storage vacuoles. The identified N-linked glycoproteins are involved in a wide range of biological processes including gene regulation and signal transduction, protein folding and assembly, protein modification and carbohydrate metabolism. The extensive coverage of glycosylated N-linked glycosites along with identification of partial N-linked glycosylation in those enzymes involving in different biochemical pathways provide useful information for functional studies of N-linked glycosylation and their biotechnological applications in A. niger.

  2. UniPep - a database for human N-linked glycosites: a resource for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Loriaux, Paul; Eng, Jimmy; Campbell, David; Keller, Andrew; Moss, Pat; Bonneau, Richard; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yong; Wollscheid, Bernd; Cooke, Kelly; Yi, Eugene C; Lee, Hookeun; Peskind, Elaine R; Zhang, Jing; Smith, Richard D; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in proteomic analyses of plasma for the purpose of discovering biomarkers. Profiling N-linked glycopeptides is a particularly promising method because the population of N-linked glycosites represents the proteomes of plasma, the cell surface, and secreted proteins at very low redundancy and provides a compelling link between the tissue and plasma proteomes. Here, we describe UniPep - a database of human N-linked glycosites - as a resource for biomarker discovery. PMID:16901351

  3. Inhibition of N-linked oligosaccharide trimming does not interfere with surface expression of certain integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, B; Matlin, K; Bause, E; Legler, G; Peyrieras, N; Ploegh, H

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 1-deoxynojirimycin (dNM) and 1-deoxymannojirimycin (dMM), inhibitors of oligosaccharide trimming glucosidase I and mannosidase I, respectively, on the biosynthesis of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein, influenza virus hemagglutinin, and human class I histocompatibility antigens were investigated. Although the oligosaccharides of these membrane glycoproteins were greatly altered, neither dNM nor dMM interferred with their surface expression, as determined by a variety of assays, including accessibility to proteases and antibodies; neither did these drugs inhibit production of infectious virus particles. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6232135

  4. High molecular weight components containing N-linked oligosaccharides of Ascaris suum extract inhibit the dendritic cells activation through DC-SIGN and MR.

    PubMed

    Favoretto, Bruna C; Casabuono, Adriana A C; Portes-Junior, José A; Jacysyn, Jacqueline F; Couto, Alicia S; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L

    2017-04-09

    Helminths, as well as their secretory/excretory products, induce a tolerogenic immune microenvironment. High molecular weight components (PI) from Ascaris suum extract down-modulate the immune response against ovalbumin (OVA). The PI exerts direct effect on dendritic cells (DCs) independent of TLR 2, 4 and MyD88 molecule and, thus, decreases the T lymphocytes response. Here, we studied the glycoconjugates in PI and the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), DC-SIGN and MR, in the modulation of DCs activity. Our data showed the presence of glycoconjugates with high mannose- and complex-type N-linked oligosaccharide chains and phosphorylcholine residues on PI. In addition, these N-linked glycoconjugates inhibited the DCs maturation induced by LPS. The binding and internalization of PI-Alexa were decreased on DCs previously incubated with mannan, anti-DC-SIGN and/or anti-MR antibodies. In agreement with this, the incubation of DCs with mannan, anti-DC-SIGN and/or anti-MR antibodies abolished the down-modulatory effect of PI on these cells. It was also observed that the blockage of CLRs, DC-SIGN and MR on DCs reverted the inhibitory effect of PI in in vitro T cells proliferation. Therefore, our data show the involvement of DC-SIGN and MR in the recognition and consequent modulatory effect of N-glycosylated components of PI on DCs.

  5. Perturbation of N-linked oligosaccharide structure results in an altered incorporation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate into specific proteins in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wellner, R.B.; Ghosh, P.C.; Roecklein, B.; Wu, H.C.

    1987-09-25

    Increased (/sup 3/H)palmitate incorporation into specific cellular proteins has been reported to occur in Chinese hamster ovary and yeast mutant cells. In this paper we report studies concerning the relationship between N-linked oligosaccharide structure and (/sup 3/H)palmitate incorporation into proteins of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We have compared the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate into proteins of wild-type and four different mutant CHO cell lines defective in various steps of N-linked protein glycosylation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoretic analysis showed that three of the mutants exhibited increased (/sup 3/H)palmitate incorporation into several CHO cellular proteins (approximately 30,000-38,000 molecular weight) as compared to the wild-type cells. One of the affected mutants which accumulates the Man5Gn2Asn intermediate structure was examined in detail. In agreement with earlier reports, virtually all of the (/sup 3/H) palmitate-labeled proteins of both wild-type and mutant cell lines are membrane-bound. Pretreatment of the mutant cell line with tunicamycin blocked the increased (/sup 3/H)palmitate incorporation into the two specific proteins (both of approximately 30,000 molecular weight) observed in untreated cells; the decreased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate into the 30,000 molecular weight species was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate into two proteins of approximately 20,000 molecular weight. Pretreatment of wild-type cells with tunicamycin also caused increased (/sup 3/H)palmitate incorporation into the 20,000 molecular weight species.

  6. Sulphation of N-linked oligosaccharides of vesicular stomatitis and influenza virus envelope glycoproteins: host cell specificity, subcellular localization and identification of substituted saccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Karaivanova, V K; Spiro, R G

    1998-01-01

    The presence of sulphate groups on various saccharide residues of N-linked carbohydrate units has now been observed in a number of glycoproteins. To explore the cell specificity of this post-translational modification, we evaluated sulphate incorporation into virus envelope glycoproteins by a variety of cells, since it is believed that assembly of their N-linked oligosaccharides is to a large extent dependent on the enzymic machinery of the host. Employing the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope glycoprotein (G protein) as a model, we noted that the addition of [35S]sulphate substituents into its complex carbohydrate units occurred in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), Madin-Darby bovine kidney, LLC-PK1 and BHK-21 cell lines but was not detectable in BRL 3A, BW5147.3, Chinese hamster ovary, HepG2, NRK-49F, IEC-18, PtK1 or 3T3 cells. The sulphate groups were exclusively located on C-3 of galactose [Gal(3-SO4)] and/or C-6 of N-acetylglucosamine [GlcNAc(6-SO4)] residues in the N-acetyllactosamine sequence of the branch chains. Moreover, we observed that the pronounced host-cell-dependence of the terminal galactose sulphation was reflected by the 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulphate:Gal-3-O-sulphotransferase activity assayed in vitro. Comparative studies carried out on the haemagglutinin of the influenza virus envelope formed by MDCK and LLC-PK1 cells indicated that sulphate in this glycoprotein was confined to its complex N-linked oligosaccharides where it occurred as Gal(3-SO4) and GlcNAc(6-SO4) on peripheral chains as well as on the mannose-substituted N-acetylglucosamine of the core. Since sulphation in both internal and peripheral locations of the virus glycoproteins was found to be arrested by the alpha1-->2 mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, as well as by the intracellular migration block imposed by brefeldin A, it was concluded that this modification is a late biosynthetic event which most likely takes place in the trans-Golgi network. PMID:9445377

  7. Characterization of N-Linked Glycosylation in a Monoclonal Antibody Produced in NS0 Cells Using Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Melissa; Wang, Yang; Rustandi, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The N-linked glycosylation in recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAb) occurs at Asn297 on the Fc region in the CH2 domain. Glycosylation heterogeneities have been well documented to affect biological activities such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) through their interaction with Fc-receptors. Hence, it is critical to monitor and characterize the N-linked glycosylation profile in a therapeutic protein such as a mAb for product consistency. In one approach, the glycans are first released from the mAb using an enzyme specific digestion, such as Protein N-Glycosidase F (PNGase) and subsequently they are labeled using a fluorophore, for example, 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS) . Here we have applied this approach and used Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) to analyze a recombinant mAb produced in murine myeloma (NS0) cells. The technique provides short analysis times, efficient separations, and high sensitivity. CE-LIF peak identification was done by a combination of glycan standards and treatment with various exoglycosidases. Furthermore, the APTS-labeled glycans were also analyzed using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to aid identification of minor peaks by sample collection and off-line mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. PMID:24276024

  8. Specificity of the murine IgD receptor on T cells is for N-linked glycans on IgD molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Amin, A R; Tamma, S M; Oppenheim, J D; Finkelman, F D; Kieda, C; Coico, R F; Thorbecke, G J

    1991-01-01

    IgD receptors on murine T cells have been reported in this issue [Tamma, S. M. L., Amin, A. R., Finkelman, F. D., Chen, Y.-W., Thorbecke, G. J. & Coico, R. F. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 9233-9237] to bind either the first or third constant region of the heavy-chain of IgD molecules--findings that could not be satisfactorily explained by IgD amino acid sequences. We now find that boiled IgD molecules or low-Mr fragments from protease-digested IgD still inhibit binding of IgD-coated erythrocytes to IgD receptors. This inhibitory activity can be absorbed with the murine IgD-binding lectin from Griffonia simplicifolia 1 (GS-1) immobilized on Sepharose. N-linked glycans, obtained from N-glycanase-treated IgD and purified by binding to GS-1-Sepharose, also inhibit rosette formation of T-helper cells bearing receptors for IgD with IgD- or mutant IgD-coated erythrocytes. Deglycosylated IgD, produced by treatment with N-glycanase, no longer binds to the lectin and fails to inhibit IgD rosetting. Binding of intact IgD to T cells is also competitively inhibited by N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, and neoglycoproteins containing these sugars. These results clearly show that N-linked glycans, present in both the first and third constant regions of the delta heavy-chain domains, are prerequisites for binding of IgD to IgD receptors. Images PMID:1924387

  9. Absence of an N-Linked Glycosylation Motif in the Glycoprotein of the Live-Attenuated Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever Vaccine, Candid #1, Results in Its Improper Processing, and Reduced Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Manning, John T.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Koma, Takaaki; Huang, Cheng; Barral, José; de la Torre, Juan C.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Junin virus (JUNV), a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus, is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The live-attenuated Candid #1 (Can) strain currently serves as a vaccine for at-risk populations. We have previously shown that the Can glycoprotein (GPC) gene is the primary gene responsible for attenuation in a guinea pig model of AHF. However, the mechanisms through which the GPC contributes to the attenuation of the Can strain remain unknown. A more complete understanding of the mechanisms underlying the attenuation and immunogenicity of the Can strain will potentially allow for the rational design of additional safe and novel vaccines. Here, we provide a detailed comparison of both RNA and protein expression profiles between both inter- and intra-segment chimeric JUNV recombinant clones expressing combinations of genes from the Can strain and the pathogenic Romero (Rom) strain. The recombinant viruses that express Can GPC, which were shown to be attenuated in guinea pigs, displayed different RNA levels and GPC processing patterns as determined by Northern and Western blot analyses, respectively. Analysis of recombinant viruses containing amino acid substitutions selected at different mouse brain passages during the generation of Can revealed that altered Can GPC processing was primarily due to the T168A substitution within G1, which eliminates an N-linked glycosylation motif. Incorporation of the T168A substitution in the Rom GPC resulted in a Can-like processing pattern of Rom GPC. In addition, JUNV GPCs containing T168A substitution were retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and displayed significantly lower cell surface expression than wild-type Rom GPC. Interestingly, the reversion A168T in Can GPC significantly increased GPC expression at the cell surface. Our results demonstrate that recombinant JUNV (rJUNV) expressing Can GPC display markedly different protein expression and elevated genomic RNA expression when compared to

  10. Sulphation of proteins secreted by a human hepatoma-derived cell line. Sulphation of N-linked oligosaccharides on alpha 2HS-glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Hortin, G; Green, E D; Baenziger, J U; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    Several human glycoproteins, including alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, caeruloplasmin and alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, synthesized by the hepatoma-derived cell line HepG2 were observed to contain covalently linked sulphate. These proteins were estimated to contain about 0.1 mol of sulphate/mol of protein. The most abundant of the sulphated glycoproteins, alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, was analysed in detail. All of the sulphate on this protein was attached to N-linked oligosaccharides which contained sialic acid and resisted release by endoglycosidase H. Several independent analytical approaches established that approx. 10% of the molecules of alpha 2HS-glycoprotein contained sulphate. Our results suggest that a number of human plasma proteins contain small amounts of sulphate linked to oligosaccharides. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3017304

  11. Resveratrol triggers ER stress-mediated apoptosis by disrupting N-linked glycosylation of proteins in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gwak, HyeRan; Kim, Soochi; Dhanasekaran, Danny N; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-02-28

    Malignant tumors have a high glucose demand and alter cellular metabolism to survive. Herein, focusing on the utility of glucose metabolism as a therapeutic target, we found that resveratrol induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis by interrupting protein glycosylation in a cancer-specific manner. Our results indicated that resveratrol suppressed the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and interrupted protein glycosylation through GSK3β activation. Application of either biochemical intermediates of the hexosamine pathway or small molecular inhibitors of GSK3β reversed the effects of resveratrol on the disruption of protein glycosylation. Additionally, an ER UDPase, ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5), modulated protein glycosylation by Akt attenuation in response to resveratrol. By inhibition or overexpression of Akt functions, we confirmed that the glycosylation activities were dependent on ENTPD5 expression and regulated by the action of Akt in ovarian cancer cells. Resveratrol-mediated disruption of protein glycosylation induced cellular apoptosis as indicated by the up-regulation of GADD153, followed by the activation of ER-stress sensors (PERK and ATF6α). Thus, our results provide novel insight into cancer cell metabolism and protein glycosylation as a therapeutic target for cancers.

  12. Mutation of N-linked glycosylation at Asn548 in CD133 decreases its ability to promote hepatoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ren, Shifang; Xie, Liqi; Cui, Chunhong; Xing, Yang; Liu, Chanjuan; Cao, Benjin; Yang, Fan; Li, Yinan; Chen, Xiaoning; Wei, Yuanyan; Lu, Haojie; Jiang, Jianhai

    2015-08-21

    The membrane glycoprotein CD133 is a popular marker for cancer stem cells and contributes to cancer initiation and invasion in a number of tumor types. CD133 promotes tumorigenesis partly through an interaction between its phosphorylated Y828 residue and the PI3K regulatory subunit p85, and the interaction with β-catenin. Although CD133 glycosylation is supposed to be associated with its function, the contribution of N-glycosylation to its functions remains unclear. Here we analyzed the exact site(s) of N-glycosylation in CD133 by mass spectrometry and found that all eight potential N-glycosylation sites of CD133 could be indeed occupied by N-glycans. Loss of individual N-glycosylation sites had no effect on the level of expression or membrane localization of CD133. However, mutation at glycosylation site Asn548 significantly decreased the ability of CD133 to promote hepatoma cell growth. Furthermore, mutation of Asn548 reduced the interaction between CD133 and β-catenin and inhibited the activation of β-catenin signaling by CD133 overexpression. Our results identified the characteristics and function of CD133 glycosylation sites. These data could potentially shed light on molecular regulation of CD133 by glycosylation and enhance our understanding of the utility of glycosylated CD133 as a target for cancer therapies.

  13. Mutation of N-linked glycosylation at Asn548 in CD133 decreases its ability to promote hepatoma cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liqi; Cui, Chunhong; Xing, Yang; Liu, Chanjuan; Cao, Benjin; Yang, Fan; Li, Yinan; Chen, Xiaoning; Wei, Yuanyan; Lu, Haojie; Jiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    The membrane glycoprotein CD133 is a popular marker for cancer stem cells and contributes to cancer initiation and invasion in a number of tumor types. CD133 promotes tumorigenesis partly through an interaction between its phosphorylated Y828 residue and the PI3K regulatory subunit p85, and the interaction with β-catenin. Although CD133 glycosylation is supposed to be associated with its function, the contribution of N-glycosylation to its functions remains unclear. Here we analyzed the exact site(s) of N-glycosylation in CD133 by mass spectrometry and found that all eight potential N-glycosylation sites of CD133 could be indeed occupied by N-glycans. Loss of individual N-glycosylation sites had no effect on the level of expression or membrane localization of CD133. However, mutation at glycosylation site Asn548 significantly decreased the ability of CD133 to promote hepatoma cell growth. Furthermore, mutation of Asn548 reduced the interaction between CD133 and β-catenin and inhibited the activation of β-catenin signaling by CD133 overexpression. Our results identified the characteristics and function of CD133 glycosylation sites. These data could potentially shed light on molecular regulation of CD133 by glycosylation and enhance our understanding of the utility of glycosylated CD133 as a target for cancer therapies. PMID:26029999

  14. Insertion of N-linked glycosylation sites in the variable regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 surface glycoprotein through AAT triplet reiteration.

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, M L; Andeweg, A C; Schipper, R; Kenter, M

    1994-01-01

    Variable regions with sequence length variation in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope exhibit an unusual pattern of codon usage with AAT, ACT, and AGT together composing > 70% of all codons used. We postulate that this distribution is caused by insertion of AAT triplets followed by point mutations and selection. Accumulation of the encoded amino acids (asparagine, serine, and threonine) leads to the creation of new N-linked glycosylation sites, which helps the virus to escape from the immune pressure exerted by virus-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:7933144

  15. The N-Linked Outer Chain Mannans and the Dfg5p and Dcw1p Endo-α-1,6-Mannanases Are Needed for Incorporation of Candida albicans Glycoproteins into the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Jie; Chinnici, Jennifer L.; Maddi, Abhiram

    2015-01-01

    A biochemical pathway for the incorporation of cell wall protein into the cell wall of Neurospora crassa was recently proposed. In this pathway, the DFG-5 and DCW-1 endo-α-1,6-mannanases function to covalently cross-link cell wall protein-associated N-linked galactomannans, which are structurally related to the yeast outer chain mannans, into the cell wall glucan-chitin matrix. In this report, we demonstrate that the mannosyltransferase enzyme Och1p, which is needed for the synthesis of the N-linked outer chain mannan, is essential for the incorporation of cell wall glycoproteins into the Candida albicans cell wall. Using endoglycosidases, we show that C. albicans cell wall proteins are cross-linked into the cell wall via their N-linked outer chain mannans. We further demonstrate that the Dfg5p and Dcw1p α-1,6-mannanases are needed for the incorporation of cell wall glycoproteins into the C. albicans cell wall. Our results support the hypothesis that the Dfg5p and Dcw1p α-1,6-mannanases incorporate cell wall glycoproteins into the C. albicans cell wall by cross-linking outer chain mannans into the cell wall glucan-chitin matrix. PMID:26048011

  16. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers.

  17. N-Linked Glycosylation of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Second Extracellular Loop

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Antonio G.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2010-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) contains five N-linked glycosylation consensus sites as follows: three residing in the N terminus and two localized on the surface of the second extracellular loop (ECL2). To study the effect of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of PAR1 signaling and trafficking, we generated mutants in which the critical asparagines of the consensus sites were mutated. Here, we report that both the PAR1 N terminus and ECL2 serve as sites for N-linked glycosylation but have different functions in the regulation of receptor signaling and trafficking. N-Linked glycosylation of the PAR1 N terminus is important for transport to the cell surface, whereas the PAR1 mutant lacking glycosylation at ECL2 (NA ECL2) trafficked to the cell surface like the wild-type receptor. However, activated PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant internalization was impaired compared with wild-type receptor, whereas constitutive internalization of unactivated receptor remained intact. Remarkably, thrombin-activated PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant displayed an enhanced maximal signaling response compared with wild-type receptor. The increased PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant signaling was not due to defects in the ability of thrombin to cleave the receptor or signal termination mechanisms. Rather, the PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant displayed a greater efficacy in thrombin-stimulated G protein signaling. Thus, N-linked glycosylation of the PAR1 extracellular surface likely influences ligand docking interactions and the stability of the active receptor conformation. Together, these studies strongly suggest that N-linked glycosylation of PAR1 at the N terminus versus the surface of ECL2 serves distinct functions critical for proper regulation of receptor trafficking and the fidelity of thrombin signaling. PMID:20368337

  18. α-1,6-Mannosylation of N-Linked Oligosaccharide Present on Cell Wall Proteins Is Required for Their Incorporation into the Cell Wall in the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa▿†

    PubMed Central

    Maddi, Abhiram; Free, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH-1) is required for the synthesis of galactomannans attached to the N-linked oligosaccharides of Neurospora crassa cell wall proteins. The Neurospora crassa och-1 mutant has a tight colonial phenotype and a defective cell wall. A carbohydrate analysis of the och-1 mutant cell wall revealed a 10-fold reduction in the levels of mannose and galactose and a total lack of 1,6-linked mannose residues. Analysis of the integral cell wall protein from wild-type and och-1 mutant cells showed that the mutant cell wall had reduced protein content. The och-1 mutant was found to secrete 18-fold more protein than wild-type cells. Proteomic analysis of the proteins released by the mutant into the growth medium identified seven of the major cell wall proteins. Western blot analysis of ACW-1 and GEL-1 (two glycosylphosphatidylinositol [GPI]-anchored proteins that are covalently integrated into the wild-type cell wall) showed that high levels of these proteins were being released into the medium by the och-1 mutant. High levels of ACW-1 and GEL-1 were also released from the och-1 mutant cell wall by subjecting the wall to boiling in a 1% SDS solution, indicating that these proteins are not being covalently integrated into the mutant cell wall. From these results, we conclude that N-linked mannosylation of cell wall proteins by OCH-1 is required for their efficient covalent incorporation into the cell wall. PMID:20870880

  19. A workflow for large-scale empirical identification of cell wall N-linked glycoproteins of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thannhauser, Theodore W; Shen, Miaoqing; Sherwood, Robert; Howe, Kevin; Fish, Tara; Yang, Yong; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng

    2013-08-01

    Glycosylation is a common PTM of plant proteins that impacts a large number of important biological processes. Nevertheless, the impacts of differential site occupancy and the nature of specific glycoforms are obscure. Historically, characterization of glycoproteins has been difficult due to the distinct physicochemical properties of the peptidyl and glycan moieties, the variable and dynamic nature of the glycosylation process, their heterogeneous nature, and the low relative abundance of each glycoform. In this study, we explore a new pipeline developed for large-scale empirical identification of N-linked glycoproteins of tomato fruit as part of our ongoing efforts to characterize the tomato secretome. The workflow presented involves a combination of lectin affinity, tryptic digestion, ion-pairing HILIC, and precursor ion-driven data-dependent MS/MS analysis with a script to facilitate the identification and characterization of occupied N-linked glycosylation sites. A total of 212 glycoproteins were identified in this study, in which 26 glycopeptides from 24 glycoproteins were successfully characterized in just one HILIC fraction. Further precursor ion discovery-based MS/MS and deglycosylation followed by high accuracy and resolution MS analysis were used to confirm the glycosylation sites and determine site occupancy rates. The workflow reported is robust and capable of producing large amounts of empirical data involving N-linked glycosylation sites and their associated glycoforms. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A workflow for large-scale empirical identification of cell wall N-linked glycoproteins of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Thannhauser, Theodore W.; Shen, Miaoqing; Sherwood, Robert; Howe, Kevin; Fish, Tara; Yang, Yong; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of plant proteins that impacts a large number of important biological processes. Nevertheless, the impacts of differential site occupancy and the nature of specific glycoforms are obscure. Historically, characterization of glycoproteins has been difficult due to the distinct physicochemical properties of the peptidyl and glycan moieties, the variable and dynamic nature of the glycosylation process, their heterogeneous nature, and the low relative abundance of each glycoform. In this study, we explore a new pipeline developed for large-scale empirical identification of N-linked glycoproteins of tomato fruit as part of our ongoing efforts to characterize the tomato secretome. The workflow presented involves a combination of lectin affinity, tryptic digestion, ion-pairing HILIC and precursor ion-driven data dependent MS/MS analysis with a script to facilitate the identification and characterization of occupied N-linked glycosylation sites. A total of 212 glycoproteins were identified in this study, in which 26 glycopeptides from 24 glycoproteins were successfully characterized in just one HILIC fraction. Further precursor ion discovery (PID)-based MS/MS and deglycosylation followed by high accuracy and resolution MS analysis were used to confirm the glycosylation sites and determine site occupancy rates. The workflow reported is robust and capable of producing large amounts of empirical data involving N-linked glycosylation sites and their associated glycoforms. PMID:23580464

  1. Loss of a Conserved N-Linked Glycosylation Site in the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoprotein V2 Region Enhances Macrophage Tropism by Increasing CD4-Independent Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Po-Jen; Herschhorn, Alon; Haim, Hillel; Salas, Ignacio; Gu, Christopher; Sodroski, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains differ in their capacity to replicate in macrophages, but mechanisms underlying these differences are not fully understood. Here, we identify a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site (N173 in SIV, corresponding to N160 in HIV) in the V2 region of the SIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) as a novel determinant of macrophage tropism and characterize mechanisms underlying this phenotype. Loss of the N173 glycosylation site in the non-macrophage-tropic SIVmac239 by introducing an N173Q mutation enhanced viral replication and multinucleated giant cell formation upon infection of rhesus macrophages, while the addition of N173 to SIVmac251 had the opposite effect. The removal of N173 in SIVmac239 enhanced CD4-independent cell-to-cell transmission to CCR5-expressing cells. SIVmac239 with N173Q mediated CD4-independent cell-cell fusion but could not infect CD4-negative cells in single-round infections. Thus, CD4-independent phenotypes were detected only in the context of cell-to-cell contact. Similar results were obtained in SIVmac251 with and without N173. N173 decreased the neutralization sensitivity of SIVmac251 but had no effect on the neutralization sensitivity of SIVmac239. The N173Q mutation had no effect on SIVmac239 binding to CD4 in Biacore assays, coimmunoprecipitation assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). These findings suggest that the loss of the N173 N-linked glycosylation site increases SIVmac239 replication in macrophages by enhancing CD4-independent cell-to-cell virus transmission through CCR5-mediated fusion. This mechanism may facilitate the escape of macrophage-tropic viruses from neutralizing antibodies while promoting spreading infection by these viruses in vivo. IMPORTANCE In this study, we identify a genetic determinant in the viral envelope (N173) that increases replication and spreading infection of SIV strains in macrophages by

  2. N-Linked glycan site occupancy impacts the distribution of a potassium channel in the cell body and outgrowths of neuronal-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, M K; Weidner, D A; Bernetski, C J; Schwalbe, R A

    2014-01-01

    Vacancy of occupied N-glycosylation sites of glycoproteins is quite disruptive to a multicellular organism, as underlined by congenital disorders of glycosylation. Since a neuronal component is typically associated with this disease, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation processing of a neuronal voltage gated potassium channel, Kv3.1b, expressed in a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. Total internal reflection fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy measurements of live B35 cells expressing wild type and glycosylation mutant Kv3.1b proteins were used to evaluate the distribution of the various forms of the Kv3.1b protein in the cell body and outgrowths. Cell adhesion assays were also employed. Microscopy images revealed that occupancy of both N-glycosylation sites of Kv3.1b had relatively similar amounts of Kv3.1b in the outgrowth and cell body while vacancy of one or both sites led to increased accumulation of Kv3.1b in the cell body. Further both the fully glycosylated and partially glycosylated N229Q Kv3.1b proteins formed higher density particles in outgrowths compared to cell body. Cellular assays demonstrated that the distinct spatial arrangements altered cell adhesion properties. Our findings provide direct evidence that occupancy of the N-glycosylation sites of Kv3.1b contributes significantly to its lateral heterogeneity in membranes of neuronal-derived cells, and in turn alters cellular properties. Our study demonstrates that N-glycans of Kv3.1b contain information regarding the association, clustering, and distribution of Kv3.1b in the cell membrane, and furthermore that decreased occupancy caused by congenital disorders of glycosylation may alter the biological activity of Kv3.1b. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. N-Linked glycoengineering for human therapeutic proteins in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pandhal, Jagroop; Wright, Phillip C

    2010-09-01

    Approx. 70% of human therapeutic proteins are N-linked glycoproteins, and therefore host cells for production must contain the relevant protein modification machinery. The discovery and characterisation of the N-linked glycosylation pathway in the pathogenic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni, and subsequently its functional transfer to Escherichia coli, presents the opportunity of using prokaryotes as cell factories for therapeutic protein production. Not only could bacteria reduce costs and increase yields, but the improved feasibility to genetically control microorganisms means new and improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics is an exciting possibility. This is a relatively new concept, and progress in bacterial N-glycosylation characterisation is reviewed and metabolic engineering targets revealed.

  4. Understanding of decreased sialylation of Fc-fusion protein in hyperosmotic recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell culture: N-glycosylation gene expression and N-linked glycan antennary profile.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Jeong, Yeong Ran; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2017-08-01

    To understand the effects of hyperosmolality on protein glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing the Fc-fusion protein were cultivated in hyperosmolar medium resulting from adding NaCl (415 mOsm/kg). The hyperosmotic culture showed increased specific Fc-fusion protein productivity (qFc ) but a decreased proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of the Fc-fusion protein. The intracellular and extracellular sialidase activities in the hyperosmotic cultures were similar to those in the control culture (314 mOsm/kg), indicating that reduced sialylation of Fc-fusion protein at hyperosmolality was not due to elevated sialidase activity. Expression of 52 N-glycosylation-related genes was assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which provides a direct digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. After 3 days of hyperosmotic culture, nine genes (ugp, slc35a3, slc35d2, gcs1, manea, mgat2, mgat5b, b4galt3, and b4galt4) were differentially expressed over 1.5-fold of the control, and all these genes were down-regulated. N-linked glycan analysis by anion exchange and hydrophilic interaction HPLC showed that the proportion of highly sialylated (di-, tri-, tetra-) and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans was significantly decreased upon hyperosmotic culture. Addition of betaine, an osmoprotectant, to the hyperosmotic culture significantly increased the proportion of highly sialylated and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans (P ≤ 0.05), while it increased the expression of the N-glycan branching/antennary genes (mgat2 and mgat4b). Thus, decreased expression of the genes with roles in the N-glycan biosynthesis pathway correlated with reduced sialic acid content of Fc-fusion protein caused by hyperosmolar conditions. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effects of hyperosmolality on N-glycosylation, especially sialylation, in rCHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng

  5. Cell Wall N-Linked Mannoprotein Biosynthesis Requires Goa1p, a Putative Regulator of Mitochondrial Complex I in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    She, Xiaodong; Calderone, Richard; Kruppa, Michael; Lowman, Douglas; Williams, David; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Ying; Khamooshi, Kasra; Liu, Weida; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The Goa1p of Candida albicans regulates mitochondrial Complex I (CI) activities in its role as a putative CI accessory protein. Transcriptional profiling of goa1∆ revealed a down regulation of genes encoding β-oligomannosyl transferases. Herein, we present data on cell wall phenotypes of goa1∆ (strain GOA31). We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), GPC/MALLS, and NMR to compare GOA31 to a gene-reconstituted strain (GOA32) and parental cells. We note by TEM a reduction in outer wall fibrils, increased inner wall transparency, and the loss of a defined wall layer close to the plasma membrane. GPC-MALLS revealed a reduction in high and intermediate Mw mannan by 85% in GOA31. A reduction of β-mannosyl but not α-mannosyl linkages was noted in GOA31 cells. β-(1,6)-linked glucan side chains were branched about twice as often but were shorter in length for GOA31. We conclude that mitochondrial CI energy production is highly integrated with cell wall formation. Our data also suggest that not all cell wall biosynthetic processes are dependent upon Goa1p even though it provides high levels of ATP to cells. The availability of both broadly conserved and fungal-specific mutants lacking CI subunit proteins should be useful in assessing functions of fungal-specific functions subunit proteins. PMID:26809064

  6. N-linked protein glycosylation in a bacterial system.

    PubMed

    Nothaft, Harald; Liu, Xin; McNally, David J; Szymanski, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    N-Linked protein glycosylation is conserved throughout the three domains of life and influences protein function, stability, and protein complex formation. N-Linked glycosylation is an essential process in Eukaryotes; however, although N-glycosylation affects multiple cellular processes in Archaea and Bacteria, it is not needed for cell survival. Methods for the analyses of N-glycosylation in eukaryotes are well established, but comparable techniques for the analyses of the pathways in Bacteria and Archaea are needed. In this chapter we describe new methods for the detection and analyses of N-linked, and the recently discovered free oligosaccharides (fOS), from whole cell lysates of Campylobacter jejuni using non-specific pronase E digestion and permethylation followed by mass spectrometry. We also describe the expression and immunodetection of the model N-glycoprotein, AcrA, fused to a hexa-histidine tag to follow protein glycosylation in C. jejuni. This chapter concludes with the recent demonstration that high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR of intact bacterial cells provides a rapid, non-invasive method for analyzing fOS in C. jejuni in vivo. This combination of techniques provides a powerful tool for the exploration, quantification, and structural analyses of N-linked and free oligosaccharides in the bacterial system.

  7. A mathematical model of N-linked glycoform biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Umaña, P; Bailey, J E

    1997-09-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. Effective engineering of this pathway to maximize the fractions of beneficial glycoforms within the glycoform population of a target glycoprotein can be aided by a mathematical model of the N-linked glycosylation process. A mathematical model is presented here, whose main function is to calculate the expected qualitative trends in the N-linked oligosaccharide distribution resulting from changes in the levels of one or more enzymes involved in the network of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that accomplish N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. It consists of mass balances for 33 different oligosaccharide species N-linked to a specified protein that is being transported through the different compartments of the Golgi complex. Values of the model parameters describing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were estimated from literature information. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates was also obtained from the literature. The solution of the system for this basal set of parameters gave a glycoform distribution consisting mainly of complex-galactosylated oligosaccharides distributed in structures with different numbers of antennae in a fashion similar to that observed for various recombinant proteins produced in CHO cells. Other simulations indicate that changes in the oligosaccharide distribution could easily result from alteration in glycoprotein productivity within the range currently attainable in industry. The overexpression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III in CHO cells was simulated under different conditions to test the main function of the model. These simulations allow a comparison of different strategies, such as simultaneous overexpression of several

  8. N-linked glycans of the human insulin receptor and their distribution over the crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Lindsay G; Lawrence, Michael C; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Strike, Phillip M; Robinson, Christine P; McKern, Neil M; Ward, Colin W

    2008-04-01

    The human insulin receptor (IR) homodimer is heavily glycosylated and contains a total of 19 predicted N-linked glycosylation sites in each monomer. The recent crystal structure of the IR ectodomain shows electron density consistent with N-linked glycosylation at the majority of sites present in the construct. Here, we describe a refined structure of the IR ectodomain that incorporates all of the N-linked glycans and reveals the extent to which the attached glycans mask the surface of the IR dimer from interaction with antibodies or other potential therapeutic binding proteins. The usefulness of Fab complexation in the crystallization of heavily glycosylated proteins is also discussed. The compositions of the glycans on IR expressed in CHO-K1 cells and the glycosylation deficient Lec8 cell line were determined by protease digestion, glycopeptide purification, amino acid sequence analysis, and mass spectrometry. Collectively the data reveal: multiple species of complex glycan at residues 25, 255, 295, 418, 606, 624, 742, 755, and 893 (IR-B numbering); multiple species of high-mannose glycan at residues 111 and 514; a single species of complex glycan at residue 671; and a single species of high-mannose glycan at residue 215. Residue 16 exhibited a mixture of complex, hybrid, and high-mannose glycan species. Of the remaining five predicted N-linked sites, those at residues 397 and 906 were confirmed by amino acid sequencing to be glycosylated, while that at residue 78 and the atypical (NKC) site at residue 282 were not glycosylated. The peptide containing the final site at residue 337 was not recovered but is seen to be glycosylated in the electron density maps of the IR ectodomain. The model of the fully glycosylated IR reveals that the sites carrying high-mannose glycans lie at positions of relatively low steric accessibility.

  9. Bioelectrochemistry of cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolowy, Krzysztof

    This paper deals with processes and phenomena of cell surface bioelectrochemistry in which charges do not move across the cell membrane. First, electrochemical properties of the cell membrane and the cell medium interface are described, and different electric potentials present in biological systems are defined. Methods of cell electrophoresis are then discussed. It is shown that none of the simple electrochemical models of the cell membrane can explain the dependence of cell electrophoretic mobility upon ionic strength and other electrochemical properties of the cell membrane, such as the difference in cell membrane charge as determined electrochemically and biochemically, or the effect of neuraminidase, pH, or membrane potential change on cell electrophoretic mobility. Thus, it is apparent that conclusions drawn from electrophoretic mobility data on the basis of simple models are false. The more complex multilayer-electrochemical model of the cell membrane is then described and shown to explain most electrochemical properties of the cell membrane. Next, different electrochemical techniques that were applied to study cell surfaces are described. It is shown that colloid titration, isoelectric focusing, and partition of cells between two immiscible phases is dependent not only on electrical properties of the cell membrane, but also on the energy of adsorption at cell surfaces of organic molecules used in these methods. Powder electrodes, cell polarography, conductometric titration, and Donnan potential methods are described and it is shown that these methods also produce results of doubtful value and are also often misinterpreted. The contact potential difference method produces results difficult to interpret and only electro-osmotic measurements and potential sensitive molecules are valuable methods. The colloid particle interaction theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) as applied to cell interactions is discussed. It is shown that the

  10. An N-linked high-mannose type oligosaccharide, expressed at the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis, mediates attachment and infectivity of the microorganism to HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C; Takahashi, N; Swanson, A F; Ozeki, Y; Hakomori, S

    1996-12-15

    The structure of the carbohydrate of the 40-kD major outer membrane component of Chlamydia trachomatis and its role in defining infectivity of the organism were investigated. The oligosaccharides were released from the glycoprotein by N-glycanase digestion, coupled to a 2-aminopyridyl residue, and subjected to two-dimensional sugar mapping technique. The major fractions consisted of "high-mannose type" oligosaccharides containing 8-9 mannose residues. Bi- and tri-antennary "complex type" oligosaccharides having terminal galactose were detected as minor components. These oligosaccharides were N-linked and contained no sialic acid. This structural profile is consistent with our previous characterization based on lectin-binding and glycosidase digestion. Functional specificity of identified chlamydial oligosaccharides was analyzed using glycopeptides fractionated from ovalbumin and structurally defined oligosaccharides from other sources. The glycopeptide fraction having high-mannose type oligosaccharide, as compared to those having complex or hybrid-type, showed a stronger inhibitory effect on attachment and infectivity of chlamydial organisms to HeLa cells. Among high-mannose type oligosaccharides, the strongest inhibition was observed with mannose 8 as compared with mannose 6, 7, or 9. These results indicate that a specific high-mannose type oligosaccharide linked to the major outer membrane protein of C. trachomatis mediates attachment and infectivity of the organism to HeLa cells.

  11. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of N-Linked Glycans in Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Drake, R R; Powers, T W; Jones, E E; Bruner, E; Mehta, A S; Angel, P M

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylated proteins account for a majority of the posttranslation modifications of cell surface, secreted, and circulating proteins. Within the tumor microenvironment, the presence of immune cells, extracellular matrix proteins, cell surface receptors, and interactions between stroma and tumor cells are all processes mediated by glycan binding and recognition reactions. Changes in glycosylation during tumorigenesis are well documented to occur and affect all of these associated adhesion and regulatory functions. A MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) workflow for profiling N-linked glycan distributions in fresh/frozen tissues and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues has recently been developed. The key to the approach is the application of a molecular coating of peptide-N-glycosidase to tissues, an enzyme that cleaves asparagine-linked glycans from their protein carrier. The released N-linked glycans can then be analyzed by MALDI-IMS directly on tissue. Generally 40 or more individual glycan structures are routinely detected, and when combined with histopathology localizations, tumor-specific glycans are readily grouped relative to nontumor regions and other structural features. This technique is a recent development and new approach in glycobiology and mass spectrometry imaging research methodology; thus, potential uses such as tumor-specific glycan biomarker panels and other applications are discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Branching N-linked oligosaccharides in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Korczak, B; Goss, P; Fernandez, B; Baker, M; Dennis, J W

    1994-01-01

    Tumor progression in rodent and human tumors is commonly associated with changes in glycoprotein glycosylation, in particular increased beta 1-6GlcNAc-branching, a regulatory step in expression of polylactosamine and extended-chain Lewis antigens. Loss of the branched oligosaccharides in murine tumor cells either due to somatic mutation, or treatment of the cells with the oligosaccharide processing inhibitor swainsonine, blocks tumor cells invasion in vitro and reduces solid tumor growth in vivo. Swainsonine and other inhibitors of N-linked oligosaccharide processing may be useful anti-cancer drugs, a premise which has begun to be tested in humans.

  13. A single N-linked glycosylation site in the Japanese encephalitis virus prM protein is critical for cell type-specific prM protein biogenesis, virus particle release, and pathogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Hahn, Youn-Soo; Lee, Chan-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Young-Min

    2008-08-01

    The prM protein of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) contains a single potential N-linked glycosylation site, N(15)-X(16)-T(17), which is highly conserved among JEV strains and closely related flaviviruses. To investigate the role of this site in JEV replication and pathogenesis, we manipulated the RNA genome by using infectious JEV cDNA to generate three prM mutants (N15A, T17A, and N15A/T17A) with alanine substituting for N(15) and/or T(17) and one mutant with silent point mutations introduced into the nucleotide sequences corresponding to all three residues in the glycosylation site. An analysis of these mutants in the presence or absence of endoglycosidases confirmed the addition of oligosaccharides to this potential glycosylation site. The loss of prM N glycosylation, without significantly altering the intracellular levels of viral RNA and proteins, led to an approximately 20-fold reduction in the production of extracellular virions, which had protein compositions and infectivities nearly identical to those of wild-type virions; this reduction occurred at the stage of virus release, rather than assembly. This release defect was correlated with small-plaque morphology and an N-glycosylation-dependent delay in viral growth. A more conservative mutation, N15Q, had the same effect as N15A. One of the four prM mutants, N15A/T17A, showed an additional defect in virus growth in mosquito C6/36 cells but not human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y or hamster BHK-21 cells. This cell type dependence was attributed to abnormal N-glycosylation-independent biogenesis of prM. In mice, the elimination of prM N glycosylation resulted in a drastic decrease in virulence after peripheral inoculation. Overall, our findings indicate that this highly conserved N-glycosylation motif in prM is crucial for multiple stages of JEV biology: prM biogenesis, virus release, and pathogenesis.

  14. A Single N-Linked Glycosylation Site in the Japanese Encephalitis Virus prM Protein Is Critical for Cell Type-Specific prM Protein Biogenesis, Virus Particle Release, and Pathogenicity in Mice ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Hahn, Youn-Soo; Lee, Chan-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Young-Min

    2008-01-01

    The prM protein of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) contains a single potential N-linked glycosylation site, N15-X16-T17, which is highly conserved among JEV strains and closely related flaviviruses. To investigate the role of this site in JEV replication and pathogenesis, we manipulated the RNA genome by using infectious JEV cDNA to generate three prM mutants (N15A, T17A, and N15A/T17A) with alanine substiting for N15 and/or T17 and one mutant with silent point mutations introduced into the nucleotide sequences corresponding to all three residues in the glycosylation site. An analysis of these mutants in the presence or absence of endoglycosidases confirmed the addition of oligosaccharides to this potential glycosylation site. The loss of prM N glycosylation, without significantly altering the intracellular levels of viral RNA and proteins, led to an ≈20-fold reduction in the production of extracellular virions, which had protein compositions and infectivities nearly identical to those of wild-type virions; this reduction occurred at the stage of virus release, rather than assembly. This release defect was correlated with small-plaque morphology and an N-glycosylation-dependent delay in viral growth. A more conservative mutation, N15Q, had the same effect as N15A. One of the four prM mutants, N15A/T17A, showed an additional defect in virus growth in mosquito C6/36 cells but not human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y or hamster BHK-21 cells. This cell type dependence was attributed to abnormal N-glycosylation-independent biogenesis of prM. In mice, the elimination of prM N glycosylation resulted in a drastic decrease in virulence after peripheral inoculation. Overall, our findings indicate that this highly conserved N-glycosylation motif in prM is crucial for multiple stages of JEV biology: prM biogenesis, virus release, and pathogenesis. PMID:18524814

  15. Evidence that maturation of the N-linked glycans of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) glycoproteins is required for virus-mediated cell fusion: The effect of {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors on RSV infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Jeffree, Chris E.; Li, Ping; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Brown, Gaie; Aitken, James D.; MacLellan, Kirsty; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: rjsugrue@ntu.edu.sg

    2006-07-05

    Glycan heterogeneity of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein was demonstrated by proteomics. The effect of maturation of the virus glycoproteins-associated glycans on virus infectivity was therefore examined using the {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) and swainsonine (SW). In the presence of SW the N-linked glycans on the F protein appeared in a partially mature form, whereas in the presence of DMJ no maturation of the glycans was observed. Neither inhibitor had a significant effect on G protein processing or on the formation of progeny virus. Although the level of infectious virus and syncytia formation was not significantly affected by SW-treatment, DMJ-treatment correlated with a one hundred-fold reduction in virus infectivity. Our data suggest that glycan maturation of the RSV glycoproteins, in particular those on the F protein, is an important step in virus maturation and is required for virus infectivity.

  16. SURFACE ALLOANTIGENS OF PLASMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshitada; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.

    1970-01-01

    A serological study of immunoglobulin-forming cells of the mouse, normal and malignant, shows that they lack all known surface differentiation antigens of the thymocyte-lymphocyte axis: TL, θ, Ly-A, Ly-B, and MSLA. Two systems of normal alloantigens are expressed on these cells, H-2 and a new system named PC. The gene Pca (Plasma cell antigen) which specifies PC.1 alloantigen segregates as a mendelian dominant not closely linked with H-2. This cell surface antigen is absent from thymocytes, leukemias, and very probably from thymus-derived lymphocytes also; it is present on cells of the liver, kidney, brain, and lymph nodes as well as on hemolytic plaque-forming cells of the spleen, and on myelomas. So PC.1 is properly classified as a differentiation alloantigen. The strain distribution of PC.1 does not conform to that of any known immunoglobulin allotype or cell surface alloantigen previously described. Thus the cell surface antigens of immunoglobulin-producing cells are clearly different from those of cells belonging to the thymocyte-lymphocyte axis. Each family of cells has distinctive alloantigens, and the two families share alloantigens of only one known system, H-2. This implies that either immunoglobulin-producing cells are not derived from thymic lymphocytes, or if they are, the program responsible for the transition must include extensive revision of cell surface structure. PMID:5419273

  17. Cell surface expression of glycosylated, nonglycosylated, and truncated forms of a cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1988-09-01

    The soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase (PK) has been expressed at the cell surface in a membrane-anchored form (APK). The hybrid protein contains the NH2-terminal signal/anchor domain of a class II integral membrane protein (hemagglutinin/neuraminidase, of the paramyxovirus SV5) fused to the PK NH2 terminus. APK contains a cryptic site that is used for N-linked glycosylation but elimination of this site by site-specific mutagenesis does not prevent cell surface localization. Truncated forms of the APK molecule, with up to 80% of the PK region of APK removed, can also be expressed at the cell surface. These data suggest that neither the complete PK molecule nor its glycosylation are necessary for intracellular transport of PK to the cell surface, and it is possible that specific signals may not be needed in the ectodomain of this hybrid protein to specify cell surface localization.

  18. ANTIGENIC STRUCTURE OF CELL SURFACES

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Tadao; Hämmerling, Ulrich; de Harven, Etienne; Boyse, Edward A.; Old, Lloyd J.

    1969-01-01

    The representation of mouse alloantigens belonging to three systems, H-2, θ and TL, on the surface of cells from thymus, spleen, lymph nodes, and peritoneal cavity, was studied by electron microscopy with ferritin-labeled antibody. As expected from earlier serological data, TL was confined to thymocytes, θ was found on thymocytes and lymphocytes, and H-2 occurred to some extent on all cell types observed. On reticular cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils, the majority of the cell surface was occupied by H-2; thymocytes had considerably less H-2, and erythrocytes and peritoneal macrophages least of all. In every instance the representation of antigen was discontinuous, the fraction of the cell surface covered being characteristic both of the antigen and of the type of cell. H-2 and θ provide a striking example of this; H-2 is present in far higher amounts on lymphocytes than on thymocytes, whereas the converse is true of θ. Within areas positive for H-2 or θ, protuberances of the surface membrane were often antigen-negative. A better definition of cell surface structure, gained from studies such as this, is necessary for further inquiry into how the cell surface is assembled, and into selective gene action in relation to cellular differentiation. PMID:5347699

  19. cap alpha. -D-Mannopyranosylmethyl-P-nitrophenyltriazene effects on the degradation and biosynthesis of N-linked oligosaccharide chains on. cap alpha. /sub 1/-acid glycoprotein by liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Docherty, P.A.; Aronson, N.N. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of ..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosylmethyl-p-nitrophenyltriazene (..cap alpha..-ManMNT) on the degradation and processing of oligosaccharide chains on ..cap alpha../sub 1/-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were studied. Addition of the triazene to a perfused liver blocked the complete degradation of endocytosed N-acetyl (/sup 14/C)glucosamine-labeled asialo-AGP and caused the accumulation of Man/sub 2/GlcNAc/sub 1/ fragments in the lysosome-enriched fraction of the liver homogenate. This compound also reduced the reincorporation of lysosomally-derived (/sup 14/C)GlcNAc into newly secreted glycoproteins. Cultured hepatocytes treated with the inhibitor synthesized and secreted fully-glycosylated AGP. However, the N-linked oligosaccharide chains on AGP secreted by the ..cap alpha..-ManMNT-treated hepatocytes remained sensitive to digestion with endoglycosidase H, were resistant to neuraminidase, and consisted of Man/sub 9-7/GlcNAc/sub 2/ structures as analyzed by high resolution Bio-Gel P-4 chromatography. As measured by their resistance to cleavage by endoglycosidase H, the normal processing of all six carbohydrate chains on AGP to the complex form did not completely resume until nearly 24 h after triazene treatment. Since ManMNT is likely to irreversibly inactivate ..cap alpha..-D-mannosidases, the return of AGP to secretory forms with complex chains after 24 h probably resulted from synthesis of new processing enzymes.

  20. Cell surface engineering of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Zhao, Weian; Gupta, Ashish; Loh, Wei Li; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging the capacity to promote regeneration, stem cell therapies offer enormous hope for solving some of the most tragic illnesses, diseases, and tissue defects world-wide. However, a significant barrier to the effective implementation of cell therapies is the inability to target a large quantity of viable cells with high efficiency to tissues of interest. Systemic infusion is desired as it minimizes the invasiveness of cell therapy, and maximizes practical aspects of repeated doses. However, cell types such as mesenchymal stem cells exhibit a poor homing capability or lose their capacity to home following culture expansion (i.e. FASEB J 21:3197-3207, 2007; Circulation 108:863-868, 2003; Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation 32:1005-1011; Blood 104:3581-3587, 2004). To address this challenge, we have developed a simple platform technology to chemically attach cell adhesion molecules to the cell surface to improve the homing efficiency to specific tissues. This chemical approach involves a stepwise process including (1) treatment of cells with sulfonated biotinyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide to introduce biotin groups on the cell surface, (2) addition of streptavidin that binds to the biotin on the cell surface and presents unoccupied binding sites, and (3) attachment of biotinylated targeting ligands that promote adhesive interactions with vascular endothelium. Specifically, in our model system, a biotinylated cell rolling ligand, sialyl Lewisx (SLeX), found on the surface of leukocytes (i.e., the active site of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL-1)), is conjugated on MSC surface. The SLeX engineered MSCs exhibit a rolling response on a P-selectin coated substrate under shear stress conditions. This indicates that this approach can be used to potentially target P-selectin expressing endothelium in the more marrow or at sites of inflammation. Importantly, the surface modification has no adverse impact on MSCs' native phenotype including their multilineage

  1. Probing the Role of N-Linked Glycans in the Stability and Activity of Fungal Cellobiohydrolases by Mutational Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adney, W. S.; Jeoh, T.; Beckham, G. T.; Chou,Y. C.; Baker, J. O.; Michener, W.; Brunecky, R.; Himmel, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei and Penicillium funiculosum produce highly effective enzyme mixtures that degrade the cellulose and hemicellulose components of plant cell walls. Many fungal species produce a glycoside hydrolase family 7 (Cel7A) cellobiohydrolase, a class of enzymes that catalytically process from the reducing end of cellulose. A direct amino acid comparison of these two enzymes shows that they not only have high amino acid homology, but also contain analogous N-linked glycosylation sites on the catalytic domain. We have previously shown (Jeoh et al. in Biotechnol Biofuels, 1:10, 2008) that expression of T. reesei cellobiohydrolase I in a commonly used industrial expression host, Aspergillus niger var. awamori, results in an increase in the amount of N-linked glycosylation of the enzyme, which negatively affects crystalline cellulose degradation activity as well as thermal stability. This complementary study examines the significance of individual N-linked glycans on the surface of the catalytic domain of Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from T. reesei and P. funiculosum by genetically adding or removing N-linked glycosylation motifs using site directed mutagenesis. Modified enzymes, expressed in A. niger var. awamori, were tested for activity and thermal stability. It was concluded that N-linked glycans in peptide loops that form part of the active site tunnel have the greatest impact on both thermal stability and enzymatic activity on crystalline cellulose for both the T. reesei and P. funiculosum Cel7A enzymes. Specifically, for the Cel7A T. reesei enzyme expressed in A. niger var. awamori, removal of the N384 glycosylation site yields a mutant with 70% greater activity after 120 h compared to the heterologously expressed wild type T. reesei enzyme. In addition, similar activity improvements were found to be associated with the addition of a new glycosylation motif at N194 in P. funiculosum. This mutant also exhibits 70% greater activity after

  2. Furrowing in altered cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, R

    1976-02-01

    Understanding the process which established the cell division mechanism requires analysis of the role of the responding surface as well as that of stimulatory subsurface structures. Cell surface was altered by the expansion which occurs during exovate formation. Exovates appear on the surface of fertilized Arbacia lixula, Paracentrotus lividus and Echinarachnius parma eggs in response to extreme flattening. They result from cytoplasmic outflow initiated in a very restricted portion of the egg surface. Observations of the formation process in pigmented A. lixula eggs revealed that the original surface may be expanded about 100 fold as the exovate swells. When exovates formed 15-30 minutes after fertilization contain the mitotic apparatus, they divide synchronously with flattened controls. If nucleated exovates are established after the beginning of first cleavage, furrows appear in ten minutes. Exovates established after the beginning of second cleavage develop furrows four minutes after the entrance of the the mitsotic apparatus. Cytoplasm beneath damaged exovate surfaces sometimes develops partial constrictions independently of the surface in the plane the furrow would have occupied. These results suggest that normal surface structure is unnecessary for furrow establishment and function.

  3. A Surface-Controlled Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1987-01-01

    Open-circuit voltage and cell efficiency increased. Proposed technique for controlling recombination velocity on solar-cell surfaces provides cells of increased efficiency and open-circuit voltage. In present cells, uncontrolled surface recombination velocity degrades opencircuit voltage and efficiency. In cell using proposed technique, transparent conducting layer, insulated from cell contacts, biased to enable variable control of surface recombination velocity.

  4. A Surface-Controlled Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1987-01-01

    Open-circuit voltage and cell efficiency increased. Proposed technique for controlling recombination velocity on solar-cell surfaces provides cells of increased efficiency and open-circuit voltage. In present cells, uncontrolled surface recombination velocity degrades opencircuit voltage and efficiency. In cell using proposed technique, transparent conducting layer, insulated from cell contacts, biased to enable variable control of surface recombination velocity.

  5. Complex N-Linked Glycans Serve as a Determinant for Exosome/Microvesicle Cargo Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yaxuan; Eng, William S.; Colquhoun, David R.; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Graham, David R.; Mahal, Lara K.

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, also known as microvesicles (EMVs), are nano-sized membranous particles secreted from nearly all mammalian cell types. These nanoparticles play critical roles in many physiological processes including cell-cell signaling, immune activation, and suppression and are associated with disease states such as tumor progression. The biological functions of EMVs are highly dependent on their protein composition, which can dictate pathogenicity. Although some mechanisms have been proposed for the regulation of EMV protein trafficking, little attention has been paid to N-linked glycosylation as a potential sorting signal. Previous work from our laboratory found a conserved glycan signature for EMVs, which differed from that of the parent cell membranes, suggesting a potential role for glycosylation in EMV biogenesis. In this study, we further explore the role of glycosylation in EMV protein trafficking. We identify EMV glycoproteins and demonstrate alteration of their recruitment as a function of their glycosylation status upon pharmacological manipulation. Furthermore, we show that genetic manipulation of the glycosylation levels of a specific EMV glycoprotein, EWI-2, directly impacts its recruitment as a function of N-linked glycan sites. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that N-linked glycosylation directs glycoprotein sorting into EMVs. PMID:25261472

  6. Complex N-linked glycans serve as a determinant for exosome/microvesicle cargo recruitment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yaxuan; Eng, William S; Colquhoun, David R; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Graham, David R; Mahal, Lara K

    2014-11-21

    Exosomes, also known as microvesicles (EMVs), are nano-sized membranous particles secreted from nearly all mammalian cell types. These nanoparticles play critical roles in many physiological processes including cell-cell signaling, immune activation, and suppression and are associated with disease states such as tumor progression. The biological functions of EMVs are highly dependent on their protein composition, which can dictate pathogenicity. Although some mechanisms have been proposed for the regulation of EMV protein trafficking, little attention has been paid to N-linked glycosylation as a potential sorting signal. Previous work from our laboratory found a conserved glycan signature for EMVs, which differed from that of the parent cell membranes, suggesting a potential role for glycosylation in EMV biogenesis. In this study, we further explore the role of glycosylation in EMV protein trafficking. We identify EMV glycoproteins and demonstrate alteration of their recruitment as a function of their glycosylation status upon pharmacological manipulation. Furthermore, we show that genetic manipulation of the glycosylation levels of a specific EMV glycoprotein, EWI-2, directly impacts its recruitment as a function of N-linked glycan sites. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that N-linked glycosylation directs glycoprotein sorting into EMVs.

  7. N-Linked glycosylation of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lizak, Christian; Fan, Yao-Yun; Weber, Thomas Christian; Aebi, Markus

    2011-03-16

    Glycosylation is the predominant protein modification to diversify the functionality of proteins. In particular, N-linked protein glycosylation can increase the biophysical and pharmacokinetic properties of therapeutic proteins. However, the major challenges in studying the consequences of protein glycosylation on a molecular level are caused by glycan heterogeneities of currently used eukaryotic expression systems, but the discovery of the N-linked protein glycosylation system in the ε-proteobacterium Campylobacter jejuni and its functional transfer to Escherichia coli opened up the possibility to produce glycoproteins in bacteria. Toward this goal, we elucidated whether antibody fragments, a potential class of therapeutic proteins, are amenable to bacterial N-linked glycosylation, thereby improving their biophysical properties. We describe a new strategy for glycoengineering and production of quantitative amounts of glycosylated scFv 3D5 at high purity. The analysis revealed the presence of a homogeneous N-glycan that significantly increased the stability and the solubility of the 3D5 antibody fragment. The process of bacterial N-linked glycosylation offers the possibility to specifically address and alter the biophysical properties of proteins.

  8. Cell surface expression of v-fms-coded glycoproteins is required for transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Rettenmier, C W; Look, A T; Sherr, C J

    1984-01-01

    The viral oncogene v-fms encodes a transforming glycoprotein with in vitro tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity. Although most v-fms-coded molecules remain internally sequestered in transformed cells, a minor population of molecules is transported to the cell surface. An engineered deletion mutant lacking 348 base pairs of the 3.0-kilobase-pair v-fms gene encoded a polypeptide that was 15 kilodaltons smaller than the wild-type v-fms gene product. The in-frame deletion of 116 amino acids was adjacent to the transmembrane anchor peptide located near the middle of the predicted protein sequence and 432 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus. The mutant polypeptide acquired N-linked oligosaccharide chains, was proteolytically processed in a manner similar to the wild-type glycoprotein, and exhibited an associated tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity in vitro. However, the N-linked oligosaccharides of the mutant glycoprotein were not processed to complex carbohydrate chains, and the glycoprotein was not detected at the cell surface. Cells expressing high levels of the mutant glycoprotein did not undergo morphological transformation and did not form colonies in semisolid medium. The transforming activity of the v-fms gene product therefore appears to be mediated through target molecules on the plasma membrane. Images PMID:6390182

  9. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, N; Yang, M K; Bi, S X; Chen, L; Zhu, Z Y; Gao, Y T; Du, Z

    2013-08-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell-cell and cell-matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro.

  10. N-linked glycan profiling of GGTA1/CMAH knockout pigs identifies new potential carbohydrate xenoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Burlak, Christopher; Bern, Marshall; Brito, Alejandro E.; Isailovic, Dragan; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Estrada, Jose L.; Li, Ping; Tector, A. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background The temporary or long-term xenotransplantation of pig organs into people would save thousands of lives each year if not for the robust human antibody response to pig carbohydrates. Genetically engineered pigs deficient in galactose α1,3 galactose (gene modified: GGTA1) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (gene modified: CMAH) have significantly improved cell survival when challenged by human antibody and complement in vitro. There remains, however, a significant portion of human antibody binding. Methods To uncover additional xenoantigens we compared the asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycome from serum proteins of humans, domestic pigs, GGTA1 knockout pigs and GGTA1/CMAH knockout pigs using mass spectrometry. Carbohydrate structures were determined with assistance from GlycoWorkbench, Cartoonist, and SimGlycan software by comparison to existing database entries and collision-induced dissociation fragmentation data. Results Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of reduced and solid-phase permethylated glycans resulted in the detection of high mannose, hybrid, and complex type N-linked glycans in the 1000 to 4500 m/z ion range. GGTA1/CMAH knockout pig samples had increased relative amounts of high-mannose, incomplete and xylosylated N-linked glycans. All pig samples had significantly higher amounts of core and possibly antennae fucosylation. Conclusions We provide for the first time a comparison of the serum protein glycomes of the human, domestic pig and genetically modified pigs important to xenotransplantation. PMID:24033743

  11. Cell attachment on microscopically textured silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stephen W.; Kam, Lance; Isaacson, Michael; Craighead, Harold G.; Szarowski, Donald H.; Turner, James N.; Shain, W.

    1997-03-01

    To assess the effect of surface topography on cell attachment, central nervous system (astroglial cells) cells were grown on surfaces patterned with two different types of texture. Reactive ion etching (RIE) was used to induce nanometer-scale roughness in silicon wafers. In a subsequent wet etch, photo-patterned resist protected selected areas of the surface, resulting in a pattern of modified and unmodified texture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the RIE-roughened 'primary' surface consists of randomly positioned columnar structures (diameter approximately equals 50 nm, height approximately equals 250 nm). The wet-etched 'secondary' surfaces had shorter and more sparsely distributed projections, controlled to a degree by wet etch duration. Confocal microscopy and SEM demonstrated that transformed astroglial (LRM55) cells preferred secondary surfaces. The morphology of cells on secondary surfaces depended on wet etch duration. with brief wet etch, cells hade stellate or mounded morphology and were not closely adherent to the surface. With long wet etch, cells had an epithelial-like morphology and were closely adherent to substrates. Under all conditions, cells discriminated between primary and secondary surfaces. In contrast to LRM55 cells, astrocytes in primary cell culture preferred primary surfaces. Thus changes in surface topography produce cell-specific selectivity and change cell attachment characteristics.

  12. Cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase functions during neural crest cell migration and neurulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mesenchymal cell migration and neurite outgrowth are mediated in part by binding of cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) to N-linked oligosaccharides within the E8 domain of laminin. In this study, we determined whether cell surface GalTase functions during neural crest cell migration and neural development in vivo using antibodies raised against affinity-purified chicken serum GalTase. The antibodies specifically recognized two embryonic proteins of 77 and 67 kD, both of which express GalTase activity. The antibodies also immunoprecipitated and inhibited chick embryo GalTase activity, and inhibited neural crest cell migration on laminin matrices in vitro. Anti-GalTase antibodies were microinjected into the head mesenchyme of stage 7-9 chick embryos or cranial to Henson's node of stage 6 embryos. Anti-avian GalTase IgG decreased cranial neural crest cell migration on the injected side but did not cross the embryonic midline and did not affect neural crest cell migration on the uninjected side. Anti-avian GalTase Fab crossed the embryonic midline and perturbed cranial neural crest cell migration throughout the head. Neural fold elevation and neural tube closure were also disrupted by Fab fragments. Cell surface GalTase was localized to migrating neural crest cells and to the basal surfaces of neural epithelia by indirect immunofluorescence, whereas GalTase was undetectable on neural crest cells prior to migration. These results suggest that, during early embryogenesis, cell surface GalTase participates during neural crest cell migration, perhaps by interacting with laminin, a major component of the basal lamina. Cell surface GalTase also appears to play a role in neural tube formation, possibly by mediating neural epithelial adhesion to the underlying basal lamina. PMID:1560031

  13. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis. PMID:27281343

  14. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis.

  15. IFNa of black carp is an antiviral cytokine modified with N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhilin; Chen, Song; Liu, Jiachen; Xiao, Jun; Yan, Jun; Feng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) play an important role in the antiviral immune response in teleost fish. In this study, one type I interferon (bcIFNa) of black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) has been cloned and characterized. The full-length cDNA of bcIFNa gene consists of 783 nucleotides and the predicted bcIFNa protein contains 185 amino acids. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that bcIFNa mRNA transcription level in all the selected tissues of black carp was greatly increased at 33 h post spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) infection. The protein of bcIFNa could be detected in both the whole cell lysate and the supernatant media of HEK293T cells transfected with plasmids expressing bcIFNa through immunoblot assay. EPC cells showed greatly increased antiviral ability when the cells were treated with the bcIFNa-containing conditioned media for 24 h before SVCV infection. Mass spectrum assay and glycosidase digestion analysis determined that bcIFNa is modified with N-linked glycosylation, which occurs on the Asn (N) of 38 site of this cytokine. The un-glycosylated mutant bcIFNa-N38Q could be secreted out of the cell and showed the similar antiviral ability against SVCV as that of wild type bcIFNa, which suggested that N-linked glycosylation does not contribute directly to the antiviral property of this fish cytokine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ethanol-induced impairment in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Welti, Michael; Hülsmeier, Andreas J

    2014-04-01

    Deficiency in N-linked protein glycosylation is a long-known characteristic of alcoholic liver disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Previous investigations of ethanol-induced glycosylation deficiency demonstrated perturbations in the early steps of substrate synthesis and in the final steps of capping N-linked glycans in the Golgi. The significance of the biosynthesis of N-glycan precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum, however, has not yet been addressed in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol-metabolizing hepatoma cells were treated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. Transcript analysis of genes involved in the biosynthesis of N-glycans, activity assays of related enzymes, dolichol-phosphate quantification, and analysis of dolichol-linked oligosaccharides were performed. Upon treatment of cells with ethanol, we found a decrease in the final N-glycan precursor Dol-PP-GlcNAc(2) Man(9) Glc(3) and in C95- and C100-dolichol-phosphate levels. Transcript analysis of genes involved in N-glycosylation showed a 17% decrease in expression levels of DPM1, a subunit of the dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase, and an 8% increase in RPN2, a subunit of the oligosaccharyl transferase. Ethanol treatment decreases the biosynthesis of dolichol-phosphate. Consequently, the formation of N-glycan precursors is affected, resulting in an aberrant precursor assembly. Messenger RNA levels of genes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis are slightly affected by ethanol treatment, indicating that the assembly of N-glycan precursors is not regulated at the transcriptional level. This study confirms that ethanol impairs N-linked glycosylation by affecting dolichol biosynthesis leading to impaired dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly. Together our data help to explain the underglycosylation phenotype observed in alcoholic liver disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  17. Surface Glycoproteins of Exosomes Shed by Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Contribute to Function.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sitara; Danielson, Steven; Clements, Virginia; Edwards, Nathan; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fenselau, Catherine

    2017-01-06

    In this report, we use a proteomic strategy to identify glycoproteins on the surface of exosomes derived from myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and then test if selected glycoproteins contribute to exosome-mediated chemotaxis and migration of MDSCs. We report successful modification of a surface chemistry method for use with exosomes and identify 21 surface N-glycoproteins on exosomes released by mouse mammary carcinoma-induced MDSCs. These glycoprotein identities and functionalities are compared with 93 N-linked glycoproteins identified on the surface of the parental cells. As with the lysate proteomes examined previously, the exosome surface N-glycoproteins are primarily a subset of the glycoproteins on the surface of the suppressor cells that released them, with related functions and related potential as therapeutic targets. The "don't eat me" molecule CD47 and its binding partners thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) and signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) were among the surface N-glycoproteins detected. Functional bioassays using antibodies to these three molecules demonstrated that CD47, TSP1, and to a lesser extent SIRPα facilitate exosome-mediated MDSC chemotaxis and migration.

  18. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change. PMID:24844289

  19. Standing surface acoustic wave based cell coculture.

    PubMed

    Li, Sixing; Guo, Feng; Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-10-07

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell-cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell-cell interactions.

  20. Standing Surface Acoustic Wave Based Cell Coculture

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell–cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell–cell interactions. PMID:25232648

  1. Back surface reflectors for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Sample solar cells were fabricated to study the effects of various back surface reflectors on the device performance. They are typical 50 micrometers thick, space quality, silicon solar cells except for variations of the back contact configuration. The back surfaces of the sample cells are polished to a mirror like finish, and have either conventional full contacts or grid finger contacts. Measurements and evaluation of various metallic back surface reflectors, as well as cells with total internal reflection, are presented. Results indicate that back surface reflectors formed using a grid finger back contact are more effective reflectors than cells with full back metallization and that Au, Ag, or Cu are better back surface reflector metals than Al.

  2. Cell behavior on surface modified polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

    PubMed

    Stanton, Morgan M; Rankenberg, Johanna M; Park, Byung-Wook; McGimpsey, W Grant; Malcuit, Christopher; Lambert, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Designing complex tissue culture systems requires cell alignment and directed extracellular matrix (ECM) and gene expression. Here, a micro-rough, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface, that also integrates a micro-pattern of 50 µm wide lines of fibronectin (FN) separated by 60 µm wide lines of bovine serum albumin (BSA), is developed. Human fibroblasts cultured on the rough, patterned substrate have aligned growth and a significant change in morphology when compared to cells on a flat, patterned surface. The rough PDMS topography significantly decreases cell area and induces the upregulation of several ECM related genes by two-fold when compared to cells cultured on flat PDMS. This study describes a simple surface engineering procedure for creating surface architecture for scaffolds to design and control the cell-surface interface.

  3. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polystyrene. This technique together with various oxidation techniques that render surfaces suitable for cell culture generated high surface densities of hydroxyl groups. The importance of surface hydroxyl groups for the adhesion of baby hamster kidney cells or leukocytes was demonstrated by the inhibition of adhesion when these groups were blocked: blocking of carboxyl groups did not inhibit adhesion and may raise the adhesion of a surface. These results applied to cell adhesion in the presence and absence of serum. The relative unimportance of fibronectin for the adhesion and spreading of baby hamster kidney cells to hydroxyl-rich surfaces was concluded when cells spread on such surfaces after protein synthesis was inhibited with cycloheximide, fibronectin was removed by trypsinization, and trypsin activity was stopped with leupeptin. PMID:6355120

  4. A mathematical model of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Krambeck, Frederick J; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2005-12-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. A mathematical model for the initial stages of this process, up to the first galactosylation of an oligosaccharide, was previously developed by Umana and Bailey (1997) (UB1997). Building on this work, an extended model is developed to include further galactosylation, fucosylation, extension of antennae by N-acetyllactosamine repeats, and sialylation. This allows many more structural features to be predicted. A number of simplifying assumptions are also relaxed to incorporate more variables for the control of glycoforms. The full model generates 7565 oligosaccharide structures in a network of 22,871 reactions. Methods for solving the model for the complete product distribution and adjusting the parameters to match experimental data are also developed. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates is obtained from the previous model and existing literature. Enzyme activities are adjusted to match experimental glycoform distributions for Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO). The model is then used to predict the effect of increasing expression of a target glycoprotein on the product glycoform distribution and evaluate appropriate metabolic engineering strategies to return the glycoform profile to its original distribution pattern. This model may find significant utility in the future to predict glycosylation patterns and direct glycoengineering projects to optimize glycoform distributions.

  5. Unconventional N-Linked Glycosylation Promotes Trimeric Autotransporter Function in Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Katherine A.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycosylation is a widespread mechanism employed by both eukaryotes and bacteria to increase the functional diversity of their proteomes. The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae glycosyltransferase HMW1C mediates unconventional N-linked glycosylation of the adhesive protein HMW1, which is encoded in a two-partner secretion system gene cluster that also encodes HMW1C. In this system, HMW1 is modified in the cytoplasm by sequential transfer of hexose residues. In the present study, we examined Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus homologues of HMW1C that are not encoded near a gene encoding an obvious acceptor protein. We found both homologues to be functional glycosyltransferases and identified their substrates as the K. kingae Knh and the A. aphrophilus EmaA trimeric autotransporter proteins. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed multiple sites of N-linked glycosylation on Knh and EmaA. Without glycosylation, Knh and EmaA failed to facilitate wild-type levels of bacterial autoaggregation or adherence to human epithelial cells, establishing that glycosylation is essential for proper protein function. PMID:26307167

  6. Solar cell having improved back surface reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, A. T. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The operating temperature is reduced and the output of a solar cell is increased by using a solar cell which carries electrodes in a grid finger pattern on its back surface. These electrodes are sintered at the proper temperature to provide good ohmic contact. After sintering, a reflective material is deposited on the back surface by vacuum evaporation. Thus, the application of the back surface reflector is separate from the back contact formation. Back surface reflectors formed in conjunction with separate grid finger configuration back contacts are more effective than those formed by full back metallization of the reflector material.

  7. Bioorthogonal labeling cell-surface proteins expressed in pancreatic cancer cells to identify potential diagnostic/therapeutic biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Randy S; Quick, Charles M; Siegel, Eric R; Raju, Ilangovan; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    To develop new diagnostic and therapeutic tools to specifically target pancreatic tumors, it is necessary to identify cell-surface proteins that may serve as potential tumor-specific targets. In this study we used an azido-labeled bioorthogonal chemical reporter to metabolically label N-linked glycoproteins on the surface of pancreatic cancer cell lines to identify potential targets that may be exploited for detection and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. Labeled glycoproteins were tagged with biotin using click chemistry, purified by streptavidin-coupled magnetic beads, separated by gel electrophoresis, and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS). MS/MS analysis of peptides from 3 cell lines revealed 954 unique proteins enriched in the azido sugar samples relative to control sugar samples. A comparison of the proteins identified in each sample indicated 20% of these proteins were present in 2 cell lines (193 of 954) and 17 of the proteins were found in all 3 cell lines. Five of the 17 proteins identified in all 3 cell lines have not been previously reported to be expressed in pancreatic cancer; thus indicating that novel cell-surface proteins can be revealed through glycoprotein profiling. Western analysis of one of these glycoproteins, ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E), revealed it is expressed in 8 out of 8 pancreatic cancer cell lines examined. Further, immunohistochemical analysis of human pancreatic tissues indicates NT5E is significantly overexpressed in pancreatic tumors compared to normal pancreas. Thus, we have demonstrated that metabolic labeling with bioorthogonal chemical reporters can be used to selectively enrich and identify novel cell-surface glycoproteins expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. PMID:26176765

  8. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45 reaches the cell surface via golgi-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Troy A; Ostergaard, Hanne L

    2002-12-27

    CD45 is a receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase essential for T cell development and lymphocyte activation. It is highly glycosylated, with multiple isoforms and glycoforms expressed on the cell surface depending on the cell type and stage of differentiation. Interestingly, we found two pools of newly synthesized CD45 expressed on plasma membrane, one of which arrived by 5 min after synthesis. The remaining pool of CD45 was fully glycosylated and began to arrive at the cell surface at approximately 15 min. The rapidly expressed population of CD45 possessed exclusively endoglycosidase H-sensitive N-linked carbohydrate. Additionally, this rapidly expressed pool of CD45 appeared on the cell surface in a brefeldin A (BFA)-insensitive manner, suggesting that it reached the cell surface independent of the Golgi complex. The remaining CD45 trafficked through the Golgi complex, and transport proceeded via a BFA-sensitive mechanism. These data suggest that CD45 is able to reach the cell surface via two distinct routes. The first is a conventional Golgi-dependent pathway that allows fully processed CD45 to be expressed. The second utilizes an ill defined mechanism that is independent of the Golgi, is BFA-resistant, and allows for the expression of CD45 with immature carbohydrate on the cell surface.

  9. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Imee Su; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10{sup -6} Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  10. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  11. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  12. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  13. Detection of Cell Surface Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, cells surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact. PMID:23296774

  14. Mechanical guidance through cell-cell and cell-surface contact during multicellular streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenlu; Driscoll, Meghan; Gupta, Satyandra K.; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    During collective cell migration, mechanical forces arise from the extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell-surface contact and from other cells through cell-cell contact. These forces regulate the motion of migrating cell groups. To determine how these mechanical interactions balance during cell migration, we measured the shape dynamics of Dictyostelium discoideum cells at the multicellular streaming stage. We found that cells can coordinate their motion by synchronizing protrusion waves that travel along their membranes when they form proper cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion. In addition, our experiments on live actin labeled cells show that intracellular actin polymerization actively responds to the change of cell-cell/surface adhesion and helps to stabilize multicellular migration streams. Our finding suggests that the coordination of motion between neighboring cells in collective migration requires a balance between cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion, and that the cell cytoskeleton plays an important role in this balance.

  15. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John Tanner

    Islet transplantation has emerged as a promising cell-based therapy for the treatment of diabetes, but its clinical efficacy remains limited by deleterious host responses that underlie islet destruction. In this dissertation, we describe the assembly of ultrathin conformal coatings that confer molecular-level control over the composition and biophysicochemical properties of the islet surface with implications for improving islet engraftment. Significantly, this work provides novel biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering with broad biomedical and biotechnological applications in cell-based therapeutics and beyond. Encapsulation of cells and tissue offers a rational approach for attenuating deleterious host responses towards transplanted cells, but a need exists to develop cell encapsulation strategies that minimize transplant volume. Towards this end, we endeavored to generate nanothin films of diverse architecture with tunable properties on the extracellular surface of individual pancreatic islets through a process of layer-by-layer (LbL) self assembly. We first describe the formation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-rich conformal coatings on islets via LbL self assembly of poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG(biotin) and streptavidin. Multilayer thin films conformed to the geometrically and chemically heterogeneous islet surface, and could be assembled without loss of islet viability or function. Significantly, coated islets performed comparably to untreated controls in a murine model of allogenic intraportal islet transplantation, and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to report in vivo survival and function of nanoencapsulated cells or cell aggregates. Based on these findings, we next postulated that structurally similar PLL-g-PEG copolymers comprised of shorter PEG grafts might be used to initiate and propagate the assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films on pancreatic islets, while simultaneously preserving islet viability. Through control of PLL

  16. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  17. Dysregulated expression of cell surface glycoprotein CDCP1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lifang; Dutta, Sucharita M.; Troyer, Dean A.; Lin, Jefferson B.; Lance, Raymond A.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Drake, Richard R; Semmes, O. John

    2015-01-01

    CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is a trans-membrane protein regulator of cell adhesion with a potent pro-migratory function in tumors. Given that proteolytic cleavage of the ectodomain correlates with outside-in oncogenic signaling, we characterized glycosylation in the context of cellular processing and expression of CDCP1 in prostate cancer. We detected 135 kDa full-length and proteolytic processed 70 kDa species in a panel of PCa cell models. The relative expression of full-length CDCP1 correlated with the metastatic potential of syngeneic cell models and an increase in surface membrane expression of CDCP1 was observed in tumor compared to adjacent normal prostate tissues. We demonstrated that glycosylation of CDCP1 is a prerequisite for protein stability and plasma membrane localization, and that the expression level and extent of N-glycosylation of CDCP1 correlated with metastatic status. Interestingly, complex N-linked glycans with sialic acid chains were restricted to the N-terminal half of the ectodomain and absent in the truncated species. Characterization of the extracellular expression of CDCP1 identified novel circulating forms and revealed that extracellular vesicles provide additional processing pathways. Employing immunoaffinity mass spectrometry, we detected elevated levels of circulating CDCP1 in patient urine with high-risk disease. Our results establish that differential glycosylation, cell surface presentation and extracellular expression of CDCP1 are hallmarks of PCa progression. PMID:26497208

  18. Detection of cell surface dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact.

  19. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  20. Automated Glycan Sequencing from Tandem Mass Spectra of N-Linked Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Yih; Mayampurath, Anoop; Zhu, Rui; Zacharias, Lauren; Song, Ehwang; Wang, Lei; Mechref, Yehia; Tang, Haixu

    2016-06-07

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine experimental tool for proteomic biomarker analysis of human blood samples, partly due to the large availability of informatics tools. As one of the most common protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) in mammals, protein glycosylation has been observed to alter in multiple human diseases and thus may potentially be candidate markers of disease progression. While mass spectrometry instrumentation has seen advancements in capabilities, discovering glycosylation-related markers using existing software is currently not straightforward. Complete characterization of protein glycosylation requires the identification of intact glycopeptides in samples, including identification of the modification site as well as the structure of the attached glycans. In this paper, we present GlycoSeq, an open-source software tool that implements a heuristic iterated glycan sequencing algorithm coupled with prior knowledge for automated elucidation of the glycan structure within a glycopeptide from its collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrum. GlycoSeq employs rules of glycosidic linkage as defined by glycan synthetic pathways to eliminate improbable glycan structures and build reasonable glycan trees. We tested the tool on two sets of tandem mass spectra of N-linked glycopeptides cell lines acquired from breast cancer patients. After employing enzymatic specificity within the N-linked glycan synthetic pathway, the sequencing results of GlycoSeq were highly consistent with the manually curated glycan structures. Hence, GlycoSeq is ready to be used for the characterization of glycan structures in glycopeptides from MS/MS analysis. GlycoSeq is released as open source software at https://github.com/chpaul/GlycoSeq/ .

  1. Cell surface engineering with edible protein nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Drachuk, Irina; Shchepelina, Olga; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Stone, Morley; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-09-23

    Natural protein (silk fibroin) nanoshells are assembled on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells without compromising their viability. The nanoshells facilitate initial protection of the cells and allow them to function in encapsulated state for some time period, afterwards being completely biodegraded and consumed by the cells. In contrast to a traditional methanol treatment, the gentle ionic treatment suggested here stabilizes the shell silk fibroin structure but does not compromise the viability of the cells, as indicated by the fast response of the encapsulated cells, with an immediate activation by the inducer molecules. Extremely high viability rates (up to 97%) and preserved activity of encapsulated cells are facilitated by cytocompatibility of the natural proteins and the formation of highly porous shells in contrast to traditional polyelectrolyte-based materials. Moreover, in a high contrast to traditional synthetic shells, the silk proteins are biodegradable and can be consumed by cells at a later stage of growth, thus releasing the cells from their temporary protective capsules. These on-demand encapsulated cells can be considered a valuable platform for biocompatible and biodegradable cell encapsulation, controlled cell protection in a synthetic environment, transfer to a device environment, and cell implantation followed by biodegradation and consumption of protective protein shells.

  2. Multiple Modes of Binding Enhance the Affinity of DC-SIGN for High-Mannose N-Linked Glycans Found on Viral Glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Castelli, R.; Drickamer, K.; Seeberger, P.H.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Zurich, ETH /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-09

    The dendritic cell surface receptor DC-SIGN and the closely related endothelial cell receptor DC-SIGNR specifically recognize high mannose N-linked carbohydrates on viral pathogens. Previous studies have shown that these receptors bind the outer trimannose branch Man{alpha}1-3[Man{alpha}1-6]Man{alpha} present in high mannose structures. Although the trimannoside binds to DC-SIGN or DC-SIGNR more strongly than mannose, additional affinity enhancements are observed in the presence of one or more Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha} moieties on the nonreducing termini of oligomannose structures. The molecular basis of this enhancement has been investigated by determining crystal structures of DC-SIGN bound to a synthetic six-mannose fragment of a high mannose N-linked oligosaccharide, Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha}1-3[Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha}1-6]Man{alpha}1-6Man and to the disaccharide Man{alpha}1-2Man. The structures reveal mixtures of two binding modes in each case. Each mode features typical C-type lectin binding at the principal Ca{sup 2+}-binding site by one mannose residue. In addition, other sugar residues form contacts unique to each binding mode. These results suggest that the affinity enhancement displayed toward oligosaccharides decorated with the Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha} structure is due in part to multiple binding modes at the primary Ca{sup 2+} site, which provide both additional contacts and a statistical (entropic) enhancement of binding.

  3. Cell Surface Glycoside Hydrolases of Streptococcus gordonii Promote Growth in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Luxia; Shah, Nehal; Palmer, Robert J.; Cisar, John O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The growth of the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii in saliva may depend on a number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs), including three cell wall-anchored proteins that are homologs of pneumococcal β-galactosidase (BgaA), β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (StrH), and endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase D (EndoD). In the present study, we introduced unmarked in-frame deletions into the corresponding genes of S. gordonii DL1, verified the presence (or absence) of the encoded proteins on the resulting mutant strains, and compared these strains with wild-type strain DL1 for growth and glycan foraging in saliva. The overnight growth of wild-type DL1 was reduced 3- to 10-fold by the deletion of any one or two genes and approximately 20-fold by the deletion of all three genes. The only notable change in the salivary proteome associated with this reduction of growth was a downward shift in the apparent molecular masses of basic proline-rich glycoproteins (PRG), which was accompanied by the loss of lectin binding sites for galactose-specific Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA) and mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The binding of ECA to PRG was also abolished in saliva cultures of mutants that expressed cell surface BgaA alone or together with either StrH or EndoD. However, the subsequent loss of GNA binding was seen only in saliva cocultures of different mutants that together expressed all three cell surface GHs. The findings indicate that the growth of S. gordonii DL1 in saliva depends to a significant extent on the sequential actions of first BgaA and then StrH and EndoD on N-linked glycans of PRG. IMPORTANCE The ability of oral bacteria to grow on salivary glycoproteins is critical for dental plaque biofilm development. Little is known, however, about how specific salivary components are attacked and utilized by different members of the biofilm community, such as Streptococcus gordonii. Streptococcus gordonii DL1 has three cell wall

  4. GlycoFish: A Database of Zebrafish N-linked Glycoproteins Identified Using SPEG Method Coupled with LC/MS

    PubMed Central

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tian, Yuan; Akan, Ilhan; Jacobson, Elena; Clark, Dean; Wu, Alexander; Jampol, Russell; Palter, Karen; Betenbaugh, Michael; Zhang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a model organism to study the mechanisms and pathways of human disorders. Many dysfunctions in neurological, development and neuromuscular systems are due to glycosylation deficiencies, but the glycoproteins involved in zebrafish embryonic development have not been established. In this study, a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic characterization of zebrafish embryos was performed to identify the N-linked glycoproteins and N-linked glycosylation sites. To increase the number of glycopeptides, proteins from zebrafish were digested with two different proteases, chymotrypsin and trypsin, into peptides of different length. The N-glycosylated peptides of zebrafish were then captured by the solid phase extraction of N-linked glycopeptides (SPEG) method and the peptides were identified with an LTQ OrbiTrap Velos mass spectrometer. From 265 unique glycopeptides, including 269 consensus NXT/S glycosites, we identified 169 different N-glycosylated proteins. The identified glycoproteins were highly abundant in proteins belonging to the transporter, cell adhesion, and ion channel/ion binding categories which are important to embryonic, organ, and central nervous system development. This proteomics data will expand our knowledge about glycoproteins in zebrafish and may be used to elucidate the role glycosylation plays in cellular processes and disease. The glycoprotein data are available through the GlycoFish database (http://betenbaugh.jhu.edu/GlycoFish) introduced in this paper. PMID:21591763

  5. Glycopeptide capture for cell surface proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-05-09

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins.

  6. Cell surface of Micrococcus luteus: chemical treatment of the cells and teichuronic acids on the surface.

    PubMed

    Monodane, T; Kusamichi, M; Tokunaga, M; Torii, M

    1989-01-01

    Micrococcus luteus IFO 3333 cells, both treated with chemical reagents and non-treated, were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The agglutinability of the cells with antiserum containing anti-teichuronic acid antibody was examined. The binding of protein A-gold particles to the cells, mediated with the antiserum, was also observed with SEM. The surface of a M. luteus cell consisted of two or three areas with borders--the rough and the smooth areas, or the rough, the slightly rough, and the smooth areas; fluffy materials were clearly seen in the rough area. Gold particles were observed uniformly and densely on the whole cell surface. However, either mild acid treatment or mild Smith degradation of the cells altered the fluffy rough area to a rough one, and extremely decreased the agglutinability and the binding of protein A-gold particles. Teichuronic acids appeared to be distributed uniformly on the whole cell surface of M. luteus IFO 3333.

  7. Fludarabine and cladribine induce changes in surface proteins on human B-lymphoid cell lines involved with apoptosis, cell survival, and antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Kohnke, Philippa L; Mactier, Swetlana; Almazi, Juhura G; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2012-09-07

    Fludarabine and cladribine are purine analogues used to treat hematological malignancies. Alone or in combination with therapeutic antibodies, they are effective in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of these drugs are not well understood. Plasma membrane proteins perform a variety of essential functions that can be affected by malignancy and perturbed by chemotherapy. Analysis of surface proteins may contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms of action of purine analogues and identify biomarkers for targeted therapy. The surface of human cells is rich in N-linked glycoproteins, enabling use of a hydrazide-coupling technique to enrich for glycoproteins, with iTRAQ labeling for quantitative comparison. A number of plasma membrane proteins on human leukemia and lymphoma cells were affected by treatment with a purine analogue, including decreases in CD22 (an adhesion and signaling molecule) and increases in CD205 (a "damaged cell marker") and CD80 and CD50 (T-cell interaction molecules). Purine analogues may affect B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and costimulatory molecules, leading to multiple signals for apoptosis and cell clearance. Fludarabine and cladribine induce differential effects, with some cell survival proteins (ECE-1 and CD100) more abundant after fludarabine treatment. Cell surface proteins induced by fludarabine and cladribine may be targets for therapeutic antibodies.

  8. Living Toroids - Cells on Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Angelini, Thomas; Marquez, Samantha; Kim, Harold; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. Substrate mechanics has been recognized as one of the important physical cues that governs cell behavior at single cell level as well as in collective cell motion. Past research has suggested several contact-guided behaviors to be the result of surface curvature. However, studies on the effect of curvature are relatively scarce likely due to the difficulty in generating substrates with well-defined curvature. Here we describe the generation of toroidal droplets, which unlike spherical droplets, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus. Cells are either encapsulated inside toroidal droplets or located on toroidal hydrogel surfaces. Preliminary studies use B. Subtilis to study the organization of bacteria biofilms. When confined in droplets surrounded by yield-stress fluid, bacteria self-organize into heterogeneous biofilm at fluid- substrate interface. It is found that the surface curvature in the sub-millimeter scale has little effect on biofilm architecture.

  9. Prediction of N-linked glycosylation sites using position relative features and statistical moments

    PubMed Central

    Akmal, Muhammad Aizaz; Rasool, Nouman

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most complex post translation modification in eukaryotic cells. Almost 50% of the human proteome is glycosylated as glycosylation plays a vital role in various biological functions such as antigen’s recognition, cell-cell communication, expression of genes and protein folding. It is a significant challenge to identify glycosylation sites in protein sequences as experimental methods are time taking and expensive. A reliable computational method is desirable for the identification of glycosylation sites. In this study, a comprehensive technique for the identification of N-linked glycosylation sites has been proposed using machine learning. The proposed predictor was trained using an up-to-date dataset through back propagation algorithm for multilayer neural network. The results of ten-fold cross-validation and other performance measures such as accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and Mathew’s correlation coefficient inferred that the accuracy of proposed tool is far better than the existing systems such as Glyomine, GlycoEP, Ensemble SVM and GPP. PMID:28797096

  10. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-08-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose.

  11. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-01-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose. Images PMID:3301817

  12. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G; Labbate, Maurizio; Djordjevic, Steven P; Larsen, Martin R; Szymanski, Christine M; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-08-24

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates the synthesis of a rigidly conserved heptasaccharide that is attached to protein substrates or released as free oligosaccharide in the periplasm. Removal of N-glycosylation results in reduced virulence and impeded host cell attachment. Since the N-glycan is conserved, the N-glycosylation system is also an attractive option for glycoengineering recombinant vaccines in Escherichia coli. To determine whether non-canonical N-glycans are present in C. jejuni, we utilized high throughput glycoproteomics to characterize C. jejuni JHH1 and identified 93 glycosylation sites, including 34 not previously reported. Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the pEtN-glycan but did not globally influence protein reactivity to patient sera, whereas deletion of the pglB oligosaccharyltransferase significantly reduced reactivity. Transfer of eptC and the pgl gene cluster to E. coli confirmed the addition of the pEtN-glycan to a target C. jejuni protein. Significantly reduced, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan-mediated structure-function interactions.

  13. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-Linked Glycan by EptC Protein-mediated Addition of Phosphoethanolamine*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nichollas E.; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V. G.; Labbate, Maurizio; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Larsen, Martin R.; Szymanski, Christine M.; Cordwell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates the synthesis of a rigidly conserved heptasaccharide that is attached to protein substrates or released as free oligosaccharide in the periplasm. Removal of N-glycosylation results in reduced virulence and impeded host cell attachment. Since the N-glycan is conserved, the N-glycosylation system is also an attractive option for glycoengineering recombinant vaccines in Escherichia coli. To determine whether non-canonical N-glycans are present in C. jejuni, we utilized high throughput glycoproteomics to characterize C. jejuni JHH1 and identified 93 glycosylation sites, including 34 not previously reported. Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the pEtN-glycan but did not globally influence protein reactivity to patient sera, whereas deletion of the pglB oligosaccharyltransferase significantly reduced reactivity. Transfer of eptC and the pgl gene cluster to E. coli confirmed the addition of the pEtN-glycan to a target C. jejuni protein. Significantly reduced, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan-mediated structure-function interactions. PMID:22761430

  14. Plasminogen activation on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, Colin

    2002-01-01

    The plasminogen activation system appears to be widely involved in many biological processes in health and disease, but the regulation of plasmin generation or the mechanisms of stimulation by cell surface receptors are not well understood. Cell surface plasminogen activation requires binding sites for plasminogen substrate and activator enzyme before enhancement of plasmin generation rate is observed. The cell surface moieties involved in binding these reactants appear to be a mixed group of proteins and other molecules, many of which have been extensively investigated. The binding of plasminogen in particular is characterized by heterogeneous receptor molecules, present in high number but generally with low affinity for plasminogen. The low affinity of the interaction, with Kd values around 10(-6) M, presents considerable technical difficulties when studying and quantitating plasminogen binding to cells or isolated receptors. Studying plasminogen activation kinetics in the presence of cells also presents technical difficulties and raises difficult questions on interpretation of results. However, approaches developed to study enzyme activation systems in other areas of hemostasis may also be applied to the problems associated with pericellular proteolysis. Models should be developed that match In vitro experimental data and help us understand the meaning of kinetic constants derived from these systems. In this way it should be possible to better understand the regulation of plasminogen activation around the cell under normal conditions and in a variety of disease states where cell-associated plasminogen activation is believed to be up-regulated. Ultimately, a sound understanding of theses regulatory mechanisms will enable us to devise strategies for modulating proteolytic activity, test these approaches in well designed In vitro systems and relate these results to the in vivo situation.

  15. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  16. Role of cell surface carbohydrate on herpes virus type I (HSV-1) entry

    SciTech Connect

    Massare, M.J.; Blough, H.A.

    1987-05-01

    The role of cell surface glycopeptides (GP) or oligosaccharides (OS) on HSV-1 (strain HF) attachment was studied by isolating those macromolecules by proteolytic digestion of uninfected cells and/or hydrazinolysis of whole cells or plasma membrane fractions. Variable amounts of GP or OS were mixed with 100-200 pfu of (/sup 3/H)-HSV incubated for 45 min at 20/sup 0/C, and infectivity determined. GP were fractionated by lectin affinity-, ion exchange- and molecular sieve column chromatography. A GP fraction containing 13 ..mu..g reducing sugar/ml inhibited plaque formation by 80%. sigma-elimination or the removal of NeuNAc had no affect. OS obtained by hydrazinolysis, inhibited plaque formation by 86-100% at concentrations of 14-20 ..mu..g reducing sugars/ml. Only complex OS, obtained by treating delipidated, whose cells with endoglycosidase D, blocked attachment; whereas high mannose fractions had no effect. These OS failed to inhibit fusion suggesting that N-linked complex OS are part of the receptor site(s).

  17. Actin cortex architecture regulates cell surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Priyamvada; Clark, Andrew G; Smith, Matthew B; Cassani, Davide A D; Dierkes, Kai; Ragab, Anan; Roux, Philippe P; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2017-06-01

    Animal cell shape is largely determined by the cortex, a thin actin network underlying the plasma membrane in which myosin-driven stresses generate contractile tension. Tension gradients result in local contractions and drive cell deformations. Previous cortical tension regulation studies have focused on myosin motors. Here, we show that cortical actin network architecture is equally important. First, we observe that actin cortex thickness and tension are inversely correlated during cell-cycle progression. We then show that the actin filament length regulators CFL1, CAPZB and DIAPH1 regulate mitotic cortex thickness and find that both increasing and decreasing thickness decreases tension in mitosis. This suggests that the mitotic cortex is poised close to a tension maximum. Finally, using a computational model, we identify a physical mechanism by which maximum tension is achieved at intermediate actin filament lengths. Our results indicate that actin network architecture, alongside myosin activity, is key to cell surface tension regulation.

  18. Performance of epitaxial back surface field cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Baraona, C. R.; Swartz, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Epitaxial back surface field structures were formed by depositing a 10 micron thick 10 ohm-cm epitaxial silicon layer onto substrates with resistivities of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 ohm-cm. A correlation between cell open-circuit voltage and substrate resistivity was observed and was compared to theory. The cells were also irradiated with 1-MeV electrons to a fluence of 5 times 10 to the 15th electrons per sq cm. The decrease of cell open-circuit voltage was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the measured short-circuit currents were within 2% of the prediction. Calculations are presented for optimum cell performance as functions of epitaxial layer thickness, radiation fluence, and substrate diffusion length.

  19. Performance of epitaxial back surface field cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Baraona, C. R.; Swartz, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    Epitaxial back surface field structures were formed by depositing a 10 micron thick 10 Omega-cm epitaxial silicon layer onto substrates with resistivities of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 Omega-cm. A correlation between cell open-circuit voltage and substrate resistivity was observed and was compared to theory. The cells were also irradiated with 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 5 X 10 to the 15th power e/cm2. The decrease of cell open-circuit voltage was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the measured short circuit currents were within 2% of the prediction. Calculations are presented of optimum cell performance as functions of epitaxial layer thickness, radiation fluence and substrate diffusion length.

  20. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  1. Galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching in N-linked glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew G.; Hayes, Jerrard M.; Bezak, Tania; Głuchowska, Sonia A.; Cosgrave, Eoin F. J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Stroop, Corné J. M.; Kok, Han; van de Laar, Teun; Rudd, Pauline M.; Tipton, Keith F.; Davey, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification that produces a complex array of branched glycan structures. The levels of branching, or antennarity, give rise to differential biological activities for single glycoproteins. However, the precise mechanism controlling the glycan branching and glycosylation network is unknown. Here, we constructed quantitative mathematical models of N-linked glycosylation that predicted new control points for glycan branching. Galactosyltransferase, which acts on N-acetylglucosamine residues, was unexpectedly found to control metabolic flux through the glycosylation pathway and the level of final antennarity of nascent protein produced in the Golgi network. To further investigate the biological consequences of glycan branching in nascent proteins, we glycoengineered a series of mammalian cells overexpressing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). We identified a mechanism in which galactosyltransferase 4 isoform regulated N-glycan branching on the nascent protein, subsequently controlling biological activity in an in vivo model of hCG activity. We found that galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching decisions taken in the Golgi of the cell, which might ultimately control the biological activity of nascent glycoprotein. PMID:25271059

  2. Bacterial cell surface structures in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Białas, Nataniel; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a widespread member of the family of Enterobacteriaceae that contains both non-virulent and virulent isolates. Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, especially belonging to serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8 and O:9 are etiologic agents of yersiniosis in animals and humans. Y. enterocolitica cell surface structures that play a significant role in virulence have been subject to many investigations. These include outer membrane (OM) glycolipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) and several cell surface adhesion proteins present only in virulent Y. enterocolitica, i.e., Inv, YadA and Ail. While the yadA gene is located on the Yersinia virulence plasmid the Ail, Inv, LPS and ECA are chromosomally encoded. These structures ensure the correct architecture of the OM, provide adhesive properties as well as resistance to antimicrobial peptides and to host innate immune response mechanisms.

  3. N-Linked Glycan Profiling of Mature Human Milk by High Performance Microfluidic Chip Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Martin, William F.; Strum, John S.; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Underwood, Mark A.; Affolter, Michael; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; German, J. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    N-linked glycans of skim human milk proteins were determined for three mothers. N-linked glycans are linked to immune defense, cell growth, and cell-cell adhesion, but their functions in human milk are undetermined. Protein-bound N-linked glycans were released with Peptidyl N-glycosidase F (PNGase F), enriched by graphitized carbon chromatography and analyzed with Chip-TOF MS. To be defined as N-glycans, compounds were required, in all three procedural replicates, to match, within 6 ppm, against a theoretical human N-glycan library, be at least two-fold higher in abundance in PNGase F-treated than in control samples. Fifty-two N-linked glycan compositions were identified and 24 were confirmed via tandem mass spectra analysis. Twenty-seven compositions have been found previously in human milk and 25 are novel compositions. By abundance, 84% of N-glycans were fucosylated and 47% were sialylated. The majority (70%) of total N-glycan abundance was comprised of N-glycans found in all three milk samples. PMID:21384928

  4. Complicated N-linked glycans in simple organisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Birgit; Hykollari, Alba; Yan, Shi; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Although countless genomes have now been sequenced, the glycomes of the vast majority of eukaryotes still present a series of unmapped frontiers. However, strides are being made in a few groups of invertebrate and unicellular organisms as regards their N-glycans and N-glycosylation pathways. Thereby, the traditional classification of glycan structures inevitably approaches its boundaries. Indeed, the glycomes of these organisms are rich in surprises including a multitude of modifications of the core regions of N-glycans and unusual antennae. From the actually rather limited glycomic information we have, it is nevertheless obvious that the biotechnological, developmental and immunological relevance of these modifications, especially in insect cell lines, model organisms and parasites means that deciphering unusual glycomes is of more than just academic interest. PMID:22944671

  5. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  6. Mutation of a Single Envelope N-Linked Glycosylation Site Enhances the Pathogenicity of Bovine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Amel Baya; Jacques, Jean-Rock; Cosse, Jean-Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle; Reichert, Michal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have coevolved with their host to ensure efficient replication and transmission without inducing excessive pathogenicity that would indirectly impair their persistence. This is exemplified by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) system in which lymphoproliferative disorders develop in ruminants after latency periods of several years. In principle, the equilibrium reached between the virus and its host could be disrupted by emergence of more pathogenic strains. Intriguingly but fortunately, such a hyperpathogenic BLV strain was never observed in the field or designed in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand the role of envelope N-linked glycosylation with the hypothesis that this posttranslational modification could either favor BLV infection by allowing viral entry or allow immune escape by using glycans as a shield. Using reverse genetics of an infectious molecular provirus, we identified a N-linked envelope glycosylation site (N230) that limits viral replication and pathogenicity. Indeed, mutation N230E unexpectedly leads to enhanced fusogenicity and protein stability. IMPORTANCE Infection by retroviruses requires the interaction of the viral envelope protein (SU) with a membrane-associated receptor allowing fusion and release of the viral genomic RNA into the cell. We show that N-linked glycosylation of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) SU protein is, as expected, essential for cell infection in vitro. Consistently, mutation of all glycosylation sites of a BLV provirus destroys infectivity in vivo. However, single mutations do not significantly modify replication in vivo. Instead, a particular mutation at SU codon 230 increases replication and accelerates pathogenesis. This unexpected observation has important consequences in terms of disease control and managing. PMID:26085161

  7. Cell surface expression of hepatitis B surface and core antigens in transfected rat fibroblast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Siddiqui, A; Vierling, J M

    1990-04-01

    Hepatocellular necrosis during hepatitis B virus infection is hypothesized to result from host immune responses against either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen expressed on the surface membrane of infected hepatocytes. To study the capacity of hepatitis B deoxyribonucleic acid to induce membrane expression of either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen in vitro, we assessed transfected rat fibroblast cell lines by indirect immunofluorescence. Rat fibroblasts were transfected with plasmid vectors containing the natural promoters, native enhancer, and uninterrupted sequences of either the Pre S/S gene or core gene. Resulting cell lines produced hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen/hepatitis B e antigen, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry showed that hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen were expressed in a granular pattern in the surface membrane of transfected cells. We conclude that surface membrane expression of both hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen is an intrinsic consequence of expression of either the Pre S/S or core gene.

  8. Antibodies reactive with cell surface carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Sela, B A; Wang, J L; Edelman, G M

    1975-01-01

    Normal and immune sera from various animal species were fractionated on columns of Sepharose covalently coupled with the glycoprotein fetuin. Elution of the material bound to fetuin yielded low but reproducible amounts of protein, ranging from 0.02 to 0.2% of the protein mass of the input sera. This material has been identified by immunoelectrophoresis in agar and by zone electrophoresis on cellulose acetate as immunoglobulin. The Ig fractions bound and agglutinated erythrocytes of various species, and also bound to cells from various mouse tissues including heart, kidney, thymus, and spleen. In all cases, the binding was inhibited by glycoproteins such as fetuin and thyroglobulin, by a glycopeptide isolated from fetuin, and by some bacterial lipopolysaccharides. When the binding of these Ig fractions to mouse splenocytes was tested in the presence of 17 saccharides, no inhibition of binding was observed except by sialic acid, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and D-mannose, all of which showed partial inhibition. Inasmuch as these four saccharides are present on the carbohydrate moiety of fetuin, the results suggest that the isolated material is a carbohydrate-specific Ig (CS-Ig) fraction of serum capable of binding to the carbohydrate portion of cell surface receptors and glycoproteins. When bound to lymphocytes, these CS-Ig molecules induced redistribution (patching and capping) of cell surface receptors. Moreover, the CS-Ig fractions from chicken and rabbit sera were weakly mitogenic for mouse splenic lymphocytes. CS-Ig fractions are useful new reagents for studying glycoproteins and the interactions and activities of cell surface carbohydrates. Images PMID:48249

  9. Interactions between N-linked glycosylation and polymerisation of neuroserpin within the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, Claudia; Ordoñez, Adriana; Lupo, Giuseppe; Gooptu, Bibek; Irving, James A; Noto, Rosina; Martorana, Vincenzo; Manno, Mauro; Timpano, Valentina; Guadagno, Noemi A; Dalton, Lucy; Marciniak, Stefan J; Lomas, David A; Miranda, Elena

    2015-12-01

    The neuronal serpin neuroserpin undergoes polymerisation as a consequence of point mutations that alter its conformational stability, leading to a neurodegenerative dementia called familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies (FENIB). Neuroserpin is a glycoprotein with predicted glycosylation sites at asparagines 157, 321 and 401. We used site-directed mutagenesis, transient transfection, western blot, metabolic labelling and ELISA to probe the relationship between glycosylation, folding, polymerisation and degradation of neuroserpin in validated cell models of health and disease. Our data show that glycosylation at N157 and N321 plays an important role in maintaining the monomeric state of neuroserpin, and we propose this is the result of steric hindrance or effects on local conformational dynamics that can contribute to polymerisation. Asparagine residue 401 is not glycosylated in wild type neuroserpin and in several polymerogenic variants that cause FENIB, but partial glycosylation was observed in the G392E mutant of neuroserpin that causes severe, early-onset dementia. Our findings indicate that N401 glycosylation reports lability of the C-terminal end of neuroserpin in its native state. This C-terminal lability is not required for neuroserpin polymerisation in the endoplasmic reticulum, but the additional glycan facilitates degradation of the mutant protein during proteasomal impairment. In summary, our results indicate how normal and variant-specific N-linked glycosylation events relate to intracellular folding, misfolding, degradation and polymerisation of neuroserpin.

  10. Comparative structural study of N-linked oligosaccharides of urinary and recombinant erythropoietins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuda, E.; Goto, M.; Murakami, A.; Akia, K.; Ueda, M.; Kawanishi, G.; Takahashi, N.; Sasaki, R.; Chiba, H.; Ishihara, H.; Mori, M.

    1988-07-26

    The structures of the N-linked oligosaccharides of the urinary erythropoietin (u-EPOI) purified from urine of aplastic anemic patients were analyzed and compared with those for recombinant erythropoietin (r-EPO) prepared with baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Asparagine-linked neutral oligosaccharides were released from each EPO protein by N-oligosaccharide glycopeptidase (almond) digestion. The reducing ends of the oligosaccharide chains thus obtained were aminated with a fluorescent reagent, 2-aminopyridine, and the mixture of pyridylamino derivatives of the oligosaccharides was separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an ODS silica column. More than 8 and 13 kinds of oligosaccharide fractions for u-EPO and r-EPO (BHK), respectively, were completely separated by the one-step HPLC procedure. The structure of each oligosaccharide thus isolated was analyzed by a combination of sequential exoglycosidase digestion and another kind of HPLC with an amide-silica column. Furthermore, high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 1/H NMR) spectroscopy and methylation analyses were carried out in the case of r-EPO (BHK).

  11. Comparative structural study of N-linked oligosaccharides of urinary and recombinant erythropoietins.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, E; Goto, M; Murakami, A; Akai, K; Ueda, M; Kawanishi, G; Takahashi, N; Sasaki, R; Chiba, H; Ishihara, H

    1988-07-26

    The structures of the N-linked oligosaccharides of the urinary erythropoietin (u-EPO) purified from urine of aplastic anemic patients were analyzed and compared with those for recombinant erythropoietin (r-EPO) prepared with baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Asparagine-linked neutral oligosaccharides were released from each EPO protein by N-oligosaccharide glycopeptidase (almond) digestion. The reducing ends of the oligosaccharide chains thus obtained were aminated with a fluorescent reagent, 2-aminopyridine, and the mixture of pyridylamino derivatives of the oligosaccharides was separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an ODS silica column. More than 8 and 13 kinds of oligosaccharide fractions for u-EPO and r-EPO (BHK), respectively, were completely separated by the one-step HPLC procedure. The structure of each oligosaccharide thus isolated was analyzed by a combination of sequential exoglycosidase digestion and another kind of HPLC with an amide-silica column. Furthermore, high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and methylation analyses were carried out in the case of r-EPO (BHK).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. N-linked glycoproteome profiling of seedling leaf in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Chen, Guan-Xing; Lv, Dong-Wen; Li, Xiao-Hui; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2015-04-03

    Brachypodium distachyon L., a model plant for cereal crops, has become important as an alternative and potential biofuel grass. In plants, N-glycosylation is one of the most common and important protein modifications, playing important roles in signal recognition, increase in protein activity, stability of protein structure, and formation of tissues and organs. In this study, we performed the first glycoproteome analysis in the seedling leaves of B. distachyon. Using lectin affinity chromatography enrichment and mass-spectrometry-based analysis, we identified 47 glycosylation sites representing 46 N-linked glycoproteins. Motif-X analysis showed that two conserved motifs, N-X-T/S (X is any amino acid, except Pro), were significantly enriched. Further functional analysis suggested that some of these identified glycoproteins are involved in signal transduction, protein trafficking, and quality control and the modification and remodeling of cell-wall components such as receptor-like kinases, protein disulfide isomerase, and polygalacturonase. Moreover, transmembrane helices and signal peptide prediction showed that most of these glycoproteins could participate in typical protein secretory pathways in eukaryotes. The results provide a general overview of protein N-glycosylation modifications during the early growth of seedling leaves in B. distachyon and supplement the glycoproteome databases of plants.

  13. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Boheler, Kenneth R.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Kropp, Erin M.; Chuppa, Sandra; Riordon, Daniel R.; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Burridge, Paul W.; Wu, Joseph C.; Wersto, Robert P.; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Rao, Sridhar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs) and induced PSCs (hiPSCs). Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures. PMID:25068131

  14. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape ‘A’ to a memorized permanent shape ‘B’ upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology.

  15. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape ‘A’ to a memorized permanent shape ‘B’ upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology. PMID:27877747

  16. N-linked glycosylation of protease-activated receptor-1 at extracellular loop 2 regulates G-protein signaling bias.

    PubMed

    Soto, Antonio G; Smith, Thomas H; Chen, Buxin; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Kenakin, Terry; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-07-07

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the coagulant protease thrombin. Similar to other GPCRs, PAR1 is promiscuous and couples to multiple heterotrimeric G-protein subtypes in the same cell and promotes diverse cellular responses. The molecular mechanism by which activation of a given GPCR with the same ligand permits coupling to multiple G-protein subtypes is unclear. Here, we report that N-linked glycosylation of PAR1 at extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) controls G12/13 versus Gq coupling specificity in response to thrombin stimulation. A PAR1 mutant deficient in glycosylation at ECL2 was more effective at stimulating Gq-mediated phosphoinositide signaling compared with glycosylated wildtype receptor. In contrast, wildtype PAR1 displayed a greater efficacy at G12/13-dependent RhoA activation compared with mutant receptor lacking glycosylation at ECL2. Endogenous PAR1 rendered deficient in glycosylation using tunicamycin, a glycoprotein synthesis inhibitor, also exhibited increased PI signaling and diminished RhoA activation opposite to native receptor. Remarkably, PAR1 wildtype and glycosylation-deficient mutant were equally effective at coupling to Gi and β-arrestin-1. Consistent with preferential G12/13 coupling, thrombin-stimulated PAR1 wildtype strongly induced RhoA-mediated stress fiber formation compared with mutant receptor. In striking contrast, glycosylation-deficient PAR1 was more effective at increasing cellular proliferation, associated with Gq signaling, than wildtype receptor. These studies suggest that N-linked glycosylation at ECL2 contributes to the stabilization of an active PAR1 state that preferentially couples to G12/13 versus Gq and defines a previously unidentified function for N-linked glycosylation of GPCRs in regulating G-protein signaling bias.

  17. Production, characterization, and pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with N-linked mannose-5 glycans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Marcella; Brown, Darren; Reed, Chae; Chung, Shan; Lutman, Jeff; Stefanich, Eric; Wong, Anne; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Bayer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The effector functions of therapeutic antibodies are strongly affected by the specific glycans added to the Fc domain during post-translational processing. Antibodies bearing high levels of N-linked mannose-5 glycan (Man5) have been reported to exhibit enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) compared with antibodies with fucosylated complex or hybrid glycans. To better understand the relationship between antibodies with high levels of Man5 and their biological activity in vivo, we developed an approach to generate substantially homogeneous antibodies bearing the Man5 glycoform. A mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, was first incorporated in the cell culture process to generate antibodies with a distribution of high mannose glycoforms. Antibodies were then purified and treated with a mannosidase for trimming to Man5 in vitro. This 2-step approach can consistently generate antibodies with > 99% Man5 glycan. Antibodies bearing varying levels of Man5 were studied to compare ADCC and Fcγ receptor binding, and they showed enhanced ADCC activity and increased binding affinity to the FcγRIIIA. In addition, the clearance rate of antibodies bearing Man8/9 and Man5 glycans was determined in a pharmacokinetics study in mice. When compared with historical data, the antibodies bearing the high mannose glycoform exhibited faster clearance rate compared with antibodies bearing the fucosylated complex glycoform, while the pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with Man8/9 and Man5 glycoforms appeared similar. In addition, we identified the presence of a mannosidase in mouse serum that converted most Man8/9 to Man6 after 24 h.

  18. Production, characterization and pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with N-linked Mannose-5 glycans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Marcella; Brown, Darren; Reed, Chae; Chung, Shan; Lutman, Jeff; Stefanich, Eric; Wong, Anne; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Bayer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The effector functions of therapeutic antibodies are strongly affected by the specific glycans added to the Fc domain during post-translational processing. Antibodies bearing high levels of N-linked mannose-5 glycan (Man5) have been reported to exhibit enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) compared with antibodies with fucosylated complex or hybrid glycans. To better understand the relationship between antibodies with high levels of Man5 and their biological activity in vivo, we developed an approach to generate substantially homogeneous antibodies bearing the Man5 glycoform. A mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, was first incorporated in the cell culture process to generate antibodies with a distribution of high mannose glycoforms. Antibodies were then purified and treated with a mannosidase for trimming to Man5 in vitro. This 2-step approach can consistently generate antibodies with > 99% Man5 glycan. Antibodies bearing varying levels of Man5 were studied to compare ADCC and Fcγ receptor binding, and they showed enhanced ADCC activity and increased binding affinity to the FcγRIIIA. In addition, the clearance rate of antibodies bearing Man8/9 and Man5 glycans was determined in a pharmacokinetics study in mice. When compared with historical data, the antibodies bearing the high mannose glycoform exhibited faster clearance rate compared with antibodies bearing the fucosylated complex glycoform, while the pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with Man8/9 and Man5 glycoforms appeared similar. In addition, we identified the presence of a mannosidase in mouse serum that converted most Man8/9 to Man6 after 24 h. PMID:22699308

  19. Detection of cell surface antigens on monolayer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Takehiko; Klein, Eva

    1970-01-01

    A small scale modified method of the immune adherence on monolayer cells grown in Falcon plastic `Microtest' plates is described. This method is especially useful in mouse systems as it simplifies the washing procedure which is an indispensable step for removal of the anticomplementary activity present in mouse serum. Histocompatibility antigens and the surface antigen induced by the Moloney virus could be detected with this method. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 1 PMID:5530203

  20. A method for microbial cell surface fingerprinting based on surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Råvik, Mattias; Cimander, Christian; Elofsson, Ulla; Veide, Andres

    2007-06-10

    A method for microbial cell surface fingerprinting using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is suggested. Four different Escherichia coli mutants have been used as model cells. Cell surface fingerprints were generated by registration of the interaction between the cell mutants and four different surfaces, with different physical and chemical properties, when a cell suspension was flown over the surface. Significant differences in fingerprint pattern between some of the mutants were observed. At the same time, the physical properties of the cell surfaces were determined using microelectrophoresis, contact angle measurements and aqueous two-phase partitioning and compared to the SPR fingerprints. The generated cell surface fingerprints and the physical property data were evaluated with multivariate data analysis that showed that the cells were separated into individual groups in a similar way using principal component analysis plots (PCA).

  1. Knowledge discovery of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jing

    High-throughput cell culture is an emerging technology that shows promise as a tool for research in tissue engineering, drug discovery, and medical diagnostics. An important, but overlooked, challenge is the integration of experimental methods with information processing suitable for handling large databases of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. In this work the traditional global descriptions of cell behaviors and surface characteristics was shown insufficient for investigating short-distance cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions. Traditional summary metrics cannot distinguish information of cell near neighborhood from the average, global features, thus often is not suitable for studying distance-sensitive cell behaviors. The problem of traditional summary metrics was addressed by introducing individual-cell based local metrics that emphasize cell local environment. An individual-cell based local data analysis method was established. Contact inhibition of cell proliferation was used as a benchmark for the effectiveness of the local metrics and the method. Where global, summary metrics were unsuccessful, the local metrics successfully and quantitatively distinguished the contact inhibition effects of MC3T3-E1 cells on PLGA, PCL, and TCPS surfaces. In order to test the new metrics and analysis method in detail, a model of cell contact inhibition was proposed. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for validating the individual-cell based local data analysis method as well as the cell model itself. The simulation results well matched with the experimental observations. The parameters used in the cell model provided new descriptions of both cell behaviors and surface characteristics. Based on the viewpoint of individual cells, the local metrics and local data analysis method were extended to the investigation of cell-surface interactions, and a new high-throughput screening and knowledge discovery method on combinatorial libraries, local cell

  2. Expanding the glycoengineering toolbox: the rise of bacterial N-linked protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jenny L; Çelik, Eda; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2013-05-01

    Glycosylation is the most prevalent post-translational modification found on proteins, occurring in all domains of life. Ever since the discovery of asparagine-linked (N-linked) protein glycosylation pathways in bacteria, major efforts have been made to harness these systems for the creation of novel therapeutics, vaccines, and diagnostics. Recent advances such as the ability to produce designer glycans in bacteria, some containing unnatural sugars, and techniques for evolving glycosylation enzymes have spawned an entirely new discipline known as bacterial glycoengineering. In addition to their biotechnological and therapeutic potential, bacteria equipped with recombinant N-linked glycosylation pathways are improving our understanding of the N-glycosylation process. This review discusses the key role played by microorganisms in glycosciences, particularly in the context of N-linked glycosylation.

  3. The criticality of high-resolution N-linked carbohydrate assays and detailed characterization of antibody effector function in the context of biosimilar development

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Lowell J; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Visone, Devi B; Daugherty, Ken C; Bartron, Jeff L; Coon, Michael; Cornwall, Cabot; Hinckley, Peter J; Connell-Crowley, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement and functional characterization of antibody Fc domain N-linked glycans is critical to successful biosimilar development. Here, we describe the application of methods to accurately quantify and characterize the N-linked glycans of 2 IgG1 biosimilars with effector function activity, and show the potential pitfalls of using assays with insufficient resolution. Accurate glycan assessment was combined with glycan enrichment using lectin chromatography or production with glycosylation inhibitors to produce enriched pools of key glycan species for subsequent assessment in cell-based antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity effector function assays. This work highlights the challenges of developing high-quality biosimilar candidates and the need for modern biotechnology capabilities. These results show that high-quality analytics, combined with sensitive cell-based assays to study in vivo mechanisms of action, is an essential part of biosimilar development. PMID:25898160

  4. The criticality of high-resolution N-linked carbohydrate assays and detailed characterization of antibody effector function in the context of biosimilar development.

    PubMed

    Brady, Lowell J; Velayudhan, Jyoti; Visone, Devi B; Daugherty, Ken C; Bartron, Jeff L; Coon, Michael; Cornwall, Cabot; Hinckley, Peter J; Connell-Crowley, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement and functional characterization of antibody Fc domain N-linked glycans is critical to successful biosimilar development. Here, we describe the application of methods to accurately quantify and characterize the N-linked glycans of 2 IgG1 biosimilars with effector function activity, and show the potential pitfalls of using assays with insufficient resolution. Accurate glycan assessment was combined with glycan enrichment using lectin chromatography or production with glycosylation inhibitors to produce enriched pools of key glycan species for subsequent assessment in cell-based antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity effector function assays. This work highlights the challenges of developing high-quality biosimilar candidates and the need for modern biotechnology capabilities. These results show that high-quality analytics, combined with sensitive cell-based assays to study in vivo mechanisms of action, is an essential part of biosimilar development.

  5. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weian; Teo, Grace Sock Leng; Kumar, Namit; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1) targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2) programming assembly of cells for tissue engineering, 3) bioimaging and sensing, and ultimately 4) manipulating cell biology. PMID:21857791

  6. Role of different classes of mammalian cell surface molecules in adherence of coagulase positive and coagulase negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed M; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M; Yassien, Mahmoud A; Hassouna, Nadia A

    2008-10-01

    In the present study the role of different mammalian cell receptors in adherence of the coagulase positive pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus and some coagulase negative staphylococci, namely Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus was investigated. Upon testing the adherence to Vero and Hep-2 cells, S. aureus isolates showed an adherence to both cell lines while S. epidermidis and S. saprophyticus isolates adhered to Vero cells only. According to the obtained results, both O-linked and N-linked mammalian cell surface glycoproteins are involved in the adherence of S. aureus isolates to Vero and Hep-2 cells, whereas only the O-linked ones serve as receptors for adherence of S. epidermidis and S. saprophyticus isolates to Vero cells. Of the O-linked glycoproteins, GAG-like receptors are involved in adherence of all tested isolates to Vero cells. The coagulase positive staphylococci preferred to adhere to the highly sulphated GAGs (Heparin and chondroitin sulphate B) while the coagulase negative isolates showed higher affinity to the less sulphated ones (Chondroitin sulphate A and C). Mucin like receptors appeared to be important for the adherence of all tested staphylococci. The role exhibited by fibronectin- and fibrinogen-like receptors was detected with S. aureus and S. epidermidis but not with S. saprophyticus isolates. While, collagen and gelatin were found to contribute to the adherence of S. aureus isolates only. Neither carbohydrate moieties of the glycoconjugates nor lipid molecules on the mammalian cell surface played a role in the adherence of the tested staphylococcal isolates. Taken together, the results revealed that both coagulase negative and coagulase positive staphylococcal tested isolates adhere to the same classes of mammalian cell surface receptors such as mucin-like, fibrinogen-like, fibronectin-like and GAG-like receptors. However, the tested isolates exhibited different degrees of affinities to such receptors.

  7. Patterned hybrid nanohole array surfaces for cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Nathan P; Lou, Yi; Muth, John F; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2009-10-06

    We report the fabrication of hybrid nanohole array surfaces to study the role of the surface nanoevironment on cell adhesion and cell migration. We use polystyrene beads and reactive ion etching to control the size and the spacing between nanoholes on a tailored self-assembled monolayer inert gold surface. The arrays were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and brightfield microscopy. For cell adhesion studies, cells were seeded to these substrates to study the effect of ligand spacing on cell spreading, stress fiber formation, and focal adhesion structure and size. Finally, comparative cell migration rates were examined on the various nanohole array surfaces using time-lapse microscopy.

  8. Secretion and N-linked glycosylation are required for prostatic acid phosphatase catalytic and antinociceptive activity.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Julie K; Fitzpatrick, Brendan J; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Secretory human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP) is glycosylated at three asparagine residues (N62, N188, N301) and has potent antinociceptive effects when administered to mice. Currently, it is unknown if these N-linked residues are required for hPAP protein stability and activity in vitro or in animal models of chronic pain. Here, we expressed wild-type hPAP and a series of Asn to Gln point mutations in the yeast Pichia pastoris X33 then analyzed protein levels and enzyme activity in cell lysates and in conditioned media. Pichia secreted wild-type recombinant (r)-hPAP into the media (6-7 mg protein/L). This protein was as active as native hPAP in biochemical assays and in mouse models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. In contrast, the N62Q and N188Q single mutants and the N62Q, N188Q double mutant were expressed at lower levels and were less active than wild-type r-hPAP. The purified N62Q, N188Q double mutant protein was also 1.9 fold less active in vivo. The N301Q mutant was not expressed, suggesting a critical role for this residue in protein stability. To explicitly test the importance of secretion, a construct lacking the signal peptide of hPAP was expressed in Pichia and assayed. This "cellular" construct was not expressed at levels detectable by western blotting. Taken together, these data indicate that secretion and post-translational carbohydrate modifications are required for PAP protein stability and catalytic activity. Moreover, our findings indicate that recombinant hPAP can be produced in Pichia--a yeast strain that is used to generate biologics for therapeutic purposes.

  9. Identification of Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of the Third and Fourth Sugars of the Methanococcus maripaludis Archaellin N-Linked Tetrasaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Jones, Gareth M.; Uchida, Kaoru; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Robotham, Anna; Logan, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    N-glycosylation is a protein posttranslational modification found in all three domains of life. Many surface proteins in Archaea, including S-layer proteins, pilins, and archaellins (archaeal flagellins) are known to contain N-linked glycans. In Methanococcus maripaludis, the archaellins are modified at multiple sites with an N-linked tetrasaccharide with the structure Sug-1,4-β-ManNAc3NAmA6Thr-1,4-β-GlcNAc3NAcA-1,3-β-GalNAc, where Sug is the unique sugar (5S)-2-acetamido-2,4-dideoxy-5-O-methyl-α-l-erythro-hexos-5-ulo-1,5-pyranose. In this study, four genes—mmp1084, mmp1085, mmp1086, and mmp1087—were targeted to determine their potential involvement of the biosynthesis of the sugar components in the N-glycan, based on bioinformatics analysis and proximity to a number of genes which have been previously demonstrated to be involved in the N-glycosylation pathway. The genes mmp1084 to mmp1087 were shown to be cotranscribed, and in-frame deletions of each gene as well as a Δmmp1086Δmmp1087 double mutant were successfully generated. All mutants were archaellated and motile. Mass spectrometry examination of purified archaella revealed that in Δmmp1084 mutant cells, the threonine linked to the third sugar of the glycan was missing, indicating a putative threonine transferase function of MMP1084. Similar analysis of the archaella of the Δmmp1085 mutant cells demonstrated that the glycan lacked the methyl group at the C-5 position of the terminal sugar, indicating that MMP1085 is a methyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of this unique sugar. Deletion of the remaining two genes, mmp1086 and mmp1087, either singularly or together, had no effect on the structure of the archaellin N-glycan. Because of their demonstrated involvement in the N-glycosylation pathway, we designated mmp1084 as aglU and mmp1085 as aglV. PMID:23836872

  10. Identification of genes involved in the biosynthesis of the third and fourth sugars of the Methanococcus maripaludis archaellin N-linked tetrasaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Jones, Gareth M; Uchida, Kaoru; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Robotham, Anna; Logan, Susan M; Kelly, John; Jarrell, Ken F

    2013-09-01

    N-glycosylation is a protein posttranslational modification found in all three domains of life. Many surface proteins in Archaea, including S-layer proteins, pilins, and archaellins (archaeal flagellins) are known to contain N-linked glycans. In Methanococcus maripaludis, the archaellins are modified at multiple sites with an N-linked tetrasaccharide with the structure Sug-1,4-β-ManNAc3NAmA6Thr-1,4-β-GlcNAc3NAcA-1,3-β-GalNAc, where Sug is the unique sugar (5S)-2-acetamido-2,4-dideoxy-5-O-methyl-α-l-erythro-hexos-5-ulo-1,5-pyranose. In this study, four genes--mmp1084, mmp1085, mmp1086, and mmp1087--were targeted to determine their potential involvement of the biosynthesis of the sugar components in the N-glycan, based on bioinformatics analysis and proximity to a number of genes which have been previously demonstrated to be involved in the N-glycosylation pathway. The genes mmp1084 to mmp1087 were shown to be cotranscribed, and in-frame deletions of each gene as well as a Δmmp1086Δmmp1087 double mutant were successfully generated. All mutants were archaellated and motile. Mass spectrometry examination of purified archaella revealed that in Δmmp1084 mutant cells, the threonine linked to the third sugar of the glycan was missing, indicating a putative threonine transferase function of MMP1084. Similar analysis of the archaella of the Δmmp1085 mutant cells demonstrated that the glycan lacked the methyl group at the C-5 position of the terminal sugar, indicating that MMP1085 is a methyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of this unique sugar. Deletion of the remaining two genes, mmp1086 and mmp1087, either singularly or together, had no effect on the structure of the archaellin N-glycan. Because of their demonstrated involvement in the N-glycosylation pathway, we designated mmp1084 as aglU and mmp1085 as aglV.

  11. Identification of a novel inducible cell-surface ligand of CD5 on activated lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CD5 is a 67-kD glycoprotein that is expressed on most T lymphocytes and on a subset of mature B cells. Although its physiologic function is unknown, several lines of evidence suggest that CD5 may play a role in the regulation of T cell activation and in T cell-antigen presenting cell interactions. Using a CD5-immunoglobulin fusion protein (CD5Rg, for receptorglobulin) we have uncovered a new CD5 ligand (CD5L) expressed on the surface of activated splenocytes. Stimulation of murine splenocytes with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies induce transient expression of CD5L on B lymphocytes that lasts for approximately 72 h. Binding of CD5Rg to activated splenocytes is trypsin resistant and independent of divalent cations. However, it is pronase sensitive and dependent on N-linked glycosylation of CD5, since treatment of CD5Rg with PNGaseF on N-glycanase completely abrogates its ability to bind activated splenocytes. It addition to splenocytes, CD5L is expressed on activated murine T cell clones. Immunoprecipitation, antibody, and recombinant protein blocking studies indicate that CD5L is distinct from CD72, which has been proposed to be a CD5 ligand. To determine whether CD5-CD5L interaction might play a role in vivo, we tested the effect of CD5Rg in a murine model of antibody-mediated membranous glomerulonephritis. Injection of CD5Rg was found to abrogate development of the disease. Taken together, our results help identify a novel ligand of CD5 and propose a role for CD5 in the regulation of immune responses. PMID:9064341

  12. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-06

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  13. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Maylie-Pfenninger, M; Jamieson, JD

    1979-01-01

    We describe here a simple, general procedure for the purification of a variety of lectins, and for the preparation of lectin-ferritin conjugates of defined molar composition and binding properties to be used as probes for cell surface saccharides. The technique uses a “universal” affinity column for lectins and their conjugates, which consists of hog sulfated gastric mucin glycopeptides covalently coupled to agarose. The procedure involes: (a) purification of lectins by chromatography of aqueous extracts of seeds or other lectin-containing fluids over the affinity column, followed by desorption of the desired lectin with its hapten suge; (b) iodination of the lectin to serve as a marker during subsequent steps; (c) conjugation of lectin to ferritin with glutaraldehyde; (d) collection of active lectin-ferritin conjugates by affinity chromatography; and (e) separation of monomeric lectin-ferritin conjugates from larger aggregates and unconjugated lectin by gel chromatography. Based on radioactivity and absorbancy at 310 nm for lectin and ferritin, respectively, the conjugates consist of one to two molecules of lectin per ferrritin molecule. Binding studies of native lectins and their ferritin conjugates to dispersed pancreatic acinar cells showed that the conjugation procedure does not significantly alter either the affinity constant of the lectin for its receptor on the cell surface or the number of sites detected. PMID:422653

  14. Cell surface fluctuations studied with defocusing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agero, U.; Monken, C. H.; Ropert, C.; Gazzinelli, R. T.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2003-05-01

    Phase objects can become visible by slightly defocusing an optical microscope, a technique seldom used as a useful tool. We revisited the theory of defocusing and apply it to our optical microscope with optics corrected at infinity. In our approximation, we obtain that the image contrast is proportional to the two-dimensional (2D) Laplacian of the phase difference introduced by the phase object. If the index of refraction of the phase object is uniform the image obtained from defocusing microscopy is the image of curvature (Laplacian of the local thickness) of the phase object, while standard phase-contrast microscopy gives information about the thickness of the object. We made artificial phase objects and measured image contrasts with defocusing microscopy. Measured contrasts are in excellent agreement with our theoretical model. We use defocusing microscopy to study curvature fluctuations (ruffles) on the surface of macrophages (cell of the innate immune system), and try to correlate mechanical properties of macrophage surface and phagocytosis. We observe large coherent propagating structures: Their shape, speed, density are measured and curvature energy estimated. Inhomogeneities of cytoskeleton refractive index, curvature modulations due to thermal fluctuations and/or periodic changes in cytoskeleton-membrane interactions cause random fluctuations in image contrast. From the temporal and spatial contrast correlation functions, we obtain the decay time and correlation length of such fluctuations that are related to their size and the viscoelastic properties of the cytoskeleton. In order to associate the dynamics of cytoskeleton with the process of phagocytosis, we use an optical tweezers to grab a zymosan particle and put it into contact with the macrophage. We then measure the time for a single phagocytosis event. We add the drug cytochalasin D that depolymerizes the cytoskeleton F-actin network: It inhibits the large propagating coherent fluctuations on the

  15. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  16. Functional analysis of N-linking oligosaccharyl transferase enzymes encoded by deep-sea vent proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Dominic C.; Jervis, Adrian J.; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Yates, Laura E.; Cuccui, Jon; Linton, Dennis; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial N-linking oligosaccharyl transferases (OTase enzymes) transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected proteins in the periplasm and were first described in the intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, a member of the ε-proteobacteria-subdivision of bacteria. More recently, orthologues from other ε-proteobacterial Campylobacter and Helicobacter species and a δ-proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, have been described, suggesting that these two subdivisions of bacteria may be a source of further N-linked protein glycosylation systems. Whole-genome sequencing of both ε- and δ-proteobacteria from deep-sea vent habitats, a rich source of species from these subdivisions, revealed putative ORFs encoding OTase enzymes and associated adjacent glycosyltransferases similar to the C. jejuni N-linked glycosylation locus. We expressed putative OTase ORFs from the deep-sea vent species Nitratiruptor tergarcus, Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Deferribacter desulfuricans in Escherichia coli and showed they were able to functionally complement the C. jejuni OTase, CjPglB . The enzymes were shown to possess relaxed glycan specificity, transferring diverse glycan structures and demonstrated different glycosylation sequon specificities. Additionally a permissive D. desulfuricans acceptor protein was identified, and we provide evidence that the N-linked glycan synthesised by N. tergarcus and S. lithotrophicum contains an acetylated sugar at the reducing end. This work demonstrates that deep-sea vent bacteria encode functional N-glycosylation machineries and are a potential source of biotechnologically important OTase enzymes. PMID:26610891

  17. The neutral N-linked glycans of the ustilaginomycete yeast Sympodiomycopsis paphiopedili.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ronilo Jose D; Ohashi, Takao; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2017-07-01

    Sympodiomycopsis paphiopedili is a basidiomycetous yeast under the subphylum Ustilaginomycotina and is a commensal organism originally isolated from the nectar of a plant species in Japan. In this study, the neutral N-linked glycans of S. paphiopedili were prepared and structurally analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). Glycosidase digestion analyses were also performed to verify certain glycan linkages. HPLC and MS analyses revealed the presence of neutral N-linked glycans ranging from Man3 GlcNAc2 -PA to Man9 GlcNAc2 -PA in length. The most abundant neutral N-linked glycan structure in this species was found to be the Manα1-2Manα1-6(Manα1-3)Manα1-6(Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3)Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (M8A). Moreover, the second and third most abundant neutral N-linked glycan in S. paphiopedili were the Manα1-2Manα1-6(Manα1-2Manα1-3)Manα1-6(Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3)Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (M9A) and the Manα1-6(Manα1-3)Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (M3B). On the other hand, the effect of the combination of glycoprotein extraction methods (citrate buffer extraction or bead extraction) and the subsequent glycan release methods (hydrazinolysis or PNGase F digestion) on the detection of N-linked glycan peaks was also examined for S. paphiopedili and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to avoid under-representation of N-linked glycan structures. High mannose and possible hypermannosylated glycan peaks were detected in all method combinations in S. cerevisiae with the citrate buffer extraction-hydrazinolysis method giving the highest peak yields as compared with the other methods. Here we report the first account of the structural analysis of the neutral N-linked glycan of S. paphiopedili and the comparison of the effect of combinations of glycoprotein extraction methods and glycan release methods with that of the glycan analysis in S. paphiopedili and S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  18. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    PubMed

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  19. Electrochemiluminescence to detect surface proteins on live cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanmei; Young, Judy; Meng, Y Gloria

    2007-10-01

    Flow cytometry and cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays have been used to detect surface proteins on cells. A recently available electrochemiluminescent assay methodology using carbon surface electrodes built into the bottom of microwell plates can be used as an alternative to these methods and has some advantages. The carbon surface plates bind suspension cells tightly enough to allow plates to be washed using a plate washer. This eliminates the centrifugation steps typically used for washing suspension cells. For adherent cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells can be grown, activated, and assayed in the same carbon surface plate. This eliminates the need to detach cells from tissue culture plates for analysis, making the electrochemiluminescent assay much easier to perform than a corresponding flow cytometry assay. This electrochemiluminescence technology provides a high throughput method to detect surface proteins on live cells.

  20. Cell surface interaction of annexin A2 and galectin-3 modulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in Her-2 negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Bargale, Anil; Patil, Basavraj R; Mohan, Rajashekar; Dinesh, U S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Gai, Pramod B; Patil, Vidya S; Amsavardani, T S

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and activation of tyrosine kinase receptors like EGFR and Src regulate the progression and metastasis of Her-2 negative breast cancer. Recently we have reported the role of cell membrane interaction of phospholipid-binding protein annexin A2 (AnxA2) and EGFR in regulating cellular signaling in the activation of angiogenesis, matrix degradation, invasion, and cancer metastasis. Beta-galactoside-specific animal lectin galectin-3 is an apoptosis inhibitor, and cell surface-associated extracellular galectin-3 also has a role in cell migration, cancer progression, and metastasis. Similar expression pattern and membrane co-localization of these two proteins made us to hypothesize in the current study that galectin-3 and AnxA2 interaction is critical for Her-2 negative breast cancer progression. By various experimental analyses, we confirm that glycosylated AnxA2 at the membrane surface interacts with galectin-3. N-linked glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin treatment convincingly blocked AnxA2 membrane translocation and its association with galectin-3. To analyze whether this interaction has any functional relevance, we tried to dissociate this interaction with purified plant lectin from chickpea (Cicer arietinum agglutinin). This highly specific 30 kDa plant lectin could dissociate AnxA2 from endogenous lectin galectin-3 interaction at the cell surface. This dissociation could down-regulate Bcl-2 family proteins, cell proliferation, and migration simultaneously triggering cell apoptosis. Targeting this interaction of membrane surface glycoprotein and its animal lectin in Her-2 negative breast cancer may be of therapeutic value.

  1. Mice lacking N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I activity die at mid-gestation, revealing an essential role for complex or hybrid N-linked carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Ioffe, E; Stanley, P

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require N-linked carbohydrates for survival. However, the biosynthetic intermediate Man5GlcNAc2Asn, in place of mature N-linked structures, allows glycoprotein synthesis and somatic cell growth to proceed normally. To determine whether the same would be true in a complex biological situation, the gene Mgat-1 was disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells and transmitted to the germ line. The Mgat-1 gene encodes N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I [GlcNAc-TI; alpha-1,3-mannosyl-glycoprotein beta-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase; UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine:glycoprotein (N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to alpha-D-mannosyl-1,3-(R1)-beta-D-mannosyl-R2) beta-1,2-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.101], the transferase that initiates synthesis of hybrid and complex N-linked carbohydrates from Man5GlcNAc2Asn. Mice lacking GlcNAc-TI activity did not survive to term. Biochemical and morphological analyses of embryos from 8.5 to 13.5 days of gestation showed that Mgat-1-/-embryos are developmentally retarded, most noticeably in neural tissue, and die between 9.5 and 10.5 days of development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8290590

  2. Toward Cell Selective Surfaces: Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Breath Figures with Antifouling Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Elzein, Tamara; Bejjani, Alice; García-Granda, Maria Jesús; Santos-Coquillat, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of microporous functional polymer surfaces that have been proven to be selective surfaces toward eukaryotic cells while maintaining antifouling properties against bacteria. The fabrication of functional porous films has been carried out by the breath figures approach that allowed us to create porous interfaces with either poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene (5FS). For this purpose, blends of block copolymers in a polystyrene homopolymer matrix have been employed. In contrast to the case of single functional polymer, using blends enables us to vary the chemical distribution of the functional groups inside and outside the formed pores. In particular, fluorinated groups were positioned at the edges while the hydrophilic PEGMA groups were selectively located inside the pores, as demonstrated by TOF-SIMS. More interestingly, studies of cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on these surfaces confirmed that PEGMA functionalized interfaces are excellent candidates to selectively allow cell growth and proliferation while maintaining antifouling properties.

  3. Cell Surface Markers in Colorectal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Zhou, Jerry; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    The classification of colorectal cancers (CRC) is currently based largely on histologically determined tumour characteristics, such as differentiation status and tumour stage, i.e., depth of tumour invasion, involvement of regional lymph nodes and the occurrence of metastatic spread to other organs. These are the conventional prognostic factors for patient survival and often determine the requirement for adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of the primary tumour. However, patients with the same CRC stage can have very different disease-related outcomes. For some, surgical removal of early-stage tumours leads to full recovery, while for others, disease recurrence and metastasis may occur regardless of adjuvant therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular processes that lead to disease progression and metastasis and to find more reliable prognostic markers and novel targets for therapy. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that correlate with tumour progression, metastasis and patient outcome, and discusses some of the challenges in finding prognostic protein markers in CRC. PMID:21339979

  4. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  5. A mass spectrometric-derived cell surface protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments.

  6. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  7. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  8. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  9. Biotinylation and characterization of Cryptococcus neoformans cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Foster, A J; Bird, R A; Smith, S N

    2007-08-01

    To develop a novel procedure for isolating and characterizing cryptococcal cell-surface proteins using biotinylation, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-streptavidin, flow cytometry and associated ligand-receptor analysis, confocal microscopy and electrophoretic separation. Cell proteins of both acapsulate and encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans cells were labelled using sulfo-NHS-biotin which, in turn, was complexed with FITC-streptavidin. Resulting cell population fluorescence supported visualization of cell-surface protein distribution by confocal microscopy, as well as evaluation of protein exposure by flow cytometry and the calculation of the ligand-binding determinants EC(50), F(max) and H(n). Biotinylation of cell-surface proteins also supported their isolation by affinity chromatography and characterization by SDS/PAGE. Ligand-binding determinants, such as EC(50) values, indicated that acapsulate and stationary phase cells have greatest affinity for biotin. F(max) values demonstrated greatest protein exposure among stationary phase cells; in turn, encapsulated cells expose more protein than acapsulate counterparts. H(n) values of below unity potentially confirm the complex multi-receptor nature of biotin binding to cryptococcal cell surfaces under investigation. Fluorescence visualization showed marked but localized fluorescence indicative of protein exposure around sites of cell division. In turn, biotinylation of cell-surface proteins and their release under reducing conditions demonstrated at least two noncovalently linked proteinaceous entities, of 43 and 57 kDa, exposed on acapsulate cryptococcal cell walls. A novel method for identifying, in situ, cell-surface proteins exposed by C. neoformans was established. This novel technique was successfully implemented using both acapsulate and encapsulated C. neoformans cells, both were found to have dynamic and markedly localized protein distribution around sites of cell division and associated cell wall

  10. Engineering chemical reactivity on cell surfaces through oligosaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, L.K.; Yareme, K.J.; Bertozzi, C.R.

    1997-05-16

    Cell surface oligosaccharide can be engineered to display unusual functional groups for the selective chemical remodeling of cell surfaces. An unnatural derivative of N-acetyl-mannosamine, which has a ketone group, was converted to the corresponding sialic acid and incorporated into cell surface oligosaccharide metabolically, resulting in the cell surface display of ketone groups. The ketone group on the cell surface can then be covalently ligated under physiological conditions with molecules carrying a complementary reactive functional group such as the hydrazide. Cell surface reactions of this kind should prove useful in the introduction of new recognition epitopes, such as peptides, oligosaccharide, or small organic molecules, onto cell surfaces and in the subsequent modulation of cell-cell or cell-small molecule binding events. The versatility of this technology was demonstrated by an example of selective drug delivery. Cells were decorated with biotin through selective conjugation to ketone groups, and selectively killed in the presence of a ricin A chain-avidin conjugate. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Single cell profiling of surface carbohydrates on Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congzhou; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates are important to various bacterial activities and functions. It is well known that different types of Bacillus display heterogeneity of surface carbohydrate compositions, but detection of their presence, quantitation and estimation of variation at the single cell level have not been previously solved. Here, using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based recognition force mapping coupled with lectin probes, the specific carbohydrate distributions of N-acetylglucosamine and mannose/glucose were detected, mapped and quantified on single B. cereus surfaces at the nanoscale across the entire cell. Further, the changes of the surface carbohydrate compositions from the vegetative cell to spore were shown. These results demonstrate AFM-based ‘recognition force mapping’ as a versatile platform to quantitatively detect and spatially map key bacterial surface biomarkers (such as carbohydrate compositions), and monitor in situ changes in surface biochemical properties during intracellular activities at the single cell level. PMID:25505137

  12. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the cell surface GRP78-expressing subpopulation of cells supports nuclear Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. These findings are important because they are...original tasks outlined in the approved statement of work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16. SECURITY...associated with cell surface GRP78 (Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1) were upregulated in GRP78(+) relative to GRP78(-) prostate cancer cells. Our results in this

  13. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions.

  14. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  15. Cell Surface Measurements in Hydrocarbon and Carbohydrate Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, R. J.; Zajic, J. E.; Gerson, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was grown in 11-liter batch fermentations with hexadecane or sodium citrate as the sole source of carbon. Surface and interfacial tension measurements of the microbial broth indicated that surface-active compounds were being produced only during growth on the hydrocarbon substrate. Contact angle measurements of an aqueous drop on a smooth lawn of cells in a hexadecane bath indicated a highly hydrophobic surface of the cells in the initial stages of the hydrocarbon fermentation (120° contact angle). At this stage, the entire cell population was bound to the hydrocarbon-aqueous interface. The contact angle dropped rapidly to approximately 45° after 14 h into the fermentation. This coincided with a shift of the cell population to the aqueous phase. Thus, the cells demonstrated more hydrophilic characteristics in the later stages of the fermentation. Contact angles on cells grown on sodium citrate ranged from 18 to 24° throughout the fermentation. The cells appear to be highly hydrophilic during growth on a soluble substrate. From the contact angle and aqueous-hydrocarbon interfacial tension, the surface free energy of the cells was calculated along with the cell-aqueous and cell-hydrocarbon interfacial tension. The results of these measurements were useful in quantitatively evaluating the hydrophobic nature of the cell surface during growth on hydrocarbons and comparing it with the hydrophilic nature of the cell surface during growth on a soluble substrate. PMID:16345526

  16. Rapid removal of N-linked oligosaccharides using microwave assisted enzyme catalyzed deglycosylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Wendy N.; Arellano, Fred; Arnott, David; Raab, Helga; Vandlen, Richard; Lill, Jennie R.

    2007-01-01

    The removal of N-linked oligosaccharides from glycoproteins is commonly performed during the preparation of samples for mass spectrometry. A reduction in the protein's structural heterogeneity is sometimes essential to obtain a mass for the intact protein. Alternatively, removal of the sugar may be desired to facilitate oligosaccharide analysis. A typical approach to deglycosylation employs overnight digestion with the enzyme peptide N-glycosidase F (PNGase F). We report a method for the accelerated removal of N-linked oligosaccharides using PNGase F assisted by microwave irradiation. Complete deglycosylation was achieved in less than 30 min for most proteins without compromising the integrity of protein samples. This method was tested on a variety of glycoproteins, including antibodies, at the microgram level.

  17. Glycomic and Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Cyst Fluids Identifies Hyperfucosylated Lactosamines on the N-linked Glycans of Overexpressed Glycoproteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Benjamin F.; Goetz, John A.; House, Michael G.; Schmidt, C. Max; Novotny, Milos V.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these “hyperfucosylated” glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively

  18. Glycomic and proteomic profiling of pancreatic cyst fluids identifies hyperfucosylated lactosamines on the N-linked glycans of overexpressed glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mann, Benjamin F; Goetz, John A; House, Michael G; Schmidt, C Max; Novotny, Milos V

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these "hyperfucosylated" glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively, following A

  19. Molecularly engineered surfaces for cell biology: from static to dynamic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gooding, J Justin; Parker, Stephen G; Lu, Yong; Gaus, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Surfaces with a well-defined presentation of ligands for receptors on the cell membrane can serve as models of the extracellular matrix for studying cell adhesion or as model cell surfaces for exploring cell-cell contacts. Because such surfaces can provide exquisite control over, for example, the density of these ligands or when the ligands are presented to the cell, they provide a very precise strategy for understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to external adhesive cues. In the present feature article, we present an overview of the basic biology of cell adhesion before discussing surfaces that have a static presentation of immobile ligands. We outline the biological information that such surfaces have given us, before progressing to recently developed switchable surfaces and surfaces that mimic the lipid bilayer, having adhesive ligands that can move around the membrane and be remodeled by the cell. Finally, the feature article closes with some of the biological information that these new types of surfaces could provide.

  20. Functional analysis of N-linking oligosaccharyl transferase enzymes encoded by deep-sea vent proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mills, Dominic C; Jervis, Adrian J; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Yates, Laura E; Cuccui, Jon; Linton, Dennis; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial N-linking oligosaccharyl transferases (OTase enzymes) transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected proteins in the periplasm and were first described in the intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, a member of the ε-proteobacteria-subdivision of bacteria. More recently, orthologues from other ε-proteobacterial Campylobacter and Helicobacter species and a δ-proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, have been described, suggesting that these two subdivisions of bacteria may be a source of further N-linked protein glycosylation systems. Whole-genome sequencing of both ε- and δ-proteobacteria from deep-sea vent habitats, a rich source of species from these subdivisions, revealed putative ORFs encoding OTase enzymes and associated adjacent glycosyltransferases similar to the C. jejuni N-linked glycosylation locus. We expressed putative OTase ORFs from the deep-sea vent species Nitratiruptor tergarcus, Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Deferribacter desulfuricans in Escherichia coli and showed that they were able to functionally complement the C. jejuni OTase, CjPglB. The enzymes were shown to possess relaxed glycan specificity, transferring diverse glycan structures and demonstrated different glycosylation sequon specificities. Additionally, a permissive D. desulfuricans acceptor protein was identified, and we provide evidence that the N-linked glycan synthesized by N. tergarcus and S. lithotrophicum contains an acetylated sugar at the reducing end. This work demonstrates that deep-sea vent bacteria encode functional N-glycosylation machineries and are a potential source of biotechnologically important OTase enzymes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Cell surface engineering of yeast for applications in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface engineering is a promising strategy for the molecular breeding of whole-cell biocatalysts. By using this strategy, yeasts can be constructed by the cell surface display of functional proteins; these yeasts are referred to as arming yeasts. Because reactions using arming yeasts as whole-cell biocatalysts occur on the cell surface, materials that cannot enter the cell can be used as reaction substrates. Numerous arming yeasts have therefore been constructed for a wide range of uses such as biofuel production, synthesis of valuable chemicals, adsorption or degradation of environmental pollutants, recovery of rare metal ions, and biosensors. Here, we review the science of yeast cell surface modification as well as current applications and future opportunities.

  2. Investigation of ovarian cancer associated sialylation changes in N-linked glycopeptides by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In approximately 80% of patients, ovarian cancer is diagnosed when the patient is already in the advanced stages of the disease. CA125 is currently used as the marker for ovarian cancer; however, it lacks specificity and sensitivity for detecting early stage disease. There is a critical unmet need for sensitive and specific routine screening tests for early diagnosis that can reduce ovarian cancer lethality by reliably detecting the disease at its earliest and treatable stages. Results In this study, we investigated the N-linked sialylated glycopeptides in serum samples from healthy and ovarian cancer patients using Lectin-directed Tandem Labeling (LTL) and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics methods. We identified 45 N-linked sialylated glycopeptides containing 46 glycosylation sites. Among those, ten sialylated glycopeptides were significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancer patients’ serum samples. LC-MS/MS analysis of the non-glycosylated peptides from the same samples, western blot data using lectin enriched glycoproteins of various ovarian cancer type samples, and PNGase F (+/−) treatment confirmed the sialylation changes in the ovarian cancer samples. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrated that several proteins are aberrantly sialylated in N-linked glycopeptides in ovarian cancer and detection of glycopeptides with abnormal sialylation changes may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for ovarian cancer. PMID:22856521

  3. A categorification of the quantum sl(N)-link polynomials using foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis we define and study a categorification of the sl(N)-link polynomial using foams, for Ngeq 3. For N=3 we define the universal sl(3)-link homology, using foams, which depends on three parameters and show that it is functorial, up to scalars, with respect to link cobordisms. Our theory is integral. We show that tensoring it with Q yields a theory which is equivalent to the rational universal Khovanov-Rozansky sl(3)-link homology. For Ngeq 4 we construct a rational theory categorifying the sl(N)-link polynomial using foams. Our theory is functorial, up to scalars, with respect to link cobordisms. To evaluate closed foams we use the Kapustin-Li formula. We show that for any link our homology is isomorphic to the Khovanov-Rozansky homology. We conjecture that the theory is integral and we compute the conjectured integral sl(N)-link homology for the (2,m)-torus links and show that it has torsion of order N.

  4. Biochemical evidence for an alternate pathway in N-linked glycoprotein biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Angelyn; Chang, Michelle M.; Whitworth, Garrett E.; Imperiali, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a complex protein modification conserved among all three domains of life. Herein we report the in vitro analysis of N-linked glycosylation from the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus voltae. Using a suite of synthetic and semisynthetic substrates, we show that AglK initiates N-linked glycosylation in M. voltae through the formation of α-linked dolichyl monophosphate N-acetylglucosamine (Dol-P-GlcNAc), which contrasts with the polyprenyl-diphosphate intermediates that feature in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Intriguingly, AglK exhibits high sequence homology to dolichyl-phosphate β-glucosyltransferases, including Alg5 in eukaryotes, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. The combined action of the first two enzymes, AglK and AglC, afforded an α-linked Dol-P-glycan that serves as a competent substrate for the archaeal oligosaccharyl transferase AglB. These studies provide the first biochemical evidence revealing that despite the apparent similarity of the overall pathways, there are actually two general strategies to achieve N-linked glycoproteins across the domains of life. PMID:23624439

  5. Highly efficient enrichment of N-linked glycopeptides using a hydrophilic covalent-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Fang; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2017-08-21

    The enrichment of glycopeptides plays an important role in glycoproteomics. In this paper, a covalent-organic framework called TpPa-1, synthesized by the Schiff base reaction of 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol and paraphenylenediamine, was first successfully utilized as a hydrophilic porous material for N-linked glycopeptide enrichment. Using this material, interference from non-glycopeptides could be efficiently eliminated, which facilitated the mass spectrometry detection of glycopeptides. By capturing N-linked glycopeptides from tryptic digests of human IgG, our method was proved to have high sensitivity at the femtomole level. And it showed superior selectivity for glycopeptides even when non-glycopeptides were 1000 times more concentrated. Due to the strong covalent bonds, this material possessed good stability and could be repeatedly used for at least 10 times. The ultra-low mass density and abundant binding sites also provided it with high binding capacity (178 mg g(-1), IgG/TpPa-1). Moreover, N-linked glycopeptides were easily enriched by this material from only 10 μL human serum, which demonstrated its potential in pretreatment of complex biological samples.

  6. AglJ adds the first sugar of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Lina; Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Ventura, Valeria V; Raetz, Christian R H; Hitchen, Paul G; Dell, Anne; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-11-01

    Like the Eukarya and Bacteria, the Archaea also perform N glycosylation. Using the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system, a series of Agl proteins involved in the archaeal version of this posttranslational modification has been identified. In the present study, the participation of HVO_1517 in N glycosylation was considered, given its homology to a known component of the eukaryal N-glycosylation pathway and because of the genomic proximity of HVO_1517 to agl genes encoding known elements of the H. volcanii N-glycosylation process. By combining the deletion of HVO_1517 with mass spectrometric analysis of both dolichol phosphate monosaccharide-charged carriers and the S-layer glycoprotein, evidence was obtained showing the participation of HVO_1517, renamed AglJ, in adding the first hexose of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating this reporter glycoprotein. The deletion of aglJ, however, did not fully prevent the attachment of a hexose residue to the S-layer glycoprotein. Moreover, in the absence of AglJ, the level of only one of the three monosaccharide-charged dolichol phosphate carriers detected in the cell was reduced. Nonetheless, in cells lacking AglJ, no further sugar subunits were added to the remaining monosaccharide-charged dolichol phosphate carriers or to the monosaccharide-modified S-layer glycoprotein, pointing to the importance of the sugar added through the actions of AglJ for proper N glycosylation. Finally, while aglJ can be deleted, H. volcanii surface layer integrity is compromised in the absence of the encoded protein.

  7. [Cell surface RNA--a possible molecular receptor of adaptogens].

    PubMed

    Malenkov, A G; Kolotygina, I M

    1984-01-01

    When RNA of the cell surface is destroyed with RNAase, the effect of adaptogenes is removed. Such effect is produced by introduction of actinomycin D 30 minutes before intake of adaptogene. Destruction of surface RNA stimulates protein synthesis. Comparison of these facts permits a hypothesis to be advanced saying that surface RNA is a receptor of adaptogenes obtained from plants of Aralia family.

  8. N-linked glycan truncation causes enhanced clearance of plasma-derived von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J M; Aguila, S; McRae, E; Ward, S E; Rawley, O; Fallon, P G; Brophy, T M; Preston, R J S; Brady, L; Sheils, O; Chion, A; O'Donnell, J S

    2016-12-01

    Essentials von Willebrands factor (VWF) glycosylation plays a key role in modulating in vivo clearance. VWF glycoforms were used to examine the role of specific glycan moieties in regulating clearance. Reduction in sialylation resulted in enhanced VWF clearance through asialoglycoprotein receptor. Progressive VWF N-linked glycan trimming resulted in increased macrophage-mediated clearance. Click to hear Dr Denis discuss clearance of von Willebrand factor in a free presentation from the ISTH Academy SUMMARY: Background Enhanced von Willebrand factor (VWF) clearance is important in the etiology of both type 1 and type 2 von Willebrand disease (VWD). In addition, previous studies have demonstrated that VWF glycans play a key role in regulating in vivo clearance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying VWF clearance remain poorly understood. Objective To define the molecular mechanisms through which VWF N-linked glycan structures influence in vivo clearance. Methods By use of a series of exoglycosidases, different plasma-derived VWF (pd-VWF) glycoforms were generated. In vivo clearance of these glycoforms was then assessed in VWF(-/-) mice in the presence or absence of inhibitors of asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), or following clodronate-induced macrophage depletion. Results Reduced amounts of N-linked and O-linked sialylation resulted in enhanced pd-VWF clearance modulated via ASGPR. In addition to this role of terminal sialylation, we further observed that progressive N-linked glycan trimming also resulted in markedly enhanced VWF clearance. Furthermore, these additional N-linked glycan effects on clearance were ASGPR-independent, and instead involved enhanced macrophage clearance that was mediated, at least in part, through LDL receptor-related protein 1. Conclusion The carbohydrate determinants expressed on VWF regulate susceptibility to proteolysis by ADAMTS-13. In addition, our findings now further demonstrate that non-sialic acid carbohydrate

  9. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  10. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  11. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  12. Growth of connective tissue progenitor cells on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George; Roy, Shuvo

    2002-12-15

    Growth of human connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs) was characterized on smooth and microtextured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces. Human bone-marrow-derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on smooth PDMS surfaces and on PDMS post microtextures that were 6 microm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 microm in diameter, respectively. Glass tissue-culture dishes were used as controls. The number of viable cells was determined, and an alkaline phosphatase stain was used as a marker for osteoblastic phenotype. CTPs attached, proliferated, and differentiated on all surfaces. Cells on the smooth PDMS and control surfaces spread and proliferated as colonies in proximity to other cells and migrated in random directions, with cell process lengths of up to 80 microm. In contrast, cells on the PDMS post microtextures grew as sparsely distributed networks of cells, with processes, occasionally up to 300 microm, that appeared to interact with the posts. Cell counts revealed that there were fewer (50%) CTPs on the smooth PDMS surface than were on the glass control surfaces. However, there were consistently more (>144%) CTPs on the PDMS post textures than on the controls. In particular, the 10-microm-in-diameter posts (268%) exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05) greater cell number than did the smooth PDMS.

  13. Attachment of human primary osteoblast cells to modified polyethylene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Poulsson, Alexandra H C; Mitchell, Stephen A; Davidson, Marcus R; Johnstone, Alan J; Emmison, Neil; Bradley, Robert H

    2009-04-09

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has a long history of use in medical devices, primarily for articulating surfaces due to its inherent low surface energy which limits tissue integration. To widen the applications of UHMWPE, the surface energy can be increased. The increase in surface energy would improve the adsorption of proteins and attachment of cells to allow tissue integration, thereby allowing UHMWPE to potentially be used for a wider range of implants. The attachment and function of human primary osteoblast-like (HOB) cells to surfaces of UHMWPE with various levels of incorporated surface oxygen have been investigated. The surface modification of the UHMWPE was produced by exposure to a UV/ozone treatment. The resulting surface chemistry was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the topography and surface structure were probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which showed an increase in surface oxygen from 11 to 26 atom % with no significant change to the surface topography. The absolute root mean square roughness of both untreated and UV/ozone-treated surfaces was within 350-450 nm, and the water contact angles decreased with increasing oxygen incorporation, i.e., showing an increase in surface hydrophilicity. Cell attachment and functionality were assessed over a 21 day period for each cell-surface combination studied; these were performed using SEM and the alamarBlue assay to study cell attachment and proliferation and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis to confirm extracellular mineral deposits, and total protein assay to examine the intra- and extracellular protein expressed by the cells. HOB cells cultured for 21 days on the modified UHMWPE surfaces with 19 and 26 atom % oxygen incorporated showed significantly higher cell densities compared to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) from day 3 onward. This indicated that the cells attached and proliferated more

  14. Surface plasmon-based infrared spectroscopy for cell biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashunsky, Victor; Lirtsman, Vladislav; Zilbershtein, Alexander; Bein, Amir; Schwartz, Betty; Aroeti, Benjamin; Golosovsky, Michael; Davidov, Dan

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology is often used as a valuable indicator of the physical condition and general status of living cells. We demonstrate a noninvasive method for morphological characterization of adherent cells. We measure infrared reflectivity spectrum at oblique angle from living cells cultured on thin Au film, and utilize the unique properties of the confined infrared waves (i.e., surface plasmon and guided modes) traveling inside the cell layer. The propagation of these waves strongly depends on cell morphology and connectivity. By tracking the resonant wavelength and attenuation of the surface plasmon and guided modes we measure the kinetics of various cellular processes such as (i) cell attachment and spreading on different substrata, (ii) modulation of the outer cell membrane with chlorpromazine, and (iii) formation of intercellular junctions associated with progressive cell polarization. Our method enables monitoring of submicron variations in cell layer morphology in real-time, and in the label-free manner.

  15. Touching Textured Surfaces: Cells in Somatosensory Cortex Respond Both to Finger Movement and to Surface Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darian-Smith, Ian; Sugitani, Michio; Heywood, John; Karita, Keishiro; Goodwin, Antony

    1982-11-01

    Single neurons in Brodmann's areas 3b and 1 of the macaque postcentral gyrus discharge when the monkey rubs the contralateral finger pads across a textured surface. Both the finger movement and the spatial pattern of the surface determine this discharge in each cell. The spatial features of the surface are represented unambiguously only in the responses of populations of these neurons, and not in the responses of the constituent cells.

  16. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-03-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices.

  17. Characteristics of oligosaccharides from rat parotid (RP) N-linked glycoproteins (GP) after. beta. -adrenoreceptor (. beta. -AR) stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, B.J.; Yeh, C.K.; Kousvelari, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have shown that ..beta..-AR stimulation of RP cells leads to marked enhancement of N-linked glycosylation in 4 secretory GP (Mrapprox.220Kd, HMW;approx.32-38Kd, MMW;approx.17Kd, LMW). To characterize oligosaccharides in GP, cells were incubated 60 min +/- isoproterenol (ISO) and analyzed 2 ways. First, cell extracts were subjected to SDS-PAGE and Western blotting with peroxidase-conjugated Con A or wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). Second, double-labeled (/sup 3/H) man//sup 14/C leu) extracts were chromatographed on G200 followed by analysis of GP on Con A-Sepharose. HMW from control (CON) and ISO cells were Endo H insensitive, Endo F sensitive, altered by incubation with deoxynojirimycin (dNM), and bound both Con A and WGA conjugates. Similar findings were observed with LMW while MMW were sensitive to Endo H and Endo F, unaffected by dNM, bound Con A (strongly) and WGA (weakly). MMW and LMW were primarily eluted from Con A-Sepharose with 0.5M ..cap alpha..-methyl mannoside (..cap alpha..-MM) while HMW were eluted sequentially with 10 mM ..cap alpha..-methyl glucoside and ..cap alpha..-MM. HMW, MMW, and LMW had approx.4 fold higher /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratios after ISO. These results suggest HMW and LMW likely contain biantennary complex and hybrid oligosaccharides while MMW contain only high mannose oligosaccharide types.

  18. The Assessment of Fuel Cell Power Plants for Surface Combatants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-30

    fuel cell technology on the design and effectiveness of future naval surface combatants. The study involved the collection of data to characterize four different fuel cell technologies; proton exchange membrane, molten carbonate, phosphoric acid, and solid oxide fuel cells. This information was used to expand current computer models to develop specific fuel cell plants that met the power requirements for several applications on a nominal 5000 Lton destroyer and a nominal 200 Lton corvette. Each of the fuel cell

  19. Fuel cell technology for lunar surface operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deronck, Henry J.

    1992-02-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells have been shown, in several NASA and contractor studies, to be an enabling technology for providing electrical power for lunar bases, outposts, and vehicles. The fuel cell, in conjunction with similar electrolysis cells, comprises a closed regenerative energy storage system, commonly referred to as a regenerative fuel cell (RFC). For stationary applications, energy densities of 1,000 watt-hours per kilograms an order of magnitude over the best rechargeable batteries, have been projected. In this RFC, the coupled fuel cell and electrolyzer act as an ultra-light battery. Electrical energy from solar arrays 'charges' the system by electrolyzing water into hydrogen and oxygen. When an electrical load is applied, the fuel cell reacts the hydrogen and oxygen to 'discharge' usable power. Several concepts for utilizing RFC's, with varying degrees of integration, have been proposed, including both primary and backup roles. For mobile power needs, such as rovers, an effective configuration may be to have only the fuel cell located on the vehicle, and to use a central electrolysis 'gas station'. Two fuel cell technologies are prime candidates for lunar power system concepts: alkaline electrolyte and proton exchange membrane. Alkaline fuel cells have been developed to a mature production power unit in NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter. Recent advances in materials offer to significantly improve durability to the level needed for extended lunar operations. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are receiving considerable support for hydrospace and terrestrial transportation applications. This technology promises durability, simplicity, and flexibility.

  20. Fuel cell technology for lunar surface operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deronck, Henry J.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells have been shown, in several NASA and contractor studies, to be an enabling technology for providing electrical power for lunar bases, outposts, and vehicles. The fuel cell, in conjunction with similar electrolysis cells, comprises a closed regenerative energy storage system, commonly referred to as a regenerative fuel cell (RFC). For stationary applications, energy densities of 1,000 watt-hours per kilograms an order of magnitude over the best rechargeable batteries, have been projected. In this RFC, the coupled fuel cell and electrolyzer act as an ultra-light battery. Electrical energy from solar arrays 'charges' the system by electrolyzing water into hydrogen and oxygen. When an electrical load is applied, the fuel cell reacts the hydrogen and oxygen to 'discharge' usable power. Several concepts for utilizing RFC's, with varying degrees of integration, have been proposed, including both primary and backup roles. For mobile power needs, such as rovers, an effective configuration may be to have only the fuel cell located on the vehicle, and to use a central electrolysis 'gas station'. Two fuel cell technologies are prime candidates for lunar power system concepts: alkaline electrolyte and proton exchange membrane. Alkaline fuel cells have been developed to a mature production power unit in NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter. Recent advances in materials offer to significantly improve durability to the level needed for extended lunar operations. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are receiving considerable support for hydrospace and terrestrial transportation applications. This technology promises durability, simplicity, and flexibility.

  1. Expression of cell adhesion complexes in epithelial cells seeded on biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Räisänen, L; Könönen, M; Juhanoja, J; Varpavaara, P; Hautaniemi, J; Kivilahti, J; Hormia, M

    2000-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that soft tissue responses around dental implants vary, depending on the material used. It is therefore also possible that there are differences in how epithelial cells attach to various biomaterial surfaces. We studied the adhesion of cultured epithelial cells to five different dental material surfaces and to glass. The efficacy of adhesion was evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence microscopy (IF) with antibodies to vinculin and alpha(6)beta(4) integrin, two cell surface molecules that are functional in epithelial cell adhesion. Our results indicate that epithelial cells adhere and spread more avidly on metallic surfaces (titanium, Ti(6)Al(4)V titanium alloy, dental gold alloy) than on ceramic surfaces (dental porcelain, aluminum oxide). As revealed by SEM, cells on metallic surfaces had a flattened morphology and formed multicellular islands. On porcelain and aluminum oxide most cells were round and adhesion occurred as single cells. Surface coverage was over twofold on metallic surfaces as compared to ceramic surfaces. IF of cells grown on metallic surfaces revealed vinculin in well-organized focal contacts and alpha(6)beta(4) integrin in punctate patterns typical of prehemidesmosomes. On porcelain and aluminum oxide surfaces the cells were mostly round and showed less well-organized adhesion complexes. Our results indicate that smooth metallic biomaterial surfaces are optimal for epithelial cell adhesion and spreading. These findings may have clinical implications in the design of transgingival implant structures. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Surface effects in high voltage silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Arndt, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The surface of low-resistivity silicon solar cells appears to be a major source of dark diffusion current. This region, consisting of the interface and the adjacent heavily doped layer, therefore, prevents attainment of the high open-circuit voltages expected from these cells. This paper describes the experimental effort carried out to reduce the various contributions of dark current from the surface. Analysis of results from this effort points to means of improving cell voltages by changing processing and structures.

  3. Titanium surface topography affects collagen biosynthesis of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Daniela B S; Miguez, Patrícia A; Mendonça, Gustavo; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2011-09-01

    Collagen-dependent microstructure and physicochemical properties of newly formed bone around implant surfaces represent key determinants of implant biomechanics. This study investigated the effects of implant surface topography on collagen biosynthesis of adherent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown for 0 to 42 days on titanium disks (20.0 × 1.0 mm) with smooth or rough surfaces. Cell attachment and spreading were evaluated by incubating cells with Texas-Red-conjugated phalloidin antibody. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA levels of Col1α1 and collagen modifying genes including prolyl hydroxylases (PHs), lysyl oxidases (LOXs) and lysyl hydroxylases (LHs). Osteogenesis was assessed at the level of osteoblast specific gene expression and alizarin red staining for mineralization. Cell layer-associated matrix and collagen content were determined by amino acid analysis. At 4h, 100% cells were flattened on both surfaces, however the cells on smooth surface had a fibroblast-like shape, while cells on rough surface lacked any defined long axis. PH, LH, and most LOX mRNA levels were greater in hMSCs grown on rough surfaces for 3 days. The mineralized area was greater for rough surface at 28 and 42 days. The collagen content (percent total protein) was also greater at rough surface compared to smooth surface at 28 (36% versus 26%) and 42 days (46% versus 29%), respectively (p<.05). In a cell culture model, rough surface topography positively modulates collagen biosynthesis and accumulation and the expression of genes associated with collagen cross-linking in adherent hMSC. The altered biosynthesis of the collagen-rich ECM adjacent to endosseous implants may influence the biomechanical properties of osseointegrated endosseous implants.

  4. Endothelial cell behavior on vascular prosthetic grafts: effect of polymer chemistry, surface structure, and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Marois, Y; Sigot-Luizard, M F; Guidoin, R

    1999-01-01

    When implanting any vascular prosthetic grafts, one important goal to ensure long-term patency is achieving complete endothelialization of the luminal surface, a process that has rarely been observed clinically in humans. Seeding vascular grafts with endothelial cells has been seen as an attractive approach but has not been clinically convincing. A determining factor may be the type of polymer and surface structure. Using organotypic culture assays, the present investigation studied the effect of different polymers, surface structures, and surface treatments on endothelial cell behavior. The materials tested were polyester (PET), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyesterurethane (PESU), and polyetherurethane (PETU) grafts with different surface structures. The surface treatments on the PET grafts included impregnation with cross-linked albumin, collagen, and gelatin, and treatments with fluoropolymer and electrically conducting polypyrrole polymer. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets (smooth surface, plain wall) were used as controls. After incubation for 7 days at 37 degrees C, cell adhesion and migration on the different polymers and structures were as follows: woven and knitted PET (high porosity) > PTFE, PESU, PETU hydrophobic (low porosity) > PETU hydrophilic, LDPE, PDMS (no porosity). Cell density results showed no difference between polymers and porous structures and a higher cell density on smooth nonporous surfaces. Compared with the nonimpregnated PET structures, knitted PET treated with albumin, collagen, or gelatin showed slight decreases of cell adhesion. No differences in cell migration and density were reported between any of the PET grafts, except for one polyester graft with a different chemistry than Dacron, which exhibited greater cell migration and lower cell density. Polyester grafts with a fluoropolymer treatment showed lower cell adhesion and migration and higher cell density than the nontreated PET. Finally

  5. Cells under siege: Viral glycoprotein interactions at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Thomas A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Stuart, David I.

    2011-01-01

    As obligate parasites, viruses are required to enter and replicate within their host, a process which employs many of their proteins to hijack natural cellular processes. High resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis has proven to be an ideal method to visualize the mechanisms by which such virus-host interactions occur and has revealed the innovative capacity of viruses to adapt efficiently to their hosts. In this review, we draw upon recently elucidated paramyxovirus-, arenavirus-, and poxvirus-host protein complex crystal structures to reveal both the capacity of viruses to appropriate one component of a physiological protein–protein binding event (often modifying it to out-compete the host-protein), and the ability to utilize novel binding sites on host cell surface receptors. The structures discussed shed light on a number of biological processes ranging from viral entry to virulence and host antagonism. Drawn together they reveal the common strategies which viruses have evolved to interact with their natural host. The structures also support molecular level rationales for how viruses can be transmitted to unrelated organisms and thus pose severe health risks. PMID:21440638

  6. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  7. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  8. Interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ziebart, Thomas; Schnell, Anne; Walter, Christian; Kämmerer, Peer W; Pabst, Andreas; Lehmann, Karl M; Ziebart, Johanna; Klein, Marc O; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important role in peri-implant angiogenesis during early bone formation. Therefore, interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and titanium dental implant surfaces are of crucial interest. The aim of our in vitro study was to investigate the reactions of EPCs in contact with different commercially available implant surfaces. EPCs from buffy coats were isolated by Ficoll density gradient separation. After cell differentiation, EPC were cultured for a period of 7 days on different titanium surfaces. The test surfaces varied in roughness and hydrophilicity: acid-etched (A), sand-blasted-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), hydrophilic A (modA), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Plastic and fibronectin-coated plastic surfaces served as controls. Cell numbers and morphology were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressions of iNOS and eNOS were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell numbers were higher in the control groups compared to the cells of titanium surfaces. Initially, hydrophilic titanium surfaces (modA and modSLA) showed lower cell numbers than hydrophobic surfaces (A and SLA). After 7 days smoother surfaces (A and modA) showed increased cell numbers compared to rougher surfaces (SLA and modSLA). Cell morphology of A, modA, and control surfaces was characterized by a multitude of pseudopodia and planar cell soma architecture. SLA and modSLA promoted small and plump cell soma with little quantity of pseudopodia. The lowest VEGF level was measured on A, the highest on modSLA. The highest eNOS and iNOS expressions were found on modA surfaces. The results of this study demonstrate that biological behaviors of EPCs can be influenced by different surfaces. The modSLA surface promotes an undifferentiated phenotype of EPCs that has the ability to secrete growth factors in great quantities. In

  9. Osteoblastlike cell adhesion on titanium surfaces modified by plasma nitriding.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jose Sandro Pereira; Amico, Sandro Campos; Rodrigues, Almir Olegario Neves; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvao; Alves, Clodomiro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of various titanium surfaces modified by cold plasma nitriding in terms of adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblastlike cells. Samples of grade 2 titanium were subjected to three different surface modification processes: polishing, nitriding by plasma direct current, and nitriding by cathodic cage discharge. To evaluate the effect of the surface treatment on the cellular response, the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblastlike cells (MC3T3) were quantified and the results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman statistical tests. Cellular morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. There was more MC3T3 cell attachment on the rougher surfaces produced by cathodic cage discharge compared with polished samples (P < .05). Plasma nitriding improves titanium surface roughness and wettability, leading to osteoblastlike cell adhesion.

  10. Effect of Stratification on Surface Properties of Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Soto, Bernardo; Leonard, Brian C.; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of mucin expression in an immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line (hTCEpi) on the surface properties of cells, such as wettability, contact angle, and surface heterogeneity. Methods hTCEpi cells were cultured to confluence in serum-free medium. The medium was then replaced by stratification medium to induce mucin biosynthesis. The mucin expression profile was analyzed using quantitative PCR and Western blotting. Contact angles were measured using a two-immiscible liquid method, and contact angle hysteresis was evaluated by tilting the apparatus and recording advancing and receding contact angles. The spatial distribution of mucins was evaluated with fluorescently labeled lectin. Results hTCEpi cells expressed the three main ocular mucins (MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16) with a maximum between days 1 and 3 of the stratification process. Upon stratification, cells caused a very significant increase in contact angle hysteresis, suggesting the development of spatially discrete and heterogeneously distributed surface features, defined by topography and/or chemical functionality. Although atomic force microscopy measurements showed no formation of appreciable topographic features on the surface of the cells, we observed a significant increase in surface chemical heterogeneity. Conclusions The surface chemical heterogeneity of the corneal epithelium may influence the dynamic behavior of tear film by “pinning” the contact line between the cellular surface and aqueous tear film. Engineering the surface properties of corneal epithelium could potentially lead to novel treatments in dry eye disease. PMID:26747762

  11. Electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2008-05-06

    The electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated surfaces of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus brevis was studied using numerical modeling in conjunction with potentiometric titration and electrophoretic mobility data as a function of solution pH and electrolyte composition. Assuming a polyelectrolytic polymeric bacterial cell surface, these experimental and numerical analyses were used to determine the effective site numbers of cell surface acid-base functional groups and Ca(2+) sorption coefficients. Using effective site concentrations determined from 1:1 electrolyte (NaCl) experimental data, the charge-regulation model was able to replicate the effects of 2:1 electrolyte (CaCl(2)), both alone and as a mixture with NaCl, on the measured zeta potential using a single Ca(2+) surface binding constant for each of the bacterial species. This knowledge is vital for understanding how cells respond to changes in solution pH and electrolyte composition as well as how they interact with other surfaces. The latter is especially important due to the widespread use of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in the interpretation of bacterial adhesion. As surface charge and surface potential both vary on a charge-regulated surface, accurate modeling of bacterial interactions with surfaces ultimately requires use of an electrostatic model that accounts for the charge-regulated nature of the cell surface.

  12. Adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on micropatterned polyelectrolyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Naoki; Guo, Likun; Wozniak, Michal J; Imaizumi, Yumie; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Zhang, Xingdong; Chen, Guoping

    2009-01-01

    Three kinds of photoreactive polyelectrolytes of polyallylamine (PAAm), poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc), and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were synthesized by the introduction of azidophenyl groups in the respective polymers. The photoreactive PAAm, PAAc, and PVA were micropatterned on polystyrene surfaces by photolithography. Observation with optical microscopy and scanning probe microscopy demonstrated the formation of a striped pattern of polyelectrolytes with a width of 200 microm. The micropatterned polyelectrolytes swelled in water. The micropatterned surfaces were used for cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their effects on adipogenic differentiation were investigated. The MSCs adhered to and proliferated evenly on the PAAm- and PAAc-patterned surfaces while they formed a cell pattern on the PVA-patterned surface. The PAAm-, PAAc-grafted, and polystyrene surfaces supported cell adhesion while the PVA-grafted surface did not. When cultured in adipogenic differentiation medium, the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs on the polyelectrolyte-patterned surfaces was demonstrated by the formation of lipid vacuoles and gene expression analysis. Oil Red-O-positive cells showed an even distribution on the PAAm- and PAAc-patterned surfaces, while they showed a pattern on the PVA-patterned surface. The fraction of Oil RedO-positive cells increased with culture time. The MSCs cultured on the PAAm-, PAAc-grafted, and polystyrene surfaces in adipogenic differentiation medium expressed the adipogenesis marker genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (PPARgamma2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4). These results indicate that the PAAm-, and PAAc-grafted, and polystyrene surfaces supported the adipogenesis of MSCs while a PVA-grafted surface did not.

  13. Multijunction Solar Cell Technology for Mars Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mardesich, Nick; Ewell, Richard C.; Mueller, Robert L.; Endicter, Scott; Aiken, Daniel; Edmondson, Kenneth; Fetze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells used for Mars surface applications have been commercial space qualified AM0 optimized devices. Due to the Martian atmosphere, these cells are not optimized for the Mars surface and as a result operate at a reduced efficiency. A multi-year program, MOST (Mars Optimized Solar Cell Technology), managed by JPL and funded by NASA Code S, was initiated in 2004, to develop tools to modify commercial AM0 cells for the Mars surface solar spectrum and to fabricate Mars optimized devices for verification. This effort required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and to develop and test commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum. This paper discusses the program, including results for the initial modified cells. Simulated Mars surface measurements of MER cells and Phoenix Lander cells (2007 launch) are provided to characterize the performance loss for those missions. In addition, the performance of the MER rover solar arrays is updated to reflect their more than two (2) year operation.

  14. Microplicae--Specialized Surface Structure of Epithelial Cells of Wet-Surfaced Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Asikainen, P; Sirviö, E; Mikkonen, J J W; Singh, S P; Schulten, E A J M; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Koistinen, A P; Kullaa, A M

    2015-01-01

    The surface structure of the superficial cells of the oral mucosa is decorated with numerous membrane ridges, termed microplicae (MPLs). The MPL structure is typical of the epithelial surfaces that are covered with protective mucus. Cell membrane MPLs are no longer seen as passive consequences of cellular activity. The interaction between MPLs and the mucins has been demonstrated, however the role of MPL structure seen on the upper surface of the oral epithelial cells is speculative. The cell surface is of potentially great significance, as it harbors many markers for refined prognosis and targets for oral mucosal diseases and cancer therapy. With these aspects in mind, we conducted the present review of the MPL structure and function in order to form the basis for further studies of MPLs of the oral epithelial cells.

  15. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  16. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  17. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation.

    PubMed

    Boyan, B D; Cheng, A; Olivares-Navarrete, R; Schwartz, Z

    2016-03-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  18. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, B.D.; Cheng, A.; Olivares-Navarrete, R.; Schwartz, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. PMID:26927483

  19. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  20. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular design of spacer-N-linked sialoglycopolypeptide as polymeric inhibitors against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Hidari, Kazuya I P J; Kozaki, Wataru; Murata, Takeomi; Hiratake, Jun; Park, Enoch Y; Suzuki, Takashi; Usui, Taichi

    2009-07-13

    A series of spacer-N-linked glycopolymers carrying long/short α2,3/6 sialylated glycan were designed as polymeric inhibitors of influenza virus. Lactose (Lac) and N-acetyllactosamine (LN: Galβ1,4GlcNAc) were first converted to spacer-N-linked disaccharide glycosides, followed by consecutive enzymatic addition of GlcNAc and Gal residues to the glycosides. The resulting spacer-N-linked glycosides with di-, tetra-, and hexasaccharides carrying a Lac, LN, lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT: Galβ1,4GlcNAcβ1,3Galβ1,4Glc), and LNβ1,3LNnT were coupled to the carboxy group of γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) and enzymatically converted to glycopolypeptides carrying α2,3/6 sialylated glycans. The interactions of a series of sialoglycopolypeptides with avian and human influenza virus strains were investigated using a hemagglutination inhibition assay. The avian virus A/Duck/HongKong/313/4/78 (H5N3) bound specifically, regardless of the structure of the asialo portion. In contrast, human virus A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) bound preferentially to long α2,6sialylated glycans with penta- or heptasaccharides in a glycan length-dependent manner. Furthermore, the Sambucus sieboldiana (SNA) lectin was also useful as a model of human virus hemagglutinin (HA) for understanding the carbohydrate binding properties, because the recognition motifs of the inner sugar in the receptor were very similar.

  2. The endomembrane requirement for cell surface repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Miyake, Katsuya; Vogel, Steven S.

    2003-01-01

    The capacity to reseal a plasma membrane disruption rapidly is required for cell survival in many physiological environments. Intracellular membrane (endomembrane) is thought to play a central role in the rapid resealing response. We here directly compare the resealing response of a cell that lacks endomembrane, the red blood cell, with that of several nucleated cells possessing an abundant endomembrane compartment. RBC membrane disruptions inflicted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser, even those initially smaller than hemoglobin, failed to reseal rapidly. By contrast, much larger laser-induced disruptions made in sea urchin eggs, fibroblasts, and neurons exhibited rapid, Ca(2+)-dependent resealing. We conclude that rapid resealing is not mediated by simple physiochemical mechanisms; endomembrane is required.

  3. Modulated surface nanostructures for enhanced light trapping and reduced surface reflection of crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Hirai, Yuji; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Usami, Noritaka

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the fabrication of modulated surface nanostructures as a new surface texture design for thin wafer solar cells. Using a combination of conventional alkali etching and colloidal lithography, we fabricated surface textures with micrometer and nanometre scales on a Si substrate. These modulated surface nanostructures exhibit reduced surface reflection in a broad spectral range, compared with conventional micrometer textures. We investigated optical absorption using a rigorous coupled wave analysis simulation, which revealed a significant reduction in surface reflection over a broad spectral range and efficient light trapping (comparable to that of conventional micrometer-scale textures) for the modulated nanostructures. We found that the modulated surface nanostructures have a high potential of improving the performance of thin wafer crystalline Si solar cells.

  4. Cell Fractionation and Arrangement on Fibers, Beads, and Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, G. M.; Rutishauser, U.; Millette, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    A new method, fiber fractionation, has been used to isolate and separate cells. The cells are adsorbed to fibers covalently coupled to molecules such as antigens, antibodies, and lectins which can bind specifically to cell-surface components. The cells are then removed mechanically by plucking the taut fibers. Alternatively, competitive inhibitors of binding may be used to remove the cells at a lesser rate. Successful fractionations have been achieved by varying the degree of derivatization of the fibers by the lectin concanavalin A. Lymphoid cells have been separated by the use of different antigens coupled to the fibers. The method may also be used for specific fixation and manipulation of viable cell populations in culture. In addition to fibers, beads and surfaces have been specifically derivatized and used to achieve different geometrical arrangements of the cells. Images PMID:5289374

  5. α2,3 and α2,6 N-Linked Sialic Acids Facilitate Efficient Binding and Transduction by Adeno-Associated Virus Types 1 and 6

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhijian; Miller, Edward; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors in the field of gene therapy. Different AAV serotypes display distinct tissue tropism, believed to be related to the distribution of their receptors on target cells. Of the 11 well-characterized AAV serotypes, heparan sulfate proteoglycan and sialic acid have been suggested to be the attachment receptors for AAV type 2 and types 4 and 5, respectively. In this report, we identify the receptor for the two closely related serotypes, AAV1 and AAV6. First, we demonstrate using coinfection experiments and luciferase reporter analysis that AAV1 and AAV6 compete for similar receptors. Unlike heparin sulfate, enzymatic or genetic removal of sialic acid markedly reduced AAV1 and AAV6 binding and transduction. Further analysis using lectin staining and lectin competition assays identified that AAV1 and AAV6 use either α2,3-linked or α2,6-linked sialic acid when transducing numerous cell types (HepG2, Pro-5, and Cos-7). Treatment of cells with proteinase K but not glycolipid inhibitor reduced AAV1 and AAV6 infection, supporting the hypothesis that the sialic acid that facilitates infection is associated with glycoproteins rather than glycolipids. In addition, we determined by inhibitor (N-benzyl GalNAc)- and cell line-specific (Lec-1) studies that AAV1 and AAV6 require N-linked and not O-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, a resialylation experiment on a deficient Lec-2 cell line confirmed a 2,3 and 2,6 N-linked sialic acid requirement, while studies of mucin with O-linked sialic acid showed no inhibition effect for AAV1 and AAV6 transduction on Cos-7 cells. Finally, using a glycan array binding assay we determined that AAV1 efficiently binds to NeuAcα2-3GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, as well as two glycoproteins with α2,3 and α2,6 N-linked sialic acids. Taken together, competition, genetic, inhibitor, enzymatic reconstitution, and glycan array experiments support α2,3 and α2,6 sialic acids that are present on N-linked

  6. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  7. The cell surface environment for pathogen recognition and entry

    PubMed Central

    Stow, Jennifer L; Condon, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The surface of mammalian cells offers an interface between the cell interior and its surrounding milieu. As part of the innate immune system, macrophages have cell surface features optimised for probing and sampling as they patrol our tissues for pathogens, debris or dead cells. Their highly dynamic and constantly moving cell surface has extensions such as lamellipodia, filopodia and dorsal ruffles that help detect pathogens. Dorsal ruffles give rise to macropinosomes for rapid, high volume non-selective fluid sampling, receptor internalisation and plasma membrane turnover. Ruffles can also generate phagocytic cups for the receptor-mediated uptake of pathogens or particles. The membrane lipids, actin cytoskeleton, receptors and signalling proteins that constitute these cell surface domains are discussed. Although the cell surface is designed to counteract pathogens, many bacteria, viruses and other pathogens have evolved to circumvent or hijack these cell structures and their underlying machinery for entry and survival. Nevertheless, these features offer important potential for developing vaccines, drugs and preventative measures to help fight infection. PMID:27195114

  8. Elastomers bonded to metal surfaces seal electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    A leakproof seal secondary cell containing alkaline electrolytes was developed by bonding an alkali-resistant elastomer, such as neoprene, to metal contact surfaces. Test results of several different elastomers strongly indicate the feasibility of this sealing method.

  9. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell surface-engineering to embed targeting ligands or tracking agents on the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Suk; Lee, Daniel Y; Valencia, Gabriel M; Won, Young-Wook; Bull, David A

    2017-01-22

    The key challenge to improve the efficacy of cell therapy is how to efficiently modify cells with a specific molecule or compound that can guide the cells to the target tissue. To address this, we have developed a cell surface engineering technology to non-invasively modify the cell surface. This technology can embed a wide variety of bioactive molecules on any cell surface and allow for the targeting of a wide range of tissues in a variety of disease states. Using our cell surface engineering technology, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC)s were modified with: 1) a homing peptide or a recombinant protein to facilitate the migration of the cells toward a specific molecular target; or 2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents to allow for in vivo tracking of the cells. The incorporation of a homing peptide or a targeting ligand on MSCs facilitated the migration of the cells toward their molecular target. MRI contrast agents were successfully embedded on the cell surfaces without adverse effects to the cells and the contrast agent-labeled cells were detectable by MRI. Our technology is a promising method of cell surface engineering that is applicable to a broad range of cell therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  12. Surface plasmonic effects on organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Ashraf; Yang, Xiaohan

    2014-02-01

    Most high-performance organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices reported in the literature have been fabricated using the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) concept. Typically, the optimum thickness of the active layer for an OPV device is around 100 nm, or possibly less; such a thin layer can lead to low absorption of light. A thicker layer, however, inevitably increases the device resistance, due to the low carrier mobilities and short exciton diffusion lengths in organic materials. This situation imposes a trade-off between light absorption and charge transport efficiencies in OPV devices, motivating the development of a variety of light-trapping techniques. Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) such as Ag, Au, etc. and other metallic nanostructures are potential candidates for improving the light absorption due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). LSPR contributes to the significant enhancement of local electromagnetic fields and improves the optical properties of the nanostructure devices. The excitation of LSPR is achieved when the frequency of the incident light matches its resonance peak, resulting in unique optical properties; selective light extinction as well as local enhancement of electromagnetic fields near the surface of metallic NPs. The resonance peak of LSPR depends strongly on the size, shape, and the dielectric environment of the metallic NPs. In this review article, progress on plasmonic enhanced OPV device performance is examined. The concepts of surface plasmonics for OPV devices, suitable plasmonic materials, location, optimum size and concentration of NP materials within the device are explored.

  13. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  14. The N-linked sugar chains of human immunoglobulin G: their unique pattern, and their functional roles.

    PubMed

    Kobata, Akira

    2008-03-01

    In contrast to other serum glycoproteins, the majority of the N-linked sugar chains of human serum IgG are not sialylated. In addition, extremely high micro-heterogeneity occurs in the serum IgG sugar chains. This micro-heterogeneity is mainly produced by the presence or absence of the two galactoses, the bisecting GlcNAc, and the fucose residue. Interesting evidence is that the molar ratio of each sugar chain of the serum IgG samples is quite constant in healthy individuals. By adding the information of the characteristic feature of the sugar patterns of myeloma IgG samples and glycosylated Bence Jones proteins, which are the products of monoclonal B-cells, it was proposed that B-cells in the human blood are a mixture of clones equipped with different sets and ratios of glycosyltransferases. It was also proposed that each glycoform of IgG might have a different function. This hypothesis was realized by the comparative studies of the function of IgG samples before and after removal of galactose residues, fucose residue, or sialic acid residues.

  15. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis in epithelial sheets: alterations of cell surface properties induced by cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Vasiliev, J M; Gelfand, I M; Domnina, L V; Zacharova, O S; Ljubimov, A V

    1975-02-01

    Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was found to be characteristic for epithelial sheets formed in cultures by several cell types: normal and transformed mouse kidney cells, and differentiated mouse hepatoma cells. In these sheets most central cells surrounded by other cells had very low phagocytic activity. In contrast, marginal cells having a free edge were able to perform an active phagocytosis. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was absent in dense cultures of mouse embryo fibroblasts and in cultures of anaplastic mouse hepatoma 22a. The upper surface of epithelial sheets was nonadhesive for prelabeled epithelial cells and fibroblasts. In contrast, the upper surface of dense cultures of mouse fibroblasts was adhesive for these cells. These and other data strengthen the suggestion that contact inhibition of phagocytosis is a result of different adhesiveness of the upper cell surface and of the surfaces near the free edge. Agents inhibiting cell surface movements at the free edges of marginal epithelial cells (cytochalasin, azide, sorbitol, low temperature) prevented adhesion of particles to these edges. Possibly, the surface of actively moving cytoplasmic processes is the only cell part that has adhesive properties necessary for the formation of attachments with other cellular and noncellular surfaces. In epithelial sheets, in contrast to fibroblast cultures, Colcemid did not activate movements of immobile contacting cell edges. These results indicate that mechanisms of contact immobilization of cell surface may be different in epithelium and fibroblasts. Firm contacts formed between epithelial cells are sufficient for stable immobilization of the surface; additional stabilization of the surface by microtubules is not essential. Fibroblasts do not form firm contacts and the Colcemid-sensitive stabilization process is essential for maintenance of the immobile state of their surfaces. Differences in the stability of cell surface immobilization produced by cell-cell

  16. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  17. Cell culture on hydrophilicity-controlled silicon nitride surfaces.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-12-01

    Cell culture on silicon nitride membranes is required for atmospheric scanning electron microscopy, electron beam excitation assisted optical microscopy, and various biological sensors. Cell adhesion to silicon nitride membranes is typically weak, and cell proliferation is limited. We increased the adhesion force and proliferation of cultured HeLa cells by controlling the surface hydrophilicity of silicon nitride membranes. We covalently coupled carboxyl groups on silicon nitride membranes, and measured the contact angles of water droplets on the surfaces to evaluate the hydrophilicity. We cultured HeLa cells on the coated membranes and evaluated stretch of the cell. Cell migration and confluence were observed on the coated silicon nitride films. We also demonstrated preliminary observation result with direct electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

  18. Microfabricated surface designs for cell culture and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, T; Chung, D J

    1994-01-01

    Grooved and holed surfaces with a well fabricated design may serve as microsubstrates for cell culture and microreactors for diagnosis. In this study, the authors prepared chemically treated, micrometer scale grooved and holed glass surfaces by combined surface modification and ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser ablation techniques, as follows. 1) Microcell-culture substrate: Amino group attached glass surfaces, prepared by the treatment with an aminopropylsilane, were condensed with a carboxylated radical initiator. Subsequently, polyacrylamide was grafted by surface initiated radical polymerization to create a very hydrophilic surface layer. Ultraviolet excimer laser beams (KrF: 248 nm) were irradiated through a microscope onto surfaces to create grooves or holes that were 10 and 50 microns in width or diameter, respectively. The depth, depending on the irradiation light strength, ranged from a few to several tenths of a micrometer. On endothelial cell (EC) seeding, ECs adhered and grew on the bottoms of the grooved or holed surface where glass was exposed on ablation. Little cell adhesion was observed on non ablated, grafted surfaces. Endothelial cells aligned along the groove, resulting in very narrow tube like tissue formation, whereas ECs tended to form a multilayered spherical aggregate in a hole. A single cell resided in a 10 microns square hole. 2) Microreactor for diagnosis: The glass surface, treated with a fluorinated silane, was ablated to create round holes. On addition of a few microliters of water, water could be quantitatively transferred into a hole because of the water repellent characteristics of non ablated, fluorinated glass. As a model of a microreactor, enzyme reactions to affect different levels of glucose were carried out in tiny holed surfaces.

  19. Theoretical analysis of cell separation based on cell surface marker density.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J J; Zborowski, M; Moore, L; Mandal, S; Fang, B B; Sun, L

    1998-07-05

    A theoretical analysis was performed to determine the number of fractions a multidisperse, immunomagnetically labeled cell population can be separated into based on the surface marker (antigen) density. A number of assumptions were made in this analysis: that there is a proportionality between the number of surface markers on the cell surface and the number of immunomagnetic labels bound; that this surface marker density is independent of the cell diameter; and that there is only the presence of magnetic and drag forces acting on the cell. Due to the normal distribution of cell diameters, a "randomizing" effect enters into the analysis, and an analogy between the "theoretical plate" analysis of distillation, adsorption, and chromatography can be made. Using the experimentally determined, normal distribution of cell diameters for human lymphocytes and a breast cancer cell line, and fluorescent activated cell screening data of specific surface marker distributions, examples of theoretical plate calculations were made and discussed.

  20. 1H NMR characterization of a hen ovalbumin tyrosinamide N-linked oligosaccharide library.

    PubMed

    Corradi Da Silva, M L; Stubbs, H J; Tamura, T; Rice, K G

    1995-04-20

    A library of 15 N-linked oligosaccharide structures was prepared from ovalbumin and characterized using high-field NMR and mass spectrometry. The oligosaccharides were enzymatically released from ovalbumin glycopeptides, and the reducing ends were reacted with ammonium bicarbonate to form oligosaccharide-glycosylamines. These reacted with Boc-tyrosine-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, resulting in a mixture of tyrosinamide-oligosaccharides. The Boc group was removed to expose an amine terminus which enhanced the resolution of tyrosinamide-oligosaccharides when chromatographed on reverse-phase HPLC. Ten major and five minor oligosaccharides were purified on a micromole scale and characterized using 1H NMR and FAB-MS. The structures include high-mannose, hybrid, and complex oligosaccharides possessing from two to five antenna, providing the most complete definition of ovalbumin N-linked oligosaccharides to date. The resulting library is well suited to biological studies due to the presence of a single terminal tyrosine residue on each oligosaccharide that allows radioiodination or the attachment of additional probes to these glycoconjugates prior to biological studies.

  1. Delineating Diseases by IMS-MS Profiling of Serum N-linked Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Isailovic, Dragan; Plasencia, Manolo D.; Gaye, Maissa M.; Stokes, Sarah T.; Kurulugama, Ruwan. T.; Pungpapong, Vitara; Zhang, Min; Kyselova, Zuzana; Goldman, Radoslav; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V.; Clemmer, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Altered branching and aberrant expression of N-linked glycans is known to be associated with disease states such as cancer. However, the complexity of determining such variations hinders the development of specific glycomic approaches for assessing disease states. Here, we examine a combination of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) measurements, with principal component analysis (PCA) for characterizing serum N-linked glycans from 81 individuals: 28 with cirrhosis of the liver; 25 with liver cancer; and 28 apparently healthy. Supervised PCA of combined ion-mobility profiles for several, to as many as ten different mass-to-charge ratios for glycan ions, improves the delineation of diseased states. This extends an earlier study [J.Proteome Res. 2008, 7, 1109-1117] of isomers associated with a single glycan (S1H5N4) in which PCA analysis of the IMS profiles appeared to differentiate the liver cancer group from the other samples. Although performed on a limited number of test subjects, the combination of IMS-MS for different combinations of ions and multivariate PCA analysis shows promise for characterizing disease states. PMID:22148953

  2. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  3. Enhancement of Biological Reactions on Cell Surfaces via Macromolecular Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Chapanian, Rafi; Kwan, David H.; Constantinescu, Iren; Shaikh, Fathima A.; Rossi, Nicholas A.A.; Withers, Stephen G.; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of macromolecules such as enzymes and antibodies with cell surfaces is often an inefficient process, requiring large amounts of expensive reagent. Here we report a general method based on macromolecular crowding with a range of neutral polymers to enhance such reactions, using red blood cells (RBCs) as a model system. Rates of conversion of Type A and B red blood cells to universal O type by removal of antigenic carbohydrates with selective glycosidases are increased up to 400-fold in the presence of crowders. Similar enhancements are seen for antibody binding. We further explore the factors underlying these enhancements using confocal microscopy and fluorescent recovery after bleaching (FRAP) techniques with various fluorescent protein fusion partners. Increased cell-surface concentration due to volume exclusion, along with two-dimensionally confined diffusion of enzymes close to the cell surface, appear to be the major contributing factors. PMID:25140641

  4. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  5. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  6. Synthetically functionalized retroviruses produced from the bioorthogonally engineered cell surface.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shirley; Kwon, Young Jik

    2011-02-16

    Conjugation of desired molecules onto retroviral surfaces through the ease of the bioorthogonal functionalization method was demonstrated. Oxidation of surface sialic acids using periodate and further p-anisidine-catalyzed conjugation with aminooxy-bearing molecules were used to directly label retroviral envelope with a fluorescent dye. The retroviral particles that were produced from a bioorthogonally functionalized virus producing cell surface and further tethered with magnetic nanoparticles were efficiently purified by simple magnetic column separation and capable of magnet-directed transduction.

  7. Cell surface differentiation of Mycoplasma mobile visualized by surface protein localization.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Akiko; Seto, Shintaro; Jaffe, Jacob D; Miyata, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a flask-shaped cell morphology and glides toward its tapered end at a rate of 3-7 cell lengths per s (2.0-4.5 microm s(-1)) by an unknown mechanism. Gliding requires that the surface of the cell is in contact with a solid substrate, such as glass or plastic. In order to characterize the nature of the outer surface of M. mobile, monoclonal antibodies were raised against intact cells and screened for their ability to recognize surface proteins. Four antibodies were identified and their protein targets were determined. One antibody recognized the Gli349 protein, which is known to be involved in glass binding and gliding. This antibody was also able to displace attached M. mobile cells from glass, suggesting that Gli349 is the major adhesion protein in M. mobile. The other three antibodies recognized members of the Mvsp family of proteins, which are presumably the major surface antigens of M. mobile. Immunofluorescence studies were performed to localize these proteins on the surface of M. mobile cells. Gli349 localized to the proximal region of the tapered part of the cell (the 'neck'), while the various Mvsp family members showed several distinct patterns of subcellular localization. MvspN and MvspO localized to the distal end of the tapered part of the cell (the 'head'), MvspK localized to the main part of the cell (the 'body'), and MvspI localized to both the head and body but not the neck. This analysis shows that M. mobile surprisingly expresses multiple versions of its major surface antigen at once but differentiates its surface by differential localization of the various paralogues.

  8. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0478 TITLE: Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0478 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study investigated a function for cell surface GRP78 in regulating prostate cancer stem-like cells . In year 1, we showed that

  9. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  10. Ceramides modulate cell-surface acetylcholine receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, C E; Pediconi, M F; Barrantes, F J

    2008-04-01

    The effects of ceramides (Cer) on the trafficking of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) to the plasma membrane were studied in CHO-K1/A5 cells, a clonal cell line that heterologously expresses the adult murine form of the receptor. When cells were incubated with short- (C6-Cer) or long- (brain-Cer) chain Cer at low concentrations, an increase in the number of cell-surface AChRs was observed concomitant with a decrease in intracellular receptor levels. The alteration in AChR distribution by low Cer treatment does not appear to be a general mechanism since the surface expression of the green fluorescent protein derivative of the vesicular stomatitis virus protein (VSVG-GFP) was not affected. High Cer concentrations caused the opposite effects, decreasing the number of cell-surface AChRs, which exhibited higher affinity for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin, and increasing the intracellular pool, which colocalized with trans-Golgi/TGN specific markers. The generation of endogenous Cer by sphingomyelinase treatment also decreased cell-surface AChR levels. These effects do not involve protein kinase C zeta or protein phosphatase 2A activation. Taken together, the results indicate that Cer modulate trafficking of AChRs to and stability at the cell surface.

  11. 2-DEOXY-GLUCOSE DOWN REGULATES ENDOTHELIAL AKT AND ERK VIA INTERFERENCE WITH N-LINKED GLYCOSYLATION, INDUCTION OF ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS AND GSK-3β ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Krisztina; Decatur, Christina; Toro, Marcela; Pham, Dien G.; Liu, Huaping; Jing, Yuqi; Murray, Timothy G.; Lampidis, Theodore J.; Merchan, Jaime R.

    2015-01-01

    Interference with endothelial cell metabolism is a promising, yet unexploited strategy for angiogenesis inhibition. We reported that the glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG) inhibits angiogenesis at significantly lower concentrations than those required for tumor cytotoxicity. Here, we found that hypersensitivity to 2-DG in endothelial cells is not associated with enhanced drug uptake compared to tumor cells, but with time dependent, endothelial selective inhibition of Akt and Erk phosphorylation. Down regulation of these critical survival pathways is shown to be due to 2-DG’s interference with N-linked glycosylation, leading to alterations in VEGFR2 (and downstream signaling) as well as induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, GSK-3β activation and apoptosis. In vivo, periocular administration of 2-DG in LHBETATAG mice was associated with significant reduction of newly formed (CD 105 +) tumor capillaries, ER stress (GRP 78 expression), and endothelial apoptosis (TUNEL). These findings uniquely link N-linked glycosylation inhibition, ER stress and Erk/Akt down regulation in endothelial cells, and provide a novel drug development strategy to overcome resistance mechanisms to currently available antiangiogenic agents. PMID:26637370

  12. Cell-surface marker analysis of rat thymic dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bañuls, M P; Alvarez, A; Ferrero, I; Zapata, A; Ardavin, C

    1993-01-01

    Rat thymic dendritic cells have been isolated by collagenase digestion, separation of the low-density cell fraction by centrifugation on metrizamide, and differential adherence. The resulting dendritic cell preparation had a purity of > 90%, and has been analysed by flow cytometry (FCM) using a large panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility (MHC) class I and class II molecules, the leucocyte common antigen CD45, the rat leucocyte antigen OX44, the rat macrophage marker ED1, and the adhesion molecules Mac-1, LFA-1 and ICAM-1. They were negative for the T- and B-cell-specific forms of CD45, CD45R and B220, and the B-cell marker OX12. Concerning T-cell marker expression, they were negative for T-cell receptor (TcR) and OX40, but they expressed CD2, CD4 and CD8, and interestingly, 50% of DC were CD5+, 50% expressed the alpha-chain of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), and 80% were positive for the T-cell activation antigen recognized by the mAb OX48. Moreover, 60% of DC expressed high levels of Thy-1, whereas 40% displayed intermediate levels of this T-cell marker. PMID:8102122

  13. Fingers in a Hele-Shaw Cell with Surface Tension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    A138 548 FINGERS IN A HELE-SHAid CELL WITH SURFACE TENSION (U) i/i WISCONSIN UN! V-*MADISON MATHEMATICS RESEARCH CENTER J YANDEN-BROECI( MAY 83 MRC...NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A A-4" MRC Technical Simimary Report #2518 i. FINGERS IN A HELE-SHAW CELLQ WITH SURFACE TENSION V=4 Jean-Marc...H CENTER "’ FINGERS IN A HXLZ-SHAW CELL WITH SURFACE TENSION Jean-Marc Vanden-Broeck Technical Summary Report #2518 May 1983 ABSTRACT McLean and

  14. Zinc uptake by brain cells: `surface' versus `bulk'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStasio, Gelsomina; Pochon, S.; Lorusso, G. F.; Tonner, B. P.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Oddo, Nino; Galli, Paolo; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.

    1996-08-01

    The uptake of zinc by cerebellar rat cultures upon exposure to 0022-3727/29/8/023/img12 solutions was comparatively investigated using two well known condensed matter physics techniques: synchrotron photoelectron spectromicroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The objective was to apply a strategy - well known in surface physics - to distinguish between `surface' and `bulk' phenomena. The results clearly demonstrate that exposure significantly enhances the bulk (cell cytoplasm) Zn concentration with respect to the physiological level, whereas the effect on the surface (cell membrane) is negligible.

  15. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  16. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  17. Complex oligosaccharides are N-linked to Kv3 voltage-gated K+ channels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Tara A; Corey, Melissa J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2007-04-01

    Neuronal Kv3 voltage-gated K(+) channels have two absolutely conserved N-glycosylation sites. Here, it is shown that Kv3.1, 3.3, and 3.4 channels are N-glycosylated in rat brain. Digestion of total brain membranes with peptide N glycosidase F (PNGase F) produced faster migrating immunobands than those of undigested membranes. Additionally, partial PNGase F digests showed that both sites are occupied by oligosaccharides. Neuraminidase treatment produced a smaller immunoband shift relative to PNGase F treatment. These results indicate that both sites are highly available and occupied by N-linked oligosaccharides for Kv3.1, 3.3, and 3.4 in rat brain, and furthermore that at least one oligosaccharide is of complex type. Additionally, these results point to an extracytoplasmic S1-S2 linker in Kv3 proteins expressed in native membranes. We suggest that N-glycosylation processing of Kv3 channels is critical for the expression of K(+) currents at the surface of neurons, and perhaps contributes to the pathophysiology of congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  18. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  19. CD44 is the principal cell surface receptor for hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Stamenkovic, I; Melnick, M; Underhill, C B; Seed, B

    1990-06-29

    CD44 is a broadly distributed cell surface protein thought to mediate cell attachment to extracelular matrix components or specific cell surface ligands. We have created soluble CD44-immunoglobulin fusion proteins and characterized their reactivity with tissue sections and lymph node high endothelial cells in primary culture. The CD44 target on high endothelial cells is sensitive to enzymes that degrade hyaluronate, and binding of soluble CD44 is blocked by low concentrations of hyaluronate or high concentrations of chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates. A mouse anti-hamster hyaluonate receptor antibody reacts with COS cells expressing hamster CD44 cDNA. In sections of all tissues examined, including lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, predigestion with hyaluronidase eliminated CD44 binding.

  20. Specific nature of Trichomonas vaginalis parasitism of host cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alderete, J F; Garza, G E

    1985-12-01

    The adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to host cells was evaluated by using monolayer cultures of HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells and human fibroblast cell lines. Saturation of sites on HeLa cells was achieved, yielding a maximal T. vaginalis NYH 286-to-cell ratio of two. The ability of radiolabeled NYH 286 to compete with unlabeled trichomonads for attachment and the time, temperature, and pH-dependent nature of host cell parasitism reinforced the idea of specific parasite-cell associations. Other trichomonal isolates (JH31A, RU375, and JHHR) were also found to adhere to cell monolayers, albeit to different degrees, and all isolates produced maximal contact-dependent HeLa cell cytotoxicity. The avirulent trichomonad, Trichomonas tenax, did not adhere to cell monolayers and did not cause host cell damage. Interestingly, parasite cytadherence was greater with HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells than with fibroblast cells. In addition, cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells never exceeded 20% of the level of cell killing observed for epithelial cells. Elucidation of properties of the pathogenic human trichomonads that allowed for host cell surface parasitism was also attempted. Treatment of motile T. vaginalis NYH 286 with trypsin diminished cell parasitism. Incubation of trypsinized organisms in growth medium allowed for regeneration of trichomonal adherence, and cycloheximide inhibited the regeneration of attachment. Organisms poisoned with metronidazole or iodoacetate failed to attach to host cells, and adherent trichomonads exposed to metronidazole or iodoacetate were readily released from parasitized cells. Coincubation experiments with polycationic proteins and sugars and pretreatment of parasites or cells with neuraminidase or periodate had no effect on host cell parasitism. Colchicine and cytochalasin B, however, did produce some inhibition of adherence to HeLa cells. The data suggest that metabolizing T. vaginalis adheres to host cells via parasite surface

  1. Specific nature of Trichomonas vaginalis parasitism of host cell surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Garza, G E

    1985-01-01

    The adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to host cells was evaluated by using monolayer cultures of HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells and human fibroblast cell lines. Saturation of sites on HeLa cells was achieved, yielding a maximal T. vaginalis NYH 286-to-cell ratio of two. The ability of radiolabeled NYH 286 to compete with unlabeled trichomonads for attachment and the time, temperature, and pH-dependent nature of host cell parasitism reinforced the idea of specific parasite-cell associations. Other trichomonal isolates (JH31A, RU375, and JHHR) were also found to adhere to cell monolayers, albeit to different degrees, and all isolates produced maximal contact-dependent HeLa cell cytotoxicity. The avirulent trichomonad, Trichomonas tenax, did not adhere to cell monolayers and did not cause host cell damage. Interestingly, parasite cytadherence was greater with HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells than with fibroblast cells. In addition, cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells never exceeded 20% of the level of cell killing observed for epithelial cells. Elucidation of properties of the pathogenic human trichomonads that allowed for host cell surface parasitism was also attempted. Treatment of motile T. vaginalis NYH 286 with trypsin diminished cell parasitism. Incubation of trypsinized organisms in growth medium allowed for regeneration of trichomonal adherence, and cycloheximide inhibited the regeneration of attachment. Organisms poisoned with metronidazole or iodoacetate failed to attach to host cells, and adherent trichomonads exposed to metronidazole or iodoacetate were readily released from parasitized cells. Coincubation experiments with polycationic proteins and sugars and pretreatment of parasites or cells with neuraminidase or periodate had no effect on host cell parasitism. Colchicine and cytochalasin B, however, did produce some inhibition of adherence to HeLa cells. The data suggest that metabolizing T. vaginalis adheres to host cells via parasite surface

  2. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  3. Effects of plasma etching solar cell front surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, W.E.; Bunyan, S.M.; Olson, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    A front surface plasma etch with Freon 14+8% O/sub 2/ or sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was found to improve terrestrial solar cell output. SEM studies of these samples revealed surface pitting on Freon 14 etched samples. About 50% of the improvement from Freon etched samples can be attributed to the light capturing effects of surface pits. Output increases from SF/sub 6/ plasma etched cells were found to be comparable with Freon etched cells after subtraction of the light trapping effects. The excess output improvement might be attributed to reduced junction depth or removal of near surface lattice damage. Investigations attempting to identify the cause are described. 1 ref.

  4. Microcarriers with Synthetic Hydrogel Surfaces for Stem Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Dias, Andrew D; Elicson, Jonathan M; Murphy, William L

    2017-08-01

    Microcarriers are scalable support surfaces for cell growth that enable high levels of expansion, and are particularly relevant for expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The goal of this study is to develop a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based microcarrier coating for hMSC expansion. Commercially available microcarriers do not offer customizability of microcarrier surface properties, including elastic modulus and surface cell adhesion ligands. The lab has previously demonstrated that tuning these material properties on PEG-based hydrogels can modulate important cellular growth characteristics, such as cell attachment and expansion, which are important in microcarrier-based culture. Eosin-Y is adsorbed to polystyrene microcarriers and used as a photoinitiator for thiol-ene polymerization under visible light. Resultant PEG coatings are over 100 µm thick and localized to microcarrier surfaces. This thickness is relevant for cells to react to mechanical properties of the hydrogel coating, and coated microcarriers support hMSC attachment and expansion. hMSC expansion is highly favorable on coated microcarriers in serum-free media, with doubling times under 25 h in the growth phase, and retained osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity after culture on microcarriers. These microcarriers with defined, synthetic coatings enable tailorable surfaces for cell expansion that may be suitable for a variety of biomanufacturing applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The role of nitric oxide in ocular surface cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Chan; Park, Gun Sic; Kim, Jin Kook; Kim, Young Myeong

    2002-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ocular surface remains unknown. We investigated the conditions leading to an increase of NO generation in tear and the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue. We evaluated the dual action (cell survival or cell death) of NO depending on its amount. We measured the concentration of nitrite plus nitrate in the tears of ocular surface diseases and examined the main source of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). When cultured human corneal fibroblast were treated with NO producing donor with or without serum, the viabilities of cells was studied. We found that the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue were corneal epithelium, fibroblast, endothelium, and inflammatory cells. Three forms of NOS (eNOS, bNOS, and iNOS) were expressed in experimentally induced inflammation. In the fibroblast culture system, the NO donor (SNAP, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine) prevented the death of corneal fibroblast cells caused by serum deprivation in a dose dependent manner up to 500 micrometer SNAP, but a higher dose decreased cell viability. This study suggested that NO might act as a double-edged sword in ocular surface diseases depending on the degree of inflammation related with NO concentration. PMID:12068145

  6. Dominant negative mutation in cell surface beta 1,4- galactosyltransferase inhibits cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In addition to its traditional location within the Golgi complex, beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) is also present on the cell surface, where it is thought to function as a cell adhesion molecule by binding to extracellular oligosaccharide ligands. Recent studies suggest that cells contain two forms of GalTase with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The longer form of GalTase contains a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic extension and is preferentially targeted to the plasma membrane, relative to the shorter GalTase protein that is confined primarily to the Golgi compartment. In this study, we created a dominant negative mutation that interferes with the function of cell surface GalTase by transfecting into cells cDNAs encoding truncated versions of the long form of GalTase containing the complete cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains, but devoid of the catalytic domain. In both F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, overexpressing the truncated long GalTase (TLGT) protein displaced the endogenous cell surface GalTase from its association with the cytoskeleton, resulting in a loss of intercellular adhesion and cell spreading specifically on matrices that use GalTase as a cell surface receptor. In contrast, overexpressing the analogous truncated short GalTase (TSGT) protein did not affect cell morphology or GalTase activity. In control assays, inducing the TLGT protein had no effect on cell interactions with fibronectin (which is independent of GalTase), or on the cytoskeleton attachment of another matrix receptor (beta 1 integrin), or on overall glycoprotein synthesis, thus eliminating nonspecific effects of the TLGT protein on cellular adhesion and metabolism. These results represent the first molecular manipulation of cell surface GalTase expression and confirm its function as a cell adhesion molecule. These studies further suggest that the cytoskeleton contains a defined, saturable number of binding sites for GalTase, which enables it to function as

  7. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties.

  8. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  9. Characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides bearing sialyl lewis x moieties on an alternatively glycosylated form of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1).

    PubMed

    Picard, M D; Pettey, C L; Marsh, H C; Thomas, L J

    2000-02-01

    We sought to produce a complement inhibitory protein possessing oligosaccharides specifically modified to contain the sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x)) moiety. This modified glycoprotein could combine anti-complement activity with the ability to inhibit selectin-mediated interactions and concentrate this activity to sites of activated endothelium where selectins are upregulated. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), previously shown to be effective in inhibiting the complement cascade, was produced in a cell line capable of adding fucose to N-linked oligosaccharides in the alpha1-3 linkage, which is necessary for sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoprotein purified from these cells was designated sCR1sLe(x), and may prove to be more effective than sCR1 in some clinical applications. Detailed analysis and characterization of sCR1sLe(x) was performed to confirm that the N-linked oligosaccharides possessed sLe(x) moieties and also to determine the extent of sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoproteins were characterized by oligosaccharide profiling, sequencing, linkage analysis and quantified by differential enzymic digestion, using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. The major glycans were identified as biantennary oligosaccharides (including sialylated and non-core fucosylated glycans). The linkages of sialic acid and the branched fucose were analysed by digestion with linkage-specific enzymes and subsequent separation by electrophoresis. All data were consistent with the presence of sLe(x) moieties on the N-linked oligosaccharides of sCR1sLe(x). sCR1sLe(x) is a prime example of a recombinant protein expressed with oligosaccharides engineered for a specific biological function, and produced using a commercially viable method.

  10. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface: unfolding the plasma membrane to fuel cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change.

  11. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    Harrison, in 1914, first recognized that cells respond to physicochemical cues such as substratum topography when he observed that fibroblasts elongated while cultured on spider silk. Recently, techniques developed in the micro-electronics industry have been used to create molds for producing microscaled topographies with various shapes and spatial arrangements. Although these patterning techniques are well-established, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying cell sensing and response to microtopographies. In this work cellular micro-environments with varying surface topographies and chemistries were evaluated with marine organisms and mammalian cells to investigate cellular sensing and response. Biofouling---the accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on submerged surfaces---is an environmental and economic concern. Engineered topographies, replicated in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) and functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) hydrogels, were evaluated for inhibition of marine fouling organism attachment. Microtopographies replicated in PDMSe inhibited attachment of the marine bacterium, Cobetia marina up to 99% versus smooth. The average normalized attachment densities of cells of C. marina and zoospores of the green algae Ulva on PDMSe topographies scaled inversely with the Engineered Roughness Index (ERIII), a representation of surface energy. Attachment densities of Ulva from four assays and C. marina from two growth phases to PDMSe surfaces scaled inversely with one equation: ERI II multiplied by the Reynolds number of the organism (Re) (R 2 = 0.77). The same microtopographies created in PDMSe reduced the initial attachment density and attachment strength of cells of the diatoms Navicula incerta and Seminavis robusta compared to smooth PDMSe. The average normalized attachment density of Navicula after exposure to shear stress (48 Pa) was correlated with the contact area between the diatom and a

  12. Cell Surfaces in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Lafitte, Claude; Mazau, Dominique; Toppan, Alain; Touzé, André

    1979-01-01

    Enrichment of the cell wall in hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein is involved in the defense of muskmelon (Cucumis melo) seedlings to Colletotrichum lagenarium, the causative agent of anthracnose. The extent to which this accumulation proceeds may be experimentally modified by treating plants with ethylene or growing them in the presence of free l-trans-hydroxyproline. It appears that the increase in the wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mediated through ethylene is paralleled by an increasing resistance of the host to the pathogen. Inversely, inhibiting the synthesis of this glycoprotein in diseased plants is strictly correlated to an accelerated and more intense colonization of the host by the pathogen. In both cases, the inverse relationship between the accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins and the ability of the pathogen to develop in the host has been checked by the quantification, in infected tissues, of glucosamine, a characteristic component of chitin-containing fungi. PMID:16660957

  13. Roles for E-cadherin cell surface regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Yuliya I.; Schecterson, Leslayann; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of E-cadherin expression in association with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs frequently during tumor metastasis. However, metastases often retain E-cadherin expression, an EMT is not required for metastasis, and metastases can arise from clusters of tumor cells. We demonstrate that the regulation of the adhesive activity of E-cadherin present at the cell surface by an inside-out signaling mechanism is important in cancer. First, we find that the metastasis of an E-cadherin–expressing mammary cell line from the mammary gland to the lung depends on reduced E-cadherin adhesive function. An activating monoclonal antibody to E-cadherin that induces a high adhesive state significantly reduced the number of cells metastasized to the lung without affecting the growth in size of the primary tumor in the mammary gland. Second, we find that many cancer-associated germline missense mutations in the E-cadherin gene in patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer selectively affect the mechanism of inside-out cell surface regulation without inhibiting basic E-cadherin adhesion function. This suggests that genetic deficits in E-cadherin cell surface regulation contribute to cancer progression. Analysis of these mutations also provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin regulation at the cell surface. PMID:27582386

  14. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells.

    PubMed

    Stickney, Zachary; Losacco, Joseph; McDevitt, Sophie; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Biao

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell-cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  15. Arginine insertion and loss of N-linked glycosylation site in HIV-1 envelope V3 region confer CXCR4-tropism

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Ode, Hirotaka; Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Kakizawa, Junko; Sato, Hironori; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The third variable region (V3) of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 plays a key role in determination of viral coreceptor usage (tropism). However, which combinations of mutations in V3 confer a tropism shift is still unclear. A unique pattern of mutations in antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1 patient was observed associated with the HIV-1 tropism shift CCR5 to CXCR4. The insertion of arginine at position 11 and the loss of the N-linked glycosylation site were indispensable for acquiring pure CXCR4-tropism, which were confirmed by cell-cell fusion assay and phenotype analysis of recombinant HIV-1 variants. The same pattern of mutations in V3 and the associated tropism shift were identified in two of 53 other patients (3.8%) with CD4+ cell count <200/mm3. The combination of arginine insertion and loss of N-linked glycosylation site usually confers CXCR4-tropism. Awareness of this rule will help to confirm the tropism prediction from V3 sequences by conventional rules. PMID:23925152

  16. The N-linking glycosylation system from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is required for adhesion and has potential use in glycoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Janine T.; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Li, Yanwen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Vohra, Prerna; Tucker, Alexander W.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Aebi, Markus; Langford, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a mucosal respiratory pathogen causing contagious porcine pleuropneumonia. Pathogenesis studies have demonstrated a major role for the capsule, exotoxins and outer membrane proteins. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae can also glycosylate proteins, using a cytoplasmic N-linked glycosylating enzyme designated NGT, but its transcriptional arrangement and role in virulence remains unknown. We investigated the NGT locus and demonstrated that the putative transcriptional unit consists of rimO, ngt and a glycosyltransferase termed agt. From this information we used the A. pleuropneumoniae glycosylation locus to decorate an acceptor protein, within Escherichia coli, with a hexose polymer that reacted with an anti-dextran antibody. Mass spectrometry analysis of a truncated protein revealed that this operon could add up to 29 repeat units to the appropriate sequon. We demonstrated the importance of NGT in virulence, by creating deletion mutants and testing them in a novel respiratory cell line adhesion model. This study demonstrates the importance of the NGT glycosylation system for pathogenesis and its potential biotechnological application for glycoengineering. PMID:28077594

  17. Hydrodynamics of Sperm Cells near Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elgeti, Jens; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Gompper, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Sperm are propelled by an actively beating tail, and display a wide variety of swimming patterns. When confined between two parallel walls, sperm swim either in circles or on curvilinear trajectories close to the walls. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations in combination with a mechanical sperm model to study the swimming behavior near walls. The simulations show that sperm become captured at the wall due to the hydrodynamic flow fields which are generated by the flagellar beat. The circular trajectories are determined by the chiral asymmetry of the sperm shape. For strong (weak) chirality, sperm swim in tight (wide) circles, with the beating plane of the flagellum oriented perpendicular (parallel) to the wall. For comparison, we also perform simulations based on a local anisotropic friction of the flagellum. In this resistive force approximation, surface adhesion and circular swimming patterns are obtained as well. However, the adhesion mechanism is now due to steric repulsion, and the orientation of the beating plane is different. Our model provides a theoretical framework that explains several distinct swimming behaviors of sperm near and far from a wall. Moreover, the model suggests a mechanism by which sperm navigate in a chemical gradient via a change of their shape. PMID:20712984

  18. Regulation of the protein glycosylation pathway in yeast: structural control of N-linked oligosaccharide elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, P.K.; Ballou, C.E.

    1987-12-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180 strain with the mnn1 mnn2 mnn9 mutations, all of which affect mannoprotein glycosylation, synthesizes N-linked oligosaccharides. Membrane fractions from the mnn1 mnn2 and mnn1 mnn2 mnn9 mutants are equally effective in catalyzing transfer from GDP-(/sup 3/H)mannose to add mannose in both ..cap alpha..1 ..-->.. 2 and ..cap alpha..1 ..-->.. 6 linkages to an oligosaccharide. Neither membrane preparation can utilize the homologous mnn1 mnn2 mnn9 oligosaccharide as an acceptor. Thus, addition of the ..cap alpha..1 ..-->.. 2-linked mannose side chain to the terminal ..cap alpha..1 ..-->.. 6-linked mannose in oligosaccharides of the mnn9 mutant inhibits the elongation reaction and may serve as an important structural control of mannoprotein glycosylation. The mnn9 mutation also increases the transit time for invertase secretion, meaning that this mutation could affect the processing machinery in the Golgi apparatus.

  19. Characterization of the O- and N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoproteins synthesized by Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Nyame, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the O- and N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoproteins synthesized by larval and adult schistosomes of Schistosoma mansoni have been investigated. Mechanically transformed schistosomula or adult schistosomes were incubated in media containing either (/sup 3/H)mannose, (/sup 3/H)glucosamine or (/sup 3/H)galactose for 48 and 24 hr, respectively, to radiolabel metabolically the oligosaccharide moieties of newly synthesized glycoproteins. Analyses of the radiolabeled glycoproteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) and fluorography demonstrated that numerous glycoproteins from 48-hr old schistosomula and adult schistosomes were labeled by both the (/sup 3/H)mannose and (/sup 3/H)glucosamine precursors. The (/sup 3/H)galactose precursor was incorporated into numerous glycoproteins in adult schistosomes; however, few, if any, glycoproteins in schistosomula were labeled by this radioactive sugar precursor.

  20. New Monoclonal Antibodies to Defined Cell Surface Proteins on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Carmel M; Chy, Hun S; Zhou, Qi; Blumenfeld, Shiri; Lambshead, Jack W; Liu, Xiaodong; Kie, Joshua; Capaldo, Bianca D; Chung, Tung-Liang; Adams, Timothy E; Phan, Tram; Bentley, John D; McKinstry, William J; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Rossello, Fernando J; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Chen, Di; Jarde, Thierry; Clark, Amander T; Abud, Helen E; Visvader, Jane E; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M; Loring, Jeanne F; Laslett, Andrew L

    2017-03-01

    The study and application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) will be enhanced by the availability of well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) detecting cell-surface epitopes. Here, we report generation of seven new mAbs that detect cell surface proteins present on live and fixed human ES cells (hESCs) and human iPS cells (hiPSCs), confirming our previous prediction that these proteins were present on the cell surface of hPSCs. The mAbs all show a high correlation with POU5F1 (OCT4) expression and other hPSC surface markers (TRA-160 and SSEA-4) in hPSC cultures and detect rare OCT4 positive cells in differentiated cell cultures. These mAbs are immunoreactive to cell surface protein epitopes on both primed and naive state hPSCs, providing useful research tools to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying human pluripotency and states of cellular reprogramming. In addition, we report that subsets of the seven new mAbs are also immunoreactive to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), normal human breast subsets and both normal and tumorigenic colorectal cell populations. The mAbs reported here should accelerate the investigation of the nature of pluripotency, and enable development of robust cell separation and tracing technologies to enrich or deplete for hPSCs and other human stem and somatic cell types. Stem Cells 2017;35:626-640.

  1. Adhesion of platelets to artificial surfaces: effect of red cells.

    PubMed

    Brash, J L; Brophy, J M; Feuerstein, I A

    1976-05-01

    Adhesion of platelets to several polymer- and protein-coated glass surfaces has been studied in vitro. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical probe rotating in a test tube containing the platelet medium and allows close control of fluid shear and mass transport. Suspensions of washed pig platelets constitute the basic platelet medium, and can be modified by adding back red cells and plasma proteins. Adhesion is measured via 51Cr-labeling of platelets. In the absence of red cells, identical low levels of adhesion were seen on all surfaces and saturation was reached within 2 min. In the presence of red cells, adhesion was greater. Saturation on all surfaces except fibrinogen and collagen again occurred within 2 min. The adhesion levels on polymer surfaces and glass were indistinguishable, while those on albumin were lower and those on fibrinogen were higher. Collagen was the most reactive surface. It did not equilibrate within 15 min., and kinetic data indicated a platelet diffusivity strongly dependent on hematocrit. These effects were attributed to rotational and translational motion of the red cells causing increased diffusion and surface-platelet collision energy.

  2. Analysis of carbohydrate-protein interactions with synthetic N-linked neoglycoconjugate probes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S Y; Manger, I D; Guile, G R; Rademacher, T W; Dwek, R A

    1993-01-01

    Recently we have describe a simple efficient chemical method of generating an asparagine side-chain linker with beta-stereochemistry at the anomeric position of neutral oligosaccharides. We now report the 1-N-glycyl beta-derivatization of sialylated saccharides. Several neoglycoconjugates formed using these N-linked inter-mediates were investigated for their usefulness in probing carbohydrate-protein interactions. First, biotinyl derivatives of two xylose/fucose class plant-type oligosaccharides purified from horseradish peroxidase were effective in demonstrating the carbohydrate specificity of polyclonal anti-(horseradish peroxidase) antibodies. Secondly, a fluorescein-labelled asialo- and digalactosylated biantennary complex sugar was synthesized and shown to bind to a Ricinus communis agglutinin column. This galactose-specific recognition was abolished by treating this fluorescein-labelled oligosaccharide with jack bean beta-galactosidase. Finally, two 1-N-glycyl beta-saccharide derivatives were modified with thiophosgene to form their corresponding isothiocyanate derivatives. Coupling of these isothiocyanate derivatives of sugars to BSA, amino-derivatized polystyrene plates and glass-fibre discs resulted in multiple sugar presentation. The binding of an anti-N-acetylglucosamine monoclonal antibody to N,N'-diacetylchitobiose residues presented on BSA and solid supports was shown by e.l.i.s.a. Similarly the binding of concanavalin A to asialo-, agalactosylated biantennary complex oligosaccharide residues attached to BSA was demonstrated by a competitive e.l.i.s.a. Our results demonstrate that N-linked neoglycoconjugates could be made readily available and they are valuable tools for the detailed analyses of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-binding proteins. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 9 PMID:7506528

  3. Subcellular localization of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases involved in the processing of N-linked oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Johnson, K.D.; Szumilo, T.; Elbein, A.D.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    Using isopycnic sucrose gradients, we have ascertained the subcellular location of several enzymes involved in the processing of the N-linked oligosaccharides of glycoproteins in developing cotyledons of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. All are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi complex as determined by co-sedimentation with the ER marker, NADH-cytochrome c reductase, or the Golgi marker, glucan synthase I. Glucosidase activity, which removes glucose residues from Glc/sub 3/Man/sub 9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/, was found exclusively in the ER. All other processing enzymes, which act subsequent to the glucose trimming steps, are associates with Golgi. These include mannosidase I (removes 1-2 mannose residues from Man/sub 6-9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), mannosidase II (removes mannose residues from GlcNAcMan/sub 5/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), and fucosyltransferase (transfers a fucose residue to the Asn-linked GlcNAc of appropriate glycans). The authors have previously reported the localization of two other glycan modifying enzymes (GlcNAc-transferase and xylosyltranferase activities) in the Golgi complex. Attempts at subfractionation of the Golgi fraction on shallow sucrose gradients yielded similar patterns of distribution for all the Golgi processing enzymes. Subfractionation on Percoll gradients resulted in two peaks of the Golgi marker enzyme inosine diphosphatase, whereas the glycan processing enzymes were all enriched in the peak of lower density. These results do not lend support to the hypothesis that N-linked oligosaccharide processing enzymes are associated with Golgi cisternae of different densities.

  4. Cell patterning on polylactic acid through surface-tethered oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshiki; Arima, Yusuke; Takemoto, Naohiro; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-02-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a candidate material to prepare scaffolds for 3-D tissue regeneration. However, cells do not adhere or proliferate well on the surface of PLA because it is hydrophobic. We report a simple and rapid method for inducing cell adhesion to PLA through DNA hybridization. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and to a terminal phospholipid (ssDNA-PEG-lipid) was used for cell surface modification. Through DNA hybridization, modified cells were able to attach to PLA surfaces modified with complementary sequence (ssDNA'). Different cell types can be attached to PLA fibers and films in a spatially controlled manner by using ssDNAs with different sequences. In addition, they proliferate well in a culture medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. The coexisting modes of cell adhesion through DNA hybridization and natural cytoskeletal adhesion machinery revealed no serious effects on cell growth. The combination of a 3-D scaffold made of PLA and cell immobilization on the PLA scaffold through DNA hybridization will be useful for the preparation of 3-D tissue and organs.

  5. Radioiodination of cell-surface glycoproteins by carbohydrate modification

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, K.A.

    1986-05-01

    Mild oxidation of cell-surface sialic acid residues followed by reduction with sodium /sup 3/H-borohydride is a common method of radiolabeling glycoproteins. In many cases it is desirable to incorporate into glycoproteins a label of higher specific activity such as /sup 125/I. Incorporation of modified amino compounds into oxidized, isolated glycoproteins by reductive amination has been demonstrated by several investigators. They have determined the conditions for the application of this approach to radioiodination of intact cells. Cells are oxidized by exposure to 1 mM sodium periodate. Tyrosine or a tyrosine derivative, radiolabeled to high specific activity with Iodogen and carrier-free Na/sup 125/I, is added, followed by 1 mM sodium cyanoborohydride. Labeled cell-surface proteins are analyzed by SDS-gel electrophoresis of cell lysates. The addition of excess carrier glycoprotein, such as fetuin, is necessary to prevent degradation of the labeled product in the cell lysate. The incorporation of radiolabel can approach that of direct iodination of cell-surface tyrosyl residues, about 100 dpm/cell. The labeling procedure has been applied to the analysis of murine lymphocyte glycoproteins.

  6. The identification of N-linked oligosaccharides on the human CR2/Epstein-Barr virus receptor and their function in receptor metabolism, plasma membrane expression, and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Weis, J J; Fearon, D T

    1985-11-05

    Human complement receptor type 2 (CR2) was biosynthetically labeled by pulsing SB B lymphoblastoid cells for 25 min with [35S]methionine followed by chase in the presence of excess unlabeled methionine. An Mr 134,000 polypeptide represented the major form of the receptor at the end of the pulse period, and within 1 h of chase this disappeared coincident with the appearance of the Mr 145,000 mature form of CR2. Precursor, but not mature, CR2 was sensitive to endoglycosidase H, indicating that maturation of CR2 represented processing of N-linked high mannose oligosaccharides to the complex type. The processing of precursor CR2 was impaired by monensin. In the presence of tunicamycin an Mr 111,000 form of CR2 was synthesized by SB cells, and this did not chase into either precursor or mature CR2. This Mr 111,000 form of CR2 did not incorporate [3H]glucosamine, indicating that it lacked both N- and O-linked oligosaccharide. The half-lives of mature CR2 and nonglycosylated CR2 pulse-labeled in the presence of tunicamycin were 13.8 and 2.8 h, respectively; the turnover rate of B1, a membrane protein normally lacking carbohydrate, was unaffected by the presence of the antibiotic. The percentage of pulse-labeled, nonglycosylated CR2 that was expressed at the cell surface after 1 h of chase in the presence of tunicamycin was 30%, identical to that of mature CR2 in cells chased in the absence of the antibiotic. However, after 6 h of chase there was no additional net accumulation of nonglycosylated CR2 at the plasma membrane, while the proportion of pulse-labeled mature CR2 at this site had risen to 81%. Therefore, N-linked oligosaccharides are essential for the stability of CR2 and have some role in its plasma membrane expression. In contrast, the observation that all three forms of CR2 bound to Sepharose C3 indicates that oligosaccharides are not necessary for the interaction between CR2 and its complement ligand.

  7. Micropatterned Azopolymer Surfaces Modulate Cell Mechanics and Cytoskeleton Structure.

    PubMed

    Rianna, Carmela; Ventre, Maurizio; Cavalli, Silvia; Radmacher, Manfred; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-30

    Physical and chemical characteristics of materials are important regulators of cell behavior. In particular, cell elasticity is a fundamental parameter that reflects the state of a cell. Surface topography finely modulates cell fate and function via adhesion mediated signaling and cytoskeleton generated forces. However, how topographies alter cell mechanics is still unclear. In this work we have analyzed the mechanical properties of peripheral and nuclear regions of NIH-3T3 cells on azopolymer substrates with different topographic patterns. Micrometer scale patterns in the form of parallel ridges or square lattices of surface elevations were encoded on light responsive azopolymer films by means of contactless optical methods. Cell mechanics was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells and consequently the cell cytoskeleton were oriented along the linear patterns affecting cytoskeletal structures, e.g., formation of actin stress fibers. Our data demonstrate that topographic substrate patterns are recognized by cells and mechanical information is transferred by the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, cytoskeleton generated forces deform the nucleus, changing its morphology that appears to be related to different mechanical properties in the nuclear region.

  8. Effects of surface viscoelasticity on cellular responses of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Motahare-Sadat; Katbab, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: One area of nanoscience deals with nanoscopic interactions between nanostructured materials and biological systems. To elucidate the effects of the substrate surface morphology and viscoelasticity on cell proliferation, fractal analysis was performed on endothelial cells cultured on nanocomposite samples based on silicone rubber (SR) and various concentrations of organomodified nanoclay (OC). Methods: The nanoclay/SR ratio was tailored to enhance cell behavior via changes in sample substrate surface roughness and viscoelasticity. Results: Surface roughness of the cured SR filled with negatively-charged nanosilicate layers had a greater effect than elasticity on cell growth. The surface roughness of SR nanocomposite samples increased with increasing the OC content, leading to enhanced cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. This was consistent with the decrease in SR segmental motions and damping factor as the primary viscoelastic parameters by the nanosilicate layers with increasing clay concentrations. Conclusions: The inclusion of clay nanolayers affected the growth and behavior of endothelial cells on microtextured SR. PMID:26989733

  9. Biological surface engineering: a simple system for cell pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yan, L; Altman, M; Lässle, M; Nugent, H; Frankel, F; Lauffenburger, D A; Whitesides, G M; Rich, A

    1999-07-01

    Biological surface engineering using synthetic biological materials has a great potential for advances in our understanding of complex biological phenomena. We developed a simple system to engineer biologically relevant surfaces using a combination of self-assembling oligopeptide monolayers and microcontact printing (muCP). We designed and synthesized two oligopeptides containing a cell adhesion motif (RADS)n (n = 2 and 3) at the N-terminus, followed by an oligo(alanine) linker and a cysteine residue at the C-terminus. The thiol group of cysteine allows the oligopeptides to attach covalently onto a gold-coated surface to form monolayers. We then microfabricated a variety of surface patterns using the cell adhesion peptides in combination with hexa-ethylene glycol thiolate which resist non-specific adsorption of proteins and cells. The resulting patterns consist of areas either supporting or inhibiting cell adhesion, thus they are capable of aligning cells in a well-defined manner, leading to specific cell array and pattern formations.

  10. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stickney, Zachary Losacco, Joseph McDevitt, Sophie Zhang, Zhiwen Lu, Biao

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  11. Quantum Efficiency Loss after PID Stress: Wavelength Dependence on Cell Surface and Cell Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jaewon; Bowden, Stuart; TamizhMani, GovindaSamy; Hacke, Peter

    2015-06-14

    It is known that the potential induced degradation (PID) stress of conventional p-base solar cells affects power, shunt resistance, junction recombination, and quantum efficiency (QE). One of the primary solutions to address the PID issue is a modification of chemical and physical properties of antireflection coating (ARC) on the cell surface. Depending on the edge isolation method used during cell processing, the ARC layer near the edges may be uniformly or non-uniformly damaged. Therefore, the pathway for sodium migration from glass to the cell junction could be either through all of the ARC surface if surface and edge ARC have low quality or through the cell edge if surface ARC has high quality but edge ARC is defective due to certain edge isolation process. In this study, two PID susceptible cells from two different manufacturers have been investigated. The QE measurements of these cells before and after PID stress were performed at both surface and edge. We observed the wavelength dependent QE loss only in the first manufacturer's cell but not in the second manufacturer's cell. The first manufacturer's cell appeared to have low quality ARC whereas the second manufacturer's cell appeared to have high quality ARC with defective edge. To rapidly screen a large number of cells for PID stress testing, a new but simple test setup that does not require laminated cell coupon has been developed and is used in this investigation.

  12. Origin of subdiffusion of water molecules on cell membrane surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Water molecules play an important role in providing unique environments for biological reactions on cell membranes. It is widely believed that water molecules form bridges that connect lipid molecules and stabilize cell membranes. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we show that translational and rotational diffusion of water molecules on lipid membrane surfaces exhibit subdiffusion and aging. Moreover, we provide evidence that both divergent mean trapping time (continuous-time random walk) and long-correlated noise (fractional Brownian motion) contribute to this subdiffusion. These results suggest that subdiffusion on cell membranes causes the water retardation, an enhancement of cell membrane stability, and a higher reaction efficiency. PMID:24739933

  13. Photodynamic induction of a bacterial cell surface polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Hoober, J K

    1977-01-01

    The photodynamic action of several dyes on cells of a bacterium, tentatively identified as a species of Arthrobacter, resulted in remarkable stimulation of synthesis of a polypeptide 21,000 daltons in mass. This polypeptide resides on the cell surface and can be solubilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate without lysis of the cells. Chlorophyllin and rose bengal are effective in inducing synthesis of the polypeptide in proportion to their ability to sensitize the photooxidation of histidine. Etiolated cells of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii y-1 excrete a substance into the medium that also sensitized the photoinduction of the polypeptide. Images PMID:885841

  14. Competition-based transfer of carbohydrate expression information from a cell-adhered surface to a secondary surface.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Xiao, Xirui; Chen, Yunlong; Qian, Ruocan; Bao, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-04-07

    An information transfer strategy was developed for the visualization of carbohydrate expression by the competition of a primary cell-adhered solid surface with a carbohydrate assembled surface as an artificial secondary surface for one species. The strategy could be effectively utilized for in situ monitoring of dynamic carbohydrate expression on an adhesive cell surface.

  15. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  16. Exploring and exploiting chemistry at the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Morgan D.; Lapointe, Vanessa; Stevens, Molly M.

    2011-08-01

    Engineering the surface chemistry of a material so that it can interface with cells is an extraordinarily demanding task. The surface of a cell is composed of thousands of different lipids, proteins and carbohydrates, all intricately (and dynamically) arranged in three dimensions on multiple length scales. This complexity presents both a challenge and an opportunity to chemists working on bioactive interfaces. Here we discuss how some of these challenges can be met with interdisciplinary material synthesis. We also review the most popular classes of functional molecules grafted on engineered surfaces and explore some alternatives that may offer greater flexibility and specificity. Finally, we discuss the emerging field of dynamic surfaces capable of stimulating and responding to cellular activity in real time.

  17. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Giroglou, Tzenan; Florin, Luise; Schäfer, Frank; Streeck, Rolf E.; Sapp, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Using pseudoinfection of cell lines, we demonstrate that cell surface heparan sulfate is required for infection by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-33 pseudovirions. Pseudoinfection was inhibited by heparin but not dermatan or chondroitin sulfate, reduced by reducing the level of surface sulfation, and abolished by heparinase treatment. Carboxy-terminally deleted HPV-33 virus-like particles still bound efficiently to heparin. The kinetics of postattachment neutralization by antiserum or heparin indicated that pseudovirions were shifted on the cell surface from a heparin-sensitive into a heparin-resistant mode of binding, possibly involving a secondary receptor. Alpha-6 integrin is not a receptor for HPV-33 pseudoinfection. PMID:11152531

  19. Leukocyte Cell Surface Proteinases: Regulation of Expression, Functions, and Mechanisms of Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: 1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinase by cells; 2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or 3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: 1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; 2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; 3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; 4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and 5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes. PMID:18329945

  20. Leukocyte cell surface proteinases: regulation of expression, functions, and mechanisms of surface localization.

    PubMed

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: (1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinases by cells; (2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or (3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: (1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; (2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; (3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; (4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and (5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes.

  1. Regulation of Cell Surface CB2 Receptor during Human B Cell Activation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Roth, Michael D

    2017-09-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) is the primary receptor pathway mediating the immunologic consequences of cannabinoids. We recently reported that human peripheral blood B cells express CB2 on both the extracellular membrane and at intracellular sites, where-as monocytes and T cells only express intracellular CB2. To better understand the pattern of CB2 expression by human B cells, we examined CD20(+) B cells from three tissue sources. Both surface and intracellular expression were present and uniform in cord blood B cells, where all cells exhibited a naïve mature phenotype (IgD(+)/CD38(Dim)). While naïve mature and quiescent memory B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(-)) from tonsils and peripheral blood exhibited a similar pattern, tonsillar activated B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(+)) expressed little to no surface CB2. We hypothesized that regulation of the surface CB2 receptor may occur during B cell activation. Consistent with this, a B cell lymphoma cell line known to exhibit an activated phenotype (SUDHL-4) was found to lack cell surface CB2 but express intracellular CB2. Furthermore, in vitro activation of human cord blood resulted in a down-regulation of surface CB2 on those B cells acquiring the activated phenotype but not on those retaining IgD expression. Using a CB2 expressing cell line (293 T/CB2-GFP), confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of both cell surface expression and multifocal intracellular expression, the latter of which co-localized with endoplasmic reticulum but not with mitochondria, lysosomes, or nucleus. Our findings suggest a dynamic multi-compartment expression pattern for CB2 in B cells that is specifically modulated during the course of B cell activation.

  2. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Marino, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein “spots” were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  3. Isolation by cell-column chromatography of immunoglobulins specific for cell surface carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    A new method of affinity chromatography using glutaraldehyde-fixed cells immobilized on Sephadex beads has been used to isolate immunoglobulins (Ig's) specific for cell surface glycoproteins. Ig's that specifically bound and agglutinated the same cells as those originally fixed on the columns were isolated from nonimmune sera of various species. Periodate treatment of the cell-columns and the free cells destroyed their ability to bind the Ig's, and the binding of the Ig's to untreated cells was inhibited by monosaccharides such as D- galactose and sialic acid. The binding of antibodies directed against cell surfaces obtained by immunizing animals with the same mouse tumor cell lines used on the columns (P388 and EL4) was not inhibited by various saccharides. Surface glycoproteins obtained from the mouse tumor cells by immunoprecipitation with the column-isolated Ig's yielded specific electrophoretic patterns that differed from those obtained using Ig's from the sera of rabbits immunized with the tumor cells. The data suggest that the Ig's isolated by cell-column chromatography were directed against carbohydrates, probably those in terminal positions of the polysaccharide portions of the tumor cell surface glycoproteins. Column-isolated Ig's specific for carbohydrates were also useful in studies of cell interactions in nonmammalian systems including Dictyostelium discoideum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cell-column method appears to be adaptable to the isolation of a variety of molecules in addition to antibodies. PMID:833547

  4. Surface free energy activated high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinru; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Tao; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin; Zuo, Yi Y

    2014-09-16

    Cell sorting is an important screening process in microbiology, biotechnology, and clinical research. Existing methods are mainly based on single-cell analysis as in flow cytometric and microfluidic cell sorters. Here we report a label-free bulk method for sorting cells by differentiating their characteristic surface free energies (SFEs). We demonstrated the feasibility of this method by sorting model binary cell mixtures of various bacterial species, including Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Escherichia coli DH5α. This method can effectively separate 10(10) bacterial cells within 30 min. Individual bacterial species can be sorted with up to 96% efficiency, and the cell viability ratio can be as high as 99%. In addition to its capacity of sorting evenly mixed bacterial cells, we demonstrated the feasibility of this method in selecting and enriching cells of minor populations in the mixture (presenting at only 1% in quantity) to a purity as high as 99%. This SFE-activated method may be used as a stand-alone method for quickly sorting a large quantity of bacterial cells or as a prescreening tool for microbial discrimination. Given its advantages of label-free, high-throughput, low cost, and simplicity, this SFE-activated cell sorting method has potential in various applications of sorting cells and abiotic particles.

  5. Efficient synthesis of spacer-N-linked double-headed glycosides carrying N-acetylglucosamine and N,N'-diacetylchitobiose and their cross-linking activities with wheat germ agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Yoshinori; Masaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Kayo; Yano, Megumi; Murata, Takeomi; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Usui, Taichi

    2008-02-25

    We describe here an efficient synthetic route to spacer-N-linked double-headed glycosides via a simple two-step procedure. N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N,N'-diacetylchitobiose [(GlcNAc)(2)] were treated with ammonia and the resulting N-beta-glycosylamines were coupled to a series of dicarboxylic acids. Condensation with each dicarboxylic acid proceeded stereoselectively to give the corresponding beta-N-linked double-headed glycoside without the need for any protection/deprotection steps. Interaction of the resulting N-linked double-headed glycosides with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) were then investigated using a precipitation assay and an optical biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Spacer-N-linked double-headed glycosides bearing GlcNAc and (GlcNAc)(2) were found to be capable of binding and precipitating WGA as divalent ligands. However, the length of the spacer groups between the two terminal sugar residues was found to greatly influence the cross-linking activities with the lectin.

  6. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. BACE1 activity regulates cell surface contactin-2 levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although BACE1 is a major therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), potential side effects of BACE1 inhibition are not well characterized. BACE1 cleaves over 60 putative substrates, however the majority of these cleavages have not been characterized. Here we investigated BACE1-mediated cleavage of human contactin-2, a GPI-anchored cell adhesion molecule. Results Our initial protein sequence analysis showed that contactin-2 harbors a strong putative BACE1 cleavage site close to its GPI membrane linker domain. When we overexpressed BACE1 in CHO cells stably transfected with human contactin-2, we found increased release of soluble contactin-2 in the conditioned media. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of BACE1 in CHO cells expressing human contactin-2 and mouse primary neurons decreased soluble contactin-2 secretion. The BACE1 cleavage site mutation 1008MM/AA dramatically impaired soluble contactin-2 release. We then asked whether contactin-2 release induced by BACE1 expression would concomitantly decrease cell surface levels of contactin-2. Using immunofluorescence and surface-biotinylation assays, we showed that BACE1 activity tightly regulates contactin-2 surface levels in CHO cells as well as in mouse primary neurons. Finally, contactin-2 levels were decreased in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples correlating inversely with elevated BACE1 levels in the same samples. Conclusion Our results clearly demonstrate that mouse and human contactin-2 are physiological substrates for BACE1. BACE1-mediated contactin-2 cleavage tightly regulates the surface expression of contactin-2 in neuronal cells. Given the role of contactin-2 in cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, our data suggest that BACE1 may play an important role in these physiological processes by regulating contactin-2 surface levels. PMID:24405708

  8. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces. II: Silica as a chemical stressor influencing cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria grow in complex solutions where the adsorption of aqueous species and nucleation of mineral phases on the cell surface may interfere with membrane-dependent homeostatic functions. While previous investigations have provided evidence that bacteria may alter their surface chemical properties in response to environmental stimuli, to our knowledge no effort has been made to evaluate surface compositional changes resulting from non-nutritional chemical stresses within a quantitative framework applicable to surface complexation modeling. We consider here the influence of exposure to silica on cyanobacterial surface chemistry, particularly in light of the propensity for cyanobacteria to become silicified in geothermal environments. Using data modeled from over 50 potentiometric titrations of the unsheathed cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, we find that both abiotic geochemical and biotic biochemical-assimilatory factors have important and different effects on cell surface chemistry. Changes in functional group distribution that resulted from growth by different nitrogen assimilation pathways were greatest in the absence of dissolved silica and less important in its presence. Furthermore, out of the three nitrogen assimilation pathways investigated, in terms of surface functional group distribution, nitrate-reducing cultures were least sensitive, and ammonium-assimilating cultures were most sensitive, to changes in media silica concentration. When functional group distributions were plotted as a function of silica concentration, it appears that, with higher silica concentrations, basic groups (p Ka > 7) increase in concentration relative to acidic groups (p Ka < 7), and the total ligand densities (on a per-weight basis) decreased. The results imply a decrease in both the magnitude and density of surface charge as the net result of growth at high silica concentrations. Thus, Anabaena sp. appears to actively respond to growth in silicifying solutions by

  9. 3D Surface Topology Guides Stem Cell Adhesion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G.; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Nghamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C.; Engler, Adam J.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilisers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors. PMID:25818420

  10. Fabrication of cell container arrays with overlaid surface topographies.

    PubMed

    Truckenmüller, Roman; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Escalante-Marun, Maryana; Groenendijk, Max; Papenburg, Bernke; Rivron, Nicolas; Unadkat, Hemant; Saile, Volker; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Albert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Wessling, Matthias; de Boer, Jan; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents cell culture substrates in the form of microcontainer arrays with overlaid surface topographies, and a technology for their fabrication. The new fabrication technology is based on microscale thermoforming of thin polymer films whose surfaces are topographically prepatterned on a micro- or nanoscale. For microthermoforming, we apply a new process on the basis of temporary back moulding of polymer films and use the novel concept of a perforated-sheet-like mould. Thermal micro- or nanoimprinting is applied for prepatterning. The novel cell container arrays are fabricated from polylactic acid (PLA) films. The thin-walled microcontainer structures have the shape of a spherical calotte merging into a hexagonal shape at their upper circumferential edges. In the arrays, the cell containers are arranged densely packed in honeycomb fashion. The inner surfaces of the highly curved container walls are provided with various topographical micro- and nanopatterns. For a first validation of the microcontainer arrays as in vitro cell culture substrates, C2C12 mouse premyoblasts are cultured in containers with microgrooved surfaces and shown to align along the grooves in the three-dimensional film substrates. In future stem-cell-biological and tissue engineering applications, microcontainers fabricated using the proposed technology may act as geometrically defined artificial microenvironments or niches.

  11. An update on cell surface proteins containing extensin-motifs.

    PubMed

    Borassi, Cecilia; Sede, Ana R; Mecchia, Martin A; Salgado Salter, Juan D; Marzol, Eliana; Muschietti, Jorge P; Estevez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that there are several molecular links that interconnect the plant cell surface continuum, which is highly important in many biological processes such as plant growth, development, and interaction with the environment. The plant cell surface continuum can be defined as the space that contains and interlinks the cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton compartments. In this review, we provide an updated view of cell surface proteins that include modular domains with an extensin (EXT)-motif followed by a cytoplasmic kinase-like domain, known as PERKs (for proline-rich extensin-like receptor kinases); with an EXT-motif and an actin binding domain, known as formins; and with extracellular hybrid-EXTs. We focus our attention on the EXT-motifs with the short sequence Ser-Pro(3-5), which is found in several different protein contexts within the same extracellular space, highlighting a putative conserved structural and functional role. A closer understanding of the dynamic regulation of plant cell surface continuum and its relationship with the downstream signalling cascade is a crucial forthcoming challenge.

  12. Dynamic and reversible surface topography influences cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Jennifer D; Wen, Jessica H; del Álamo, Juan C; Engler, Adam J

    2013-08-01

    Microscale and nanoscale surface topography changes can influence cell functions, including morphology. Although in vitro responses to static topography are novel, cells in vivo constantly remodel topography. To better understand how cells respond to changes in topography over time, we developed a soft polyacrylamide hydrogel with magnetic nickel microwires randomly oriented in the surface of the material. Varying the magnetic field around the microwires reversibly induced their alignment with the direction of the field, causing the smooth hydrogel surface to develop small wrinkles; changes in surface roughness, ΔRRMS , ranged from 0.05 to 0.70 μm and could be oscillated without hydrogel creep. Vascular smooth muscle cell morphology was assessed when exposed to acute and dynamic topography changes. Area and shape changes occurred when an acute topographical change was imposed for substrates exceeding roughness of 0.2 μm, but longer-term oscillating topography did not produce significant changes in morphology irrespective of wire stiffness. These data imply that cells may be able to use topography changes to transmit signals as they respond immediately to changes in roughness. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Autonomous Molecular Cascades for Evaluation of Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P.; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs1–4. Previously studied nucleic acid-based-automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata3,5) and finite-state automata for analysis of nucleic acids6 with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells7,8. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement9,10 cascades directed by antibodies that can analyze cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a molecular automaton that successfully completes its analysis is the presence of a unique molecular tag on the cell surface of a specific subpopulation of lymphocytes within human blood cells. PMID:23892986

  14. Cell surface markers of cancer stem cells: diagnostic macromolecules and targets for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Timothy E; Wang, Dan; Harki, Daniel A

    2013-04-01

    The recognition that the persistence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in patients following chemotherapy can result in disease relapse underscores the necessity to develop therapeutics against those cells. CSCs display a unique repertoire of cell surface macromolecules, which have proven essential for their characterization and isolation. Additionally, CSC-specific cell surface macromolecules or markers provide targets for the development of specific agents to destroy them. In this review, we compiled those cell surface molecules that have been validated as CSC markers for many common blood and solid tumors. We describe the unique chemical and structural features of the most common cell surface markers, as well as recent efforts to deliver chemotherapeutic agents into CSCs by targeting those macromolecules.

  15. Human NK cells: From surface receptors to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Pietra, Gabriella; Vacca, Paola; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in innate defenses against pathogens, primarily viruses, and are also thought to be part of the immunosurveillance against tumors. They express an array of surface receptors that mediate NK cell function. The human leukocytes antigen (HLA) class I-specific inhibitory receptors allow NK cells to detect and kill cells that have lost or under-express HLA class I antigens, a typical feature of tumor or virally infected cells. However, NK cell activation and induction of cytolytic activity and cytokine production depends on another important checkpoint, namely the expression on target cells of ligands recognized by activating NK receptors. Despite their potent cytolytic activity, NK cells frequently fail to eliminate tumors. This is due to mechanisms of tumor escape, determined by the tumor cells themselves or by tumor-associated cells (i.e. the tumor microenvironment) via the release of soluble suppressive factors or the induction of inhibitory loops involving induction of regulatory T cells, M2-polarized macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. The most important clinical application involving NK cells is the cure of high-risk leukemias in the haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting. NK cells originated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of HLA-haploidentical donors may express Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) that are mismatched with the HLA class I alleles of the recipient. This allows NK cells to kill leukemia blasts residual after the conditioning regimen, while sparing normal cells (that do not express ligands for activating NK receptors). More recent approaches based on the specific removal of TCR α/β(+) T cells and of CD19(+) B cells, allow the infusion, together with CD34(+) HSC, of mature KIR(+) NK cells and of TCR γ/δ(+) T cells, both characterized by a potent anti-leukemia activity. This greatly reduces the time interval necessary to obtain alloreactive, KIR(+) NK

  16. Only scratching the cell surface: extracellular signals in cerebrum development.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Jean M

    2013-08-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type's competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development.

  17. Only scratching the cell surface; extracellular signals in cerebrum development

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Jean M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type’s competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development. PMID:23669550

  18. Engineered Aptamers to Probe Molecular Interactions on the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Batool, Sana; Bhandari, Sanam; George, Shanell; Okeoma, Precious; Van, Nabeela; Zümrüt, Hazan E; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika

    2017-08-29

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of molecular interactions on the cell membrane. To decipher such interactions, molecular scaffolds can be engineered as a tool to modulate these events as they occur on the cell membrane. To guarantee reliability, scaffolds that function as modulators of cell membrane events must be coupled to a targeting moiety with superior chemical versatility. In this regard, nucleic acid aptamers are a suitable class of targeting moieties. Aptamers are inherently chemical in nature, allowing extensive site-specific chemical modification to engineer sensing molecules. Aptamers can be easily selected using a simple laboratory-based in vitro evolution method enabling the design and development of aptamer-based functional molecular scaffolds against wide range of cell surface molecules. This article reviews the application of aptamers as monitors and modulators of molecular interactions on the mammalian cell surface with the aim of increasing our understanding of cell-surface receptor response to external stimuli. The information gained from these types of studies could eventually prove useful in engineering improved medical diagnostics and therapeutics.

  19. Entry Kinetics and Cell-Cell Transmission of Surface-Bound Retroviral Vector Particles

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Lee S.; Skinner, Amy M.; Woodward, Josha A.; Kurre, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Transduction with recombinant Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) -1 derived lentivirus vectors is a multi-step process initiated by surface attachment and subsequent receptor-directed uptake into the target cell. We previously reported the retention of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G) pseudotyped particles on murine progenitor cells and their delayed cell-cell transfer. Methods To examine the underlying mechanism in more detail we used a combination of approaches focused on investigating the role of receptor-independent factors in modulating attachment. Results Studies of synchronized transduction herein reveal cell-type specific rates of vector particle clearance with substantial delays during particle entry into murine hematopoietic progenitor cells. The observed uptake kinetics from the surface of the 1° cell correlate inversely with the magnitude of transfer to 2° targets, corresponding with our initial observation of preferential cell-cell transfer in the context of brief vector exposures. We further demonstrate that vector particle entry into cells is associated with the cell–type specific abundance of extracellular matrix fibronectin. Residual particle – ECM binding and 2° transfer can be competitively disrupted by heparin exposure without affecting murine progenitor homing and repopulation. Conclusions While cellular attachment factors, including fibronectin, aid gene transfer by colocalizing particles to cells and disfavoring early dissociation from targets, they also appear to stabilize particles on the cell surface. Our study highlights the inadvertent consequences for cell entry and cell-cell transfer. PMID:20440757

  20. Role of the N-linked glycans of the prM and E envelope proteins in tick-borne encephalitis virus particle secretion.

    PubMed

    Goto, Akiko; Yoshii, Kentarou; Obara, Mayumi; Ueki, Tomotaka; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2005-04-27

    The tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus has two membrane glycoproteins (prM and E), which each has one N-linked glycan. Constructs that express prM and E proteins of TBE virus have been shown to produce virus-like particles (VLPs), which have surface properties that are similar to those of infectious viruses. To reveal the function of glycosylation of the TBE virus prM and E proteins in the secretion of VLPs, we expressed glycosylation-mutated prM and E proteins and compared the secretion levels and biological properties of the VLPs. In the prM protein glycosylation-deficient mutant, the level of secreted E protein was reduced to 60% of the wild-type level. On the other hand, in the E or prM-E protein glycosylation-deficient mutant, the level of secreted E protein was reduced to 10% of the wild-type level. Furthermore, the mutant which was glycosylated at positions 66 and 154 in protein E, the level of secreted E protein was four-fold higher than that of the wild-type. However, in the mutant which was glycosylated at position 66 only, E protein secretion was reduced to only 10% of the wild-type level. These data suggest that the glycan associated with the N-linked glycosylation site at position 154 in protein E plays an important role in VLP secretion.

  1. Expression of cell surface antigens on mast cells: mast cell phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Florian, Stefan; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Krauth, Maria-Theresa; Sonneck, Karoline; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2006-01-01

    During the past few decades, a number of functionally important cell surface antigens have been detected on human mast cells (MCs). These antigens include the stem cell factor receptor (SCFR/CD117), the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor, adhesion molecules, and activation-linked membrane determinants. Several of these antigens (CD2, CD25, CD35, CD88, CD203c) appear to be upregulated on MCs in patients with systemic mastocytosis and therefore are used as diagnostic markers. Quantitative measurement of these markers on MCs is thus of diagnostic value and is usually performed by multicolor-based flow cytometry techniques utilizing a PE- or APC-labeled antibody against CD117 for MCs detection. This chapter gives an overview about the methods of staining of MC in various tissues with special reference to novel diagnostic markers applied in patients with suspected systemic mastocytosis.

  2. Surface plasmon resonance imaging of cells and surface-associated fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alexander W; Halter, Michael; Tona, Alessandro; Bhadriraju, Kiran; Plant, Anne L

    2009-01-01

    Background A critical challenge in cell biology is quantifying the interactions of cells with their extracellular matrix (ECM) environment and the active remodeling by cells of their ECM. Fluorescence microscopy is a commonly employed technique for examining cell-matrix interactions. A label-free imaging method would provide an alternative that would eliminate the requirement of transfected cells and modified biological molecules, and if collected nondestructively, would allow long term observation and analysis of live cells. Results Using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI), the deposition of protein by vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) cultured on fibronectin was quantified as a function of cell density and distance from the cell periphery. We observed that as much as 120 ng/cm2 of protein was deposited by cells in 24 h. Conclusion SPRI is a real-time, low-light-level, label-free imaging technique that allows the simultaneous observation and quantification of protein layers and cellular features. This technique is compatible with live cells such that it is possible to monitor cellular modifications to the extracellular matrix in real-time. PMID:19245706

  3. Simplified fabrication of back surface electric field silicon cells and novel characteristics of such cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the characteristics and behavior of 10 ohm-cm silicon cells having abnormally high open-circuit voltages was made. The cells studied were made by a new, highly simplified, contact fabrication process which creates both a contact and a thin electric field region at the cell back surface without the need for phosphorus layer removal. These cells had open-circuit voltages of about 0.58 V and their performance as a function of thickness, temperature, and 1 MeV electron irradiation is detailed. The study showed that 10 ohm-cm back-surface-field cells can have the high initial efficiencies and desirable temperature behavior of low resistivity cells. Thin back-surface-field cells were made and showed, in addition, much greater radiation damage resistance. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results.

  4. Simplified fabrication of back surface electric field silicon cells and novel characteristics of such cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the characteristics and behavior of 10 ohm-cm silicon cells having abnormally high open-circuit voltages was made. The cells studied were made by a new, highly simplified, contact fabrication process which creates both a contact and a thin electric field region at the cell back surface without the need for phosphorus layer removal. These cells had open-circuit voltages of about 0.58 V and their performance as a function of thickness, temperature, and 1 MeV electron irradiation is detailed. The study showed that 10 ohm-cm back-surface-field cells can have the high initial efficiencies and desirable temperature behavior of low resistivity cells. Thin back-surface-field cells were made and showed, in addition, much greater radiation damage resistance. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results.

  5. Simplified fabrication of back surface electric field silicon cells and novel characteristics of such cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the characteristics and behavior of 10 ohm-cm silicon cells having abnormally high open-circuit voltages was made. The cells studied were made by a new, highly simplified, contact fabrication process which creates both a contact and a thin electric field region at the cell back surface without the need for phosphorus layer removal. These cells had open-circuit voltages of about 0.58 V and their performance as a function of thickness, temperature, and 1 MeV electron irradiation is detailed. The study showed that 10 ohm-cm back-surface-field cells can have the high initial efficiencies and desirable temperature behavior of low resistivity cells. Thin back-surface-field cells were made and showed, in addition, much greater radiation damage resistance. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results.

  6. Ocular surface reconstruction using stem cell and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro; Inatomi, Tsutomu; Sotozono, Chie; Koizumi, Noriko; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    Most human sensory information is gained through eyesight, and integrity of the ocular surface, including cornea and conjunctiva, is known to be indispensable for good vision. It is believed that severe damage to corneal epithelial stem cells results in devastating ocular surface disease, and many researchers and scientists have tried to reconstruct the ocular surface using medical and surgical approaches. Ocular surface reconstruction via regenerative therapy is a newly developed medical field that promises to be the next generation of therapeutic modalities, based on the use of tissue-specific stem cells to generate biological substitutes and improve tissue functions. The accomplishment of these objectives depends on three key factors: stem cells, which have highly proliferative capacities and longevities; the substrates determining the environmental niche; and growth factors that support them appropriately. This manuscript describes the diligent development of ocular surface reconstruction using tissue engineering techniques, both past and present, and discusses and validates their future use for regenerative therapy in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell surface energy, contact angles and phase partition. II. Bacterial cells in biphasic aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gerson, D F; Akit, J

    1980-11-04

    Partition coefficients in biphasic mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) and Dextran are compared to cell surface energies obtained from contact angles of each liquid phase on cell layers. Linear relationships are observed between these two independent measurements for a variety of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the importance of interfacial phenomena and contact angles in the phase-partition process.

  8. Diffusion-limited reactions on the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Tauber, Uwe; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly

    2003-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) stimulates proliferation of many cell types, and are crucial in such processes as eg. wound healing. Cells have specific receptor (R) protein molecules on their surface which bind FGF for this purpose. FGF is also bound by Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) molecules which are present on the cell surface. In isolation, both these complexes are unstable, with half-life of the order of 10-20 minutes, wheras in intact cells, the half-life of FGF-R complex is nearly 5 hours! To account for this increased stability, it has been proposed that R-FGF complex combines with HSPG via surface diffusion and forms the triad R-FGF-HSPG. We examine the feasibility of this reaction using the well-known Smoluchowski theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results support the triad formation theory, and are in qualitative agreement with experimental results. We also discuss the effects of slowing down of surface diffusion of these molecules by such factors as eg. the cytosekeletal network and anchored proteins.

  9. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits...

  10. Multijunction Solar Cells Optimized for the Mars Surface Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Fetzer, Chris; Karam, Nasser H.; Stella, Paul; Mardesich, Nick; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an update on the performance of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) which have been continually performing for more than 3 years beyond their original 90-day missions. The paper also gives the latest results on the optimization of a multijunction solar cell that is optimized to give more power on the surface of Mars.

  11. Micromechanical and surface adhesive properties of single saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzi, Bahman; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2017-09-01

    The adhesion and mechanical properties of a biological cell (e.g. cell membrane elasticity and adhesiveness) are often strong indicators for the state of its health. Many existing techniques for determining mechanical properties of cells require direct physical contact with a single cell or a group of cells. Physical contact with the cell can trigger complex mechanotransduction mechanisms, leading to cellular responses, and consequently interfering with measurement accuracy. In the current work, based on ultrasonic excitation and interferometric (optical) motion detection, a non-contact method for characterizing the adhesion and mechanical properties of single cells is presented. It is experimentally demonstrated that the rocking (rigid body) motion and internal vibrational resonance frequencies of a single saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) (baker’s yeast) cell can be acquired with the current approach, and the Young’s modulus and surface tension of the cell membrane as well as surface adhesion energy can be extracted from the values of these acquired resonance frequencies. The detected resonance frequency ranges for single SC cells include a rocking (rigid body) frequency of 330  ±  70 kHz and two breathing resonance frequencies of 1.53  ±  0.12 and 2.02  ±  0.31 MHz. Based on these values, the average work-of-adhesion of SC cells on a silicon substrate in aqueous medium is extracted, for the first time, as WASC-Si=16.2+/- 3.8 mJ {{m}-2} . Similarly, the surface tension and the Young’s modulus of the SC cell wall are predicted as {{σ }SC}=0.16+/- 0.02 N {{m}-1} and {{E}SC}= 9.20  ±  2.80 MPa, respectively. These results are compared to those reported in the literature by utilizing various methods, and good agreements are found. The current approach eliminates the measurement inaccuracies associated with the physical contact. Exciting and detecting cell dynamics at micro-second time-scales is significantly faster than the

  12. Measuring antimicrobial peptide activity on epithelial surfaces in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Gill; Yim, Sunghan; Rigo, Isaura; McMahon, Laura

    2009-01-01

    To more accurately assess the activity and role of epithelial-cell derived antimicrobial peptides in their native settings, it is essential to perform assays at the surfaces under relevant conditions. In order to carry this out, we utilize 3-dimensional cultures of airway and gingival epithelium, which are grown at an air-liquid interface. Under these conditions, the cultures can be subjected to challenge with a variety of factors known to cause an increase in antimicrobial peptide gene expression. The functional relevance of this induction can then be assessed by quantifying antibacterial activity either directly on the surface of the cells or using the fluid secreted onto the apical surface of the cultures. The relative contribution of the peptides can also be measured by pre-incubation of the secreted fluid with specific inhibitory antibodies. Thus, a relatively inexpensive in vitro model can be used to evaluate the role of antimicrobial peptides in mucosal epithelium. PMID:20094876

  13. Convergent Synthesis of N-Linked Glycopeptides via Aminolysis of ω-Asp p-Nitrophenyl Thioesters in Solution.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing-Jing; Gao, Xiao-Fei; Xin, Ling-Ming; Lei, Ze; Liu, Zheng; Guo, Jun

    2016-10-07

    An efficient N-linked glycosylation reaction between glycosylamines and p-nitrophenyl thioester peptides has been developed. The reaction conditions are mild and compatible with the C-terminal free carboxylic acid group and the unprotected N-linked sialyloligosaccharide. By means of this convergent strategy, a versatile N-glycopeptide fragment containing an N-terminal Thz and a C-terminal thioester was readily prepared, which is available for the synthesis of long glycopeptides and glycoproteins using the protocol of native chemical ligation.

  14. Diverse specificity of cellulosome attachment to the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Pinheiro, Benedita A.; Cameron, Kate; Cuskin, Fiona; Viegas, Aldino; Najmudin, Shabir; Bule, Pedro; Pires, Virginia M. R.; Romão, Maria João; Bayer, Edward A.; Spencer, Holly L.; Smith, Steven; Gilbert, Harry J.; Alves, Victor D.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, the cellulosome, one of Nature’s most intricate multi-enzyme complexes, has been continuously fine-tuned to efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant carbohydrates. To facilitate the uptake of released sugars, anaerobic bacteria use highly ordered protein-protein interactions to recruit these nanomachines to the cell surface. Dockerin modules located within a non-catalytic macromolecular scaffold, whose primary role is to assemble cellulosomal enzymatic subunits, bind cohesin modules of cell envelope proteins, thereby anchoring the cellulosome onto the bacterial cell. Here we have elucidated the unique molecular mechanisms used by anaerobic bacteria for cellulosome cellular attachment. The structure and biochemical analysis of five cohesin-dockerin complexes revealed that cell surface dockerins contain two cohesin-binding interfaces, which can present different or identical specificities. In contrast to the current static model, we propose that dockerins utilize multivalent modes of cohesin recognition to recruit cellulosomes to the cell surface, a mechanism that maximises substrate access while facilitating complex assembly. PMID:27924829

  15. Cell Surface Vimentin Is an Attachment Receptor for Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ning; Cong, Haolong; Tian, Hongchao; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Wenliang; Song, Lei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a highly transmissible pathogenic agent that causes severe central nervous system diseases in infected infants and young children. Here, we reported that EV71 VP1 protein could bind to vimentin intermediate filaments expressed on the host cell surface. Soluble vimentin or an antibody against vimentin could inhibit the binding of EV71 to host cells. Accompanied with the reduction of vimentin expression on the cell surface, the binding of EV71 to cells was remarkably decreased. Further evidence showed that the N terminus of vimentin is responsible for the interaction between EV71 and vimentin. These results indicated that vimentin on the host cell surface may serve as an attachment site that mediated the initial binding and subsequently increased the infectivity of EV71. IMPORTANCE This study delivers important findings on the roles of vimentin filaments in relation to EV71 infection and provides information that not only improves our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis but also presents us with potentially new strategies for the treatment of diseases caused by EV71 infections. PMID:24623428

  16. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Stark, Valerie E; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L

    2016-04-05

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC.

  17. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Stark, Valerie E.; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC. PMID:26894861

  18. Microbial cell surface characteristics: Elucidating attachment/detachment using hydrophobicity and electrokinetic measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface properties of microorganisms play an important role in their behavior within the environment. Electrophoretic mobility and cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells influence their initial interaction with surfaces and mediate their stability within an aqueous su...

  19. Microbial cell surface characteristics: Elucidating attachment/detachment using hydrophobicity and electrokinetic measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface properties of microorganisms play an important role in their behavior within the environment. Electrophoretic mobility and cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells influence their initial interaction with surfaces and mediate their stability within an aqueous su...

  20. Mapping the N-linked glycosites of rice (Oryza sativa L.) germinating embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuxuan; Wang, Yifeng; Qiu, Jiehua; Li, Zhiyong; Tong, Xiaohong; Shi, Zhaomei; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Germination is a key event in the angiosperm life cycle. N-glycosylation of proteins is one of the most common post-translational modifications, and has been recognized to be an important regulator of the proteome of the germinating embryo. Here, we report the first N-linked glycosites mapping of rice embryos during germination by using a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) glycopeptides enrichment strategy associated with high accuracy mass spectrometry identification. A total of 242 glycosites from 191 unique proteins was discovered. Inspection of the motifs and sequence structures involved suggested that all the glycosites were concentrated within [NxS/T] motif, while 82.3% of them were in a coil structure. N-glycosylation preferentially occurred on proteins with glycoside hydrolase activities, which were significantly enriched in the starch and sucrose metabolism pathway, suggesting that N-glycosylation is involved in embryo germination by regulating carbohydrate metabolism. Notably, protein-protein interaction analysis revealed a network with several Brassinosteroids signaling proteins, including XIAO and other BR-responsive proteins, implying that glycosylation-mediated Brassinosteroids signaling may be a key mechanism regulating rice embryo germination. In summary, this study expanded our knowledge of protein glycosylation in rice, and provided novel insight into the PTM regulation in rice seed germination. PMID:28328971

  1. MAGIC-web: a platform for untargeted and targeted N-linked glycoprotein identification

    PubMed Central

    Lih, T. Mamie; Choong, Wai-Kok; Chen, Chen-Chun; Cheng, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Hsin-Nan; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chang, Hui-Yin; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Sung, Ting-Yi

    2016-01-01

    MAGIC-web is the first web server, to the best of our knowledge, that performs both untargeted and targeted analyses of mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomics data for site-specific N-linked glycoprotein identification. The first two modules, MAGIC and MAGIC+, are designed for untargeted and targeted analysis, respectively. MAGIC is implemented with our previously proposed novel Y1-ion pattern matching method, which adequately detects Y1- and Y0-ion without prior information of proteins and glycans, and then generates in silico MS2 spectra that serve as input to a database search engine (e.g. Mascot) to search against a large-scale protein sequence database. On top of that, the newly implemented MAGIC+ allows users to determine glycopeptide sequences using their own protein sequence file. The third module, Reports Integrator, provides the service of combining protein identification results from Mascot and glycan-related information from MAGIC-web to generate a complete site-specific protein-glycan summary report. The last module, Glycan Search, is designed for the users who are interested in finding possible glycan structures with specific numbers and types of monosaccharides. The results from MAGIC, MAGIC+ and Reports Integrator can be downloaded via provided links whereas the annotated spectra and glycan structures can be visualized in the browser. MAGIC-web is accessible from http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/MAGIC-web/index.html. PMID:27084943

  2. MAGIC-web: a platform for untargeted and targeted N-linked glycoprotein identification.

    PubMed

    Lih, T Mamie; Choong, Wai-Kok; Chen, Chen-Chun; Cheng, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Hsin-Nan; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chang, Hui-Yin; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Sung, Ting-Yi

    2016-07-08

    MAGIC-web is the first web server, to the best of our knowledge, that performs both untargeted and targeted analyses of mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomics data for site-specific N-linked glycoprotein identification. The first two modules, MAGIC and MAGIC+, are designed for untargeted and targeted analysis, respectively. MAGIC is implemented with our previously proposed novel Y1-ion pattern matching method, which adequately detects Y1- and Y0-ion without prior information of proteins and glycans, and then generates in silico MS(2) spectra that serve as input to a database search engine (e.g. Mascot) to search against a large-scale protein sequence database. On top of that, the newly implemented MAGIC+ allows users to determine glycopeptide sequences using their own protein sequence file. The third module, Reports Integrator, provides the service of combining protein identification results from Mascot and glycan-related information from MAGIC-web to generate a complete site-specific protein-glycan summary report. The last module, Glycan Search, is designed for the users who are interested in finding possible glycan structures with specific numbers and types of monosaccharides. The results from MAGIC, MAGIC+ and Reports Integrator can be downloaded via provided links whereas the annotated spectra and glycan structures can be visualized in the browser. MAGIC-web is accessible from http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/MAGIC-web/index.html.

  3. Xylose Migration During Tandem Mass Spectrometry of N-Linked Glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Elizabeth S.; Loziuk, Philip L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the rearrangement of gas-phase ions via tandem mass spectrometry is critical to improving manual and automated interpretation of complex datasets. N-glycan analysis may be carried out under collision induced (CID) or higher energy collision dissociation (HCD), which favors cleavage at the glycosidic bond. However, fucose migration has been observed in tandem MS, leading to the formation of new bonds over four saccharide units away. In the following work, we report the second instance of saccharide migration ever to occur for N-glycans. Using horseradish peroxidase as a standard, the beta-1,2 xylose was observed to migrate from a hexose to a glucosamine residue on the (Xyl)Man3GlcNac2 glycan. This investigation was followed up in a complex N-linked glycan mixture derived from stem differentiating xylem tissue, and the rearranged product ion was observed for 75% of the glycans. Rearrangement was not favored in isomeric glycans with a core or antennae fucose and unobserved in glycans predicted to have a permanent core-fucose modification. As the first empirical observation of this rearrangement, this work warrants dissemination so it may be searched in de novo sequencing glycan workflows.

  4. N-linked glycosylation in Archaea: a structural, functional, and genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jarrell, Ken F; Ding, Yan; Meyer, Benjamin H; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-06-01

    N-glycosylation of proteins is one of the most prevalent posttranslational modifications in nature. Accordingly, a pathway with shared commonalities is found in all three domains of life. While excellent model systems have been developed for studying N-glycosylation in both Eukarya and Bacteria, an understanding of this process in Archaea was hampered until recently by a lack of effective molecular tools. However, within the last decade, impressive advances in the study of the archaeal version of this important pathway have been made for halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles, combining glycan structural information obtained by mass spectrometry with bioinformatic, genetic, biochemical, and enzymatic data. These studies reveal both features shared with the eukaryal and bacterial domains and novel archaeon-specific aspects. Unique features of N-glycosylation in Archaea include the presence of unusual dolichol lipid carriers, the use of a variety of linking sugars that connect the glycan to proteins, the presence of novel sugars as glycan constituents, the presence of two very different N-linked glycans attached to the same protein, and the ability to vary the N-glycan composition under different growth conditions. These advances are the focus of this review, with an emphasis on N-glycosylation pathways in Haloferax, Methanococcus, and Sulfolobus.

  5. Diversity in prokaryotic glycosylation: an archaeal-derived N-linked glycan contains legionaminic acid.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Aitio, Olli; Helin, Jari; Guan, Ziqiang; Permi, Perttu; Bamford, Dennis H; Eichler, Jerry; Roine, Elina

    2012-05-01

    VP4, the major structural protein of the haloarchaeal pleomorphic virus, HRPV-1, is glycosylated. To define the glycan structure attached to this protein, oligosaccharides released by β-elimination were analysed by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Such analyses showed that the major VP4-derived glycan is a pentasaccharide comprising glucose, glucuronic acid, mannose, sulphated glucuronic acid and a terminal 5-N-formyl-legionaminic acid residue. This is the first observation of legionaminic acid, a sialic acid-like sugar, in an archaeal-derived glycan structure. The importance of this residue for viral infection was demonstrated upon incubation with N-acetylneuraminic acid, a similar monosaccharide. Such treatment reduced progeny virus production by half 4 h post infection. LC-ESI/MS analysis confirmed the presence of pentasaccharide precursors on two different VP4-derived peptides bearing the N-glycosylation signal, NTT. The same sites modified by the native host, Halorubrum sp. strain PV6, were also recognized by the Haloferax volcanii N-glycosylation apparatus, as determined by LC-ESI/MS of heterologously expressed VP4. Here, however, the N-linked pentasaccharide was the same as shown to decorate the S-layer glycoprotein in this species. Hence, N-glycosylation of the haloarchaeal viral protein, VP4, is host-specific. These results thus present additional examples of archaeal N-glycosylation diversity and show the ability of Archaea to modify heterologously expressed proteins.

  6. Xylose Migration During Tandem Mass Spectrometry of N-Linked Glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Elizabeth S.; Loziuk, Philip L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the rearrangement of gas-phase ions via tandem mass spectrometry is critical to improving manual and automated interpretation of complex datasets. N-glycan analysis may be carried out under collision induced (CID) or higher energy collision dissociation (HCD), which favors cleavage at the glycosidic bond. However, fucose migration has been observed in tandem MS, leading to the formation of new bonds over four saccharide units away. In the following work, we report the second instance of saccharide migration ever to occur for N-glycans. Using horseradish peroxidase as a standard, the beta-1,2 xylose was observed to migrate from a hexose to a glucosamine residue on the (Xyl)Man3GlcNac2 glycan. This investigation was followed up in a complex N-linked glycan mixture derived from stem differentiating xylem tissue, and the rearranged product ion was observed for 75% of the glycans. Rearrangement was not favored in isomeric glycans with a core or antennae fucose and unobserved in glycans predicted to have a permanent core-fucose modification. As the first empirical observation of this rearrangement, this work warrants dissemination so it may be searched in de novo sequencing glycan workflows.

  7. Mapping the N-linked glycosites of rice (Oryza sativa L.) germinating embryos.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jiezheng; Zhao, Juan; Hou, Yuxuan; Wang, Yifeng; Qiu, Jiehua; Li, Zhiyong; Tong, Xiaohong; Shi, Zhaomei; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Germination is a key event in the angiosperm life cycle. N-glycosylation of proteins is one of the most common post-translational modifications, and has been recognized to be an important regulator of the proteome of the germinating embryo. Here, we report the first N-linked glycosites mapping of rice embryos during germination by using a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) glycopeptides enrichment strategy associated with high accuracy mass spectrometry identification. A total of 242 glycosites from 191 unique proteins was discovered. Inspection of the motifs and sequence structures involved suggested that all the glycosites were concentrated within [NxS/T] motif, while 82.3% of them were in a coil structure. N-glycosylation preferentially occurred on proteins with glycoside hydrolase activities, which were significantly enriched in the starch and sucrose metabolism pathway, suggesting that N-glycosylation is involved in embryo germination by regulating carbohydrate metabolism. Notably, protein-protein interaction analysis revealed a network with several Brassinosteroids signaling proteins, including XIAO and other BR-responsive proteins, implying that glycosylation-mediated Brassinosteroids signaling may be a key mechanism regulating rice embryo germination. In summary, this study expanded our knowledge of protein glycosylation in rice, and provided novel insight into the PTM regulation in rice seed germination.

  8. N-Linked Glycosylation in Archaea: a Structural, Functional, and Genetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Meyer, Benjamin H.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY N-glycosylation of proteins is one of the most prevalent posttranslational modifications in nature. Accordingly, a pathway with shared commonalities is found in all three domains of life. While excellent model systems have been developed for studying N-glycosylation in both Eukarya and Bacteria, an understanding of this process in Archaea was hampered until recently by a lack of effective molecular tools. However, within the last decade, impressive advances in the study of the archaeal version of this important pathway have been made for halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles, combining glycan structural information obtained by mass spectrometry with bioinformatic, genetic, biochemical, and enzymatic data. These studies reveal both features shared with the eukaryal and bacterial domains and novel archaeon-specific aspects. Unique features of N-glycosylation in Archaea include the presence of unusual dolichol lipid carriers, the use of a variety of linking sugars that connect the glycan to proteins, the presence of novel sugars as glycan constituents, the presence of two very different N-linked glycans attached to the same protein, and the ability to vary the N-glycan composition under different growth conditions. These advances are the focus of this review, with an emphasis on N-glycosylation pathways in Haloferax, Methanococcus, and Sulfolobus. PMID:24847024

  9. Chemical Characterization of N-Linked Oligosaccharide As the Antigen Epitope Recognized by an Anti-Sperm Auto-Monoclonal Antibody, Ts4.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Endo, Shuichiro; Takamori, Kenji; Hasegawa, Akiko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Ts4, an anti-sperm auto-monoclonal antibody, possesses immunoreactivity to the acrosomal region of mouse epididymal spermatozoa. In addition, the mAb shows specific immunoreactivity to reproduction-related regions such as testicular germ cells and early embryo. Our qualitative study previously showed that the antigen epitope for Ts4 contained a N-linked common oligosaccharide (OS) chain on testicular glycoproteins as determined by Western blotting for testicular glycoproteins after treatment with several glycohydrolases. Since the distribution of the Ts4-epitope is unique, the OS chain in Ts4-epitope may have role(s) in the reproductive process. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular structure of the Ts4-epitope, particularly its OS moiety. Using Ts4 immunoprecipitation combined with liquid chromatography and multiple-stage mass spectrometry, the candidate carbohydrate structure in the Ts4-epitope is proposed to be N-linked fucosylated agalacto-biantennary with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) or with N-acetylgalactosamine-GlcNAc motif. Further binding analyses using various lectins against the mouse testicular Ts4-immunoprecipitants revealed that Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin and Pisum sativum agglutinin showed positive staining of the bands corresponding to Ts4 reactive proteins. Moreover, the immunoreactivity of Ts4 against the testicular extract was completely abrogated after digestion with β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. These results show that the Ts4-epitope contains agalacto-biantennary N-glycan with bisecting GlcNAc carrying fucose residues.

  10. Distinct glycan-charged phosphodolichol carriers are required for the assembly of the pentasaccharide N-linked to the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Kaminski, Lina; Konrad, Zvia; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-12-01

    In Archaea, dolichol phosphates have been implicated as glycan carriers in the N-glycosylation pathway, much like their eukaryal counterparts. To clarify this relation, highly sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was employed to detect and characterize glycan-charged phosphodolichols in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. It is reported that Hfx. volcanii contains a series of C(55) and C(60) dolichol phosphates presenting saturated isoprene subunits at the α and ω positions and sequentially modified with the first, second, third and methylated fourth sugar subunits comprising the first four subunits of the pentasaccharide N-linked to the S-layer glycoprotein, a reporter of N-glycosylation. Moreover, when this glycan-charged phosphodolichol pool was examined in cells deleted of agl genes encoding glycosyltransferases participating in N-glycosylation and previously assigned roles in adding pentasaccharide residues one to four, the composition of the lipid-linked glycans was perturbed in the identical manner as was S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation in these mutants. In contrast, the fifth sugar of the pentasaccharide, identified as mannose in this study, is added to a distinct dolichol phosphate carrier. This represents the first evidence that in Archaea, as in Eukarya, the oligosaccharides N-linked to glycoproteins are sequentially assembled from glycans originating from distinct phosphodolichol carriers.

  11. Cell Surface Nucleolin Facilitates Enterovirus 71 Binding and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pei-Yi; Wang, Ya-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Lo, Yu-Chih; Wang, Ya-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Wang, Jen-Ren; Lai, Ming-Der

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the pathogenesis of enterovirus 71 (EV71) remains mostly ambiguous, identifying the factors that mediate viral binding and entry to host cells is indispensable to ultimately uncover the mechanisms that underlie virus infection and pathogenesis. Despite the identification of several receptors/attachment molecules for EV71, the binding, entry, and infection mechanisms of EV71 remain unclear. Herein, we employed glycoproteomic approaches to identify human nucleolin as a novel binding receptor for EV71. Glycoproteins purified by lectin chromatography from the membrane extraction of human cells were treated with sialidase, followed by immunoprecipitation with EV71 particles. Among the 16 proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis, cell surface nucleolin attracted our attention. We found that EV71 interacted directly with nucleolin via the VP1 capsid protein and that an antinucleolin antibody reduced the binding of EV71 to human cells. In addition, the knockdown of cell surface nucleolin decreased EV71 binding, infection, and production in human cells. Furthermore, the expression of human nucleolin on the cell surface of a mouse cell line increased EV71 binding and conferred EV71 infection and production in the cells. These results strongly indicate that human nucleolin can mediate EV71 binding to and infection of cells. Our findings also demonstrate that the use of glycoproteomic approaches is a reliable methodology to discover novel receptors for pathogens. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of EV71 have been reported in Asia-Pacific countries and have caused thousands of deaths in young children during the last 2 decades. The discovery of new EV71-interacting molecules to understand the infection mechanism has become an emergent issue. Hence, this study uses glycoproteomic approaches to comprehensively investigate the EV71-interacting glycoproteins. Several EV71-interacting glycoproteins are identified, and the role of cell surface nucleolin in

  12. Amphiphilic cationic peptides mediate cell adhesion to plastic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rideout, D C; Lambert, M; Kendall, D A; Moe, G R; Osterman, D G; Tao, H P; Weinstein, I B; Kaiser, E T

    1985-09-01

    Four amphiphilic peptides, each with net charges of +2 or more at neutrality and molecular weights under 4 kilodaltons, were found to mediate the adhesion of normal rat kidney fibroblasts to polystyrene surfaces. Two of these peptides, a model for calcitonin (peptide 1, MCT) and melittin (peptide 2, MEL), form amphiphilic alpha-helical structures at aqueous/nonpolar interfaces. The other two, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone model (peptide 3, LHM) and a platelet factor model (peptide 4, MPF) form beta-strand structures in amphiphilic environments. Although it contains only 10 residues, LHM mediated adhesion to surfaces coated with solutions containing as little as 10 pmoles/ml of peptide. All four of these peptides were capable of forming monolayers at air-buffer interfaces with collapse pressures greater than 20 dynes/cm. None of these four peptides contains the tetrapeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, which has been associated with fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Ten polypeptides that also lacked the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser but were nonamphiphilic and/or had net charges less than +2 at neutrality were all incapable of mediating cell adhesion (Pierschbacher and Ruoslahti, 1984). The morphologies of NRK cells spread on polystyrene coated with peptide LHM resemble the morphologies on fibronectin-coated surfaces, whereas cells spread on surfaces coated with MCT or MEL exhibit strikingly different morphologies. The adhesiveness of MCT, MEL, LHM, and MPF implies that many amphiphilic cationic peptides could prove useful as well defined adhesive substrata for cell culture and for studies of the mechanism of cell adhesion.

  13. Mutational and functional analysis of N-linked glycosylation of envelope fusion protein F of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu; Wang, Manli; Li, Xin; Li, Shufen; van Oers, Monique M; Vlak, Just M; Braakman, Ineke; Hu, Zhihong; Deng, Fei; Wang, Hualin

    2016-04-01

    The envelope fusion (F) protein of baculoviruses is a heavily N-glycosylated protein that plays a significant role in the virus infection cycle. N-Linked glycosylation of virus envelope glycoprotein is important for virus envelope glycoprotein folding and its function in general. There are six predicted N-glycosylation sites in the F (HaF) protein of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV). The N-glycosylation site located in the F(2) subunit (N104) of HaF has been identified and functionally characterized previously (Long et al., 2007). In this study, the other five potential N-glycosylation sites located in the HaF1 subunit, namely, N293, N361, N526, N571 and N595, were analysed extensively to examine their N-glycosylation and relative importance to the function of HaF. The results showed that four of these five potential glycosylation sites in the F(1) subunit, N293, N361, N526 and N571, were N-glycosylated in F proteins of mature HearNPV budded viruses (BVs) but that N595 was not. In general, the conserved site N526 was critical to the functioning of HaF, as absence of N-glycosylation of N526 reduced the efficiency of HaF folding and trafficking, consequently decreased fusogenicity and modified the subcellular localization of HaF proteins, and thus impaired virus production and infectivity. The absence of N-glycosylation at other individual sites was found to have different effects on the fusogenicity and subcelluar distribution of HaF proteins in HzAM1 cells. In summary, N-glycosylation plays comprehensive roles in HaF function and virus infectivity, which is further discussed.

  14. Comparative proteomics and glycoproteomics reveal increased N-linked glycosylation and relaxed sequon specificity in Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 O.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Marzook, N Bishara; Cain, Joel A; Solis, Nestor; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Djordjevic, Steven P; Packer, Nicolle H; Larsen, Martin R; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-11-07

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni encodes a protein glycosylation (Pgl) locus responsible for the N-glycosylation of membrane-associated proteins. We examined two variants of the genome sequenced strain NCTC11168: O, a representative of the original clinical isolate, and GS, a laboratory-adapted relative of O. Comparative proteomics by iTRAQ and two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) allowed the confident identification of 1214 proteins (73.9% of the predicted C. jejuni proteome), of which 187 were present at statistically significant altered levels of abundance between variants. Proteins associated with the O variant included adhesins (CadF and FlpA), proteases, capsule biosynthesis, and cell shape determinants as well as six proteins encoded by the Pgl system, including the PglK flippase and PglB oligosaccharyltransferase. Lectin blotting highlighted specific glycoproteins more abundant in NCTC11168 O, whereas others remained unaltered. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and LC-MS/MS identified 30 completely novel glycosites from 15 proteins. A novel glycopeptide from a 14 kDa membrane protein (Cj0455c) was identified that did not contain the C. jejuni N-linked sequon D/E-X-N-X-S/T (X ≠ Pro) but that instead contained a sequon with leucine at the -2 position. Occupied atypical sequons were also observed in Cj0958c (OxaA; Gln at the -2 position) and Cj0152c (Ala at the +2 position). The relative O and GS abundances of 30 glycopeptides were determined by label-free quantitation, which revealed a >100-fold increase in the atypical glycopeptide from Cj0455c in isolate O. Our data provide further evidence for the importance of the Pgl system in C. jejuni.

  15. Science and Art of Cell-Based Ocular Surface Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek; Shukla, Sachin; Ramachandran, Charanya; Mishra, Dilip Kumar; Katikireddy, Kishore R; Lal, Ikeda; Chauhan, Sunil K; Sangwan, Virender S

    2015-01-01

    The potential cause of blindness worldwide includes diseases of the cornea, ocular surface (limbal stem cell deficiency, allergic conjunctivitis, dry eye diseases), and retinal diseases. The presence of stem cells (limbal stem cells) in the basal region of the limbus makes it an important tool for the ocular regeneration and also in maintaining the transparency of eye by replacing the corneal epithelium continuously. Various surgical modalities have been developed like cultured limbal epithelial transplantation, cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation, simple limbal epithelial transplantation, etc., utilizing the cell-based regenerative properties to treat limbal disorder. Cell-based therapies for ocular repair and regeneration comprise a major hope by therapies involving the mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and limbal stem cells for the restoration of vision in individuals whose ocular tissue has been irreversibly damaged by disease or trauma. This review explores critical needs in human disease mainly the ocular problem where cell-based therapeutics is exceptionally well suited and also the use of animal models, various artificial scaffolds, as well as advancement in clinical technique to challenge the current demand to overcome corneal blindness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Integration of plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein surface activation for single-cell patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2010-07-01

    Surface patterning for single-cell culture was accomplished by combining plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein-induced surface activation. Hydrophilic patterns were produced on Parylene C films deposited on glass substrates by oxygen plasma treatment through the windows of polydimethylsiloxane shadow masks. After incubation first with Pluronic F108 solution and then serum medium overnight, surface seeding with mesenchymal stem cells in serum medium resulted in single-cell patterning. The present method provides a means of surface patterning with direct implications in single-cell culture.

  17. Surface modification of substrates for bacteria and cell culture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baede, Tom; Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    The plasma needle is a medical device that consists of a tungsten wire placed in a tube through which helium flows. A RF voltage frequency of 13.05 MHz is applied to the wire to produce the plasma. The device has a non-thermal effect and is therefore suited for both organic and inorganic surfaces. It was designed to manipulate tissues, but can also be used to modify the bacterial adhesion properties of material surfaces. The surface modification has a number of applications, most notably cell culture and the preventive treatment of caries. The research consists of two sets of experiments. In the first experiments the effect of the plasma treatment on the wettability was studied by means of contact angle measurements. The wettability quantifies the hydrophilic behavior of a surface. Plasma treatment with the plasma needle significantly increased the wettability of the studied materials. The persistence of the wettability change was also examined. For some materials the effect was only temporary. Bacteria are very particular about the surfaces they adhere to and the wettability of the surface plays an important role in their preference. The next set of experiments dealt with the effect of plasma treatment on bacterial adhesion. This effect was measured by comparing the growth rates of E. coli and S. mutans bacteria that were cultured on both plasma and non-treated surfaces. The effect appears to be species specific.

  18. Proteomics and glycoproteomics of pluripotent stem-cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a unique cell type with promising potential in regenerative and personalized medicine. Yet the difficulty to understand and coax their seemingly stochastic differentiation and spontaneous self-renewal have largely limited their clinical applications. A call has been made by numerous researchers for a better characterization of surface proteins on these cells, in search of biomarkers that can dictate developmental stages and lineage specifications, and can help formulate mechanistic insight of stem-cell fate choices. In the past two decades, proteomics has gained significant recognition in profiling surface proteins at high throughput. This review will summarize the impact of these studies on stem-cell biology, and discuss the used proteomic techniques. A systematic comparison of all the techniques and their results is also attempted here to help reveal pros, cons, and the complementarity of the existing methods. This awareness should assist in selecting suitable strategies for stem-cell related research, and shed light on technical improvements that can be explored in the future. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Development of a novel mammalian cell surface antibody display platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Jacobsen, Frederick W; Cai, Ling; Chen, Qing; Shen, Weyen David

    2010-01-01

    Antibody display systems have been successfully applied to screen, select and characterize antibody fragments. These systems typically use prokaryotic organisms such as phage and bacteria or lower eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast. These organisms possess either no or different post-translational modification functions from mammalian cells and prefer to display small antibody fragments instead of full-length IgGs. We report here a novel mammalian cell-based antibody display platform that displays full-length functional antibodies on the surface of mammalian cells. Through recombinase-mediated DNA integration, each host cell contains one copy of the gene of interest in the genome. Utilizing a hot-spot integration site, the expression levels of the gene of interest are high and comparable between clones, ensuring a high signal to noise ratio. Coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology, our platform is high throughput and can distinguish antibodies with very high antigen binding affinities directly on the cell surface. Single-round FACS can enrich high affinity antibodies by more than 500 fold. Antibodies with significantly improved neutralizing activity have been identified from a randomly mutagenized library, demonstrating the power of this platform in screening and selecting antibody therapeutics.

  20. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  1. The Role Of Cells, Neurotrophins, Extracellular Matrix And Cell Surface Molecules In Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Murali

    2009-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a complicated process whereby axons and myelin sheaths undergo degeneration, and eventually are phagocytosed by macrophages and Schwann cells following nerve damage. Schwann cells proliferate and the endoneural tubes persist. In addition, neurotrophins, neural cell adhesion molecules, cytokines and other soluble factors are upregulated to facilitate regeneration. The important role of cellular components, neurotrophins, and extracellular matrix components, including cell surface molecules involved in this regenerative process, is highlighted and discussed in this review. PMID:22589652

  2. Vav Family Proteins Couple to Diverse Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Sheri L.; Selfors, Laura M.; Fredericks, Jessica; Breit, Timo; Fujikawa, Keiko; Alt, Frederick W.; Brugge, Joan S.; Swat, Wojciech

    2000-01-01

    Vav proteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho family GTPases which activate pathways leading to actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and transcriptional alterations. Vav proteins contain several protein binding domains which can link cell surface receptors to downstream signaling proteins. Vav1 is expressed exclusively in hematopoietic cells and tyrosine phosphorylated in response to activation of multiple cell surface receptors. However, it is not known whether the recently identified isoforms Vav2 and Vav3, which are broadly expressed, can couple with similar classes of receptors, nor is it known whether all Vav isoforms possess identical functional activities. We expressed Vav1, Vav2, and Vav3 at equivalent levels to directly compare the responses of the Vav proteins to receptor activation. Although each Vav isoform was tyrosine phosphorylated upon activation of representative receptor tyrosine kinases, integrin, and lymphocyte antigen receptors, we found unique aspects of Vav protein coupling in each receptor pathway. Each Vav protein coprecipitated with activated epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors, and multiple phosphorylated tyrosine residues on the PDGF receptor were able to mediate Vav2 tyrosine phosphorylation. Integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav proteins was not detected in nonhematopoietic cells unless the protein tyrosine kinase Syk was also expressed, suggesting that integrin activation of Vav proteins may be restricted to cell types that express particular tyrosine kinases. In addition, we found that Vav1, but not Vav2 or Vav3, can efficiently cooperate with T-cell receptor signaling to enhance NFAT-dependent transcription, while Vav1 and Vav3, but not Vav2, can enhance NFκB-dependent transcription. Thus, although each Vav isoform can respond to similar cell surface receptors, there are isoform-specific differences in their activation of downstream signaling pathways. PMID:10938113

  3. Surface science studies of model fuel cell electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, N. M.; Ross, P. N.

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss progress in the understanding of electrocatalytic reactions through the study of model systems with surface spectroscopies. Pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys have been used quite successfully as models for real (commercial) electrocatalysts. Given the sheer volume of all work in electrocatalysis that is on fuel cell reactions, we will focus on electrocatalysts for fuel cells. Since Pt is the model fuel cell electrocatalyst, we will focus entirely on studies of pure Pt and Pt bimetallic alloys. The electrode reactions discussed include hydrogen oxidation/evolution, oxygen reduction, and the electrooxidation of carbon monoxide, formic acid, and methanol. Surface spectroscopies emphasized are FTIR, STM/AFM and surface X-ray scattering (SXS). The discussion focuses on the relation between the energetics of adsorption of intermediates and the reaction pathway and kinetics, and how the energetics and kinetics relate to the extrinsic properties of the model system, e.g. surface structure and/or composition. Finally, we conclude by discussing the limitations that are reached by using pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys as models for real catalysts, and suggest some directions for developing more realistic systems.

  4. Surface code—biophysical signals for apoptotic cell clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Mona; Maueröder, Christian; Brauner, Jan M.; Chaurio, Ricardo; Janko, Christina; Herrmann, Martin; Muñoz, Luis E.

    2013-12-01

    Apoptotic cell death and the clearance of dying cells play an important and physiological role in embryonic development and normal tissue turnover. In contrast to necrosis, apoptosis proceeds in an anti-inflammatory manner. It is orchestrated by the timed release and/or exposure of so-called ‘find-me’, ‘eat me’ and ‘tolerate me’ signals. Mononuclear phagocytes are attracted by various ‘find-me’ signals, including proteins, nucleotides, and phospholipids released by the dying cell, whereas the involvement of granulocytes is prevented via ‘stay away’ signals. The exposure of anionic phospholipids like phosphatidylserine (PS) by apoptotic cells on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is one of the main ‘eat me’ signals. PS is recognized by a number of innate receptors as well as by soluble bridging molecules on the surface of phagocytes. Importantly, phagocytes are able to discriminate between viable and apoptotic cells both exposing PS. Due to cytoskeleton remodeling PS has a higher lateral mobility on the surfaces of apoptotic cells thereby promoting receptor clustering on the phagocyte. PS not only plays an important role in the engulfment process, but also acts as ‘tolerate me’ signal inducing the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines by phagocytes. An efficient and fast clearance of apoptotic cells is required to prevent secondary necrosis and leakage of intracellular danger signals into the surrounding tissue. Failure or prolongation of the clearance process leads to the release of intracellular antigens into the periphery provoking inflammation and development of systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease like systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we review the current findings concerning apoptosis-inducing pathways, important players of apoptotic cell recognition and clearance as well as the role of membrane remodeling in the engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytes.

  5. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Freeman, A; Abramov, S; Georgiou, G

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins (e.g., enzymes, single-chain antibodies, on the surface of bacterial cells) (Georgiou et al., 1993). Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article we describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on "bi-layer encagement" (Tor et al., 1989) for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA (46-159)-beta-lactamase fusion that displays beta-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 degrees C of surface anchored beta-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 degrees C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  6. Quantum-radiative cooling for solar cells with textured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Boris; Ivanov, Igor

    2004-11-01

    Efficient technique of Quantum Radiative Cooling (QRC) of textured Solar Cells and Modules is described that is capable of Solar Module (SM) temperature reduction by 5-20C, resulting in 3-10% efficiency increase. Novel methods are based on the quantum assisted IR emission from the surface covered by either multi-layer coatings made of Si-nitride, SiO or Si oxy-nitride films or specifically designed insulating sun-transparent chamber (QRC zone) that contains Selective Emissive (SE) gas or gas mix. QRC zone is mounted on the top of Solar Module replacing existing lamination coatings. To enhance the efficiency of QRC some specific methods and fabrication procedures are proposed to form an electricly charged textured surface that provide a high Electric Field at the surface thus enhancing IR emissivity from the surface. Such procedure can be also used to form the field Induced Surface Barriers in the Si-based Solar Cells that can substitute the existing diffused Emitters resulting in significant reduction of the Cycle Time as well as prospective Fabrication Cost.

  7. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Lin, Liwei

    2011-05-01

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of -1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions.

  8. Analysis of cell surface alterations in Legionella pneumophila cells treated with human apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-03-01

    Binding of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) to Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide was analysed at the molecular level by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thereby providing biophysical evidence for apoE-L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide interaction. Atomic force microscopy imaging of apoE-exposed L. pneumophila cells revealed alterations in the bacterial cell surface topography and nanomechanical properties in comparison with control bacteria. The changes induced by apoE binding to lipopolysaccharide on the surface of L. pneumophila cells may participate in: (1) impeding the penetration of host cells by the bacteria; (2) suppression of pathogen intracellular growth and eventually; and (3) inhibition of the development of infection.

  9. Establishment of cell surface engineering and its development.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface display of proteins/peptides has been established based on mechanisms of localizing proteins to the cell surface. In contrast to conventional intracellular and extracellular (secretion) expression systems, this method, generally called an arming technology, is particularly effective when using yeasts as a host, because the control of protein folding that is often required for the preparation of proteins can be natural. This technology can be employed for basic and applied research purposes. In this review, I describe various strategies for the construction of engineered yeasts and provide an outline of the diverse applications of this technology to industrial processes such as the production of biofuels and chemicals, as well as bioremediation and health-related processes. Furthermore, this technology is suitable for novel protein engineering and directed evolution through high-throughput screening, because proteins/peptides displayed on the cell surface can be directly analyzed using intact cells without concentration and purification. Functional proteins/peptides with improved or novel functions can be created using this beneficial, powerful, and promising technique.

  10. Ligand engagement on material surfaces is discriminated by cell mechanosensoring.

    PubMed

    Battista, Edmondo; Causa, Filippo; Lettera, Vincenzo; Panzetta, Valeria; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fusco, Sabato; Gentile, Francesco; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-03-01

    Peptide or protein ligands can be used for molecular decoration to enhance the functionality of synthetic materials. However, some skepticism has arisen about the efficacy of such strategy in practical contexts since serum proteins largely adsorb. To address this issue, it is crucial to ascertain whether a chemically conjugated integrin-binding peptide is fully recognized by a cell even if partially covered by a physisorbed layer of serum protein; in more general terms, if competitive protein fragments physisorbed onto the surface are distinguishable from those chemically anchored to it. Here, we engraft an RGD peptide on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) surfaces and follow the dynamics of focal adhesion (FA) and cytoskeleton assembly at different times and culture conditions using a variety of analytical tools. Although the presence of serum protein covers the bioconjugated RGD significantly, after the first adhesion phase cells dig into the physisorbed layer and reach the submerged signal to establish a more stable adhesion structure (mature FAs). Although the spreading area index is not substantially affected by the presence of the RGD peptide, cells attached to chemically bound signals develop a stronger adhesive interaction with the materials and assemble a mechanically stable cytoskeleton. This demonstrates that cells are able to discriminate, via mechanosensoring, between adhesive motives belonging to physisorbed proteins and those firmly anchored on the material surface.

  11. Choline phosphate functionalized surface: protein-resistant but cell-adhesive zwitterionic surface potential for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingyu; Chen, Tianchan; Lin, Zaifu; Li, Xian'e; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2015-01-11

    A choline phosphate (CP) modified surface is designed to resist protein adsorption due to its zwitterionic properties and simultaneously promote cell adhesion though its universal interaction with phosphate choline (PC) headgroups of the cell membrane. This work provides a new approach to obtain a cell-adhesive surface with a non-biofouling 'background', which has a potential for tissue engineering.

  12. Surface modified alginate microcapsules for 3D cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-06-01

    Culture as three dimensional cell aggregates or spheroids can offer an ideal platform for tissue engineering applications and for pharmaceutical screening. Such 3D culture models, however, may suffer from the problems such as immune response and ineffective and cumbersome culture. This paper describes a simple method for producing microcapsules with alginate cores and a thin shell of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) to encapsulate mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS) cells, generating a non-fouling surface as an effective immunoisolation barrier. We demonstrated the trapping of the alginate microcapsules in a microwell array for the continuous observation and culture of a large number of encapsulated miPS cells in parallel. miPS cells cultured in the microcapsules survived well and proliferated to form a single cell aggregate. Droplet formation of monodisperse microcapsules with controlled size combined with flow cytometry provided an efficient way to quantitatively analyze the growth of encapsulated cells in a high-throughput manner. The simple and cost-effective coating technique employed to produce the core-shell microcapsules could be used in the emerging field of cell therapy. The microwell array would provide a convenient, user friendly and high-throughput platform for long-term cell culture and monitoring.

  13. N-Linked Glycosyl Auxiliary-Mediated Native Chemical Ligation on Aspartic Acid: Application towards N-Glycopeptide Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hua; Le Mai Hoang, Kim; Vu, Minh Duy; Pasunooti, Kalyan; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2016-08-22

    A practical approach towards N-glycopeptide synthesis using an auxiliary-mediated dual native chemical ligation (NCL) has been developed. The first NCL connects an N-linked glycosyl auxiliary to the thioester side chain of an N-terminal aspartate oligopeptide. This intermediate undergoes a second NCL with a C-terminal thioester oligopeptide. Mild cleavage provides the desired N-glycopeptide.

  14. N-linked Glycosylation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Erns Glycoprotein Alters Virulence in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erns is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). We recently reported the influence of glycosylation of E2 in the virulence of CSFV strain Brescia. Here, we studied the effect of Erns N-linked glycosylation pattern on virulence of CSFV strain Brescia in swine. ...

  15. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  16. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  17. Interfacing biomembrane mimetic polymer surfaces with living cells Surface modification for reliable bioartificial liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takami, Utae; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2008-11-01

    The surface design used for reducing nonspecific biofouling is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. We present here a newly synthesized a carbohydrate-immobilized phosphorylcholine polymer for surface modification of medical devices to control the interface with living cells. A random copolymer composed of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), n-butyl methacrylate (BMA), and 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate (LAMA) was synthesized by conventional radical polymerization. The monomer feeding ratio in the copolymer was adjusted to 24/75/1 (MPC/BMA/LAMA). The copolymer (PMBL1.0) could be coated by solvent evaporation from an ethanol solution. Cells of the human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) having asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) were seeded on PMBL1.0 or poly(BMA) (PBMA)-coated PET plates. On PBMA, many adherent cells were observed and were well spread with monolayer adhesion. HepG2 adhesion was observed on PMBL1.0 because the cell has ASGPRs. Furthermore, some of the cells adhering to PMBL1.0 had a spheroid formation and similarly shaped spheroids were scattered on the surface. According to confocal laser microscopic observation after 96 h cultivation, it was found that albumin production preferentially occurred in the center of the spheroid. The albumin production of the cells that adhered to PBMA was sparse. The amount of albumin production per unit cell that adhered to PMBL1.0 was determined by ELISA and was significantly higher than that which adhered to PBMA. Long-term cultivation of HepG2 was also performed using hollow fiber mini-modules coated with PMBL1.0. The concentration of albumin produced from HepG2 increased continuously for one month. In the mini-module, the function of HepG2 was effectively preserved for that period. On the hollow fiber membrane, spheroid formation of HepG2 cells was also observed. In conclusion, PMBL1.0 can provide a suitable surface for the cultivation of

  18. Probing and mapping electrode surfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blinn, Kevin S; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-20

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen (1-7). The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion(2). Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation(8-12). It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition(8, 10, 13, 14) ("coking") and sulfur poisoning(11, 15) and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation(16). The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM

  19. Probing and Mapping Electrode Surfaces in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blinn, Kevin S.; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Liu, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen 1-7. The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion2. Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation8-12. It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition8, 10, 13, 14 ("coking") and sulfur poisoning11, 15 and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation16. The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM and STM

  20. Basic surface properties of Aedes albopictus cells: effect of Mayaro virus infection on electrostatic charge and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Mezêncio, J M; Costa e Silva Filho, F; Rebello, M A

    1997-01-01

    Aedes albopictus cells possess a negative cell surface charge of -12.7 mV with an isoelectrophoretic point (IEP) located between pH 3.0 and 4.0. Infection with Mayaro virus rendered the surface of A. albopictus cells less negative reaching a zeta-potential value of -9.7 mV after 100 h of infection. Concomitantly, the IEP of the infected cells were also altered from 3.0-4.0 to 4.0-5.0. Furthermore, the contact angle measurements clearly showed qualitative alterations in the cell surface of infected cells.

  1. Distinguishing between whole cells and cell debris using surface plasmon coupled emission (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, Muhammad A.; Menyuk, Curtis R.; Kostov, Yordan

    2017-02-01

    Distinguishing between intact cells, dead but still whole cells, and cell debris is an important but difficult task in life sciences. The most common way to identify dead cells is using a cell-impermeant DNA binding dye, such as propidium iodide. A healthy living cell has an intact cell membrane and will act as a barrier to the dye so that it cannot enter the cell. A dead cell has a compromised cell membrane, and it will allow the dye into the cell to bind to the DNA and become fluorescent. The dead cells therefore will be positive and the live cells will be negative. The dead cells later deteriorate quickly into debris. Different pieces of debris from a single cell can be incorrectly identified as separate dead cells. Although a flow cytometer can quickly perform numerous quantitative, sensitive measurements on each individual cell to determine the viability of cells within a large, heterogeneous population, it is bulky, expensive, and only large hospitals and laboratories can afford them. In this work, we show that the distance-dependent coupling of fluorophore light to surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) from fluorescently-labeled cells can be used to distinguish whole cells from cell debris. Once the fluorescent labels are excited by a laser, the fluorescently-labeled whole cells create two distinct intensity rings in the far-field, in contrast to fluorescently-labeled cell debris, which only creates one ring. The distinct far-field patterns can be captured by camera and used to distinguish between whole cells and cell debris.

  2. Fragmentation Characteristics of Deprotonated N-linked Glycopeptides: Influences of Amino Acid Composition and Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaze, Takashi; Kawabata, Shin-ichirou; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Glycopeptide structural analysis using tandem mass spectrometry is becoming a common approach for elucidating site-specific N-glycosylation. The analysis is generally performed in positive-ion mode. Therefore, fragmentation of protonated glycopeptides has been extensively investigated; however, few studies are available on deprotonated glycopeptides, despite the usefulness of negative-ion mode analysis in detecting glycopeptide signals. Here, large sets of glycopeptides derived from well-characterized glycoproteins were investigated to understand the fragmentation behavior of deprotonated N-linked glycopeptides under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. The fragment ion species were found to be significantly variable depending on their amino acid sequence and could be classified into three types: (i) glycan fragment ions, (ii) glycan-lost fragment ions and their secondary cleavage products, and (iii) fragment ions with intact glycan moiety. The CID spectra of glycopeptides having a short peptide sequence were dominated by type (i) glycan fragments (e.g., 2,4AR, 2,4AR-1, D, and E ions). These fragments define detailed structural features of the glycan moiety such as branching. For glycopeptides with medium or long peptide sequences, the major fragments were type (ii) ions (e.g., [peptide + 0,2X0-H]- and [peptide-NH3-H]-). The appearance of type (iii) ions strongly depended on the peptide sequence, and especially on the presence of Asp, Asn, and Glu. When a glycosylated Asn is located on the C-terminus, an interesting fragment having an Asn residue with intact glycan moiety, [glycan + Asn-36]-, was abundantly formed. Observed fragments are reasonably explained by a combination of existing fragmentation rules suggested for N-glycans and peptides.

  3. Structural characterization of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating glycoproteins of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Lin, Chia-Wei; Aebi, Markus; Eichler, Jerry; Guerardel, Yann

    2016-07-01

    N-Glycosylation is a post-translational modification performed in all three domains of life. In the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii, glycoproteins such as the S-layer glycoprotein are modified by an N-linked pentasaccharide assembled by a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins. In the present study, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to define the structure of this glycan attached to at least four of the seven putative S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation sites, namely Asn-13, Asn-83, Asn-274 and Asn-279. Such approaches detected a trisaccharide corresponding to glucuronic acid (GlcA)-β1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, a tetrasaccharide corresponding to methyl-O-4-GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, and a pentasaccharide corresponding to hexose-1,2-[methyl-O-4-]GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, with previous MS and radiolabeling experiments showing the hexose at the non-reducing end of the pentasaccharide to be mannose. The present analysis thus corrects the earlier assignment of the penultimate sugar as a methyl ester of a hexuronic acid, instead revealing this sugar to be a methylated GlcA. The assignments made here are in good agreement with what was already known of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway from previous genetic and biochemical efforts while providing new insight into the process.

  4. Adherence of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis to epithelial cells correlates with fungal cell surface carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G; Beltrão, Eduardo I C; Oliveira, Patrícia C; Neves, Rejane P

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have described the adherence of Candida albicans to epithelial cells but little is known about Candida parapsilosis adhesion and its role in host cell surface recognition. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between the adherence of 20 C. albicans and 12 C. parapsilosis strains to human buccal epithelial cells and the expression of fungal cell surface carbohydrates using lectin histochemistry. Adherence assays were carried out by incubating epithelial cells in yeast suspensions (10(7) cells ml(-1) ) and peroxidase conjugated lectins (Con A, WGA, UEA I and PNA at 25 μg ml(-1) ) were used for lectin histochemistry. The results showed that adherence was overall greater for C. albicans than for C. parapsilosis (P < 0.01) and that the individual strain differences correlated with a high content of cell surface α-l-fucose residues as indicated by the UEA I staining pattern. Based on the saccharide specificity of the lectins used, these results suggest that l-fucose residues on cell surface glycoconjugates may represent recognition molecules for interactions between the yeast strain studied and the host (r = 0.6985, P = 0.0045). In addition, our results indicated the presence of α-d-glucose/α-d-mannose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine/N-acetylneuraminic acid and D-galactose/N-acetyl-D-galactosamine in fungal cell wall.

  5. Glucocorticoids and the cell surface of human glioma cells: relationship to cytostasis.

    PubMed

    Mackie, A E; Freshney, R I; Akturk, F; Hunt, G

    1988-12-01

    The glucocorticoid hormones methyl prednisolone and dexamethasone were shown to be cytostatic, but not cytotoxic, at high cell densities for early passage and continuous cell lines from human glioma at 0.25 microM and above, in the presence or absence of serum. In the absence of serum both steroids at 2.5 nM increased the saturation density close to the level reached in serum. Examination of the iodinated glycoproteins of the cell surface by gel electrophoresis did not reveal any consistent change. However, gel exclusion chromatography of protease digests of the cell surface and of material released into the medium showed an increase in incorporation of 3H-glucosamine in pronase digests after treatment with methyl prednisolone. Ion exchange chromatography showed that sulphated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulphate, increased and hyaluronic acid decreased in response to steroids, and there was increased retention of GAGs on the cell surface relative to the released fraction. It was concluded that glucocorticoid hormones modify the cell surface of human glioma cells and that this may contribute to enhanced cell intraction and lead to increased density limitation of cell proliferation.

  6. Glucocorticoids and the cell surface of human glioma cells: relationship to cytostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, A. E.; Freshney, R. I.; Akturk, F.; Hunt, G.

    1988-01-01

    The glucocorticoid hormones methyl prednisolone and dexamethasone were shown to be cytostatic, but not cytotoxic, at high cell densities for early passage and continuous cell lines from human glioma at 0.25 microM and above, in the presence or absence of serum. In the absence of serum both steroids at 2.5 nM increased the saturation density close to the level reached in serum. Examination of the iodinated glycoproteins of the cell surface by gel electrophoresis did not reveal any consistent change. However, gel exclusion chromatography of protease digests of the cell surface and of material released into the medium showed an increase in incorporation of 3H-glucosamine in pronase digests after treatment with methyl prednisolone. Ion exchange chromatography showed that sulphated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparan sulphate, increased and hyaluronic acid decreased in response to steroids, and there was increased retention of GAGs on the cell surface relative to the released fraction. It was concluded that glucocorticoid hormones modify the cell surface of human glioma cells and that this may contribute to enhanced cell intraction and lead to increased density limitation of cell proliferation. PMID:3254724

  7. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  8. The cell surface expressed nucleolin is a glycoprotein that triggers calcium entry into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Losfeld, Marie-Estelle; Khoury, Diala El; Mariot, Pascal; Carpentier, Mathieu; Krust, Bernard; Briand, Jean-Paul; Mazurier, Joel; Hovanessian, Ara G.; Legrand, Dominique

    2009-01-15

    Nucleolin is an ubiquitous nucleolar phosphoprotein involved in fundamental aspects of transcription regulation, cell proliferation and growth. It has also been described as a shuttling molecule between nucleus, cytosol and the cell surface. Several studies have demonstrated that surface nucleolin serves as a receptor for various extracellular ligands implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, mitogenesis and angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that nucleolin in the extranuclear cell compartment is a glycoprotein containing N- and O-glycans. In the present study, we show that glycosylation is an essential requirement for surface nucleolin expression, since it is prevented when cells are cultured in the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation. Accordingly, surface but not nuclear nucleolin is radioactively labeled upon metabolic labeling of cells with [{sup 3}H]glucosamine. Besides its well-demonstrated role in the internalization of specific ligands, here we show that ligand binding to surface nucleolin could also induce Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells. Indeed, by flow cytometry, microscopy and patch-clamp experiments, we show that the HB-19 pseudopeptide, which binds specifically surface nucleolin, triggers rapid and intense membrane Ca{sup 2+} fluxes in various types of cells. The use of several drugs then indicated that Store-Operated Ca{sup 2+} Entry (SOCE)-like channels are involved in the generation of these fluxes. Taken together, our findings suggest that binding of an extracellular ligand to surface nucleolin could be involved in the activation of signaling pathways by promoting Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells.

  9. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  10. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  11. Proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anne; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Crossett, Ben; Nagy, Judit; Brown, Katherine; Fairweather, Neil

    2005-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that causes disease of the large intestine, particularly after treatment with antibiotics. The bacterium produces two toxins (A and B) that are responsible for the pathology of the disease. In addition, a number of bacterial virulence factors associated with adhesion to the gut have previously been identified, including the cell wall protein Cwp66, the high-molecular weight surface layer protein (HMW-SLP) and the flagella. As the genome sequence predicts many other cell wall associated proteins, we have investigated the diversity of proteins in cell wall extracts, with the aim of identifying further virulence factors. We have used a number of methods to remove the proteins associated with the cell wall of C. difficile. Two of the resulting extracts, obtained using low pH glycine treatment and lysozyme digestion of the cell wall, have been analysed in detail by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. One hundred and nineteen spots, comprising 49 different proteins, have been identified. The two surface layer proteins (SLPs) are the most abundant proteins, and we have also found components of the flagellum. Interestingly, we have also determined that a number of paralogs of the HMW-SLP are expressed, and these could represent targets for further investigation as virulence factors.

  12. Physicochemical properties of native and recombinant mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) 8S globulins and the effects of the N-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Roberta N; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tecson-Mendoza, Evelyn Mae; Bernardo, Amy Emiliana N; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2006-08-09

    We have previously cloned and characterized the cDNAs of three isoforms of the 8S globulin of mungbean, expressed the major 8Salpha isoform in Escherichia coli, and purified and successfully crystallized it (Bernardo, A. E. N.; Garcia, R. N.; Adachi, M.; Angeles, J. G. C.; Kaga, A; Ishimoto, M.; Utsumi, S.; Tecson-Mendoza, E. M. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2004, 52, 2552-2560). Herein, we report the physicochemical and emulsifying properties of the native 8S and recombinant 8Salpha globulin or vicilin. The circular dichroism spectra analysis of the native 8S and recombinant 8Salpha globulins revealed that the recombinant 8Salpha formed a secondary structure close to that of the native 8S. Further, gel filtration analysis showed that 8Salpha was able to assemble into trimers. The native 8S and recombinant 8Salpha globulins were soluble at pH 3.4 and at pH 7.4-9.0 at low ionic strength, mu = 0.08. Interestingly, the native 8S was more soluble at pH 7.0 and pH 7.4 than the recombinant 8Salpha at mu = 0.08. Both forms were very soluble at pH 3.4-9.0 at high ionic strength, mu = 0.50. The native form exhibited a higher T(m) (69.2, 79.5, and 83.8 degrees C) than the recombinant form (65.6, 71.6, 77.5 degrees C) at mu = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.5, respectively. The recombinant form was found to have greater surface hydrophobicity than the native form. There was little difference in the emulsifying ability between the native 8S and 8Salpha at pH 3.4 and pH 7.6. The results indicate that the presence of N-linked glycans is not essential in the assembly and stable conformation of the mungbean vicilin. However, the N-linked glycans might have contributed to the higher solubility at low ionic strength, greater thermal stability, and decreased surface hydrophobicity of the native vicilin as compared to the recombinant 8Salpha. On the other hand, the N-linked glycans showed little effect on the emulsifying ability of the protein.

  13. Polar/apolar compounds induce leukemia cell differentiation by modulating cell-surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeli, A; Carlà, M; Del Bene, M R; Becchetti, A; Wanke, E; Olivotto, M

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of action of polar/apolar inducers of cell differentiation, such as dimethyl sulfoxide and hexamethylene-bisacetamide, is still obscure. In this paper evidence is provided that their effects on murine erythroleukemia cells are modulated by various extracellular cations as a precise function of the cation effects on membrane surface potential. The interfacial effects of the inducers were directly measured on the charged electrode, showing that both dimethyl sulfoxide and hexamethylene-bisacetamide, at the effective concentrations for cell differentiation and within the physiological range of charge density, adsorb at the charged surface and produce a potential shift. A linear correlation was found between this shift and the inducer effects on cell differentiation. Besides offering a different interpretation of the mechanism of action of the inducers, these findings indicate that surface potential has a signaling function. They may also be relevant to cancer treatments based on tumor-cell commitment to terminal differentiation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8516337

  14. Pharmacological induction of cell surface GRP78 contributes to apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer tumor with triple-negative receptors (estrogen, progesterone and Her 2, receptors) is the most aggressive and deadly subtype, with high rates of disease recurrence and poor survival. Here, we show that induction in cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin was associated with CHOP/GADD153 upregulation and increase in apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer tumor cells. GRP78 is a major regulator of the stress induced unfolded protein response pathway and CHOP/GADD153 is a pro-apoptotic transcription factor associated exclusively with stress induced apoptosis. The blocking of cell surface GRP78 by anti-GRP78 antibody prevented apoptosis, suggesting that induction of cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin is required for apoptosis. A better understanding of stress induction of apoptotic signaling in triple negative breast cancer cells may help to define new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25360516

  15. Active screen plasma nitriding enhances cell attachment to polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaklamani, Georgia; Bowen, James; Mehrban, Nazia; Dong, Hanshan; Grover, Liam M.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2013-05-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a well-established technique used for the surface modification of materials, the result of which is often a product with enhanced functional performance. Here we report the modification of the chemical and mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight poly(ethylene) (UHMWPE) using 80:20 (v/v) N2/H2 ASPN, followed by growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on the treated and untreated polymer surfaces. ASPN-treated UHMWPE showed extensive fibroblast attachment within 3 h of seeding, whereas fibroblasts did not successfully attach to untreated UHMWPE. Fibroblast-coated surfaces were maintained for up to 28 days, monitoring their metabolic activity and morphology throughout. The chemical properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing the presence of Csbnd N, Cdbnd N, and Ctbnd N chemical bonds. The elastic modulus, surface topography, and adhesion properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied over 28 days during sample storage under ambient conditions and during immersion in two commonly used cell culture media.

  16. Nematic twist cell: Strong chirality induced at the surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Nemitz, Ian R.; Pendery, Joel S.; Schubert, Christopher P. J.; Lemieux, Robert P.; Rosenblatt, Charles

    2013-04-01

    A nematic twist cell having a thickness gradient was filled with a mixture containing a configurationally achiral liquid crystal (LC) and chiral dopant. A chiral-based linear electrooptic effect was observed on application of an ac electric field. This "electroclinic effect" varied monotonically with d, changing sign at d =d0 where the chiral dopant exactly compensated the imposed twist. The results indicate that a significant chiral electrooptic effect always exists near the surfaces of a twist cell containing molecules that can be conformationally deracemized. Additionally, this approach can be used to measure the helical twisting power (HTP) of a chiral dopant in a liquid crystal.

  17. Mysterious hexagonal pyramids on the surface of Pyrobaculum cells.

    PubMed

    Rensen, Elena; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2015-11-01

    In attempts to induce putative temperate viruses, we UV-irradiated cells of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum oguniense. Virus replication could not be detected; however, we observed the development of pyramidal structures with 6-fold symmetry on the cell surface. The hexagonal basis of the pyramids was continuous with the cellular cytoplasmic membrane and apparently grew via the gradual expansion of the 6 triangular lateral faces, ultimately protruding through the S-layer. When the base of these isosceles triangles reached approximately 200 nm in length, the pyramids opened like flower petals. The origin and function of these mysterious nanostructures remain unknown.

  18. Multiplexed Targeted Mass Spectrometry-Based Assays for the Quantification of N-Linked Glycosite-Containing Peptides in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Harlan, Robert; Chen, Jing; Aiyetan, Paul; Liu, Yansheng; Sokoll, Lori J.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Chan, Daniel W.; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common protein modifications, and the quantitative analysis of glycoproteins has the potential to reveal biological functions and their association with disease. However, the high throughput accurate quantification of glycoproteins is technically challenging due to the scarcity of robust assays to detect and quantify glycoproteins. Here we describe the development of multiplexed targeted MS assays to quantify N-linked glycosite-containing peptides in serum using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). Each assay was characterized by its performance metrics and criteria established by the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI CPTAC) to facilitate the widespread adoption of the assays in studies designed to confidently detect changes in the relative abundance of these analytes. An in-house developed software program, MRMPlus, was used to compute assay performance parameters including specificity, precision, and repeatability. We show that 43 selected N-linked glycosite-containing peptides identified in prostate cancer tissue studies carried out in our group were detected in the sera of prostate cancer patients within the quantitative range of the developed PRM assays. A total of 41 of these formerly N-linked glycosite-containing peptides (corresponding to 37 proteins) were reproducibly quantified based on their relative peak area ratios in human serum during PRM assay development, with 4 proteins showing differential significance in serum from nonaggressive (NAG) vs aggressive (AG) prostate cancer patient serum (n = 50, NAG vs AG). The data demonstrate that the assays can be used for the high throughput and reproducible quantification of a panel of formerly N-linked glycosite-containing peptides. The developed assays can also be used for the quantification of formerly N-linked glycosite-containing peptides in human serum irrespective of disease state. PMID:26451657

  19. Multiplexed Targeted Mass Spectrometry-Based Assays for the Quantification of N-Linked Glycosite-Containing Peptides in Serum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stefani N; Harlan, Robert; Chen, Jing; Aiyetan, Paul; Liu, Yansheng; Sokoll, Lori J; Aebersold, Ruedi; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2015-11-03

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common protein modifications, and the quantitative analysis of glycoproteins has the potential to reveal biological functions and their association with disease. However, the high throughput accurate quantification of glycoproteins is technically challenging due to the scarcity of robust assays to detect and quantify glycoproteins. Here we describe the development of multiplexed targeted MS assays to quantify N-linked glycosite-containing peptides in serum using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). Each assay was characterized by its performance metrics and criteria established by the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI CPTAC) to facilitate the widespread adoption of the assays in studies designed to confidently detect changes in the relative abundance of these analytes. An in-house developed software program, MRMPlus, was used to compute assay performance parameters including specificity, precision, and repeatability. We show that 43 selected N-linked glycosite-containing peptides identified in prostate cancer tissue studies carried out in our group were detected in the sera of prostate cancer patients within the quantitative range of the developed PRM assays. A total of 41 of these formerly N-linked glycosite-containing peptides (corresponding to 37 proteins) were reproducibly quantified based on their relative peak area ratios in human serum during PRM assay development, with 4 proteins showing differential significance in serum from nonaggressive (NAG) vs aggressive (AG) prostate cancer patient serum (n = 50, NAG vs AG). The data demonstrate that the assays can be used for the high throughput and reproducible quantification of a panel of formerly N-linked glycosite-containing peptides. The developed assays can also be used for the quantification of formerly N-linked glycosite-containing peptides in human serum irrespective of disease state.

  20. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  1. N-linked glycosylation of macrophage-derived PAF-AH is a major determinant of enzyme association with plasma HDL.

    PubMed

    Tselepis, A D; Karabina, S A; Stengel, D; Piédagnel, R; Chapman, M J; Ninio, E

    2001-10-01

    Human plasma PAF-AH (platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase) is a Ca(2)+-independent phospholipase A2 of hematopoietic origin associated with LDL and HDL; it degrades PAF and oxidizes phospholipids. We show that human macrophages synthesize PAF-AH as a premedial Golgi precursor containing high mannose N-linked glycans. Secreted PAF-AH possesses a molecular mass of approximately 55 kDa and contains mature N-linked glycans. Secreted PAF-AH activity (90 +/- 4% of the total) bound to a wheat germ lectin column and could be eluted with N-acetylglucosamine, whereas digestion with N-acetylneuraminidase II completely abolished enzyme absorption. Tunicamycin significantly reduced cell-associated PAF-AH activity and inhibited enzyme secretion; but it did not alter the ratio of secreted to cell-associated enzyme (1.8 at 6 h and 3.1 at 24 h), suggesting that glycosylation is not essential for PAF-AH secretion. Digestion of cell-associated PAF-AH or secreted PAF-AH with peptide N-glycosidase F affected neither catalytic activity nor its resistance to proteolysis with trypsin or proteinase K; in addition, it did not affect PAF-AH association with LDL, but significantly increased its association with HDL. We suggest that macrophage-derived PAF-AH contains heterogeneous asparagine-conjugated sugar chain(s) involving sialic acid, which hinders its association with HDL but does not influence the secretion, catalytic activity, or resistance of PAF-AH to proteases.

  2. Turnover of cell surface proteoglycans in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Brauker, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Human fibroblasts were cultured in /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup -2/ to label the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs); the extracellular matrix was derived from these labeled cells by removal of cells with the chelating agent ethylene glycol-bis-(..beta..-amino ethyl ether)N,N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA). When unlabeled cells were plated onto these radiolabeled extracellular matrices, two distinct events were observed: (a) the cells actively released (/sup 35/S)PG from the matrix and; (b) the cells degraded a large fraction of the matrix PG, releasing free sulfate. The latter degradation event could be inhibited in a specific dose-dependent manner by addition of mannose 6-phosphate to the culture medium. Analyses of this effect in terms of the saccharide specificity, NH/sub 4/Cl sensitivity, and the requirement for cells suggest that both an intracellular compartment and the mannose 6-phosphate receptor that binds lysosomal enzymes at the cell surface may play important roles in the turnover of PG of the extracellular matrix.

  3. Cell-surface prion protein interacts with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Li, Ruliang; Petersen, Robert B; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-01-01

    We used ELISA and flow cytometry to study the binding of prion protein PrP to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We found that recombinant human PrP (rPrP) binds GAGs including chondroitin sulphate A, chondroitin sulphate B, hyaluronic acid, and heparin. rPrP binding to GAGs occurs via the N-terminus, a region known to bind divalent cations. Additionally, rPrP binding to GAGs is enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+, but not Ca2+ and Mn2+. rPrP binds heparin strongest, and the binding is inhibited by certain heparin analogues, including heparin disaccharide and sulphate-containing monosaccharides, but not by acetylated heparin. Full-length normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), but not N-terminally truncated PrPC species, from human brain bind GAGs in a similar Cu2+/Zn2+-enhanced fashion. We found that GAGs specifically bind to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 23-35 in the N-terminus of rPrP. We further demonstrated that while both wild-type PrPC and an octapeptide-repeat-deleted mutant PrP produced by transfected cells bound heparin at the cell surface, the PrP N-terminal deletion mutant and non-transfectant control failed to bind heparin. Binding of heparin to wild-type PrPC on the cell surface results in a reduction of the level of cell-surface PrPC. These results provide strong evidence that PrPC is a surface receptor for GAGs. PMID:12186633

  4. Cell-surface prion protein interacts with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Li, Ruliang; Petersen, Robert B; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-11-15

    We used ELISA and flow cytometry to study the binding of prion protein PrP to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We found that recombinant human PrP (rPrP) binds GAGs including chondroitin sulphate A, chondroitin sulphate B, hyaluronic acid, and heparin. rPrP binding to GAGs occurs via the N-terminus, a region known to bind divalent cations. Additionally, rPrP binding to GAGs is enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+, but not Ca2+ and Mn2+. rPrP binds heparin strongest, and the binding is inhibited by certain heparin analogues, including heparin disaccharide and sulphate-containing monosaccharides, but not by acetylated heparin. Full-length normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), but not N-terminally truncated PrPC species, from human brain bind GAGs in a similar Cu2+/Zn2+-enhanced fashion. We found that GAGs specifically bind to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 23-35 in the N-terminus of rPrP. We further demonstrated that while both wild-type PrPC and an octapeptide-repeat-deleted mutant PrP produced by transfected cells bound heparin at the cell surface, the PrP N-terminal deletion mutant and non-transfectant control failed to bind heparin. Binding of heparin to wild-type PrPC on the cell surface results in a reduction of the level of cell-surface PrPC. These results provide strong evidence that PrPC is a surface receptor for GAGs.

  5. Surface Chemistry Regulates Valvular Interstitial Cell Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Matthew N.; Coombs, Kent E.; Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    The primary driver for valvular calcification is the differentiation of valvular interstitial cells (VICs) into a diseased phenotype. However, the factors leading to the onset of osteoblastic-like VICs (obVICs) and resulting calcification are not fully understood. This study isolates the effect of substrate surface chemistry on in vitro VIC differentiation and calcified tissue formation. Using ω-functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold [CH3 (hydrophobic), OH (hydrophilic), COOH (COO−, negative at physiological pH), and NH2 (NH3+, positive at physiological pH)], we have demonstrated that surface chemistry modulates VIC phenotype and calcified tissue deposition independent of osteoblastic-inducing media additives. Over seven days VICs exhibited surface-dependent differences in cell proliferation (COO− = NH3+> OH > CH3), morphology, and osteoblastic potential. Both NH3+and CH3-terminated SAMs promoted calcified tissue formation while COO−-terminated SAMs showed no calcification. VICs on NH3+-SAMs exhibited the most osteoblastic phenotypic markers through robust nodule formation, up-regulated osteocalcin and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and adoption of a round/rhomboid morphology indicative of osteoblastic differentiation. With the slowest proliferation, VICs on CH3-SAMs promoted calcified aggregate formation through cell detachment and increased cell death indicative of dystrophic calcification. Furthermore, induction of calcified tissue deposition on NH3+ and CH3-SAMs was distinctly different than that of media induced osteoblastic VICs. These results demonstrate that substrate surface chemistry alters VIC behavior and plays an important role in calcified tissue formation. In addition, we have identified two novel methods of calcified VIC induction in vitro. Further study of these environments may yield new models for in vitro testing of therapeutics for calcified valve stenosis, although additional studies need to be conducted

  6. Exogenous cathepsin G upregulates cell surface MHC class I molecules on immune and glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Madleen; Turiello, Nadine; Molenda, Nicole; Palesch, David; Meid, Annika; Schroeder, Roman; Basilico, Paola; Benarafa, Charaf; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Zimecki, Michal; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Burster, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. During an adaptive immune response, MHC molecules are regulated by several mechanisms including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon gamma (IFN-g). However, it is unclear whether the serine protease cathepsin G (CatG), which is generally secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, might regulate MHC I molecules. We identified CatG, and to a higher extend CatG and lactoferrin (LF), as an exogenous regulator of cell surface MHC I expression of immune cells and glioblastoma stem cells. In addition, levels of MHC I molecules are reduced on dendritic cells from CatG deficient mice compared to their wild type counterparts. Furthermore, cell surface CatG on immune cells, including T cells, B cells, and NK cells triggers MHC I on THP-1 monocytes suggesting a novel mechanism for CatG to facilitate intercellular communication between infiltrating cells and the respective target cell. Subsequently, our findings highlight the pivotal role of CatG as a checkpoint protease which might force target cells to display their intracellular MHC I:antigen repertoire. PMID:27806341

  7. Surface Trafficking of APP and BACE in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Bauereiss, Anna; Welzel, Oliver; Jung, Jasmin; Grosse-Holz, Simon; Lelental, Natalia; Lewczuk, Piotr; Wenzel, Eva M; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja W

    2015-06-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ)-peptide, the major constituent of the plaques that develop during Alzheimer's disease, is generated via the cleavage of Aβ precursor protein (APP) by β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE). Using live-cell imaging of APP and BACE labeled with pH-sensitive proteins, we could detect the release events of APP and BACE and their distinct kinetics. We provide kinetic evidence for the cleavage of APP by α-secretase on the cellular surface after exocytosis. Furthermore, simultaneous dual-color evanescent field illumination revealed that the two proteins are trafficked to the surface in separate compartments. Perturbing the membrane lipid composition resulted in a reduced frequency of exocytosis and affected BACE more strongly than APP. We propose that surface fusion frequency is a key factor regulating the aggregation of APP and BACE in the same membrane compartment and that this process can be modulated via pharmacological intervention.

  8. Effects of molecular weight and surface functionalization on surface composition and cell adhesion to Hyaluronan coated titanium.

    PubMed

    Morra, M; Cassinelli, C; Carpi, A; Giardino, R; Fini, M

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the effect of surface functionalization on surface composition and cell adhesion to titanium samples by high and low molecular weight Hyaluronan (HA). HA was covalently linked to aminated Ti surfaces obtained by two different surface functionalization techniques, that is polyethyleneimine (PEI) adsorption and deposition from allylamine plasma. The two approaches yield very different surface densities of available amino groups, affecting this way the number and frequency of surface-HA bonds and the configurational freedom of the latter. Results of cell adhesion test are dependent on the surface functionalization approach adopted, low molecular weight HA coupled to PEI functionalized Ti does not yield the same degree of resistance to cell adhesion found on other samples. These results indicate that the details of the surface functionalization step are crucial for surface engineering of implant devices by biological molecules.

  9. Cell separation using tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Peng, Zhangli; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Geri, Michela; Li, Sixing; Li, Peng; Chen, Yuchao; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-09-09

    Separation of cells is a critical process for studying cell properties, disease diagnostics, and therapeutics. Cell sorting by acoustic waves offers a means to separate cells on the basis of their size and physical properties in a label-free, contactless, and biocompatible manner. The separation sensitivity and efficiency of currently available acoustic-based approaches, however, are limited, thereby restricting their widespread application in research and health diagnostics. In this work, we introduce a unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves (taSSAW), which are oriented at an optimally designed inclination to the flow direction in the microfluidic channel. We demonstrate that this design significantly improves the efficiency and sensitivity of acoustic separation techniques. To optimize our device design, we carried out systematic simulations of cell trajectories, matching closely with experimental results. Using numerically optimized design of taSSAW, we successfully separated 2- and 10-µm-diameter polystyrene beads with a separation efficiency of ∼ 99%, and separated 7.3- and 9.9-µm-polystyrene beads with an efficiency of ∼ 97%. We illustrate that taSSAW is capable of effectively separating particles-cells of approximately the same size and density but different compressibility. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the present technique for biological-biomedical applications by sorting MCF-7 human breast cancer cells from nonmalignant leukocytes, while preserving the integrity of the separated cells. The method introduced here thus offers a unique route for separating circulating tumor cells, and for label-free cell separation with potential applications in biological research, disease diagnostics, and clinical practice.

  10. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Solís, JL; Luévano-Colmenero, GH; Vargas-Mancilla, J

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a cell at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed from a single cell is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are incorporated into the cell. Materials (subjects) and methods: The tumor biopsies were obtained from 5 patients who were clinically diagnosed with breast cancer. Breast cancer cells isolated from the biopsy were washed, centrifuged and seeded out. Cultivation took place in DMEM at 37°C in a humidified of 5% CO2 in air with addition of colloidal silver nanoparticles of 40 nm into the cell by sonication. Immediately, the washed cells were analyzed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7. Raman analysis was carried out on the Jobin-Yvon LabRAM HR800 microscope system, with a NIR 830 nm laser excitation source. Results: The strongly enhanced Raman signals allow Raman measurements of a single cell in the 200–1800 cm−1 range in relatively short collection times (5 second) using 17 mW near-infrared excitation. Observed spectral features differed across the cell, but chemical constituents in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm, such as DNA, RNA, and amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine can be identified. Conclusions: Particularly strong field enhancement can be observed when nanoparticles form colloidal clusters. The results suggest that SERS could be a new technique for the identification of breast cancer cell. PMID:24155548

  11. Fibrin glue inhibits migration of ocular surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A M; Faraj, L A; McIntosh, O D; Dhillon, V K; Dua, H S

    2016-10-01

    PurposeFibrin glue has been used successfully in numerous ophthalmic surgical procedures. Recently, fibrin glue has been used in limbal stem cell transplantation to reduce both operative time and to negate the need for sutures. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of fibrin glue on epithelial cell migration in vitro.MethodsCorneoscleral rims were split to retain the epithelial layer, Bowman's layer, and anterior stroma. Rims were cut into eight equal-sized pieces and were placed directly on culture plates or affixed with fibrin glue. Rims were maintained in culture for 25 days and epithelial cell growth was monitored. Cells were photographed to measure area or growth and immunofluorescence staining of explants for fibrin was performed.ResultsExplants that were glued demonstrated significantly delayed epithelial cell growth and migration as compared with explants without glue. By day 16, all fibrin glue had dissolved and coincided with onset of cell growth from glued explants. Cell growth commenced between days 3 and 4 for control explants without glue and around days 14-16 for explants with fibrin glue.ConclusionsFibrin glue delays epithelial cell migration by acting as a physical barrier and can potentially interfere with explant-derived limbal epithelial cell migration on to the corneal surface. We propose that glue should be used to attach the conjunctival frill of the limbal explant but care should be taken to ensure that the glue does not wrap around the explant if used to secure the explant as well. Strategic use of glue, to attach the recessed conjunctiva, can be advantageous in delaying conjunctival cell migration and reducing the need for sequential sector conjunctival epitheliectomy.

  12. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  13. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  14. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus J.; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F.; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along “nanowire” appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface. PMID:21606337

  15. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas A; Edwards, Marcus J; Gates, Andrew J; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S; Marshall, Matthew J; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J

    2011-06-07

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along "nanowire" appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  16. SPARC regulates collagen interaction with cardiac fibroblast cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett S; Zhang, Yuhua; Card, Lauren; Rivera, Lee B; Brekken, Rolf A; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac tissue from mice that do not express secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) have reduced amounts of insoluble collagen content at baseline and in response to pressure overload hypertrophy compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, the cellular mechanism by which SPARC affects myocardial collagen is not clearly defined. Although expression of SPARC by cardiac myocytes has been detected in vitro, immunohistochemistry of hearts demonstrated SPARC staining primarily associated with interstitial fibroblastic cells. Primary cardiac fibroblasts isolated from SPARC-null and WT mice were assayed for collagen I synthesis by [(3)H]proline incorporation into procollagen and by immunoblot analysis of procollagen processing. Bacterial collagenase was used to discern intracellular from extracellular forms of collagen I. Increased amounts of collagen I were found associated with SPARC-null versus WT cells, and the proportion of total collagen I detected on SPARC-null fibroblasts without propeptides [collagen-α(1)(I)] was higher than in WT cells. In addition, the amount of total collagen sensitive to collagenase digestion (extracellular) was greater in SPARC-null cells than in WT cells, indicating an increase in cell surface-associated collagen in the absence of SPARC. Furthermore, higher levels of collagen type V, a fibrillar collagen implicated in collagen fibril initiation, were found in SPARC-null fibroblasts. The absence of SPARC did not result in significant differences in proliferation or in decreased production of procollagen I by cardiac fibroblasts. We conclude that SPARC regulates collagen in the heart by modulating procollagen processing and interactions with fibroblast cell surfaces. These results are consistent with decreased levels of interstitial collagen in the hearts of SPARC-null mice being due primarily to inefficient collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix rather than to differences in collagen production.

  17. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  18. Cell surface charge and cell division in Escherichia coli after x irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, C.; Kojima, K.; Nishizawa, K.; Hirota, Y.

    1981-09-01

    Simultaneous detection of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) and morphology of individual irradiated Escherichia coli cells under the phase microscope revealed a concurrent decrease in EPM and arrest of cell division. EPM decreased with time and reached a minimum 15 min after irradiation with doses ranging from 100 R to 80 kR. Cells elongating due to the division block retained the minimum EPM. After a recovery phase, separated small-sized daughter cells and some long filamentous cells, which had a few cleavages at the termini, returned to the normal EPM. This finding indicates that recovery in EPM, which represents recovery in the surface architecture, precedes or coincides with the resumption of cell division. Nuclear staining of the recovering cells leads to the suggestion that the cleavage of the cell takes place whenever the EPM has recovered, irrespective of the segregation of DNA, which gives rise to anuclear cells having normal EPM.

  19. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    PubMed

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2016-12-27

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1(+) but not STRO-1(-) cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1(BRIGHT) /HSP70(-) fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2016.

  20. Cell surface alpha 2,6 sialylation affects adhesion of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoqiang; Kemmner, Wolfgang; Grigull, Sabine; Schlag, Peter M

    2002-05-15

    Tumor-associated alterations of cell surface glycosylation play a crucial role in the adhesion and metastasis of carcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alpha 2,6-sialylation on the adhesion properties of breast carcinoma cells. To this end mammary carcinoma cells, MDA-MB-435, were sense-transfected with sialyltransferase ST6Gal-I cDNA or antisense-transfected with a part of the ST6Gal-I sequence. Sense transfectants showed an enhanced ST6Gal-I mRNA expression and enzyme activity and an increased binding of the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), specific for alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid. Transfection with ST6Gal-I in the antisense direction resulted in less enzyme activity and SNA reactivity. A sense-transfected clone carrying increased amounts of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid adhered preferentially to collagen IV and showed reduced cell-cell adhesion and enhanced invasion capacity. In contrast, antisense transfection led to less collagen IV adhesion but enhanced homotypic cell-cell adhesion. In another approach, inhibition of ST6Gal-I enzyme activity by application of soluble antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. Antisense treatment resulted in reduced ST6 mRNA expression and cell surface 2,6-sialylation and significantly decreased collagen IV adhesion. Our results suggest that cell surface alpha 2,6-sialylation contributes to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion of tumor cells. Inhibition of sialytransferase ST6Gal-I by antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides might be a way to reduce the metastatic capacity of carcinoma cells.

  1. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  2. Formation of nanofilms on cell surfaces to improve the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amemiya, Yosuke; Kawano, Keiko; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles into fibroblast and neural cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms formed on cell surfaces improved the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms improved the insertion efficiency even in Y27632-treated cells. -- Abstract: A nanoneedle, an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip etched to 200 nm in diameter and 10 {mu}m in length, can be inserted into cells with the aid of an AFM and has been used to introduce functional molecules into cells and to analyze intracellular information with minimal cell damage. However, some cell lines have shown low insertion efficiency of the nanoneedle. Improvement in the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into such cells is a significant issue for nanoneedle-based cell manipulation and analysis. Here, we have formed nanofilms composed of extracellular matrix molecules on cell surfaces and found that the formation of the nanofilms improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into fibroblast and neural cells. The nanofilms were shown to improve insertion efficiency even in cells in which the formation of actin stress fibers was inhibited by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, suggesting that the nanofilms with the mesh structure directly contributed to the improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle.

  3. Interaction of human tumor viruses with host cell surface receptors and cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-05-22

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  4. A possible model for cell-cell recognition via surface macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Burger, M M; Turner, R S; Kuhns, W J; Weinbaum, G

    1975-07-17

    Alternative possibilities for the establishment of the proper cell distribution during embryogenesis are summarized at the beginning, followed by an assessment of the examples known so far where cell-cell recognition is known to be mediated via cell surface components. In the second part the species-specific recognition process which occurs during the sorting-out of dissociated sponge cells is analysed since it may serve as a possible model for cell-cell recognition in higher animals. Three possible mechanisms for the establishment of proper cell distribution are considered. These include, first, chemotaxis: secondly, guidance of cell or cell sheet movement by extracellular matrix or by surrounding cells and thirdly, random movement followed by recognition at the final point of destination. Recognition is necessary for both of the two latter processes, i.e. for cell guidance as well as for locking the cells into their final position after random movement. Two basically different recognition mechanisms should be distinguished from each other. On the one hand cells may recognize each other with the help of macromolecules situated in or just outside of the plasmamembrane which fit to each other like enzymes and substrates or antibodies and antigens. On the other hand, cells may exchange information by exchanging cytoplasmatic components via vesicles or gap junctions. The species-specific aggregation of dissociated sponge cells is considered to be a possible model for cell-cell recognition in higher animals. A proteoglycan-like intercellular macromolecule called aggregation factor seems to mediate recognition of a given species of cells in the reaggregation process of dissociated cells. The data available at the present time suggest that a monovalent surface macromolecule (baseplate) may mediate the recognition process probably by recognizing the carbohydrate side chains of the multivalent proteoglycan aggregation factor. A cell-free system was devised to mimic this

  5. Cell Surface Protein Detection to Assess Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Magdalena; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The migration of membrane receptors upon exposure to different stimulants/inhibitors is of great importance. Among others, the internalization of membrane receptors affects their accessibility to ligands and cell responsiveness to environmental cues. Experimentally, receptor internalization can be used as a measure of their activation. In our studies, we employed this approach to explore cross-talk between a seven transmembrane domain receptor for neuropeptide Y (NPY), Y5R, and a tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB. To this end, we measured the internalization of Y5R upon stimulation with the TrkB ligand, BDNF. Upon treatment with BDNF, the cells were exposed to a membrane impermeable, biotinylation reagent that selectively labels surface proteins. Subsequently, the biotinylated membrane proteins were affinity-purified on columns with avidin resins and analyzed by Western blot. Differences in the fraction of receptors present on the cell surface of control and ligand-treated cells served as a measure of their internalization and response to particular stimuli.

  6. Enhancing Cell therapies from the Outside In: Cell Surface Engineering Using Synthetic Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Matthias T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic treatments based on the injection of living cells are in clinical use and preclinical development for diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease to diabetes. To enhance the function of therapeutic cells, a variety of chemical and materials science strategies are being developed that engineer the surface of therapeutic cells with new molecules, artificial receptors, and multifunctional nanomaterials, synthetically endowing donor cells with new properties and functions. These approaches offer a powerful complement to traditional genetic engineering strategies for enhancing the function of living cells. PMID:21826117

  7. Paired Expression Analysis of Tumor Cell Surface Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Sindiri, Sivasish; Duris, Christine; Wen, Xinyu; He, Jianbin; Wei, Jun S.; Jarzembowski, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antibody-based therapy or with T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is useful to the extent that the cell surface membrane protein being targeted is not expressed on normal tissues. The most successful CAR-based (anti-CD19) or antibody-based therapy (anti-CD20) in hematologic malignancies has the side effect of eliminating the normal B cell compartment. Targeting solid tumors may not provide a similar expendable marker. Beyond antibody to Her2/NEU and EGFR, very few antibody-based and no CAR-based therapies have seen broad clinical application for solid tumors. To expand the way in which the surfaceome of solid tumors can be analyzed, we created an algorithm that defines the pairwise relative overexpression of surface antigens. This enables the development of specific immunotherapies that require the expression of two discrete antigens on the surface of the tumor target. This dyad analysis was facilitated by employing the Hotelling’s T-squared test (Hotelling–Lawley multivariate analysis of variance) for two independent variables in comparison to a third constant entity (i.e., gene expression levels in normal tissues). We also present a unique consensus scoring mechanism for identifying transcripts that encode cell surface proteins. The unique application of our bioinformatics processing pipeline and statistical tools allowed us to compare the expression of two membrane protein targets as a pair, and to propose a new strategy based on implementing immunotherapies that require both antigens to be expressed on the tumor cell surface to trigger therapeutic effector mechanisms. Specifically, we found that, for MYCN amplified neuroblastoma, pairwise expression of ACVR2B or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with GFRA3, GFRA2, Cadherin 24, or with one another provided the strongest hits. For MYCN, non-amplified stage 4 neuroblastoma, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1, or ALK paired with GFRA2, GFRA3, SSK1, GPR173, or

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  9. Characteristic Changes in Cell Surface Glycosylation Accompany Intestinal Epithelial Cell (IEC) Differentiation: High Mannose Structures Dominate the Cell Surface Glycome of Undifferentiated Enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Dayoung; Brune, Kristin A; Mitra, Anupam; Marusina, Alina I; Maverakis, Emanual; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-11-01

    Changes in cell surface glycosylation occur during the development and differentiation of cells and have been widely correlated with the progression of several diseases. Because of their structural diversity and sensitivity to intra- and extracellular conditions, glycans are an indispensable tool for analyzing cellular transformations. Glycans present on the surface of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) mediate interactions with billions of native microorganisms, which continuously populate the mammalian gut. A distinct feature of IECs is that they differentiate as they migrate upwards from the crypt base to the villus tip. In this study, nano-LC/ESI QTOF MS profiling was used to characterize the changes in glycosylation that correspond to Caco-2 cell differentiation. As Caco-2 cells differentiate to form a brush border membrane, a decrease in high mannose type glycans and a concurrent increase in fucosylated and sialylated complex/hybrid type glycans were observed. At day 21, when cells appear to be completely differentiated, remodeling of the cell surface glycome ceases. Differential expression of glycans during IEC maturation appears to play a key functional role in regulating the membrane-associated hydrolases and contributes to the mucosal surface innate defense mechanisms. Developing methodologies to rapidly identify changes in IEC surface glycans may lead to a rapid screening approach for a variety of disease states affecting the GI tract. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem-like...investigate the hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem...investigate these signaling pathways in year 2. Task 4: Investigate the relative expression of Snail -1, a GSK-3 target, in adherent prostate cancer cells

  11. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  12. Advances in the theory and application of BSF cells. [Back Surface Field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the influence of fabrication processes and bulk material properties on the behavior of back surface field (BSF) cells is reported. It is concluded that a photovoltage is generated at the p(+), p back junction of the cell. The concept of majority carrier collection is proposed as a possible mechanism for this generation. Advantages accruing to the advent of BSF cells are outlined.

  13. Advances in the theory and application of BSF cells. [Back Surface Field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the influence of fabrication processes and bulk material properties on the behavior of back surface field (BSF) cells is reported. It is concluded that a photovoltage is generated at the p(+), p back junction of the cell. The concept of majority carrier collection is proposed as a possible mechanism for this generation. Advantages accruing to the advent of BSF cells are outlined.

  14. Advances in targeting cell surface signalling molecules for immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheng; Zhu, Yuwen; Chen, Lieping

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the development of immunomodulatory approaches to combat a broad range of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, autoimmunity and inflammation as well as in the prevention of transplant rejection. Immunomodulatory approaches mostly involve the use of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant fusion proteins that target cell surface signalling molecules on immune cells to drive immune responses towards the desired direction. Advances in our understanding of the human immune system, along with valuable lessons learned from the first generation of therapeutic biologics, are aiding the design of the next generation of immunomodulatory biologics with better therapeutic efficacy, minimized adverse effects and long-lasting clinical benefit. The recent encouraging results from antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) and B7 homolog 1 (B7H1; also known as PDL1) for the treatment of various advanced human cancers show that immunomodulatory therapy has come of age. PMID:23370250

  15. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  16. A hybrid biocathode: surface display of O2-reducing enzymes for microbial fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Szczupak, Alon; Kol-Kalman, Dan; Alfonta, Lital

    2012-01-04

    Laccase and bilirubin oxidase were successfully displayed on the surface of yeast cells. Subsequently, these modified yeast cells were used in the cathode compartment of a microbial fuel cell. The performance of the fuel cells is compared.

  17. Ovarian carcinoma cells synthesize both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate cell surface proteoglycans that mediate cell adhesion to interstitial matrix.

    PubMed

    Kokenyesi, R

    Metastatic ovarian carcinoma metastasizes by intra-peritoneal, non-hematogenous dissemination. The adhesion of the ovarian carcinoma cells to extracellular matrix components, such as types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, is essential for intra-peritoneal dissemination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cell surface proteoglycans (a class of matrix receptors) are produced by ovarian carcinoma cells, and whether these proteoglycans have a role in the adhesion of ovarian carcinoma cells to types I and III collagen and fibronectin. Proteoglycans were metabolically labeled for biochemical studies. Both phosphatidylinositol-anchored and integral membrane-type cell surface proteoglycans were found to be present on the SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cell lines. Three proteoglycan populations of differing hydrodynamic size were detected in both SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cells. Digestions with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC showed that cell surface proteoglycans of SK-OV-3 cells had higher proportion of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (75:25 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio), while NIH:OVCAR-3 cells had higher proportion of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (10:90 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio). RT-PCR indicated the synthesis of a unique assortment of syndecans, glypicans, and CD44 by the two cell lines. In adhesion assays performed on matrix-coated titer plates both cell lines adhered to types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, and cell adhesion was inhibited by preincubation of the matrix with heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, or chondroitin glycosaminoglycans. Treatment of the cells with heparitinase, chondroitinase ABC, or methylumbelliferyl xyloside also interfered with adhesion confirming the role of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate cell surface proteoglycans as matrix receptors on ovarian carcinoma cells.

  18. Role of Site-Specific N-Glycans Expressed on GluA2 in the Regulation of Cell Surface Expression of AMPA-Type Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yusuke; Morise, Jyoji; Morita, Ippei; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    The AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR), which is a tetrameric complex composed of four subunits (GluA1-4) with several combinations, mediates the majority of rapid excitatory synaptic transmissions in the nervous system. Cell surface expression levels of AMPAR modulate synaptic plasticity, which is considered one of the molecular bases for learning and memory formation. To date, a unique trisaccharide (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc), human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate, was found expressed specifically on N-linked glycans of GluA2 and regulated the cell surface expression of AMPAR and the spine maturation process. However, evidence that the HNK-1 epitope on N-glycans of GluA2 directly affects these phenomena is lacking. Moreover, it is thought that other N-glycans on GluA2 also have potential roles in the regulation of AMPAR functions. In the present study, using a series of mutants lacking potential N-glycosylation sites (N256, N370, N406, and N413) within GluA2, we demonstrated that the mutant lacking the N-glycan at N370 strongly suppressed the intracellular trafficking of GluA2 from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in HEK293 cells. Cell surface expression of GluA1, which is a major subunit of AMPAR in neurons, was also suppressed by co-expression of the GluA2 N370S mutant. The N370S mutant and wild-type GluA2 were co-immunoprecipitated with GluA1, suggesting that N370S was properly associated with GluA1. Moreover, we found that N413 was the main potential site of the HNK-1 epitope that promoted the interaction of GluA2 with N-cadherin, resulting in enhanced cell surface expression of GluA2. The HNK-1 epitope on N-glycan at the N413 of GluA2 was also involved in the cell surface expression of GluA1. Thus, our data suggested that site-specific N-glycans on GluA2 regulate the intracellular trafficking and cell surface expression of AMPAR.

  19. Surface-labelling studies on skeletal-muscle cells in vitro. Heterogeneity of iodinated cell-surface proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cates, G A; Holland, P C

    1980-01-01

    1. Two distinct classes of protein were detected at the surface of chick-embryo skeletal-muscle cells after iodination of the cells in monolayer culture. 2. The two classes of iodinated proteins differed in their ability to co-purify with a vesicular plasma-membrane fraction prepared from surface-labelled cells. 3. One class consisted of predominantly high-molecular-weight glycoproteins that co-purified with the plasma-membrane fraction, but showed no significant qualitative or quantitative alterations in labelling with 125I and lactoperoxidase during myogenesis. 4. A second class of predominantly lower-molecular-weight proteins showed reproducible quantitative alterations in 125I-labelling during myogenesis but failed to co-purify with the plasma-membrane fraction. 5. This second class of proteins may represent matrix proteins involved in intercellular adhesion or adhesion of cells to the substratum. They are unlikely to be directly required for the process of plasma-membrane fusion during myogenesis, since they do not copurify with a vesicular plasma-membrane fraction known to be capable of Ca2+-dependent fusion in vitro. PMID:7370009

  20. Functional mapping of cell surface proteins with localized stimulation of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bingyun; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes the development of using individual micro and nano meter-sized vesicles as delivery vessels to functionally map the distribution of cell surface proteins at the level of single cells. The formation of different sizes of vesicles from tens of nanometers to a few micrometers in diameter that contain the desired molecules is addressed. An optical trap is used to manipulate the loaded vesicle to specific cell morphology of interest, and a pulsed UV laser is used to photo-release the stimuli onto the cell membrane. Carbachol activated cellular calcium flux, upon binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, is studied by this method, and the potential of using this method for the functional mapping of localized proteins on the cell surface membrane is discussed.

  1. Surface Functionalized Graphene Biosensor on Sapphire for Cancer Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Joe, Daniel J; Hwang, Jeonghyun; Johnson, Christelle; Cha, Ho-Young; Lee, Jo-Won; Shen, Xiling; Spencer, Michael G; Tiwari, Sandip; Kim, Moonkyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has several unique physical, optical and electrical properties such as a two-dimensional (2D) planar structure, high optical transparency and high carrier mobility at room temperature. These make graphene interesting for electrical biosensing. Using a catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, graphene film is grown on a sapphire substrate. There is a single or a few sheets as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrical graphene biosensors are fabricated to detect large-sized biological analytes such as cancer cells. Human colorectal carcinoma cells are sensed by the resistance change of an active bio-functionalized graphene device as the cells are captured by the immobilized antibody surface. The functionalized sensors show an increase in resistance as large as ~20% of the baseline with a small number of adhered cells. This study suggests that the bio-functionalized electrical graphene sensors on sapphire, which is a highly transparent material, can potentially detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and monitor cellular electrical behavior while being compatible with fluorescence-based optical-detection bioassays.

  2. Controlling cell–cell interactions using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B.; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells. PMID:25535339

  3. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  4. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression. PMID:26601950

  5. Endothelial cell labeling with indium-111-oxine as a marker of cell attachment to bioprosthetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sharefkin, J.B.; Lather, C.; Smith, M.; Rich, N.M.

    1983-03-01

    Canine vascular endothelium labeled with indium-111-oxine was used as a marker of cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces with complex textures. Primarily cultured and freshly harvested endothelial cells both took up the label rapidly. An average of 72% of a 32 micro Ci labeling dose was taken up by 1.5 X 10(6) cells in 10 min in serum-free medium. Over 95% of freshly labeled cells were viable by trypan blue tests and only 5% of the label was released after 1 h incubations at 37 degrees C. Labeled and unlabeled cells had similar rates of attachment to plastic dishes. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed that labeled cells retained their ability to spread on tissue culture dishes even at low (1%) serum levels. Labeled endothelial cells seeded onto Dacron or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular prostheses by methods used in current surgical models could be identified by autoradiography of microscopic sections of the prostheses, and the efficiency of cell attachment to the prosthesis could be measured by gamma counting. Indium-111 labeling affords a simple and rapid way to measure initial cell attachment to, and distribution on, vascular prosthetic materials. The method could also allow measurement of early cell loss from a flow surface in vivo by using external gamma imaging.

  6. Tetraploid cells from cytokinesis failure induce aneuploidy and spontaneous transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lei; Zhang, Tianwei; Yi, Qiyi; Huang, Yun; Wang, Zheng; Hou, Heli; Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Wei; Hao, Qiaomei; Guo, Zongyou; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2012-08-01

    Most ovarian cancers originate from the ovarian surface epithelium and are characterized by aneuploid karyotypes. Aneuploidy, a consequence of chromosome instability, is an early event during the development of ovarian cancers. However, how aneuploid cells are evolved from normal diploid cells in ovarian cancers remains unknown. In the present study, cytogenetic analyses of a mouse syngeneic ovarian cancer model revealed that diploid mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells (MOSECs) experienced an intermediate tetraploid cell stage, before evolving to aneuploid (mainly near-tetraploid) cells. Using long-term live-cell imaging followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrated that tetraploid cells originally arose from cytokinesis failure of bipolar mitosis in diploid cells, and gave rise to aneuploid cells through chromosome mis-segregation during both bipolar and multipolar mitoses. Injection of the late passage aneuploid MOSECs resulted in tumor formation in C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, we reveal a pathway for the evolution of diploid to aneuploid MOSECs and elucidate a mechanism for the development of near-tetraploid ovarian cancer cells.

  7. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture