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Sample records for cell survival kinetics

  1. Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, B.; Andreeff, M.; Li, D.

    1983-11-01

    Cell survival kinetics in both peripheral blood and in bone marrow have been studied over the time course of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Our unique TBI regimen allows the study of the in vivo radiation effect uncomplicated by prior cyclophosphamide, since this agent is given after TBI in our cytoreduction scheme. Peripheral blood cell concentrations were monitored with conventional laboratory cell counts and differentials. Absolute bone marrow cell concentrations were monitored by measuring cell concentrations in an aspirate sample and correcting for dilution with blood by a cell cycle kinetic method using cytofluorometry. For lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients in remission, the effective D/sub 0/ ranged from 373 rad in 10 children less than or equal to 10 y old, to 536 rad in the four patients between 11 to 17 y old, while n = 1.0 in all groups. There was no trend observed according to age. Granulocytes had a much higher effective D/sub 0/, approximately 1000 rad in vivo. Absolute nucleated cell concentration in marrow dropped slowly initially, due to an increased lymphocyte concentration in marrow during a concurrent drop in lymphocyte concentration in peripheral blood, but eventually fell on the last day of TBI ranging from 7 to 44% of the initial marrow nucleated cell concentration. Marrow myeloid elements, however, dropped continuously throughout the course of TBI.

  2. Cell survival fraction estimation based on the probability densities of domain and cell nucleus specific energies using improved microdosimetric kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2012-10-01

    Estimation of the survival fractions of cells irradiated with various particles over a wide linear energy transfer (LET) range is of great importance in the treatment planning of charged-particle therapy. Two computational models were developed for estimating survival fractions based on the concept of the microdosimetric kinetic model. They were designated as the double-stochastic microdosimetric kinetic and stochastic microdosimetric kinetic models. The former model takes into account the stochastic natures of both domain and cell nucleus specific energies, whereas the latter model represents the stochastic nature of domain specific energy by its approximated mean value and variance to reduce the computational time. The probability densities of the domain and cell nucleus specific energies are the fundamental quantities for expressing survival fractions in these models. These densities are calculated using the microdosimetric and LET-estimator functions implemented in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) in combination with the convolution or database method. Both the double-stochastic microdosimetric kinetic and stochastic microdosimetric kinetic models can reproduce the measured survival fractions for high-LET and high-dose irradiations, whereas a previously proposed microdosimetric kinetic model predicts lower values for these fractions, mainly due to intrinsic ignorance of the stochastic nature of cell nucleus specific energies in the calculation. The models we developed should contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of cell inactivation, as well as improve the accuracy of treatment planning of charged-particle therapy.

  3. Comparative study of dose distributions and cell survival fractions for 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O beams using Geant4 and Microdosimetric Kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Depth and radial dose profiles for therapeutic 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O beams are calculated using the Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT). 4He and 16O ions are presented as alternative options to 1H and 12C broadly used for ion-beam cancer therapy. Biological dose profiles and survival fractions of cells are estimated using the modified Microdosimetric Kinetic model. Depth distributions of cell survival of healthy tissues, assuming 10% and 50% survival of tumor cells, are calculated for 6 cm SOBPs at two tumor depths and for different tissues radiosensitivities. It is found that the optimal ion choice depends on (i) depth of the tumor, (ii) dose levels and (iii) the contrast of radiosensitivities of tumor and surrounding healthy tissues. Our results indicate that 12C and 16O ions are more appropriate to spare healthy tissues in the case of a more radioresistant tumor at moderate depths. On the other hand, a sensitive tumor surrounded by more resistant tissues can be better treated with 1H and 4He ions. In general, 4He beam is found to be a good candidate for therapy. It better spares healthy tissues in all considered cases compared to 1H. Besides, the dose conformation is improved for deep-seated tumors compared to 1H, and the damage to surrounding healthy tissues is reduced compared to heavier ions due to the lower impact of nuclear fragmentation. No definite advantages of 16O with respect to 12C ions are found in this study.

  4. Comparative study of dose distributions and cell survival fractions for 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O beams using Geant4 and Microdosimetric Kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-04-21

    Depth and radial dose profiles for therapeutic (1)H, (4)He, (12)C and (16)O beams are calculated using the Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT). (4)He and (16)O ions are presented as alternative options to (1)H and (12)C broadly used for ion-beam cancer therapy. Biological dose profiles and survival fractions of cells are estimated using the modified Microdosimetric Kinetic model. Depth distributions of cell survival of healthy tissues, assuming 10% and 50% survival of tumor cells, are calculated for 6 cm SOBPs at two tumor depths and for different tissues radiosensitivities. It is found that the optimal ion choice depends on (i) depth of the tumor, (ii) dose levels and (iii) the contrast of radiosensitivities of tumor and surrounding healthy tissues. Our results indicate that (12)C and (16)O ions are more appropriate to spare healthy tissues in the case of a more radioresistant tumor at moderate depths. On the other hand, a sensitive tumor surrounded by more resistant tissues can be better treated with (1)H and (4)He ions. In general, (4)He beam is found to be a good candidate for therapy. It better spares healthy tissues in all considered cases compared to (1)H. Besides, the dose conformation is improved for deep-seated tumors compared to (1)H, and the damage to surrounding healthy tissues is reduced compared to heavier ions due to the lower impact of nuclear fragmentation. No definite advantages of (16)O with respect to (12)C ions are found in this study.

  5. Long-term survival and T-cell kinetics in relapsed/refractory ALL patients who achieved MRD response after blinatumomab treatment.

    PubMed

    Zugmaier, Gerhard; Gökbuget, Nicola; Klinger, Matthias; Viardot, Andreas; Stelljes, Matthias; Neumann, Svenja; Horst, Heinz-A; Marks, Reinhard; Faul, Christoph; Diedrich, Helmut; Reichle, Albrecht; Brüggemann, Monika; Holland, Chris; Schmidt, Margit; Einsele, Hermann; Bargou, Ralf C; Topp, Max S

    2015-12-10

    This long-term follow-up analysis evaluated overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in a phase 2 study of the bispecific T-cell engager antibody construct blinatumomab in 36 adults with relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the primary analysis, 25 (69%) patients with relapsed/refractory ALL achieved complete remission with full (CR) or partial (CRh) hematologic recovery of peripheral blood counts within the first 2 cycles. Twenty-five patients (69%) had a minimal residual disease (MRD) response (<10(-4) blasts), including 22 CR/CRh responders, 2 patients with hypocellular bone marrow, and 1 patient with normocellular bone marrow but low peripheral counts. Ten of the 36 patients (28%) were long-term survivors (OS ≥30 months). Median OS was 13.0 months (median follow-up, 32.6 months). MRD response was associated with significantly longer OS (Mantel-Byar P = .009). All 10 long-term survivors had an MRD response. Median RFS was 8.8 months (median follow-up, 28.9 months). A plateau for RFS was reached after ∼18 months. Six of the 10 long-term survivors remained relapse-free, including 4 who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) as consolidation for blinatumomab and 2 who received 3 additional cycles of blinatumomab instead of allo-SCT. Three long-term survivors had neurologic events or cytokine release syndrome, resulting in temporary blinatumomab discontinuation; all restarted blinatumomab successfully. Long-term survivors had more pronounced T-cell expansion than patients with OS <30 months.

  6. Long-term survival and T-cell kinetics in relapsed/refractory ALL patients who achieved MRD response after blinatumomab treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gökbuget, Nicola; Klinger, Matthias; Viardot, Andreas; Stelljes, Matthias; Neumann, Svenja; Horst, Heinz-A.; Marks, Reinhard; Faul, Christoph; Diedrich, Helmut; Reichle, Albrecht; Brüggemann, Monika; Holland, Chris; Schmidt, Margit; Einsele, Hermann; Bargou, Ralf C.; Topp, Max S.

    2015-01-01

    This long-term follow-up analysis evaluated overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in a phase 2 study of the bispecific T-cell engager antibody construct blinatumomab in 36 adults with relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the primary analysis, 25 (69%) patients with relapsed/refractory ALL achieved complete remission with full (CR) or partial (CRh) hematologic recovery of peripheral blood counts within the first 2 cycles. Twenty-five patients (69%) had a minimal residual disease (MRD) response (<10−4 blasts), including 22 CR/CRh responders, 2 patients with hypocellular bone marrow, and 1 patient with normocellular bone marrow but low peripheral counts. Ten of the 36 patients (28%) were long-term survivors (OS ≥30 months). Median OS was 13.0 months (median follow-up, 32.6 months). MRD response was associated with significantly longer OS (Mantel-Byar P = .009). All 10 long-term survivors had an MRD response. Median RFS was 8.8 months (median follow-up, 28.9 months). A plateau for RFS was reached after ∼18 months. Six of the 10 long-term survivors remained relapse-free, including 4 who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) as consolidation for blinatumomab and 2 who received 3 additional cycles of blinatumomab instead of allo-SCT. Three long-term survivors had neurologic events or cytokine release syndrome, resulting in temporary blinatumomab discontinuation; all restarted blinatumomab successfully. Long-term survivors had more pronounced T-cell expansion than patients with OS <30 months. PMID:26480933

  7. Cometary impact and amino acid survival - Chemical kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9?? above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometa??ry delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  8. Control of lens epithelial cell survival

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the survival requirements of developing lens epithelial cells to test the hypothesis that most cells are programmed to kill themselves unless they are continuously signaled by other cells not to do so. The lens cells survived for weeks in both explant cultures and high-density dissociated cell cultures in the absence of other cells or added serum or protein, suggesting that they do not require signals from other cell types to survive. When cultured at low density, however, they died by apoptosis, suggesting that they depend on other lens epithelial cells for their survival. Lens epithelial cells cultured at high density in agarose gels also survived for weeks, even though they were not in direct contact with one another, suggesting that they can promote one another's survival in the absence of cell- cell contact. Conditioned medium from high density cultures promoted the survival of cells cultured at low density, suggesting that lens epithelial cells support one another's survival by secreting survival factors. We show for the first time that normal cell death occurs within the anterior epithelium in the mature lens, but this death is strictly confined to the region of the anterior suture. PMID:8491781

  9. Modelling reaction kinetics inside cells

    PubMed Central

    Grima, Ramon; Schnell, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in molecular biology such as the development of non-invasive single molecule imaging techniques have given us a window into the intricate biochemical activities that occur inside cells. In this article we review four distinct theoretical and simulation frameworks: (1) non-spatial and deterministic, (2) spatial and deterministic, (3) non-spatial and stochastic and (4) spatial and stochastic. Each framework can be suited to modelling and interpreting intracellular reaction kinetics. By estimating the fundamental length scales, one can roughly determine which models are best suited for the particular reaction pathway under study. We discuss differences in prediction between the four modelling methodologies. In particular we show that taking into account noise and space does not simply add quantitative predictive accuracy but may also lead to qualitatively different physiological predictions, unaccounted for by classical deterministic models. PMID:18793122

  10. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  11. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  12. Dynamic identification of growth and survival kinetic parameters of microorganisms in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inverse analysis is a mathematical method used in predictive microbiology to determine the kinetic parameters of microbial growth and survival in foods. The traditional approach in inverse analysis relies on isothermal experiments that are time-consuming and labor-intensive, and errors are accumula...

  13. Cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival

    PubMed Central

    Komissarov, Alexey A.; Rafieva, Lola M.; Kostrov, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic vacuolization (also called cytoplasmic vacuolation) is a well-known morphological phenomenon observed in mammalian cells after exposure to bacterial or viral pathogens as well as to various natural and artificial low-molecular-weight compounds. Vacuolization often accompanies cell death; however, its role in cell death processes remains unclear. This can be attributed to studying vacuolization at the level of morphology for many years. At the same time, new data on the molecular mechanisms of the vacuole formation and structure have become available. In addition, numerous examples of the association between vacuolization and previously unknown cell death types have been reported. Here, we review these data to make a deeper insight into the role of cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival. PMID:27331412

  14. Imaging neurotransmitter release kinetics in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Weihong; Yeung, E.S.; Haydon, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    A new UV-laser based optical microscope and CCD detection system has been developed to image neurotransmitter in living biological cells. We demonstrate the detection of serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual living glial cells (astrocytes) based on its native fluorescence. The detection methodology has high sensitivity, low limit of detection and does not require coupling to fluorescence dyes. We have studied serotonin uptake kinetics and its release dynamics in single glial cells. Different regions of a glial cell have taken up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of kinetics. Similarly, different serotonin release mechanisms have been observed in different astrocyte cell regions. The temporal resolution of this detection system is as fast as 50 ms, and the spatial resolution is diffraction limited. We will also report on single enzyme molecule reaction studies and single metal ion detection based on CCD imaging of pL reaction vials formed by micromachining on fused silica.

  15. Cellular senescence: ex vivo p53-dependent asymmetric cell kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Although senescence is a defining property of euploid mammalian cells, its physiologic basis remains obscure. Previously, cell kinetics properties of normal tissue cells have not been considered in models for senescence. We now provide evidence that senescence is in fact the natural consequence of normal in vivo somatic stem cell kinetics extended in culture. This concept of senescence is based on our discovery that cells engineered to conditionally express the well-recognized tumor suppressor protein and senescence factor, p53, exhibit asymmetric cell kinetics. In vivo, asymmetric cell kinetics are essential for maintenance of somatic stem cells; ex vivo, the same cell kinetics yield senescence as a simple kinetic endpoint. This new “asymmetric cell kinetics model” for senescence suggests novel strategies for the isolation and propagation of somatic tissue stem cells in culture. PMID:12488624

  16. Disease kinetics but not disease burden is relevant for survival in melanoma of unknown primary tumor.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Markus V; Tietze, Julia K; Reinholz, Markus; Rahimi, Farnaz; Jung, Andreas; Kirchner, Thomas; Ruzicka, Thomas; Flaig, Michael J; Berking, Carola

    2015-10-01

    Melanoma of unknown primary (MUP) is a type of metastatic melanoma with no evidence of a primary tumor. Recent evidence suggested better survival in MUP as compared to melanoma with a known primary site (MKP). However, prognostic markers that reliably predict overall survival in MUP are lacking. The primary objective of this study was to analyze the mutational status of the BRAF, NRAS, and KIT oncogenes and to investigate if the genotype or other clinical parameters were associated with overall survival. We retrospectively analyzed the genotype and the clinical course of 40 patients with MUP. Mutations of BRAF and NRAS were determined with pyrosequencing. Mutations of KIT were investigated with a nested PCR approach followed by Sanger sequencing. Survival fractions were calculated applying the Kaplan-Meier model. Mutations in the BRAF (50.0%), NRAS (17.5%), and KIT genes (5.0%) were found frequently, but had no major impact on overall survival (p=0.62). The AJCC stage was a strong prognostic factor with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 (stage III vs. IV; p=0.04). All patients diagnosed with stage III disease survived the median follow-up period of 23 months (p=0.03). The survival rates of patients with stage IV were significantly associated with rapid disease progression but not with metastatic tumor load at primary diagnosis (p=0.01). Altogether, AJCC stage and time to disease progression were important prognostic parameters. We propose that the kinetics of the disease but not the initial metastatic burden nor the mutational status is relevant for survival in advanced MUP.

  17. Mechanisms of cell survival in myocardial hibernation.

    PubMed

    Depre, Christophe; Vatner, Stephen F

    2005-04-01

    Myocardial hibernation represents a condition of regional ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic coronary artery disease, which reverses gradually after revascularization. The precise mechanism mediating the regional dysfunction is still debated. One hypothesis suggests that chronic hypoperfusion results in a self-protecting downregulation in myocardial function and metabolism to match the decreased oxygen supply. An alternative hypothesis suggests that the myocardium is subject to repetitive episodes of ischemic dysfunction resulting from an imbalance between myocardial metabolic demand and supply that eventually creates a sustained depression of contractility. It is generally agreed that hibernating myocardium is submitted repeatedly to ischemic stress, and therefore one question persists: how do myocytes survive in the setting of chronic ischemia? The hallmark of hibernating myocardium is a maintained viability of the dysfunctional myocardium which relies on an increased uptake of glucose. We propose that, in addition to this metabolic adjustment, there must be molecular switches that confer resistance to ischemia in hibernating myocardium. Such mechanisms include the activation of a genomic program of cell survival as well as autophagy. These protective mechanisms are induced by ischemia and remain activated chronically as long as either sustained or intermittent ischemia persists.

  18. Nrf2 signaling and cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Niture, Suryakant K.; Kaspar, James W.; Shen, Jun; Jaiswal, Anil K.

    2010-04-01

    Nrf2:INrf2 acts as a sensor for oxidative/electrophilic stress. INrf2 serves as an adaptor to link Nrf2 to the ubiquitin ligase Cul3-Rbx1 complex that ubiquitinate and degrade Nrf2. Under basal conditions, cytosolic INrf2/Cul3-Rbx1 is constantly degrading Nrf2. When a cell encounters stress Nrf2 dissociates from the INrf2 and translocates into the nucleus. Oxidative/electrophilic stress induced modification of INrf2Cysteine151 and/or protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Nrf2Serine40 controls Nrf2 release from INrf2 followed by stabilization and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Nrf2 binds to the antioxidant response element (ARE) and activates a myriad of genes that protect cells against oxidative/electrophilic stress and neoplasia. A delayed response of oxidative/electrophilic stress activates GSK-3beta that phosphorylates Fyn at unknown threonine residue(s). Phosphorylated Fyn translocates to the nucleus and phosphorylates Nrf2Tyrosine568 that leads to nuclear export and degradation of Nrf2. Prothymosin-alpha mediated nuclear translocation of INrf2 also degrades nuclear Nrf2. The degradation of Nrf2 both in cytosol and nuclear compartments rapidly brings down its levels to normal resulting in suppression of Nrf2 downstream gene expression. An auto-regulatory loop between Nrf2 and INrf2 controls their cellular abundance. Nrf2 regulates INrf2 by controlling its transcription, and INrf2 controls Nrf2 by degrading it. In conclusion, switching on and off of Nrf2 combined with promoting an auto-regulatory loop between them regulates activation/deactivation of defensive genes leading to protection of cells against adverse effects of oxidative and electrophilic stress and promote cell survival.

  19. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  20. Cometary impact and amino acid survival--chemical kinetics and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S

    2006-06-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9 degrees above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometary delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely.

  1. Adolescent binge alcohol exposure alters hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation in rats: effects on cell cycle kinetics.

    PubMed

    McClain, Justin A; Hayes, Dayna M; Morris, Stephanie A; Nixon, Kimberly

    2011-09-01

    Binge alcohol exposure in adolescent rats potently inhibits adult hippocampal neurogenesis by altering neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation and survival; however, it is not clear whether alcohol results in an increase or decrease in net proliferation. Thus, the effects of alcohol on hippocampal NPC cell cycle phase distribution and kinetics were assessed in an adolescent rat model of an alcohol use disorder. Cell cycle distribution was measured using a combination of markers (Ki-67, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and phosphohistone H3) to determine the proportion of NPCs within G1, S, and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Cell cycle kinetics were calculated using a cumulative bromodeoxyuridine injection protocol to determine the effect of alcohol on cell cycle length and S-phase duration. Binge alcohol exposure reduced the proportion of NPCs in S-phase, but had no effect on G1 or G2/M phases, indicating that alcohol specifically targets S-phase of the cell cycle. Cell cycle kinetics studies revealed that alcohol reduced NPC cell cycle duration by 36% and shortened S-phase by 62%, suggesting that binge alcohol exposure accelerates progression through the cell cycle. This effect would be expected to increase NPC proliferation, which was supported by a slight, but significant increase in the number of Sox-2+ NPCs residing in the hippocampal subgranular zone following binge alcohol exposure. These studies suggest the mechanism of alcohol inhibition of neurogenesis and also reveal the earliest evidence of the compensatory neurogenesis reaction that has been observed a week after binge alcohol exposure.

  2. Cell survival in a simulated Mars environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; Kurk, Michael Andy; Boland, Eugene; Thomas, David

    2016-07-01

    The most ancient life forms on earth date back comfortably to the time when liquid water was believed to be abundant on Mars. These ancient life forms include cyanobacteria, contemporary autotrophic earth organisms believed to have descended from ancestors present as long as 3.5 billion years ago. Contemporary cyanobacteria have adapted to the earth environment's harshest conditions (long-term drying, high and low temperature), and, being autotrophic, they are among the most likely life forms to withstand space travel and the Mars environment. However, it is unlikely that humans would unwittingly contaminate a planetary spacecraft with these microbes. One the other hand, heterotrophic microbes that co-habit with humans are more likely spacecraft contaminants, as history attests. Indeed, soil samples from the Atacama desert have yielded colony-forming organisms resembling enteric bacteria. There is a need to understand the survivability of cyanobacteria (likely survivors, unlikely contaminants) and heterotrophic eubacteria (unlikely survivors, likely contaminants) under simulated planetary conditions. A 35-day test was performed in a commercial planetary simulation system (Techshot, Inc., Greenville, IN) in which the minimum night-time temperature was -80 C, the maximum daytime temperature was +26 C, the simulated day-night light cycle in earth hours was 12-on and 12-off, and the total pressure of the pure CO _{2} atmosphere was maintained below 11 mbar. Any water present was allowed to equilibrate with the changing temperature and pressure. The gas phase was sampled into a CR1-A low-pressure hygrometer (Buck Technologies, Boulder, CO), and dew/frost point was measured once every hour and recorded on a data logger, along with the varying temperature in the chamber, from which the partial pressure of water was calculated. According to measurements there was no liquid water present throughout the test except during the initial pump-down period when aqueous specimens

  3. Polyphosphate Affects on Breast Cancer Cell Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    vortexing), heating , and pellet resuspensions. Figure 12 depicts the steps of the procedure. E . coli cultures were pelleted in a 1.5-mL tube and...biosynthetic enzyme, polyphosphate kinase (PPK) has been purified from Escherichia coli ( E . coli ) (Akiyama et al., 1992), as have an exopolyphosphatase (PPX...respond to and survive environmental challenges, such as nutrient deprivation, heat shock , phosphate deficiency, oxidative stress, and osmotic

  4. Visualizing cell-cycle kinetics after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci).

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsuaki; Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-12-10

    Hypoxia induces G1 arrest in many cancer cell types. Tumor cells are often exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation, especially under acute hypoxic conditions in vivo. In this study, we investigated cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). Hypoxic treatment halted cell-cycle progression during mid-S to G2 phase, as determined by the cell cycle-regulated E3 ligase activities of SCF(Skp2) and APC/C(Cdh1), which are regulators of the Fucci probes; however, the DNA content of the arrested cells was equivalent to that in G1 phase. After reoxygenation, time-lapse imaging and DNA content analysis revealed that all cells reached G2 phase, and that Fucci fluorescence was distinctly separated into two fractions 24h after reoxygenation: red cells that released from G2 arrest after repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) exhibited higher clonogenic survival, whereas most cells that stayed green contained many DSBs and exhibited lower survival. We conclude that hypoxia disrupts coordination of DNA synthesis and E3 ligase activities associated with cell-cycle progression, and that DSB repair could greatly influence cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  5. Kinetics of a Criegee intermediate that would survive high humidity and may oxidize atmospheric SO2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Li; Chao, Wen; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-09-01

    Criegee intermediates are thought to play a role in atmospheric chemistry, in particular, the oxidation of SO2, which produces SO3 and subsequently H2SO4, an important constituent of aerosols and acid rain. However, the impact of such oxidation reactions is affected by the reactions of Criegee intermediates with water vapor, because of high water concentrations in the troposphere. In this work, the kinetics of the reactions of dimethyl substituted Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO with water vapor and with SO2 were directly measured via UV absorption of (CH3)2COO under near-atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that (i) the water reaction with (CH3)2COO is not fast enough (kH2O < 1.5 × 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1)) to consume atmospheric (CH3)2COO significantly and (ii) (CH3)2COO reacts with SO2 at a near-gas-kinetic-limit rate (kSO2 = 1.3 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)). These observations imply a significant fraction of atmospheric (CH3)2COO may survive under humid conditions and react with SO2, very different from the case of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO, in which the reaction with water dimer predominates in the CH2OO decay under typical tropospheric conditions. In addition, a significant pressure dependence was observed for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, suggesting the use of low pressure rate may underestimate the impact of this reaction. This work demonstrates that the reactivity of a Criegee intermediate toward water vapor strongly depends on its structure, which will influence the main decay pathways and steady-state concentrations for various Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere.

  6. Kinetics of a Criegee intermediate that would survive high humidity and may oxidize atmospheric SO2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao-Li; Chao, Wen; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-01-01

    Criegee intermediates are thought to play a role in atmospheric chemistry, in particular, the oxidation of SO2, which produces SO3 and subsequently H2SO4, an important constituent of aerosols and acid rain. However, the impact of such oxidation reactions is affected by the reactions of Criegee intermediates with water vapor, because of high water concentrations in the troposphere. In this work, the kinetics of the reactions of dimethyl substituted Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO with water vapor and with SO2 were directly measured via UV absorption of (CH3)2COO under near-atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that (i) the water reaction with (CH3)2COO is not fast enough (kH2O < 1.5 × 10−16 cm3s−1) to consume atmospheric (CH3)2COO significantly and (ii) (CH3)2COO reacts with SO2 at a near–gas-kinetic-limit rate (kSO2 = 1.3 × 10−10 cm3s−1). These observations imply a significant fraction of atmospheric (CH3)2COO may survive under humid conditions and react with SO2, very different from the case of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO, in which the reaction with water dimer predominates in the CH2OO decay under typical tropospheric conditions. In addition, a significant pressure dependence was observed for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, suggesting the use of low pressure rate may underestimate the impact of this reaction. This work demonstrates that the reactivity of a Criegee intermediate toward water vapor strongly depends on its structure, which will influence the main decay pathways and steady-state concentrations for various Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. PMID:26283390

  7. Decohesion kinetics in polymer organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Christopher; Novoa, Fernando; Dupont, Stephanie; Dauskardt, Reinhold

    2014-12-10

    We investigate the role of molecular weight (MW) of the photoactive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) on the temperature-dependent decohesion kinetics of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). The MW of P3HT has been directly correlated to its carrier field effect mobilities and the ambient temperature also affects OSC in-service performance and P3HT arrangement within the BHJ layer. Under inert conditions, time-dependent decohesion readily occurs within the BHJ layer at loads well below its fracture resistance. We observe that by increasing the MW of P3HT, greater resistance to decohesion is achieved. However, failure consistently occurs within the BHJ layer representing the weakest layer within the device stack. Additionally, it was found that at temperatures below the glass transition temperature (∼41-45 °C), decohesion was characterized by brittle failure via molecular bond rupture. Above the glass transition temperature, decohesion growth occurred by a viscoelastic process in the BHJ layer, leading to a significant degree of viscoelastic deformation. We develop a viscoelastic model based on molecular relaxation to describe the resulting behavior. The study has implications for OSC long-term reliability and device performance, which are important for OSC production and implementation.

  8. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.

    2007-07-01

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the hemispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides significantly faster binding kinetics and ensures more spatially homogeneous distribution of local (from a pixel) signals over a cell in the transient regime. The advantage of using thin slabs with small volume of analyte solution may be hampered by the much longer binding kinetics needing the auxiliary mixing devices. Our analysis proves that the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment should be included to the list of essential factors at biochip designing.

  9. CD84 is a survival receptor for CLL cells

    PubMed Central

    Binsky-Ehrenreich, Inbal; Marom, Ayelet; Sobotta, Mirko C.; Lantner, Frida; Harpaz, Nurit; Shvidel, Lev; Berrebi, Alain; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Haran, Michal; Herishanu, Yair; Aloshin, Anna; Sagi, Irit; Goldenberg, David M.; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Shachar, Idit

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy of mature lymphocytes that is manifest by the progressive accumulation of transformed cells, mostly due to their decreased apoptosis. CD84 belongs to the Signaling Lymphocyte Activating Molecule (SLAM) family of immunoreceptors and has an as yet unknown function in normal B cells and CLL lymphocytes. We show that CD84 is over-expressed in CLL cells. Activation of cell surface CD84 initiates a signaling cascade, which enhances cell survival. Both immunoneutralization or blockade of CD84 induce cell death in vitro and in vivo. Thus, overexpression of CD84 from an early stage may be critical for the survival of CLL. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies based on the blockade of a CD84 dependent survival pathway. PMID:23435417

  10. Surviving apoptosis: life-death signaling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are regulated by opposing pro-survival and pro-death signals. An interesting feature of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family of ligands is that they simultaneously activate opposing signals within a single cell via the same ligand-receptor complex. The magnitude of pro-death events such as caspase activation and pro-survival events such as NF-κB activation vary not only from one cell type to the next but also among individual cells of the same type due to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The molecules involved in these pro-survival/pro-death pathways, and the different phenotypes that result from their activities, have been recently reviewed. Here we focus on the impact of cell-to-cell variability in the strength of these opposing signals on shaping cell fate decisions. PMID:25920803

  11. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function. PMID:26687129

  12. Stochastic modeling and experimental analysis of phenotypic switching and survival of cancer cells under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Kumar, Niraj; Sundaram, Bala; Celli, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Rahul

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is critical to their survival under stress. A significant contribution to heterogeneity of cancer calls derives from the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a conserved cellular program that is crucial for embryonic development. Several studies have investigated the role of EMT in growth of early stage tumors into invasive malignancies. Also, EMT has been closely associated with the acquisition of chemoresistance properties in cancer cells. Motivated by these studies, we analyze multi-phenotype stochastic models of the evolution of cancers cell populations under stress. We derive analytical results for time-dependent probability distributions that provide insights into the competing rates underlying phenotypic switching (e.g. during EMT) and the corresponding survival of cancer cells. Experimentally, we evaluate these model-based predictions by imaging human pancreatic cancer cell lines grown with and without cytotoxic agents and measure growth kinetics, survival, morphological changes and (terminal evaluation of) biomarkers with associated epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The results derived suggest approaches for distinguishing between adaptation and selection scenarios for survival in the presence of external stresses.

  13. CA125-related tumor cell kinetics variables after chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Colloca, G; Venturino, A; Governato, I

    2016-08-01

    Various kinetic parameters, based on a minimum of two time points, have been built with CA125 determinations. The aim of this study is to review studies about the clinical application of CA125-related tumor cell kinetics variables in patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) receiving chemotherapy. A literature search for studies about CA125-related variables in patients with AOC was undertaken on three databases, by predefined search criteria, and a selection of studies was performed. Sixty-two studies were selected. CA125-related variables were summarized in three groups: response-related, time-to-event, and other CA125-related tumor cell kinetics variables. Even though CA125 changes and half-life after chemotherapy were the most studied, other variables and two models have been well defined, and often showed an interesting power to predict survival. These kinetics variables are related to the CA125 regression curve, pre- and post-chemotherapy kinetics, or are variables inferred from a population model of CA125 kinetics.

  14. VEGF improves survival of mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Jennifer; Huang Yu; Arakawa-Hoyt, Janice; Washko, Daniel; Takagawa, Junya; Ye, Jianqin; Grossman, William; Su Hua

    2008-11-14

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a promising source for cell-based treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), but existing strategies are restricted by low cell survival and engraftment. We examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improve MSC viability in infracted hearts. We found long-term culture increased MSC-cellular stress: expressing more cell cycle inhibitors, p16{sup INK}, p21 and p19{sup ARF}. VEGF treatment reduced cellular stress, increased pro-survival factors, phosphorylated-Akt and Bcl-xL expression and cell proliferation. Co-injection of MSCs with VEGF to MI hearts increased cell engraftment and resulted in better improvement of cardiac function than that injected with MSCs or VEGF alone. In conclusion, VEGF protects MSCs from culture-induce cellular stress and improves their viability in ischemic myocardium, which results in improvements of their therapeutic effect for the treatment of MI.

  15. Kinetic models in industrial biotechnology - Improving cell factory performance.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Joachim; Cvijovic, Marija; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Nielsen, Jens; Jirstrand, Mats

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of industrial bioprocesses capitalize on living cells by using them as cell factories that convert sugars into chemicals. These processes range from the production of bulk chemicals in yeasts and bacteria to the synthesis of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cell lines. One of the tools in the continuous search for improved performance of such production systems is the development and application of mathematical models. To be of value for industrial biotechnology, mathematical models should be able to assist in the rational design of cell factory properties or in the production processes in which they are utilized. Kinetic models are particularly suitable towards this end because they are capable of representing the complex biochemistry of cells in a more complete way compared to most other types of models. They can, at least in principle, be used to in detail understand, predict, and evaluate the effects of adding, removing, or modifying molecular components of a cell factory and for supporting the design of the bioreactor or fermentation process. However, several challenges still remain before kinetic modeling will reach the degree of maturity required for routine application in industry. Here we review the current status of kinetic cell factory modeling. Emphasis is on modeling methodology concepts, including model network structure, kinetic rate expressions, parameter estimation, optimization methods, identifiability analysis, model reduction, and model validation, but several applications of kinetic models for the improvement of cell factories are also discussed.

  16. Intermittent individual housing increases survival of newly proliferated cells.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Elin; Pham, Therese M; Zwart, Mieke; Baumans, Vera; Brené, Stefan

    2005-09-08

    In this study, we analyzed how intermittent individual housing with or without a running wheel influenced corticosterone levels and survival of newly proliferated cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Female Balb/c mice, in standard or enhanced housing, were divided into groups that were individually housed with or without running wheels on every second day. Intermittent individual housing without, but not with, running wheels increased survival of proliferated cells in the dentate gyrus as compared with continuous group housing in standard or enhanced conditions. Thus, changes in housing conditions on every second day can, under certain circumstances, have an impact on the survival of newly proliferated cells in the dentate gyrus.

  17. Illicit survival of cancer cells during polyploidization and depolyploidization

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, I; Galluzzi, L; Senovilla, L; Criollo, A; Jemaà, M; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2011-01-01

    Tetraploidy and the depolyploidization of tetraploid cells may contribute to oncogenesis. Several mechanisms have evolved to avoid the generation, survival, proliferation and depolyploidization of tetraploids. Cells that illicitly survive these checkpoints are prone to chromosomal instability and aneuploidization. Along with their replication, tetraploids constantly undergo chromosomal rearrangements that eventually lead to pseudodiploidy by two non-exclusive mechanisms: (i) multipolar divisions and (ii) illicit bipolar divisions in the presence of improper microtubule-kinetochore attachments. Here, we describe the regulation and the molecular mechanisms that underlie such a ‘polyploidization–depolyploidization' cascade, while focusing on the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in tetraploidy-driven tumorigenesis. We speculate that the identification of signaling/metabolic cascades that are required for the survival of tetraploid or aneuploid (but not diploid) cancer cells may pave the way for the development of novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents. PMID:21072053

  18. Illicit survival of cancer cells during polyploidization and depolyploidization.

    PubMed

    Vitale, I; Galluzzi, L; Senovilla, L; Criollo, A; Jemaà, M; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2011-09-01

    Tetraploidy and the depolyploidization of tetraploid cells may contribute to oncogenesis. Several mechanisms have evolved to avoid the generation, survival, proliferation and depolyploidization of tetraploids. Cells that illicitly survive these checkpoints are prone to chromosomal instability and aneuploidization. Along with their replication, tetraploids constantly undergo chromosomal rearrangements that eventually lead to pseudodiploidy by two non-exclusive mechanisms: (i) multipolar divisions and (ii) illicit bipolar divisions in the presence of improper microtubule-kinetochore attachments. Here, we describe the regulation and the molecular mechanisms that underlie such a 'polyploidization-depolyploidization' cascade, while focusing on the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in tetraploidy-driven tumorigenesis. We speculate that the identification of signaling/metabolic cascades that are required for the survival of tetraploid or aneuploid (but not diploid) cancer cells may pave the way for the development of novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents.

  19. Influence of acute hypoxia and radiation quality on cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinganelli, Walter; Ma, Ning-Yi; Von Neubeck, Cläre; Maier, Andreas; Schicker, Corinna; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Durante, Marco

    2013-01-01

    To measure the effect of acute oxygen depletion on cell survival for different types of radiation, experiments have been performed using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and RAT-1 rat prostate cancer cells. A special chamber has been developed to perform irradiations under different levels of oxygenation. The oxygen concentrations used were normoxia (air), hypoxia (94.5% N2, 5% CO2, 0.5% O2) and anoxia (95% N2, 5% CO2). Cells were exposed to X-rays and to C-, N- or O-ions with linear energy transfer (LET) values ranging from 100–160 keV/µm. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values have been calculated from the measured clonogenic survival curves. For both cell lines, the X-ray OER depended on the survival level. For particle irradiation, OER was not dependent on the survival level but decreased with increasing LET. The RBE of CHO cells under oxic conditions reached a plateau for LET values above 100 keV/µm, while it was still increasing under anoxia. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that our chamber could be used to measure radiosensitivity under intermediate hypoxia. Measurements suggest that ions heavier than carbon could be of additional advantage in the irradiation, especially of radioresistant hypoxic tumor regions. PMID:23824123

  20. Radiation effects on membranes - 1. Cellular permeability and cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, S.; Jayakumar, A.; Trivedi, A.; Kesavan, P.C.; Prasad, R.

    1982-05-01

    The effect of various doses of ..gamma.. radiation (5-60 krad) on the membrane permeability and cell survival of Candida albicans, a pathogenic yeast, was investigated. A reduction in the cell survival and in the accumulation of amino acids (proline, glycine, lysine, and glutamic acid) was observed following irradiation. The rate of oxygen uptake, which is often associated with transport, was also reduced. There was no damage to available sulfhydryl groups following the exposure of cells to various doses of ..gamma.. radiation. The membrane lipid composition of C. albicans cells can be altered by growing them in alkanes of varying chain lengths. The effects of such altered lipid composition on radiosensitivity was examined. It was observed that C. albicans cells with altered lipid content acquire resistance to ..gamma.. radiation.

  1. Cell kinetics of GM-CFC in the steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, M.P.; MacVittie, T.J.; Dodgen, D.P.

    1985-07-01

    The kinetics of cell turnover for myeloid/monocyte cells that form colonies in agar (GM-CFC) were measured through the progressive increase in their sensitivity to 313-nm light during a period of cell labeling with BrdCyd. Two components of cell killing with distinctly separate labeling kinetics revealed both the presence of two generations within the GM-CFC compartment and the properties of the kinetics of the precursors of the GM-CFC. These precursors of the GM-CFC were not assayable in a routine GM-CFC assay when pregnant mouse uterus extract and mouse L-cell-conditioned medium were used to stimulate colony formation but were revealed by the labeling kinetics of the assayable GM-CFC. Further, these precursor cells appeared to enter the assayable GM-CFC population from a noncycling state. This was evidenced by the failure of the majority of these cells to incorporate BrdCyd during five days of infusion. The half-time for cell turnover within this precursor compartment was measured to be approximately 5.5 days. Further, these normally noncycling cells proliferated rapidly in response to endotoxin. High-proliferative-potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFC) were tested as a candidate for this precursor population. The results of the determination of the kinetics for these cells showed that the HPP-CFC exist largely in a Go state, existing at an average rate of once every four days. The slow turnover time for these cells and their response to endotoxin challenge are consistent with a close relationship between the HPP-CFC and the Go pool of cells that is the direct precursor of the GM-CFC.

  2. Amniotic fluid stem cells increase embryo survival following injury.

    PubMed

    Prasongchean, Weerapong; Bagni, Marinella; Calzarossa, Cinzia; De Coppi, Paolo; Ferretti, Patrizia

    2012-03-20

    Although amniotic fluid cells can differentiate into several mesenchymal lineages and have been proposed as a valuable therapeutic cell source, their ability to undergo terminal neuronal differentiation remains a cause of controversy. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuronal differentiation ability of the c-Kit-positive population from GFP-transgenic rat amniotic fluid, amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells, and to assess how they affected injury response in avian embryos. AFS cells were found to express several neural stem/progenitor cell markers. However, no overt neuronal differentiation was apparent after either treatment with small molecules known to stimulate neuronal differentiation, attempts to differentiate AFS cell-derived embryoid body-like structures, or grafting AFS cells into environments known to support neuronal differentiation (organotypic rat hippocampal cultures, embryonic chick nervous system). Nonetheless, AFS cells significantly reduced hemorrhage and increased survival when grafted at the site of an extensive thoracic crush injury in E2.5 chick embryos. Increased embryo survival was induced neither by desmopressin treatment, which also reduced hemorrhage, nor by grafting other mesenchymal or neural cells, indicating a specific effect of AFS cells. This was found to be mediated by soluble factors in a transwell coculture model. Altogether, this study shows that AFS cells reduce tissue damage and increase survival in injured embryos, providing a potentially valuable tool as therapeutic agents for tissue repair, particularly prenatal/perinatal repair of defects diagnosed during gestation, but this effect is mediated via paracrine mechanisms rather than the ability of AFS cells to fully differentiate into neuronal cells.

  3. Effects of Triclosan on Neural Stem Cell Viability and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bo Kyung; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Yang, Sung Min; Bang, Minji; Choi, Chang Soon; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial or sanitizing agent used in personal care and household products such as toothpaste, soaps, mouthwashes and kitchen utensils. There are increasing evidence of the potentially harmful effects of triclosan in many systemic and cellular processes of the body. In this study, we investigated the effects of triclosan in the survivability of cultured rat neural stem cells (NSCs). Cortical cells from embryonic day 14 rat embryos were isolated and cultured in vitro. After stabilizing the culture, triclosan was introduced to the cells with concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 50 μM and in varied time periods. Thereafter, cell viability parameters were measured using MTT assay and PI staining. TCS decreased the cell viability of treated NSC in a concentration-dependent manner along with increased expressions of apoptotic markers, cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, while reduced expression of Bcl2. To explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of TCS in NSC, we measured the activation of MAPKs and intracellular ROS. TCS at 50 μM induced the activations of both p38 and JNK, which may adversely affect cell survival. In contrast, the activities of ERK, Akt and PI3K, which are positively correlated with cell survival, were inhibited. Moreover, TCS at this concentration augmented the ROS generation in treated NSC and depleted the glutathione activity. Taken together, these results suggest that TCS can induce neurodegenerative effects in developing rat brains through mechanisms involving ROS activation and apoptosis initiation. PMID:26759708

  4. UV disinfection of RBC-treated light greywater effluent: kinetics, survival and regrowth of selected microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Gilboa, Yael; Friedler, Eran

    2008-02-01

    The microbial quality of raw greywater was found to be much better than that of municipal wastewater, with 1.6 x 10(7)cfu ml(-1) heterotrophic plate count (HPC), and 3.8 x 10(4), 9.9 x 10(3), 3.3 x 10(3) and 4.6 x 10(0)cfu 100 ml(-1) faecal coliforms (FC), Staphylococcus aureus sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa sp. and Clostridium perfringes sp., respectively. Further, three viral indicators monitored (somatic phage, host: Escherichia coli CN(13) and F-RNA phages, hosts: E. coli F+(amp), E. coli K12) were not present in raw greywater. The greywater was treated by an RBC followed by sedimentation. The treatment removed two orders of magnitude of all bacteria. UV disinfection kinetics, survival and regrowth of HPC, FC, P. aeruginosa sp. and S. aureus sp. were examined. At doses up to 69 mW s cm(-2) FC were found to be the most resistant bacteria, followed by HPC, P. aeruginosa sp. and S. aureus sp. (inactivation rate coefficients: 0.0687, 0.113, 0.129 and 0.201 cm2 mW(-1)s(-1), respectively). At higher doses (69-439 mW s cm(-2)) all but HPC (which exhibited a tailing curve) were completely eliminated. Microscopic examination showed that FC self-aggregate in the greywater effluent. This provides FC an advantage at low doses, since the concentration of suspended matter (that can provide shelter from UV radiation) in the effluent was very low. FC, P. aeruginosa sp. and S. aureus sp. did not exhibit regrowth up to 6h after exposure to increasing UV doses (19-439 mW s cm(-2)). HPC regrowth was proven to be statistically significant in un-disinfected effluent and after irradiation with high UV doses (147 and 439 mW s cm(-2)). At these doses regrowth resulted from growth of UV-resistant bacteria due to decreased competition with other bacteria eliminated by the irradiation.

  5. Control of Cell Survival in Adult Mammalian Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, H Georg

    2015-10-28

    The fact that continuous proliferation of stem cells and progenitors, as well as the production of new neurons, occurs in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) raises several basic questions concerning the number of neurons required in a particular system. Can we observe continued growth of brain regions that sustain neurogenesis? Or does an elimination mechanism exist to maintain a constant number of cells? If so, are old neurons replaced, or are the new neurons competing for limited network access among each other? What signals support their survival and integration and what factors are responsible for their elimination? This review will address these and other questions regarding regulatory mechanisms that control cell-death and cell-survival mechanisms during neurogenesis in the intact adult mammalian brain.

  6. MarCell{trademark} software for modeling bone marrow radiation cell kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.

    1997-11-01

    Differential equations were used to model cellular injury, repair, and compensatory proliferation in the irradiated bone marrow. Recently, that model was implemented as MarCell{trademark}, a user-friendly MS-DOS computer program that allows users from a variety of technical disciplines to evaluate complex radiation exposure. The software allows menu selections for different sources of ionizing radiation. Choices for cell lineages include progenitor, stroma, and malignant, and the available species include mouse, rat, dog, sheep, swine, burro, and man. An attractive feature is that any protracted irradiation can be compared with an equivalent prompt dose (EPD) in terms of cell kinetics for either the source used or for a reference such as 250 kVp x rays or {sup 60}Co. EPD is used to mean a dose rate for which no meaningful biological recovery occurs during the period of irradiation. For human as species, output from MarCell{trademark} includes: risk of 30-day mortality; risk of whole-body cancer and leukemia based either on radiation-induced cytopenia or compensatory cell proliferation; cell survival and repopulation plots as functions of time or dose; and 4-week recovery following treatment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  7. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth.

    PubMed

    Boroughs, Lindsey K; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-04-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further.

  8. Mechanosensitive pannexin-1 channels mediate microvascular metastatic cell survival.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Paul W; Zhang, Steven; Soong, T David; Halberg, Nils; Goodarzi, Hani; Mangrum, Creed; Wu, Y Gloria; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-07-01

    During metastatic progression, circulating cancer cells become lodged within the microvasculature of end organs, where most die from mechanical deformation. Although this phenomenon was first described over a half-century ago, the mechanisms enabling certain cells to survive this metastasis-suppressive barrier remain unknown. By applying whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing technology to isogenic cancer cells of differing metastatic capacities, we identified a mutation encoding a truncated form of the pannexin-1 (PANX1) channel, PANX1(1-89), as recurrently enriched in highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PANX1(1-89) functions to permit metastatic cell survival during traumatic deformation in the microvasculature by augmenting ATP release from mechanosensitive PANX1 channels activated by membrane stretch. PANX1-mediated ATP release acts as an autocrine suppressor of deformation-induced apoptosis through P2Y-purinergic receptors. Finally, small-molecule therapeutic inhibition of PANX1 channels is found to reduce the efficiency of breast cancer metastasis. These data suggest a molecular basis for metastatic cell survival on microvasculature-induced biomechanical trauma.

  9. CD84 is a survival receptor for CLL cells.

    PubMed

    Binsky-Ehrenreich, I; Marom, A; Sobotta, M C; Shvidel, L; Berrebi, A; Hazan-Halevy, I; Kay, S; Aloshin, A; Sagi, I; Goldenberg, D M; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Herishanu, Y; Haran, M; Shachar, I

    2014-02-20

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by the accumulation of CD5+ B lymphocytes in peripheral blood, lymphoid organs and bone marrow. The main feature of the disease is accumulation of the malignant cells due to decreased apoptosis. CD84 belongs to the signaling lymphocyte activating molecule family of immunoreceptors, and has an unknown function in CLL cells. Here, we show that the expression of CD84 is significantly elevated from the early stages of the disease, and is regulated by macrophage migration inhibitory factor and its receptor, CD74. Activation of cell surface CD84 initiates a signaling cascade that enhances CLL cell survival. Both downmodulation of CD84 expression and its immune-mediated blockade induce cell death in vitro and in vivo. In addition, analysis of samples derived from an on-going clinical trial, in which human subjects were treated with humanized anti-CD74 (milatuzumab), shows a decrease in CD84 messenger RNA and protein levels in milatuzumab-treated cells. This downregulation was correlated with reduction of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expression. Thus, our data show that overexpression of CD84 in CLL is an important survival mechanism that appears to be an early event in the pathogenesis of the disease. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies based on the blockade of this CD84-dependent survival pathway.

  10. Stress-induced cleavage of Myc promotes cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Ngouenet, Celine; Anderson, Sarah; Brabletz, Thomas; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is critical in Myc-induced tumor progression. Here we report that cancer cells evade death under stress by activating calpain-mediated proteolysis of Myc. This generates Myc-nick, a cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive cleavage product of Myc. We found conversion of Myc into Myc-nick in cell lines and tissues derived from multiple cancers. In colon cancer, the production of Myc-nick is enhanced under stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Under these conditions, ectopic expression of Myc-nick promotes anchorage-independent growth and cell survival at least in part by promoting autophagy. Myc-nick also delays colon cancer cell death after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide, cisplatin, and imatinib. Furthermore, colon cancer cells expressing a cleavage-resistant form of Myc undergo extensive apoptosis but are rescued by overexpression of Myc-nick. We also found that ectopic expression of Myc-nick results in the induction of the actin-bundling protein fascin, formation of filopodia, and increased cell motility—all mediators of tumor metastasis. Myc-nick-induced survival, autophagy, and motility require Myc box II (MBII), a region of Myc-nick that recruits acetyltransferases that in turn modify cytoplasmic proteins, including α-tubulin and ATG3. Our results suggest that Myc-nick-induced survival and motility contribute to colon cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24696454

  11. Erythropoietin Augments Survival of Glioma Cells After Radiation and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouna, Imam; Sperling, Swetlana; Kim, Ella; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jelkmann, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Despite beneficial effects of irradiation/chemotherapy on survival of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, collateral damage to intact neural tissue leads to 'radiochemobrain' and reduced quality of life in survivors. For prophylactic neuroprotection, erythropoietin (EPO) is a promising candidate, provided that concerns regarding potential tumor promoting effects are alleviated. Methods and Materials: Human GBM-derived cell lines U87, G44, G112, and the gliosarcoma-derived line G28 were treated with EPO, with and without combinations of irradiation or temozolomide (TMZ). Responsiveness of glioma cells to EPO was measured by cell migration from spheroids, cell proliferation, and clonogenic survival. Implantation of U87 cells into brains of nude mice, followed 5 days later by EPO treatment (5,000 U/kg intraperitoneal every other day for 2 weeks) should reveal effects of EPO on tumor growth in vivo. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed for EPOR, HIF-1{alpha}, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)vIII in cell lines and 22 human GBM specimens. Results: EPO did not modulate basal glioma cell migration and stimulated proliferation in only one of four cell lines. Importantly, EPO did not enhance tumor growth in mouse brains. Preincubation of glioma cells with EPO for 3 h, followed by irradiation and TMZ for another 24 h, resulted in protection against chemoradiation-induced cytotoxicity in three cell lines. Conversely, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in survival of G28 gliosarcoma cells. In GBM specimens, expression of HIF-1{alpha} correlated positively with expression of EPOR and EGFRvIII. EPOR and EGFRvIII expression did not correlate. Conclusions: EPO is unlikely to appreciably influence basal glioma growth. However, concomitant use of EPO with irradiation/chemotherapy in GBM patients is not advisable.

  12. Survival of mature T cells depends on signaling through HOIP

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kazumi; Kitamura, Akiko; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Chung, Doo Hyun; Kagami, Shoji; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yasutomo, Koji

    2016-01-01

    T cell development in the thymus is controlled by a multistep process. The NF-κB pathway regulates T cell development as well as T cell activation at multiple differentiation stages. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is composed of Sharpin, HOIL-1L and HOIP, and it is crucial for regulating the NF-κB and cell death pathways. However, little is known about the roles of LUBAC in T-cell development and activation. Here, we show that in T-HOIPΔlinear mice lacking the ubiquitin ligase activity of LUBAC, thymic CD4+ or CD8+ T cell numbers were markedly reduced with severe defects in NKT cell development. HOIPΔlinear CD4+ T cells failed to phosphorylate IκBα and JNK through T cell receptor-mediated stimulation. Mature CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in T-HOIPΔlinear mice underwent apoptosis more rapidly than control T cells, and it was accompanied by lower CD127 expression on CD4+CD24low and CD8+CD24low T cells in the thymus. The enforced expression of CD127 in T-HOIPΔlinear thymocytes rescued the development of mature CD8+ T cells. Collectively, our results showed that LUBAC ligase activity is key for the survival of mature T cells, and suggest multiple roles of the NF-κB and cell death pathways in activating or maintaining T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. PMID:27786304

  13. DNA repair in microgravity: studies on bacteria and mammalian cells in the experiments REPAIR and KINETICS.

    PubMed

    Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Baumstark-Khan, C; Rink, H; Kozubek, S; Schäfer, M; Schmitz, C

    1996-06-27

    The impact of microgravity on cellular repair processes was tested in the space experiments REPAIR and KINETICS, which were performed during the IML-2 mission in the Biorack of ESA: (a) survival of spores of Bacillus subtilis HA101 after UV-irradiation (up to 340 J m-2) in the experiment REPAIR; (b) in the experiment KINETICS the kinetics of DNA repair in three different test systems: rejoining of X-ray-induced DNA strand breaks (B1) in cells of Escherichia coli B/r (120 Gy) and (B2) in human fibroblasts (5 and 10 Gy) as well as (B3) induction of the SOS response after gamma-irradiation (300 Gy) of cells of Escherichia coli PQ37. Cells were irradiated prior to the space mission and were kept in a non-metabolic state (metabolically inactive spores of B. subtilis on membrane filters, frozen cells of E. coli and human fibroblasts) until incubation in orbit. Germination and growth of B. subtilis were initiated by humidification, E. coli and fibroblasts were thawed up and incubated at 37 degrees C for defined repair periods (up to 4.5 h), thereafter they were frozen again for laboratory analysis. Relevant controls were performed in-flight (1 x g reference centrifuge) and on ground (1 x g and 1.4 x g) The results show no significant differences between the microgravity samples and the corresponding controls neither in the survival curves nor in the kinetics of DNA strand break rejoining and induction of the SOS response (proven by Student's t-test, 2 P = 0.05). These observations provide evidence that in the microgravity environment cells are able to repair radiation-induced DNA damage close to normality. The results suggest that a disturbance of cellular repair processes in the microgravity environment might not be the explanation for the reported synergism of radiation and microgravity.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  15. Extended monod kinetics for substrate, product, and cell inhibition.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Levenspiel, O

    1988-08-05

    A generalized form of Monod kinetics is proposed to account for all kinds of product, cell, and substrate inhibition. This model assumes that there exists a critical inhibitor concentration above which cells cannot grow, and that the constants of the Monod equation are functions of this limiting inhibitor concentration. Methods for evaluating the constants of this rate form are presented. Finally the proposed kinetic form is compared with the available data in the literature, which unfortunately is very sparse. In all cases, this equation form fitted the data very well.

  16. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  17. Targeting TGF-β1 suppresses survival of and invasion by anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenhai; Xu, Yanyan; Zhao, Cheng; Hao, Fengyun; Chen, Dong; Guan, Jinping; Zhang, Kejun

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has been implicated in promoting cell survival, migration and invasion in many cancers, including anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). In the present study, we studied the effect of suppressing TGF-β1 by RNA silencing on the survival, invasion and metastasis of ATC cells. Methods: Small interfering RNA (siRNA) constructs targeting TGF-β1 were validated and used to develop clonal derivatives of the ATC cell line, 8505C. The cells were used in several in vitro assays, including migration, invasion, survival rate, colony formation and apoptosis. A wound healing assay was used to determine the migration of cells in culture and a Boyden chamber transwell assay was used for invasion. Further, clones were used in an in vivo mouse model to study the kinetics of tumor growth and metastatic growth in lungs. Results: Targeting TGF-β1 expression in 8505C cells caused a 70% decrease in migration and a 78% decrease in invasion, as well as a 68% decrease in proliferation and a 19% increase in apoptosis in vitro. The growth of primary tumors in vivo was also inhibited when compared with parental 8505C cells; however, the number of mice bearing lung metastases was not significantly decreased. Conclusions: Targeting TGF-β1 may be effective in inhibiting primary tumor formation, but not metastasis, by ATC cells. TGF-β1 inhibition in combination with other tumor-targeted therapies may be more effective in inhibiting ATC. PMID:28386367

  18. Improved survival of children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T; Rogers, Zora R; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2010-04-29

    The survival of young children with sickle cell disease (SCD) has improved, but less is known about older children and adolescents. We studied the Dallas Newborn Cohort (DNC) to estimate contemporary 18-year survival for newborns with SCD and document changes in the causes and ages of death over time. We also explored whether improvements in the quality of medical care were temporally associated with survival. The DNC now includes 940 subjects with 8857 patient-years of follow-up. Most children with sickle cell anemia (93.9%) and nearly all children with milder forms of SCD (98.4%) now live to become adults. The incidence of death and the pattern of mortality changed over the duration of the cohort. Sepsis is no longer the leading cause of death. All the recent deaths in the cohort occurred in patients 18 years or older, most shortly after the transition to adult care. Quality of care in the DNC has improved over time, with significantly more timely initial visits and preventive interventions for young children. In summary, most children with SCD now survive the childhood years, but young adults who transition to adult medical care are at high risk for early death.

  19. Water transport and cell survival in cryobiological procedures.

    PubMed

    Farrant, J

    1977-03-29

    Living cells may be cooled to 77 K (liquid nitrogen) either to destroy them selectively or to store them for long periods. Water transport across the cell membranes during freezing and thawing is a primary factor determining whether the cells survive. These water movements are controlled by phase changes both intracellular and extracellular and by other factors such as the nature of any cryoprotective agent present, and the rates of cooling and thawing. The relation between cooling procedure, water transport and cell survival is discussed. In particular, the crucial rôle of dilution shock is emphasized: this is the damage to cells induced during the dilution that occurs both as ice melts during rewarming and when any cryoprotective additives are removed after thawing. Apart from the usefulness of understanding these processes for maximizing preservation or controlling selective destruction, the diverse responses of cells to different combinations of water transport and temperature changes appear likely to provide basic information on the properties of cell membranes.

  20. Dual Specificity Phosphatase 5 Is Essential for T Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Schauder, David M.; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Bordas, Michelle; Cui, Weiguo; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulates many key cellular processes such as differentiation, apoptosis, and survival. The final proteins in this pathway, ERK1/2, are regulated by dual specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5). DUSP5 is a nuclear, inducible phosphatase with high affinity and fidelity for ERK1/2. By regulating the final step in the MAPK signaling cascade, DUSP5 exerts strong regulatory control over a central cellular pathway. Like other DUSPs, DUSP5 plays an important role in immune function. In this study, we have utilized new knockout mouse reagents to explore its function further. We demonstrate that global loss of DUSP5 does not result in any gross phenotypic changes. However, loss of DUSP5 affects memory/effector CD8+ T cell populations in response to acute viral infection. Specifically, Dusp5-/- mice have decreased proportions of short-lived effector cells (SLECs) and increased proportions of memory precursor effector cells (MPECs) in response to infection. Further, we show that this phenotype is T cell intrinsic; a bone marrow chimera model restricting loss of DUSP5 to the CD8+ T cell compartment displays a similar phenotype. Dusp5-/- T cells also display increased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and altered metabolic profiles, suggesting that DUSP5 is a pro-survival protein in T cells. PMID:27936095

  1. Kinetic model of excitatory synaptic transmission to cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Marienhagen, J; Keller, B U; Zippelius, A

    1997-09-21

    We present a minimal kinetic model for excitatory synaptic transmission to cerebellar Purkinje cells. The main components are a kinetic model for a single glutamate receptor, which is calibrated with the help of patch clamp data, and a mean field approximation for the dynamics of a population of channels, which generate an EPSC. The resulting minimal model of the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse is used to estimate the dynamics of glutamate in the synaptic cleft and to clarify the role of receptor desensitization in synaptic transmission. We also apply the model to different aspects of synaptic modulation, like long-term depression and potentiation by pharmacological application of ampakines. In the framework of the minimal model these effects can be understood as the result of modified receptor kinetics.

  2. A kinetic model for flavonoid production in tea cell culture.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Iizuka, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2017-02-01

    As one of the strategies for efficient production of a metabolite from cell cultures, a kinetic model is very useful tool to predict productivity under various culture conditions. In this study, we propose a kinetic model for flavonoid production in tea cell culture based on the cell life cycle and expression of PAL, the gene encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL)-the key enzyme in flavonoid biosynthesis. The flavonoid production rate was considered to be related to the amount of active PAL. Synthesis of PAL was modelled based on a general gene expression/translation mechanism, including the transcription of DNA encoding PAL into mRNA and the translation of PAL mRNA into the PAL protein. The transcription of DNA was assumed to be promoted at high light intensity and suppressed by a feedback regulatory mechanism at high flavonoid concentrations. In the model, mRNA and PAL were considered to self-decompose and to be lost by cell rupture. The model constants were estimated by fitting the experimental results obtained from tea cell cultures under various light intensities. The model accurately described the kinetic behaviors of dry and fresh cell concentrations, glucose concentration, cell viability, PAL specific activity, and flavonoid content under a wide range of light intensities. The model simulated flavonoid productivity per medium under various culture conditions. Therefore, this model will be useful to predict optimum culture conditions for maximum flavonoid productivity in cultured tea cells.

  3. Pulmonary toxicity of cytostatic drugs: cell kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Godfrey, G.; Frome, E.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.

    1987-02-01

    Mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of /sup 3/H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide-treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2-3 weeks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature whereas in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It is concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemicals designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid.

  4. Discrete dynamic modeling of T cell survival signaling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ranran

    2009-03-01

    Biochemistry-based frameworks are often not applicable for the modeling of heterogeneous regulatory systems that are sparsely documented in terms of quantitative information. As an alternative, qualitative models assuming a small set of discrete states are gaining acceptance. This talk will present a discrete dynamic model of the signaling network responsible for the survival and long-term competence of cytotoxic T cells in the blood cancer T-LGL leukemia. We integrated the signaling pathways involved in normal T cell activation and the known deregulations of survival signaling in leukemic T-LGL, and formulated the regulation of each network element as a Boolean (logic) rule. Our model suggests that the persistence of two signals is sufficient to reproduce all known deregulations in leukemic T-LGL. It also indicates the nodes whose inactivity is necessary and sufficient for the reversal of the T-LGL state. We have experimentally validated several model predictions, including: (i) Inhibiting PDGF signaling induces apoptosis in leukemic T-LGL. (ii) Sphingosine kinase 1 and NFκB are essential for the long-term survival of T cells in T-LGL leukemia. (iii) T box expressed in T cells (T-bet) is constitutively activated in the T-LGL state. The model has identified potential therapeutic targets for T-LGL leukemia and can be used for generating long-term competent CTL necessary for tumor and cancer vaccine development. The success of this model, and of other discrete dynamic models, suggests that the organization of signaling networks has an determining role in their dynamics. Reference: R. Zhang, M. V. Shah, J. Yang, S. B. Nyland, X. Liu, J. K. Yun, R. Albert, T. P. Loughran, Jr., Network Model of Survival Signaling in LGL Leukemia, PNAS 105, 16308-16313 (2008).

  5. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  6. Distinct Kinetics of Effector CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cells after Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in Naïve or Vaccinated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of effector CD8+-T-cell responses to specific Trypanosoma cruzi epitopes was investigated after challenge. Our results suggest that the delayed kinetics differs from that observed in other microbial infections and facilitates the establishment of the disease in naïve mice. In contrast, in vaccinated mice, the swift CD8+-T-cell response helps host survival after challenge. PMID:16552083

  7. Kinetics of MDR Transport in Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koshkin, Vasilij; Yang, Burton B.; Krylov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) driven by ABC (ATP binding cassette) membrane transporters is one of the major causes of treatment failure in human malignancy. MDR capacity is thought to be unevenly distributed among tumor cells, with higher capacity residing in tumor-initiating cells (TIC) (though opposite finding are occasionally reported). Functional evidence for enhanced MDR of TICs was previously provided using a “side population” assay. This assay estimates MDR capacity by a single parameter - cell’s ability to retain fluorescent MDR substrate, so that cells with high MDR capacity (“side population”) demonstrate low substrate retention. In the present work MDR in TICs was investigated in greater detail using a kinetic approach, which monitors MDR efflux from single cells. Analysis of kinetic traces obtained allowed for the estimation of both the velocity (Vmax) and affinity (KM) of MDR transport in single cells. In this way it was shown that activation of MDR in TICs occurs in two ways: through the increase of Vmax in one fraction of cells, and through decrease of KM in another fraction. In addition, kinetic data showed that heterogeneity of MDR parameters in TICs significantly exceeds that of bulk cells. Potential consequences of these findings for chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:24223908

  8. Halofuginone promotes satellite cell activation and survival in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Bodanovsky, Anna; Maimon, Hadar; Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Halofuginone is a leading agent in preventing fibrosis and inflammation in various muscular dystrophies. We hypothesized that in addition to these actions, halofuginone directly promotes the cell-cycle events of satellite cells in the mdx and dysf(-/-) mouse models of early-onset Duchenne muscular dystrophy and late-onset dysferlinopathy, respectively. In both models, addition of halofuginone to freshly prepared single gastrocnemius myofibers derived from 6-week-old mice increased BrdU incorporation at as early as 18h of incubation, as well as phospho-histone H3 (PHH3) and MyoD protein expression in the attached satellite cells, while having no apparent effect on myofibers derived from wild-type mice. BrdU incorporation was abolished by an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, suggesting involvement of this pathway in mediating halofuginone's effects on cell-cycle events. In cultures of myofibers and myoblasts isolated from dysf(-/-) mice, halofuginone reduced Bax and induced Bcl2 expression levels and induced Akt phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Addition of an inhibitor of the phosphinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway reversed the halofuginone-induced cell survival, suggesting this pathway's involvement in mediating halofuginone's effects on survival. Thus, in addition to its known role in inhibiting fibrosis and inflammation, halofuginone plays a direct role in satellite cell activity and survival in muscular dystrophies, regardless of the mutation. These actions are of the utmost importance for improving muscle pathology and function in muscular dystrophies.

  9. Pharmacologically active microcarriers for endothelial progenitor cell support and survival.

    PubMed

    Musilli, Claudia; Karam, Jean-Pierre; Paccosi, Sara; Muscari, Claudio; Mugelli, Alessandro; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Parenti, Astrid

    2012-08-01

    The regenerative potential of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-based therapies is limited due to poor cell viability and minimal retention following application. Neovascularization can be improved by means of scaffolds supporting EPCs. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether human early EPCs (eEPCs) could be efficiently cultured on pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), made with poly(d,l-lactic-coglycolic acid) and coated with adhesion/extracellular matrix molecules. They may serve as a support for stem cells and may be used as cell carriers providing a controlled delivery of active protein such as the angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). eEPC adhesion to fibronectin-coated PAMs (FN-PAMs) was assessed by means of microscopic evaluation and by means of Alamar blue assay. Phospho ERK(1/2) and PARP-1 expression was measured by means of Western blot to assess the survival effects of FN-PAMs releasing VEGF-A (FN-VEGF-PAMs). The Alamar blue assay or a modified Boyden chamber assay was employed to assess proliferative or migratory capacity, respectively. Our data indicate that eEPCs were able to adhere to empty FN-PAMs within a few hours. FN-VEGF-PAMs increased the ability of eEPCs to adhere to them and strongly supported endothelial-like phenotype and cell survival. Moreover, the release of VEGF-A by FN-PAMs stimulated in vitro HUVEC migration and proliferation. These data strongly support the use of PAMs for supporting eEPC growth and survival and for stimulating resident mature human endothelial cells.

  10. Intracellular survival of Burkholderia cepacia complex in phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Valvano, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species are a group of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that infect the airways of cystic fibrosis patients, and occasionally they infect other immunocompromised patients. Bcc bacteria display high-level multidrug resistance and chronically persist in the infected host while eliciting robust inflammatory responses. Studies using macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells, combined with advances in the genetic manipulation of these bacteria, have increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virulence in these pathogens and the molecular details of cell-host responses triggering inflammation. This article discusses our current view of the intracellular survival of Burkholderia cenocepacia within macrophages.

  11. IGFBP2 promotes glioma tumor stem cell expansion and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, David; Hsieh, Antony; Stea, Baldassarre; Ellsworth, Ron

    2010-06-25

    IGFBP2 is overexpressed in the most common brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM), and its expression is inversely correlated to GBM patient survival. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for IGFBP2 in glioma cell invasion and astrocytoma development. However, the function of IGFBP2 in the restricted, self-renewing, and tumorigenic GBM cell population comprised of tumor-initiating stem cells has yet to be determined. Herein we demonstrate that IGFBP2 is overexpressed within the stem cell compartment of GBMs and is integral for the clonal expansion and proliferative properties of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, IGFBP2 inhibition reduced Akt-dependent GSC genotoxic and drug resistance. These results suggest that IGFBP2 is a selective malignant factor that may contribute significantly to GBM pathogenesis by enriching for GSCs and mediating their survival. Given the current dearth of selective molecular targets against GSCs, we anticipate our results to be of high therapeutic relevance in combating the rapid and lethal course of GBM.

  12. Autophagy regulates the survival of cells with chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dawei; Shaukat, Zeeshan; Xu, Tianqi; Denton, Donna; Saint, Robert; Gregory, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) refers to genomic instability in which cells have gained or lost chromosomes or chromosomal fragments. A high level of CIN is common in solid tumours and is associated with cancer drug resistance and poor prognosis. The impact of CIN-induced stress and the resulting cellular responses are only just beginning to emerge. Using proliferating tissue in Drosophila as a model, we found that autophagy is activated in CIN cells and is necessary for their survival. Specifically, increasing the removal of defective mitochondria by mitophagy is able to lower levels of reactive oxygen species and the resultant cellular damage that is normally seen in CIN cells. In response to DNA damage, CIN is increased in a positive feedback loop, and we found that increasing autophagy by Tor depletion could decrease the level of CIN in proliferating cells. These findings underline the importance of autophagy control in the development of CIN tumours. PMID:27590505

  13. Bacterial cells carrying synthetic dual-function operon survived starvation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuki; Ito, Yoichiro; Tsuru, Saburo; Ying, Bei-Wen; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    A synthetic dual-function operon with a bistable structure was designed and successfully integrated into the bacterial genome. Bistability was generated by the mutual inhibitory structure comprised of the promoters P(tet) and P(lac) and the repressors LacI and TetR. Dual function essential for cell growth was introduced by replacing the genes (i.e., hisC and leuB) encoding proteins involved in the biosynthesis of histidine and leucine from their native chromosomal locations to the synthetic operon. Both colony formation and population dynamics of the cells carrying this operon showed that the cells survived starvation and the newly formed population transited between the two stable states, representing the induced hisC and leuB levels, in accordance with the nutritional status. The results strongly suggested that the synthetic design of proto-operons sensitive to external perturbations is practical and functional in native cells.

  14. Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection

    PubMed Central

    Simonis, Matthias; Hübner, Wolfgang; Wilking, Alice; Huser, Thomas; Hennig, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Insertion of foreign molecules such as functionalized fluorescent probes, antibodies, or plasmid DNA to living cells requires overcoming the plasma membrane barrier without harming the cell during the staining process. Many techniques such as electroporation, lipofection or microinjection have been developed to overcome the cellular plasma membrane, but they all result in reduced cell viability. A novel approach is the injection of cells with a nanopipette and using electrophoretic forces for the delivery of molecules. The tip size of these pipettes is approximately ten times smaller than typical microinjection pipettes and rather than pressure pulses as delivery method, moderate DC electric fields are used to drive charged molecules out of the tip. Here, we show that this approach leads to a significantly higher survival rate of nanoinjected cells and that injection with nanopipettes has a significantly lower impact on the proliferation behavior of injected cells. Thus, we propose that injection with nanopipettes using electrophoretic delivery is an excellent alternative when working with valuable and rare living cells, such as primary cells or stem cells. PMID:28120926

  15. Rapamycin Prolongs the Survival of Corneal Epithelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gidfar, Sanaz; Milani, Farnoud Y.; Milani, Behrad Y.; Shen, Xiang; Eslani, Medi; Putra, Ilham; Huvard, Michael J.; Sagha, Hossein; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2017-01-01

    Rapamycin has previously been shown to have anti-aging effects in cells and organisms. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of rapamycin on primary human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Cell growth and viability were evaluated by bright field microscopy. Cell proliferation and cycle were evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of differentiation markers was evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated β-Galactosidase staining and by Western blot analysis of p16. Apoptosis was evaluated by a TUNEL assay. The results demonstrated that primary HCEC treated with rapamycin had lower proliferation but considerably longer survival in vitro. Rapamycin-treated cells maintained a higher capacity to proliferate after removal of rapamycin and expressed more keratin 14, N-Cadherin, DeltaNp63 and ABCG2, and less keratin 12, consistent with their less differentiated state. Rapamycin treated cells demonstrated less senescence by X-β-Gal SA staining and by lower expression of p16. Apoptosis was also lower in the rapamycin treated cells. These results indicate that rapamycin treatment of HCEC prevents the loss of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells to replicative senescence and apoptosis. Rapamycin may be a useful additive for ex vivo expansion of corneal epithelial cells. PMID:28054657

  16. PERK Integrates Oncogenic Signaling and Cell Survival During Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yiwen; Diehl, J Alan

    2016-10-01

    Unfolded protein responses (UPR), consisting of three major transducers PERK, IRE1, and ATF6, occur in the midst of a variety of intracellular and extracellular challenges that perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER stress occurs and is thought to be a contributing factor to a number of human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and various metabolic syndromes. In the context of neoplastic growth, oncogenic stress resulting from dysregulation of oncogenes such as c-Myc, Braf(V600E) , and HRAS(G12V) trigger the UPR as an adaptive strategy for cancer cell survival. PERK is an ER resident type I protein kinase harboring both pro-apoptotic and pro-survival capabilities. PERK, as a coordinator through its downstream substrates, reprograms cancer gene expression to facilitate survival in response to oncogenes and microenvironmental challenges, such as hypoxia, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Herein, we discuss how PERK kinase engages in tumor initiation, transformation, adaption microenvironmental stress, chemoresistance and potential opportunities, and potential opportunities for PERK targeted therapy. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2088-2096, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. CXCR4 engagement promotes dendritic cell survival and maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Kabashima, Kenji Sugita, Kazunari; Shiraishi, Noriko; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Fujii, Nobutaka; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2007-10-05

    It has been reported that human monocyte derived-dendritic cells (DCs) express CXCR4, responsible for chemotaxis to CXCL12. However, it remains unknown whether CXCR4 is involved in other functions of DCs. Initially, we found that CXCR4 was expressed on bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). The addition of specific CXCR4 antagonist, 4-F-Benzoyl-TN14003, to the culture of mouse BMDCs decreased their number, especially the mature subset of them. The similar effect was found on the number of Langerhans cells (LCs) but not keratinocytes among epidermal cell suspensions. Since LCs are incapable of proliferating in vitro, these results indicate that CXCR4 engagement is important for not only maturation but also survival of DCs. Consistently, the dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced, antigen-specific in vitro proliferation of previously sensitized lymph node cells was enhanced by CXCL12, and suppressed by CXCR4 antagonist. These findings suggest that CXCL12-CXCR4 engagement enhances DC maturation and survival to initiate acquired immune response.

  18. Toll-like receptor signaling in cell proliferation and survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinyan; Jiang, Song; Tapping, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important sensors of foreign microbial components as well as products of damaged or inflamed self tissues. Upon sensing these molecules, TLRs initiate a series of downstream signaling events that drive cellular responses including the production of cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory mediators. This outcome results from the intracellular assembly of protein complexes that drive phosphorylation and other signaling cascades ultimately leading to chromatin remodeling and transcription factor activation. In addition to driving inflammatory responses, TLRs also regulate cell proliferation and survival which serves to expand useful immune cells and integrate inflammatory responses and tissue repair processes. In this context, central TLR signaling molecules, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), play key roles. In addition, four major groups of transcription factors which are targets of TLR activation also control cell fate. This review focuses on the role of TLR signaling as it relates to cell proliferation and survival. This topic not only has important implications for understanding host defense and tissue repair, but also cancer which is often associated with conditions of chronic inflammation. PMID:19775907

  19. Modeling the survival kinetics of Salmonella in tree nuts for use in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Santillana Farakos, Sofia M; Pouillot, Régis; Anderson, Nathan; Johnson, Rhoma; Son, Insook; Van Doren, Jane

    2016-06-16

    Salmonella has been shown to survive in tree nuts over long periods of time. This survival capacity and its variability are key elements for risk assessment of Salmonella in tree nuts. The aim of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict survival of Salmonella in tree nuts at ambient storage temperatures that considers variability and uncertainty separately and can easily be incorporated into a risk assessment model. Data on Salmonella survival on raw almonds, pecans, pistachios and walnuts were collected from the peer reviewed literature. The Weibull model was chosen as the baseline model and various fixed effect and mixed effect models were fit to the data. The best model identified through statistical analysis testing was then used to develop a hierarchical Bayesian model. Salmonella in tree nuts showed slow declines at temperatures ranging from 21°C to 24°C. A high degree of variability in survival was observed across tree nut studies reported in the literature. Statistical analysis results indicated that the best applicable model was a mixed effect model that included a fixed and random variation of δ per tree nut (which is the time it takes for the first log10 reduction) and a fixed variation of ρ per tree nut (parameter which defines the shape of the curve). Higher estimated survival rates (δ) were obtained for Salmonella on pistachios, followed in decreasing order by pecans, almonds and walnuts. The posterior distributions obtained from Bayesian inference were used to estimate the variability in the log10 decrease levels in survival for each tree nut, and the uncertainty of these estimates. These modeled uncertainty and variability distributions of the estimates can be used to obtain a complete exposure assessment of Salmonella in tree nuts when including time-temperature parameters for storage and consumption data. The statistical approach presented in this study may be applied to any studies that aim to develop predictive models to be

  20. Starved epithelial cells uptake extracellular matrix for survival

    PubMed Central

    Muranen, Taru; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Curry, Natasha L.; Hwang, Julie; DuBois, Cory D.; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Clish, Clary B.; Brugge, Joan S.; Kalaany, Nada Y.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix adhesion is required for normal epithelial cell survival, nutrient uptake and metabolism. This requirement can be overcome by oncogene activation. Interestingly, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR leads to apoptosis of matrix-detached, but not matrix-attached cancer cells, suggesting that matrix-attached cells use alternate mechanisms to maintain nutrient supplies. Here we demonstrate that under conditions of dietary restriction or growth factor starvation, where PI3K/mTOR signalling is decreased, matrix-attached human mammary epithelial cells upregulate and internalize β4-integrin along with its matrix substrate, laminin. Endocytosed laminin localizes to lysosomes, results in increased intracellular levels of essential amino acids and enhanced mTORC1 signalling, preventing cell death. Moreover, we show that starved human fibroblasts secrete matrix proteins that maintain the growth of starved mammary epithelial cells contingent upon epithelial cell β4-integrin expression. Our study identifies a crosstalk between stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells under starvation that could be exploited therapeutically to target tumours resistant to PI3K/mTOR inhibition. PMID:28071763

  1. Sialidase NEU4 is involved in glioblastoma stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, I; Testa, F; Zappasodi, R; Cairo, C W; Zhang, Y; Lupo, B; Galli, R; Di Nicola, M; Venerando, B; Tringali, C

    2014-01-01

    The human sialidase, NEU4, has emerged as a possible regulator of neuronal differentiation and its overexpression has been demonstrated to promote the acquisition of a stem cell-like phenotype in neuroblastoma cells. In this paper, we demonstrated that glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) isolated from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines and patients' specimens as neurospheres are specifically marked by the upregulation of NEU4; in contrast, the expression of NEU4 is very low in non-neurosphere-differentiated GBM cells. We showed that NEU4 silencing by miRNA or a chemical inhibitor of its catalytic activity triggered key events in GSCs, including (a) the activation of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β, with the consequent inhibition of Sonic Hedgehog and Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathways; (b) the decrease of the stem cell-like gene expression and marker signatures, evidenced by the reduction of NANOG, OCT-4, SOX-2, CD133 expression, ganglioside GD3 synthesis, and an altered protein glycosylation profile; and (c) a significant decrease in GSCs survival. Consistent with this finding, increased NEU4 activity and expression induced in the more differentiated GBM cells by the NEU4 agonist thymoquinone increased the expression of OCT-4 and GLI-1. Thus, NEU4 expression and activity appeared to help to determine the molecular signature of GSCs and to be closely connected with their survival properties. Given the pivotal role played by GSCs in GBM lethality, our results strongly suggest that NEU4 inhibition could significantly improve current therapies against this tumour. PMID:25144716

  2. Cell cycle progression dictates the requirement for BCL2 in natural killer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Viant, Charlotte; Guia, Sophie; Hennessy, Robert J; Rautela, Jai; Pham, Kim; Bernat, Claire; Goh, Wilford; Jiao, Yuhao; Delconte, Rebecca; Roger, Michael; Simon, Vanina; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Grabow, Stephanie; Belz, Gabrielle T; Kile, Benjamin T; Strasser, Andreas; Gray, Daniel; Hodgkin, Phillip D; Beutler, Bruce; Vivier, Eric; Ugolini, Sophie; Huntington, Nicholas D

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells with antitumor functions. Using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutagenesis screen in mice, we identified a strain with an NK cell deficiency caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the Bcl2 (B cell lymphoma 2) gene. Analysis of these mice and the conditional deletion of Bcl2 in NK cells revealed a nonredundant intrinsic requirement for BCL2 in NK cell survival. In these mice, NK cells in cycle were protected against apoptosis, and NK cell counts were restored in inflammatory conditions, suggesting a redundant role for BCL2 in proliferating NK cells. Consistent with this, cycling NK cells expressed higher MCL1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1) levels in both control and BCL2-null mice. Finally, we showed that deletion of BIM restored survival in BCL2-deficient but not MCL1-deficient NK cells. Overall, these data demonstrate an essential role for the binding of BCL2 to BIM in the survival of noncycling NK cells. They also favor a model in which MCL1 is the dominant survival protein in proliferating NK cells.

  3. Human mesenchymal stem cells promote survival of T cells in a quiescent state.

    PubMed

    Benvenuto, Federica; Ferrari, Stefania; Gerdoni, Ezio; Gualandi, Francesca; Frassoni, Francesco; Pistoia, Vito; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Uccelli, Antonio

    2007-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are part of the bone marrow that provides signals supporting survival and growth of bystander hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). MSC modulate also the immune response, as they inhibit proliferation of lymphocytes. In order to investigate whether MSC can support survival of T cells, we investigated MSC capacity of rescuing T lymphocytes from cell death induced by different mechanisms. We observed that MSC prolong survival of unstimulated T cells and apoptosis-prone thymocytes cultured under starving conditions. MSC rescued T cells from activation induced cell death (AICD) by downregulation of Fas receptor and Fas ligand on T cell surface and inhibition of endogenous proteases involved in cell death. MSC dampened also Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of CD95 expressing Jurkat leukemic T cells. In contrast, rescue from AICD was not associated with a significant change of Bcl-2, an inhibitor of apoptosis induced by cell stress. Accordingly, MSC exhibited a minimal capacity of rescuing Jurkat cells from chemically induced apoptosis, a process disrupting the mitochondrial membrane potential regulated by Bcl-2. These results suggest that MSC interfere with the Fas receptor regulated process of programmed cell death. Overall, MSC can inhibit proliferation of activated T cells while supporting their survival in a quiescent state, providing a model of their activity inside the HSC niche. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  4. Transglutaminase Is a Tumor Cell and Cancer Stem Cell Survival Factor

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Richard L.; Fisher, Matthew L.; Grun, Dan; Adhikary, Gautam; Xu, Wen; Kerr, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that cancer cells express elevated levels of type II transglutaminase (TG2), and that expression is further highly enriched in cancer stem cells derived from these cancers. Moreover, elevated TG2 expression is associated with enhanced cancer stem cell marker expression, survival signaling, proliferation, migration, invasion, integrin-mediated adhesion, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance. TG2 expression is also associated with formation of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes the role of TG2 as a cancer cell survival factor in a range of tumor types, and as a target for preventive and therapeutic intervention. The literature supports the idea that TG2, in the closed/GTP-binding/signaling conformation, drives cancer cell and cancer stem cell survival, and that TG2, in the open/crosslinking conformation, is associated with cell death. PMID:26258961

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Survival Signaling Requires Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; Upadhyay, Awani; Ido, Liyana J.; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Identification of pro-cell survival signaling pathways has implications for cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disease. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor LET-23 (LET-23 EGFR) has a prosurvival function in counteracting excitotoxicity, and we identify novel molecular players required for this prosurvival signaling. uv1 sensory cells in the C. elegans uterus undergo excitotoxic death in response to activation of the OSM-9/OCR-4 TRPV channel by the endogenous agonist nicotinamide. Activation of LET-23 EGFR can effectively prevent this excitotoxic death. We investigate the roles of signaling pathways known to act downstream of LET-23 EGFR in C. elegans and find that the LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway, but not the IP3 receptor pathway, is required for efficient LET-23 EGFR activity in its prosurvival function. However, activation of LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway does not appear to be sufficient to fully mimic LET-23 EGFR activity. We screen for genes that are required for EGFR prosurvival function and uncover a role for phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes in EGFR prosurvival function. Finally, we show that exogenous application of phosphatidylcholine is sufficient to prevent some deaths in this excitotoxicity model. Our work implicates regulation of lipid synthesis downstream of EGFR in cell survival and death decisions. PMID:27605519

  6. Iron alters cell survival in a mitochondria-dependent pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bauckman, Kyle; Haller, Edward; Taran, Nicholas; Rockfield, Stephanie; Ruiz-Rivera, Abigail; Nanjundan, Meera

    2015-03-01

    The role of iron in the development of cancer remains unclear. We previously reported that iron reduces cell survival in a Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent manner in ovarian cells; however, the underlying downstream pathway leading to reduced survival was unclear. Although levels of intracellular iron, ferritin/CD71 protein and reactive oxygen species did not correlate with iron-induced cell survival changes, we identified mitochondrial damage (via TEM) and reduced expression of outer mitochondrial membrane proteins (translocase of outer membrane: TOM20 and TOM70) in cell lines sensitive to iron. Interestingly, Ru360 (an inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter) reversed mitochondrial changes and restored cell survival in HEY ovarian carcinoma cells treated with iron. Further, cells treated with Ru360 and iron also had reduced autophagic punctae with increased lysosomal numbers, implying cross-talk between these compartments. Mitochondrial changes were dependent on activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway since treatment with a MAPK inhibitor restored expression of TOM20/TOM70 proteins. Although glutathione antioxidant levels were reduced in HEY treated with iron, extracellular glutamate levels were unaltered. Strikingly, oxalomalate (inhibitor of aconitase, involved in glutamate production) reversed iron-induced responses in a similar manner to Ru360. Collectively, our results implicate iron in modulating cell survival in a mitochondria-dependent manner in ovarian cancer cells.

  7. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues.

  8. Measurement of posttransfusion red cell survival with the biotin label.

    PubMed

    Mock, Donald M; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Strauss, Ronald G; Cancelas, Jose A; Cohen, Robert M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Franco, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize and critically assess information concerning the biotin method to label red blood cells (RBC) for use in studies of RBC and transfusion biology-information that will prove useful to a broad audience of clinicians and scientists. A review of RBC biology, with emphasis on RBC senescence and in vivo survival, is included, followed by an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of biotin-labeled RBC (BioRBC) for measuring circulating RBC volume, posttransfusion RBC recovery, RBC life span, and RBC age-dependent properties. The advantages of BioRBC over (51)Cr RBC labeling, the current reference method, are discussed. Because the biotin method is straightforward and robust, including the ability to follow the entire life spans of multiple RBC populations concurrently in the same subject, BioRBC offers distinct advantages for studying RBC biology and physiology, particularly RBC survival. The method for biotin labeling, validation of the method, and application of BioRBCs to studies of sickle cell disease, diabetes, and anemia of prematurity are reviewed. Studies documenting the safe use of BioRBC are reviewed; unanswered questions requiring future studies, remaining concerns, and regulatory barriers to broader application of BioRBC including adoption as a new reference method are also presented.

  9. Cell death and survival signalling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tucka, Joanna; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The loss of cells is an important factor in many diseases, including those of the cardiovascular system. Whereas apoptosis is an essential process in development and tissue homeostasis, its occurrence is often associated with various pathologies. Apoptosis of neurons that fail to make appropriate connections is essential for the selection of correct neural signalling in the developing embryo, but its appearance in adults is often associated with neurodegenerative disease. Similarly, in the cardiovascular system, remodeling of the mammalian outflow tract during the transition from a single to dual series circulation with four chambers is accompanied by a precise pattern of cell death, but apoptosis of cardiomyocytes contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury in the heart. In many cases, it is unclear whether apoptosis represents a causative association or merely a consequence of the disease itself. There are many excellent reviews on cell death in the cardiovascular system (1-5); in this review we outline the critical signalling pathways that promote the survival of cardiovascular cells, and their relevance to both physiological cell death and disease.

  10. Neuroglobin, a Factor Playing for Nerve Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Diego; Tortorella, Cinzia; Marcoli, Manuela; Maura, Guido; Agnati, Luigi F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell death represents the final outcome of several pathological conditions of the central nervous system and available evidence suggests that in both acute injuries and neurodegenerative diseases it is often associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, the possibility to prevent mitochondrial events involved in cell death might represent efficient tools to limit neuronal damage. In recent years, increased attention has been paid to the endogenous protein neuroglobin, since accumulating evidence showed that its high expression was associated with preserved mitochondrial function and to an increased survival of nerve cells in vitro and in vivo in a variety of experimental models of cell insult. The biological and structural features of neuroglobin and the mitochondria-related mechanisms of neuroglobin-induced neuroprotection will be here briefly discussed. In this respect, the inhibition of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis emerges as a key neuroprotective effect induced by the protein. These findings could open the possibility to develop efficient neuroglobin-mediated therapeutic strategies aimed at minimizing the neuronal cell death occurring in impacting neurological pathologies like stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27809238

  11. Natural zwitterionic betaine enables cells to survive ultrarapid cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Cai, Nana; Zhai, Hongwen; Zhang, Jiamin; Zhu, Yingnan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cryoprotectants (CPAs) play a critical role in cryopreservation because they can resist the cell damage caused by the freezing process. Current state-of-the-art CPAs are mainly based on an organic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and several DMSO-cryopreserved cell products have been brought to market. However, the intrinsic toxicity and complex freezing protocol of DMSO still remain as the bottleneck of the wide use for clinical applications. Herein, we reported that betaine, a natural zwitterionic molecule, could serve as a nontoxic and high efficient CPA. At optimum concentration of betaine, different cell types exhibited exceptional post-thaw survival efficiency with ultrarapid freezing protocol, which was straightforward, cost efficient but difficult to succeed using DMSO. Moreover, betaine showed negligible cytotoxicity even after long-term exposure of cells. Mechanistically, we hypothesized that betaine could be ultra-rapidly taken up by cells for intracellular protection during the freezing process. This technology unlocks the possibility of alternating the traditional toxic CPAs and is applicable to a variety of clinical applications. PMID:27874036

  12. Cell yield and cell survival following chemotherapy of the B16 melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, T. C.; Peacock, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    We describe in this paper cell survival studies, using in vitro clonogenic assays, performed on the B16 melanoma treated in situ with various cytotoxic agents. In addition we have determined the effects of these agents on the yield of cells obtained by trypsinization. In untreated tumours the mean cell yield was approximately 10(8)/g, which is 20--30% of the cells actually present in the tissue. The plating efficiency was approximately 40%. Most agents rapidly affected both cell yield and cell survival. For example, within 20--30 h, gamma-radiation and several alkylating agents reduced cell yield by about 40%. The cell yield change was associated with an increase in mean cell size. Cell yield was reduced even more (approximately 70%) by Vinca alkaloids. This large reduction was associated with extensive cell lysis, observed as an increase in the necrotic fraction of tumours from approximately 35% to approximately 70%. Adriamycin, bleomycin and Ara-C also produced a moderate reduction in cell yield (approximately 40%), but actinomycin D did not reduce cell yield and FU increased it by about 30%. Only gamma-radiation, cyclophosphamide, CCNU, BCNU and melphalan produced more than a 90% reduction in cell survival, although there was a small but measurable reduction with all other agents except vinblastine, HN2 and actinomycin D. PMID:728348

  13. Quantification of epidermal growth factor receptor expression level and binding kinetics on cell surfaces by surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Shaopeng; Yin, Linliang; Yang, Yunze; Guan, Yan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Han; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-10-06

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, also known as ErbB-1 or HER-1) is a membrane bound protein that has been associated with a variety of solid tumors and the control of cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Quantification of the EGFR expression level in cell membranes and the interaction kinetics with drugs are thus important for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here we report mapping of the distribution and interaction kinetics of EGFR in their native environment with the surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique. The monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was used as a model drug in this study. The binding of the antibody to EGFR overexpressed A431 cells was monitored in real time, which was found to follow the first-order kinetics with an association rate constant (ka) and dissociation rate constant (kd) of (2.7 ± 0.6) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (1.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The dissociation constant (KD) was determined to be 0.53 ± 0.26 nM with up to seven-fold variation among different individual A431 cells. In addition, the averaged A431 cell surface EGFR density was found to be 636/μm(2) with an estimation of 5 × 10(5) EGFR per cell. Additional measurement also revealed that different EGFR positive cell lines (A431, HeLa, and A549) show receptor density dependent anti-EGFR binding kinetics. The results demonstrate that SPRi is a valuable tool for direct quantification of membrane protein expression level and ligand binding kinetics at single cell resolution. Our findings show that the local environment affects the drug-receptor interactions, and in situ measurement of membrane protein binding kinetics is important.

  14. Kinetics of Lipofuscin Formation in Aging Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-03-01

    Lipofuscin is a deposit that is formed over time by aggregation and clustering of incompletely degraded membrane material in various types of cells. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat and is known to be present in age- related macular dgeneration (AMD), Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in adults. The degradation of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) through accumulation of lipsofuscin is considered a significant pathogenic factor in the development of AMD. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results with the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration.

  15. Differences in human macrophage receptor usage, lysosomal fusion kinetics and survival between logarithmic and metacyclic Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Norikiyo; Bratt, Carol L; Rodriguez, Nilda E; Wilson, Mary E

    2009-12-01

    The obligate intracellular protozoan, Leishmania infantum chagasi (Lic) undergoes receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages followed by a transient delay in phagolysosome maturation. We found differences in the pathway through which virulent Lic metacyclic promastigotes or avirulent logarithmic promastigotes are phagocytosed by human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Both logarithmic and metacyclic promastigotes entered MDMs through a compartment lined by the third complement receptor (CR3). In contrast, many logarithmic promastigotes entered through vacuoles lined by mannose receptors (MR) whereas most metacyclic promastigotes did not (P < 0.005). CR3-positive vacuoles containing metacyclic promastigotes stained for caveolin-1 protein, suggesting CR3 localizes in caveolae during phagocytosis. Following entry, the kinetics of phagolysosomal maturation and intracellular survival also differed. Vacuoles containing metacyclic parasites did not accumulate lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) at early times after phagocytosis, whereas vacuoles with logarithmic promastigotes did. MDMs phagocytosed greater numbers of logarithmic than metacyclic promastigotes, yet metacyclics ultimately replicated intracellularly with greater efficiency. These data suggest that virulent metacyclic Leishmania promastigotes fail to ligate macrophage MR, and enter through a path that ultimately enhances intracellular survival. The relatively quiescent entry of virulent Leishmania spp. into macrophages may be accounted for by the ability of metacyclic promastigotes to selectively bypass deleterious entry pathways.

  16. Pak2 regulates hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yi; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Staser, Karl; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Park, Su-Jung; Hahn, Seongmin; Cooper, Scott; Sun, Zejin; Jiang, Li; Yang, XianLin; Yuan, Jin; Kosoff, Rachelle; Sandusky, George; Srour, Edward F.; Chernoff, Jonathan; Clapp, Wade

    2015-01-01

    p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), a serine/threonine kinase, has been previously shown to be essential for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment. However, Pak2 modulation of long-term hematopoiesis and lineage commitment remain unreported. Utilizing a conditional Pak2 knock out (KO) mouse model, we found that disruption of Pak2 in HSCs induced profound leukopenia and a mild macrocytic anemia. Although loss of Pak2 in HSCs leads to less efficient short- and long-term competitive hematopoiesis than wild type (WT) cells, it does not affect HSC self-renewal per se. Pak2 disruption decreased the survival and proliferation of multi-cytokine stimulated immature progenitors. Loss of Pak2 skewed lineage differentiation toward granulocytopoiesis and monocytopoiesis in mice as evidenced by 1) a three to six-fold increase in the percentage of peripheral blood granulocytes and a significant increase in the percentage of granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) in mice transplanted with Pak2-disrupted BM; 2) Pak2-disrupted BM and c-kit+ cells yielded higher numbers of more mature subsets of granulocyte-monocyte colonies and polymophonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), respectively, when cultured in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Pak2 disruption resulted respectively in decreased and increased gene expression of transcription factors JunB and c-Myc, which may suggest underlying mechanisms by which Pak2 regulates granulocyte-monocyte lineage commitment. Furthermore, Pak2 disruption led to 1) higher percentage of CD4+CD8+ double positive T cells and lower percentages of CD4+CD8− or CD4−CD8+ single positive T cells in thymus and 2) decreased numbers of mature B cells and increased numbers of Pre-Pro B cells in BM, suggesting defects in lymphopoiesis. PMID:25586960

  17. Multifaceted role of prohibitin in cell survival and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ya-Ting; Chen, Ping; Ouyang, Ruo-Yun; Song, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Human eukaryotic prohibitin (prohibitin-1 and prohibitin-2) is a membrane protein with different cellular localizations. It is involved in multiple cellular functions, including energy metabolism, proliferation, apoptosis, and senescence. The subcellular localization of prohibitin may determine its functions. Membrane prohibitin regulate the cellular signaling of membrane transport, nuclear prohibitin control transcription activation and the cell cycle, and mitochondrial prohibitin complex stabilize the mitochondrial genome and modulate mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial biogenesis, and the mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Moreover, prohibitin can translocates into the nucleus or the mitochondria under apoptotic signals and the subcellular shuttling of prohibitin is necessary for apoptosis process. Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death that is important for the maintenance of normal physiological functions. Consequently, any alteration in the content, post-transcriptional modification (i.e. phosphorylation) or the nuclear or mitochondrial translocation of prohibitin may influence cell fate. Understanding the mechanisms of the expression and regulation of prohibitin may be useful for future research. This review provides an overview of the multifaceted and essential roles played by prohibitin in the regulation of cell survival and apoptosis.

  18. Cytoplasmic proliferating cell nuclear antigen connects glycolysis and cell survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Delphine; De Chiara, Alessia; Chapuis, Nicolas; Candalh, Céline; Mocek, Julie; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Haddaoui, Lamya; Ifrah, Norbert; Hermine, Olivier; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Frachet, Philippe; Bouscary, Didier; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a scaffolding protein involved in DNA replication, has been described as a key element in survival of mature neutrophil granulocytes, which are non-proliferating cells. Herein, we demonstrated an active export of PCNA involved in cell survival and chemotherapy resistance. Notably, daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cells (HL-60R) have a prominent cytosolic PCNA localization due to increased nuclear export compared to daunorubicin-sensitive HL-60 cells (HL-60S). By interacting with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a protein involved in NAD biosynthesis, PCNA coordinates glycolysis and survival, especially in HL-60R cells. These cells showed a dramatic increase in intracellular NAD+ concentration as well as glycolysis including increased expression and activity of hexokinase 1 and increased lactate production. Furthermore, this functional activity of cytoplasmic PCNA was also demonstrated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our data uncover a novel pathway of nuclear export of PCNA that drives cell survival by increasing metabolism flux. PMID:27759041

  19. Influence of galangin on HL-60 cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, Charles S; Milne, Lesley

    2006-11-08

    The effect of galangin, a flavonol component of India root spice and the 'herbal' medicine propolis, on HL-60 human leukaemia cell survival is characterised. Galangin (1-100 microM) exerted an antiproliferative effect that, with dose and exposure longevity, was progressively associated with an elevated hypodiploid DNA content and expression of the active form of caspase-3, principally prior to membrane damage. At >or=50 microM, plasmamembrane phosphatidylserine exposure was observed. There was no evidence for intracellular oxidative stress as an orchestrator of cytotoxicity and significant phagocyte-like differentiation was not detected. We discuss whether such cytotoxicity will be therapeutically exploitable or contribute to cancer prevention within a pharmacological or dietary context.

  20. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean H; West, John D

    2016-05-15

    The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera with functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1(-/-) null cells in adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras and determine if Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes in one female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c), this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many adult tissues.

  1. Delayed apoptosis allows islet β-cells to implement an autophagic mechanism to promote cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Heather L.; Peterson, Brett S.; Haldeman, Jonathan M.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Hohmeier, Hans E.

    2017-01-01

    Increased β-cell death coupled with the inability to replicate existing β-cells drives the decline in β-cell mass observed in the progression of both major forms of diabetes. Understanding endogenous mechanisms of islet cell survival could have considerable value for the development of novel strategies to limit β-cell loss and thereby promote β-cell recovery. Insulinoma cells have provided useful insight into β-cell death pathways but observations made in cell lines sometimes fail to translate to primary islets. Here, we report dramatic differences in the temporal regulation and engagement of the apoptotic program in primary rodent islets relative to the INS-1 derived 832/13 cell line. As expected, 832/13 cells rapidly induced cell stress markers in response to ER stress or DNA damage and were fully committed to apoptosis, resulting in >80% cell death within 24 h. In contrast, primary rat islets were largely refractory to cell death in response to ER stress and DNA damage, despite rapid induction of stress markers, such as XBP-1(s), CHOP, and PUMA. Gene expression profiling revealed a general suppression of pro-apoptotic machinery, such as Apaf-1 and caspase 3, and sustained levels of pro-survival factors, such as cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and XIAP, in rat islets. Furthermore, we observed sustained induction of autophagy following chronic ER stress and found that inhibition of autophagy rendered islet β-cells highly vulnerable to ER stress-induced cell death. We propose that islet β-cells dampen the apoptotic response to delay the onset of cell death, providing a temporal window in which autophagy can be activated to limit cellular damage and promote survival. PMID:28212395

  2. Quantitative evaluation of the transplanted lin(-) hematopoietic cell migration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kašėta, Vytautas; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Liubavičiūtė, Aušra; Maciulevičienė, Rūta; Stirkė, Arūnas; Biziulevičienė, Genė

    2016-02-01

    Stem cells take part in organogenesis, cell maturation and injury repair. The migration is necessary for each of these functions to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of transplanted hematopoietic lin(-) cell population (which consists mainly of the stem and progenitor cells) in BALB/c mouse contact hypersensitivity model and quantify the migration to the site of inflammation in the affected foot and other healthy organs. Quantitative analysis was carried out with the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lung, liver, damaged and healthy foot tissue samples at different time points were collected for analysis. The quantitative data normalization was performed according to the comparative quantification method. The analysis of foot samples shows the significant migration of transplanted cells to the recipient mice affected foot. The quantity was more than 1000 times higher, as compared with that of the untreated foot. Due to the inflammation, the number of donor origin cells migrating to the lungs, liver, spleen and bone marrow was found to be decreased. Our data shows that transplanted cells selectively migrated into the inflammation areas of the foot edema. Also, the inflammation caused a secondary migration in ectopic spleen of hematopoietic stem cell niches and re-homing from the spleen to the bone marrow took place.

  3. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-01-01

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic-equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high-precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early-time T cell signaling. Using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations, I show that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in determining single-cell kinetics from cell-population results. PMID:26958894

  4. Quantitative tumour necrosis is an independent predictor of overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Cheville, John C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting results regarding whether tumour necrosis is a predictor of survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. In addition, studies quantifying the extent of necrosis are limited.The aim of this study was to determine if quantifying tumour necrosis could improve its predictive value for survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.We reviewed the clinical pathological information contained in The Cancer Genome Atlas for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and correlated it with overall survival using a Cox proportional hazard model. Necrosis was quantified on a single frozen section slide taken at the time of tissue harvesting for molecular studies.For all tumours, the presence of tumour necrosis was a significant predictor of overall survival (p < 0.001) on univariate analysis. When quantitated, >10% necrosis was associated with survival, but ≤10% necrosis was not. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.004), T3b stage (p = 0.02), M1 stage (p < 0.001), necrosis >30% (p < 0.001), and elevated serum calcium (p = 0.003) remained significant. For clinical stage 1-2 (T1-T2N0M0) tumours, necrosis >20% was significant on univariate analysis (p ≤ 0.005), and remained so on multivariate analysis (p < 0.001).We conclude that quantitating the extent of tumour necrosis adds prognostic information in clear cell renal cell carcinomas, including organ confined tumours.

  5. Kinetic analysis of barium currents in chick cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zidanic, M; Fuchs, P A

    1995-01-01

    Inward barium current (IBa) through voltage-gated calcium channels was recorded from chick cochlear hair cells using the whole-cell clamp technique. IBa was sensitive to dihydropyridines and insensitive to the peptide toxins omega-agatoxin IVa, omega-conotoxin GVIa, and omega-conotoxin MVIIC. Changing the holding potential over a -40 to -80 mV range had no effect on the time course or magnitude of IBa nor did it reveal any inactivating inward currents. The activation of IBa was modeled with Hodgkin-Huxley m2 kinetics. The time constant of activation, tau m, was 550 microseconds at -30 mV and gradually decreased to 100 microseconds at +50 mV. A Boltzmann fit to the activation curve, m infinity, yielded a half activation voltage of -15 mV and a steepness factor of 7.8 mV. Opening and closing rate constants, alpha m and beta m, were calculated from tau m and m infinity, then fit with modified exponential functions. The H-H model derived by evaluating the exponential functions for alpha m and beta m not only provided an excellent fit to the time course of IBa activation, but was predictive of the time course and magnitude of the IBa tail current. No differences in kinetics or voltage dependence of activation of IBa were found between tall and short hair cells. We conclude that both tall and short hair cells of the chick cochlea predominantly, if not exclusively, express noninactivating L-type calcium channels. These channels are therefore responsible for processes requiring voltage-dependent calcium entry through the basolateral cell membrane, such as transmitter release and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels. PMID:7787021

  6. Cell death versus cell survival instructed by supramolecular cohesion of nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Ortony, Julia H.; Lee, One-Sun; Matson, John B.; Boekhoven, Job; Yu, Jeong Min; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-01-01

    Many naturally occurring peptides containing cationic and hydrophobic domains have evolved to interact with mammalian cell membranes and have been incorporated into materials for non-viral gene delivery, cancer therapy, or treatment of microbial infections. Their electrostatic attraction to the negatively charged cell surface and hydrophobic interactions with the membrane lipids enable intracellular delivery or cell lysis. While the effects of hydrophobicity and cationic charge of soluble molecules on the cell membrane are well known, the interactions between materials with these molecular features and cells remain poorly understood. Here we report that varying the cohesive forces within nanofibres of supramolecular materials with nearly identical cationic and hydrophobic structure instruct cell death or cell survival. Weak intermolecular bonds promote cell death through disruption of lipid membranes, while materials reinforced by hydrogen bonds support cell viability. These findings provide new strategies to design biomaterials that interact with the cell membrane. PMID:24531236

  7. Cell death versus cell survival instructed by supramolecular cohesion of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Ortony, Julia H.; Lee, One-Sun; Matson, John B.; Boekhoven, Job; Yu, Jeong Min; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-02-01

    Many naturally occurring peptides containing cationic and hydrophobic domains have evolved to interact with mammalian cell membranes and have been incorporated into materials for non-viral gene delivery, cancer therapy or treatment of microbial infections. Their electrostatic attraction to the negatively charged cell surface and hydrophobic interactions with the membrane lipids enable intracellular delivery or cell lysis. Although the effects of hydrophobicity and cationic charge of soluble molecules on the cell membrane are well known, the interactions between materials with these molecular features and cells remain poorly understood. Here we report that varying the cohesive forces within nanofibres of supramolecular materials with nearly identical cationic and hydrophobic structure instruct cell death or cell survival. Weak intermolecular bonds promote cell death through disruption of lipid membranes, while materials reinforced by hydrogen bonds support cell viability. These findings provide new strategies to design biomaterials that interact with the cell membrane.

  8. Cancer cell survival during detachment from the ECM: multiple barriers to tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Cassandra L; Weigel, Kelsey J; Schafer, Zachary T

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial cells require attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) for survival. However, during tumour progression and metastasis, cancerous epithelial cells must adapt to and survive in the absence of ECM. During the past 20 years, several cellular changes, including anoikis, have been shown to regulate cell viability when cells become detached from the ECM. In this Opinion article, we review in detail how cancer cells can overcome or take advantage of these specific processes. Gaining a better understanding of how cancer cells survive during detachment from the ECM will be instrumental in designing chemotherapeutic strategies that aim to eliminate ECM-detached metastatic cells.

  9. Time-course regulation of quercetin on cell survival/proliferation pathways in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Angeles Martín, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2008-04-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid, has been shown to possess anticarcinogenic properties, but the precise molecular mechanisms of action are not thoroughly elucidated. This study was aimed at investigating the time-course regulation effect of quercetin on survival/proliferation pathways in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). Quercetin induced a significant time-dependent inactivation of the major survival signaling proteins, i. e., phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha), in concert with a time-dependent activation of key death-related signals: c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and PKC-delta. These data suggest that quercetin exerts a tight regulation of survival/proliferation pathways that requires the integration of different signals and persists over time, being the balance of these regulatory signals what determines the fate of HepG2 cells.

  10. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  11. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  12. Autophagy in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes tumor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Trimmer, Casey; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Chiavarina, Barbara; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Chengwang; Pavlides, Stephanos; Martinez-Cantarin, Maria P; Capozza, Franco; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Caro, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Recently, using a co-culture system, we demonstrated that MCF7 epithelial cancer cells induce oxidative stress in adjacent cancer-associated fibroblasts, resulting in the autophagic/lysosomal degradation of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1). However, the detailed signaling mechanism(s) underlying this process remain largely unknown. Here, we show that hypoxia is sufficient to induce the autophagic degradation of Cav-1 in stromal fibroblasts, which is blocked by the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine. Concomitant with the hypoxia-induced degradation of Cav-1, we see the upregulation of a number of well-established autophagy/mitophagy markers, namely LC3, ATG16L, BNIP3, BNIP3L, HIF-1α and NFκB. In addition, pharmacological activation of HIF-1α drives Cav-1 degradation, while pharmacological inactivation of HIF-1 prevents the downregulation of Cav-1. Similarly, pharmacological inactivation of NFκB—another inducer of autophagy—prevents Cav-1 degradation. Moreover, treatment with an inhibitor of glutathione synthase, namely BSO, which induces oxidative stress via depletion of the reduced glutathione pool, is sufficient to induce the autophagic degradation of Cav-1. Thus, it appears that oxidative stress mediated induction of HIF1- and NFκB-activation in fibroblasts drives the autophagic degradation of Cav-1. In direct support of this hypothesis, we show that MCF7 cancer cells activate HIF-1α- and NFκB-driven luciferase reporters in adjacent cancer-associated fibroblasts, via a paracrine mechanism. Consistent with these findings, acute knockdown of Cav-1 in stromal fibroblasts, using an siRNA approach, is indeed sufficient to induce autophagy, with the upregulation of both lysosomal and mitophagy markers. How does the loss of stromal Cav-1 and the induction of stromal autophagy affect cancer cell survival? Interestingly, we show that a loss of Cav-1 in stromal fibroblasts protects adjacent cancer cells against apoptotic cell death. Thus, autophagic cancer

  13. ZFAT is an antiapoptotic molecule and critical for cell survival in MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Doi, Keiko; Koyanagi, Midori; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Yasuo; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2009-02-04

    ZFAT (also known as ZNF406), originally identified as a candidate gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, encodes a zinc-finger protein, however, its function has not been elucidated. Here, we report that human ZFAT protein is expressed in peripheral B and T lymphocytes and a human acute T lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line, MOLT-4 cells. Intriguing is that mouse ZFAT expression in CD4(+) lymphocytes is increased during blast formation. Furthermore, ZFAT-knockdown in MOLT-4 induces apoptosis via activation of caspases. These results suggested that ZFAT protein is a critical regulator involved in apoptosis and cell survival for immune-related cells.

  14. Toroidal Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code with Gyro-kinetic Electron and Fully-kinetic ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jingbo; Zhang, Wenlu; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Ding

    2016-10-01

    A kinetic simulation model has been developed using gyro-kinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion by removing fast gyro motion of electrons using the Lie-transform perturbation theory. A particle-in-cell kinetic code is developed based on this model in general magnetic flux coordinate systems, which is particularly suitable for simulations of toroidally confined plasma. Single particle motion and field solver are successfully verified respectively. Integrated electrostatic benchmark, for example the lower-hybrid wave (LHW) and ion Bernstein wave (IBW), shows a good agreement with theoretical results. Preliminary electromagnetic benchmark of fast wave at lower hybrid frequency range is also presented. This code can be a first-principal tool to investigate high frequency nonlinear phenomenon, such as parametric decay instability, during lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion cyclotron radio frequency heating (ICRF) with complex geometry effect included. Supported by National Special Research Program of China For ITER and National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  15. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL.

  16. Optimized Cell Survival and Seeding Efficiency for Craniofacial Tissue Engineering Using Clinical Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Archana; Eubanks, Emily; Edwards, Sean; Aronovich, Sharon; Travan, Suncica; Rudek, Ivan; Wang, Feng; Lanis, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries involving the face are very common, yet the clinical management of the resulting craniofacial deficiencies is challenging. These injuries are commonly associated with missing teeth, for which replacement is compromised due to inadequate jawbone support. Using cell therapy, we report the upper jaw reconstruction of a patient who lost teeth and 75% of the supporting jawbone following injury. A mixed population of bone marrow-derived autologous stem and progenitor cells was seeded onto β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), which served as a scaffold to deliver cells directly to the defect. Conditions (temperature, incubation time) to achieve the highest cell survival and seeding efficiency were optimized. Four months after cell therapy, cone beam computed tomography and a bone biopsy were performed, and oral implants were placed to support an engineered dental prosthesis. Cell seeding efficiency (>81%) of the β-TCP and survival during the seeding process (94%) were highest when cells were incubated with β-TCP for 30 minutes, regardless of incubation temperature; however, at 1 hour, cell survival was highest when incubated at 4°C. Clinical, radiographic, and histological analyses confirmed that by 4 months, the cell therapy regenerated 80% of the original jawbone deficiency with vascularized, mineralized bone sufficient to stably place oral implants. Functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patient was successfully completed with installation of a dental prosthesis 6 months following implant placement. This proof-of-concept clinical report used an evidence-based approach for the cell transplantation protocol used and is the first to describe a cell therapy for craniofacial trauma reconstruction. PMID:25378653

  17. Kinetics of circulating progenitor cell mobilization during submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Niemiro, Grace M; Parel, Justin; Beals, Joseph; van Vliet, Stephan; Paluska, Scott A; Moore, Daniel R; Burd, Nicholas A; De Lisio, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) are a heterogeneous population of stem/progenitor cells in peripheral blood that includes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs and HSCs), endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are involved in tissue repair and adaptation. CPC mobilization during exercise remains uncharacterized in young adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of CPC mobilization during and after submaximal treadmill running and their relationship to mobilization factors. Seven men [age = 25.3 ± 2.4 yr, body mass index = 23.5 ± 1.0 kg/m(2), peak O2 uptake (V̇o2peak) = 60.9 ± 2.74 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)] ran on a treadmill for 60 min at 70% V̇o2peak Blood sampling occurred before (Pre), during [20 min (20e), 40 min (40e), 60 min (60e)], and after exercise [15 min (15p), 60 min (60p), 120 min (120p)] for quantification of CPCs (CD34(+)), HSPCs (CD34(+)/CD45(low)), HSCs (CD34(+)/CD45(low)/CD38(-)), CD34(+) MSCs (CD45(-)/CD34(+)/CD31(-)/CD105(+)), CD34(-) MSCs (CD45(-)/CD34(-)/CD31(-)/CD105(+)), and EPCs (CD45(-)/CD34(+)/CD31(+)) via flow cytometry. CPC concentration increased compared with Pre at 20e and 40e (2.7- and 2.4-fold, respectively, P < 0.05). HSPCs and HSCs increased at 20e compared with 60p (2.7- and 2.8-fold, respectively, P < 0.05), whereas EPCs and both MSC populations did not change. CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12 (1.5-fold; P < 0.05) and stem cell factor (1.3-fold; P < 0.05) were increased at 40e and remained elevated postexercise. The peak increase in CPCs was positively correlated to concentration of endothelial cells during exercise with no relationship to CXCL12 and SCF. Our data show the kinetics of progenitor cell mobilization during exercise that could provide insight into cellular mediators of exercise-induced adaptations, and have implication for the use of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for CPC collection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using

  18. Stem cell factor enhances the survival of murine intestinal stem cells after photon irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, B.R.; Khan, W.; Hancock, S.L.

    1995-04-01

    Recombinant rat stem cell factor (SCF) has been shown to decrease lethality in mice exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI) in the lower range of lethality through radioprotection of hematopoietic stem cells and acceleration of bone marrow repopulation. This study evaluates the effect of SCF on the survival of the intestinal mucosal stem cell after TBI. This non-hematopoietic cell is clinically relevant. Gastrointestinal toxicity is common during and after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy and limits the radiation dose in these regions. As observed with bone marrow, the administration of SCF to mice prior to TBI enhanced the survival of mouse duodenal crypt stem cells. The maximum enhancement of survival was seen when 100 {mu}/kg of SCF was given intraperitoneally 8 h before irradiation. This regimen increased the survival of duodenal crypt stem cells after 12.0 Gy TBI from 22.5 {+-} 0.7 per duodenal cross section for controls to 30.0 {+-} 1.7 after treatment with SCF (P=0.03). The TBI dose producing 50% mortality of 6 days (LD{sub 50/6}) was increased from 14.9 Gy for control mice to 19.0 Gy for mice treated with SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF has radioprotective effects on a non-hematopoietic stem cell population and suggest that SCF may be of clinical value in preventing radiation injury to the intestine. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Cell survival curve for primary hepatic carcinoma cells and relationship between SF2 of hepatic carcinoma cells and radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Zhong; Huang, Wen-Ying; Lin, Ju-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Sheng; Lan, Xiao; Cai, Xiao-Kun; Liang, Kuo-Huan; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish the cell survival curve for primary hepatic carcinoma cells and to study the relationship between SF2 of primary hepatic carcinoma cells and radiosensitivity. METHODS: Hepatic carcinoma cells were cultured in vitro using 39 samples of hepatic carcinoma at stages II-IV. Twenty-nine samples were cultured successfully in the fifth generation cells. After these cells were radiated with different dosages, the cell survival ratio and SF2 were calculated by clonogenic assay and SF2 model respectively. The relationship between SF2 and the clinical pathological feature was analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-nine of thirty-nine samples were successfully cultured. After X-ray radiation of the fifth generation cells with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy, the cell survival rate was 41%, 36.5%, 31.0%, 26.8%, and 19%, respectively. There was a negative correlation between cell survival and irradiation dosage (r = -0.973, P<0.05). SF2 ranged 0.28-0.78 and correlated with the clinical stage and pathological grade of hepatic carcinoma (P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between SF2 and D0.5 (r = 0.773, P<0.05). CONCLUSION: SF2 correlates with the clinical stage and pathological grade of hepatic carcinoma and is a marker for predicting the radiosensitivity of hepatic carcinomas. PMID:16437614

  20. Transplantation of Human Neural Progenitor Cells Expressing IGF-1 Enhances Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Caiwei; Sun, Yu; Liao, Tiffany; Beattie, Ursula; López, Francisco J.; Chen, Dong Feng; Lashkari, Kameran

    2015-01-01

    We have previously characterized human neuronal progenitor cells (hNP) that can adopt a retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-like morphology within the RGC and nerve fiber layers of the retina. In an effort to determine whether hNPs could be used a candidate cells for targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs), we evaluated whether hNPs transfected with an vector that expresses IGF-1 in the form of a fusion protein with tdTomato (TD), would increase RGC survival in vitro and confer neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of glaucoma. RGCs co-cultured with hNPIGF-TD cells displayed enhanced survival, and increased neurite extension and branching as compared to hNPTD or untransfected hNP cells. Application of various IGF-1 signaling blockers or IGF-1 receptor antagonists abrogated these effects. In vivo, using a model of glaucoma we showed that IOP elevation led to reductions in retinal RGC count. In this model, evaluation of retinal flatmounts and optic nerve cross sections indicated that only hNPIGF-TD cells effectively reduced RGC death and showed a trend to improve optic nerve axonal loss. RT-PCR analysis of retina lysates over time showed that the neurotrophic effects of IGF-1 were also attributed to down-regulation of inflammatory and to some extent, angiogenic pathways. This study shows that neuronal progenitor cells that hone into the RGC and nerve fiber layers may be used as vehicles for local production and delivery of a desired NTF. Transplantation of hNPIGF-TD cells improves RGC survival in vitro and protects against RGC loss in a rodent model of glaucoma. Our findings have provided experimental evidence and form the basis for applying cell-based strategies for local delivery of NTFs into the retina. Application of cell-based delivery may be extended to other disease conditions beyond glaucoma. PMID:25923430

  1. Kinetic analysis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 gene expression in cell culture and infected animals.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Kesic, Matthew; Yin, Han; Yu, Lianbo; Green, Patrick L

    2009-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell leukemia and is associated with a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. It has been hypothesized that a highly regulated pattern of HTLV-1 gene expression is critical for virus survival and disease pathogenesis. In this study, real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to determine the kinetics of viral gene expression in cells transiently transfected with an HTLV-1 proviral plasmid, in newly infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and in PBMCs from newly infected rabbits. The HTLV-1 gene expression profiles in transiently transfected and infected cells were similar; over time, all transcripts increased and then maintained stable levels. gag/pol, tax/rex, and env mRNA were detected first and at the highest levels, whereas the expression levels of the accessory genes, including the antisense Hbz, were significantly lower than the tax/rex levels (ranging from 1 to 4 logs depending on the specific mRNA). In infected rabbits, tax/rex and gag/pol mRNA levels peaked early after inoculation and progressively decreased, which correlated inversely with the proviral load and host antibody response against viral proteins. Interestingly, Hbz mRNA was detectable at 1 week postinfection and increased and stabilized. The expression levels of all other HTLV-1 genes in infected rabbit PBMCs were at or below our limit of detection. This analysis provides insight into viral gene expression under various in vitro and in vivo experimental conditions. Our in vivo data indicate that in infected rabbits, Hbz mRNA expression over time directly correlates with the proviral load, which provides the first evidence linking Hbz expression to proviral load and the survival of the virus-infected cell in the host.

  2. Methane/steam reforming kinetics for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, E.; Riensche, E.

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the kinetics of the methane/steam reforming process at anode materials of a solid oxide fuel cell. A nickel cermet was applied consisting of 80 wt.% ZrO 2 and 20 wt.% Ni. The temperature was varied from 700 to 940 °C, the CH 4 partial pressure from 0.11 to 0.33 bar, and the system pressure from 1.1 to 2.8 bar. The influence of the ratio H 2O/CH 4 was studied, in particular, by increasing this quantity from 2.6 to 8. The tests showed that, within the accuracy of the data, no effect of the H 2O partial pressure on the catalytic reforming process could be observed. Due to the high conversion rates of CH 4 at high temperatures, however, mass-transfer effects occurred, that must be taken into account when evaluating the steam-reforming data.

  3. Method of freezing living cells and tissues with improved subsequent survival

    DOEpatents

    Senkan, Selim M.; Hirsch, Gerald P.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method for freezing red blood cells, ther living cells, or tissues with improved subsequent survival, wherein constant-volume freezing is utilized that results in significantly improved survival compared with constant-pressure freezing; optimization is attainable through the use of different vessel geometries, cooling baths and warming baths, and sample concentrations.

  4. Kinetics of particle deposition in the oblique impinging jet cell.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Musiał, Elizeusz; Siwek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    A new oblique impinging-jet (OBIJ) cell was developed, suitable for colloid deposition studies at various interfaces. In contrast to previously used orthogonal cells, the OBIJ construction makes possible direct microscope observations of particle deposition on nontransparent substrates. The cell performance was tested by studying kinetics of polystyrene latex particle deposition on mica. Two limiting cell configuration were used in the experiments: (i) the lower position (inverted microscope observation of substrate surface through air) and (ii) the upper position (observation of the substrate surface with adsorbed particles through the suspension layer). The dependence of local mass transfer rate (particle flux) on the position over the substrate surface was studied for various flow Reynolds numbers. It was demonstrated that deposition rate attained maximum at the flow stagnation point whose position was dependent on Re number. Moreover, it was shown that the local flux decreased at much slower rate when moving in the downstream direction, than for previously used impinging-jet cells. Consequently, the area of uniform transport conditions was larger, enabling more precise determination of the limiting particle flux at the stagnation-point. The dependence of the flux on Re number was systematically studied for various ionic strength of the suspension. It was demonstrated, in accordance with previous results for the ordinary impinging-jet, that the flux increased significantly for low ionic strength and high Re number. This phenomenon, referred to as the inverse salt effect, was interpreted in terms of the convective diffusion theory. The governing transport equation originating from this theory was solved numerically, for the region near the stagnation point, using the finite-difference method. These numerical solutions were used for nonlinear fitting of the flow intensity parameter dependence on the Re number. In this way the flow field in the vicinity of the

  5. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  6. [A test for sperm cell survival in peritoneal fluid].

    PubMed

    Radwan, J; Niwald, W; Bielak, A; Pawlicki, J; Banaszczyk, R; Makuła, D

    1995-06-01

    The role of the peritoneal fluid in the physiology of reproduction, as well as in the transportation and survival of gametes, is little known. The authors have examined interactions between spermatozoa and the peritoneal fluid, collected during laparoscopy in the, so-called, survival test, from 42 infertile couples. The studied survival of spermatozoa in the peritoneal fluid was relatively high--19% after 48 hours--longer than in Menezo B2 fluid. Values of the test have been indicated, especially in cases of endometriosis-caused and idiopathic infertility.

  7. IL22/IL-22R pathway induces cell survival in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Akil, Hussein; Abbaci, Amazigh; Lalloué, Fabrice; Bessette, Barbara; Costes, Léa M M; Domballe, Linda; Charreau, Sandrine; Guilloteau, Karline; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Bernard, François-Xavier; Morel, Franck; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Lecron, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family that binds to a heterodimeric receptor consisting of IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1) and IL-10R2. IL-22R expression was initially characterized on epithelial cells, and plays an essential role in a number of inflammatory diseases. Recently, a functional receptor was detected on cancer cells such as hepatocarcinoma and lung carcinoma, but its presence was not reported in glioblastoma (GBM). Two GBM cell lines and 10 primary cell lines established from patients undergoing surgery for malignant GBM were used to investigate the expression of IL-22 and IL-22R by using quantitative RT-PCR, western blotting and confocal microscopy studies. The role of IL-22 in proliferation and survival of GBM cell lines was investigated in vitro by BrdU and ELISA cell death assays. We report herein that the two subunits of the IL-22R complex are expressed on human GBM cells. Their activation, depending on exogenous IL-22, induced antiapoptotic effect and cell proliferation. IL-22 treatment of GBM cells resulted in increased levels of phosphorylated Akt, STAT3 signaling protein and its downstream antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL and decreased level of phosphorylated ERK1/2. In addition, IL-22R subunits were expressed in all the 10 tested primary cell lines established from GBM tumors. Our results showed that IL-22R is expressed on GBM established and primary cell lines. Depending on STAT3, ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways, IL-22 induced GBM cell survival. These data are consistent with a potential role of IL-22R in tumorigenesis of GBM. Since endogenous IL-22 was not detected in all studied GBM cells, we hypothesize that IL-22R could be activated by immune microenvironmental IL-22 producing cells.

  8. Neuroblastoma cells depend on HDAC11 for mitotic cell cycle progression and survival.

    PubMed

    Thole, Theresa M; Lodrini, Marco; Fabian, Johannes; Wuenschel, Jasmin; Pfeil, Sebastian; Hielscher, Thomas; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Heinicke, Ulrike; Fulda, Simone; Witt, Olaf; Eggert, Angelika; Fischer, Matthias; Deubzer, Hedwig E

    2017-03-02

    The number of long-term survivors of high-risk neuroblastoma remains discouraging, with 10-year survival as low as 20%, despite decades of considerable international efforts to improve outcome. Major obstacles remain and include managing resistance to induction therapy, which causes tumor progression and early death in high-risk patients, and managing chemotherapy-resistant relapses, which can occur years after the initial diagnosis. Identifying and validating novel therapeutic targets is essential to improve treatment. Delineating and deciphering specific functions of single histone deacetylases in neuroblastoma may support development of targeted acetylome-modifying therapeutics for patients with molecularly defined high-risk neuroblastoma profiles. We show here that HDAC11 depletion in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma cell lines strongly induces cell death, mostly mediated by apoptotic programs. Genes necessary for mitotic cell cycle progression and cell division were most prominently enriched in at least two of three time points in whole-genome expression data combined from two cell systems, and all nine genes in these functional categories were strongly repressed, including CENPA, KIF14, KIF23 and RACGAP1. Enforced expression of one selected candidate, RACGAP1, partially rescued the induction of apoptosis caused by HDAC11 depletion. High-level expression of all nine genes in primary neuroblastomas significantly correlated with unfavorable overall and event-free survival in patients, suggesting a role in mediating the more aggressive biological and clinical phenotype of these tumors. Our study identified a group of cell cycle-promoting genes regulated by HDAC11, being both predictors of unfavorable patient outcome and essential for tumor cell viability. The data indicate a significant role of HDAC11 for mitotic cell cycle progression and survival of MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells, and suggests that HDAC11 could be a valuable drug target.

  9. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R.; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  10. Aggregation kinetics of human mesenchymal stem cells under wave motion.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ang-Chen; Liu, Yijun; Yuan, Xuegang; Chella, Ravindran; Ma, Teng

    2016-12-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are primary candidates in cell therapy and regenerative medicine but preserving their therapeutic potency following culture expansion is a significant challenge. hMSCs can spontaneously assemble into three-dimensional (3D) aggregates that enhance their regenerative properties. The present study investigated the impact of hydrodynamics conditions on hMSC aggregation kinetics under controlled rocking motion. While various laboratory methods have been developed for hMSC aggregate production, the rocking platform provides gentle mixing and can be scaled up using large bags as in wave motion bioreactors. The results show that the hMSC aggregation is mediated by cell adhesion molecules and that aggregate size distribution is influenced by seeding density, culture time, and hydrodynamic conditions. The analysis of fluid shear stress by COMSOL indicated that aggregate size distribution is inversely correlated with shear stress and that the rocking angle had a more pronounced effect on aggregate size distribution than the rocking speed due to its impact on shear stress. hMSC aggregates obtained from the bioreactor exhibit increased stemness, migratory properties, and expression of angiogenic factors. The results demonstrate the potential of the rocking platform to produce hMSC aggregates with controlled size distribution for therapeutic application.

  11. A proteomic kinetic analysis of IGROV1 ovarian carcinoma cell line response to cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Le Moguen, Karen; Lincet, Hubert; Marcelo, Paulo; Lemoisson, Edwige; Heutte, Natacha; Duval, Marilyne; Poulain, Laurent; Vinh, Joëlle; Gauduchon, Pascal; Baudin, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality by gynecological cancer. Despite good response to surgery and initial chemotherapy, essentially based on cisplatin (cis-diamino-dichloro-platinum(II) (CDDP)) compounds, frequent recurrences with chemoresistance acquisition are responsible for poor prognosis. Several mechanisms have been described as implicated in CDDP resistance, however they are not sufficient to exhaustively account for this resistance emergence. We applied a proteomic approach based on 2-DE coupled with MS (MALDI-TOF/TOF) to identify proteins associated with chemoresistance induced by CDDP. A kinetic analysis of IGROV1 cell behavior following treatment with CDDP and subsequent statistical analysis revealed time and/or concentration-dependent modifications in protein expression. We evidenced events such as decreased amino-acid and nucleotide synthesis potentially associated with cell cycle blockade, and variations that may be related to resistance acquisition, such as possible enhanced glycolysis and increased proliferating potential. Moreover, overexpressions of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 and both cytokeratins 8 and 18 were consistent with our previous findings, demonstrating that expression of these proteins was increased in cisplatin-resistant IGROV1-R10 as compared to IGROV1 parental cells. Identification of such proteins could allow improved understanding of the mechanisms leading to cell death or survival and, thus, to the acquisition of chemoresistance.

  12. Cell kinetics of repair after allyl alcohol-induced liver necrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Ilic, Z; Sell, S

    1996-04-01

    The cellular kinetics of repair and scarring which occurs after induction of periportal necrosis in mice by allyl alcohol were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. Thirty-six six-week-old female C57BI/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with two doses of allyl alcohol on day 0 and tissue sections were taken at various times and stained by haematoxylin and eosin or immunostained for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), bile duct/oval cell marker A-6, and DNA fragments (apoptosis). Within 6 hours, periportal necrosis was seen extending to produce large zones of confluent, pan-acinar irregular necrosis, predominantly in the right and medial lobes with sparing of the left and caudate lobes. Restoration of liver mass was accomplished mainly by proliferation of mature hepatocytes in the surviving lobes of the liver (hyperplasia). In the right and medial lobes where necrosis was limited to the periportal zone, there was some, but much less, proliferation of small, oval periportal cells. The large necrotic zones in the right and median lobes shrank and were replaced by granulomatous inflammation. This cellular contribution of liver regeneration in the mouse was different from that previously reported in the rat and provides a means of inducing only a small proliferation of oval cells.

  13. Lack of correlation between basal cell survival and gross response in irradiated swine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Shymko, R.M.; Hauser, D.L.; Archambeau, J.O.

    1984-07-01

    The relationship between basal cell survival and gross response in irradiated swine skin was tested by comparing dose survival curves derived from time-dose isoeffect data with curves obtained directly from basal cell counts in histological sections. Assuming equal effect per exposure and constant cell survival at isoeffect, best-fitting single-hit multi-target and liner-quadratic response curves were determined for time-dose schedules resulting in non-healing of 50% of irradiated fields. Basal cell survivals for single doses of 970, 1649, 2231, and 2619 rad were estimated 1) by counting regenerating islands and 2) by monitoring total basal cell counts through time. The dose survival curve derived from the isoeffect data was steeper than the curve obtained from direct basal cell counts. Furthermore, the direct basal cell survival curve extrapolates to less than 100% at zero dose, indicating the presence of a resistant basal cell subpopulation. The data show that the isoeffect in this case is not strongly coupled to basal cell survival.

  14. The Survival of Engrafted Neural Stem Cells Within Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yajie; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Successful cell-based therapy of neurological disorders is highly dependent on the survival of transplanted stem cells, with the overall graft survival of naked, unprotected cells in general remaining poor. We investigated the use of an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel for enhancement of survival of transplanted mouse C17.2 cells, human neural progenitor cells (ReNcells), and human glial-restricted precursors (GRPs). The gelation properties of the HA hydrogel were first characterized and optimized for intracerebral injection, resulting in a 25 min delayed-injection after mixing of the hydrogel components. Using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive readout of cell survival, we found that the hydrogel can protect xenografted cells as evidenced by the prolonged survival of C17.2 cells implanted in immunocompetent rats (p<0.01 at day 12). The survival of human ReNcells and human GRPs implanted in the brain of immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice was also significantly improved after hydrogel scaffolding (ReNcells, p<0.05 at day 5; GRPs, p<0.05 at day 7). However, an inflammatory response could be noted two weeks after injection of hydrogel into immunocompetent mice brains. We conclude that hydrogel scaffolding increases the survival of engrafted neural stem cells, justifying further optimization of hydrogel compositions. PMID:23623429

  15. Comparative intracellular uptake of adriamycin and 4'-deoxydoxorubicin by non-small cell lung tumor cells in culture and its relationship to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D J; Kerr, A M; Freshney, R I; Kaye, S B

    1986-08-15

    4'-Deoxydoxorubicin (4'-deoxy) is a new adriamycin analogue with a similar spectrum of antitumour activity but is significantly more lipophilic than the parent compound. We report the kinetics and uptake of the two drugs by human non-small cell lung tumour cells in monolayer culture and the relationship between intracellular drug levels and cytotoxicity. The rate and degree of cell uptake of 4'-deoxy (Vmax = 30 ng/10(5) cells/min) was greater than that of adriamycin (Vmax = 0.15 ng/10(5) cells/min). Although for a given intracellular drug concentration adriamycin was more lethal, on the basis of extracellular drug concentration, cell kill was virtually identical. The log cell survival vs intracellular drug concentration plot was linear for adriamycin but biphasic for 4'-deoxy. Intracellular distribution of the two drugs was followed by fluorescent microscopy and it was apparent that adriamycin was localized mainly within the nucleus whereas 4'-deoxy accumulated within the cytoplasm. Our results suggest that the relationship between intracellular distribution of the two drugs could reflect different modes of action for the drugs with respect to binding sites or could be a non-specific phenomenon, unrelated to lethal effects.

  16. HSP90 promotes Burkitt lymphoma cell survival by maintaining tonic B-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Walter, Roland; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Doebele, Carmen; Comoglio, Federico; Tomska, Katarzyna; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Young, Ryan M; Jacobs, Laura; Keller, Ulrich; Bönig, Halvard; Engelke, Michael; Rosenwald, Andreas; Urlaub, Henning; Staudt, Louis M; Serve, Hubert; Zenz, Thorsten; Oellerich, Thomas

    2017-02-02

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm that is currently treated by intensive chemotherapy in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. Because of their toxicity, current treatment regimens are often not suitable for elderly patients or for patients in developing countries where BL is endemic. Targeted therapies for BL are therefore needed. In this study, we performed a compound screen in 17 BL cell lines to identify small molecule inhibitors affecting cell survival. We found that inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) induced apoptosis in BL cells in vitro at concentrations that did not affect normal B cells. By global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling, we show that, in BL, HSP90 inhibition compromises the activity of the pivotal B-cell antigen receptor (BCR)-proximal effector spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), which we identified as an HSP90 client protein. Consistently, expression of constitutively active TEL-SYK counteracted the apoptotic effect of HSP90 inhibition. Together, our results demonstrate that HSP90 inhibition impairs BL cell survival by interfering with tonic BCR signaling, thus providing a molecular rationale for the use of HSP90 inhibitors in the treatment of BL.

  17. Pathogenic long-lived plasma cells and their survival niches in autoimmunity, malignancy, and allergy.

    PubMed

    Winter, Oliver; Dame, Christof; Jundt, Franziska; Hiepe, Falk

    2012-12-01

    Long-lived plasma cells survive in a protected microenvironment for years or even a lifetime and provide humoral memory by establishing persistent Ab titers. Long-lived autoreactive, malignant, and allergen-specific plasma cells are likewise protected in their survival niche and are refractory to immunosuppression, B cell depletion, and irradiation. Their elimination remains an essential therapeutic challenge. Recent data indicate that long-lived plasma cells reside in a multicomponent plasma cell niche with a stable mesenchymal and a dynamic hematopoietic component, both providing essential soluble and membrane-bound survival factors. Alternative niches with different hematopoietic cell components compensate fluctuations of single cell types but may also harbor distinct plasma cell subsets. In this Brief Review, we discuss conventional therapies in autoimmunity and multiple myeloma in comparison with novel drugs that target plasma cells and their niches. In the future, such strategies may enable the specific depletion of pathogenic plasma cells while leaving the protective humoral memory intact.

  18. Macrophage-mediated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival is independent of APRIL signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Attekum, MHA; Terpstra, S; Reinen, E; Kater, AP; Eldering, E

    2016-01-01

    Survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells is mainly driven by interactions within the lymph node (LN) microenvironment with bystander cells such as T cells or cells from the monocytic lineage. Although the survival effect by T cells is largely governed by the TNFR ligand family member CD40L, the exact mechanism of monocyte-derived cell-induced survival is not known. An important role has been attributed to the TNFR ligand, a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), although the exact mechanism remained unclear. Since we detected that APRIL was expressed by CD68+ cells in CLL LN, we addressed its relevance in various aspects of CLL biology, using a novel APRIL overexpressing co-culture system, recombinant APRIL, and APRIL reporter cells. Unexpectedly, we found, that in these various systems, APRIL had no effect on survival of CLL cells, and activation of NF-κB was not enhanced on APRIL stimulation. Moreover, APRIL stity mulation did not affect CLL proliferation, neither as single stimulus nor in combination with known CLL proliferation stimuli. Furthermore, the survival effect conveyed by macrophages to CLL cells was not affected by transmembrane activator and CAML interactor-Fc, an APRIL decoy receptor. We conclude that the direct role ascribed to APRIL in CLL cell survival might be overestimated due to application of supraphysiological levels of recombinant APRIL. PMID:27551513

  19. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  20. Prolongation of survival of rat cardiac allografts by T cell vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Reshef, T; Pfeffermann, R A; Cohen, I R

    1993-01-01

    Administration of attenuated, activated autoimmune T lymphocytes to syngeneic mice and rats has been shown to prevent or induce remission of experimental autoimmune diseases specific for the autoimmune T cells. The process has been termed "T cell vaccination." In a recent study, T cell vaccination was done using T cells sensitized to rat alloantigens. The procedure produced a significant reduction of the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) against allogeneic cells. The reduction in MLR was not specific: Vaccination with T cells specific for stimulator cells of one allotype led to a reduced MLR stimulated by cells of another allotype. The present study was undertaken to examine whether T cell vaccination can induce tolerance to transplantation antigens in vivo. We used the model of heterotopic cardiac transplantation in rats. We now report that vaccinating rats with syngeneic, activated, alloantigen-primed T lymphocytes significantly prolonged survival of rat cardiac allografts. The effect of T cell vaccination was most evident when the T cells had been obtained from rats specifically sensitized against the donor rats: Brown-Norway (BN) allografts in control Wistar rats survived 8.5 +/- 0.4 d while BN allografts survived 29.2 +/- 7.1 d in Wistar rats that had been vaccinated with Wistar anti-BN cells. Vaccination of Wistar rats with Wistar anti-hooded T cells prolonged survival of BN heart allografts to a lesser but significant degree (13.0 +/- 1.1 d). Thus, T cell vaccination of recipients can prolong survival of allografts. PMID:8432846

  1. Enhanced endogenous type I interferon cell-driven survival and inhibition of spontaneous apoptosis by Riluzole

    SciTech Connect

    Achour, Ammar

    2009-03-30

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), although effective in improving the survival of HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been able to reconstitute the adaptive immune response. We have described the use of novel chemical agents to restore T-cell survival/proliferation by inducing cytokine production. Due to its cationic amphiphilic structure, these molecules appear to enhance immune restoration. In this study, we investigated the action of Riluzole (2-amino-6-trifuromethoxybenzothiazole) in HIV-1 infection. Riluzole is able to increase (effective dose from 1 to 1000 nM) the cell-survival of T cells from HIV-1-infected patients and inhibit spontaneous apoptosis. The immunomodulatory effect of riluzole-sensitized cells was ascribed to endogenous type I interferon (IFN) derived from monocytes. Riluzole might be used for restoring the cell survival of immunocompromised patients and eliminating latent infected cells upon HIV-1 reactivation.

  2. Enhanced survival of Leishmania major in neutrophil granulocytes in the presence of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hellberg, Lars; Köhl, Jörg; Laskay, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the first leukocytes that encounter and phagocytose Leishmania major (L. major) parasites in the infected skin. The parasites can nonetheless survive within neutrophils. However, the mechanisms enabling the survival of Leishmania within neutrophils are still elusive. Previous findings indicated that human neutrophils can engulf apoptotic cells. Since apoptotic neutrophils are abundant in infected tissues, we hypothesized that the uptake of apoptotic cells results in diminished anti-leishmanial activity and, consequently, contributes to enhanced survival of the parasites at the site of infection. In the present study, we demonstrated that L. major-infected primary human neutrophils acquire enhanced capacity to engulf apoptotic cells. This was associated with increased expression of the complement receptors 1 and 3 involved in phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Next, we showed that ingestion of apoptotic cells affects neutrophil antimicrobial functions. We observed that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by neutrophils downregulates the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and PKCδ, the kinases involved in activation of NADPH oxidase and hence reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In line, uptake of apoptotic cells inhibits TNF- and L. major-induced ROS production by neutrophils. Importantly, we found that the survival of Leishmania in neutrophils is strongly enhanced in neutrophils exposed to apoptotic cells. Together, our findings reveal that apoptotic cells promote L. major survival within neutrophils by downregulating critical antimicrobial functions. This suggests that the induction of enhanced uptake of apoptotic cells represents a novel evasion mechanism of the parasites that facilitates their survival in neutrophil granulocytes. PMID:28187163

  3. Hedgehog signaling is activated in canine transitional cell carcinoma and contributes to cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, T L; Kitchell, B E; Biller, B

    2017-03-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most commonly diagnosed tumor of the canine urinary system. Hedgehog (HH) signaling represents one possible novel therapeutic target, based on its recently identified central role in human urothelial carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to determine if HH mediators are expressed in canine TCC and the effect of inhibition of this pathway on cell growth and survival. HH pathway mediators were found to be expressed in five canine TCC cell lines. Indian HH was expressed in tumor cells in five canine bladder tumor tissues, but not in normal canine bladder tissue. Inhibition of HH signaling with cyclopamine and GANT61 led to significantly decreased cell proliferation but had a smaller effect on apoptosis. These results support future investigation of inhibitors of HH signaling in the treatment of canine TCC.

  4. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  5. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    PubMed Central

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  6. Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the {alpha}-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

  7. Track-event theory of cell survival with second-order repair.

    PubMed

    Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work, a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. It is assumed that a cell is killed by an event that is defined by two double-strand breaks on the same or different chromosomes. Two different mechanisms can produce events. A one-track event is always represented by two simultaneous double-strand breaks. A two-track event results in one double-strand break. Therefore, at least two two-track events on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. It is assumed that two double-strand breaks can be repaired with a certain repair probability. Both the one-track events and the two-track events are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell killing which is described by the Poisson distribution, the cell survival probability was derived. The model was fitted to experimental data. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data as well as the LQ model and is based on two free parameters. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival as well as the LQ model.

  8. Sonic hedgehog signaling coordinates the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells by regulating cell cycle kinetics during development of the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Komada, Munekazu

    2012-06-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) acts as a morphogen in normal development of various vertebrate tissues and organs. Shh signaling is essential for patterning and cell-fate specification, particularly in the central nervous system. Shh signaling plays different roles depending on its concentration, area, and timing of exposure. During the development of the neocortex, a low level of Shh is expressed in the neural stem/progenitor cells as well as in mature neurons in the dorsal telencephalon. Shh signaling in neocortex development has been shown to regulate cell cycle kinetics of radial glial cells and intermediate progenitor cells, thereby maintaining the proliferation, survival and differentiation of neurons in the neocortex. During the development of the telencephalon, endogenous Shh signaling is involved in the transition of slow-cycling neural stem cells to fast-cycling neural progenitor cells. It seems that high-level Shh signaling in the ventral telencephalon is essential for ventral specification, while low-level Shh signaling in the dorsal telencephalon plays important roles in the fine-tuning of cell cycle kinetics. The Shh levels and multiple functions of Shh signaling are important for proper corticogenesis in the developing brain. The present paper discusses the roles of Shh signaling in the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells.

  9. An X chromosome gene regulates hematopoietic stem cell kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Abkowitz, Janis L.; Taboada, Monica; Shelton, Grady H.; Catlin, Sandra N.; Guttorp, Peter; Kiklevich, J. Veronika

    1998-01-01

    Females are natural mosaics for X chromosome-linked genes. As X chromosome inactivation occurs randomly, the ratio of parental phenotypes among blood cells is approximately 1:1. Recently, however, ratios of greater than 3:1 have been observed in 38–56% of women over age 60. This could result from a depletion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with aging (and the maintenance of hematopoiesis by a few residual clones) or from myelodysplasia (the dominance of a neoplastic clone). Each possibility has major implications for chemotherapy and for transplantation in elderly patients. We report similar findings in longitudinal studies of female Safari cats and demonstrate that the excessive skewing that develops with aging results from a third mechanism that has no pathologic consequence, hemizygous selection. We show that there is a competitive advantage for all HSCs with a specific X chromosome phenotype and, thus, demonstrate that an X chromosome gene (or genes) regulates HSC replication, differentiation, and/or survival. PMID:9520458

  10. Cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells irradiated out-of-field.

    PubMed

    Shields, L; Vega-Carrascal, I; Singleton, S; Lyng, F M; McClean, B

    2014-11-01

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells is not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  11. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Entry Kinetics and Cell-Cell Transmission of Surface-Bound Retroviral Vector Particles

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Lee S.; Skinner, Amy M.; Woodward, Josha A.; Kurre, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Transduction with recombinant Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) -1 derived lentivirus vectors is a multi-step process initiated by surface attachment and subsequent receptor-directed uptake into the target cell. We previously reported the retention of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G) pseudotyped particles on murine progenitor cells and their delayed cell-cell transfer. Methods To examine the underlying mechanism in more detail we used a combination of approaches focused on investigating the role of receptor-independent factors in modulating attachment. Results Studies of synchronized transduction herein reveal cell-type specific rates of vector particle clearance with substantial delays during particle entry into murine hematopoietic progenitor cells. The observed uptake kinetics from the surface of the 1° cell correlate inversely with the magnitude of transfer to 2° targets, corresponding with our initial observation of preferential cell-cell transfer in the context of brief vector exposures. We further demonstrate that vector particle entry into cells is associated with the cell–type specific abundance of extracellular matrix fibronectin. Residual particle – ECM binding and 2° transfer can be competitively disrupted by heparin exposure without affecting murine progenitor homing and repopulation. Conclusions While cellular attachment factors, including fibronectin, aid gene transfer by colocalizing particles to cells and disfavoring early dissociation from targets, they also appear to stabilize particles on the cell surface. Our study highlights the inadvertent consequences for cell entry and cell-cell transfer. PMID:20440757

  13. A particle dynamic model of red blood cell aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Marianne; Garcia, Damien; Meiselman, Herbert J; Cloutier, Guy

    2009-11-01

    To elucidate the relationship between microscopic red blood cell (RBC) interactions and macroscopic rheological behavior, we propose a two-dimensional particle model capable of mimicking the main characteristics of RBC aggregation kinetics. The mechanical model of RBCs sheared in Couette flow is based on Newton law. We assumed a hydrodynamic force to move particles, a force to describe aggregation and an elasticity force. The role of molecular mass and concentration of neutral polymers on aggregation [Neu, B., and H. J. Meiselman. Biophys. J. 83:2482-2490, 2002] could be mimicked. Specifically, it was shown that for any shear rate (SR), the mean aggregate size (MAS) grew with time until it reached a constant value, which is consistent with in vitro experiments. It was also demonstrated that we could mimic the modal relationship between MAS and SR and the occurrence of maximum aggregation at about 0.1 s(-1). As anticipated, simulations indicated that an increase in aggregation force augmented MAS. Further, augmentation of the depletion layer thickness influenced MAS only for SR close to zero, which is a new finding. To conclude, our contribution reveals that the aggregation force intensity and SR influence the steady state MAS, and that the depletion and layer thickness affect the aggregation speed.

  14. Cell kinetics and biochemical parameters in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Becciolini, A; Porciani, S; Balzi, M; Lanini, A; Scubla, E; Pacini, P; Benucci, A; Distante, V

    1992-01-01

    The study analyzes biochemical and cell kinetic parameters to characterize solid tumor growth in humans. The concentrations of polyamines, CEA, the thymidine labeling index (T.L.I.) and the mitotic index (M.I.) were determined on fragments of neoplastic tissue from 18 patients with breast carcinoma. Urinary polyamines were evaluated in the same patients. Two groups of patients were distinguished according to the median value of the with high T.L.I., M.I. and tissue polyamines were significantly higher than in the group with low T.L.I., whereas tissue CEA was lower, though in a not statistically significant way. Urinary polyamines showed no variations between groups. These preliminary results showed that T.L.I. levels were higher in patients who relapsed during a 4-year follow-up than in patients achieving complete remission and remaining disease free. Results concerning polyamine concentration showed that the tissue polyamine level in breast carcinoma indicated proliferative activity, but this does not seem to be valuable for current prognostic purposes.

  15. Non-small cell lung cancer cell survival crucially depends on functional insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Carolin Maria; Zimmermann, Katrin; Zilleßen, Pia; Pfeifer, Alexander; Racké, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Insulin plays an important role as a growth factor and its contribution to tumor proliferation is intensely discussed. It acts via the cognate insulin receptor (IR) but can also activate the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R). Apart from increasing proliferation, insulin might have additional effects in lung cancer. Therefore, we investigated insulin action and effects of IR knockdown (KD) in three (NCI-H292, NCI-H226 and NCI-H460) independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. All lung cancer lines studied were found to express IR, albeit with marked differences in the ratio of the two variants IR-A and IR-B. Insulin activated the classical signaling pathway with IR autophosphorylation and Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, activation of MAPK was observed in H292 cells, accompanied by enhanced proliferation. Lentiviral shRNA IR KD caused strong decrease in survival of all three lines, indicating that the effects of insulin in lung cancer go beyond enhancing proliferation. Unspecific effects were ruled out by employing further shRNAs and different insulin-responsive cells (human pre-adipocytes) for comparison. Caspase assays demonstrated that IR KD strongly induced apoptosis in these lung cancer cells, providing the physiological basis of the rapid cell loss. In search for the underlying mechanism, we analyzed alterations in the gene expression profile in response to IR KD. A strong induction of certain cytokines (e.g. IL20 and tumour necrosis factor) became obvious and it turned out that these cytokines trigger apoptosis in the NSCLC cells tested. This indicates a novel role of IR in tumor cell survival via suppression of pro-apoptotic cytokines.

  16. Single-cell analysis of transcription kinetics across the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Samuel O; Xu, Heng; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Freire, Pablo R; Zwaka, Thomas P; Golding, Ido

    2016-01-29

    Transcription is a highly stochastic process. To infer transcription kinetics for a gene-of-interest, researchers commonly compare the distribution of mRNA copy-number to the prediction of a theoretical model. However, the reliability of this procedure is limited because the measured mRNA numbers represent integration over the mRNA lifetime, contribution from multiple gene copies, and mixing of cells from different cell-cycle phases. We address these limitations by simultaneously quantifying nascent and mature mRNA in individual cells, and incorporating cell-cycle effects in the analysis of mRNA statistics. We demonstrate our approach on Oct4 and Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Both genes follow similar two-state kinetics. However, Nanog exhibits slower ON/OFF switching, resulting in increased cell-to-cell variability in mRNA levels. Early in the cell cycle, the two copies of each gene exhibit independent activity. After gene replication, the probability of each gene copy to be active diminishes, resulting in dosage compensation.

  17. Single-cell analysis of transcription kinetics across the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Samuel O; Xu, Heng; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Freire, Pablo R; Zwaka, Thomas P; Golding, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a highly stochastic process. To infer transcription kinetics for a gene-of-interest, researchers commonly compare the distribution of mRNA copy-number to the prediction of a theoretical model. However, the reliability of this procedure is limited because the measured mRNA numbers represent integration over the mRNA lifetime, contribution from multiple gene copies, and mixing of cells from different cell-cycle phases. We address these limitations by simultaneously quantifying nascent and mature mRNA in individual cells, and incorporating cell-cycle effects in the analysis of mRNA statistics. We demonstrate our approach on Oct4 and Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Both genes follow similar two-state kinetics. However, Nanog exhibits slower ON/OFF switching, resulting in increased cell-to-cell variability in mRNA levels. Early in the cell cycle, the two copies of each gene exhibit independent activity. After gene replication, the probability of each gene copy to be active diminishes, resulting in dosage compensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12175.001 PMID:26824388

  18. A stochastic model of cell survival for high-Z nanoparticle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Ngwa, Wil; Berbeco, Ross; Makrigiorgos, Mike; Hoegele, Wolfgang; Cifter, Fulya; Sajo, Erno

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present a stochastic framework for the assessment of cell survival in gold nanoparticle radiotherapy. Methods: The authors derive the equations for the effective macroscopic dose enhancement for a population of cells with nonideal distribution of gold nanoparticles (GNP), allowing different number of GNP per cell and different distances with respect to the cellular target. They use the mixed Poisson distribution formalism to model the impact of the aforementioned physical factors on the effective dose enhancement. Results: The authors show relatively large differences in the estimation of cell survival arising from using approximated formulae. They predict degeneration of the cell killing capacity due to different number of GNP per cell and different distances with respect to the cellular target. Conclusions: The presented stochastic framework can be used in interpretation of experimental cell survival or tumor control probability studies.

  19. Autophagy in response to photodynamic therapy: cell survival vs. cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Xue, Liang-yan; Chiu, Song-mao; Joseph, Sheeba

    2009-02-01

    Autophagy (or more properly, macroautophagy) is a pathway whereby damaged organelles or other cell components are encased in a double membrane, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes for digestion by lysosomal hydrolases. This process can promote cell survival by removing damaged organelles, but when damage is extensive, it can also be a mechanism of cell death. Similar to the Kessel and Agostinis laboratories, we have reported the vigorous induction of autophagy by PDT; this was found in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells whether or not they were able to efficiently induce apoptosis. One way to evaluate the role of autophagy in PDT-treated cells is to silence one of the essential genes in the pathway. Kessel and Reiners silenced the Atg7 gene of murine leukemia L1210 cells using inhibitory RNA and found sensitization to PDT-induced cell death at a low dose of PDT, implying that autophagy is protective when PDT damage is modest. We have examined the role of autophagy in an epithelium-derived cancer cell by comparing parental and Atg7-silenced MCF-7 cells to varying doses of PDT with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. In contrast to L1210 cells, autophagy-deficient MCF-7 cells were more resistant to the lethal effects of PDT, as judged by clonogenic assays. A possible explanation for the difference in outcome for L1210 vs. MCF-7 cells is the greatly reduced ability of the latter to undergo apoptosis, a deficiency that may convert autophagy into a cell-death process even at low PDT doses. Experiments to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible are in process.

  20. Differential effects on CLL cell survival exerted by different microenvironmental elements.

    PubMed

    Ghia, P; Circosta, P; Scielzo, C; Vallario, A; Camporeale, A; Granziero, L; Caligaris-Cappio, F

    2005-01-01

    Selected microenvironmental stimuli confer to leukemic cells a growth advantage and an extended survival. We aimed at dissecting the differential support provided by the different cellular components of the microenvironment where CLL cells accumulate. To this end we cultured purified CLL cells in vitro in the presence or absence of different accessory cells (stromal cells, autologous T lymphocytes) and/or soluble molecules (IL-4, sCD40L) and assessed the leukemic cell response in terms of cell viability and chemoattracting capacity. The results indicate that both T lymphocytes and stromal cells are involved in sustaining the survival of leukemic B cells, but indicate that their support is different in terms of time of onset and duration. T cells have a short-term support activity while stromal cells provide long-term support.

  1. Electrochemical degradation, kinetics & performance studies of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debanjan

    Linear and Non-linear electrochemical characterization techniques and equivalent circuit modelling were carried out on miniature and sub-commercial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stacks as an in-situ diagnostic approach to evaluate and analyze their performance under the presence of simulated alternative fuel conditions. The main focus of the study was to track the change in cell behavior and response live, as the cell was generating power. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was the most important linear AC technique used for the study. The distinct effects of inorganic components usually present in hydrocarbon fuel reformates on SOFC behavior have been determined, allowing identification of possible "fingerprint" impedance behavior corresponding to specific fuel conditions and reaction mechanisms. Critical electrochemical processes and degradation mechanisms which might affect cell performance were identified and quantified. Sulfur and siloxane cause the most prominent degradation and the associated electrochemical cell parameters such as Gerisher and Warburg elements are applied respectively for better understanding of the degradation processes. Electrochemical Frequency Modulation (EFM) was applied for kinetic studies in SOFCs for the very first time for estimating the exchange current density and transfer coefficients. EFM is a non-linear in-situ electrochemical technique conceptually different from EIS and is used extensively in corrosion work, but rarely used on fuel cells till now. EFM is based on exploring information obtained from non-linear higher harmonic contributions from potential perturbations of electrochemical systems, otherwise not obtained by EIS. The baseline fuel used was 3 % humidified hydrogen with a 5-cell SOFC sub-commercial planar stack to perform the analysis. Traditional methods such as EIS and Tafel analysis were carried out at similar operating conditions to verify and correlate with the EFM data and ensure the validity of the

  2. IL-15 Expression on RA Synovial Fibroblasts Promotes B Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Miguel, Marta; García-Carmona, Yolanda; Balsa, Alejandro; Bautista-Caro, María-Belén; Arroyo-Villa, Irene; Cobo-Ibáñez, Tatiana; Bonilla-Hernán, María Gema; de Ayala, Carlos Pérez; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Martín-Mola, Emilio; Miranda-Carús, María-Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to examine the role of RA Synovial Fibroblast (RASFib) IL-15 expression on B cell survival. Methods Magnetically sorted peripheral blood memory B cells from 15 healthy subjects were cocultured with RASFib. Results RASFib constitutively expressed membrane IL-15. Survival of isolated B cells cultured for 6 days, below 5%, was extended in coculture with RASFib to 52+/−8% (p<0.001). IL-15 neutralizing agents but not isotype controls, reduced this rate to 31+/−6% (p<0.05). Interestingly, rhIL-15 had no effect on isolated B cells but significantly increased their survival in coculture with RASFib. In parallel, B cell IL-15R chains were upregulated in cocultures. BAFF and VCAM-1, that are expressed on RASFib, were tested as potential candidates involved in upregulating B cell IL-15R. Culture of B cells in the presence of rhBAFF or rhVCAM-1 resulted in significantly increased survival, together with upregulation of all three IL-15R chains; in parallel, rhIL-15 potentiated the anti-apoptotic effect of BAFF and VCAM-1. Both BAFF and VCAM-1 neutralizing agents downmodulated the effect of RASFib on B cell survival and IL-15R expression. In parallel, rhIL-15 had a lower effect on the survival of B cells cocultured with RASFib in the presence of BAFF or VCAM-1 neutralizing agents. Peripheral blood B cells from 15 early RA patients demonstrated an upregulated IL-15R and increased survival in cocultures. Conclusion IL-15 expression on RASFib significantly contributes to the anti-apoptotic effect of RASFib on B cells. IL-15 action is facilitated by BAFF and VCAM-1 expressed on RASFib, through an upregulation of IL-15R chains. PMID:22792388

  3. Inhibition of human lung cancer cell proliferation and survival by wine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compounds of plant origin and food components have attracted scientific attention for use as agents for cancer prevention and treatment. Wine contains polyphenols that were shown to have anti-cancer and other health benefits. The survival pathways of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), and the tumor suppressor p53 are key modulators of cancer cell growth and survival. In this study, we examined the effects of wine on proliferation and survival of human Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and its effects on signaling events. Methods Human NSCLC adenocarcinoma A549 and H1299 cells were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by thymidine incorporation. Clonogenic assays were used to assess cell survival. Immunoblotting was used to examine total and phosphorylated levels of Akt, Erk and p53. Results In A549 cells red wine inhibited cell proliferation and reduced clonogenic survival at doses as low as 0.02%. Red wine significantly reduced basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk phosphorylation while it increased the levels of total and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15). Control experiments indicated that the anti-proliferative effects of wine were not mediated by the associated contents of ethanol or the polyphenol resveratrol and were independent of glucose transport into cancer cells. White wine also inhibited clonogenic survival, albeit at a higher doses (0.5-2%), and reduced Akt phosphorylation. The effects of both red and white wine on Akt phosphorylation were also verified in H1299 cells. Conclusions Red wine inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells and blocks clonogenic survival at low concentrations. This is associated with inhibition of basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk signals and enhancement of total and phosphorylated levels of p53. White wine mediates similar effects albeit at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that wine may have considerable anti-tumour and chemoprevention properties in lung cancer and deserves further

  4. Biphasic Dependence of Glioma Survival and Cell Migration on CD44 Expression Level.

    PubMed

    Klank, Rebecca L; Decker Grunke, Stacy A; Bangasser, Benjamin L; Forster, Colleen L; Price, Matthew A; Odde, Thomas J; SantaCruz, Karen S; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Canoll, Peter; Turley, Eva A; McCarthy, James B; Ohlfest, John R; Odde, David J

    2017-01-03

    While several studies link the cell-surface marker CD44 to cancer progression, conflicting results show both positive and negative correlations with increased CD44 levels. Here, we demonstrate that the survival outcomes of genetically induced glioma-bearing mice and of high-grade human glioma patients are biphasically correlated with CD44 level, with the poorest outcomes occurring at intermediate levels. Furthermore, the high-CD44-expressing mesenchymal subtype exhibited a positive trend of survival with increased CD44 level. Mouse cell migration rates in ex vivo brain slice cultures were also biphasically associated with CD44 level, with maximal migration corresponding to minimal survival. Cell simulations suggest that cell-substrate adhesiveness is sufficient to explain this biphasic migration. More generally, these results highlight the potential importance of non-monotonic relationships between survival and biomarkers associated with cancer progression.

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid enhances survival of human CD34+ cells in ischemic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Ivana; Fidalgo-Carvalho, Isabel; Aday, Sezin; Vazão, Helena; Carvalheiro, Tiago; Grãos, Mário; Duarte, António; Cardoso, Carla; Gonçalves, Lino; Carvalho, Lina; Paiva, Artur; Ferreira, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials are exploring therapeutic effect of human CD34+ cells in ischemic diseases, including myocardial infarction. Unfortunately, most of the cells die few days after delivery. Herein we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-treated human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells cultured under hypoxic and serum-deprived conditions present 2.2-fold and 1.3-fold higher survival relatively to non-treated cells and prostaglandin E2-treated cells, respectively. The pro-survival effect of LPA is concentration- and time-dependent and it is mediated by the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor γ (PPARγ) and downstream, by the activation of pro-survival ERK and Akt signaling pathways and the inhibition of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In hypoxia and serum-deprived culture conditions, LPA induces CD34+ cell proliferation without maintaining the their undifferentiating state, and enhances IL-8, IL-6 and G-CSF secretion during the first 12 h compared to non-treated cells. LPA-treated CD34+ cells delivered in fibrin gels have enhanced survival and improved cardiac fractional shortening at 2 weeks on rat infarcted hearts as compared to hearts treated with placebo. We have developed a new platform to enhance the survival of CD34+ cells using a natural and cost-effective ligand and demonstrated its utility in the preservation of the functionality of the heart after infarction. PMID:26553339

  6. Cell Survival and Apoptosis Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Marine Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Se-Kwon, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis leads to activation of cell survival factors (e.g., AKT) causes continuous cell proliferation in cancer. Apoptosis, the major form of cellular suicide, is central to various physiological processes and the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. A number of discoveries have clarified the molecular mechanism of apoptosis, thus clarifying the link between apoptosis and cell survival factors, which has a therapeutic outcome. Induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell survival by anticancer agents has been shown to correlate with tumor response. Cellular damage induces growth arrest and tumor suppression by inducing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence; the mechanism of cell death depends on the magnitude of DNA damage following exposure to various anticancer agents. Apoptosis is mainly regulated by cell survival and proliferating signaling molecules. As a new therapeutic strategy, alternative types of cell death might be exploited to control and eradicate cancer cells. This review discusses the signaling of apoptosis and cell survival, as well as the potential contribution of marine bioactive compounds, suggesting that new therapeutic strategies might follow. PMID:23348928

  7. Survival of mature T cells in the periphery is intrinsically dependent on GIMAP1 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Preeta; Webb, Louise M.C.; Avdo, Inxhina; Pascall, John

    2016-01-01

    An effective immune system depends upon the survival of mature T cells in the periphery. Members of the GIMAP family of GTPases have been proposed to regulate this homeostasis, supported by the paucity of peripheral T cells in rodents deficient for either GIMAP1 or GIMAP5. It is unclear whether this lack of T cells is a consequence of an ontological defect, causing the thymus to generate and export T cells incapable of surviving in the periphery, or whether (alternatively or additionally) mature T cells intrinsically require GIMAP1 for survival. Using the ERT2Cre+ transgene, we conditionally deleted Gimap1 in C57BL/6 mice and demonstrate that GIMAP1 is intrinsically required for the survival of mature T cells in the periphery. We show that, in contrast to GIMAP5, this requirement is independent of the T‐cells' activation status. We investigated the nature of the survival defect in GIMAP1‐deficient CD4+ T cells and show that the death occurring after GIMAP1 ablation is accompanied by mitochondrial depolarization and activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. This study shows that GIMAP1 is critical for maintaining the peripheral T‐cell pool in mice and offers a potent target for the treatment of T‐cell‐mediated diseases. PMID:27792288

  8. HSP70 mediates survival in apoptotic cells-Boolean network prediction and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Vasaikar, Suhas V; Ghosh, Sourish; Narain, Priyam; Basu, Anirban; Gomes, James

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal stress or injury results in the activation of proteins, which regulate the balance between survival and apoptosis. However, the complex mechanism of cell signaling involving cell death and survival, activated in response to cellular stress is not yet completely understood. To bring more clarity about these mechanisms, a Boolean network was constructed that represented the apoptotic pathway in neuronal cells. FasL and neurotrophic growth factor (NGF) were considered as inputs in the absence and presence of heat shock proteins known to shift the balance toward survival by rescuing pro-apoptotic cells. The probabilities of survival, DNA repair and apoptosis as cellular fates, in the presence of either the growth factor or FasL, revealed a survival bias encoded in the network. Boolean predictions tested by measuring the mRNA level of caspase-3, caspase-8, and BAX in neuronal Neuro2a (N2a) cell line with NGF and FasL as external input, showed positive correlation with the observed experimental results for survival and apoptotic states. It was observed that HSP70 contributed more toward rescuing cells from apoptosis in comparison to HSP27, HSP40, and HSP90. Overexpression of HSP70 in N2a transfected cells showed reversal of cellular fate from FasL-induced apoptosis to survival. Further, the pro-survival role of the proteins BCL2, IAP, cFLIP, and NFκB determined by vertex perturbation analysis was experimentally validated through protein inhibition experiments using EM20-25, Embelin and Wedelolactone, which resulted in 1.27-, 1.26-, and 1.46-fold increase in apoptosis of N2a cells. The existence of a one-to-one correspondence between cellular fates and attractor states shows that Boolean networks may be employed with confidence in qualitative analytical studies of biological networks.

  9. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  10. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Masanori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nakasono, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (≥8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5(+) stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ≥1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay.

  11. Silencing survivin activates autophagy as an alternative survival pathway in HCC cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Jia; Li, Li-Tzu; Chen, Hsin-An; Hung, Chin-Sheng; Wei, Po-Li

    2014-10-01

    Autophagy is a survival mechanism that is activated in response to nutrient deprivation. The link between aberrant autophagy and cancer has been increasingly recognized. Survivin, an anti-apoptotic molecule, and the autophagy pathway are correlated with therapeutic responses to cancer. However, the role of autophagy in cancer progression remains unclear. Here, we generated survivin knockdown cells (survivin-KD) by introducing a short interfering RNA (siRNA) into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and we observed a 20 % reduction in the survival of these survivin-KD cells, as determined by MTT assay. In addition, an increased number of stress granules, increased positive staining by acridine orange and a shift in the high side scatter (SSC) cell population in flow cytometry analysis were observed in survivin-KD cells. Furthermore, electron microscopy revealed an increased number of autophagosomes in survivin-KD cells compared with scrambled control cells. Finally, we treated cells with an autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA, and observed a decrease in cell survival in survivin-KD cells compared with scrambled control cells. Our study suggests that an autophagy signal may be activated after the anti-apoptotic molecule survivin is suppressed. This finding implies that autophagy may be an alternative survival pathway in HCC cells and may provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies for HCC.

  12. Survival of human embryonic stem cells implanted in the guinea pig auditory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Min; Hackelberg, Sandra; Green, Kari L.; Lunghamer, Kelly G.; Kurioka, Takaomi; Loomis, Benjamin R.; Swiderski, Donald L.; Duncan, R. Keith; Raphael, Yehoash

    2017-01-01

    Hair cells in the mature cochlea cannot spontaneously regenerate. One potential approach for restoring hair cells is stem cell therapy. However, when cells are transplanted into scala media (SM) of the cochlea, they promptly die due to the high potassium concentration. We previously described a method for conditioning the SM to make it more hospitable to implanted cells and showed that HeLa cells could survive for up to a week using this method. Here, we evaluated the survival of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) constitutively expressing GFP (H9 Cre-LoxP) in deaf guinea pig cochleae that were pre-conditioned to reduce potassium levels. GFP-positive cells could be detected in the cochlea for at least 7 days after the injection. The cells appeared spherical or irregularly shaped, and some were aggregated. Flushing SM with sodium caprate prior to transplantation resulted in a lower proportion of stem cells expressing the pluripotency marker Oct3/4 and increased cell survival. The data demonstrate that conditioning procedures aimed at transiently reducing the concentration of potassium in the SM facilitate survival of hESCs for at least one week. During this time window, additional procedures can be applied to initiate the differentiation of the implanted hESCs into new hair cells. PMID:28387239

  13. Kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in Li/SOCl2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Lee D.; Frank, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    Work is described that was designed to determine the kinetic constants necessary to extrapolate kinetic data on Li/SOCl2 cells over the temperature range from 25 to 75 C. A second objective was to characterize as far as possible the chemical reactions that occur in the cells since these reactions may be important in understanding the potential hazards of these cells. The kinetics of the corrosion processes in undischarged Li/SOCl2 cells were determined and separated according to their occurrence at the anode and cathode; the effects that switching the current on and off has on the corrosion reactions was determined; and the effects of discharge state on the kinetics of the corrosion process were found. A thermodynamic analysis of the current-producing reactions in the cell was done and is included.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells promote osteosarcoma cell survival and drug resistance through activation of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shen; Wang, Lei; Fan, Qiming; Hao, Yongqiang; Fan, Cunyi; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironment plays a key role in the development of drug resistant tumor cells. In this study, we tried to determine whether the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the tumor microenvironment contribute to the increased chemoresistance of osteosarcoma. We found that exposure of Saos-2 and U2-OS cells to MSCs conditioned medium (CM) increased the viable cells in the presence of therapeutic concentrations of doxorubicin or cisplatin. Meanwhile, the MSC CM-associated pro-proliferative effects were accompanied by reduced caspase 3/7 activity and Annexin V binding. We confirmed that STAT3 activation by IL-6 regulates MSCs-induced chemoresistance. Blockade of this signal re-sensitized drug-resistant Saos-2 cells to drug treatment. Using a osteosarcoma mouse model with co-injection of MSCs with Saos-2cells, we found that inhibition of STAT3 prolonged the survival time of tumor bearing mice by suppressing tumor growth and increasing the sensitivity of tumor cells to doxorubicin. Finally, we demonstrated that increased expression of p-STAT3, multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and P-glycoprotein (MDR-1) was associated with high chemotherapy resistance in clinical osteosarcoma samples. Collectively, our findings suggest that MSCs within the tumor microenvironment may represent a new target to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy in osteosarcoma patients. PMID:27340780

  15. Cell surface lactate receptor GPR81 is crucial for cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christina L; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Deng, Defeng; Liu, Shi He; Philip, Bincy; Gomez, Sobeyda; Burns, William R; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Wang, Huamin; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Logsdon, Craig D

    2014-09-15

    The mechanisms that allow cancer cells to adapt to the typical tumor microenvironment of low oxygen and glucose and high lactate are not well understood. GPR81 is a lactate receptor recently identified in adipose and muscle cells that has not been investigated in cancer. In the current study, we examined GPR81 expression and function in cancer cells. We found that GPR81 was present in colon, breast, lung, hepatocellular, salivary gland, cervical, and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Examination of tumors resected from patients with pancreatic cancer indicated that 94% (148 of 158) expressed high levels of GPR81. Functionally, we observed that the reduction of GPR81 levels using shRNA-mediated silencing had little effect on pancreatic cancer cells cultured in high glucose, but led to the rapid death of cancer cells cultured in conditions of low glucose supplemented with lactate. We also observed that lactate addition to culture media induced the expression of genes involved in lactate metabolism, including monocarboxylase transporters in control, but not in GPR81-silenced cells. In vivo, GPR81 expression levels correlated with the rate of pancreatic cancer tumor growth and metastasis. Cells in which GPR81 was silenced showed a dramatic decrease in growth and metastasis. Implantation of cancer cells in vivo was also observed to lead to greatly elevated levels of GPR81. These data support that GPR81 is important for cancer cell regulation of lactate transport mechanisms. Furthermore, lactate transport is important for the survival of cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5301-10. ©2014 AACR.

  16. TNFAIP3 promotes survival of CD4 T cells by restricting MTOR and promoting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Yu; Oshima, Shigeru; Takahara, Masahiro; Maeyashiki, Chiaki; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nibe, Yoichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ma, Averil; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in metabolism, differentiation, and survival in T cells. TNFAIP3/A20 is a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is thought to be a negative regulator of autophagy in cell lines. However, the role of TNFAIP3 in autophagy remains unclear. To determine whether TNFAIP3 regulates autophagy in CD4 T cells, we first analyzed Tnfaip3-deficient naïve CD4 T cells in vitro. We demonstrated that Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited reduced MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) puncta formation, increased mitochondrial content, and exaggerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These results indicate that TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy after T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in CD4 T cells. We then investigated the mechanism by which TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy signaling. We found that TNFAIP3 bound to the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex and that Tnfaip3-deficient cells displayed enhanced ubiquitination of the MTOR complex and MTOR activity. To confirm the effects of enhanced MTOR activity in Tnfaip3-deficient cells, we analyzed cell survival following treatment with Torin1, an MTOR inhibitor. Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited fewer cell numbers than the control cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the impaired survival of Tnfaip3-deficient cells was ameliorated with Torin1 treatment in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Torin1 was abolished by Atg5 deficiency. Thus, enhanced MTOR activity regulates the survival of Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells. Taken together, our findings illustrate that TNFAIP3 restricts MTOR signaling and promotes autophagy, providing new insight into the manner in which MTOR and autophagy regulate survival in CD4 T cells.

  17. Alpha tumor necrosis factor contributes to CD8{sup +} T cell survival in the transition phase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Meiqing; Ye, Zhenmin; Umeshappa, Keshav Sokke; Moyana, Terence; Xiang, Jim . E-mail: jxiang@scf.sk.ca

    2007-08-31

    Cytokine and costimulation signals determine CD8{sup +} T cell responses in proliferation phase. In this study, we assessed the potential effect of cytokines and costimulations to CD8{sup +} T cell survival in transition phase by transferring in vitro ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed dendritic cell-activated CD8{sup +} T cells derived from OVA-specific T cell receptor transgenic OT I mice into wild-type C57BL/6 mice or mice with designated gene knockout. We found that deficiency of IL-10, IL-12, IFN-{gamma}, CD28, CD40, CD80, CD40L, and 41BBL in recipients did not affect CD8{sup +} T cell survival after adoptive transfer. In contrast, TNF-{alpha} deficiency in both recipients and donor CD8{sup +} effector T cells significantly reduced CD8{sup +} T cell survival. Therefore, our data demonstrate that the host- and T cell-derived TNF-{alpha} signaling contributes to CD8{sup +} effector T cell survival and their transition to memory T cells in the transition phase, and may be useful information when designing vaccination.

  18. Study of plasma-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells survival using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ranjit K; Salman, Ahmad; Mordechai, Shaul; Manor, Esther

    2013-11-01

    Components present in the acellular fraction of blood influence the blood cell survival and function and the response to biotic and abiotic factors. Human plasma and sera have been used as therapeutic agents and are known to increase cell survival. White blood cells in normal blood are exposed to plasma components in vivo, but the effect of such plasma components in vitro on adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that includes monocytes has not been fully investigated. We cultured human PBMCs with autologous plasma and observed structural variation due to plasma addition in PBMCs along with increased cell survival. Light microscopy of the cells showed increased granularity in plasma-treated cells. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to elucidate the possible mechanism by studying the changes in the biochemical composition of the cells that explained the observations. FTIR spectroscopy of plasma-treated cells show altered spectral pattern in the mid-IR region, indicating increased phospholipid levels. Heat-stable components in the plasma possibly increase the differentiation of PBMCs, as evident by increased phospholipid metabolism. The data suggest that plasma-stimulated membrane biogenesis may contribute to PBMC survival by inducing them to differentiate into antigen presenting cells (APCs) like macrophages and dendritic cells.

  19. Survival after squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma of the skin: A retrospective cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Rees, Judy R; Zens, M Scot; Celaya, Maria O; Riddle, Bruce L; Karagas, Margaret R; Peacock, Janet L

    2015-08-15

    A retrospective cohort analysis of survival after keratinocyte cancer (KC) was conducted using data from a large, population-based case-control study of KC in New Hampshire. The original study collected detailed information during personal interviews between 1993 and 2002 from individuals with squamous (SCC) and basal (BCC) cell carcinoma, and controls identified through the Department of Transportation, frequency-matched on age and sex. Participants without a history of non-skin cancer at enrolment were followed as a retrospective cohort to assess survival after either SCC or BCC, or a reference date for controls. Through 2009, cancers were identified from the New Hampshire State Cancer Registry and self-report; death information was obtained from state death certificate files and the National Death Index. There were significant differences in survival between those with SCC, BCC and controls (p = 0.040), with significantly greater risk of mortality after SCC compared to controls (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.25; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.54). Mortality after BCC was not significantly altered (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.77-1.19). The excess mortality after SCC persisted after adjustment for numerous personal risk factors including time-varying non-skin cancer occurrence, age, sex and smoking. Survival from the date of the intervening cancer, however, did not vary (HR for SCC 0.98; 95% CI 0.70-1.38). Mortality also remained elevated when individuals with subsequent melanoma were excluded (HR for SCC 1.30; 95% CI 1.05-1.61). Increased mortality after SCC cannot be explained by the occurrence of intervening cancers, but may reflect a more general predisposition to life threatening illness that merits further investigation.

  20. Cell kinetics, DNA integrity, differentiation, and lipid fingerprinting analysis of rabbit adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Letícia Siqueira de Sá; Lessio, Camila; Sawaki e Nakamura, Ahy Natally; Lo Turco, Edson Guimarães; da Silva, Camila Gonzaga; Zambon, João Paulo; Gozzo, Fábio César; Pilau, Eduardo Jorge; de Almeida, Fernando Gonçalves

    2014-10-01

    Human adipose tissue has been described as a potential alternative reservoir for stem cells. Although studies have been performed in rabbits using autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC), these cells have not been well characterized. The primary objectives of this study were to demonstrate the presence of adipose-derived stem cells isolated from rabbit inguinal fat pads and to characterize them through osteogenic and adipogenic in vitro differentiation and lipid fingerprinting analysis. The secondary objective was to evaluate cell behavior through growth kinetics, cell viability, and DNA integrity. Rabbit ADSCs were isolated to determine the in vitro growth kinetics and cell viability. DNA integrity was assessed by an alkaline Comet assay in passages 0 and 5. The osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by Von Kossa, and Alizarin Red S staining and adipogenic differentiation were assessed by Oil Red O staining. Lipid fingerprinting analyses of control, adipogenic, and osteogenic differentiated cells were performed by MALDI-TOF/MS. We demonstrate that rabbit ADSC have a constant growth rate at the early passages, with increased DNA fragmentation at or after passage 5. Rabbit ADSC viability was similar in passages 2 and 5 (90.7% and 86.6%, respectively), but there was a tendency to decreased cellular growth rate after passage 3. The ADSC were characterized by the expression of surface markers such as CD29 (67.4%) and CD44 (89.4%), using CD 45 (0.77%) as a negative control. ADSC from rabbits were successfully isolated form the inguinal region. These cells were capable to differentiate into osteogenic and adipogenic tissue when they were placed in inductive media. After each passage, there was a trend towards decreased cell growth. On the other hand, DNA fragmentation increased at each passage. ADSC had a different lipid profile when placed in control, adipogenic, or osteogenic media.

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2: A Role in Cancer Stem Cell Survival and Repopulation of Cancer Cells during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Emma A.; Argyle, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible form of the enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of prostanoids, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major mediator of inflammation and angiogenesis. COX-2 is overexpressed in cancer cells and is associated with progressive tumour growth, as well as resistance of cancer cells to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These therapies are often delivered in multiple doses, which are spaced out to allow the recovery of normal tissues between treatments. However, surviving cancer cells also proliferate during treatment intervals, leading to repopulation of the tumour and limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. Tumour cell repopulation is a major cause of treatment failure. The central dogma is that conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy selects resistant cancer cells that are able to reinitiate tumour growth. However, there is compelling evidence of an active proliferative response, driven by increased COX-2 expression and downstream PGE2 release, which contribute to the repopulation of tumours and poor patient outcome. In this review, we will examine the evidence for a role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell biology and as a mediator of tumour repopulation that can be molecularly targeted to overcome resistance to therapy. PMID:27882058

  2. High expression of prolactin receptor is associated with cell survival in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The altered expression of prolactin (PRL) and its receptor (PRLR) has been implicated in breast and other types of cancer. There are few studies that have focused on the analysis of PRL/PRLR in cervical cancer where the development of neoplastic lesions is influenced by the variation of the hormonal status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PRL/PRLR and the effect of PRL treatment on cell proliferation and apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines. Results High expression of multiple PRLR forms and PRLvariants of 60–80 kDa were observed in cervical cancer cell lines compared with non-tumorigenic keratinocytes evaluated by Western blot, immunofluorecence and real time PCR. Treatment with PRL (200 ng/ml) increased cell proliferation in HeLa cells determined by the MTT assay at day 3 and after 1 day a protective effect against etoposide induced apoptosis in HeLa, SiHa and C-33A cervical cancer cell lines analyzed by the TUNEL assay. Conclusions Our data suggests that PRL/PRLR signaling could act as an important survival factor for cervical cancer. The use of an effective PRL antagonist may provide a better therapeutic intervention in cervical cancer. PMID:24148306

  3. Bone Matrix Osteonectin Limits Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Lowther, Katie M.; Kessler, Catherine B.; Tilbury, Karissa; Lieberman, Jay R.; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.; Campagnola, Paul; Delany, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding prostate cancer metastasis to bone and the interaction of these cells with the bone microenvironment. Osteonectin/SPARC/BM-40 is a collagen binding matricellular protein that is enriched in bone. Its expression is increased in prostate cancer metastases, and it stimulates the migration of prostate carcinoma cells. However, the presence of osteonectin in cancer cells and the stroma may limit prostate tumor development and progression. To determine how bone matrix osteonectin affects the behavior of prostate cancer cells, we modeled prostate cancer cell-bone interactions using the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3, and mineralized matrices synthesized by wild type and osteonectin-null osteoblasts in vitro. We developed this in vitro system because the structural complexity of collagen matrices in vivo is not mimicked by reconstituted collagen scaffolds or by more complex substrates, like basement membrane extracts. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that the wild type matrices had thick collagen fibers organized into longitudinal bundles, whereas osteonectin-null matrices had thinner fibers in random networks. Importantly, a mouse model of prostate cancer metastases to bone showed a collagen fiber phenotype similar to the wild type matrix synthesized in vitro. When PC-3 cells were grown on the wild type matrices, they displayed decreased cell proliferation, increased cell spreading, and decreased resistance to radiation-induced cell death, compared to cells grown on osteonectin-null matrix. Our data support the idea that osteonectin can suppress prostate cancer pathogenesis, expanding this concept to the microenvironment of skeletal metastases. PMID:22525512

  4. Estimation of transfused red cell survival using an enzyme-linked antiglobulin test

    SciTech Connect

    Kickler, T.S.; Smith, B.; Bell, W.; Drew, H.; Baldwin, M.; Ness, P.M.

    1985-09-01

    An enzyme-linked antiglobulin test (ELAT) method was developed to estimate survival of transfused red cells. This procedure is based on a principle analogous to that of the Ashby technique were antigenically distinct red cells are transfused and their survival studied. The authors compared the ELAT survival to the V Chromium method (V Cr) in four patients. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias showed T 1/2 by ELAT of 17.5, 18, and 17 days versus 18.5, 20, and 19 days by the V Cr method. A fourth patient with traumatic cardiac hemolysis had two studies performed. In this case, the ELAT showed a T 1/2 of 10 and 8.1 days while V Cr T 1/2 values were 11 and 10.5 days. The ELAT method for measuring red cell survival yielded data which agreed closely with the results of the V Cr method. Although V Cr is the accepted method for red cell survival, the ELAT method can be used to estimate transfused red cell survival.

  5. The Enrichment of Survivin in Exosomes from Breast Cancer Cells Treated with Paclitaxel Promotes Cell Survival and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, Bridget T.; Johansen, Eric R.; Cerione, Richard A.; Antonyak, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The generation and release of membrane-enclosed packets from cancer cells, called extracellular vesicles (EVs), play important roles in propagating transformed phenotypes, including promoting cell survival. EVs mediate their effects by transferring their contents, which include specific proteins and nucleic acids, to target cells. However, how the cargo and function of EVs change in response to different stimuli remains unclear. Here, we discovered that treating highly aggressive MDAMB231 breast cancer cells with paclitaxel (PTX), a chemotherapy that stabilizes microtubules, causes them to generate a specific class of EV, namely exosomes, that are highly enriched with the cell survival protein and cancer marker, Survivin. Treating MDAMB231 cells with a variety of other chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibitors that block cell growth and survival, did not have the same effect as PTX, with the exception of nocodazole, another inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Exosomes isolated from PTX-treated MDAMB231 cells strongly promoted the survival of serum-starved and PTX-treated fibroblasts and SKBR3 breast cancer cells, an effect that was ablated when Survivin was knocked-down from these vesicles using siRNA. These findings underscore how the enrichment of a specific cargo in exosomes promotes cell survival, as well as can potentially serve as a marker of PTX resistance. PMID:27941677

  6. CCL11-CCR3 interactions promote survival of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells via ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Sugaya, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Asano, Yoshihide; Tada, Yayoi; Kadono, Takafumi; Okochi, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Sato, Shinichi

    2011-03-15

    CCR3 is a specific marker of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cells. ALCL cells also express CCL11, a ligand for CCR3, leading to the hypothesis that CCL11 may play an autocrine role in ALCL progression. In this study, we investigated a role of CCL11 in cell survival and growth of human Ki-JK cells, established from an ALCL patient, and murine EL-4 lymphoma cells. Both Ki-JK and EL-4 cells expressed cell surface CCR3. CCL11 increased cell survival rates of Ki-JK cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it promoted EL-4 cell proliferation. Furthermore, CCL11 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in both Ki-JK cells and EL-4 cells. Cell survival and tumor proliferation promoted by CCL11 was completely blocked by inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. CCL11 induced expression of antiapoptotic proteins, Bcl-xL and survivin, in Ki-JK cells. CCL11 also enhanced tumor growth of EL-4 and Ki-JK cells in vivo. Consistent with these results, tumor cells of cutaneous ALCL expressed CCR3 and increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2, Bcl-xL, and survivin in situ. Thus, our findings prompt a novel therapeutic approach to treat relapses of an aggressive form of lymphoma based on the discovery that a cell surface marker of disease functions as a critical autocrine growth receptor.

  7. Persistent poor long-term prognosis of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients surviving invasive aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, Géraldine; Porcher, Raphaël; Bergeron, Anne; Robin, Marie; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Ferry, Christèle; Rocha, Vanderson; Petropoulou, Anna; Xhaard, Aliénor; Lacroix, Claire; Sulahian, Annie; Socié, Gérard; Ribaud, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background Voriconazole treatment increases early survival of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with invasive aspergillosis. We investigated whether this survival advantage translates into an increased long-term survival. Design and Methods This retrospective study involved all patients with an invasive aspergillosis diagnosis transplanted between September 1997 and December 2008, at the Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris, France. The primary end point was survival up to 36 months. Survival analysis before and after 12 weeks, as well as cumulative incidence analysis in a competing risk framework, were used to assess the effect of voriconazole treatment and other factors on mortality. Results Among 87 patients, 42 received first-line voriconazole and 45 received another antifungal agent. Median survival time was 2.6 months and survival rate at 36 months was 18%. Overall, there was a significant difference in the survival rates of the two groups. Specifically, there was a dramatic difference in survival rates up to ten months post-aspergillosis diagnosis but no significant difference after this time. Over the first 36 months as a whole, no significant difference in survival rate was observed between the two groups. First-line voriconazole significantly reduced aspergillosis-attributable mortality. However, first-line voriconazole patients experienced a significantly higher probability of death from a non-aspergillosis-attributable cause. Conclusions Although the prognosis for invasive aspergillosis after stem cell transplantation has dramatically improved with the use of voriconazole, this major advance in care does not translate into increased long-term survival for these severely immunocompromised patients. PMID:22371177

  8. A rapid survival assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell cycle effects.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, Chandni; McFaline, Jose L; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-02

    We describe a rapid method to accurately measure the cytotoxicity of mammalian cells upon exposure to various drugs. Using this assay, we obtain survival data in a fraction of the time required to perform the traditional clonogenic survival assay, considered the gold standard. The dynamic range of the assay allows sensitivity measurements on a multi-log scale allowing better resolution of comparative sensitivities. Moreover, the results obtained contain additional information on cell cycle effects of the drug treatment. Cell survival is obtained from a quantitative comparison of proliferation between drug-treated and untreated cells. During the assay, cells are treated with a drug and, following a recovery period, allowed to proliferate in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Cells that synthesize DNA in the presence of BrdU exhibit quenched Hoechst fluorescence, easily detected by flow cytometry; quenching is used to determine relative proliferation in treated vs. untreated cells. Finally, this assay can be used in high-throughput format to simultaneously screen multiple cell lines and drugs for accurate measurements of cell survival and cell cycle effects after drug treatment.

  9. Oct4 is required for primordial germ cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kehler, James; Tolkunova, Elena; Koschorz, Birgit; Pesce, Maurizio; Gentile, Luca; Boiani, Michele; Lomelí, Hilda; Nagy, Andras; McLaughlin, K John; Schöler, Hans R; Tomilin, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Oct4 has an essential role in maintaining pluripotency of cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) and embryonic stem cells. However, Oct4 null homozygous embryos die around the time of implantation, thus precluding further analysis of gene function during development. We have used the conditional Cre/loxP gene targeting strategy to assess Oct4 function in primordial germ cells (PGCs). Loss of Oct4 function leads to apoptosis of PGCs rather than to differentiation into a trophectodermal lineage, as has been described for Oct4-deficient ICM cells. These new results suggest a previously unknown function of Oct4 in maintaining viability of mammalian germline. PMID:15486564

  10. Gab1 mediates neurite outgrowth, DNA synthesis, and survival in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, J M; Saïd, F A; Wong, A J; Kaplan, D R

    1999-12-24

    The Gab1-docking protein has been shown to regulate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase PI3K activity and potentiate nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced survival in PC12 cells. Here, we investigated the potential of Gab1 to induce neurite outgrowth and DNA synthesis, two other important aspects of NGF-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells and NGF-independent survival. We generated a recombinant adenovirus encoding hemagglutinin (HA)-epitope-tagged Gab1 and expressed this protein in PC12 cells. HA-Gab1 was constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in PC12 cells and induced the phosphorylation of Akt/protein kinase B and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase. HA-Gab1-stimulated a 10-fold increase in neurite outgrowth in the absence of NGF and a 5-fold increase in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. HA-Gab1 also stimulated DNA synthesis and caused NGF-independent survival in PC12 cells. Finally, we found that HA-Gab1-induced neuritogenesis was completely suppressed by pharmacological inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) activity and 50% suppressed by inhibition of PI3K activity. In contrast, HA-Gab1-stimulated cell survival was efficiently suppressed only by inhibition of both PI3K and MEK activities. These results indicate that Gab1 is capable of mediating differentiation, DNA synthesis, and cell survival and uses both PI3K and MEK signaling pathways to achieve its effects.

  11. Time-course regulation of survival pathways by epicatechin on HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Angeles Martín, María; Goya, Luis; Bravo, Laura; Ramos, Sonia

    2009-02-01

    Polyphenols, such as epicatechin, have been reported to exhibit a wide range of biological activities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the time-dependent regulation by epicatechin of survival/proliferation pathways in HepG2 cells. Treatment of HepG2 cells with 10 micromol/L epicatechin did not result in any cell damage up to 18 h, as evaluated by the lactate dehydrogenase assay. Moreover, the enhanced cell death evoked by an oxidative stress induced with tert-butyl hydroperoxide was prevented in the cells pretreated 4 or 18 h with epicatechin. Epicatechin-induced survival was a rapid event that was accompanied by early and sustained activation of major survival signaling proteins, such as AKT/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and extracellular-regulated kinase (activated from 5 min to 18 h), as well as protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha (30 min to 18 h), in concert with unaltered c-jun N-amino terminal kinase levels and early inactivation of key death-related signals like PKC-delta (5 min to 18 h). Additionally, reactive oxygen species generation was transiently reduced when cells were treated with 10 micromol/L epicatechin (15-240 min). These data suggest that epicatechin induces cellular survival through a tight regulation of survival/proliferation pathways that requires the integration of different signals and persists over time, the ultimate effect on HepG2 cells being regulated by the balance among these signals.

  12. Myelin Basic Protein Cleaves Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 and Promotes Neuritogenesis and Cell Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, David; Loers, Gabriele; Kleene, Ralf; Oezen, Iris; Kataria, Hardeep; Katagihallimath, Nainesh; Braren, Ingke; Harauz, George; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule L1 is a Lewisx-carrying glycoprotein that plays important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to L1 in a Lewisx-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MBP is released by murine cerebellar neurons as a sumoylated dynamin-containing protein upon L1 stimulation and that this MBP cleaves L1 as a serine protease in the L1 extracellular domain at Arg687 yielding a transmembrane fragment that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cell culture. L1-induced neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival are reduced in MBP-deficient cerebellar neurons and in wild-type cerebellar neurons in the presence of an MBP antibody or L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site. Genetic ablation of MBP in shiverer mice and mutagenesis of the proteolytically active site in MBP or of the MBP cleavage site within L1 as well as serine protease inhibitors and an L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site abolish generation of the L1 fragment. Our findings provide evidence for novel functions of MBP in the nervous system. PMID:24671420

  13. Kinetically Assembled Nanoparticles of Bioactive Macromolecules Exhibit Enhanced Stability and Cell-Targeted Biological Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    York, Adam W.; Zablocki, Kyle R.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Gu, Li; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetically assembled nanoparticles are fabricated from an advanced class of bioactive macromolecules that have potential utility in counteracting atherosclerotic plaque development via receptor-level blockage of inflammatory cells. In contrast to micellar analogs that exhibit poor potency and structural integrity under physiologic conditions, these kinetic nanoparticle assemblies maintain structural stability and demonstrate superior bioactivity in mediating oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake in inflammatory cells. PMID:22223224

  14. Antigen availability determines CD8+ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P.; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mazo, Irina B.; Haining, William N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary T cells are activated by antigen (Ag) bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in 3 phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8+ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, while higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation, but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12h and 24h. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  15. A Systems-Level Interrogation Identifies Regulators of Drosophila Blood Cell Number and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Makhijani, Kalpana; Alexander, Brandy; Perrimon, Norbert; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cell number is typically determined by a balance of intracellular signals that positively and negatively regulate cell survival and proliferation. Dissecting these signaling networks facilitates the understanding of normal development and tumorigenesis. Here, we study signaling by the Drosophila PDGF/VEGF Receptor (Pvr) in embryonic blood cells (hemocytes) and in the related cell line Kc as a model for the requirement of PDGF/VEGF receptors in vertebrate cell survival and proliferation. The system allows the investigation of downstream and parallel signaling networks, based on the ability of Pvr to activate Ras/Erk, Akt/TOR, and yet-uncharacterized signaling pathway/s, which redundantly mediate cell survival and contribute to proliferation. Using Kc cells, we performed a genome wide RNAi screen for regulators of cell number in a sensitized, Pvr deficient background. We identified the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Insulin-like receptor (InR) as a major Pvr Enhancer, and the nuclear hormone receptors Ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (usp), corresponding to mammalian Retinoid X Receptor (RXR), as Pvr Suppressors. In vivo analysis in the Drosophila embryo revealed a previously unrecognized role for EcR to promote apoptotic death of embryonic blood cells, which is balanced with pro-survival signaling by Pvr and InR. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrates distinct modes of cell number regulation by EcR and RTK signaling. We define common phosphorylation targets of Pvr and InR that include regulators of cell survival, and unique targets responsible for specialized receptor functions. Interestingly, our analysis reveals that the selection of phosphorylation targets by signaling receptors shows qualitative changes depending on the signaling status of the cell, which may have wide-reaching implications for other cell regulatory systems. PMID:25749252

  16. The NMDA receptor functions independently and as an LRP1 co-receptor to promote Schwann cell survival and migration

    PubMed Central

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Lam, Michael S.; Shibayama, Masataka; Campana, W. Marie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors, which associate with LDL-receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) to trigger cell signaling in response to protein ligands in neurons. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the NMDA-R is expressed by rat Schwann cells and functions independently and with LRP1 to regulate Schwann cell physiology. The NR1 (encoded by GRIN1) and NR2b (encoded by GRIN2B) NMDA-R subunits were expressed by cultured Schwann cells and upregulated in sciatic nerves following crush injury. The ability of LRP1 ligands to activate ERK1/2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively) and promote Schwann cell migration required the NMDA-R. NR1 gene silencing compromised Schwann cell survival. Injection of the LRP1 ligands tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as PLAT) or MMP9-PEX into crush-injured sciatic nerves activated ERK1/2 in Schwann cells in vivo, and the response was blocked by systemic treatment with the NMDA-R inhibitor MK801. tPA was unique among the LRP1 ligands examined because tPA activated cell signaling and promoted Schwann cell migration by interacting with the NMDA-R independently of LRP1, albeit with delayed kinetics. These results define the NMDA-R as a Schwann cell signaling receptor for protein ligands and a major regulator of Schwann cell physiology, which may be particularly important in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. PMID:26272917

  17. IL-17-producing NKT cells depend exclusively on IL-7 for homeostasis and survival.

    PubMed

    Webster, K E; Kim, H-O; Kyparissoudis, K; Corpuz, T M; Pinget, G V; Uldrich, A P; Brink, R; Belz, G T; Cho, J-H; Godfrey, D I; Sprent, J

    2014-09-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like T cells that rapidly recognize pathogens and produce cytokines that shape the ensuing immune response. IL-17-producing NKT cells are enriched in barrier tissues, such as the lung, skin, and peripheral lymph nodes, and the factors that maintain this population in the periphery have not been elucidated. Here we show that NKT17 cells deviate from other NKT cells in their survival requirements. In contrast to conventional NKT cells that are maintained by IL-15, RORγt(+) NKT cells are IL-15 independent and instead rely completely on IL-7. IL-7 initiates a T-cell receptor-independent (TCR-independent) expansion of NKT17 cells, thus supporting their homeostasis. Without IL-7, survival is dramatically impaired, yet residual cells remain lineage committed with no downregulation of RORγt evident. Their preferential response to IL-7 does not reflect enhanced signaling through STAT proteins, but instead is modulated via the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. The ability to compete for IL-7 is dependent on high-density IL-7 receptor expression, which would promote uptake of low levels of IL-7 produced in the non-lymphoid sites of lung and skin. This dependence on IL-7 is also reported for RORγt(+) innate lymphoid cells and CD4(+) Th17 cells, and suggests common survival requirements for functionally similar cells.

  18. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis. PMID:26816215

  19. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B

    2016-01-27

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis.

  20. Kuwanon V Inhibits Proliferation, Promotes Cell Survival and Increases Neurogenesis of Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sun-Young; Park, Min-Hye; Lee, Mina; Kim, Jae-Ouk; Lee, Ha-Rim; Han, Byung Woo; Svendsen, Clive N.; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia. Regulation of NSC fate by small molecules is important for the generation of a certain type of cell. The identification of small molecules that can induce new neurons from NSCs could facilitate regenerative medicine and drug development for neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we screened natural compounds to identify molecules that are effective on NSC cell fate determination. We found that Kuwanon V (KWV), which was isolated from the mulberry tree (Morus bombycis) root, increased neurogenesis in rat NSCs. In addition, during NSC differentiation, KWV increased cell survival and inhibited cell proliferation as shown by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine pulse experiments, Ki67 immunostaining and neurosphere forming assays. Interestingly, KWV enhanced neuronal differentiation and decreased NSC proliferation even in the presence of mitogens such as epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2. KWV treatment of NSCs reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, increased mRNA expression levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, down-regulated Notch/Hairy expression levels and up-regulated microRNA miR-9, miR-29a and miR-181a. Taken together, our data suggest that KWV modulates NSC fate to induce neurogenesis, and it may be considered as a new drug candidate that can regenerate or protect neurons in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25706719

  1. Multiple signaling pathways promote B lymphocyte stimulator–dependent B-cell growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Casey J.; Schmidt, Madelyn R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Opferman, Joseph T.; Korsmeyer, Stanley J.; Hilbert, David M.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)/BAFF, a tumor necrosis factor superfamily ligand, promotes B-cell survival and resistance to atrophy. BLyS stimulation activates 2 independent signaling pathways, Akt/mTOR and Pim 2, associated with cell growth and survival. BLyS blocks the cell volume loss (atrophy) that freshly isolated B cells normally undergo when maintained in vitro while concurrently increasing glycolytic activity and overall metabolism. This atrophy resistance requires Akt/mTOR. We used a genetic approach to resolve the contributions of Akt/mTOR and Pim kinase pathways to BLyS-mediated survival. Pim 2–deficient B cells are readily protected from death by BLyS stimulation, but this protection is completely abrogated by treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment in vivo significantly reduces both follicular and marginal zone B cells in Pim-deficient but not healthy hosts. BLyS-dependent survival requires the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. Mcl-1 protein levels rise and fall in response to BLyS addition and withdrawal, respectively, and conditional deletion of the Mcl-1 gene renders B cells refractory to BLyS-mediated protection. Because BlyS is required for the normal homeostasis of all B cells, these data suggest a therapeutic strategy simultaneously inhibiting mTOR and Pim 2 could target pathogenic B cells. PMID:17942753

  2. Repair-dependent cell radiation survival and transformation: an integrated theory.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, John C

    2014-09-07

    The repair-dependent model of cell radiation survival is extended to include radiation-induced transformations. The probability of transformation is presumed to scale with the number of potentially lethal damages that are repaired in a surviving cell or the interactions of such damages. The theory predicts that at doses corresponding to high survival, the transformation frequency is the sum of simple polynomial functions of dose; linear, quadratic, etc, essentially as described in widely used linear-quadratic expressions. At high doses, corresponding to low survival, the ratio of transformed to surviving cells asymptotically approaches an upper limit. The low dose fundamental- and high dose plateau domains are separated by a downwardly concave transition region. Published transformation data for mammalian cells show the high-dose plateaus predicted by the repair-dependent model for both ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. For the neoplastic transformation experiments that were analyzed, the data can be fit with only the repair-dependent quadratic function. At low doses, the transformation frequency is strictly quadratic, but becomes sigmodial over a wider range of doses. Inclusion of data from the transition region in a traditional linear-quadratic analysis of neoplastic transformation frequency data can exaggerate the magnitude of, or create the appearance of, a linear component. Quantitative analysis of survival and transformation data shows good agreement for ultraviolet radiation; the shapes of the transformation components can be predicted from survival data. For ionizing radiations, both neutrons and x-rays, survival data overestimate the transforming ability for low to moderate doses. The presumed cause of this difference is that, unlike UV photons, a single x-ray or neutron may generate more than one lethal damage in a cell, so the distribution of such damages in the population is not accurately described by Poisson statistics. However, the complete

  3. PPAR-delta promotes survival of breast cancer cells in harsh metabolic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Wang, G; Shi, Y; Sun, L; Gorczynski, R; Li, Y-J; Xu, Z; Spaner, D E

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARδ) in breast cancer cells is negatively associated with patient survival, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. High PPARδ protein levels in rat breast adenocarcinomas were found to be associated with increased growth in soft agar and mice. Transgenic expression of PPARδ increased the ability of human breast cancer cell lines to migrate in vitro and form lung metastases in mice. PPARδ also conferred the ability to grow in exhausted tissue culture media and survive in low-glucose and other endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions such as hypoxia. Upregulation of PPARδ by glucocorticoids or synthetic agonists also protected human breast cancer cells from low glucose. Survival in low glucose was related to increased antioxidant defenses mediated in part by catalase and also to late AKT phosphorylation, which is associated with the prolonged glucose-deprivation response. Synthetic antagonists reversed the survival benefits conferred by PPARδ in vitro. These findings suggest that PPARδ conditions breast cancer cells to survive in harsh microenvironmental conditions by reducing oxidative stress and enhancing survival signaling responses. Drugs that target PPARδ may have a role in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27270614

  4. Survival and Inflammatory Response in Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell-enriched Mouse Fat Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Begic, Anadi; Isfoss, Björn L.; Lønnerød, Linn K.; Vigen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ATMSCs) are currently used in grafting procedures in a number of clinical trials. The reconstructive role of such cells in fat graft enrichment is largely unclear. This study was undertaken to assess survival and inflammatory response in fat grafts enriched with ATMSCs in mice. Methods: ATMSC-enriched adipose tissue was grafted subcutaneously in a clinically relevant manner in mice, and survival and inflammatory response were determined by bioluminescence imaging of transgenic tissue constitutively expressing luciferase or driven by inflammation in wild-type animals. Results: Only a minor fraction of ATMSCs transplanted subcutaneously were found to survive long term, yet fat grafts enriched with ATMSCs showed improved survival for a limited period, compared with no enrichment. NF-κB activity was transiently increased in ATMSC-enriched grafts, and the grafts responded adequately to a proinflammatory stimulus. In one animal, cells originating from the subcutaneous graft were found at a site of inflammation distant from the site of engraftment. Conclusion: ATMSCs display limited subcutaneous survival. Still, ATMSC enrichment may improve the outcome of adipose tissue grafting procedures by facilitating short-term graft survival and adequate inflammatory responses. Migration of cells from grafted adipose tissue requires further investigation. PMID:28293494

  5. B-cell homeostasis requires complementary CD22 and BLyS/BR3 survival signals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan H.; Haas, Karen M.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Yanaba, Koichi; Ward, Christopher D.; Migone, Thi-Sau

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral B-cell numbers are tightly regulated by homeostatic mechanisms that influence the transitional and mature B-cell compartments and dictate the size and clonotypic diversity of the B-cell repertoire. B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS, a trademark of Human Genome Sciences, Inc.) plays a key role in regulating peripheral B-cell homeostasis. CD22 also promotes peripheral B-cell survival through ligand-dependent mechanisms. The B-cell subsets affected by the absence of BLyS and CD22 signals overlap, suggesting that BLyS- and CD22-mediated survival are intertwined. To examine this, the effects of BLyS insufficiency following neutralizing BLyS mAb treatment in mice also treated with CD22 ligand-blocking mAb were examined. Combined targeting of the BLyS and CD22 survival pathways led to significantly greater clearance of recirculating bone marrow, blood, marginal zone and follicular B cells than either treatment alone. Likewise, BLyS blockade further reduced bone marrow, blood and spleen B-cell numbers in CD22−/− mice. Notably, BLyS receptor expression and downstream signaling were normal in CD22−/− B cells, suggesting that CD22 does not directly alter BLyS responsiveness. CD22 survival signals were likewise intact in the absence of BLyS, as CD22 mAb treatment depleted blood B cells from mice with impaired BLyS receptor 3 (BR3) signaling. Finally, enforced BclxL expression, which rescues BR3 impairment, did not affect B-cell depletion following CD22 mAb treatment. Thus, the current studies support a model whereby CD22 and BLyS promote the survival of overlapping B-cell subsets but contribute to their maintenance through independent and complementary signaling pathways. PMID:20513733

  6. The RBE-LET relationship for rodent intestinal crypt cell survival, testes weight loss, and multicellular spheroid cell survival after heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E. L.; Powers-Risius, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents data for survival of mouse intestinal crypt cells, mouse testes weight loss as an indicator of survival of spermatogonial stem cells, and survival of rat 9L spheroid cells after irradiation in the plateau region of unmodified particle beams ranging in mass from 4He to 139La. The LET values range from 1.6 to 953 keV/microns. These studies examine the RBE-LET relationship for two normal tissues and for an in vitro tissue model, multicellular spheroids. When the RBE values are plotted as a function of LET, the resulting curve is characterized by a region in which RBE increases with LET, a peak RBE at an LET value of 100 keV/microns, and a region of decreasing RBE at LETs greater than 100 keV/microns. Inactivation cross sections (sigma) for these three biological systems have been calculated from the exponential terminal slope of the dose-response relationship for each ion. For this determination the dose is expressed as particle fluence and the parameter sigma indicates effect per particle. A plot of sigma versus LET shows that the curve for testes weight loss is shifted to the left, indicating greater radiosensitivity at lower LETs than for crypt cell and spheroid cell survival. The curves for cross section versus LET for all three model systems show similar characteristics with a relatively linear portion below 100 keV/microns and a region of lessened slope in the LET range above 100 keV/microns for testes and spheroids. The data indicate that the effectiveness per particle increases as a function of LET and, to a limited extent, Z, at LET values greater than 100 keV/microns. Previously published results for spread Bragg peaks are also summarized, and they suggest that RBE is dependent on both the LET and the Z of the particle.

  7. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  8. Experimental investigation on neural cell survival after dielectrophoretic trapping.

    PubMed

    Heida, T; Rutten, W L C; Marani, E

    2002-12-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic forces can effectively be used to trap cortical rat neurons. The creation of dielectrophoretic forces requires electric fields of high non-uniformity. High electric field strengths, however, can cause excessive membrane potentials by which cells may unrecoverably be changed or it may lead to cell death. In a previous study it was found that cells trapped at 3 Vtt/14 MHz did not change morphologically as compared to cells that were not exposed to the electric field. This study investigates the viability of fetal cortical rat neurons after being trapped by negative dielectrophoretic forces at frequencies up to 1 MHz. A planar quadrupole micro-electrode structure was used for the creation of a non-uniform electric field. The sinusoidal input signal was varied in amplitude (3 and 5 Vtt) and frequency (10 kHz-1 MHz). The results presented in this paper show that the viability of dielectrophoretically trapped postnatal cortical rat cells was greatly frequency dependent. To preserve viability frequencies above 100 kHz (at 3 Vtt) or 1 MHz (5 Vtt) must be used.

  9. N-Cadherin Mediates Neuronal Cell Survival through Bim Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Boscher, Cécile; Wolff, Emeline; Mège, René-Marc; Birbes, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    N-cadherin is a major adhesion molecule involved in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion regulates neuroepithelial cell polarity, neuronal precursor migration, growth cone migration and synaptic plasticity. In vitro, it has been involved in signaling events regulating processes such as cell mobility, proliferation and differentiation. N-cadherin has also been implicated in adhesion-dependent protection against apoptosis in non-neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated if the engagement of N-cadherin participates to the control of neuronal cells survival/death balance. We observed that plating either primary mouse spinal cord neurons or primary rat hippocampal neurons on N-cadherin recombinant substrate greatly enhances their survival compared to non-specific adhesion on poly-L-lysine. We show that N-cadherin engagement, in the absence of other survival factors (cell-matrix interactions and serum), protects GT1-7 neuronal cells against apoptosis. Using this cell line, we then searched for the signaling pathways involved in the survival effect of N-cadherin engagement. The PI3-kinase/Akt survival pathway and its downstream effector Bad are not involved, as no phosphorylation of Akt or Bad proteins in response to N-cadherin engagement was observed. In contrast, N-cadherin engagement activated the Erk1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Moreover, N-cadherin ligation mediated a 2-fold decrease in the level of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim-EL whereas the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was unchanged. Inhibition of Mek1/2 kinases with U0126, and the resulting inhibition of Erk1/2 phosphorylation, induced the increase of both the level of Bim-EL and apoptosis of cells seeded on the N-cadherin substrate, suggesting that Erk phosphorylation is necessary for cell survival. Finally, the overexpression of a phosphorylation defective form of Bim-EL prevented N-cadherin-engagement induced cell survival. In conclusion, our

  10. Doxycycline Enhances Survival and Self-Renewal of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mi-Yoon; Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Kim, Hyongbum; Park, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Summary We here report that doxycycline, an antibacterial agent, exerts dramatic effects on human embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESC/iPSCs) survival and self-renewal. The survival-promoting effect was also manifest in cultures of neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESC/iPSCs. These doxycycline effects are not associated with its antibacterial action, but mediated by direct activation of a PI3K-AKT intracellular signal. These findings indicate doxycycline as a useful supplement for stem cell cultures, facilitating their growth and maintenance. PMID:25254347

  11. Snail reprograms glucose metabolism by repressing phosphofructokinase PFKP allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Cha, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Yang, Ji Hye; Yun, Jun Seop; Cho, Eunae Sandra; Zhang, Xianglan; Nam, Miso; Kim, Nami; Yuk, Young-Su; Cha, So Young; Lee, Yoonmi; Ryu, Joo Kyung; Park, Sunghyouk; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Soo-Youl; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Yook, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Sil

    2017-02-08

    Dynamic regulation of glucose flux between aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is not well-understood. Here we show that Snail (SNAI1), a key transcriptional repressor of EMT, regulates glucose flux toward PPP, allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress. Mechanistically, Snail regulates glycolytic activity via repression of phosphofructokinase, platelet (PFKP), a major isoform of cancer-specific phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), an enzyme involving the first rate-limiting step of glycolysis. The suppression of PFKP switches the glucose flux towards PPP, generating NADPH with increased metabolites of oxidative PPP. Functionally, dynamic regulation of PFKP significantly potentiates cancer cell survival under metabolic stress and increases metastatic capacities in vivo. Further, knockdown of PFKP rescues metabolic reprogramming and cell death induced by loss of Snail. Thus, the Snail-PFKP axis plays an important role in cancer cell survival via regulation of glucose flux between glycolysis and PPP.

  12. Snail reprograms glucose metabolism by repressing phosphofructokinase PFKP allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee; Cha, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Yang, Ji Hye; Yun, Jun Seop; Cho, Eunae Sandra; Zhang, Xianglan; Nam, Miso; Kim, Nami; Yuk, Young-Su; Cha, So Young; Lee, Yoonmi; Ryu, Joo Kyung; Park, Sunghyouk; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Soo-Youl; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Yook, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Sil

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of glucose flux between aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) during epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is not well-understood. Here we show that Snail (SNAI1), a key transcriptional repressor of EMT, regulates glucose flux toward PPP, allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress. Mechanistically, Snail regulates glycolytic activity via repression of phosphofructokinase, platelet (PFKP), a major isoform of cancer-specific phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), an enzyme involving the first rate-limiting step of glycolysis. The suppression of PFKP switches the glucose flux towards PPP, generating NADPH with increased metabolites of oxidative PPP. Functionally, dynamic regulation of PFKP significantly potentiates cancer cell survival under metabolic stress and increases metastatic capacities in vivo. Further, knockdown of PFKP rescues metabolic reprogramming and cell death induced by loss of Snail. Thus, the Snail-PFKP axis plays an important role in cancer cell survival via regulation of glucose flux between glycolysis and PPP. PMID:28176759

  13. [Ten years progression-free survival obtained in a patient with mantle cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Wysokińska, Elwira; Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Kamińska, Marzena; Surdyka, Dariusz; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2015-05-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a rare aggressive lymphoma derived from B cells, characterized by rapid progression and subsequent recurrence. It is considered to be an incurable disease, with exception of a certain group of patients treated with an autogenic stem cell transplantation. The mean survival time is three years, after applying the conventional regimen based on COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone) or CHOP chemotherapy (COP + doxorubicin). An addition of rituximab to CHOP regimen significantly prolongs progression-free survival. The present case reports ten years progression-free survival in a female patient with mantle cell lymphoma with baseline clinical stage IVB (MIPI 5), treated with nine courses of CHOP chemotherapy. Rituximab was added from 3 to 8 course. The complete clinical, radiological and histopathological response has been obtained.

  14. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Taro Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  15. The Bcl-2 family: roles in cell survival and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cory, Suzanne; Huang, David C S; Adams, Jerry M

    2003-11-24

    Apoptosis, the cell-suicide programme executed by caspases, is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis, and impaired apoptosis is now recognized to be a key step in tumorigenesis. Whether a cell should live or die is largely determined by the Bcl-2 family of anti- and proapoptotic regulators. These proteins respond to cues from various forms of intracellular stress, such as DNA damage or cytokine deprivation, and interact with opposing family members to determine whether or not the caspase proteolytic cascade should be unleashed. This review summarizes current views of how these proteins sense stress, interact with their relatives, perturb organelles such as the mitochondrion and endoplasmic reticulum and govern pathways to caspase activation. It briefly explores how family members influence cell-cycle entry and outlines the evidence for their involvement in tumour development, both as oncoproteins and tumour suppressors. Finally, it discusses the promise of novel anticancer therapeutics that target these vital regulators.

  16. Immunoproteasomes are essential for survival and expansion of T cells in virus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Jacqueline; van den Broek, Maries; Groettrup, Marcus; Basler, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Immunoproteasomes containing the IFN-inducible subunits β1i (LMP2), β2i (MECL-1) and β5i (LMP7) alter proteasomal cleavage preference and optimize the generation of peptide ligands of MHC class I molecules. Here, we report on an unexpected new function of immunoproteasome subunits for the survival and expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells during viral infection of mice. The effect of immunoproteasome subunit deficiency on T-cell survival upon adoptive transfer was most prominent for the lack of LMP7 followed by MECL-1 and LMP2. The survival of T cells in uninfected mice or the homeostatic expansion after transfer into RAG-2(-/-) mice was not affected by the lack of the immunosubunits. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells lacking LMP7 or MECL-1 started to divide after transfer into LCMV-infected mice but experienced a considerable cell loss within 2 days after transfer. We provide strong evidence that the loss of immunoproteasome-deficient T cells after transfer is not a consequence of graft rejection by the host, but instead is based on the requirement for immunoproteasomes for the survival of T cells in LCMV-infected mice. Therefore, the immunoproteasome may qualify as a potential new target for the suppression of undesired proinflammatory T-cell responses.

  17. Dose-rate dependent stochastic effects in radiation cell-survival models.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R K; Hlatky, L R

    1990-01-01

    When cells are subjected to ionizing radiation the specific energy rate (microscopic analog of dose-rate) varies from cell to cell. Within one cell, this rate fluctuates during the course of time; a crossing of a sensitive cellular site by a high energy charged particle produces many ionizations almost simultaneously, but during the interval between events no ionizations occur. In any cell-survival model one can incorporate the effect of such fluctuations without changing the basic biological assumptions. Using stochastic differential equations and Monte Carlo methods to take into account stochastic effects we calculated the dose-survival relationships in a number of current cell survival models. Some of the models assume quadratic misrepair; others assume saturable repair enzyme systems. It was found that a significant effect of random fluctuations is to decrease the theoretically predicted amount of dose-rate sparing. In the limit of low dose-rates neglecting the stochastic nature of specific energy rates often leads to qualitatively misleading results by overestimating the surviving fraction drastically. In the opposite limit of acute irradiation, analyzing the fluctuations in rates merely amounts to analyzing fluctuations in total specific energy via the usual microdosimetric specific energy distribution function, and neglecting fluctuations usually underestimates the surviving fraction. The MOnte Carlo methods interpolate systematically between the low dose-rate and high dose-rate limits. As in other approaches, the slope of the survival curve at low dose-rates is virtually independent of dose and equals the initial slope of the survival curve for acute radiation.

  18. The Netrin-4/ Neogenin-1 axis promotes neuroblastoma cell survival and migration.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Andrea A; Falcón, Paulina; Espinoza, Natalie; R, Luis Solano; Milla, Luis A; Hernandez-SanMiguel, Esther; Torres, Vicente A; Sanchez-Gomez, Pilar; Palma, Verónica

    2017-02-07

    Neogenin-1 (NEO1) is a transmembrane receptor involved in axonal guidance, angiogenesis, neuronal cell migration and cell death, during both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. It has been described as a dependence receptor, because it promotes cell death in the absence of its ligands (Netrin and Repulsive Guidance Molecule (RGM) families) and cell survival when they are present. Although NEO1 and its ligands are involved in tumor progression, their precise role in tumor cell survival and migration remain unclear. Public databases contain extensive information regarding the expression of NEO1 and its ligands Netrin-1 (NTN1) and Netrin-4 (NTN4) in primary neuroblastoma (NB) tumors. Analysis of this data revealed that patients with high expression levels of both NEO1 and NTN4 have a poor survival rate. Accordingly, our analyses in NB cell lines with different genetic backgrounds revealed that knocking-down NEO1 reduces cell migration, whereas silencing of endogenous NTN4 induced cell death. Conversely, overexpression of NEO1 resulted in higher cell migration in the presence of NTN4, and increased apoptosis in the absence of ligand. Increased apoptosis was prevented when utilizing physiological concentrations of exogenous Netrin-4. Likewise, cell death induced after NTN4 knock-down was rescued when NEO1 was transiently silenced, thus revealing an important role for NEO1 in NB cell survival. In vivo analysis, using the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, showed that NEO1 and endogenous NTN4 are involved in tumor extravasation and metastasis. Our data collectively demonstrate that endogenous NTN4/NEO1 maintain NB growth via both pro-survival and pro-migratory molecular signaling.

  19. High expression of HMGA2 predicts poor survival in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na, Ning; Si, Tujie; Huang, Zhengyu; Miao, Bin; Hong, Liangqing; Li, Heng; Qiu, Jiang; Qiu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes and is upregulated in several tumors, but its role in renal carcinoma remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of HMGA2 and its relationship to the overall survival (OS) of patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) following surgery. The expression of HMGA2 was evaluated retrospectively by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 162 patients with ccRCC who underwent nephrectomy in 2003 and 2004. An IHC analysis revealed that HMGA2 was expressed in the nuclei of tumor cells in 146 (90.1%) patients with ccRCC. The level of HMGA2 was positively correlated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and Fuhrman Grade. A Kaplan–Meier analysis with log-rank test found that patients with high HMGA2 expression had a poor outcome and that patients with low HMGA2 expression had better survival. Cox regression analysis showed that HMGA2 expression could serve as an independent prognostic factor for ccRCC patients. The efficacy of the following prognostic models was improved when HMGA2 expression was added: tumor node metastasis stage, UCLA Integrated Scoring System, Mayo Clinic stage, size, grade, and necrosis score. In summary, this study showed that HMGA2 expression is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with ccRCC. HMGA2 was found to be a valuable biomarker for ccRCC progression. PMID:27932890

  20. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureban, Sripathi M.; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis. PMID:26270561

  1. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury.

    PubMed

    Sureban, Sripathi M; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis.

  2. Early detection of poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: tumor kinetics evaluated by circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Souza e Silva, Virgílio; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos; Abdallah, Emne A; Damascena, Aline; Paludo, Jociana; Chojniak, Rubens; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; de Mello, Celso Abdon Lopes; Alves, Vanessa S; Fanelli, Marcello F

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer worldwide. New prognostic markers are needed to identify patients with poorer prognosis, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) seem to be promising to accomplish this. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted by blood collection from patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC), three times, every 2 months in conjunction with image examinations for evaluation of therapeutic response. CTC isolation and counting were performed by Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells (ISET). Results A total of 54 patients with mCRC with a mean age of 57.3 years (31–82 years) were included. Among all patients, 60% (n=32) were carriers of wild-type KRAS (WT KRAS) tumors and 90% of them (n=29) were exposed to monoclonal antibodies along with systemic treatment. Evaluating CTC kinetics, when we compared the baseline (pretreatment) CTC level (CTC1) with the level at first follow-up (CTC2), we observed that CTC1-positive patients (CTCs above the median), who became negative (CTCs below the median) had a favorable evolution (n=14), with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 14.7 months. This was higher than that for patients with an unfavorable evolution (CTC1− that became CTC2+; n=13, 6.9 months; P=0.06). Patients with WT KRAS with favorable kinetics had higher PFS (14.7 months) in comparison to those with WT KRAS with unfavorable kinetics (9.4 months; P=0.02). Moreover, patients whose imaging studies showed radiological progression had an increased quantification of CTCs at CTC2 compared to those without progression (P=0.04). Conclusion This study made possible the presentation of ISET as a feasible tool for evaluating CTC kinetics in patients with mCRC, which can be promising in their clinical evaluation. PMID:28008271

  3. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2014-01-25

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programmed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer.

  4. Kinetic behaviour of the cells touching substrate: the interfacial stiffness guides cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianjun; Han, Dong; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2014-01-01

    To describe detailed behaviour of cell spreading under the influence of substrate stiffness, A549 cells cultured on the surfaces of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyacrylamide (PAAm) with bulk rigidities ranging from 0.1 kPa to 40 kPa were in situ observed. The spreading behaviour of cells on PAAm presented a positive correlation between spreading speed and substrate stiffness. After computing the deformations of PAAm gels and collagen, the bulk stiffness of PAAm, rather than matrix tethering, determined the cell behaviour. On the other hand, spreading behaviour of the cells was unaffected by varying the bulk stiffness of PDMS. Based on simulation analyses, the elasticity of silica-like layer induced by UV radiation on PDMS surface dominated cell-substrate interaction, rather than the bulk stiffness of the material, indicating that it is the interfacial stiffness that mainly guided the cell spreading. And then the kinetics of cell spreading was for the first time modeled based on absolute rate theory. PMID:24468681

  5. Effect of hormonal manipulation and doxorubicin administration on cell cycle kinetics of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bontenbal, M.; Sieuwerts, A. M.; Klijn, J. G.; Peters, H. A.; Krijnen, H. L.; Sonneveld, P.; Foekens, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Dual-parameter flow cytometry, following bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation and propidium iodide (PI) uptake into DNA, was used to study the effects of oestradiol and/or insulin on cell cycle kinetics of human breast cancer cells in vitro. After a lag-period of 6-12 h, an optimum in the percentage of S-phase cells was reached between 18 and 24 h after hormone administration. A 1 h pulse of oestradiol was as effective as the continuous presence of oestradiol in pushing the cells from quiescent growing cultures into the cell cycle. A 1 h pulse of insulin was less effective than continuous administration. The addition of doxorubicin resulted in an accumulation of the cells in the late S/G2M-phases. It is concluded that dual-parameter flow cytometry allows accurate assessment of the effects of hormones and chemotherapy on the cell cycle. Therefore this method is very suitable for studying the interaction of hormones and chemotherapy on cell growth. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2679851

  6. Survival features of EBV-stabilized cells from centenarians: morpho-functional and transcriptomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Matarrese, Paola; Tinari, Antonella; Ascione, Barbara; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Remondini, Daniel; Salvioli, Stefano; Tenedini, Elena; Tagliafico, Enrico; Franceschi, Claudio; Malorni, Walter

    2012-12-01

    In the present work, we analyzed the survival features of six different Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-stabilized lymphoid cell lines obtained from adult subjects and from subjects of more than 95 years. For the first, we found that lymphoid B cells from centenarians were more resistant to apoptosis induction and displayed a more developed lysosomal compartment, the most critical component of phagic machinery, in comparison with lymphoid B cells from adult subjects. In addition, cells from centenarians were capable of engulfing and digesting other cells, i.e., their siblings (even entire cells), whereas lymphoid cells from "control samples", i.e., from adults, did not. This behavior was improved by nutrient deprivation but, strikingly, it was unaffected by the autophagy-modulating drug, rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, and 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. Transcriptomic analyses indicated that: (1) aspartyl proteases, (2) cell surface molecules such as integrins and cadherins, and (3) some components of cytoskeletal network could contribute to establish this survival phenotype. Also, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways such as Wnt signaling pathway, an essential contributor to cell migration and actin cytoskeleton remodeling, appeared as prominent. Although we cannot rule out the possibility that EBV-immortalization could play a role, since we observed this phagic behavior in cells from centenarians but not in those from adults, we hypothesize that it may represent an important survival determinant in cells from centenarians.

  7. An optimized colony forming assay for low-dose-radiation cell survival measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu J.; Sutherland B.; Hu W.; Ding N.; Ye C.; Usikalu M.; Li S.; Hu B.; Zhou G.

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable method to quantify the cell survival of low-dose irradiations. Two crucial factors were considered, the same number of cells plated in each flask and an appropriate interval between cell plating and irradiation. For the former, we optimized cell harvest with trypsin, diluted cells in one container, and directly seeded cells on the bottom of flasks in a low density before irradiation. Reproducible plating efficiency was obtained. For the latter, we plated cells on the bottom of flasks and then monitored the processing of attachment, cell cycle variations, and the plating efficiency after exposure to 20 cGy of X-rays. The results showed that a period of 4.5 h to 7.5 h after plating was suitable for further treatment. In order to confirm the reliability and feasibility of our method, we also measured the survival curves of these M059K and M059J glioma cell lines by following the optimized protocol and obtained consistent results reported by others with cell sorting system. In conclusion, we successfully developed a reliable and simple way to measure the survival fractions of human cells exposed to low dose irradiation, which might be helpful for the studies on low-dose radiation biology.

  8. Polysialic acid sustains cancer cell survival and migratory capacity in a hypoxic environment

    PubMed Central

    Elkashef, Sara M.; Allison, Simon J.; Sadiq, Maria; Basheer, Haneen A.; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Pors, Klaus; Falconer, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique carbohydrate polymer expressed on the surface of NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule) in a number of cancers where it modulates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, migration, invasion and metastasis and is strongly associated with poor clinical prognosis. We have carried out the first investigation into the effect of polySia expression on the behaviour of cancer cells in hypoxia, a key source of chemoresistance in tumours. The role of polysialylation and associated tumour cell migration and cell adhesion were studied in hypoxia, along with effects on cell survival and the potential role of HIF-1. Our findings provide the first evidence that polySia expression sustains migratory capacity and is associated with tumour cell survival in hypoxia. Initial mechanistic studies indicate a potential role for HIF-1 in sustaining polySia-mediated migratory capacity, but not cell survival. These data add to the growing body of evidence pointing to a crucial role for the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) in neuroendocrine tumour progression and provide the first evidence to suggest that polySia is associated with an aggressive phenotype in tumour hypoxia. These results have significant potential implications for polyST inhibition as an anti-metastatic therapeutic strategy and for targeting hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:27611649

  9. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Er-Wen; Xue, Sheng-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Suo-Wen; Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang; Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong; Li, Jie; Liu, Chao

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  10. Halofuginone improves muscle-cell survival in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Bodanovsky, Anna; Guttman, Noga; Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Genin, Ola; Levy, Oshrat; Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2014-07-01

    Halofuginone has been shown to prevent fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-β/Smad3 pathway in muscular dystrophies. We hypothesized that halofuginone would reduce apoptosis--the presumed cause of satellite-cell depletion during muscle degradation-in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Six-week-old mdx mouse diaphragm exhibited fourfold higher numbers of apoptotic nuclei compared with wild-type mice as determined by a TUNEL assay. Apoptotic nuclei were found in macrophages and in Pax7-expressing cells; some were located in centrally-nucleated regenerating myofibers. Halofuginone treatment of mdx mice reduced the apoptotic nuclei number in the diaphragm, together with reduction in Bax and induction in Bcl2 levels in myofibers isolated from these mice. A similar effect was observed when halofuginone was added to cultured myofibers. No apparent effect of halofuginone was observed in wild-type mice. Inhibition of apoptosis or staurosporine-induced apoptosis by halofuginone in mdx primary myoblasts and C2 myogenic cell line, respectively, was reflected by less pyknotic/apoptotic cells and reduced Bax expression. This reduction was reversed by a phosphinositide-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase inhibitors, suggesting involvement of these pathways in mediating halofuginone's effects on apoptosis. Halofuginone increased apoptosis in α smooth muscle actin- and prolyl 4-hydroxylase β-expressing cells in mdx diaphragm and in myofibroblasts, the major source of extracellular matrix. The data suggest an additional mechanism by which halofuginone improves muscle pathology and function in muscular dystrophies.

  11. Purified eicosapentaenoic acid induces prolonged survival of cardiac allografts and generates regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Iwami, D; Zhang, Q; Aramaki, O; Nonomura, K; Shirasugi, N; Niimi, M

    2009-06-01

    Fish oil, which is rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has been found to have immunomodulatory effects. We examined whether administration of purified EPA affected survival of fully mismatched murine cardiac allografts. Hearts from C57BL/10 (H-2(b)) mice were transplanted into CBA (H-2(k)) recipients treated with one intraperitoneal dose of purified EPA the day of transplantation. Untreated CBA recipients and recipients given 0.1 g/kg of EPA rejected C57BL/10 hearts (median survival time [MST], 8 and 13 days, respectively). With a 1.0 g/kg dose of EPA, graft survival was markedly prolonged (MST >100 days). To determine whether regulatory cells were generated, naïve mice (secondary recipients) underwent adoptive transfer of splenocytes from EPA-treated primary recipients and cardiac allograft transplantation. Adoptive transfer of whole, CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+) splenocytes from EPA-treated recipients induced indefinite survival in secondary recipients. Flow cytometry showed that the CD4(+)CD25(+) cells were Foxp3(+). In reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) mRNA was upregulated by EPA treatment. A PPARgamma antagonist abrogated the prolongation of graft survival induced by EPA treatment (MST, 13 days). Thus, in our model, purified EPA induced prolonged survival of fully mismatched cardiac allografts and generated regulatory T cells dependent on PPARgamma activation.

  12. Biodegradable polymer composite grafts promote the survival and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Minoru; Lavik, Erin; Klassen, Henry; Zahir, Tasneem; Langer, Robert; Young, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) are multipotent central nervous system precursors that give rise to all of the cell types of the retina during development. Several groups have reported that mammalian RPCs can be isolated and expanded in culture and can differentiate into retinal neurons upon grafting to the mature, diseased eye. However, cell delivery and survival remain formidable obstacles to application of RPCs in a clinical setting. Because biodegradable polymer/progenitor constructs have been shown to be capable of tissue generation in other compartments, we evaluated the survival, migration, and differentiation of RPCs delivered on PLLA/PLGA polymer substrates to the mouse subretinal space and compared these results to conventional injections of RPCs. Polymer composite grafts resulted in a near 10-fold increase in the number of surviving cells after 4 weeks, with a 16-fold increase in cell delivery. Grafted RPCs migrated into the host retina and expressed the mature markers neurofilament-200, glial fibrillary acidic protein, protein kinase C-alpha, recoverin, and rhodopsin. We conclude that biodegradable polymer/progenitor cell composite grafts provide an effective means of increasing progenitor cell survival and overall yield when transplanting to sites within the central nervous system such as the retina.

  13. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  14. Zebrafish cerebrospinal fluid mediates cell survival through a retinoid signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jessica T.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) includes conserved factors whose function is largely unexplored. To assess the role of CSF during embryonic development, CSF was repeatedly drained from embryonic zebrafish brain ventricles soon after their inflation. Removal of CSF increased cell death in the diencephalon, indicating a survival function. Factors within the CSF are required for neuroepithelial cell survival as injected mouse CSF but not artificial CSF could prevent cell death after CSF depletion. Mass spectrometry analysis of the CSF identified retinol binding protein 4 (Rbp4), which transports retinol, the precursor to retinoic acid (RA). Consistent with a role for Rbp4 in cell survival, inhibition of Rbp4 or RA synthesis increased neuroepithelial cell death. Conversely, ventricle injection of exogenous human RBP4 plus retinol, or RA alone prevented cell death after CSF depletion. Zebrafish rbp4 is highly expressed in the yolk syncytial layer, suggesting Rbp4 protein and retinol/RA precursors can be transported into the CSF from the yolk. In accord with this suggestion, injection of human RBP4 protein into the yolk prevents neuroepithelial cell death in rbp4 loss‐of‐function embryos. Together, these data support the model that Rbp4 and RA precursors are present within the CSF and used for synthesis of RA, which promotes embryonic neuroepithelial survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 75–92, 2016 PMID:25980532

  15. The Hippo pathway promotes cell survival in response to chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Di Cara, F; Maile, T M; Parsons, B D; Magico, A; Basu, S; Tapon, N; King-Jones, K

    2015-01-01

    Cellular stress defense mechanisms have evolved to maintain homeostasis in response to a broad variety of environmental challenges. Stress signaling pathways activate multiple cellular programs that range from the activation of survival pathways to the initiation of cell death when cells are damaged beyond repair. To identify novel players acting in stress response pathways, we conducted a cell culture RNA interference (RNAi) screen using caffeine as a xenobiotic stress-inducing agent, as this compound is a well-established inducer of detoxification response pathways. Specifically, we examined how caffeine affects cell survival when Drosophila kinases and phosphatases were depleted via RNAi. Using this approach, we identified and validated 10 kinases and 4 phosphatases that are essential for cell survival under caffeine-induced stress both in cell culture and living flies. Remarkably, our screen yielded an enrichment of Hippo pathway components, indicating that this pathway regulates cellular stress responses. Indeed, we show that the Hippo pathway acts as a potent repressor of stress-induced cell death. Further, we demonstrate that Hippo activation is necessary to inhibit a pro-apoptotic program triggered by the interaction of the transcriptional co-activator Yki with the transcription factor p53 in response to a range of stress stimuli. Our in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function data therefore implicate Hippo signaling in the transduction of cellular survival signals in response to chemical stress. PMID:26021298

  16. Tumor cell survival dependence on helical tomotherapy, continuous arc and segmented dose delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wensha; Wang, Li; Larner, James; Read, Paul; Benedict, Stan; Sheng, Ke

    2009-11-01

    The temporal pattern of radiation delivery has been shown to influence the tumor cell survival fractions for the same radiation dose. To study the effect more specifically for state of the art rotational radiation delivery modalities, 2 Gy of radiation dose was delivered to H460 lung carcinoma, PC3 prostate cancer cells and MCF-7 breast tumor cells by helical tomotherapy (HT), seven-field LINAC (7F), and continuous dose delivery (CDD) over 2 min that simulates volumetric rotational arc therapy. Cell survival was measured by the clonogenic assay. The number of viable H460 cell colonies was 23.2 ± 14.4% and 27.7 ± 15.6% lower when irradiated by CDD compared with HT and 7F, respectively, and the corresponding values were 36.8 ± 18.9% and 35.3 ± 18.9% lower for MCF7 cells (p < 0.01). The survival of PC3 was also lower when irradiated by CDD than by HT or 7F but the difference was not as significant (p = 0.06 and 0.04, respectively). The higher survival fraction from HT delivery was unexpected because 90% of the 2 Gy was delivered in less than 1 min at a significantly higher dose rate than the other two delivery techniques. The results suggest that continuous dose delivery at a constant dose rate results in superior in vitro tumor cell killing compared with prolonged, segmented or variable dose rate delivery.

  17. Desmin Related Disease: A Matter of Cell Survival Failure

    PubMed Central

    Capetanaki, Yassemi; Papathanasiou, Stamatis; Diokmetzidou, Antigoni; Vatsellas, Giannis; Tsikitis, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of the highly organized striated muscle tissue requires a cell-wide dynamic network that through interactions with all vital cell structures, provides an effective mechanochemical integrator of morphology and function, absolutely necessary for intra- and intercellular coordination of all muscle functions. A good candidate for such a system is the desmin intermediate filament cytoskeletal network. Human desmin mutations and post-translational modifications cause disturbance of this network, thus leading to loss of function of both desmin and its binding partners, as well as potential toxic effects of the formed aggregates. Both loss of normal function and gain of toxic function are linked to mitochondrial defects, cardiomyocyte death, muscle degeneration and development of skeletal myopathy and cardiomyopathy. PMID:25680090

  18. Dendritic cell immunotherapy versus bevacizumab plus irinotecan in recurrent malignant glioma patients: a survival gain analysis

    PubMed Central

    Artene, Stefan-Alexandru; Turcu-Stiolica, Adina; Hartley, Richard; Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Daianu, Oana; Brindusa, Corina; Alexandru, Oana; Tataranu, Ligia Gabriela; Purcaru, Stefana Oana; Dricu, Anica

    2016-01-01

    Background The bevacizumab and irinotecan protocol is considered a standard treatment regimen for recurrent malignant glioma. Recent advances in immunotherapy have hinted that vaccination with dendritic cells could become an alternative salvage therapy for the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma. Methods A search was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and Embase in order to identify studies with patients receiving bevacizumab plus irinotecan or dendritic cell therapy for recurrent malignant gliomas. The data obtained from these studies were used to perform a systematic review and survival gain analysis. Results Fourteen clinical studies with patients receiving either bevacizumab plus irinotecan or dendritic cell vaccination were identified. Seven studies followed patients that received bevacizumab plus irinotecan (302 patients) and seven studies included patients that received dendritic cell immunotherapy (80 patients). For the patients who received bevacizumab plus irinotecan, the mean reported median overall survival was 7.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.84–10.16) months. For the patients who received dendritic cell immunotherapy, the mean reported median overall survival was 17.9 (95% CI 11.34–24.46) months. For irinotecan + bevacizumab group, the mean survival gain was −0.02±2.00, while that for the dendritic cell immunotherapy group was −0.01±4.54. Conclusion For patients with recurrent malignant gliomas, dendritic cell immunotherapy treatment does not have a significantly different effect when compared with bevacizumab and irinotecan in terms of survival gain (P=0.535) and does not improve weighted survival gain (P=0.620). PMID:27877052

  19. Caffeine-enhanced survival of radiation-sensitive, repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-11-01

    A clone of V79 Chinese hamster cells (V79-AL162/S-10) with unique properties has been isolated after a challenge of parental cells (V79-AL162) with 1 mM ouabain. Compared with parental cells, or with other clones isolated after the ouabain challenge, these cells form smaller colonies, are more sensitive to both x rays and fission-spectrum neutrons, and respond atypically to a postirradiation treatment with caffeine. Their enhanced response to x rays results mainly from a large reduction in the shoulder of their survival curve, probably because in late S phase, the most resistant phase in the cell cycle, the survival curve of these cells has a reduced shoulder width. Caffeine, and to a lesser extent theophylline, added to the colony-forming medium immediately after exposure appreciably increases the width of the shoulder of these sensitive cells, whereas caffeine has the opposite effect on the response of normal V79 cells. Thus the unique response of the V79-AL162/S-10 cells to a radiation posttreatment with caffeine (increased survival) results from a net increase in their ability to repair damage that is otherwise lethal; caffeine treatment ordinarly prevents normal V79 cells from repairing damage that is only potentially lethal.

  20. Enhanced autophagy is required for survival in EGFR-independent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Yuji; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Koizume, Shiro; Sekiguchi, Hironobu; Saito, Haruhiro; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Kameda, Yoichi; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Oguni, Sachiko; Niki, Toshiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancers harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations depend on constitutive activation of the kinase for survival. Although most EGFR-mutant lung cancers are sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and shrink in response to treatment, acquired resistance to TKI therapy is common. We demonstrate here that two EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and HCC4006, contain a subpopulation of cells that have undergone epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and survive independent of activated EGFR. These EGFR-independent cancer cells, herein termed gefitinib-resistant (GR) cells, demonstrate higher levels of basal autophagy than their parental cells and thrive under hypoxic, reduced-serum conditions in vitro; this somewhat simulates the hypoxic environment common to cancerous tissues. We show that depletion of the essential autophagy gene, ATG5, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, markedly reduces GR cell viability under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, we show a significant elevation in caspase activity in GR cells following knockdown of ATG5. These results suggest that GR cells can evade apoptosis and survive in hostile, hypoxic environments with constant autophagic flux. We also show the presence of autophagosomes in some cancer cells from patient samples, even in untreated EGFR-mutant lung cancer tissue samples. Together, our results indicate that autophagy inhibitors alone or in combination with EGFR TKIs may be an effective approach for the treatment of EGFR-mutant lung cancers, where basal autophagy of some cancer cells is upregulated.

  1. Effect of brefelamide on HGF-induced survival of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Honma, Shigeyoshi; Takasaka, Sachina; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibuya, Takahiro; Mitazaki, Satoru; Abe, Sumiko; Yoshida, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by their high level of resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy and new treatment options are urgently required. We previously demonstrated that brefelamide, an aromatic amide isolated from methanol extracts of cellular slime molds Dictyostelium brefeldianum and D. giganteum, had antiproliferative effects on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells, a model of glioma. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which brefelamide inhibited 1321N1 and PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell proliferation. When cells were cultured in serum-free medium, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased survival of 1321N1 cells but not PC12 cells. HGF receptor, c-MET, was strongly expressed in 1321N1 cells, but not in PC12 cells. Pretreatment of 1321N1 cells with brefelamide inhibited both HGF-induced cell survival and expression of c-MET. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT was increased by HGF, but these changes were inhibited by brefelamide pretreatment. Moreover, HGF mRNA levels and secretion were reduced by brefelamide. These results suggest that brefelamide reduces survival of 1321N1 cells via multiple effects including suppression of HGF receptor expression and HGF secretion and inhibition of ERK and AKT phosphorylation.

  2. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  3. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; Stemler, Kristina M.; White, Lynn S.; Loza, Andrew J.; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M.; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26644583

  4. Placental growth factor is a survival factor for tumor endothelial cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Adini, Avner; Kornaga, Tad; Firoozbakht, Farshid; Benjamin, Laura E

    2002-05-15

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-related factor, placental growth factor (PlGF),has been shown recently to play an important role in pathological VEGF-driven angiogenesis. In this study, we examine the effects of mPlGF/PlGF-2 overexpression in tumors grown from glioma cells containing a tetracycline-regulated mPlGF cDNA. Overexpression of mPlGF leads to increased tumor growth and vascular survival. When tetracycline is used to abruptly withdraw mPlGF overexpression, we see increased apoptosis in both vascular cells and macrophages. In addition, PlGF-2 induces survival gene expression and inhibits apoptosis in vitro. Thus, we propose that PlGF-2 contributes to tumor angiogenesis by providing increased survival function to endothelial cells and macrophages.

  5. Protect and serve: Bcl-2 proteins as guardians and rulers of cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Frédérique; de Carné Trécesson, Sophie; Bertin-Ciftci, Joséphine; Juin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members promote cancer cell survival by binding to their pro-apoptotic counterparts, thereby preventing mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) and cytotoxic caspase activation. Yet, these proteins do not only function as guardians of mitochondrial permeability, preserving it, and maintaining cell survival in the face of acute or chronic stress, they also regulate non-apoptotic functions of caspases and biological processes beyond MOMP from diverse subcellular localizations and in complex with numerous binding partners outside of the Bcl-2 family. In particular, some of the non-canonical effects and functions of Bcl-2 homologs lead to an interplay with E2F-1, NFκB, and Myc transcriptional pathways, which themselves influence cancer cell growth and survival. We thus propose that, by feedback loops that we currently have only hints of, Bcl-2 proteins may act as rulers of survival signaling, predetermining the apoptotic threshold that they also directly scaffold. This underscores the robustness of the control exerted by Bcl-2 homologs over cancer cell survival, and implies that small molecules compounds currently used in the clinic to inhibit their mitochondrial activity may be not always be fully efficient to override this control. PMID:23974114

  6. Hyaluronan Tumor Cell Interactions in Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Comparison of the prognostic potential of hyaluronic acid , hyaluronidase (HYAL-1), CD44v6 and microvessel density for prostate cancer. Int J Cancer, 2004...112(1): p. 121-9. 22. Posey, J.T., et al., Evaluation of the prognostic potential of hyaluronic acid and hyaluronidase (HYAL1) for prostate... hyaluronic acid and CD44. Mol Cell Biol, 2000. 20(10): p. 3482-96. 29. Gao, A.C., et al., CD44 is a metastasis suppressor gene for prostatic cancer

  7. Expression of β-globin by cancer cells promotes cell survival during blood-borne dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Miyamoto, David T.; Wittner, Ben S.; Sullivan, James P.; Aceto, Nicola; Jordan, Nicole Vincent; Yu, Min; Karabacak, Nezihi Murat; Comaills, Valentine; Morris, Robert; Desai, Rushil; Desai, Niyati; Emmons, Erin; Milner, John D.; Lee, Richard J.; Wu, Chin-Lee; Sequist, Lecia V.; Haas, Wilhelm; Ting, David T.; Toner, Mehmet; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis-competent circulating tumour cells (CTCs) experience oxidative stress in the bloodstream, but their survival mechanisms are not well defined. Here, comparing single-cell RNA-Seq profiles of CTCs from breast, prostate and lung cancers, we observe consistent induction of β-globin (HBB), but not its partner α-globin (HBA). The tumour-specific origin of HBB is confirmed by sequence polymorphisms within human xenograft-derived CTCs in mouse models. Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured breast CTCs triggers HBB induction, mediated through the transcriptional regulator KLF4. Depletion of HBB in CTC-derived cultures has minimal effects on primary tumour growth, but it greatly increases apoptosis following ROS exposure, and dramatically reduces CTC-derived lung metastases. These effects are reversed by the anti-oxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine. Conversely, overexpression of HBB is sufficient to suppress intracellular ROS within CTCs. Altogether, these observations suggest that β-globin is selectively deregulated in cancer cells, mediating a cytoprotective effect during blood-borne metastasis. PMID:28181495

  8. IL-7 modulates B cells survival and activation by inducing BAFF and CD70 expression in T cells.

    PubMed

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Ruffin, Nicolas; Lantto, Rebecka; Vivar, Nancy; Chiodi, Francesca; Rethi, Bence

    2012-06-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) promotes the maintenance and activation of peripheral T cells, whereas it does not act directly on mature B cells due to the lack of IL-7Rα expression on these. We report here that, in spite of the insensitivity of B cells to IL-7, high concentration of IL-7 can lead to increased B cell survival and antibody production in the presence of T cells, without the use of any further B cell stimulatory signal. IL-7 promoted B cell activation through inducing CD70 expression on resting T cells, particularly on CD4+ memory cells. The interaction of CD70 molecules with the B cell costimulatory receptor CD27 led to B cell proliferation, the accumulation of CD38 + CD20- plasmablasts and antibody production. In addition, IL-7 treatment induced BAFF secretion from resting peripheral T cells thereby promoting B cell survival. IL-7 levels can increase in lymphopenic conditions, in autoimmune diseases or in patients receiving T cell regenerative IL-7 therapy. Based on our findings high IL-7 levels can lead to increased B cell activation by inducing the B cell regulatory proteins CD70 and BAFF in resting T cells. Such activity might be beneficial in short term immune-stimulatory IL-7 therapies; permanently increased IL-7 levels, on the other hand, can contribute to impaired B cell tolerance.

  9. A naringenin–tamoxifen combination impairs cell proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hatkevich, Talia; Ramos, Joseph; Santos-Sanchez, Idalys; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2014-10-01

    Since over 60% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive (ER+), many therapies have targeted the ER. The ER is activated by both estrogen binding and phosphorylation. While anti-estrogen therapies, such as tamoxifen (Tam) have been successful they do not target the growth factor promoting phosphorylation of the ER. Other proliferation pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, (PI3K) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are activated in breast cancer cells and are associated with poor prognosis. Thus targeting multiple cellular proliferation and survival pathways at the onset of treatment is critical for the development of more effective therapies. The grapefruit flavanone naringenin (Nar) is an inhibitor of both the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Previous studies examining either Nar or Tam used charcoal-stripped serum which removed estrogen as well as other factors. We wanted to use serum containing medium in order to retain all the potential inducers of cell proliferation so as not to exclude any targets of Nar. Here we show that a Nar–Tam combination is more effective than either Tam alone or Nar alone in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination impaired cellular proliferation and viability to a greater extent than either component alone in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the use of a Nar–Tam combination requires lower concentrations of both compounds to achieve the same effects on proliferation and viability. Nar may function by inhibiting both PI3K and MAPK pathways as well as localizing ERα to the cytoplasm in MCF-7 cells. Our results demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination induces apoptosis and impairs proliferation signaling to a greater extent than either compound alone. These studies provide critical information for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Nar–Tam impairs cell viability more effectively than

  10. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector.

    PubMed

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Mairani, Andrea; Seidel, Philipp; Krunic, Damir; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Greilich, Steffen; Abdollahi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for the assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Toward further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD) was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation-induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the fluorescent nuclear track detector as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated with radiation-induced foci as surrogates for DNA double-strand breaks, the hallmark of radiation-induced cell lethality. Long-term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD.

  11. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector

    PubMed Central

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Mairani, Andrea; Seidel, Philipp; Krunic, Damir; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Greilich, Steffen; Abdollahi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for the assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Toward further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD) was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation-induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the fluorescent nuclear track detector as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated with radiation-induced foci as surrogates for DNA double-strand breaks, the hallmark of radiation-induced cell lethality. Long-term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD. PMID:26697410

  12. Contribution of Growth and Cell Cycle Checkpoints to Radiation Survival in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jaklevic, Burnley; Uyetake, Lyle; Lemstra, Willy; Chang, Julia; Leary, William; Edwards, Anthony; Vidwans, Smruti; Sibon, Ody; Tin Su, Tin

    2006-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints contribute to survival after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) by arresting the cell cycle and permitting repair. As such, yeast and mammalian cells lacking checkpoints are more sensitive to killing by IR. We reported previously that Drosophila larvae mutant for grp (encoding a homolog of Chk1) survive IR as well as wild type despite being deficient in cell cycle checkpoints. This discrepancy could be due to differences either among species or between unicellular and multicellular systems. Here, we provide evidence that Grapes is needed for survival of Drosophila S2 cells after exposure to similar doses of IR, suggesting that multicellular organisms may utilize checkpoint-independent mechanisms to survive irradiation. The dispensability of checkpoints in multicellular organisms could be due to replacement of damaged cells by regeneration through increased nutritional uptake and compensatory proliferation. In support of this idea, we find that inhibition of nutritional uptake (by starvation or onset of pupariation) or inhibition of growth factor signaling and downstream targets (by mutations in cdk4, chico, or dmyc) reduced the radiation survival of larvae. Further, some of these treatments are more detrimental for grp mutants, suggesting that the need for compensatory proliferation is greater for checkpoint mutants. The difference in survival of grp and wild-type larvae allowed us to screen for small molecules that act as genotype-specific radiation sensitizers in a multicellular context. A pilot screen of a small molecule library from the National Cancer Institute yielded known and approved radio-sensitizing anticancer drugs. Since radiation is a common treatment option for human cancers, we propose that Drosophila may be used as an in vivo screening tool for genotype-specific drugs that enhance the effect of radiation therapy. PMID:17028317

  13. AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway is critically involved in human pluripotent stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Romorini, Leonardo; Garate, Ximena; Neiman, Gabriel; Luzzani, Carlos; Furmento, Verónica Alejandra; Guberman, Alejandra Sonia; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Scassa, María Elida; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent stem cells (PSC) that can differentiate into a wide range of specialized cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor is essential for PSC survival, stemness and self-renewal. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates cell viability and apoptosis in many cell types. Although it has been demonstrated that PI3K/AKT activation by bFGF is relevant for PSC stemness maintenance its role on PSC survival remains elusive. In this study we explored the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PSC survival by AKT. We found that inhibition of AKT with three non-structurally related inhibitors (GSK690693, AKT inhibitor VIII and AKT inhibitor IV) decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. We observed a rapid increase in phosphatidylserine translocation and in the extent of DNA fragmentation after inhibitors addition. Moreover, abrogation of AKT activity led to Caspase-9, Caspase-3, and PARP cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated by pharmacological inhibition and siRNA knockdown that GSK3β signaling is responsible, at least in part, of the apoptosis triggered by AKT inhibition. Moreover, GSK3β inhibition decreases basal apoptosis rate and promotes PSC proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AKT activation prevents apoptosis, partly through inhibition of GSK3β, and thus results relevant for PSC survival. PMID:27762303

  14. Kaiso depletion attenuates the growth and survival of triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bassey-Archibong, Blessing I; Rayner, Lyndsay G A; Hercules, Shawn M; Aarts, Craig W; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Bramson, Jonathan L; Hassell, John A; Daniel, Juliet M

    2017-03-23

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) are highly aggressive and lack specific targeted therapies. Recent studies have reported high expression of the transcription factor Kaiso in triple negative tumors, and this correlates with their increased aggressiveness. However, little is known about the clinical relevance of Kaiso in the growth and survival of TNBCs. Herein, we report that Kaiso depletion attenuates TNBC cell proliferation, and delays tumor onset in mice xenografted with the aggressive MDA-231 breast tumor cells. We further demonstrate that Kaiso depletion attenuates the survival of TNBC cells and increases their propensity for apoptotic-mediated cell death. Notably, Kaiso depletion downregulates BRCA1 expression in TNBC cells expressing mutant-p53 and we found that high Kaiso and BRCA1 expression correlates with a poor overall survival in breast cancer patients. Collectively, our findings reveal a role for Kaiso in the proliferation and survival of TNBC cells, and suggest a relevant role for Kaiso in the prognosis and treatment of TNBCs.

  15. Autophagy promotes survival of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve axotomy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Muela, N; Germain, F; Mariño, G; Fitze, P S; Boya, P

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential recycling pathway implicated in neurodegeneration either as a pro-survival or a pro-death mechanism. Its role after axonal injury is still uncertain. Axotomy of the optic nerve is a classical model of neurodegeneration. It induces retinal ganglion cell death, a process also occurring in glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. We analyzed autophagy induction and cell survival following optic nerve transection (ONT) in mice. Our results demonstrate activation of autophagy shortly after axotomy with autophagosome formation, upregulation of the autophagy regulator Atg5 and apoptotic death of 50% of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after 5 days. Genetic downregulation of autophagy using knockout mice for Atg4B (another regulator of autophagy) or with specific deletion of Atg5 in retinal ganglion cells, using the Atg5flox/flox mice reduces cell survival after ONT, whereas pharmacological induction of autophagy in vivo increases the number of surviving cells. In conclusion, our data support that autophagy has a cytoprotective role in RGCs after traumatic injury and may provide a new therapeutic strategy to ameliorate retinal diseases. PMID:21701497

  16. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in ischaemia but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohoon; Fiske, Brian P; Birsoy, Kivanc; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Kami, Kenjiro; Possemato, Richard L; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Pacold, Michael E; Chen, Walter W; Cantor, Jason R; Shelton, Laura M; Gui, Dan Y; Kwon, Manjae; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Ligon, Keith L; Kang, Seong Woo; Snuderl, Matija; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Sabatini, David M

    2015-04-16

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumour microenvironment. Here we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain cancer cells within the ischaemic zones of gliomas. In human glioblastoma multiforme, mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT2) and glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) are highly expressed in the pseudopalisading cells that surround necrotic foci. We find that SHMT2 activity limits that of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and reduces oxygen consumption, eliciting a metabolic state that confers a profound survival advantage to cells in poorly vascularized tumour regions. GLDC inhibition impairs cells with high SHMT2 levels as the excess glycine not metabolized by GLDC can be converted to the toxic molecules aminoacetone and methylglyoxal. Thus, SHMT2 is required for cancer cells to adapt to the tumour environment, but also renders these cells sensitive to glycine cleavage system inhibition.

  17. IL-7 receptor blockade following T cell depletion promotes long-term allograft survival

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Hoa-Le; Boeffard, Françoise; Longis, Julie; Danger, Richard; Martinet, Bernard; Haspot, Fabienne; Vanhove, Bernard; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    T cell depletion is commonly used in organ transplantation for immunosuppression; however, a restoration of T cell homeostasis following depletion leads to increased memory T cells, which may promote transplant rejection. The cytokine IL-7 is important for controlling lymphopoiesis under both normal and lymphopenic conditions. Here, we investigated whether blocking IL-7 signaling with a mAb that targets IL-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) alone or following T cell depletion confers an advantage for allograft survival in murine transplant models. We found that IL-7R blockade alone induced indefinite pancreatic islet allograft survival if anti–IL-7R treatment was started 3 weeks before graft. IL-7R blockade following anti-CD4– and anti-CD8–mediated T cell depletion markedly prolonged skin allograft survival. Furthermore, IL-7 inhibition in combination with T cell depletion synergized with either CTLA-4Ig administration or suboptimal doses of tacrolimus to induce long-term skin graft acceptance in this stringent transplant model. Together, these therapies inhibited T cell reconstitution, decreased memory T cell numbers, increased the relative frequency of Tregs, and abrogated both cellular and humoral alloimmune responses. Our data suggest that IL-7R blockade following T cell depletion has potential as a robust, immunosuppressive therapy in transplantation. PMID:24569454

  18. Kinetics of red blood cell aggregation: an example of geometric polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Samsel, R.W.

    1984-04-02

    The kinetics of the process by which red blood cells aggregate into long cylindrical, and sometimes branched, structures called rouleaux is studied within the framework of both reversible and irreversible addition and condensation polymerization reactions. However, unlike usual polymer kinetics, here we take into account the geometry of the subunits and the geometry of the growing structure. Geometric factors such as the amount of reactive wall area influence the probability of branching and hence the final shape of the aggregate. The inclusion of loop formation reactions is shown to be crucial in obtaining physically realistic equilibrium solutions of the kinetic equations. 11 references, 3 figures.

  19. Survival benefit of surgery to patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Chen, Ping-Tsung; Lu, Ming- Shian; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    To assess if surgery provided survival benefit to patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), we performed a retrospective review of 1230 patients who were newly diagnosed with stage T2-T4 esophageal SCC from 2007 to 2014 in our hospital. There were greater than 70% of patients with age under 65 years, and more than 85% were stage T3-T4 at the time of diagnosis. The median survival time was 1.06 year (95% CI 0.99–1.1 yrs). Survival analyses showed that survival time was significantly associated with age, T stage, clinical lymph node involvement and treatment modality (surgery versus definite chemoradiotherapy). Surgery still possessed a powerful impact on overall survival by multivariable analysis. Death risk of patients treated with curative surgery was significantly lower than those with definite chemoradiotherapy. Furthermore, for patients of stage T3N(+) and T4, surgery combined with (neo-)adjuvant treatment were significantly associated with higher survival rate than surgery alone or definite chemoradiotherapy. In conclusion, the patients who undergo surgery were significantly associated longer survival, therefore, curative resection should be considered for esophageal cancer patients who are medically fit for surgery. Moreover, combined with (neo-)adjuvant treatment is recommended for surgically resectable stage T3-T4 esophageal SCC. PMID:28383075

  20. Effect of single-dose radiation on cell survival and growth hormone secretion by rat anterior pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, Z.; Kuten, A.; Hertz, P.; Tatcher, M.; Kedar, A.; Benderly, A.

    1983-06-01

    Cranial irradiation has been shown to impair growth hormone secretion in children. In this study a cell culture of dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells was exposed to single doses of radiation in the range of 100 to 1500 rad. Survival curves were obtained for the different anterior pituitary cell lines, and growth hormone secretion was measured in the tissue culture medium. Both survival and growth hormone secretion curves showed an initial shoulder in the range of 0 to 300 rad, followed by a decline between 300 to 750 rad. It is concluded that growth hormone secreting acidophilic pituicytes are sensitive to radiation at single doses greater than 300 rad.

  1. Survival and mortality among users and non-users of hydroxyurea with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Olinda Maria Rodrigues; Ivo, Maria Lúcia; Ferreira, Marcos Antonio; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Bispo, Ieda Maria Gonçalves Pacce; de Oliveira, Eveny Cristine Luna

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to estimate survival, mortality and cause of death among users or not of hydroxyurea with sickle cell disease. METHOD: cohort study with retrospective data collection, from 1980 to 2010 of patients receiving inpatient treatment in two Brazilian public hospitals. The survival probability was determined using the Kaplan-Meier estimator, survival calculations (SPSS version 10.0), comparison between survival curves, using the log rank method. The level of significance was p=0.05. RESULTS: of 63 patients, 87% had sickle cell anemia, with 39 using hydroxyurea, with a mean time of use of the drug of 20.0±10.0 years and a mean dose of 17.37±5.4 to 20.94±7.2 mg/kg/day, raising the fetal hemoglobin. In the comparison between those using hydroxyurea and those not, the survival curve was greater among the users (p=0.014). A total of 10 deaths occurred, with a mean age of 28.1 years old, and with Acute Respiratory Failure as the main cause. CONCLUSION: the survival curve is greater among the users of hydroxyurea. The results indicate the importance of the nurse incorporating therapeutic advances of hydroxyurea in her care actions. PMID:25806633

  2. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-03-26

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals.

  3. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  4. How to Improve the Survival of Transplanted Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Ischemic Heart?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangpeng; Chen, Xiongwen; Wang, Wei Eric; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) is an intensely studied stem cell type applied for cardiac repair. For decades, the preclinical researches on animal model and clinical trials have suggested that MSC transplantation exerts therapeutic effect on ischemic heart disease. However, there remain major limitations to be overcome, one of which is the very low survival rate after transplantation in heart tissue. Various strategies have been tried to improve the MSC survival, and many of them showed promising results. In this review, we analyzed the studies in recent years to summarize the methods, effects, and mechanisms of the new strategies to address this question. PMID:26681958

  5. Single-cell analysis of transcription kinetics across the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Samuel; Xu, Heng; Jaiswal, Sonal; Freire, Pablo; Zwaka, Thomas; Golding, Ido

    2015-03-01

    Transcription is a highly stochastic process. A common way of inferring transcription kinetics is to measure mRNA abundance in individual cells and compare the observed copy-number statistics to the prediction of a theoretical stochastic model. However, the reliability of this procedure is hampered by the fact that the measured mRNA numbers represent integration over the finite lifetime of mRNA, over multiple copies of the same gene, and the mixing of cells from different phases of the cell cycle. Here we address these limitations by simultaneously quantifying nascent and mature mRNA in individual cells, and incorporating gene-copy and cell-cycle effects in the analysis of mRNA statistics. We demonstrate this approach on Oct4 and Nanog, two key players in the mouse pluripotency network. We find that both genes are well described by a two-state stochastic model for transcription initiation. The difference in their expression characteristics is attributed to a 2.6-fold difference in the probability of switching to an active transcriptional state. Early in the cell cycle, the two copies of each gene exhibit independent activity. However, after gene replication, the probability of each gene copy to be active diminishes, resulting in dosage compensation.

  6. Tumor-associated macrophages subvert T-cell function and correlate with reduced survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Stefanie Regine; Thielicke, Julia; Stöckli, Martina; Matter, Claudia; von Boehmer, Lotta; Cecconi, Virginia; Hermanns, Thomas; Hefermehl, Lukas; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-01-01

    Although malignant cells can be recognized and controlled by the immune system, in patients with clinically apparent cancer immunosurveillance has failed. To better understand local immunoregulatory processes that impact on cancer progression, we correlated intratumoral immunological profiles with the survival of patients affected by primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). A retrospective analysis of 54 primary ccRCC samples for 31 different immune response-related transcripts, revealed a negative correlation of CD68 (a marker of tumor-associated macrophages, TAMs) and FOXP3 (a marker of regulatory T cells, Tregs) with survival. The subsequent analysis of 12 TAM-related transcripts revealed an association between the genes coding for CD163, interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and fibronectin 1 (FN1), all of which have been linked to the M2 TAM phenotype, with reduced survival and increased tumor stage, whereas the opposite was the case for the M1-associated gene coding for inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS). The M2 signature of (CD68+) TAMs was found to correlate with CD163 expression, as determined in prospectively collected fresh ccRCC tissue samples. Upon co-culture with autologous tumor cells, CD11b+ cells isolated from paired blood samples expressed CD163 and other M2-associated proteins, suggesting that the malignant cells promote the accumulation of M2 TAMs. Furthermore, the tumor-associated milieu as well as isolated TAMs induced the skewing of autologous, blood-derived CD4+ T cells toward a more immunosuppressive phenotype, as shown by decreased production of effector cytokines, increased production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and enhanced expression of the co-inhibitory molecules programmed death 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (TIM-3). Taken together, our data suggest that ccRCC progressively attracts macrophages and induces their skewing into M2 TAMs, in turn subverting tumor-infiltrating T cells such that immunoregulatory

  7. Tumor-associated macrophages subvert T-cell function and correlate with reduced survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Stefanie Regine; Thielicke, Julia; Stöckli, Martina; Matter, Claudia; von Boehmer, Lotta; Cecconi, Virginia; Hermanns, Thomas; Hefermehl, Lukas; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-03-01

    Although malignant cells can be recognized and controlled by the immune system, in patients with clinically apparent cancer immunosurveillance has failed. To better understand local immunoregulatory processes that impact on cancer progression, we correlated intratumoral immunological profiles with the survival of patients affected by primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). A retrospective analysis of 54 primary ccRCC samples for 31 different immune response-related transcripts, revealed a negative correlation of CD68 (a marker of tumor-associated macrophages, TAMs) and FOXP3 (a marker of regulatory T cells, Tregs) with survival. The subsequent analysis of 12 TAM-related transcripts revealed an association between the genes coding for CD163, interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and fibronectin 1 (FN1), all of which have been linked to the M2 TAM phenotype, with reduced survival and increased tumor stage, whereas the opposite was the case for the M1-associated gene coding for inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS). The M2 signature of (CD68(+)) TAMs was found to correlate with CD163 expression, as determined in prospectively collected fresh ccRCC tissue samples. Upon co-culture with autologous tumor cells, CD11b(+) cells isolated from paired blood samples expressed CD163 and other M2-associated proteins, suggesting that the malignant cells promote the accumulation of M2 TAMs. Furthermore, the tumor-associated milieu as well as isolated TAMs induced the skewing of autologous, blood-derived CD4(+) T cells toward a more immunosuppressive phenotype, as shown by decreased production of effector cytokines, increased production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and enhanced expression of the co-inhibitory molecules programmed death 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (TIM-3). Taken together, our data suggest that ccRCC progressively attracts macrophages and induces their skewing into M2 TAMs, in turn subverting tumor-infiltrating T cells such that

  8. Survival of tissue-resident memory T cells requires exogenous lipid uptake and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pan, Youdong; Tian, Tian; Park, Chang Ook; Lofftus, Serena Y; Mei, Shenglin; Liu, Xing; Luo, Chi; O'Malley, John T; Gehad, Ahmed; Teague, Jessica E; Divito, Sherrie J; Fuhlbrigge, Robert; Puigserver, Pere; Krueger, James G; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Clark, Rachael A; Kupper, Thomas S

    2017-03-09

    Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells persist indefinitely in epithelial barrier tissues and protect the host against pathogens. However, the biological pathways that enable the long-term survival of TRM cells are obscure. Here we show that mouse CD8(+) TRM cells generated by viral infection of the skin differentially express high levels of several molecules that mediate lipid uptake and intracellular transport, including fatty-acid-binding proteins 4 and 5 (FABP4 and FABP5). We further show that T-cell-specific deficiency of Fabp4 and Fabp5 (Fabp4/Fabp5) impairs exogenous free fatty acid (FFA) uptake by CD8(+) TRM cells and greatly reduces their long-term survival in vivo, while having no effect on the survival of central memory T (TCM) cells in lymph nodes. In vitro, CD8(+) TRM cells, but not CD8(+) TCM cells, demonstrated increased mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in the presence of exogenous FFAs; this increase was not seen in Fabp4/Fabp5 double-knockout CD8(+) TRM cells. The persistence of CD8(+) TRM cells in the skin was strongly diminished by inhibition of mitochondrial FFA β-oxidation in vivo. Moreover, skin CD8(+) TRM cells that lacked Fabp4/Fabp5 were less effective at protecting mice from cutaneous viral infection, and lung Fabp4/Fabp5 double-knockout CD8(+) TRM cells generated by skin vaccinia virus (VACV) infection were less effective at protecting mice from a lethal pulmonary challenge with VACV. Consistent with the mouse data, increased FABP4 and FABP5 expression and enhanced extracellular FFA uptake were also demonstrated in human CD8(+) TRM cells in normal and psoriatic skin. These results suggest that FABP4 and FABP5 have a critical role in the maintenance, longevity and function of CD8(+) TRM cells, and suggest that CD8(+) TRM cells use exogenous FFAs and their oxidative metabolism to persist in tissue and to mediate protective immunity.

  9. Kinetics of tumor cell death by hyperthermic treatment and x-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Y

    1977-12-01

    Kinetics of cell death by hyperthermic treatment at 44 degrees was analyzed using cultured mouse mammary carcinoma cells, and compared with that after X-irradiation. The cells treated with hyperthermia began to die randomly with a mean lethal time of 10 hr after a lag time of 10 hr. After irradiation, the lag time and mean lethal time were 40 and 34 hr, respectively. Early appearance of dead cells by hyperthermic treatment indicates that the critical target is related to cellular metabolism.

  10. c-Rel is essential for B lymphocyte survival and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Tumang, J R; Owyang, A; Andjelic, S; Jin, Z; Hardy, R R; Liou, M L; Liou, H C

    1998-12-01

    c-Rel is a lymphoid-specific member of the NF-kappaB/Rel family of transcriptional factors. To investigate the role of c-Rel in B lymphocyte function, we generated a c-Rel(-/-) mouse via a gene targeting approach. Although early lymphocyte development is normal in c-Rel(-/-) mice, there are significantly fewer B cells displaying a memory (IgM/IgD-) phenotype. Upon immunization, c-Rel(-/-) mice generate fewer B cells with a germinal center (PNAhi) phenotype. In vitro, c-Rel(-/-) B cells proliferate poorly upon ligation of their surface IgM or CD40 receptors or when stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or T cell help. Early molecular events that precede proliferation, such as increases in RNA synthesis as well as IL-2 receptor alpha chain expression, are greatly diminished in c-Rel(-/-) B cells. Furthermore, c-Rel(-/-) B cells are impaired in the ability to receive survival signals generated by anti-IgM or LPS. In contrast, CD40-mediated cell survival is normal in c-Rel(-/-) B cells, suggesting the involvement of a survival-signaling pathway that is independent of c-Rel. When c-Rel (-/-) B cells are co-stimulated with either anti-IgM and CD40 or LPS and CD40, they are rendered capable of progressing through the cell cycle. Finally, co-culture experiments suggest that the defects observed in c-Rel(-/-) B cells are intrinsic to the cell and can not be rescued through either cell-cell contact or addition of soluble factors. Thus, c-Rel is requisite for differentiation to the germinal center and memory B cells in vivo and is required for the transduction of survival and cell cycle progression signals mediated by anti-IgM and LPS in vitro. Furthermore, while c-Rel is involved in CD40-induced proliferation, it is apparently dispensable for the survival signals transduced by CD40.

  11. Dietary lutein modulates growth and survival genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Gokarn, Sarita V; Krueger, Eric G; Bright, John J

    2015-02-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid pigment present in fruits and vegetables that has anti-inflammatory and antitumor properties. In this study, we examined the effect of lutein on proliferation and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer (PC-3) cells. We found that in vitro culture of PC-3 cells with lutein induced mild decrease in proliferation that improved in combination treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists and other chemotherapeutic agents. Flow cytometry analyses showed that lutein improved drug-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer. Gene array and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that lutein altered the expression of growth and apoptosis-associated biomarker genes in PC-3 cells. These findings highlight that lutein modulates the expression of growth and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer cells.

  12. Host cell cytotoxicity, cellular repopulation dynamics, and phase-specific cell survival in X-irradiated rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S. ); Kavanau, K.S.; Afzal, S.M.J.; Curtis, S.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Postirradiation tumor volume response, cellular repopulation dynamics, cell-cycle perturbations, and phase-specific cell survival were characterized in rat rhabdomyosarcoma R-1 tumors (the R2C5 subline) following an in situ 10-Gy dose of 225-kVp X rays. This X-ray dose produced a 7.5-day delay in tumor growth to twice the volume measured at the time of irradiation, and reduced the initial surviving fraction of R2C5 cells to 0.17 as measured by the excision assay procedure. The surviving fraction of R2C5 cells returned to unity by the 16th day after tumor irradiation. On the basis of flow cytometry measurements of DNA content in tumor cells stained with a noncytotoxic concentration of Hoechst 33342, a transient G{sub 2} block was observed 1 day after irradiation. Flow cytometry measurements also demonstrated that the tetraploid R2C5 cells constituted only 30% of the total tumor cell population, with the remainder being diploid host cells comprised of macrophages, monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Large numbers of host cells infiltrated the irradiated tumors, leading to an increase in the percentage of diploid cells by Day 2 and reaching a level of more than 80% of the total tumor cell population by 4 to 8 days after irradiation. The influx of host cells into irradiated tumors was correlated temporally with a significant 12-fold decrease in the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells that occurred between Days 2 and 4 postirradiation. When the diploid host cell population was removed by cell sorting procedures, the surviving fraction of R2C5 cells at Day 4 substantially greater than that in the presence of the host cells. Experiments involving the mixing of 4/1 and 12/1 ratios of diploid host cells and tetraploid tumor cells isolated from irradiated and unirradiated tumors demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of the host cells was specific for the irradiated tumor cells.

  13. Sox9 modulates cell survival and adipogenic differentiation of multipotent adult rat mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Sabine; Bauer, Richard J; Bosserhoff, Anja K; Göttl, Claudia; Grifka, Joachim; Grässel, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Sox9 is a key transcription factor in early chondrogenesis with distinct roles in differentiation processes and during embryonic development. Here, we report that Sox9 modulates cell survival and contributes to the commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation lineages. We found that the Sox9 activity level affects the expression of the key transcription factor in adipogenic differentiation, C/EBPβ, and that cyclin D1 mediates the expression of the osteogenic marker osteocalcin in undifferentiated adult bone-marrow-derived rat MSC. Introducing a stable Sox9 knockdown into undifferentiated rat MSC resulted in a marked decrease in proliferation rate and an increase in apoptotic activity. This was linked to a profound upregulation of p21 and cyclin D1 gene and protein expression accompanied by an induction of caspase 3/7 activity and an inhibition of Bcl-2. We observed that Sox9 silencing provoked a delayed S-phase progression and an increased nuclear localization of p21. The protein stability of cyclin D1 was induced in the absence of Sox9 presumably as a function of altered p38 signalling. In addition, the major transcription factor for adipogenic differentiation, C/EBPβ, was repressed after silencing Sox9. The nearly complete absence of C/EBPβ protein as a result of increased destabilization of the C/EBPβ mRNA and the impact on osteocalcin gene expression and protein synthesis, suggests that a delicate balance of Sox9 level is not only imperative for proper chondrogenic differentiation of progenitor cells, but also affects the adipogenic and probably osteogenic differentiation pathways of MSC. Our results identified Sox9 as an important link between differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis in undifferentiated adult rat mesenchymal stem cells, emphasizing the importance of the delicate balance of a precisely regulated Sox9 activity in MSC not only for proper skeletal development during embryogenesis but probably also

  14. Metallodrug induced apoptotic cell death and survival attempts are characterizable by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, K.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Meyer, D.

    2014-09-01

    Chrysotherapeutics are under investigation as new or additional treatments for different types of cancers. In this study, gold complexes were investigated for their anticancer potential using Raman spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to determine whether Raman spectroscopy could be used for the characterization of metallodrug-induced cell death. Symptoms of cell death such as decreased peak intensities of proteins bonds and phosphodiester bonds found in deoxyribose nucleic acids were evident in the principal component analysis of the spectra. Vibrational bands around 761 cm-1 and 1300 cm-1 (tryptophan, ethanolamine group, and phosphatidylethanolamine) and 1720 cm-1 (ester bonds associated with phospholipids) appeared in the Raman spectra of cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells after metallodrug treatment. The significantly (p < 0.05, one way analysis of variance) increased intensity of phosphatidylethanolamine after metallodrug treatment could be a molecular signature of induced apoptosis since both the co-regulated phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine are externalized during cell death. Treated cells had significantly higher levels of glucose and glycogen vibrational peaks, indicative of a survival mechanism of cancer cells under chemical stress. Cancer cells excrete chemotherapeutics to improve their chances of survival and utilize glucose to achieve this. Raman spectroscopy was able to monitor a survival strategy of cancer cells in the form of glucose uptake to alleviate chemical stress. Raman spectroscopy was invaluable in obtaining molecular information generated by biomolecules affected by anticancer metallodrug treatments and presents an alternative to less reproducible, conventional biochemical assays for cytotoxicity analyses.

  15. Effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate on human pulp cell survival pathways ERK and AKT.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Gianrico; D'Antò, Vincenzo; Valletta, Rosa; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut; Rengo, Sandro

    2008-06-01

    Previous investigations have revealed that dental monomers could affect intracellular pathways leading to cell survival or cell death. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) might mediate cell responses as well as cell survival and apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways in human primary pulp fibroblasts (HPCs). HPCs were treated with various concentrations of HEMA, after which viability and reactive oxygen species levels were determined by flow cytometry with Annexin V-PI staining and 2,7-dichlorofluorescine diacetate, respectively. Whole-cell extracts were immunoblotted with anti-P-Akt or anti-P-ERK1/2. Cell viability decreased in a dose-dependent manner after HEMA exposure, showing a significant decrease with 10 mmol/L HEMA (p < .05). HEMA treatment resulted in a 4-fold increase in reactive oxygen species formation (p < .05). A short HEMA exposure (30-90 minutes) increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, whereas a decrease in the AKT phosphorylation was observed. Selective inhibitors of the ERK (PD98059) and AKT (LY294002) pathways amplified HPC cell damage after HEMA exposure. Our findings demonstrated that HEMA exposure modulates the ERK and AKT pathways in different manners, and that in turn, they function in parallel to mediate pro-survival signaling in pulp cells subjected to HEMA cytotoxicity.

  16. ELF magnetic fields do not affect cell survival and DNA damage induced by ultraviolet B.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Narita, Eijiro; Yamada, Masaru; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2014-02-01

    We investigated whether extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposure has modification effects on cell survival after ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation and on repair process of DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA and XP2OS(SV) cells. The ELF magnetic field exposure was conducted using a Helmholtz coil-based system that was designed to generate a sinusoidal magnetic field at 5 mT and 60 Hz. Cell survival was assessed by WST assay after UV-B irradiation at 20-80 J/m(2) , ELF magnetic field exposure for 24 h, followed by incubation for 48 h. DNA damage was assessed by quantification of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation and 6-4 photoproduct formation using ELISA after UV-B irradiation at 20-80 J/m(2) followed by ELF magnetic field exposure for 24 h. No significant changes were observed in cell survival between ELF magnetic field and sham exposures. Similarly, DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation did not change significantly following ELF magnetic field exposure. Our results suggest that ELF magnetic field exposure at 5 mT does not have modification effect on cell survival after UV-B irradiation and on repair process of DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation.

  17. PP2C family members play key roles in regulation of cell survival and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinri; Toriumi, Shinnosuke; Saito, Jun-Ichi; Awano, Kenjiro; Kudo, Tada-Aki; Kobayashi, Takayasu

    2006-07-01

    Although unlimited proliferation of cancer cells is supported by multiple signaling pathways involved in the regulation of proliferation, survival, and apoptosis, the molecular mechanisms coordinating these different pathways to promote the proliferation and survival of cancer cells have remained unclear. SAPK and integrin-ILK signaling pathways play key roles in the promotion of apoptosis and cell proliferation/survival, respectively. Studies of TNFalpha- and H2O2-induced apoptosis revealed that ASK1, a component of the SAPK system, mediates the TNFalpha and H2O2 signaling of apoptosis. ASK1 is activated by autophosphorylation of a specific threonine residue (T845) following TNFalpha stimulation. Our recent studies indicate that PP2Cepsilon, a member of the PP2C family, associates with and inactivates ASK1 by dephosphorylating T845. In contrast, PP2Cdelta/ILKAP, a second PP2C family member, activates ASK1 by enhancing cellular phosphorylation of T845. PP2Cdelta/ILKAP also forms a complex with ILK1 to inhibit the GSK3beta-mediated integrin-ILK1 signaling in vivo, inhibiting cell cycle progression. These observations raise the possibility that PP2Cdelta/ILKAP acts to control the cross-talk between integrin-induced and TNFalpha-induced signaling pathways, inhibiting the former and stimulating the latter, thereby inhibiting proliferation and survival and promoting the apoptosis of cancer cells.

  18. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies.

  19. Factors Associated with Survival in a Contemporary Adult Sickle Cell Disease Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Elmariah, Hany; Garrett, Melanie E.; De Castro, Laura M.; Jonassaint, Jude; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Eckman, James; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Telen, Marilyn J.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the relationship of clinical differences among sickle cell disease (SCD) patients in order to understand the major contributors to early mortality in a contemporary cohort. Survival data were obtained for 542 adult subjects who were enrolled since 2002 at three university hospitals in the southeast United States. Subjects were followed for a median of 9.3 years. At enrollment, clinical parameters were collected, including hemoglobin (Hb) genotype, baseline laboratory values, comorbidities, and medication usage. Levels of soluble adhesion molecules were measured for a subset of 87 subjects. The relationship of clinical characteristics to survival was determined using regression analysis. Median age at enrollment was 32 years. Median survival was 61 years for all subjects. Median survival for Hb SS and Sβ0 was 58 years and for Hb SC and Sβ+ was 66 years. Elevated white blood count, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, proteinuria, frequency of pain crises, pulmonary hypertension, cerebrovascular events, seizures, stroke, sVCAM-1 and short-acting narcotics use were significantly associated with decreased survival. 42% of subjects were on hydroxyurea therapy, which was not associated with survival. SCD continues to reduce life expectancy for affected individuals, particularly those with Hb Sβ0 and SS. Not only were comorbidities individually associated with decreased survival, but an additive effect was observed, so that those with a greater number of negative endpoints had worse survival (p<0.0001). The association of higher sVCAM-1 levels with decreased survival suggests that targeted therapies to reduce endothelial damage and inflammation may also be beneficial. PMID:24478166

  20. The KSHV K1 Protein Modulates AMPK Function to Enhance Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Penny M.; Zhang, Zhigang; Bhende, Prasana M.; Giffin, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) as well as two lymphoproliferative diseases, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. KSHV encodes viral proteins, such as K1, that alter signaling pathways involved in cell survival. Expression of K1 has been reported to transform rodent fibroblasts, and K1 transgenic mice develop multiple tumors, suggesting that K1 has an important role in KSHV pathogenesis. We found that cells infected with a KSHV virus containing a WT K1 gene had a survival advantage under conditions of nutrient deprivation compared to cells infected with KSHV K1 mutant viruses. 5’ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to nutrient deprivation by maintaining energy homeostasis, and AMPK signaling has been shown to promote cell survival in various types of cancers. Under conditions of AMPK inhibition, we also observed that cells infected with KSHV containing a WT K1 gene had a survival advantage compared to KSHV K1 mutant virus infected cells. To explore the underpinnings of this phenotype, we identified K1-associated cellular proteins by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. We found that the KSHV K1 protein associates with the gamma subunit of AMPK (AMPKγ1). We corroborated this finding by independently confirming that K1 co-immunoprecipitates with AMPKγ1. Co-immunoprecipitations of wild-type K1 (K1WT) or K1 domain mutants and AMPKγ1, revealed that the K1 N-terminus is important for the association between K1 and AMPKγ1. We propose that the KSHV K1 protein promotes cell survival via its association with AMPKγ1 following exposure to stress. PMID:27829024

  1. In vitro study of cell survival following dynamic MLC intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Duzenli, Cheryl; Durand, Ralph E.

    2007-04-15

    The possibility of reduced cell kill following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared to conventional radiation therapy has been debated in the literature. This potential reduction in cell kill relates to prolonged treatment times typical of IMRT dose delivery and consequently increased repair of sublethal lesions. While there is some theoretical support to this reduction in cell kill published in the literature, direct experimental evidence specific to IMRT dose delivery patterns is lacking. In this study we present cell survival data for three cell lines: Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts, human cervical carcinoma, SiHa and colon adenocarcinoma, WiDr. Cell survival was obtained for 2.1 Gy delivered as acute dose with parallel-opposed pair (POP), irradiation time 75 s, which served as a reference; regular seven-field IMRT, irradiation time 5 min; and IMRT with a break for multiple leaf collimator (MLC) re-initialization after three fields were delivered, irradiation time 10 min. An actual seven-field dynamic MLC IMRT plan for a head and neck patient was used. The IMRT plan was generated for a Varian EX or iX linear accelerator with 120 leaf Millenium MLC. Survival data were also collected for doses 1x, 2x, 3x, 4x, and 5x 2.1 Gy to establish parameters of the linear-quadratic equation describing survival following acute dose delivery. Cells were irradiated inside an acrylic cylindrical phantom specifically designed for this study. Doses from both IMRT and POP were validated using ion chamber measurements. A reproducible increase in cell survival was observed following IMRT dose delivery. This increase varied from small for V79, with a surviving fraction of 0.8326 following POP vs 0.8420 following uninterrupted IMRT, to very pronounced for SiHa, with a surviving fraction of 0.3903 following POP vs 0.5330 for uninterrupted IMRT. When compared to IMRT or IMRT with a break for MLC initialization, cell survival following acute dose delivery was

  2. Cell membrane damage is involved in the impaired survival of bone marrow stem cells by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Cui, Yuqi; Tan, Tao; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Hao, Hong; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhang, Jia; He, Guanglong; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Lei, Minxiang; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-12-01

    Cell therapy with bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) remains a viable option for tissue repair and regeneration. A major challenge for cell therapy is the limited cell survival after implantation. This study was to investigate the effect of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL, naturally present in human blood) on BMSC injury and the effect of MG53, a tissue repair protein, for the improvement of stem cell survival. Rat bone marrow multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) were treated with ox-LDL, which caused significant cell death as reflected by the increased LDH release to the media. Exposure of MAPCs to ox-LDL led to entry of fluorescent dye FM1-43 measured under confocal microscope, suggesting damage to the plasma membrane. Ox-LDL also generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. While antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely blocked ROS production from ox-LDL, it failed to prevent ox-LDL-induced cell death. When MAPCs were treated with the recombinant human MG53 protein (rhMG53) ox-LDL induced LDH release and FM1-43 dye entry were significantly reduced. In the presence of rhMG53, the MAPCs showed enhanced cell survival and proliferation. Our data suggest that membrane damage induced by ox-LDL contributed to the impaired survival of MAPCs. rhMG53 treatment protected MAPCs against membrane damage and enhanced their survival which might represent a novel means for improving efficacy for stem cell-based therapy for treatment of diseases, especially in setting of hyperlipidemia.

  3. The influence of printing parameters on cell survival rate and printability in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Yang; Mao, Shuangshuang; Sun, Wei; Yao, Rui

    2015-11-02

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has provided a versatile methodology to fabricate cell-laden tissue-like constructs and in vitro tissue/pathological models for tissue engineering, drug testing and screening applications. However, it still remains a challenge to print bioinks with high viscoelasticity to achieve long-term stable structure and maintain high cell survival rate after printing at the same time. In this study, we systematically investigated the influence of 3D cell printing parameters, i.e. composition and concentration of bioink, holding temperature and holding time, on the printability and cell survival rate in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology. Rheological measurements were utilized to characterize the viscoelasticity of gelatin-based bioinks. Results demonstrated that the bioink viscoelasticity was increased when increasing the bioink concentration, increasing holding time and decreasing holding temperature below gelation temperature. The decline of cell survival rate after 3D cell printing process was observed when increasing the viscoelasticity of the gelatin-based bioinks. However, different process parameter combinations would result in the similar rheological characteristics and thus showed similar cell survival rate after 3D bioprinting process. On the other hand, bioink viscoelasticity should also reach a certain point to ensure good printability and shape fidelity. At last, we proposed a protocol for 3D bioprinting of temperature-sensitive gelatin-based hydrogel bioinks with both high cell survival rate and good printability. This research would be useful for biofabrication researchers to adjust the 3D bioprinting process parameters quickly and as a referable template for designing new bioinks.

  4. A CpG-methylation-based assay to predict survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jin-Huan; Haddad, Ahmed; Wu, Kai-Jie; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Kapur, Payal; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhao, Liang-Yun; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Jian-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yan-Hong; Cai, Mu-Yan; Xie, Dan; Liao, Bing; Li, Cai-Xia; Li, Pei-Xing; Wang, Zong-Ren; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Shi, Lei; Liu, Qing-Zuo; Gao, Zhen-Li; He, Da-Lin; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Li, Quan-Zhen; Margulis, Vitaly; Luo, Jun-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) display divergent clinical behaviours. Molecular markers might improve risk stratification of ccRCC. Here we use, based on genome-wide CpG methylation profiling, a LASSO model to develop a five-CpG-based assay for ccRCC prognosis that can be used with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens. The five-CpG-based classifier was validated in three independent sets from China, United States and the Cancer Genome Atlas data set. The classifier predicts the overall survival of ccRCC patients (hazard ratio=2.96−4.82; P=3.9 × 10−6−2.2 × 10−9), independent of standard clinical prognostic factors. The five-CpG-based classifier successfully categorizes patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, with significant differences of clinical outcome in respective clinical stages and individual ‘stage, size, grade and necrosis' scores. Moreover, methylation at the five CpGs correlates with expression of five genes: PITX1, FOXE3, TWF2, EHBP1L1 and RIN1. Our five-CpG-based classifier is a practical and reliable prognostic tool for ccRCC that can add prognostic value to the staging system. PMID:26515236

  5. Shear flow-induced detachment kinetics of Dictyostelium discoideum cells from solid substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Décavé, Emmanuel; Garrivier, Daniel; Bréchet, Yves; Fourcade, Bertrand; Bruckert, Franz

    2002-01-01

    Using Dictyostelium discoideum as a model organism of specific and nonspecific adhesion, we studied the kinetics of shear flow-induced cell detachment. For a given cell, detachment occurs for values of the applied hydrodynamic stress above a threshold. Cells are removed from the substrate with an apparent first-order rate constant that strongly depends on the applied stress. The threshold stress depends on cell size and physicochemical properties of the substrate, but is not affected by depolymerization of the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton. In contrast, the kinetics of cell detachment is almost independent of cell size, but is strongly affected by a modification of the substrate and the presence of an intact actin cytoskeleton. These results are interpreted in the framework of a peeling model. The threshold stress and the cell-detachment rate measure the local equilibrium energy and the dissociation rate constant of the adhesion bridges, respectively. PMID:11964228

  6. Single nucleus versus single-cell gel electrophoresis: kinetics of DNA track formation.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, Katerina; Chopei, Marianna; Sivolob, Andrei

    2015-04-01

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, or the comet assay, is usually performed with nucleoids prepared after a lysis of either whole cells (more often) or isolated cell nuclei (rarely). Electrophoretic properties of the second type of nucleoids have never been investigated carefully. We measured the kinetics of the DNA exit from nuclei-derived nucleoids in comparison with cell-derived nucleoids. The results show that general organization of the nuclei-derived nucleoids is not changed very much in comparison with nucleoids commonly obtained from whole cells. At the same time, in contrast to the cell-derived nucleoids, for which the exit is stepwise and cooperative, the DNA exit from the nuclei-derived nucleoids can be described by a simple monomolecular kinetics. This difference is probably due to agarose penetration into nuclei (but not into cells) before polymerization of the agarose gel. We suggest that single-nucleus gel electrophoresis may be a way for the comet assay standardization.

  7. Peripheral T Cell Survival Requires Continual Ligation of the T Cell Receptor to Major Histocompatibility Complex–Encoded Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kirberg, Jörg; Berns, Anton; Boehmer, Harald von

    1997-01-01

    In the thymus, T cells are selected according to their T cell receptor (TCR) specificity. After positive selection, mature cells are exported from primary lymphoid organs to seed the secondary lymphoid tissue. An important question is whether survival of mature T cells is an intrinsic property or requires continuous survival signals, i.e., engagement of the TCR by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the periphery, perhaps in a similar way as occurring during thymic positive selection. To address this issue we used recombination-activating gene (Rag)-deficient H-2b mice expressing a transgenic TCR restricted by I-Ed class II MHC molecules. After engraftment with Rag−/− H-2d fetal thymi, CD4+8− peripheral T cells emerged. These cells were isolated and transferred into immunodeficient hosts of H-2b or H-2d haplotype, some of the latter being common cytokine receptor γ chain deficient to exclude rejection of H-2b donor cells by host natural killer cells. Our results show that in the absence, but not in the presence, of selecting MHC molecules, peripheral mature T cells are short lived and disappear within 7 wk, indicating that continuous contact of the TCR with selecting MHC molecules is required for survival of T cells. PMID:9334366

  8. Malignant Precursor Cells Pre-Exist in Human Breast DCIS and Require Autophagy for Survival

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Virginia; Mariani, Brian D.; Gallagher, Rosa I.; Tran, Khoa; Banks, Stacey; Wiedemann, Joy; Huryk, Heather; Mueller, Claudius; Adamo, Luana; Deng, Jianghong; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Pastore, Lucia; Zaman, Syed; Menezes, Geetha; Mize, James; Johal, Jasbir; Edmiston, Kirsten; Liotta, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Background While it is accepted that a majority of invasive breast cancer progresses from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) precursor stage, very little is known about the factors that promote survival of DCIS neoplastic cells within the hypoxic, nutrient deprived intraductal microenvironment. Methodology and Principal Findings We examined the hypothesis that fresh human DCIS lesions contain pre-existing carcinoma precursor cells. We characterized these cells by full genome molecular cytogenetics (Illumina HumanCytoSNP profile), and signal pathway profiling (Reverse Phase Protein Microarray, 59 endpoints), and demonstrated that autophagy is required for survival and anchorage independent growth of the cytogenetically abnormal tumorigenic DCIS cells. Ex vivo organoid culture of fresh human DCIS lesions, without enzymatic treatment or sorting, induced the emergence of neoplastic epithelial cells exhibiting the following characteristics: a) spontaneous generation of hundreds of spheroids and duct-like 3-D structures in culture within 2–4 weeks; b) tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice; c) cytogenetically abnormal (copy number loss or gain in chromosomes including 1, 5, 6, 8, 13, 17) compared to the normal karyotype of the non-neoplastic cells in the source patient's breast tissue; d) in vitro migration and invasion of autologous breast stroma; and e) up-regulation of signal pathways linked to, and components of, cellular autophagy. Multiple autophagy markers were present in the patient's original DCIS lesion and the mouse xenograft. We tested whether autophagy was necessary for survival of cytogenetically abnormal DCIS cells. The lysosomotropic inhibitor (chloroquine phosphate) of autophagy completely suppressed the generation of DCIS spheroids/3-D structures, suppressed ex vivo invasion of autologous stroma, induced apoptosis, suppressed autophagy associated proteins including Atg5, AKT/PI3 Kinase and mTOR, eliminated cytogenetically abnormal spheroid forming cells from

  9. Analysis of graft survival in a trial of stem cell transplant in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Tezeta; Gearing, Marla; Senitzer, David; Saxe, Debra; Brat, Daniel J; Bray, Robert; Gebel, Howard; Hill, Charles; Boulis, Nicholas; Riley, Jonathan; Feldman, Eva; Johe, Karl; Hazel, Thomas; Polak, Meraida; Bordeau, Jane; Federici, Thais; Glass, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The first US Food and Drug Administration–approved clinical trial to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with neural stem cell–based therapy is in progress. The goal of the current study was to identify and assess the survival of human spinal cord–derived neural stem cells (HSSCs) transplanted into the spinal cord in patients with ALS. Methods Spinal cords transplanted with HSSCs were examined from six autopsy cases. Homogenized tissues were interrogated for the presence of donor versus recipient DNA using real-time PCR methods (qPCR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using DNA probes for XY chromosomes to identify male donor HSSCs in one female case, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to characterize the identified donor cells. Results Genomic DNA from donor HSSCs was identified in all cases, comprising 0.67–5.4% of total tissue DNA in patients surviving 196 to 921 days after transplantation. In the one female patient a “nest” of cells identified on H&E staining were XY-positive by FISH, confirming donor origin. A subset of XY-positive cells labeled for the neuronal marker NeuN and stem cell marker SOX2. Interpretation This is the first study to identify human neural stem cells transplanted into a human spinal cord. Transplanted HSSCs survived up to 2.5 years posttransplant. Some cells differentiated into neurons, while others maintained their stem cell phenotype. This work is a proof of concept of the survival and differentiation of human stems cell transplanted into the spinal cord of ALS patients. PMID:25540804

  10. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik A; Walker, Sarah R; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C; Frank, David A

    2008-12-15

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival.

  11. Caspase inhibitors promote vestibular hair cell survival and function after aminoglycoside treatment in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Haque, Asim; Huss, David; Messana, Elizabeth P.; Alosi, Julie A.; Roberson, David W.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Dickman, J. David; Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear undergo apoptosis after acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment, causing permanent auditory and vestibular deficits in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for caspase activation in hair cell death and ototoxic injury that can be reduced by concurrent treatment with caspase inhibitors in vitro. In this study, we examined the protective effects of caspase inhibition on hair cell death in vivo after systemic injections of aminoglycosides. In one series of experiments, chickens were implanted with osmotic pumps that administrated the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(Ome)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) into inner ear fluids. One day after the surgery, the animals received a 5 d course of treatment with streptomycin, a vestibulotoxic aminoglycoside. Direct infusion of zVAD into the vestibule significantly increased hair cell survival after streptomycin treatment. A second series of experiments determined whether rescued hair cells could function as sensory receptors. Animals treated with streptomycin displayed vestibular system impairment as measured by a greatly reduced vestibulo-ocular response (VOR). In contrast, animals that received concurrent systemic administration of zVAD with streptomycin had both significantly greater hair cell survival and significantly increased VOR responses, as compared with animals treated with streptomycin alone. These findings suggest that inhibiting the activation of caspases promotes the survival of hair cells and protects against vestibular function deficits after aminoglycoside treatment.

  12. Encapsulated Whole Bone Marrow Cells Improve Survival in Wistar Rats after 90% Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Cruz, Carolina; Kieling, Carlos Oscar; López, Mónica Luján; Osvaldt, Alessandro; Ochs de Muñoz, Gustavo; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel; Giugliani, Roberto; Matte, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. The use of bone marrow cells has been suggested as an alternative treatment for acute liver failure. In this study, we investigate the effect of encapsulated whole bone marrow cells in a liver failure model. Methods. Encapsulated cells or empty capsules were implanted in rats submitted to 90% partial hepatectomy. The survival rate was assessed. Another group was euthanized at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after hepatectomy to study expression of cytokines and growth factors. Results. Whole bone marrow group showed a higher than 10 days survival rate compared to empty capsules group. Gene expression related to early phase of liver regeneration at 6 hours after hepatectomy was decreased in encapsulated cells group, whereas genes related to regeneration were increased at 12, 24, and 48 hours. Whole bone marrow group showed lower regeneration rate at 72 hours and higher expression and activity of caspase 3. In contrast, lysosomal-β-glucuronidase activity was elevated in empty capsules group. Conclusions. The results show that encapsulated whole bone marrow cells reduce the expression of genes involved in liver regeneration and increase those responsible for ending hepatocyte division. In addition, these cells favor apoptotic cell death and decrease necrosis, thus increasing survival. PMID:26649048

  13. ATG7 regulates energy metabolism, differentiation and survival of Philadelphia-chromosome-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    Karvela, Maria; Baquero, Pablo; Kuntz, Elodie M.; Mukhopadhyay, Arunima; Mitchell, Rebecca; Allan, Elaine K.; Chan, Edmond; Kranc, Kamil R.; Calabretta, Bruno; Salomoni, Paolo; Gottlieb, Eyal; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Helgason, G. Vignir

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major drawback of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is that primitive CML cells are able to survive TKI-mediated BCR-ABL inhibition, leading to disease persistence in patients. Investigation of strategies aiming to inhibit alternative survival pathways in CML is therefore critical. We have previously shown that a nonspecific pharmacological inhibition of autophagy potentiates TKI-induced death in Philadelphia chromosome-positive cells. Here we provide further understanding of how specific and pharmacological autophagy inhibition affects nonmitochondrial and mitochondrial energy metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated differentiation of CML cells and highlight ATG7 (a critical component of the LC3 conjugation system) as a potential specific therapeutic target. By combining extra- and intracellular steady state metabolite measurements by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with metabolic flux assays using labeled glucose and functional assays, we demonstrate that knockdown of ATG7 results in decreased glycolysis and increased flux of labeled carbons through the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle. This leads to increased oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Furthermore, following ROS accumulation, CML cells, including primary CML CD34+ progenitor cells, differentiate toward the erythroid lineage. Finally, ATG7 knockdown sensitizes CML progenitor cells to TKI-induced death, without affecting survival of normal cells, suggesting that specific inhibitors of ATG7 in combination with TKI would provide a novel therapeutic approach for CML patients exhibiting persistent disease. PMID:27168493

  14. Myeloid Cell-Specific Knockout of NFI-A Improves Sepsis Survival.

    PubMed

    McPeak, Melissa B; Youssef, Dima; Williams, Danielle A; Pritchett, Christopher; Yao, Zhi Q; McCall, Charles E; El Gazzar, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Myeloid progenitor-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) arise from myeloid progenitors and suppress both innate and adaptive immunity. MDSCs expand during the later phases of sepsis in mice, promote immunosuppression, and reduce survival. Here, we report that the myeloid differentiation-related transcription factor nuclear factor I-A (NFI-A) controls MDSC expansion during sepsis and impacts survival. Unlike MDSCs, myeloid cells with conditional deletion of the Nfia gene normally differentiated into effector cells during sepsis, cleared infecting bacteria, and did not express immunosuppressive mediators. In contrast, ectopic expression of NFI-A in myeloid progenitors from NFI-A myeloid cell-deficient mice impeded myeloid cell maturation and promoted immune repressor function. Importantly, surviving septic mice with conditionally deficient NFI-A myeloid cells were able to respond to challenge with bacterial endotoxin by mounting an acute inflammatory response. Together, these results support the concept of NFI-A as a master molecular transcriptome switch that controls myeloid cell differentiation and maturation and that malfunction of this switch during sepsis promotes MDSC expansion that adversely impacts sepsis outcome.

  15. Enhanced survival of retinal ganglion cells is mediated by Müller glial cell-derived PEDF.

    PubMed

    Unterlauft, Jan Darius; Claudepierre, Thomas; Schmidt, Manuela; Müller, Katja; Yafai, Yousef; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Eichler, Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    The death of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) leads to visual impairment and blindness in ocular neurodegenerative diseases, primarily in glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy; hence, mechanisms that contribute to protecting RGC from ischemia/hypoxia are of great interest. We here address the role of retinal glial (Müller) cells and of pigment-epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), one of the main neuroprotectants released from the glial cells. We show that the hypoxia-induced loss in the viability of cultured purified RGC is due to apoptosis, but that the number of viable RGC increases when co-cultured with Müller glial cells suggesting that glial soluble mediators attenuate the death of RGC. When PEDF was ablated from Müller cells a significantly lower number of RGC survived in RGC-Müller cell co-cultures indicating that PEDF is a major survival factor allowing RGC to escape cell death. We further found that RGC express a PEDF receptor known as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 2 (PNPLA2) and that PEDF exposure, as well as the presence of Müller cells, leads to an activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RGC. Furthermore, adding an NF-κB inhibitor (SN50) to PEDF-treated RGC cultures reduced the survival of RGC. These findings strongly suggest that NF-κB activation in RGC is critically involved in the pro-survival action of Müller-cell derived PEDF and plays an important role in maintaining neuronal survival.

  16. Water-Exchange-Modified Kinetic Parameters from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI as Prognostic Biomarkers of Survival in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Antiangiogenic Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ho; Hayano, Koichi; Zhu, Andrew X.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background To find prognostic biomarkers in pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) water-exchange-modified (WX) kinetic parameters for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with antiangiogenic monotherapy. Methods Twenty patients with advanced HCC underwent DCE-MRI and were subsequently treated with sunitinib. Pretreatment DCE-MRI data on advanced HCC were analyzed using five different WX kinetic models: the Tofts-Kety (WX-TK), extended TK (WX-ETK), two compartment exchange, adiabatic approximation to tissue homogeneity (WX-AATH), and distributed parameter (WX-DP) models. The total hepatic blood flow, arterial flow fraction (γ), arterial blood flow (BFA), portal blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, permeability-surface area product, fractional interstitial volume (vI), extraction fraction, mean intracellular water molecule lifetime (τC), and fractional intracellular volume (vC) were calculated. After receiver operating characteristic analysis with leave-one-out cross-validation, individual parameters for each model were assessed in terms of 1-year-survival (1YS) discrimination using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and association with overall survival (OS) using univariate Cox regression analysis with permutation testing. Results The WX-TK-model-derived γ (P = 0.022) and vI (P = 0.010), and WX-ETK-model-derived τC (P = 0.023) and vC (P = 0.042) were statistically significant prognostic biomarkers for 1YS. Increase in the WX-DP-model-derived BFA (P = 0.025) and decrease in the WX-TK, WX-ETK, WX-AATH, and WX-DP-model-derived vC (P = 0.034, P = 0.038, P = 0.028, P = 0.041, respectively) were significantly associated with an increase in OS. Conclusions The WX-ETK-model-derived vC was an effective prognostic biomarker for advanced HCC treated with sunitinib. PMID:26366997

  17. Survival of Er(a+) red cells in a patient with allo-anti-Era

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.W.; Skradski, K.J.; Thoreson, J.R.; Polesky, H.F.

    1985-03-01

    /sup 51/Chromium-labeled Er(a+) red cells survived nearly normally (T1/2 of 21 days) in a patient with allo-anti-Era. Transfusion of Er(a+) blood was without significant reaction and did not affect the anti-Era titer.

  18. Nicotine-mediated signals modulate cell death and survival of T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oloris, Silvia C.S.; Frazer-Abel, Ashley A.; Jubala, Cristan M.; Fosmire, Susan P.; Helm, Karen M.; Robinson, Sally R.; Korpela, Derek M.; Duckett, Megan M.; Baksh, Shairaz; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2010-02-01

    The capacity of nicotine to affect the behavior of non-neuronal cells through neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been the subject of considerable recent attention. Previously, we showed that exposure to nicotine activates the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor in lymphocytes and endothelial cells, leading to alterations in cellular growth and vascular endothelial growth factor production. Here, we extend these studies to document effects of nicotine on lymphocyte survival. The data show that nicotine induces paradoxical effects that might alternatively enforce survival or trigger apoptosis, suggesting that depending on timing and context, nicotine might act both as a survival factor or as an inducer of apoptosis in normal or transformed lymphocytes, and possibly other non-neuronal cells. In addition, our results show that, while having overlapping functions, low and high affinity nAChRs also transmit signals that promote distinct outcomes in lymphocytes. The sum of our data suggests that selective modulation of nAChRs might be useful to regulate lymphocyte activation and survival in health and disease.

  19. Growth hormone and cell survival in the neural retina: caspase dependence and independence.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve; Baudet, Marie-Laure; Sanders, Esmond J

    2006-11-06

    Growth hormone has recently been shown to be expressed in the retinal ganglion cells of embryonic chicks, in which it induces cell survival during neurogenesis. The mechanism of this action has been examined in neural retina explants from 6-day-old and 8-day-old embryos that were incubated for 48 h in 10 M growth hormone, to reduce the number of spontaneous apoptotic cells. This anti-apoptotic action was accompanied by a reduction in caspase-3 expression and, at embryonic day 8, by reduced expression of apoptosis inducing factor-1, which is caspase independent. These actions were specific, as other genes involved in apoptotic signaling (bcl-2, bcl-x, bid and inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) were unaffected. These results therefore demonstrate caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways in growth hormone-induced retinal cell survival.

  20. The adaptor 3BP2 is required for KIT receptor expression and human mast cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ainsua-Enrich, Erola; Serrano-Candelas, Eva; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Picado, César; Sayós, Joan; Rivera, Juan; Martín, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    3BP2 is a cytoplasmic adaptor protein that acts as a positive regulator in mast cell FcεRI-dependent signaling. The KIT receptor whose ligand is the stem cell factor (SCF) is necessary for mast cell development, proliferation and survival as well as for optimal IgE-dependent signal. Activating mutations in KIT have been associated with several diseases including mastocytosis. In the present work, we found that 3BP2 silencing impairs KIT signaling pathways, thus affecting PI3K and MAP kinase pathways in human mast cells from HMC-1, LAD2 (human mast cell lines) and CD34+-derived mast cells. Unexpectedly, silencing of 3BP2 reduces KIT expression in normal human mast cells as well as in HMC-1 cells where KIT is mutated, thus increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase 3/7 activity. 3BP2 silencing reduces KIT transcription expression levels. Interestingly, 3BP2 silencing decreased MITF expression, a transcription factor involved in KIT expression. Reconstitution of 3BP2 in knockdown cells leads to reversal of KIT expression as well as survival phenotype. Accordingly MITF reconstitution enhances KIT expression levels in 3BP2 silenced cells. Moreover, downregulation of KIT expression by miRNA221 overexpression or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib also reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression. Furthermore, KIT tyrosine activity inhibition reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression, demonstrating again a tight and reciprocal relationship between these molecules. Taken together, our results show that 3BP2 regulates human mast cell survival and participates in KIT-mediated signal transduction by directly controlling KIT receptor expression, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target in mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and deregulated KIT disorders. PMID:25810396

  1. A simple prognostic model for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hazem I.; Patenaude, Francois; Toumishey, Ethan; Ross, Laura; Abdelsalam, Mahmoud; Reiman, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The primary purpose of this study was to develop a simpler prognostic model to predict overall survival for patients treated for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) by examining variables shown in the literature to be associated with survival. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients treated for mRCC at two Canadian centres. All patients who started first-line treatment were included in the analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was constructed using a stepwise procedure. Patients were assigned to risk groups depending on how many of the three risk factors from the final multivariate model they had. Results: There were three risk factors in the final multivariate model: hemoglobin, prior nephrectomy, and time from diagnosis to treatment. Patients in the high-risk group (two or three risk factors) had a median survival of 5.9 months, while those in the intermediate-risk group (one risk factor) had a median survival of 16.2 months, and those in the low-risk group (no risk factors) had a median survival of 50.6 months. Conclusions: In multivariate analysis, shorter survival times were associated with hemoglobin below the lower limit of normal, absence of prior nephrectomy, and initiation of treatment within one year of diagnosis. PMID:27217858

  2. Effect of boar seminal plasma immunosuppressive factor on NK cell activity and skin graft survival.

    PubMed

    Veselsky, L; Holan, V; Soucek, J; Stanek, R; Hoskova, M

    1992-01-01

    The B 10 strain of mice was used to test the effect of the boar seminal vesicle immunosuppressive factor on the female mouse response to the male-specific transplantation antigen. Influence of this factor on human natural killer (NK) cell activity was also studied. No inhibitory effect of the immunosuppressive factor on graft survival was apparent during a time of more than 200 days, nor did the factor suppress NK cell activity.

  3. Snail family members and cell survival in physiological and pathological cleft palates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alvarez, Concepción; Blanco, María J; Pérez, Raquel; Rabadán, M Angeles; Aparicio, Marta; Resel, Eva; Martínez, Tamara; Nieto, M Angela

    2004-01-01

    Palate fusion is a complex process that involves the coordination of a series of cellular changes including cell death and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Since members of the Snail family of zinc-finger regulators are involved in both triggering of the EMT and cell survival, we decided to study their putative role in palatal fusion. Furthermore, Snail genes are induced by transforming growth factor beta gene (TGF-beta) superfamily members, and TGF-beta(3) null mutant mice (TGF-beta(3)-/-) show a cleft palate phenotype. Here we show that in the wild-type mouse at the time of fusion, Snail is expressed in a few cells of the midline epithelial seam (MES), compatible with a role in triggering of the EMT in a small subpopulation of the MES. We also find an intriguing relationship between the expression of Snail family members and cell survival associated to the cleft palate condition. Indeed, Snail is expressed in the medial edge epithelial (MEE) cells in TGF-beta(3)-/-mouse embryo palates, where it is activated by the aberrant expression of its inducer, TGF-beta(1), in the underlying mesenchyme. In contrast to Snail-deficient wild-type pre-adhesion MEE cells, Snail-expressing TGF-beta(3) mutant MEE cells survive as they do their counterparts in the chick embryo. Interestingly, Slug is the Snail family member expressed in the chick MEE, providing another example of interchange of Snail and Slug expression between avian and mammalian embryos. We propose that in the absence of TGF-beta(3), TGF-beta(1) is upregulated in the mesenchyme, and that in both physiological (avian) and pathological (TGF-beta(3)-/-mammalian) cleft palates, it induces the expression of Snail genes promoting the survival of the MEE cells and permitting their subsequent differentiation into keratinized stratified epithelium.

  4. Downregulation of Metabolic Activity Increases Cell Survival Under Hypoxic Conditions: Potential Applications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehyun; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Jackson, John D.; Lee, Sang Jin; Atala, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge to the success of cell-based implants for tissue regeneration is an insufficient supply of oxygen before host vasculature is integrated into the implants, resulting in premature cell death and dysfunction. Whereas increasing oxygenation to the implants has been a major focus in the field, our strategy is aimed at lowering oxygen consumption by downregulating cellular metabolism of cell-based implants. Adenosine, which is a purine nucleoside that functions as an energy transferring molecule, has been reported to increase under hypoxia, resulting in reducing the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demands of the Na+/K+ ATPase. In the present study, we investigated whether adenosine could be used to downregulate cellular metabolism to achieve prolonged survival under hypoxic conditions. Murine myoblasts (C2C12) lacking a self-survival mechanism were treated with adenosine under 0.1% hypoxic stress. The cells, cultured in the presence of 5 mM adenosine, maintained their viability under hypoxia, and regained their normal growth and function of forming myotubes when transferred to normoxic conditions at day 11 without further supply of adenosine, whereas nontreated cells failed to survive. An increase in adenosine concentrations shortened the onset of reproliferation after transfer to normoxic conditions. This increase correlated with an increase in metabolic downregulation during the early phase of hypoxia. A higher intracellular ATP level was observed in adenosine-treated cells throughout the duration of hypoxia. This strategy of increasing cell survival under hypoxic conditions through downregulating cellular metabolism may be utilized for cell-based tissue regeneration applications as well as protecting tissues against hypoxic injuries. PMID:24524875

  5. A physiologically based kinetic model for elucidating the in vivo distribution of administered mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haolu; Liang, Xiaowen; Xu, Zhi Ping; Crawford, Darrell H G; Liu, Xin; Roberts, Michael S

    2016-02-29

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) present a promising tool in cell therapy for the treatment of various diseases, the in vivo distribution of administered MSCs has still been poorly understood, which hampers the precise prediction and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we developed the first model to characterize the physiological kinetics of administered MSCs based on direct visualization of cell spatiotemporal disposition by intravital microscopy and assessment of cell quantity using flow cytometry. This physiologically based kinetic model was validated with multiple external datasets, indicating potential inter-route and inter-species predictive capability. Our results suggest that the targeting efficiency of MSCs is determined by the lung retention and interaction between MSCs and target organs, including cell arrest, depletion and release. By adapting specific parameters, this model can be easily applied to abnormal conditions or other types of circulating cells for designing treatment protocols and guiding future experiments.

  6. Kinetic analysis of dihydroxyacetone production from crude glycerol by immobilized cells of Gluconobacter oxydans MTCC 904.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Pritam Kumar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2016-09-01

    The present study has investigated kinetic features of bioconversion of biodiesel-derived crude glycerol to dihydroxyacetone with immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans cells using modified Haldane substrate-inhibition model. The results have been compared against free cells and pure glycerol. Relative variations in the kinetic parameters KS, KI, Vmax, n and X reveal that immobilized G. oxydans cells (on PU foam substrate) with crude glycerol as substrate give higher order of inhibition (n) and lower maximum reaction velocities (Vmax). These results are essentially implications of substrate transport restrictions across immobilization matrix, which causes retention of substrate in the matrix and reduction in fractional available substrate (X) for the cells. This causes reduction in both KS (substrate concentration at Vmax/2) and KI (inhibition constant) as compared to free cells. For immobilized cells, substrate concentration (Smax) corresponding to Vmax is practically same for both pure and crude glycerol as substrate.

  7. High Density Lipoproteins Selectively Promote the Survival of Human Regulatory T-cells.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Cesar M; Rodriguez-Perea, Ana Lucia; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria; Jackson, Courtney M; Melchior, John T; Davidson, W Sean; Chougnet, Claire A

    2017-04-04

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to affect regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis, as suggested by the increased Treg counts in HDL-treated mice and by the positive correlation between Treg frequency and HDL-C levels in statin-treated healthy adults. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Herein, we show that HDL, not LDL, significantly decreased the apoptosis of human Treg in vitro, whereas they did not alter naive or memory CD4+ T-cell survival. Similarly, oleic acid bound to serum albumin increased Treg survival. Treg bound and internalized high amounts of HDL compared to other subsets, which might arise from the higher expression of the scavenger receptor class B-type I by Treg; accordingly, blocking this receptor hindered HDL-mediated Treg survival. Mechanistically, we showed that HDL increased Treg ATP concentration and mitochondrial activity, enhancing basal respiration, maximal respiration and spare respiratory capacity. Blockade of fatty acid oxidation by etoxomir abolished the HDL-mediated enhanced survival and mitochondrial activity. Our findings thus suggest that Treg can specifically internalize HDL from their microenvironment and use them as an energy source. Furthermore, a novel implication of our data is that enhanced Treg survival may contribute to HDL anti-inflammatory properties.

  8. Kinetics of ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse enzymatic hydrolysate concentrated with molasses under cell recycle.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Rafael Ramos; Maugeri Filho, Francisco; Maciel Filho, Rubens; da Costa, Aline Carvalho

    2013-02-01

    In this work, a kinetic model for ethanol fermentation from sugarcane bagasse enzymatic hydrolysate concentrated with molasses was developed. A model previously developed for fermentation of pure molasses was modified by the inclusion of a new term for acetic acid inhibition on microorganism growth rate and the kinetic parameters were estimated as functions of temperature. The influence of the hydrolysate on the kinetic parameters is analyzed by comparing with the parameters from fermentation of pure molasses. The impact of cells recycling in the kinetic parameters is also evaluated, as well as on the ethanol yield and productivity. The model developed described accurately most of the fermentations performed in several successive batches for temperatures from 30 to 38°C.

  9. Kinetic assay shows that increasing red cell volume could be a treatment for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Henry, Eric R; Hofrichter, James; Smith, Jeffrey F; Cellmer, Troy; Dunkelberger, Emily B; Metaferia, Belhu B; Jones-Straehle, Stacy; Boutom, Sarah; Christoph, Garrott W; Wakefield, Terri H; Link, Mary E; Staton, Dwayne; Vass, Erica R; Miller, Jeffery L; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F; Eaton, William A

    2017-01-31

    Although it has been known for more than 60 years that the cause of sickle cell disease is polymerization of a hemoglobin mutant, hydroxyurea is the only drug approved for treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. This drug, however, is only partially successful, and the discovery of additional drugs that inhibit fiber formation has been hampered by the lack of a sensitive and quantitative cellular assay. Here, we describe such a method in a 96-well plate format that is based on laser-induced polymerization in sickle trait cells and robust, automated image analysis to detect the precise time at which fibers distort ("sickle") the cells. With this kinetic method, we show that small increases in cell volume to reduce the hemoglobin concentration can result in therapeutic increases in the delay time prior to fiber formation. We also show that, of the two drugs (AES103 and GBT440) in clinical trials that inhibit polymerization by increasing oxygen affinity, one of them (GBT440) also inhibits sickling in the absence of oxygen by two additional mechanisms.

  10. Kinetic assay shows that increasing red cell volume could be a treatment for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Henry, Eric R.; Hofrichter, James; Smith, Jeffrey F.; Cellmer, Troy; Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Metaferia, Belhu B.; Jones-Straehle, Stacy; Boutom, Sarah; Christoph, Garrott W.; Wakefield, Terri H.; Link, Mary E.; Staton, Dwayne; Vass, Erica R.; Miller, Jeffery L.; Hsieh, Matthew M.; Tisdale, John F.; Eaton, William A.

    2017-01-01

    Although it has been known for more than 60 years that the cause of sickle cell disease is polymerization of a hemoglobin mutant, hydroxyurea is the only drug approved for treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. This drug, however, is only partially successful, and the discovery of additional drugs that inhibit fiber formation has been hampered by the lack of a sensitive and quantitative cellular assay. Here, we describe such a method in a 96-well plate format that is based on laser-induced polymerization in sickle trait cells and robust, automated image analysis to detect the precise time at which fibers distort (“sickle”) the cells. With this kinetic method, we show that small increases in cell volume to reduce the hemoglobin concentration can result in therapeutic increases in the delay time prior to fiber formation. We also show that, of the two drugs (AES103 and GBT440) in clinical trials that inhibit polymerization by increasing oxygen affinity, one of them (GBT440) also inhibits sickling in the absence of oxygen by two additional mechanisms. PMID:28096387

  11. PIAS1-FAK Interaction Promotes the Survival and Progression of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Constanzo, Jerfiz D; Tang, Ke-Jing; Rindhe, Smita; Melegari, Margherita; Liu, Hui; Tang, Ximing; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio; Scaglioni, Pier Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The sequence of genomic alterations acquired by cancer cells during tumor progression and metastasis is poorly understood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that integrates cytoskeleton remodeling, mitogenic signaling and cell survival. FAK has previously been reported to undergo nuclear localization during cell migration, cell differentiation and apoptosis. However, the mechanism behind FAK nuclear accumulation and its contribution to tumor progression has remained elusive. We report that amplification of FAK and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 gene loci frequently co-occur in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, and that both gene products are enriched in a subset of primary NSCLCs. We demonstrate that endogenous FAK and PIAS1 proteins interact in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus of NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of PIAS1 promotes proteolytic cleavage of the FAK C-terminus, focal adhesion maturation and FAK nuclear localization. Silencing of PIAS1 deregulates focal adhesion turnover, increases susceptibility to apoptosis in vitro and impairs tumor xenograft formation in vivo. Nuclear FAK in turn stimulates gene transcription favoring DNA repair, cell metabolism and cytoskeleton regulation. Consistently, ablation of FAK by CRISPR/Cas9 editing, results in basal DNA damage, susceptibility to ionizing radiation and impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Our findings provide insight into a mechanism regulating FAK cytoplasm-nuclear distribution and demonstrate that FAK activity in the nucleus promotes NSCLC survival and progression by increasing cell-ECM interaction and DNA repair regulation.

  12. Mga is essential for the survival of pluripotent cells during peri-implantation development.

    PubMed

    Washkowitz, Andrew J; Schall, Caroline; Zhang, Kun; Wurst, Wolfgang; Floss, Thomas; Mager, Jesse; Papaioannou, Virginia E

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance and control of pluripotency is of great interest in stem cell biology. The dual specificity T-box/basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper transcription factor Mga is expressed in the pluripotent cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) and epiblast of the peri-implantation mouse embryo, but its function has not been investigated previously. Here, we use a loss-of-function allele and RNA knockdown to demonstrate that Mga depletion leads to the death of proliferating pluripotent ICM cells in vivo and in vitro, and the death of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. Additionally, quiescent pluripotent cells lacking Mga are lost during embryonic diapause. Expression of Odc1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of ornithine into putrescine in the synthesis of polyamines, is reduced in Mga mutant cells, and the survival of mutant ICM cells as well as ESCs is rescued in culture by the addition of exogenous putrescine. These results suggest a mechanism whereby Mga influences pluripotent cell survival through regulation of the polyamine pool in pluripotent cells of the embryo, whether they are in a proliferative or quiescent state.

  13. CD14+ cells from peripheral blood positively regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival resulting in increased erythroid yield.

    PubMed

    Heideveld, Esther; Masiello, Francesca; Marra, Manuela; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Yağcı, Nurcan; von Lindern, Marieke; Migliaccio, Anna Rita F; van den Akker, Emile

    2015-11-01

    Expansion of erythroblasts from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells is 4- to 15-fold more efficient than that of CD34(+) cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, purified CD34(+) and CD34(-) populations from blood do not reconstitute this erythroid yield, suggesting a role for feeder cells present in blood mononuclear cells that increase hematopoietic output. Immunodepleting peripheral blood mononuclear cells for CD14(+) cells reduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion. Conversely, the yield was increased upon co-culture of CD34(+) cells with CD14(+) cells (full contact or transwell assays) or CD34(+) cells re-constituted in conditioned medium from CD14(+) cells. In particular, CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes/macrophages enhanced erythroblast outgrowth from CD34(+) cells. No effect of CD14(+) cells on erythroblasts themselves was observed. However, 2 days of co-culturing CD34(+) and CD14(+) cells increased CD34(+) cell numbers and colony-forming units 5-fold. Proliferation assays suggested that CD14(+) cells sustain CD34(+) cell survival but not proliferation. These data identify previously unrecognized erythroid and non-erythroid CD34(-) and CD34(+) populations in blood that contribute to the erythroid yield. A flow cytometry panel containing CD34/CD36 can be used to follow specific stages during CD34(+) differentiation to erythroblasts. We have shown modulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival by CD14(+) cells present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells which can also be found near specific hematopoietic niches in the bone marrow.

  14. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  15. Human ribosomal protein L9 is a Bax suppressor that promotes cell survival in yeast.

    PubMed

    Eid, Rawan; Sheibani, Sara; Gharib, Nada; Lapointe, Jason F; Horowitz, Avital; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    The identification of a human ribosomal protein L9 (hRPL9) cDNA as a sequence capable of suppressing the lethal effects of heterologously expressed murine Bax in yeast led us to investigate its antiapoptotic potential. Using growth and viability assays, we show that yeast cells heterologously expressing hRPL9 are resistant to the growth inhibitory and lethal effects of exogenously supplied copper, indicating that it has pro-survival properties. To explore potential mechanisms, we used yeast mutants defective in all three types of programmed cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy). The ability to retain pro-survival function in all the mutants suggests that hRPL9 may regulate a common pro-death process. In contrast, the yeast RPL9 orthologues, RPL9A and RPL9B, have opposite effects when overexpressed in yeast. In effect, instead of showing resistance to stress, RPL9A and RPL9B overexpressing cells show reduced cell growth. Further analysis indicates that the effects of overexpressed RPL9A and RPL9B are not in themselves lethal, instead, they serve to increase cell doubling time. Thus, yeast RPL9s are more representative of RPs whose extra-ribosomal function is similar to that of tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RPL9 represents a species- and sequence-specific regulator of cell growth and survival.

  16. Spen is required for pigment cell survival during pupal development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Querenet, Matthieu; Goubard, Valerie; Chatelain, Gilles; Davoust, Nathalie; Mollereau, Bertrand

    2015-06-15

    Apoptosis is required during development to eliminate superfluous cells and sculpt tissues; spatial and timed control of apoptosis ensures that the necessary number of cells is eliminated at a precise time in a given tissue. The elimination of supernumerary pigment or inter-ommatidial cells (IOCs) depends on cell-cell communication and is necessary for the formation of the honeycomb-like structure of the Drosophila eye. However, the mechanisms occurring during pupal development and controlling apoptosis of superfluous IOC in space and time remain unclear. Here, we found that split-ends (spen) is required for IOC survival at the time of removal of superfluous IOCs. Loss of spen function leads to abnormal removal of IOCs by apoptosis. We show that spen is required non-autonomously in cone cells for the survival of IOCs by positively regulating the Spitz/EGFR pathway. We propose that Spen is an important survival factor that ensures spatial control of the apoptotic wave that is necessary for the correct patterning and formation of the Drosophila eye.

  17. "Inflamm-aging" influences immune cell survival factors in human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Pangrazzi, Luca; Meryk, Andreas; Naismith, Erin; Koziel, Rafal; Lair, Julian; Krismer, Martin; Trieb, Klemens; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2017-03-01

    The bone marrow (BM) plays a key role in the long-term maintenance of immunological memory. However, the impact of aging on the production of survival factors for effector/memory T cells and plasma cells in the human BM has not been studied. We now show that the expression of molecules involved in the maintenance of immunological memory in the human BM changes with age. While IL-15, which protects potentially harmful CD8(+) CD28(-) senescent T cells, increases, IL-7 decreases. IL-6, which may synergize with IL-15, is also overexpressed. In contrast, a proliferation-inducing ligand, a plasma cell survival factor, is reduced. IFN-y, TNF, and ROS accumulate in the BM in old age. IL-15 and IL-6 expression are stimulated by IFN-y and correlate with ROS levels in BM mononuclear cells. Both cytokines are reduced by incubation with the ROS scavengers N-acetylcysteine and vitamin C. IL-15 and IL-6 are also overexpressed in the BM of superoxide dismutase 1 knockout mice compared to their WT counterparts. In summary, our results demonstrate the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in age-related changes of immune cell survival factors in the BM, suggesting that antioxidants may be beneficial in counteracting immunosenescence by improving immunological memory in old age.

  18. Transcorneal electrical stimulation alters morphology and survival of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Henrich-Noack, Petra; Voigt, Nadine; Prilloff, Sylvia; Fedorov, Anton; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2013-05-24

    Traumatic optic nerve injury leads to retrograde death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), but transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) can increase the cell survival rate. To understand the mechanisms and to further define the TES-induced effects we monitored in living animals RGC morphology and survival after optic nerve crush (ONC) in real time by using in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) of the retina. ONC was performed in rats and ICON was performed before crush and on post-lesion days 3, 7 and 15 which allowed us to repeatedly record RGC number and size. TES or sham-stimulation were performed immediately after the crush and on post-injury day 11. Three days after ONC we detected a higher percentage of surviving RGCs in the TES group as compared to sham-treated controls. However, the difference was below significance level on day 7 and disappeared completely by day 15. The death rate was more variable amongst the TES-treated rats than in the control group. Morphological analysis revealed that average cell size changed significantly in the control group but not in stimulated animals and the morphological alterations of surviving neurons were smaller in TES-treated compared to control cells. In conclusion, TES delays post-traumatic cell death significantly. Moreover, we found "responder animals" which also benefited in the long-term from the treatment. Our in vivo cellular imaging results provide evidence that TES reduces ONC-associated neuronal swelling and shrinkage especially in RGCs which survived long-term. Further studies are now needed to determine the differences of responders vs. non-responders.

  19. Convective cell generation by kinetic Alfven wave turbulence in the auroral ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Yu, M. Y.; Lu, J. Y.

    2012-06-15

    Modulation of convective cells by kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence is investigated. The interaction is governed by a nonlinear dispersion relation for the convective cells. It is shown that KAW turbulence is disrupted by excitation of the large-scale convective motion through a resonant instability. Application of the results to the auroral ionosphere shows that cross-scale coupling of the KAW turbulence and convective cells plays an important role in the evolution of ionospheric plasma turbulence.

  20. Long-term results of the GIMEMA VEL-03-096 trial in MM patients receiving VTD consolidation after ASCT: MRD kinetics' impact on survival.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, S; Ladetto, M; Drandi, D; Cavallo, F; Genuardi, E; Urbano, M; Caltagirone, S; Grasso, M; Rossini, F; Guglielmelli, T; Cangialosi, C; Liberati, A M; Callea, V; Carovita, T; Crippa, C; De Rosa, L; Pisani, F; Falcone, A P; Pregno, P; Oliva, S; Terragna, C; Musto, P; Passera, R; Boccadoro, M; Palumbo, A

    2015-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis is a useful prognostic tool in multiple myeloma (MM), although its long-term impact still needs to be addressed. This report presents the updated results of the GIMEMA-VEL-03-096 trial. Thirty-nine MM patients receiving bortezomib-thalidomide-dexamethasone after autologous transplantation were monitored for MRD by both nested and real-time quantitative-PCR until relapse. Our data confirm the strong impact of MRD on survival: overall survival was 72% at 8 years median follow-up for patients in major MRD response versus 48% for those experiencing MRD persistence (P=0.041). In addition, MRD kinetics resulted predictive for relapse: indeed median remission duration was not reached for patients in major MRD response, 38 months for those experiencing MRD reappearance and 9 months for patients with MRD persistence (P<0.001). Moreover: (1) 26 patients achieving major MRD response (67%) benefit of excellent disease control (median TNT: 42 months); (2) MRD reappearance heralds relapse, with a TNT comparable to that of MRD persistence (9 versus 10 months, P=0.706); (3) the median lag between MRD reappearance and need for salvage treatment is 9 months. These results suggest the usefulness of a long-term MRD monitoring in MM patients and the need for maintenance or pre-emptive treatments ensuring durable responses.

  1. Effect of UVC, UVB, UVA and a solar simulator on the survival of mouse melanoma cell lines differing in melanin content

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, H.Z.; Hill, G.J.; Cieszka, K.; Azure, M.

    1994-12-31

    These studies were designed to determine the survival of cells that vary in constitutive pigment levels after exposure to different UV wave lengths. The lamps employed emitted UVC (near monochromatic 254 nm), UVB (Philips TL01-88.7% of UV output is UVB), UVA (Philips HPW125-89% of output is at 365 nm) and Westinghouse FS20 (broad band UVB and UVA). Dish lids were used to cut off UVC in the UVB and FS20 experiments and 0.25 inch plate glass was used to cut off UVB in the UVA experiments. UVC photons interact with putative intracellular photosensitizers which in turn convert O{sub 2} to active oxygen species which damage DNA to produce strand breaks, cross links and base damage. UVB acts by both mechanisms. The two cell lines studied were Cloudman S91/I3 (3.6 pg melanin/cell) and the closely related S91/amel (1.2 pg melanin/cell). Attached cells were covered with Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++} free PBS and irradiated in the cold. Colonies were scored after 2 weeks. The two cell lines exhibit similar survival kinetics after UVC. S91/IE is more sensitive to killing by either UVB (TL01) or UVA. However, S91/amel cells are more sensitive to killing by UVB plus UVA (FS20). It is clear that UV of different qualities can interact to produce effects that would not be predicted based on responses to monochromatic wave lengths.

  2. Electromagnetic waves and living cells: A kinetic thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-11-01

    Cells are complex thermodynamic systems. Their energy transfer, thermo-electro-chemical processes and transports phenomena can occur across the cells membranes, the border of the complex system. Moreover, cells can also actively modify their behaviours in relation to any change of their environment. All the living systems waste heat, which is no more than the result of their internal irreversibility. This heat is dissipated into their environment. But, this wasted heat represents also a sort of information, which outflows from the cell towards its environment, completely accessible to any observer. The analysis of irreversibility related to this wasted heat can represent a new useful approach to the study of the cells behaviour. This approach allows us to consider the living systems as black boxes and analyse only the inflows and outflows and their changes in relation to any environmental change. This analysis allows also the explanation of the effects of electromagnetic fields on the cell behaviour.

  3. A macrophage and theca cell-enriched stromal cell population influences growth and survival of immature murine follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tingen, Candace M; Kiesewetter, Sarah E; Jozefik, Jennifer; Thomas, Cristina; Tagler, David; Shea, Lonnie; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2011-06-01

    Innovations in in vitro ovarian follicle culture have revolutionized the field of fertility preservation, but the successful culturing of isolated primary and small secondary follicles remains difficult. Herein, we describe a revised 3D culture system that uses a feeder layer of ovarian stromal cells to support early follicle development. This culture system allows significantly improved primary and early secondary follicle growth and survival. The stromal cells, consisting mostly of thecal cells and ovarian macrophages, recapitulate the in vivo conditions of these small follicles and increase the production of androgens and cytokines missing from stromal cell-free culture conditions. These results demonstrate that small follicles have a stage-specific reliance on the ovarian environment, and that growth and survival can be improved in vitro through a milieu created by pre-pubertal ovarian stromal cell co-culture.

  4. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  5. Cell-Deposited Matrix Improves Retinal Pigment Epithelium Survival on Aged Submacular Human Bruch's Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Ilene K.; Gullapalli, Vamsi K.; Sun, Qian; Wang, Jianqiu; Nunes, Celia F.; Cheewatrakoolpong, Noounanong; Johnson, Adam C.; Degner, Benjamin C.; Hua, Jianyuan; Liu, Tong; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether resurfacing submacular human Bruch's membrane with a cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) improves retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) survival. Methods. Bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells were seeded onto the inner collagenous layer of submacular Bruch's membrane explants of human donor eyes to allow ECM deposition. Control explants from fellow eyes were cultured in medium only. The deposited ECM was exposed by removing BCE. Fetal RPE cells were then cultured on these explants for 1, 14, or 21 days. The explants were analyzed quantitatively by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Surviving RPE cells from explants cultured for 21 days were harvested to compare bestrophin and RPE65 mRNA expression. Mass spectroscopy was performed on BCE-ECM to examine the protein composition. Results. The BCE-treated explants showed significantly higher RPE nuclear density than did the control explants at all time points. RPE expressed more differentiated features on BCE-treated explants than on untreated explants, but expressed very little mRNA for bestrophin or RPE65. The untreated young (<50 years) and African American submacular Bruch's membrane explants supported significantly higher RPE nuclear densities (NDs) than did the Caucasian explants. These differences were reduced or nonexistent in the BCE-ECM-treated explants. Proteins identified in the BCE-ECM included ECM proteins, ECM-associated proteins, cell membrane proteins, and intracellular proteins. Conclusions. Increased RPE survival can be achieved on aged submacular human Bruch's membrane by resurfacing the latter with a cell-deposited ECM. Caucasian eyes seem to benefit the most, as cell survival is the worst on submacular Bruch's membrane in these eyes. PMID:21398292

  6. Blockade of PAR1 signaling with cell-penetrating pepducins inhibits Akt-survival pathways in breast cancer cells and suppresses tumor survival and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eric; Boire, Adrienne; Agarwal, Anika; Nguyen, Nga; O'Callaghan, Katie; Tu, Powen; Kuliopulos, Athan; Covic, Lidija

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is not expressed in normal breast epithelia, but is up-regulated in invasive breast carcinomas. In the present study, we found that matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) robustly activates the PAR1-Akt survival pathway in breast carcinoma cells. This process is blocked by a cell-penetrating lipopeptide ‘pepducin’, P1pal-7, which is a potent inhibitor of cell viability in breast carcinoma cells expressing PAR1. Both a MMP-1 inhibitor and P1pal-7 significantly promote apoptosis in breast tumor xenografts and inhibit metastasis to the lungs by up to 88%. Dual therapy with P1pal-7 and taxotere inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenografts by 95%. Consistently, biochemical analysis of xenograft tumors treated with P1pal-7 or MMP-1 inhibitor demonstrated attenuated Akt activity. Ectopic expression of constitutively active Akt rescues breast cancer cells from the synergistic cytotoxicity of P1pal-7 and taxotere, suggesting that Akt is a critical component of PAR1-dependent cancer cell viability. Together, these findings indicate that blockade of MMP1-PAR1 signaling may provide a benefit beyond treatment with taxotere alone in advanced, metastatic breast cancer. PMID:19622769

  7. Squamous-cell carcinoma of the tongue: preoperative interstitial radium and external irradiation. Part II. Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vermund, H.; Breenhovd, I.O.; Kaalhus, O.; Poppe, E.

    1984-05-01

    The authors evaluated 300 cases of squamous-cell carcinoma of the anterior two thirds of the tongue treated from 1958 through 1972. Effects of treament on absolute and relative survival were determined by the log rank method. Selection was non-random, based on the extent of the primary tumor, age and general condition. Surgery, irradiation, or a combination of preoperative interstitial high-intensity radium needles and resection gave similar results in patients with tumor smaller than 4 cm. In patients with larger tumor or mobile, unilateral neck metastases, irradiation plus surgery produced better survival than irradiation alone. Different radiation techniques are analyzed.

  8. Correlating the kinetics of cytokine-induced E-selectin adhesion and expression on endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, J D; Ting-Beall, H P; Hochmuth, R M

    2001-01-01

    Many human diseases are mediated through the immune system. In chronic inflammatory disorders, the processes ordinarily involved in tissue healing become destructive. Endothelial cells normally recruit leukocytes to inflamed tissue using cytokine-induced adhesion receptors on the surfaces of interacting cells. Leukocyte capture depends on specialized characteristics of these receptors, particularly the binding kinetics. This study is designed to clarify the relationship between cytokine-induced changes in cell properties and binding kinetics. Here, we measure the kinetics of expression and monoclonal antibody binding for E-selectin in interleukin-1alpha-stimulated microvascular endothelium in vitro and incorporate the data into kinetic models. Quantitative flow cytometry is used to determine molecular density (expression), and micropipette assays are used to find the probability of adhesion (function). Within five hours of interleukin-1alpha stimulation, E-selectin density increases from 0 to 742 sites/microm(2), and antibody-E-selectin adhesion probability increases from a baseline of 6.3% to 64%. A kinetic model is applied to find an apparent association rate constant, k(f), of 3.7 x 10(-14) cm(2)/sec for antibody-E-selectin binding. Although the model successfully predicts experimental results, the rate constant is undervalued for a diffusion-limited process, suggesting that functional adhesion may be modified through cytokine-induced changes in microtopology and receptor localization. PMID:11159434

  9. Survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells correlates with efficient DNA repair in an essential gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bohr, V.A.; Okumoto, D.S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1986-06-01

    The survival of UV-irradiated mammalian cells is not necessarily correlated with their overall capacity to carry out DNA repair. Human cells typically remove 80% of the pyrimidine dimers produced by a UV dose of 5 J/m2 within 24 hr. In contrast, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line survives UV irradiation equally well while removing only 15% of the dimers. Using a newly developed technique to measure dimer frequencies in single-copy specific sequences, we find that the CHO cells remove 70% of the dimers from the essential dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene but only 20% from sequences located 30 kilobases or more upstream from the 5' end of the gene in a 24-hr period. Repair-deficient human cells from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) are similar to the CHO cells in overall repair levels, but they are extremely sensitive to killing by UV irradiation. In the XPC cells, we find little or no repair in the DHFR gene; in contrast, in normal human fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes, greater than 80% of the dimers induced in the gene by 20 J/m2 are removed in 24 hr. Since the CHO and normal human cells exhibit similar UV resistance, much higher than that of XPC cells, our findings suggest a correlation between efficient repair of essential genes and resistance to DNA-damaging agents such as UV light.

  10. Tyrosine kinase c-Abl regulates the survival of plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Feng; Xu, Shengli; Huang, Yuhan; Ou, Xijun; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase c-Abl plays an important role in early B cell development. Its deletion leads to reduced pro- and pre-B cell generation in mice. However, its function in B cell terminal differentiation remains unexplored. Here, we used c-Ablf/f Aicdacre/+ mice, in which c-Abl is ablated only in antigen-activated B cells, to study the role of c-Abl in germinal center (GC) B and antibody-secreting plasma cell formation. Upon challenge with a model antigen, we found normal GC and memory B but reduced plasma cells and antigen-specific antibody response in the mutant mice. In-vitro studies revealed that plasma cells lacking c-Abl could be generated but did not accumulate in culture, indicative of survival defect. They also exhibited impaired STAT3 phosphorylation. The plasma cell defects could be rectified by introduction of Bim-deficiency or delivery of colivelin, a STAT3 activator, into c-Ablf/f Aicdacre/+ mice. Hence, c-Abl signalling regulates the survival of plasma cells. PMID:28057924

  11. QHREDGS Enhances Tube Formation, Metabolism and Survival of Endothelial Cells in Collagen-Chitosan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W.; Dallabrida, Susan M.; Reis, Lewis A.; Ismail, Nesreen; Rupnick, Maria; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels) in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:24013716

  12. Tyrosine kinase c-Abl regulates the survival of plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Feng; Xu, Shengli; Huang, Yuhan; Ou, Xijun; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2017-01-06

    Tyrosine kinase c-Abl plays an important role in early B cell development. Its deletion leads to reduced pro- and pre-B cell generation in mice. However, its function in B cell terminal differentiation remains unexplored. Here, we used c-Abl(f/f) Aicda(cre/+) mice, in which c-Abl is ablated only in antigen-activated B cells, to study the role of c-Abl in germinal center (GC) B and antibody-secreting plasma cell formation. Upon challenge with a model antigen, we found normal GC and memory B but reduced plasma cells and antigen-specific antibody response in the mutant mice. In-vitro studies revealed that plasma cells lacking c-Abl could be generated but did not accumulate in culture, indicative of survival defect. They also exhibited impaired STAT3 phosphorylation. The plasma cell defects could be rectified by introduction of Bim-deficiency or delivery of colivelin, a STAT3 activator, into c-Abl(f/f) Aicda(cre/+) mice. Hence, c-Abl signalling regulates the survival of plasma cells.

  13. β-Adrenergic Regulation of Cardiac Progenitor Cell Death Versus Survival and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohsin; Mohsin, Sadia; Avitabile, Daniele; Siddiqi, Sailay; Nguyen, Jonathan; Wallach, Kathleen; Quijada, Pearl; McGregor, Michael; Gude, Natalie; Alvarez, Roberto; Tilley, Douglas G.; Koch, Walter J.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Short-term β-adrenergic stimulation promotes contractility in response to stress but is ultimately detrimental in the failing heart because of accrual of cardiomyocyte death. Endogenous cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) activation may partially offset cardiomyocyte losses, but consequences of long-term β-adrenergic drive on CPC survival and proliferation are unknown. Objective We sought to determine the relationship between β-adrenergic activity and regulation of CPC function. Methods and Results Mouse and human CPCs express only β2 adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) in conjunction with stem cell marker c-kit. Activation of β2-AR signaling promotes proliferation associated with increased AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation, upregulation of cyclin D1, and decreased levels of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2. Conversely, silencing of β2-AR expression or treatment with β2-antagonist ICI 118, 551 impairs CPC proliferation and survival. β1-AR expression in CPC is induced by differentiation stimuli, sensitizing CPC to isoproterenol-induced cell death that is abrogated by metoprolol. Efficacy of β1-AR blockade by metoprolol to increase CPC survival and proliferation was confirmed in vivo by adoptive transfer of CPC into failing mouse myocardium. Conclusions β-adrenergic stimulation promotes expansion and survival of CPCs through β2-AR, but acquisition of β1-AR on commitment to the myocyte lineage results in loss of CPCs and early myocyte precursors. PMID:23243208

  14. HIF1-Alpha Expression Predicts Survival of Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Mercante, Ana Maria da Cunha; Louro, Iúri Drumond; Gonçalves, Antônio José; de Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; da Silva, Eloiza Helena Tajara; da Silva, Adriana Madeira Álvares

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma is an important cause of death and morbidity wordwide and effective prognostic markers are still to be discovered. HIF1α protein is associated with hypoxia response and neovascularization, essential conditions for solid tumors survival. The relationship between HIF1α expression, tumor progression and treatment response in head and neck cancer is still poorly understood. Patients and Methods In this study, we investigated HIF1α expression by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays and its relationship with clinical findings, histopathological results and survival of 66 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower mouth. Results Our results demonstrated that high HIF1α expression is associated with local disease-free survival, independently from the choice of treatment. Furthermore, high expression of HIF1α in patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy was associated with survival, therefore being a novel prognostic marker in squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth. Additionally, our results showed that MVD was associated with HIF1α expression and local disease relapse. Conclusion These findings suggest that HIF1α expression can be used as a prognostic marker and predictor of postoperative radiotherapy response, helping the oncologist choose the best treatment for each patient. PMID:23028863

  15. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of the Electrochemical Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donald E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes basic characteristics of the electrochemical cell. Also describes basic principles of electrochemical procedures and use of these concepts to explain use of the term "primarily" in discussions of methods primarily responsive to equilibrium cell potential, bulk ohmic resistance, and the Faradaic impedance. (JN)

  16. Distinct signaling programs control human hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Colin A.; Aghaeepour, Nima; Miller, Paul H.; Pellacani, Davide; Beer, Philip A.; Sachs, Karen; Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, WeiJia; Humphries, R. Keith; Sauvageau, Guy; Zandstra, Peter W.; Bendall, Sean C.; Nolan, Garry P.; Hansen, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Several growth factors (GFs) that together promote quiescent human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion ex vivo have been identified; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these GFs regulate the survival, proliferation. and differentiation of human HSCs remain poorly understood. We now describe experiments in which we used mass cytometry to simultaneously measure multiple surface markers, transcription factors, active signaling intermediates, viability, and cell-cycle indicators in single CD34+ cord blood cells before and up to 2 hours after their stimulation with stem cell factor, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (5 GFs) either alone or combined. Cells with a CD34+CD38−CD45RA−CD90+CD49f+ (CD49f+) phenotype (∼10% HSCs with >6-month repopulating activity in immunodeficient mice) displayed rapid increases in activated STAT1/3/5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, AKT, CREB, and S6 by 1 or more of these GFs, and β-catenin only when the 5 GFs were combined. Certain minority subsets within the CD49f+ compartment were poorly GF-responsive and, among the more GF-responsive subsets of CD49f+ cells, different signaling intermediates correlated with the levels of the myeloid- and lymphoid-associated transcription factors measured. Phenotypically similar, but CD90−CD49f− cells (MPPs) contained lower baseline levels of multiple signaling intermediates than the CD90+CD49f+ cells, but showed similar response amplitudes to the same GFs. Importantly, we found activation or inhibition of AKT and β-catenin directly altered immediate CD49f+ cell survival and proliferation. These findings identify rapid signaling events that 5 GFs elicit directly in the most primitive human hematopoietic cell types to promote their survival and proliferation. PMID:27827829

  17. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kover, Karen; Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu; Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa; Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V.

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  18. Distinct signaling programs control human hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Knapp, David J H F; Hammond, Colin A; Aghaeepour, Nima; Miller, Paul H; Pellacani, Davide; Beer, Philip A; Sachs, Karen; Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, WeiJia; Humphries, R Keith; Sauvageau, Guy; Zandstra, Peter W; Bendall, Sean C; Nolan, Garry P; Hansen, Carl; Eaves, Connie J

    2017-01-19

    Several growth factors (GFs) that together promote quiescent human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion ex vivo have been identified; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these GFs regulate the survival, proliferation. and differentiation of human HSCs remain poorly understood. We now describe experiments in which we used mass cytometry to simultaneously measure multiple surface markers, transcription factors, active signaling intermediates, viability, and cell-cycle indicators in single CD34(+) cord blood cells before and up to 2 hours after their stimulation with stem cell factor, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (5 GFs) either alone or combined. Cells with a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD45RA(-)CD90(+)CD49f(+) (CD49f(+)) phenotype (∼10% HSCs with >6-month repopulating activity in immunodeficient mice) displayed rapid increases in activated STAT1/3/5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, AKT, CREB, and S6 by 1 or more of these GFs, and β-catenin only when the 5 GFs were combined. Certain minority subsets within the CD49f(+) compartment were poorly GF-responsive and, among the more GF-responsive subsets of CD49f(+) cells, different signaling intermediates correlated with the levels of the myeloid- and lymphoid-associated transcription factors measured. Phenotypically similar, but CD90(-)CD49f(-) cells (MPPs) contained lower baseline levels of multiple signaling intermediates than the CD90(+)CD49f(+) cells, but showed similar response amplitudes to the same GFs. Importantly, we found activation or inhibition of AKT and β-catenin directly altered immediate CD49f(+) cell survival and proliferation. These findings identify rapid signaling events that 5 GFs elicit directly in the most primitive human hematopoietic cell types to promote their survival and proliferation.

  19. Donor Chimerism Early after Reduced-intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Predicts Relapse and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L.; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill-defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donor T-cell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM). 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid; 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18-74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched) and median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6-120.7) were evaluated. In multivariable analysis total donor cell and T-cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism <90% was associated with increased relapse (HR 2.54, 95% CI 1.83-3.51, p<0.0001), impaired PFS (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.53-2.65, p<0.0001) and worse OS (1.50, 95% CI 1.11-2.04, p=0.009), but not NRM (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.44-2.27, p=0.33). There was no additional utility of incorporating sustained D30-D100 total donor cell chimerism, or T-cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts that may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions. PMID:24907627

  20. Clonogenic Multiple Myeloma Cells have Shared stemness Signature Associated with Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Reghunathan, Renji; Bi, Chonglei; Liu, Shaw Cheng; Loong, Koh Tze; Chung, Tae-Hoon; Huang, Gaofeng; Chng, Wee Joo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the abnormal clonal expansion of post germinal B cells in the bone marrow. It was previously reported that clonogenic myeloma cells are CD138−. Human MM cell lines RPMI8226 and NCI H929 contained 2-5% of CD138− population. In this study, we showed that CD138− cells have increased ALDH1 activity, a hallmark of normal and neoplastic stem cells. CD138−ALDH+ cells were more clonogenic than CD138+ALDH− cells and only CD138− cells differentiated into CD138+ population. In vivo tumor initiation and clonogenic potentials of the CD138− population was confirmed using NOG mice. We derived a gene expression signature from functionally validated and enriched CD138− clonogenic population from MM cell lines and validated these in patient samples. This data showed that CD138− cells had an enriched expression of genes that are expressed in normal and malignant stem cells. Differentially expressed genes included components of the polycomb repressor complex (PRC) and their targets. Inhibition of PRC by DZNep showed differential effect on CD138− and CD138+ populations. The ‘stemness’ signature derived from clonogenic CD138− cells overlap significantly with signatures of common progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and Leukemic stem cells and is associated with poorer survival in different clinical datasets. PMID:23985559

  1. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression.

  2. A Kinetic Model for Cell Damage Caused by Oligomer Formation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liu; Huang, Ya-Jing; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-10-06

    It is well known that the formation of amyloid fiber may cause invertible damage to cells, although the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. In this article, a microscopic model considering the detailed processes of amyloid formation and cell damage is constructed based on four simple assumptions, one of which is that cell damage is raised by oligomers rather than mature fibrils. By taking the maximum entropy principle, this microscopic model in the form of infinite mass-action equations together with two reaction-convection partial differential equations (PDEs) has been greatly coarse-grained into a macroscopic system consisting of only five ordinary differential equations (ODEs). With this simple model, the effects of primary nucleation, elongation, fragmentation, and protein and seeds concentration on amyloid formation and cell damage have been extensively explored and compared with experiments. We hope that our results will provide new insights into the quantitative linkage between amyloid formation and cell damage.

  3. Pluripotent stem cells with normal or reduced self renewal survive lethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, G.; Neben, S.; Yee, M.; Bullis, J.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-08-01

    Transfusion with 10,000 or 20,000 marrow cells resulted in 30+ days survival of 15%-50% of mice exposed to an Ld90 or LD100 or radiation. The use of congenic mice with alloenzyme markers permitted the identification of host and donor cells in the peripheral blood of transfused animals. Donor cells were present initially in all hosts. Between 55% and 92% of the animals became 100% host type by 12-24 weeks after transfusion in three separate experiments. To explore whether the temporary repopulation by donor cells was due to short-lived stem cells, the marrows of several primary hosts were transfused into secondary, lethally irradiated hosts. Some of the retransplanted primary donor and host cells persisted only temporarily. It is suggested that some of the donor stem cells in both the primary and secondary hosts had an intrinsically shortened life span.

  4. The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) promotes survival and migration of acute myeloid leukemia cells through CD63/PI3K/Akt/p21 signaling.

    PubMed

    Forte, Dorian; Salvestrini, Valentina; Corradi, Giulia; Rossi, Lara; Catani, Lucia; Lemoli, Roberto M; Cavo, Michele; Curti, Antonio

    2017-01-10

    We and others have shown that the Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), a member of the inflammatory network exerting pleiotropic effects in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, regulates the survival and proliferation of different cell types, including normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Moreover, TIMP-1 has been shown to be involved in cancer progression. However, its role in leukemic microenvironment has not been addressed. Here, we investigated the activity of TIMP-1 on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) cell functions. First, we found that TIMP-1 levels were increased in the BM plasma of AML patients at diagnosis. In vitro, recombinant human (rh)TIMP-1 promoted the survival and cell cycle S-phase entry of AML cells. These kinetic effects were related to the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. rhTIMP-1 increases CXCL12-driven migration of leukemic cells through PI3K signaling. Interestingly, activation of CD63 receptor was required for TIMP-1's cytokine/chemokine activity. Of note, rhTIMP-1 stimulation modulated mRNA expression of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)-1α, downstream of PI3K/Akt activation. We then co-cultured AML cells with normal or leukemic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to investigate the interaction of TIMP-1 with cellular component(s) of BM microenvironment. Our results showed that the proliferation and migration of leukemic cells were greatly enhanced by rhTIMP-1 in presence of AML-MSCs as compared to normal MSCs. Thus, we demonstrated that TIMP-1 modulates leukemic blasts survival, migration and function via CD63/PI3K/Akt/p21 signaling. As a "bad actor" in a "bad soil", we propose TIMP-1 as a potential novel therapeutic target in leukemic BM microenvironment.

  5. Survival and photoreactivability of ultraviolet-irradiated cultured fish cells (CAF-MM1)

    SciTech Connect

    Mano, Y.; Mitani, H.; Etoh, H.; Egami, N.

    1980-12-01

    The sensitivity to ultraviolet light (uv) and photoreactivating ability of cultured fish clone cells (CAF-MM1) were investigated. Dose-survival relationship curves were obtained using the colony-forming technique at various postirradiation temperatures (33, 26, and 20/sup 0/C). At 26/sup 0/C the values of D/sub 0/, D/sub q/, and the extrapolation number (n) were 1.74 J/m/sup 2/, 2.62 J/m/sup 2/, and 4.5, respectively; no marked differences in these values were found among different temperatures. Visible light illumination after uv irradiation produced a marked increase in survival. No photoreactivation effects were observed beyond about 30 h. Caffeine increased uv sensitivity of the CAF-MM1 cells, and from the results it is suggested that the cells have some caffeine-sensitive dark repair mechanisms.

  6. The Par3 polarity protein is an exocyst receptor essential for mammary cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Mukhtar; Macara, Ian G.

    2017-01-01

    The exocyst is an essential component of the secretory pathway required for delivery of basolateral proteins to the plasma membranes of epithelial cells. Delivery occurs adjacent to tight junctions (TJ), suggesting that it recognizes a receptor at this location. However, no such receptor has been identified. The Par3 polarity protein associates with TJs but has no known function in membrane traffic. We now show that, unexpectedly, Par3 is essential for mammary cell survival. Par3 silencing causes apoptosis, triggered by phosphoinositide trisphosphate depletion and decreased Akt phosphorylation, resulting from failure of the exocyst to deliver basolateral proteins to the cortex. A small region of PAR3 binds directly to Exo70 and is sufficient for exocyst docking, membrane-protein delivery and cell survival. PAR3 lacking this domain can associate with the cortex but cannot support exocyst function. We conclude that Par3 is the long-sought exocyst receptor required for targeted membrane-protein delivery. PMID:28358000

  7. Chitosan hydrogel improves mesenchymal stem cell transplant survival and cardiac function following myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Li, Yang; Deng, Bo; Liu, Xiaojing; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Qing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) remains the leading cause of cardiovascular-associated mortality and morbidity. Improving the retention rate, survival and cardiomyocyte differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is important in improving the treatment of patients with MI. In the present study, temperature-responsive chitosan hydrogel, an injectable scaffold, was used to deliver MSCs directly into the infarcted myocardium of rats following MI. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining were used to evaluate cardiac cell survival and regeneration, and cardiac function was assessed using an echocardiograph. It was demonstrated that chitosan hydrogel increased graft size and cell retention in the ischemic heart, promoted MSCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes and increased the effects of MSCs on neovasculature formation. Furthermore, chitosan hydrogel enhanced the effect of MSCs on the improvement of cardiac function and hemodynamics in the infarcted area of rats following MI. These findings suggest that chitosan hydrogel is an appropriate material to deliver MSCs into infarcted myocardium. PMID:28352335

  8. Autologous Dendritic Cells Prolong Allograft Survival Through Tmem176b-Dependent Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Charnet, P.; Savina, A.; Tilly, G.; Gautreau, L.; Carretero-Iglesia, L.; Beriou, G.; Cebrian, I.; Cens, T.; Hepburn, L.; Chiffoleau, E.; Floto, R. A.; Anegon, I.; Amigorena, S.; Hill, M.; Cuturi, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The administration of autologous (recipient-derived) tolerogenic dendritic cells (ATDCs) is under clinical evaluation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these cells prolong graft survival in a donor-specific manner is unknown. Here, we tested mouse ATDCs for their therapeutic potential in a skin transplantation model. ATDC injection in combination with anti-CD3 treatment induced the accumulation of CD8+CD11c+ T cells and significantly prolonged allograft survival. TMEM176B is an intracellular protein expressed in ATDCs and initially identified in allograft tolerance. We show that Tmem176b−/− ATDCs completely failed to trigger both phenomena but recovered their effect when loaded with donor peptides before injection. These results strongly suggested that ATDCs require TMEM176B to cross-present antigens in a tolerogenic fashion. In agreement with this, Tmem176b−/− ATDCs specifically failed to cross-present male antigens or ovalbumin to CD8+ T cells. Finally, we observed that a Tmem176b-dependent cation current controls phagosomal pH, a critical parameter in cross-presentation. Thus, ATDCs require TMEM176B to cross-present donor antigens to induce donor-specific CD8+CD11c+ T cells with regulatory properties and prolong graft survival. PMID:24731243

  9. Dual transcriptional activities underlie opposing effects of retinoic acid on cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Berry, Daniel C.; Shaw, Natacha S.; Travis, Skylar N.; Noy, Noa

    2007-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional activation of the nuclear receptor RAR by retinoic acid (RA) often leads to inhibition of cell growth. However, in some tissues, RA promotes cell survival and hyperplasia, activities that are unlikely to be mediated by RAR. Here we show that, in addition to functioning through RAR, RA activates the ‘orphan’ nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ, which, in turn, induces the expression of pro-survival genes. Partitioning of RA between the two receptors is regulated by the intracellular lipid-binding proteins CRABP-II and FABP5. These proteins specifically deliver RA from the cytosol to nuclear RAR and PPARβ/δ, respectively, thereby selectively enhancing the transcriptional activity of their cognate receptors. Consequently, RA functions through RAR and is a pro-apoptotic agent in cells with high CRABP-II/FABP5 ratio, but it signals through PPARβ/δ and promotes survival in cells that highly express FABP5. Opposing effects of RA on cell growth thus emanate from alternate activation of two different nuclear receptors. PMID:17512406

  10. Localized hypoxia within the subgranular zone determines the early survival of newborn hippocampal granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Schnell, Eric; Westbrook, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    The majority of adult hippocampal newborn cells die during early differentiation from intermediate progenitors (IPCs) to immature neurons. Neural stem cells in vivo are located in a relative hypoxic environment, and hypoxia enhances their survival, proliferation and stemness in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that migration of IPCs away from hypoxic zones within the SGZ might result in oxidative damage, thus triggering cell death. Hypoxic niches were observed along the SGZ, composed of adult NSCs and early IPCs, and oxidative byproducts were present in adjacent late IPCs and neuroblasts. Stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1α with dimethyloxallyl glycine increased early survival, but not proliferation or differentiation, in neurospheres in vitro and in newly born SGZ cells in vivo. Rescue experiments in Baxfl/flmutants supported these results. We propose that localized hypoxia within the SGZ contributes to the neurogenic microenvironment and determines the early, activity-independent survival of adult hippocampal newborn cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08722.001 PMID:26476335

  11. Racial Patterns of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Incidence and Survival in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Scott V.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare incidence and survival of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes among US racial/ethnic groups. Methods Patients with PTCL (age ≥ 15 years; 2000 to 2012) were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries. Race/ethnicity was categorized as non-Hispanic white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic white, or American Indian/Alaskan native. Age-standardized annual incidence rates and incidence rate ratios were estimated with 95% CIs, and case-case odds ratios were estimated by race/ethnicity using polytomous regression. Survival was estimated from SEER follow-up data with Cox regression. Results Thirteen thousand one hundred seven patients with PTCL were identified. Annual PTCL incidence was highest in blacks and lowest in Native Americans. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, blacks had a higher incidence of PTCL not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and a lower incidence of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL); Asians/Pacific Islanders had a higher incidence of AITL, extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma and NK-cell leukemia (ENKCL), and ATLL and a lower incidence of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; Hispanics had a higher incidence of AITL and ENKCL; and Native Americans had a lower incidence of PTCL-NOS (all P < .05). The ratio of ENKCL to PCTL-NOS among Native Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic whites was approximately three- to four-fold the same ratio among non-Hispanic whites. Survival varied significantly by race/ethnicity (P < .001), with blacks in particular experiencing shorter survival for most subtypes. Conclusion Striking variation in incidence, proportions of PTCL subtypes, and survival was observed. Aspects of these PTCL subtype patterns, such as for ENKCL and ATLL, were similar to corresponding global populations. Despite the small population size and limited number of Native American

  12. Cadmium and cellular signaling cascades: interactions between cell death and survival pathways.

    PubMed

    Thévenod, Frank; Lee, Wing-Kee

    2013-10-01

    Cellular stress elicited by the toxic metal Cd(2+) does not coerce the cell into committing to die from the onset. Rather, detoxification and adaptive processes are triggered concurrently, allowing survival until normal function is restored. With high Cd(2+), death pathways predominate. However, if sublethal stress levels affect cells for prolonged periods, as in chronic low Cd(2+) exposure, adaptive and survival mechanisms may deregulate, such that tumorigenesis ensues. Hence, death and malignancy are the two ends of a continuum of cellular responses to Cd(2+), determined by magnitude and duration of Cd(2+) stress. Signaling cascades are the key factors affecting cellular reactions to Cd(2+). This review critically surveys recent literature to outline major features of death and survival signaling pathways as well as their activation, interactions and cross talk in cells exposed to Cd(2+). Under physiological conditions, receptor activation generates 2nd messengers, which are short-lived and act specifically on effectors through their spatial and temporal dynamics to transiently alter effector activity. Cd(2+) recruits physiological 2nd messenger systems, in particular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which control key Ca(2+)- and redox-sensitive molecular switches dictating cell function and fate. Severe ROS/Ca(2+) signals activate cell death effectors (ceramides, ASK1-JNK/p38, calpains, caspases) and/or cause irreversible damage to vital organelles, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas low localized ROS/Ca(2+) levels act as 2nd messengers promoting cellular adaptation and survival through signal transduction (ERK1/2, PI3K/Akt-PKB) and transcriptional regulators (Ref1-Nrf2, NF-κB, Wnt, AP-1, bestrophin-3). Other cellular proteins and processes targeted by ROS/Ca(2+) (metallothioneins, Bcl-2 proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system, ER stress-associated unfolded protein response, autophagy, cell cycle) can evoke death or survival

  13. Electrode kinetics of a water vapor electrolysis cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, G.

    1974-01-01

    The anodic electrochemical behavior of the water vapor electrolysis cell was investigated. A theoretical review of various aspects of cell overvoltage is presented with special emphasis on concentration overvoltage and activation overvoltage. Other sources of overvoltage are described. The experimental apparatus controlled and measured anode potential and cell current. Potentials between 1.10 and 2.60 V (vs NHE) and currents between 0.1 and 3000 mA were investigated. Different behavior was observed between the standard cell and the free electrolyte cell. The free electrolyte cell followed typical Tafel behavior (i.e. activation overvoltage) with Tafel slopes of about 0.15, and the exchange current densities of 10 to the minus 9th power A/sq cm, both in good agreement with literature values. The standard cell exhibitied this same Tafel behavior at lower current densities but deviated toward lower than expected current densities at higher potentials. This behavior and other results were examined to determine their origin.

  14. Clearance kinetics of biomaterials affects stem cell retention and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia Y; Wu, Pei J; Roffler, Steve R; Lee, Sho T; Hwang, Shiaw M; Wang, Shoei S; Wang, Kuan; Hsieh, Patrick C H

    2014-02-10

    The use of biomaterial carriers to improve the therapeutic efficacy of stem cells is known to augment cell delivery, retention, and viability. However, the way that carrier clearance kinetics boosts stem cell delivery and impacts stem cell function remains poorly characterized. In this study, we designed a platform to simultaneously quantify carrier clearance and stem cell retention to evaluate the impact of carrier clearance kinetics on stem cell retention. Additionally, a murine model of hindlimb ischemia was employed to investigate the effects of various cell retention profiles on mitigating peripheral arterial disease. To image the in vivo behaviors of material and cells, we used biotinylated hyaluronan with fluorescently labeled streptavidin and Discosoma sp. Red (Ds-Red)-expressing human mesenchymal stem cells. We found that the retention of transplanted stem cells was closely related to the remaining biomaterial. Furthermore, therapeutic effectiveness was also affected by stem cell retention. These results demonstrate that low-molecular-weight hyaluronan had a slow clearance and high cell retention profile, improving the therapeutic efficacy of human stem cells.

  15. Soluble factors secreted by glioblastoma cell lines facilitate recruitment, survival, and expansion of regulatory T cells: implications for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Courtney A.; Ahn, Brian J.; Han, Seunggu J.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with glioma, the tumor microenvironment can significantly impact pro-inflammatory immune cell functions. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly defined. Because immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg) are over represented in the tumor microenvironment compared with peripheral blood, we hypothesized that the tumor may have an effect on Treg survival, migration, expansion, and/or induction of a regulatory phenotype from non-Treg conventional CD4+ T cells. We defined the impact of soluble factors produced by tumor cells on Treg from healthy patients in vitro to determine mechanisms by which gliomas influence T cell populations. We found that tumor-derived soluble factors allowed for preferential proliferation and increased chemotaxis of Treg, compared with conventional T cells, indicating that these mechanisms may contribute to the increased Treg in the tumor microenvironment. Conventional T cells also exhibited a significantly increased expression of pro-apoptotic transcripts in the presence of tumor-derived factors, indicating that survival of Treg in the tumor site is driven by exposure to soluble factors produced by the tumor. Together, these data suggest that tumor burden may induce increased Treg infiltration, proliferation, and survival, negating productive anti-tumor immune responses in patients treated with immunotherapies. Collectively, our data indicate that several mechanisms of Treg recruitment and retention in the tumor microenvironment exist and may need to be addressed to improve the specificity of immunotherapies seeking to eliminate Treg in patients with glioma. PMID:22406925

  16. Invariant NKT cells require autophagy to coordinate proliferation and survival signals during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pei, Bo; Zhao, Meng; Miller, Brian C; Véla, Jose Luis; Bruinsma, Monique W; Virgin, Herbert W; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-06-15

    Autophagy regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival in multiple cell types, including cells of the immune system. In this study, we examined the effects of a disruption of autophagy on the differentiation of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Using mice with a T lymphocyte-specific deletion of Atg5 or Atg7, two members of the macroautophagic pathway, we observed a profound decrease in the iNKT cell population. The deficit is cell-autonomous, and it acts predominantly to reduce the number of mature cells, as well as the function of peripheral iNKT cells. In the absence of autophagy, there is reduced progression of iNKT cells in the thymus through the cell cycle, as well as increased apoptosis of these cells. Importantly, the reduction in Th1-biased iNKT cells is most pronounced, leading to a selective reduction in iNKT cell-derived IFN-γ. Our findings highlight the unique metabolic and genetic requirements for the differentiation of iNKT cells.

  17. Plasma Membrane Integrity and Survival of Melanoma Cells After Nanosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Evans, Rodger; Guillén, Gabriel; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) photoacoustic detection systems can aid clinical decision-making in the treatment of cancer. Interaction of melanin within melanoma cells with nanosecond laser pulses generates photoacoustic waves that make its detection possible. This study aims at: (1) determining melanoma cell survival after laser pulses of 6 ns at λ = 355 and 532 nm; (2) comparing the potential enhancement in the photoacoustic signal using λ = 355 nm in contrast with λ = 532 nm; (3) determining the critical laser fluence at which melanin begins to leak out from melanoma cells; and (4) developing a time-resolved imaging (TRI) system to study the intracellular interactions and their effect on the plasma membrane integrity. Monolayers of melanoma cells were grown on tissue culture-treated clusters and irradiated with up to 1.0 J/cm2. Surviving cells were stained with trypan blue and counted using a hemacytometer. The phosphate buffered saline absorbance was measured with a nanodrop spectrophotometer to detect melanin leakage from the melanoma cells post-laser irradiation. Photoacoustic signal magnitude was studied at both wavelengths using piezoelectric sensors. TRI with 6 ns resolution was used to image plasma membrane damage. Cell survival decreased proportionally with increasing laser fluence for both wavelengths, although the decrease is more pronounced for 355 nm radiation than for 532 nm. It was found that melanin leaks from cells equally for both wavelengths. No significant difference in photoacoustic signal was found between wavelengths. TRI showed clear damage to plasma membrane due to laser-induced bubble formation. PMID:20589533

  18. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  19. Morphine inhibits Purkinje cell survival and dendritic differentiation in organotypic cultures of the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kurt F.; Gurwell, Julie A.; Turbek, Carol S.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of morphine on the morphogenesis and survival of calbindin-D28kimmunoreactive Purkinje cells was studied in organotypic explant cultures isolated from 1- or 7-day-old mouse cerebella. To reduce experimental variability, bilaterally matched pairs of organotypic cultures were used to compare the effects of opiate drug treatment. One explant within each pair was untreated, while the remaining explant was continuously treated for 7 to 10 days with morphine, morphine plus naloxone, or naloxone alone. In explants derived from 1-day-old mice, morphine treatment significantly reduced Purkinje cell dendritic length compared to symmetrically-matched untreated control explants. The concentration of morphine estimated to cause a half-maximal reduction (EC50) in dendritic length was 4.9 × 10−8 M. At higher concentrations (EC50 = 3.6 × 10−6 M), morphine also significantly decreased the number of Purkinje cells in explants from 1-day-old mice compared to untreated explants. Electron microscopy identified increased numbers of degenerating Purkinje cells in explants derived from 1-day-old mice. This showed that high concentrations (10−5 M) of morphine reduced Purkinje cell numbers by decreasing their rate of survival. In explants derived from 7-day-old mice, morphine (10−5 M) neither affected Purkinje cell dendritic length nor cell numbers compared to symmetrically-matched untreated (control) explants. Collectively, these findings suggest that morphine per se, through a direct action on the cerebellum, can affect Purkinje cell differentiation and survival. The results additionally suggest there is a critical period during development when Purkinje cells are especially vulnerable to the effects of morphine. PMID:7821399

  20. A Calpain Inhibitor Enhances the Survival of Schwann Cells In Vitro and after Transplantation into the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Guller, Yelena; Raffa, Scott J.; Hurtado, Andres; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite the diversity of cells available for transplantation into sites of spinal cord injury (SCI), and the known ability of transplanted cells to integrate into host tissue, functional improvement associated with cellular transplantation has been limited. One factor potentially limiting the efficacy of transplanted cells is poor cell survival. Recently we demonstrated rapid and early death of Schwann cells (SCs) within the first 24 h after transplantation, by both necrosis and apoptosis, which results in fewer than 20% of the cells surviving beyond 1 week. To enhance SC transplant survival, in vitro and in vivo models to rapidly screen compounds for their ability to promote SC survival are needed. The current study utilized in vitro models of apoptosis and necrosis, and based on withdrawal of serum and mitogens and the application of hydrogen peroxide, we screened several inhibitors of apoptosis and necrosis. Of the compounds tested, the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 enhanced SC survival both in vitro in response to oxidative stress induced by application of H2O2, and in vivo following delayed transplantation into the moderately contused spinal cord. The results support the use of calpain inhibitors as a promising new treatment for promoting the survival of transplanted cells. They also suggest that in vitro assays for cell survival may be useful for establishing new compounds that can then be tested in vivo for their ability to promote transplanted SC survival. PMID:20568964

  1. Staying in Shape: the Impact of Cell Shape on Bacterial Survival in Diverse Environments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Desirée C.; Blair, Kris M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria display an abundance of cellular forms and can change shape during their life cycle. Many plausible models regarding the functional significance of cell morphology have emerged. A greater understanding of the genetic programs underpinning morphological variation in diverse bacterial groups, combined with assays of bacteria under conditions that mimic their varied natural environments, from flowing freshwater streams to diverse human body sites, provides new opportunities to probe the functional significance of cell shape. Here we explore shape diversity among bacteria, at the levels of cell geometry, size, and surface appendages (both placement and number), as it relates to survival in diverse environments. Cell shape in most bacteria is determined by the cell wall. A major challenge in this field has been deconvoluting the effects of differences in the chemical properties of the cell wall and the resulting cell shape perturbations on observed fitness changes. Still, such studies have begun to reveal the selective pressures that drive the diverse forms (or cell wall compositions) observed in mammalian pathogens and bacteria more generally, including efficient adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces, survival under low-nutrient or stressful conditions, evasion of mammalian complement deposition, efficient dispersal through mucous barriers and tissues, and efficient nutrient acquisition. PMID:26864431

  2. Mitotic MELK-eIF4B signaling controls protein synthesis and tumor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yubao; Begley, Michael; Li, Qing; Huang, Hai-Tsang; Lako, Ana; Eck, Michael J.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Zhao, Jean J.

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase maternal and embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is critical for mitotic progression of cancer cells; however, its mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. By combined approaches of immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and peptide library profiling, we identified the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B) as a MELK-interacting protein during mitosis and a bona fide substrate of MELK. MELK phosphorylates eIF4B at Ser406, a modification found to be most robust in the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. We further show that the MELK–eIF4B signaling axis regulates protein synthesis during mitosis. Specifically, synthesis of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL1), an antiapoptotic protein known to play a role in cancer cell survival during cell division, depends on the function of MELK-elF4B. Inactivation of MELK or eIF4B results in reduced protein synthesis of MCL1, which, in turn, induces apoptotic cell death of cancer cells. Our study thus defines a MELK–eIF4B signaling axis that regulates protein synthesis during mitosis, and consequently influences cancer cell survival. PMID:27528663

  3. Programmed death-1 controls T cell survival by regulating oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tkachev, Victor; Goodell, Stefanie; Opipari, Anthony W; Hao, Ling-Yang; Franchi, Luigi; Glick, Gary D; Ferrara, James L M; Byersdorfer, Craig A

    2015-06-15

    The coinhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) maintains immune homeostasis by negatively regulating T cell function and survival. Blockade of PD-1 increases the severity of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but the interplay between PD-1 inhibition and T cell metabolism is not well studied. We found that both murine and human alloreactive T cells concomitantly upregulated PD-1 expression and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. This PD-1(Hi)ROS(Hi) phenotype was specific to alloreactive T cells and was not observed in syngeneic T cells during homeostatic proliferation. Blockade of PD-1 signaling decreased both mitochondrial H2O2 and total cellular ROS levels, and PD-1-driven increases in ROS were dependent upon the oxidation of fatty acids, because treatment with etomoxir nullified changes in ROS levels following PD-1 blockade. Downstream of PD-1, elevated ROS levels impaired T cell survival in a process reversed by antioxidants. Furthermore, PD-1-driven changes in ROS were fundamental to establishing a cell's susceptibility to subsequent metabolic inhibition, because blockade of PD-1 decreased the efficacy of later F1F0-ATP synthase modulation. These data indicate that PD-1 facilitates apoptosis in alloreactive T cells by increasing ROS in a process dependent upon the oxidation of fat. In addition, blockade of PD-1 undermines the potential for subsequent metabolic inhibition, an important consideration given the increasing use of anti-PD-1 therapies in the clinic.

  4. Nrf1 is critical for redox balance and survival of liver cells during development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linyun; Kwong, Mandy; Lu, Ronghua; Ginzinger, David; Lee, Candy; Leung, Laura; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2003-07-01

    The Nrf1 transcription factor belongs to the CNC subfamily of basic leucine zipper proteins. Knockout of Nrf1 is lethal in mouse embryos, but nothing is known about the cell types that absolutely require its function during development. We show by chimera analysis that Nrf1 is essential for the hepatocyte lineage. Mouse embryonic stem cells lacking Nrf1 developed normally and contributed to most tissues in adult chimeras where Nrf1 is normally expressed. Nrf1-deficient cells contributed to fetal, but not adult, liver cells. Loss of Nrf1 function resulted in liver cell apoptosis in late-gestation chimeric fetuses. Fetal livers from mutant embryos exhibited increased oxidative stress and impaired expression of antioxidant genes, and primary cultures of nrf1(-/-) fetal hepatocytes were sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced cell death, suggesting that impaired antioxidant defense may be responsible for the apoptosis observed in the livers of chimeric mice. In addition, cells deficient in Nrf1 were sensitized to the cytotoxic effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Our results provide in vivo evidence demonstrating an essential role of Nrf1 in the survival of hepatocytes during development. Our results also suggest that Nrf1 may promote cell survival by maintaining redox balance and protecting embryonic hepatocytes from TNF-mediated apoptosis during development.

  5. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhongli; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen; Xiao, Zefen; Tan, Wen; and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  6. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Predicts Survival in Elderly Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kunlun; Liu, Yang; You, Jie; Cui, Han; Zhu, Yiwei; Yuan, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The impact of nutritional status on survival among elderly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients undergoing radiotherapy is unclear. In this study, we aimed at validating the performance of the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in predicting overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 239 ESCC patients aged 60 and over admitted consecutively from January 2008 to November 2014 in the Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Tumor Hospital (Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Zhengzhou University), Zhengzhou, Henan, China. All patients were subjected to nutritional screening using GNRI, and were followed for the occurrence of lymphatic node metastasis, radiation complication and mortality. The Kaplan–Meier method with Log-rank test was used to estimate survival curves. Univariable Cox regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with overall survival time. Among the 239 patients, 184 patients (76.9%) took no nutritional risk, 32 patients (13.4%) took moderate risk of malnutrition, and 23 patients (9.7%) took a high risk of malnutrition. Univariable Cox regression showed that both high nutritional risk group and moderate nutritional risk group were significantly less likely to survive than no nutritional risk patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.688, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.019–2.798 for moderate risk group, and HR = 2.699, 95% CI = 1.512–4.819 for high risk group, respectively). The GNRI is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A GNRI ≤98 can be suggested as an indicator of surviving less. PMID:27196126

  7. Improvement in survival end points of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma through sequential targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Emiliano; Schmidinger, Manuela; Heng, Daniel Y C; Grünwald, Viktor; Escudier, Bernard

    2016-11-01

    Survival of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has improved since the advent of targeted therapy. Approved agents include the multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sunitinib, sorafenib, axitinib, pazopanib, cabozantinib, and lenvatinib (approved in combination with everolimus), the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors everolimus and temsirolimus, and the programmed death-1 (PD-1) targeted immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab. The identification of predictive and prognostic factors of survival is increasing, and both clinical predictive factors and pathology-related prognostic factors are being evaluated. Serum-based biomarkers and certain histologic subtypes of RCC, as well as clinical factors such as dose intensity and the development of some class effect adverse events, have been identified as predictors of survival. Expression levels of microRNAs, expression of chemokine receptor 4, hypermethylation of certain genes, VEGF polymorphisms, and elevation of plasma fibrinogen or d-dimer have been shown to be prognostic indicators of survival. In the future, prognosis and treatment of patients with mRCC might be based on genomic classification, especially of the 4 most commonly mutated genes in RCC (VHL, PBRM1, BAP1, and SETD2). Median overall survival has improved for patients treated with a first-line targeted agent compared with survival of patients treated with first-line interferon-α, and results of clinical trials have shown a survival benefit of sequential treatment with targeted agents. Prognosis of patients with mRCC will likely improve with optimization and individualization of current sequential treatment with targeted agents.

  8. Redundant Function of Plasmacytoid and Conventional Dendritic Cells Is Required To Survive a Natural Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaminsky, Lauren W.; Sei, Janet J.; Parekh, Nikhil J.; Davies, Michael L.; Reider, Irene E.; Krouse, Tracy E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses that spread systemically from a peripheral site of infection cause morbidity and mortality in the human population. Innate myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mo-DC), and dendritic cells (DC), respond early during viral infection to control viral replication, reducing virus spread from the peripheral site. Ectromelia virus (ECTV), an orthopoxvirus that naturally infects the mouse, spreads systemically from the peripheral site of infection and results in death of susceptible mice. While phagocytic cells have a requisite role in the response to ECTV, the requirement for individual myeloid cell populations during acute immune responses to peripheral viral infection is unclear. In this study, a variety of myeloid-specific depletion methods were used to dissect the roles of individual myeloid cell subsets in the survival of ECTV infection. We showed that DC are the primary producers of type I interferons (T1-IFN), requisite cytokines for survival, following ECTV infection. DC, but not macrophages, monocytes, or granulocytes, were required for control of the virus and survival of mice following ECTV infection. Depletion of either plasmacytoid DC (pDC) alone or the lymphoid-resident DC subset (CD8α+ DC) alone did not confer lethal susceptibility to ECTV. However, the function of at least one of the pDC or CD8α+ DC subsets is required for survival of ECTV infection, as mice depleted of both populations were susceptible to ECTV challenge. The presence of at least one of these DC subsets is sufficient for cytokine production that reduces ECTV replication and virus spread, facilitating survival following infection. IMPORTANCE Prior to the eradication of variola virus, the orthopoxvirus that causes smallpox, one-third of infected people succumbed to the disease. Following successful eradication of smallpox, vaccination rates with the smallpox vaccine have significantly dropped. There is now an increasing

  9. DIRC3 and near NABP1 genetic polymorphisms are associated laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yanxia; Chen, Zhengshuai; Li, Jingjie; Li, Bin; Jin, Tianbo; Cao, Peilong; Shao, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is one of the most common and aggressive malignancies of the upper digestive tract. The present study is a retrospective analysis of data from a prospective longitudinal study. A total of 170 male LSCC patients (average age, 60.75±10.082) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University School of Medicine were recruited between January 2002 and April 2013 for this study. We assessed correlations between patient characteristics and survival, and sequenced genomic DNA from patient peripheral blood samples. We found that the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs11903757, with closest proximity to NABP1 and SDPR, and rs966423 in DIRC3, were associated with survival in LSCC patients. Median follow-up was 38 months (range 3–122) and median survival time was 48 months. LSCC patients with total laryngectomy, poor differentiation, T3-T4 stage, N1-N2 stage or III-IV TNM stage had reduced survival. This is the first study to demonstrate that the rs11903757 GT (HR=2.036; 95% CI, 1.071–3.872; p=0.030) and rs966423 TT (HR=11.677; 95% CI, 3.901–34.950; p=0.000) genotypes predict poor patient outcome. These polymorphisms may serve as useful clinical markers to predict patient survival, and to guide individual patient therapeutic decisions. PMID:27793000

  10. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  11. Co-encapsulation of bioengineered IGF-II-producing cells and pancreatic islets: effect on beta-cell survival.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, G; Dusseault, J; Benhamou, P Y; Rosenberg, L; Hallé, J P

    2011-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) has been shown to promote pancreatic β-cell survival. We evaluated the effect of co-encapsulating islets and bioengineered IGF-II-producing cells on islet cell survival. IGF-II or green fast protein (GFP) genes were transferred into TM4 cells, and purified using a neomycin resistance gene, leading to pure cell cultures (TM4-IGF-II or TM4-GFP) with a stable overexpression of the transferred gene. Islets were co-encapsulated with TM4-IGF-II or TM4-GFP, or encapsulated alone in alginate microcapsules. Rat and mouse islet cell survival was studied in vitro and in vivo, respectively. After 12 days in culture, islet viability (dual staining, acridine orange/propidium iodide) was 83% with TM4-IGF-II, compared with 51% (P<0.05) and 41% (P<0.001) with TM4-GFP and islets alone, respectively. The study of islet necrotic centers and the evaluation of islet function, using the MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) assay, yielded similar results. From 125 days after transplantation, more diabetic mice maintained normoglycemia when they were transplanted with islets co-encapsulated with TM4-IGF-II (4/7). A significant difference for the maintenance of normoglycemia was observed between recipients of islets co-encapsulated with TM4-IGF-II versus islets alone (P=0.023), or with TM4-GFP (P=0.048). In conclusion, the co-encapsulation of islets with bioengineered IGF-II-producing cells promotes islet cell survival.

  12. Differing Requirements for MALT1 Function in Peripheral B Cell Survival and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peishan; Zhu, Zilu; Hachmann, Janna; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Salvesen, Guy; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, formation of the germinal center (GC) is essential for the generation of high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. The canonical NF-κB pathway has been implicated in the initiation of GC reaction, and defects in this pathway have been linked to immune deficiencies. The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in regulating NF-κB activation upon triggering of Ag receptors. Although previous studies have reported that MALT1 deficiency abrogates the GC response, the relative contribution of B cells and T cells to the defective phenotype remains unclear. We used chimeric mouse models to demonstrate that MALT1 function is required in B cells for GC formation. This role is restricted to BCR signaling where MALT1 is critical for B cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, the proapoptotic signal transmitted in the absence of MALT1 is dominant to the prosurvival effects of T cell-derived stimuli. In addition to GC B cell differentiation, MALT1 is required for plasma cell differentiation, but not mitogenic responses. Lastly, we show that ectopic expression of Bcl-2 can partially rescue the GC phenotype in MALT1-deficient animals by prolonging the lifespan of BCR-activated B cells, but plasma cell differentiation and Ab production remain defective. Thus, our data uncover previously unappreciated aspects of MALT1 function in B cells and highlight its importance in humoral immunity.

  13. Extracellular matrix of secondary lymphoid organs impacts on B-cell fate and survival

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nathalie; Ruegg, Markus A.; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Winkler, Thomas H.; Kearney, John F.; Cardell, Susanna; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We describe a unique extracellular matrix (ECM) niche in the spleen, the marginal zone (MZ), characterized by the basement membrane glycoproteins, laminin α5 and agrin, that promotes formation of a specialized population of MZ B lymphocytes that respond rapidly to blood-borne antigens. Mice with reduced laminin α5 expression show reduced MZ B cells and increased numbers of newly formed (NF) transitional B cells that migrate from the bone marrow, without changes in other immune or stromal cell compartments. Transient integrin α6β1-mediated interaction of NF B cells with laminin α5 in the MZ supports the MZ B-cell population, their long-term survival, and antibody response. Data suggest that the unique 3D structure and biochemical composition of the ECM of lymphoid organs impacts on immune cell fate. PMID:23847204

  14. Ohmic resistance affects microbial community and electrochemical kinetics in a multi-anode microbial electrochemical cell

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-anode microbial electrochemical cells (MXCs) are considered as one of the most promising configurations for scale-up of MXCs, but fundamental understanding of anode kinetics governing current density is limited in the MXCs. In this study we first assessed microbial communi...

  15. Reconstruction of damaged corneal epithelium using Venus-labeled limbal epithelial stem cells and tracking of surviving donor cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ji-Qing; Liu, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Hua, Jin-Lian; Liu, Wei-Shuai; Dou, Zhong-Ying; Lei, An-Min

    2013-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells are responsible for the self-renewal and replenishment of the corneal epithelium. Although it is possible to repair the ocular surface using limbal stem cell transplantation, the mechanisms behind this therapy are unclear. To investigate the distribution of surviving donor cells in a reconstructed corneal epithelium, we screened a Venus-labeled limbal stem cell strain in goats. Cells were cultivated on denuded human amniotic membrane for 21 days to produce Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets. The Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets were transplanted to goat models of limbal stem cell deficiency. At 3 months post-surgery, the damaged corneal epithelia were obviously improved in the transplanted group compared with the non-transplanted control, with the donor cells still residing in the reconstructed ocular surface epithelium. Using Venus as a marker, our results indicated that the location and survival of donor cells varied, depending on the corneal epithelial region. Additionally, immunofluorescent staining of the reconstructed corneal epithelium demonstrated that many P63(+) cells were unevenly distributed among basal and suprabasal epithelial layers. Our study provides a new model, and reveals some of the mechanisms involved in corneal epithelial cell regeneration research.

  16. Protein kinase C beta II suppresses colorectal cancer by regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Catríona M.; Phelan, James; Callender, Julia A.; Cathcart, Mary Clare; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul; Dalton, Tara; Coffey, John C.; Newton, Alexandra C.; O'sullivan, Jacintha; Kiely, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive efforts, cancer therapies directed at the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases have failed in clinical trials. These therapies have been directed at inhibiting PKC and have, in some cases, worsened disease outcome. Here we examine colon cancer patients and show not only that PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor, but patients with low levels of this isozyme have significantly decreased disease free survival. Specifically, analysis of gene expression levels of all PKC genes in matched normal and cancer tissue samples from colon cancer patients revealed a striking down-regulation of the gene coding PKC Beta in the cancer tissue (n = 21). Tissue microarray analysis revealed a dramatic down-regulation of PKC Beta II protein levels in both the epithelial and stromal diseased tissue (n = 166). Of clinical significance, low levels of the protein in the normal tissue of patients is associated with a low (10%) 10 year survival compared with a much higher (60%) survival in patients with relatively high levels of the protein. Consistent with PKC Beta II levels protecting against colon cancer, overexpression of PKC Beta II in colon cancer cell lines reveals that PKC Beta II reverses transformation in cell based assays. Further to this, activation of PKC Beta II results in a dramatic downregulation of IGF-I-induced AKT, indicating a role for PKCs in regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival. Thus, PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor in colon cancer and low levels serve as a predictor for poor survival outcome. PMID:26989024

  17. Nuclear but Not Cytosolic Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Beta Has an Essential Function in Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Redondo-Muñoz, Javier; Perez-García, Vicente; Cortes, Isabel; Chagoyen, Monica; Carrera, Ana C.

    2011-01-01

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are heterodimeric enzymes composed of a p85 regulatory and a p110 catalytic subunit that induce the formation of 3-polyphosphoinositides, which mediate cell survival, division, and migration. There are two ubiquitous PI3K isoforms p110α and p110β that have nonredundant functions in embryonic development and cell division. However, whereas p110α concentrates in the cytoplasm, p110β localizes to the nucleus and modulates nuclear processes such as DNA replication and repair. At present, the structural features that determine p110β nuclear localization remain unknown. We describe here that association with the p85β regulatory subunit controls p110β nuclear localization. We identified a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in p110β C2 domain that mediates its nuclear entry, as well as a nuclear export sequence (NES) in p85β. Deletion of p110β induced apoptosis, and complementation with the cytoplasmic C2-NLS p110β mutant was unable to restore cell survival. These studies show that p110β NLS and p85β NES regulate p85β/p110β nuclear localization, supporting the idea that nuclear, but not cytoplasmic, p110β controls cell survival. PMID:21383062

  18. Kremen1 and Dickkopf1 control cell survival in a Wnt-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Causeret, F; Sumia, I; Pierani, A

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, a tight control of cell death is required to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis. Improper function of apoptotic or survival pathways can not only affect developmental programs but also favor cancer progression. Here we describe a novel apoptotic signaling pathway involving the transmembrane receptor Kremen1 and its ligand, the Wnt-antagonist Dickkopf1. Using a whole embryo culture system, we first show that Dickkopf1 treatment promotes cell survival in a mouse model exhibiting increased apoptosis in the developing neural plate. Remarkably, this effect was not recapitulated by chemical Wnt inhibition. We then show that Dickkopf1 receptor Kremen1 is a bona fide dependence receptor, triggering cell death unless bound to its ligand. We performed Wnt-activity assays to demonstrate that the pro-apoptotic and anti-Wnt functions mediated by Kremen1 are strictly independent. Furthermore, we combined phylogenetic and mutagenesis approaches to identify a specific motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Kremen1, which is (i) specifically conserved in the lineage of placental mammals and (ii) strictly required for apoptosis induction. Finally, we show that somatic mutations of kremen1 found in human cancers can affect its pro-apoptotic activity, supporting a tumor suppressor function. Our findings thus reveal a new Wnt-independent function for Kremen1 and Dickkopf1 in the regulation of cell survival with potential implications in cancer therapies. PMID:26206087

  19. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1: A critical player in the survival strategy of stressed cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyang; Sang, Nianli

    2015-01-01

    HIF-1 activation has been well known as an adaptive strategy to hypoxia. Recently it became clear that hypoxia was often accompanied by insufficient supply of glucose or amino acids as a common result of poor circulation that frequently occurs in solid tumors and ischemic lesions, creating a mixed nutrient insufficiency. In response to nutrient insufficiency, stressed cells elicit survival strategies including activation of AMPK and HIF-1 to cope with the stress. Particularly, in solid tumors, HIF-1 promotes cell survival and migration, stimulates angiogenesis, and induces resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Interestingly, radiation and some chemotherapeutics are reported to trigger the activation of AMPK. Here we discuss the recent advances that may potentially link the stress responsive mechanisms including AMPK activation, ATF4 activation and the enhancement of Hsp70/Hsp90 function to HIF-1 activation. Potential implication and application of the stress-facilitated HIF-1 activation in solid tumors and ischemic disorders will be discussed. A better understanding of HIF-1 activation in cells exposed to stresses is expected to facilitate the design of therapeutic approaches that specifically modulate cell survival strategy. PMID:26206147

  20. Dendritic cell immunotherapy combined with gemcitabine chemotherapy enhances survival in a murine model of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghansah, Tomar; Vohra, Nasreen; Kinney, Kathleen; Weber, Amy; Kodumudi, Krithika; Springett, Gregory; Sarnaik, Amod A; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2013-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extremely aggressive malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice have multiple immunoregulatory subsets including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) that may limit the effectiveness of anti-tumor immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer. It is possible that modulating these subsets will enhance anti-tumor immunity. The goal of this study was to explore depletion of immunoregulatory cells to enhance dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy in a murine model of pancreatic cancer. Flow cytometry results showed an increase in both Tregs and MDSC in untreated pancreatic cancer-bearing mice compared with control. Elimination of Tregs alone or in combination with DC-based vaccination had no effect on pancreatic tumor growth or survival. Gemcitabine (Gem) is a chemotherapeutic drug routinely used for the treatment for pancreatic cancer patients. Treatment with Gem led to a significant decrease in MDSC percentages in the spleens of tumor-bearing mice, but did not enhance overall survival. However, combination therapy with DC vaccination followed by Gem treatment led to a significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival in pancreatic cancer-bearing mice. Increased MDSC were measured in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatment with Gem also led to a decrease of this population in pancreatic cancer patients, suggesting that combination therapy with DC-based cancer vaccination and Gem may lead to improved treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer.

  1. Lesion-induced increase in survival and migration of human neural progenitor cells releasing GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Behrstock, Soshana; Ebert, Allison D.; Klein, Sandra; Schmitt, Melanie; Moore, Jeannette M.; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) has been proposed to provide neuronal replacement or astrocytes delivering growth factors for brain disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Success in such studies likely requires migration from the site of transplantation and integration into host tissue in the face of ongoing damage. In the current study, hNPC modified to release glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (hNPCGDNF) were transplanted into either intact or lesioned animals. GDNF release itself had no effect on the survival, migration or differentiation of the cells. The most robust migration and survival was found using a direct lesion of striatum (Huntington’s model) with indirect lesions of the dopamine system (Parkinson’s model) or intact animals showing successively less migration and survival. No lesion affected differentiation patterns. We conclude that the type of brain injury dictates migration and integration of hNPC which has important consequences when considering transplantation of these cells as a therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19044202

  2. Survival-associated heterogeneity of marker-defined perivascular cells in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mezheyeuski, Artur; Dragomir, Anca; Pfeiffer, Per; Kure, Elin H.; Ikdahl, Tone; Skovlund, Eva; Corvigno, Sara; Strell, Carina; Pietras, Kristian; Ponten, Fredrik; Mulder, Jan; Qvortrup, Camilla; Portyanko, Anna; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Östman, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular cells (PC) were recently implied as regulators of metastasis and immune cell activity. Perivascular heterogeneity in clinical samples, and associations with other tumor features and outcome, remain largely unknown. Here we report a novel method for digital quantitative analyses of vessel characteristics and PC, which was applied to two collections of human metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Initial analyses identified marker-defined subsets of PC, including cells expressing PDGFR-β or α-SMA or both markers. PC subsets were largely independently expressed in a manner unrelated to vessel density and size. Association studies implied specific oncogenic mutations in malignant cells as determinants of PC status. Semi-quantitative and digital-image-analyses-based scoring of the NORDIC-VII cohort identified significant associations between low expression of perivascular PDGFR-α and -β and shorter overall survival. Analyses of the SPCRC cohort confirmed these findings. Perivascular PDGFR-α and -β remained independent factors for survival in multivariate analyses. Overall, our study identified host vasculature and oncogenic status as determinants of tumor perivascular features. Perivascular PDGFR-α and -β were identified as novel independent markers predicting survival in mCRC. The novel methodology should be suitable for similar analyses in other tumor collections. PMID:27248825

  3. Hypoxia inducible factor 1α promotes survival of mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bingke; Li, Feng; Fang, Jie; Xu, Limin; Sun, Chengmei; Han, Jianbang; Hua, Tian; Zhang, Zhongfei; Feng, Zhiming; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal materials for cell therapy. Research has indicated that hypoxia benefits MSC survival, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. This study aims to uncover potential mechanisms involving hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) to explain the promoted MSC survival under hypoxia. MSCs were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured under normoxia or hypoxia condition. The overexpression vector or small interfering RNA of Hif1a gene was transfected to MSCs, after which cell viability, apoptosis and expression of HIF1A were analyzed by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Factors in p53 pathway were detected to reveal the related mechanisms. Results showed that hypoxia elevated MSCs viability and up-regulated HIF1A (P < 0.05) as previously reported. HIF1A overexpression promoted viability (P < 0.01) and suppressed apoptosis (P < 0.001) under normoxia. Correspondingly, HIF1A knockdown inhibited viability (P < 0.05) and promoted apoptosis (P < 0.01) of MSCs under hypoxia. Expression analysis suggested that p53, phosphate-p53 and p21 were repressed by HIF1A overexpression and promoted by HIF1A knockdown, and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression had the opposite pattern (P < 0.05). These results suggest that HIF1A may improve viability and suppress apoptosis of MSCs, implying the protective effect of HIF1A on MSC survival under hypoxia. The underlying mechanisms may involve the HIF1A-suppressed p53 pathway. This study helps to explain the mechanism of MSC survival under hypoxia, and facilitates the application of MSCs in cell therapy. PMID:28386377

  4. Integrin β1 Increases Stem Cell Survival and Cardiac Function after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lili; Guan, Qifan; Dai, Shuling; Wei, Wen; Zhang, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for myocardial infarction (MI), but its application is limited by poor viability of BMSCs. In this study, we aimed to improve the survival of BMSCs by lentivirus vector mediated overexpression of integrin β1. In vitro study showed that integrin β1 overexpression could facilitate the proliferation of BMSCs under oxygen glucose deprivation condition and regulated the expression of Caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, FAK, and ILK in BMSCs. Next, MI was induced in rat model and Igtb1BMSCs, NullBMSCs, or NatBMSCs were transplanted by intramyocardial injection. One week later, the survival of BMSCs was higher in Itgb1 BMSCs group than in other groups. Four weeks after transplantation, heart function was significantly improved in Igtb1BMSCs group compared to other groups. The expression levels of Caspase-3 and Bax were decreased while the expression levels of Bcl-2, FAK, ILK, and VEGF were increased in the cardiomyocytes of Igtb1BMSCs group compared to other groups. In conclusion, integrin β1 overexpression could increase the survival of BMSCs and improve the efficacy of transplanted BMSCs for MI treatment. The beneficial effects may be mediated by inhibiting the apoptosis of both transplanted BMSCs and cardiomyocytes through adhesion-mediated cell survival signaling. PMID:28367125

  5. Survivability of Salmonella cells in popcorn after microwave oven and conventional cooking.

    PubMed

    Anaya, I; Aguirrezabal, A; Ventura, M; Comellas, L; Agut, M

    2008-01-01

    The survivability of Salmonella cells in popcorn preparation was determined for two distinct cooking methods. The first method used a standard microwave oven. The second method used conventional cooking in a pan. Prior to thermal processing in independent experiments, 12 suspensions in a range between 1x10(3) and 8x10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) per gram of Salmonella cells were inoculated in both raw microwave popcorn and conventional corn kernels. The influence of the initial concentration of Salmonella cells in the raw products and the lethal effects on Salmonella by thermal treatments for cooking were studied. Survival of Salmonella cells was determined in the thermally processed material by pre-enrichment and enrichment in selective medium, in accordance with the legislation for expanded cereals and cereals in flakes. Viable experimental contaminants were recovered from the conventionally cooked popcorn with initial inoculation concentrations of 9x10(4)cells/g or greater. Salmonella cell viability was significantly reduced after microwave oven treatment, with recoveries only from initial concentrations of 2x10(6)cells/g or superior.

  6. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor–induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  7. Mild Nutrient Starvation Triggers the Development of a Small-Cell Survival Morphotype in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mu-Lu; Gengenbacher, Martin; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria, generally believed to be non-sporulating, are well known to survive shock starvation in saline for extended periods of time in a non-replicating state without any apparent morphological changes. Here, we uncover that mycobacteria can undergo cellular differentiation by exposing Mycobacterium smegmatis to mild starvation conditions. Traces of various carbon sources in saline triggered the development of a novel small resting cell (SMRC) morphotype. Development of SMRCs could also be observed for other mycobacteria, suggesting evolutionary conservation of this differentiation pathway. Fluorescence microscopic analyses showed that development of SMRCs progresses via septated, multi-nucleoided cell intermediates, which divide to generate mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Intriguingly, saline shock-starved large resting cells (LARCs), which did not show cell size or surface changes when observed by scanning electron microscopy, remodeled their internal structure to septated, multi-nucleoided cells, similar to the intermediates seen during differentiation to SMRCs. Our results suggest that mycobacteria harbor a starvation-induced differentiation program in which at first septated, multi-nucleoided cells are generated. Under zero-nutrient conditions bacteria terminate development at this stage as LARCs. In the presence of traces of a carbon source, these multi-nucleoided cells continue differentiation into mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Both SMRCs and LARCs exhibited extreme antibiotic tolerance. SMRCs showed increased long-term starvation survival, which was associated with the presence of lipid inclusion bodies. PMID:27379076

  8. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Elsing, Alexandra N; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K; Bergman, Heidi A; Himanen, Samu V; Kallio, Marko J; Roos-Mattjus, Pia; Sistonen, Lea

    2014-09-15

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis.

  9. Soymilk residue (okara) as a natural immobilization carrier for Lactobacillus plantarum cells enhances soymilk fermentation, glucosidic isoflavone bioconversion, and cell survival under simulated gastric and intestinal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xiudong, Xia; Ying, Wang; Xiaoli, Liu; Ying, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cell immobilization is an alternative to microencapsulation for the maintenance of cells in a liquid medium. However, artificial immobilization carriers are expensive and pose a high safety risk. Okara, a food-grade byproduct from soymilk production, is rich in prebiotics. Lactobacilli could provide health enhancing effects to the host. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of okara as a natural immobilizer for L. plantarum 70810 cells. The study also aimed to evaluate the effects of okara-immobilized L. plantarum 70810 cells (IL) on soymilk fermentation, glucosidic isoflavone bioconversion, and cell resistance to simulated gastric and intestinal stresses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to show cells adherence to the surface of okara. Lactic acid, acetic acid and isoflavone analyses in unfermented and fermented soymilk were performed by HPLC with UV detection. Viability and growth kinetics of immobilized and free L. plantarum 70810 cells (FL) were followed during soymilk fermentation. Moreover, changes in pH, titrable acidity and viscosity were measured by conventional methods. For in vitro testing of simulated gastrointestinal resistance, fermented soymilk was inoculated with FL or IL and an aliquot incubated into acidic MRS broth which was conveniently prepared to simulate gastric, pancreatic juices and bile salts. Survival to simulated gastric and intestinal stresses was evaluated by plate count of colony forming units on MRS agar. SEM revealed that the lactobacilli cells attached and bound to the surface of okara. Compared with FL, IL exhibited a significantly higher specific growth rate, shorter lag phase of growth, higher productions of lactic and acetic acids, a faster decrease in pH and increase in titrable acidity, and a higher soymilk viscosity. Similarly, IL in soymilk showed higher productions of daizein and genistein compared with the control. Compared with FL, IL showed reinforced resistance to simulatedgastric and intestinal

  10. Soymilk residue (okara) as a natural immobilization carrier for Lactobacillus plantarum cells enhances soymilk fermentation, glucosidic isoflavone bioconversion, and cell survival under simulated gastric and intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiudong, Xia; Ying, Wang; Xiaoli, Liu; Ying, Li; Jianzhong, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Cell immobilization is an alternative to microencapsulation for the maintenance of cells in a liquid medium. However, artificial immobilization carriers are expensive and pose a high safety risk. Okara, a food-grade byproduct from soymilk production, is rich in prebiotics. Lactobacilli could provide health enhancing effects to the host. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of okara as a natural immobilizer for L. plantarum 70810 cells. The study also aimed to evaluate the effects of okara-immobilized L. plantarum 70810 cells (IL) on soymilk fermentation, glucosidic isoflavone bioconversion, and cell resistance to simulated gastric and intestinal stresses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to show cells adherence to the surface of okara. Lactic acid, acetic acid and isoflavone analyses in unfermented and fermented soymilk were performed by HPLC with UV detection. Viability and growth kinetics of immobilized and free L. plantarum 70810 cells (FL) were followed during soymilk fermentation. Moreover, changes in pH, titrable acidity and viscosity were measured by conventional methods. For in vitro testing of simulated gastrointestinal resistance, fermented soymilk was inoculated with FL or IL and an aliquot incubated into acidic MRS broth which was conveniently prepared to simulate gastric, pancreatic juices and bile salts. Survival to simulated gastric and intestinal stresses was evaluated by plate count of colony forming units on MRS agar. SEM revealed that the lactobacilli cells attached and bound to the surface of okara. Compared with FL, IL exhibited a significantly higher specific growth rate, shorter lag phase of growth, higher productions of lactic and acetic acids, a faster decrease in pH and increase in titrable acidity, and a higher soymilk viscosity. Similarly, IL in soymilk showed higher productions of daizein and genistein compared with the control. Compared with FL, IL showed reinforced resistance to simulatedgastric and intestinal

  11. Nuclear size as a cell-kinetic marker for osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. E.; Mozsary, P. G.; Klingler, E.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear morphometric assay for preosteoblasts is introduced as a cell-kinetic technique, applicable to routine histological preparations of mineralized tissue. Because this method is a morphological marker for osteoblast precursor cell differentiation, it provides a new dimension for determining the mechanism of osteoblast histogenesis. Osteoblast precursors of the periodontal ligament are a mixed population of progenitors, kinetically separable into two distinct groups according to nuclear size. Preosteoblasts, the immediate proliferating precursors of osteoblasts, have large nuclei (greater than 170 micrometers3) and are derived from relatively undifferentiated fibroblastlike cells, which have smaller nuclei (less than 80 micrometers3). Increase in nuclear volume, during G1 phase of the cell cycle, is apparently a morphological manifestation of change in genomic expression. This key event in preosteoblast differentiation is related to mechanical stress/strain and may be an important rate-limiting step in osteoblast histogenesis.

  12. p75 neurotrophin receptor and pro-BDNF promote cell survival and migration in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo; Saada, Sofiane; Naves, Thomas; Guillaudeau, Angélique; Perraud, Aurélie; Sindou, Philippe; Lacroix, Aurélie; Descazeaud, Aurélien; Lalloué, Fabrice; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    p75NTR, a member of TNF receptor family, is the low affinity receptor common to several mature neurotrophins and the high affinity receptor for pro-neurotrophins. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), a member of neurotrophin family has been described to play an important role in development and progression of several cancers, through its binding to a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) and/or p75NTR. However, the functions of these two receptors in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have never been investigated. An overexpression of p75NTR, pro-BDNF, and to a lesser extent for TrkB and sortilin, was detected by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 83 clear cell RCC tumors. p75NTR, mainly expressed in tumor tissues, was significantly associated with higher Fuhrman grade in multivariate analysis. In two derived-RCC lines, 786-O and ACHN cells, we demonstrated that pro-BDNF induced cell survival and migration, through p75NTR as provided by p75NTR RNA silencing or blocking anti-p75NTR antibody. This mechanism is independent of TrkB activation as demonstrated by k252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor for Trk neurotrophin receptors. Taken together, these data highlight for the first time an important role for p75NTR in renal cancer and indicate a putative novel target therapy in RCC. PMID:27120782

  13. Transcription factor KLF2 regulates homeostatic NK cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Rabacal, Whitney; Pabbisetty, Sudheer K; Hoek, Kristen L; Cendron, Delphine; Guo, Yin; Maseda, Damian; Sebzda, Eric

    2016-05-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and lyse virally infected or transformed cells. This latter property is being pursued in clinics to treat leukemia with the hope that further breakthroughs in NK cell biology can extend treatments to other cancers. At issue is the ability to expand transferred NK cells and prolong their functionality within the context of a tumor. In terms of NK cell expansion and survival, we now report that Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is a key transcription factor that underpins both of these events. Excision of Klf2 using gene-targeted mouse models promotes spontaneous proliferation of immature NK cells in peripheral tissues, a phenotype that is replicated under ex vivo conditions. Moreover, KLF2 imprints a homeostatic migration pattern on mature NK cells that allows these cells to access IL-15-rich microenvironments. KLF2 accomplishes this feat within the mature NK cell lineage via regulation of a subset of homing receptors that respond to homeostatic ligands while leaving constitutively expressed receptors that recognize inflammatory cytokines unperturbed. Under steady-state conditions, KLF2-deficient NK cells alter their expression of homeostatic homing receptors and subsequently undergo apoptosis due to IL-15 starvation. This novel mechanism has implications regarding NK cell contraction following the termination of immune responses including the possibility that retention of an IL-15 transpresenting support system is key to extending NK cell activity in a tumor environment.

  14. High proportions of regulatory T cells in PBSC grafts predict improved survival after allogeneic haematopoietic SCT

    PubMed Central

    Danby, R D; Zhang, W; Medd, P; Littlewood, T J; Peniket, A; Rocha, V; Roberts, D J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate immune responses and improve survival in murine transplant models. However, whether the Treg content of allogeneic cell grafts influences the outcome in human haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is not well established. In a prospective study of 94 adult allogeneic PBSC transplants (60% unrelated; 85% reduced intensity conditioning), the median Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25+FOXP3+CD127dim/−) dose transplanted was 4.7 × 106/kg, with Tregs accounting for a median of 2.96% of CD4+ T cells. Patients transplanted with grafts containing a Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio above the median had a 3-year overall survival of 75%, compared with 49% in those receiving grafts with a Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio below the median (P=0.02), with a 3-year non-relapse mortality of 13% and 35%, respectively (P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, a high graft Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio was an independent predictor of lower non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio (HR), 0.30; P=0.02), improved overall survival (HR, 0.45; P=0.03) and improved sustained neutrophil (HR, 0.52; P=0.002), platelet (HR, 0.51; P<0.001) and lymphocyte (HR, 0.54; P=0.009) recovery. These data support the hypothesis that the proportion of Tregs in allogeneic HSC grafts influences clinical outcome and suggest that Treg therapies could improve allogeneic HSC transplantation. PMID:26389831

  15. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Poff, A M; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, T N; D'Agostino, D P

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use.

  16. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, AM; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, TN; D’Agostino, DP

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use. PMID:24615175

  17. Effect of pesticides on cell survival in liver and brain rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Astiz, Mariana; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos Alberto

    2009-10-01

    Pesticides are the main environmental factor associated with the etiology of human neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the treatment of rats with low doses of dimethoate, zineb or glyphosate alone or in combination induces oxidative stress (OS) in liver and brain. The aim of the present work was to investigate if the pesticide-induced OS was able to affect brain and liver cell survival. The treatment of Wistar rats with the pesticides (i.p. 1/250 LD50, three times a week for 5 weeks) caused loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cardiolipin content, especially in substantia nigra (SN), with a concomitant increase of fatty acid peroxidation. The activation of calpain apoptotic cascade (instead of the caspase-dependent pathway) would be responsible for the DNA fragmentation pattern observed. Thus, these results may contribute to understand the effect(s) of chronic and simultaneous exposure to pesticides on cell survival.

  18. Survival advantage of AMPK activation to androgen-independent prostate cancer cells during energy stress.

    PubMed

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Wu, Yue; Mohler, James L; Ip, Clement

    2010-10-01

    Androgen-independent prostate cancer usually develops as a relapse following androgen ablation therapy. Removing androgen systemically causes vascular degeneration and nutrient depletion of the prostate tumor tissue. The fact that the malignancy later evolves to androgen-independence suggests that some cancer cells are able to survive the challenge of energy/nutrient deprivation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important manager of energy stress. The present study was designed to investigate the role of AMPK in contributing to the survival of the androgen-independent phenotype. Most of the experiments were carried out in the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and the androgen-independent C4-2 cells. These two cell lines have the same genetic background, since the C4-2 line is derived from the LNCaP line. Glucose deprivation (GD) was instituted to model energy stress encountered by these cells. The key findings are as follows. First, the activation of AMPK by GD was much stronger in C4-2 cells than in LNCaP cells, and the robustness of AMPK activation was correlated favorably with cell viability. Second, the response of AMPK was specific to energy deficiency rather than to amino acid deficiency. The activation of AMPK by GD was functional, as demonstrated by appropriate phosphorylation changes of mTOR and mTOR downstream substrates. Third, blocking AMPK activation by chemical inhibitor or dominant negative AMPK led to increased apoptotic cell death. The observation that similar results were found in other androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, including CW22Rv1 abd VCaP, provided further assurance that AMPK is a facilitator on the road to androgen-independence of prostate cancer cells.

  19. The FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway is critical for chordoma cell growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunping; Mintz, Akiva; Shah, Sagar R; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Hsu, Wesley

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the expression of brachyury is necessary for chordoma growth. However, the mechanism associated with brachyury-regulated cell growth is poorly understood. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), a regulator of brachyury expression in normal tissue, may also play an important role in chordoma pathophysiology. Using a panel of chordoma cell lines, we explored the role of FGF signaling and brachyury in cell growth and survival. Western blots showed that all chordoma cell lines expressed fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), FGFR3, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas no cell lines expressed FGFR1 and FGFR4. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that chordoma cells produced FGF2. Neutralization of FGF2 inhibited MEK/ERK phosphorylation, decreased brachyury expression and induced apoptosis while reducing cell growth. Activation of the FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway by FGF2-initiated phosphorylation of FGFR substrate 2 (FRS2)-α (Tyr196) prevented apoptosis while promoting cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Immunofluorescence staining showed that FGF2 promoted the translocation of phosphorylated ERK to the nucleus and increased brachyury expression. The selective inhibition of FGFR, MEK and ERK phosphorylation by PD173074, PD0325901 and PD184352, respectively, decreased brachyury expression, induced apoptosis, and inhibited cell growth and EMT. Moreover, knockdown of brachyury by small hairpin RNA reduced FGF2 secretion, inhibited FGFR/MEK/ERK phosphorylation and blocked the effects of FGF2 on cell growth, apoptosis and EMT. Those findings highlight that FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway coordinately regulates chordoma cell growth and survival and may represent a novel chemotherapeutic target for chordoma.

  20. The Cellular State Determines the Effect of Melatonin on the Survival of Mixed Cerebellar Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Daiane Gil; Markus, Regina P.

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key transcription factor involved in neuroinflammation, is essential for the survival of neurons in situ and of cerebellar granule cells in culture. Melatonin is known to inhibit the activation of NF-κB and has a cytoprotective function. In this study, we evaluated whether the cytoprotective effect of melatonin depends on the state of activation of a mixed cerebellar culture that is composed predominantly of granule cells; we tested the effect of melatonin on cultured rat cerebellar cells stimulated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The addition of melatonin (0.1 nM–1 µM) reduced the survival of naïve cells while inhibiting LPS-induced cell death. Melatonin (100 nM) transiently (15 min) inhibited the nuclear translocation of both NF-κB dimers (p50/p50, p50/RelA) and, after 60 min, increased the activation of p50/RelA. Melatonin-induced p50/RelA activity in naïve cells resulted in the transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of NO. Otherwise, in cultures treated with LPS, melatonin blocked the LPS-induced activation of p50/RelA and the reduction in p50/p50 levels and inhibited iNOS expression and NO synthesis. Therefore, melatonin in vehicle-treated cells induces cell death, while it protects against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, we confirmed that melatonin is a neuroprotective drug when cerebellar cells are challenged; however, melatonin can also lead to cell death when the normal balance of the NF-κB pathway is disturbed. Our data provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the influence of cell context on the final output response of melatonin. PMID:25184316

  1. Estradiol promotes pentose phosphate pathway addiction and cell survival via reactivation of Akt in mTORC1 hyperactive cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Gu, X; Zhang, E; Park, M-A; Pereira, A M; Wang, S; Morrison, T; Li, C; Blenis, J; Gerbaudo, V H; Henske, E P; Yu, J J

    2014-05-15

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a female-predominant interstitial lung disease that can lead to respiratory failure. LAM cells typically have inactivating TSC2 mutations, leading to mTORC1 activation. The gender specificity of LAM suggests that estradiol contributes to disease development, yet the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are not completely understood. Using metabolomic profiling, we identified an estradiol-enhanced pentose phosphate pathway signature in Tsc2-deficient cells. Estradiol increased levels of cellular NADPH, decreased levels of reactive oxygen species, and enhanced cell survival under oxidative stress. Mechanistically, estradiol reactivated Akt in TSC2-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo, induced membrane translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT1 or GLUT4), and increased glucose uptake in an Akt-dependent manner. (18)F-FDG-PET imaging demonstrated enhanced glucose uptake in xenograft tumors of Tsc2-deficient cells from estradiol-treated mice. Expression array study identified estradiol-enhanced transcript levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway. Consistent with this, G6PD was abundant in xenograft tumors and lung metastatic lesions of Tsc2-deficient cells from estradiol-treated mice. Molecular depletion of G6PD attenuated estradiol-enhanced survival in vitro, and treatment with 6-aminonicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of G6PD, reduced lung colonization of Tsc2-deficient cells. Collectively, these data indicate that estradiol promotes glucose metabolism in mTORC1 hyperactive cells through the pentose phosphate pathway via Akt reactivation and G6PD upregulation, thereby enhancing cell survival under oxidative stress. Interestingly, a strong correlation between estrogen exposure and G6PD was also found in breast cancer cells. Targeting the pentose phosphate pathway may have therapeutic benefit for LAM and possibly other hormonally dependent neoplasms.

  2. Kinetics of Oxygen Reduction in Aprotic Li-O2 Cells: A Model-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Safari, M; Adams, B D; Nazar, L F

    2014-10-16

    A comprehensive and general kinetic model is developed for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic Li-O2 cells. The model is based on the competitive uptake of lithium superoxide by the surface and solution. A demonstrative kinetic study is provided to demystify the origin of curvature in Tafel plots as well as the current dependency and aberrant diversity of the nature and morphology of discharge products in these systems. Our results are general and extend to any system where solubilization of superoxide is favored, such as where phase-transfer catalysts play an important role.

  3. Targeting proapoptotic protein BAD inhibits survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sastry, K S R; Al-Muftah, M A; Li, Pu; Al-Kowari, M K; Wang, E; Ismail Chouchane, A; Kizhakayil, D; Kulik, G; Marincola, F M; Haoudi, A; Chouchane, L

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the resistance of cancer stem cells (CSC) to many conventional therapies is one of the major limiting factors of cancer therapy efficacy. Identification of mechanisms responsible for survival and self-renewal of CSC will help design new therapeutic strategies that target and eliminate both differentiated cancer cells and CSC. Here we demonstrated the potential role of proapoptotic protein BAD in the biology of CSC in melanoma, prostate and breast cancers. We enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells (CSC) by tumorosphere formation and purified this population by FACS. Both spheres and CSC exhibited increased potential for proliferation, migration, invasion, sphere formation, anchorage-independent growth, as well as upregulation of several stem cell-associated markers. We showed that the phosphorylation of BAD is essential for the survival of CSC. Conversely, ectopic expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant BAD induced apoptosis in CSC. This effect was enhanced by treatment with a BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Both pharmacological agents that inhibit survival kinases and growth factors that are involved in drug resistance delivered their respective cytotoxic and protective effects by modulating the BAD phosphorylation in CSC. Furthermore, the frequency and self-renewal capacity of CSC was significantly reduced by knocking down the BAD expression. Consistent with our in vitro results, significant phosphorylation of BAD was found in CD44(+) CSC of 83% breast tumor specimens. In addition, we also identified a positive correlation between BAD expression and disease stage in prostate cancer, suggesting a role of BAD in tumor advancement. Our studies unveil the role of BAD in the survival and self-renewal of CSC and propose BAD not only as an attractive target for cancer therapy but also as a marker of tumor progression.

  4. Targeting proapoptotic protein BAD inhibits survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, K S R; Al-Muftah, M A; Li, Pu; Al-Kowari, M K; Wang, E; Ismail Chouchane, A; Kizhakayil, D; Kulik, G; Marincola, F M; Haoudi, A; Chouchane, L

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the resistance of cancer stem cells (CSC) to many conventional therapies is one of the major limiting factors of cancer therapy efficacy. Identification of mechanisms responsible for survival and self-renewal of CSC will help design new therapeutic strategies that target and eliminate both differentiated cancer cells and CSC. Here we demonstrated the potential role of proapoptotic protein BAD in the biology of CSC in melanoma, prostate and breast cancers. We enriched CD44+/CD24− cells (CSC) by tumorosphere formation and purified this population by FACS. Both spheres and CSC exhibited increased potential for proliferation, migration, invasion, sphere formation, anchorage-independent growth, as well as upregulation of several stem cell-associated markers. We showed that the phosphorylation of BAD is essential for the survival of CSC. Conversely, ectopic expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant BAD induced apoptosis in CSC. This effect was enhanced by treatment with a BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Both pharmacological agents that inhibit survival kinases and growth factors that are involved in drug resistance delivered their respective cytotoxic and protective effects by modulating the BAD phosphorylation in CSC. Furthermore, the frequency and self-renewal capacity of CSC was significantly reduced by knocking down the BAD expression. Consistent with our in vitro results, significant phosphorylation of BAD was found in CD44+ CSC of 83% breast tumor specimens. In addition, we also identified a positive correlation between BAD expression and disease stage in prostate cancer, suggesting a role of BAD in tumor advancement. Our studies unveil the role of BAD in the survival and self-renewal of CSC and propose BAD not only as an attractive target for cancer therapy but also as a marker of tumor progression. PMID:25215949

  5. Prognostic factors for survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: update 2008.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-15

    A variety of prognostic factor models to predict survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been developed. Diverse populations of patients with variable treatments have been used for these analyses. A variety of clinical, pathologic, and molecular factors have been studied, but current models use predominantly easily obtained clinical factors. These approaches are reviewed, and current approaches to further refine and develop these techniques are reviewed.

  6. DICER1 is essential for survival of postmitotic rod photoreceptor cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sundermeier, Thomas R.; Zhang, Ning; Vinberg, Frans; Mustafi, Debarshi; Kohno, Hideo; Golczak, Marcin; Bai, Xiaodong; Maeda, Akiko; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the proximal cause of blindness in many retinal degenerative disorders; hence, understanding the gene regulatory networks that promote photoreceptor survival is at the forefront of efforts to combat blindness. Down-regulation of the microRNA (miRNA)-processing enzyme DICER1 in the retinal pigmented epithelium has been implicated in geographic atrophy, an advanced form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, little is known about the function of DICER1 in mature rod photoreceptor cells, another retinal cell type that is severely affected in AMD. Using a conditional-knockout (cKO) mouse model, we report that loss of DICER1 in mature postmitotic rods leads to robust retinal degeneration accompanied by loss of visual function. At 14 wk of age, cKO mice exhibit a 90% reduction in photoreceptor nuclei and a 97% reduction in visual chromophore compared with those in control littermates. Before degeneration, cKO mice do not exhibit significant defects in either phototransduction or the visual cycle, suggesting that miRNAs play a primary role in rod photoreceptor survival. Using comparative small RNA sequencing analysis, we identified rod photoreceptor miRNAs of the miR-22, miR-26, miR-30, miR-92, miR-124, and let-7 families as potential factors involved in regulating the survival of rods.—Sundermeier, T. R., Zhang, N., Vinberg, F., Mustafi, D., Kohno, H., Golczak, M., Bai, X., Maeda, A., Kefalov, V. J., Palczewski, K. DICER1 is essential for survival of postmitotic rod photoreceptor cells in mice. PMID:24812086

  7. Mast cell chymase induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis by disrupting NF-{kappa}B-mediated survival signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Leskinen, Markus J.; Heikkilae, Hanna M.; Speer, Mei Y.; Hakala, Jukka K.; Laine, Mika; Kovanen, Petri T.; Lindstedt, Ken A. . E-mail: ken.lindstedt@wri.fi

    2006-05-01

    Chymase released from activated mast cells induces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in vitro by degrading the pericellular matrix component fibronectin, so causing disruption of focal adhesion complexes and Akt dephosphorylation, which are necessary for cell adhesion and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of chymase-mediated apoptosis downstream of Akt have remained elusive. Here, we show by means of RT-PCR, Western blotting, EMSA, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, that chymase induces SMC apoptosis by disrupting NF-{kappa}B-mediated survival signaling. Following chymase treatment, the translocation of active NF-{kappa}B/p65 to the nucleus was partly abolished and the amount of nuclear p65 was reduced. Pretreatment of SMCs with chymase also inhibited LPS- and IL-1{beta}-induced nuclear translocation of p65. The chymase-induced degradation of p65 was mediated by active caspases. Loss of NF-{kappa}B-mediated transactivation resulted in downregulation of bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, leading to mitochondrial swelling and release of cytochrome c. The apoptotic process involved activation of both caspase 9 and caspase 8. The results reveal that, by disrupting the NF-{kappa}B-mediated survival-signaling pathway, activated chymase-secreting mast cells can mediate apoptosis of cultured arterial SMCs. Since activated mast cells colocalize with apoptotic SMCs in vulnerable areas of human atherosclerotic plaques, they may participate in the weakening and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques.

  8. Kv3.4 potassium channel-mediated electrosignaling controls cell cycle and survival of irradiated leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Palme, Daniela; Misovic, Milan; Schmid, Evi; Klumpp, Dominik; Salih, Helmut R; Rudner, Justine; Huber, Stephan M

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant ion channel expression in the plasma membrane is characteristic for many tumor entities and has been attributed to neoplastic transformation, tumor progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance. The present study aimed to define the function of these "oncogenic" channels for radioresistance of leukemia cells. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells were irradiated (0-6 Gy X ray), ion channel expression and activity, Ca(2+)- and protein signaling, cell cycle progression, and cell survival were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, patch-clamp recording, fura-2 Ca(2+)-imaging, immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and clonogenic survival assays, respectively. Ionizing radiation-induced G2/M arrest was preceded by activation of Kv3.4-like voltage-gated potassium channels. Channel activation in turn resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) entry and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase-II, and inactivation of the phosphatase cdc25B and the cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2. Accordingly, channel inhibition by tetraethylammonium and blood-depressing substance-1 and substance-2 or downregulation by RNA interference led to release from radiation-induced G2/M arrest, increased apoptosis, and decreased clonogenic survival. Together, these findings indicate the functional significance of voltage-gated K(+) channels for the radioresistance of myeloid leukemia cells.

  9. Curcumin inhibits the survival and metastasis of prostate cancer cells via the Notch-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingzhe; Wang, Chengli; Zhang, Zhijie; Chen, Xiaojun; Jia, Yusen; Wang, Bin; Kong, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies in men, and it urgently demands precise interventions that target the signaling pathways implicated in its initiation, progression, and metastasis. The Notch-1 signaling pathway is closely associated with the pathophysiology of prostate cancer. This study investigated the antitumor effects and mechanisms of curcumin, which is a well-known natural compound from curcuminoids, in prostate cancer cells. Viability, proliferation, and migration were analyzed in two prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, after curcumin treatment. Whether the Notch-1 signaling pathway is involved in the antitumor effects of curcumin was examined. Curcumin inhibited the survival and proliferation of PC3 and DU145 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and inhibited DU145 migration. Curcumin did not affect the expression of Notch-1 or its active product NICD, but it did inhibit the expression of MT1-MMP and MMP2 proteins in DU145 cells. We found that curcumin inhibited the DNA-binding ability of NICD in DU145 cells. In conclusion, curcumin inhibited the survival and metastasis of prostate cancer cells via the Notch-1 signaling pathway.

  10. Autoimmunity-inducing metals (Hg, Au and Ag) modulate mast cell signaling, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Toshio; Ra, Chisei

    2011-11-01

    The three heavy metals, mercury, gold and silver commonly and specifically induce aberrant immunological responses leading to autoimmune disorders in genetically susceptible animals and humans. The disorders are characterized by autoantibody production, increases in serum IgG and IgE, polyclonal activation of B and T lymphocytes and renal immune complex deposition and glomerulonephritis. Mast cells play key roles in allergic and inflammatory reactions. A growing body of evidence suggests that mast cells are key players in innate and adaptive immunity and involved in autoimmune diseases. Mast cells are also direct targets for autoimmunity-inducing metals both in vitro and in vivo and play a role in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. The three metals specifically modulate mast cell function, including degranulation and secretion of arachidonic acid metabolites and cytokines such as interleukin-4. Divergent signaling components, including mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, reactive oxygen and nitric oxide generation and Ca2+ influx are modulated by the metals. Furthermore, the metals have considerable impacts on mast cell survival, which also species seems to be involved in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the impacts of the three metals on mast cell signaling, function and survival and their possible roles in the pathologies of metal-induced autoimmunity.

  11. Cell Surface CD74-MIF Interactions Drive Melanoma Survival in Response to Interferon-γ.

    PubMed

    Tanese, Keiji; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Berkova, Zuzana; Wang, Yuling; Samaniego, Felipe; Lee, Jeffrey E; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Grimm, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Melanoma is believed to be a highly immunogenic tumor and recent developments in immunotherapies are promising. IFN-γ produced by immune cells has a crucial role in tumor immune surveillance; however, it has also been reported to be pro-tumorigenic. In the current study, we found that IFN-γ enhances the expression of CD74, which interacts with its ligand, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and thereby activates the PI3K/AKT pathway in melanoma, promoting tumor survival. IFN-γ increased phosphorylation of AKT Ser473 and upregulated total cell surface expression of CD74 in human melanoma cell lines tested. CD74 was highly expressed in melanoma tissues. Moreover, the expression of CD74 on tumor cells correlated with plasma IFN-γ levels in melanoma patient samples. In our analysis of melanoma cell lines, all produced MIF constitutively. Blockade of CD74-MIF interaction reduced AKT phosphorylation and expression of pro-tumorigenic molecules, including IL-6, IL-8, and BCL-2. Inhibition of CD74-MIF interaction significantly suppressed tumor growth in the presence of IFN-γ in our xenograft mouse model. Thus, we conclude that IFN-γ promotes melanoma cell survival by regulating CD74-MIF signaling, suggesting that targeting the CD74-MIF interaction under IFN-γ-stimulatory conditions would be an effective therapeutic approach for melanoma.

  12. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha is essential to breast cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Chajès, Véronique; Cambot, Marie; Moreau, Karen; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Joulin, Virginie

    2006-05-15

    Activation of de novo fatty acid synthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer cells. We have recently described an interaction between acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACCalpha), a key enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, and BRCA1, which indicates a possible connection between lipid synthesis and genetic factors involved in susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers. For this reason, we explored the role of ACCalpha in breast cancer cell survival using an RNA interference (RNAi) approach. We show that specific silencing of either the ACCalpha or the fatty acid synthase (FAS) genes in cancer cells results in a major decrease in palmitic acid synthesis. Depletion of the cellular pool of palmitic acid is associated with induction of apoptosis concomitant with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial impairment. Expression of a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-resistant form of ACCalpha mRNA prevented the effect of ACCalpha-RNAi but failed to prevent the effect of FAS gene silencing. Furthermore, supplementation of the culture medium with palmitate or with the antioxidant vitamin E resulted in the complete rescue of cells from both ACCalpha and FAS siRNA-induced apoptosis. Finally, human mammary epithelial cells are resistant to RNAi against either ACCalpha or FAS. These data confirm the importance of lipogenesis in cancer cell survival and indicate that this pathway represents a key target for antineoplastic therapy that, however, might require specific dietary recommendation for full efficacy.

  13. Identification of Annexin A4 as a hepatopancreas factor involved in liver cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danhua; Golubkov, Vladislav S.; Han, Wenlong; Correa, Ricardo G.; Zhou, Ying; Lee, Sunyoung; Strongin, Alex Y.; Dong, P. Duc Si

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into liver and pancreas development, we investigated the target of 2F11, a monoclonal antibody of unknown antigen, widely used in zebrafish studies for labeling hepatopancreatic ducts. Utilizing mass spectrometry and in vivo assays, we determined the molecular target of 2F11 to be Annexin A4 (Anxa4), a calcium binding protein. We further found that in both zebrafish and mouse endoderm, Anxa4 is broadly expressed in the developing liver and pancreas, and later becomes more restricted to the hepatopancreatic ducts and pancreatic islets, including the insulin producing β-cells. Although Anxa4 is a known target of several monogenic diabetes genes and its elevated expression is associated with chemoresistance in malignancy, its in vivo role is largely unexplored. Knockdown of Anxa4 in zebrafish leads to elevated expression of caspase 8 and Δ113p53, and liver bud specific activation of Caspase 3 and apoptosis. Mosaic knockdown reveal that Anxa4 is required cell-autonomously in the liver bud for cell survival. This finding is further corroborated with mosaic anxa4 knockout studies using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Collectively, we identify Anxa4 as a new, evolutionarily conserved hepatopancreatic factor that is required in zebrafish for liver progenitor viability, through inhibition of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. A role for Anxa4 in cell survival may have implications for the mechanism of diabetic β-cell apoptosis and cancer cell chemoresistance. PMID:25176043

  14. Study of cell kinetics within evolving secondary Haversian systems.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Z F; Hooper, C

    1980-01-01

    A study of the origin, proliferation rate and migration of cells within the secondary evolving Haversian systems was undertaken in young adult Beagle dogs. Autoradiographs of serial longitudinal sections prepared from rib biopsies taken from one hour to eleven days after the injection of tritiated thymidine were subjected to semiquantitative analysis as to the time of appearance, number, location and transformation of various labelled cells. Numerous labelled osteoblasts appeared early (at 14-24 hours) in the most proximal closing cone. With time, this zone was seen to have been left behind the advancing cutting cone and the successive generations of osteoblasts. The first labelled osteocytes were seen at nine days after injection, in the distal closing cone. Labelled nuclei within the osteoclasts were few and appeared late (none before 24 hours). It is apparent that each self renewing cell population within these systems (i.e. osteoclasts, osteoblasts and endothelial cells) derives from its own immediate precursor and evolves at its own speed. The mononuclear osteoclasts' precursors divide locally and infrequently and the turnover of osteoclastic nuclei appears to be slow; consequently their life span and that of the osteoclasts appears to be longer than the time of the observation, i.e. 11 days. The proliferation of osteoblasts' precursors and osteoblasts recruitment is rapid. The life span of osteoblasts was found to be indeterminate; some osteoblasts may become osteocytes within a few days while others may continue to deposit bone for several weeks. Since the recruitment of osteoclastic nuclei is slow while that of the osteoblasts is fast, it is unlikely that the osteoclasts in the sites of lamellar bone remodelling modulate into osteoblasts. Images Fig. 2(cont.) Fig. 2 Fig. 3(cont.) Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7440406

  15. Revealing Assembly of a Pore-Forming Complex Using Single-Cell Kinetic Analysis and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Mirko; Iacovache, Ioan; Boss, Daniel; Naef, Felix; van der Goot, F Gisou; Molina, Nacho

    2016-04-12

    Many biological processes depend on the sequential assembly of protein complexes. However, studying the kinetics of such processes by direct methods is often not feasible. As an important class of such protein complexes, pore-forming toxins start their journey as soluble monomeric proteins, and oligomerize into transmembrane complexes to eventually form pores in the target cell membrane. Here, we monitored pore formation kinetics for the well-characterized bacterial pore-forming toxin aerolysin in single cells in real time to determine the lag times leading to the formation of the first functional pores per cell. Probabilistic modeling of these lag times revealed that one slow and seven equally fast rate-limiting reactions best explain the overall pore formation kinetics. The model predicted that monomer activation is the rate-limiting step for the entire pore formation process. We hypothesized that this could be through release of a propeptide and indeed found that peptide removal abolished these steps. This study illustrates how stochasticity in the kinetics of a complex process can be exploited to identify rate-limiting mechanisms underlying multistep biomolecular assembly pathways.

  16. Kinetics of Reactive Modules Adds Discriminative Dimensions for Selective Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Quérard, Jérôme; Le Saux, Thomas; Gautier, Arnaud; Alcor, Damien; Croquette, Vincent; Lemarchand, Annie; Gosse, Charlie; Jullien, Ludovic

    2016-05-18

    Living cells are chemical mixtures of exceptional interest and significance, whose investigation requires the development of powerful analytical tools fulfilling the demanding constraints resulting from their singular features. In particular, multiplexed observation of a large number of molecular targets with high spatiotemporal resolution appears highly desirable. One attractive road to address this analytical challenge relies on engaging the targets in reactions and exploiting the rich kinetic signature of the resulting reactive module, which originates from its topology and its rate constants. This review explores the various facets of this promising strategy. We first emphasize the singularity of the content of a living cell as a chemical mixture and suggest that its multiplexed observation is significant and timely. Then, we show that exploiting the kinetics of analytical processes is relevant to selectively detect a given analyte: upon perturbing the system, the kinetic window associated to response read-out has to be matched with that of the targeted reactive module. Eventually, we introduce the state-of-the-art of cell imaging exploiting protocols based on reaction kinetics and draw some promising perspectives.

  17. Angiopoietin-2 promotes ER+ breast cancer cell survival in bone marrow niche

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyun Ho; Kim, Baek Gil; Lee, Joo Hyun; Kang, Suki; Kim, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    In estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, it is recognized that metastases may develop after a long period of dormancy. Bone marrow (BM) vascular niche is where the dormant tumor cells are most likely to reside. So far, it is not fully understood why the dormant tumor cells become proliferative and eventually generate tumor. We hypothesized that therapeutic or menopause-related estrogen depletion may be the switch behind dormant ER+ tumor cell awakening in BM. We utilized an existing experimental model of BM endothelial niche that can simulate ER+ tumor cell dormancy to test our hypothesis. In results, estrogen depletion paradoxically promoted ER+ tumor cell proliferation in the BM endothelial niche, and their molecular phenotype shifted from dormant to awaken. Following estrogen depletion, the BM niche cells produced angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), which destabilized niche endothelium by interfering ANGPT1/Tie2 signaling, and promoted ER+ tumor cell survival under estrogen deficiency via cell surface integrin &1. Knockdown of ANGPT2 completely negated ER+ tumor cell awakening in the niche. Furthermore, ANGPT2 expression in ER+ tumor human samples was associated with increased risk of distant metastasis only in those who underwent adjuvant estrogen depletion therapy, not in those who did not undergo adjuvant therapy. In conclusion, we demonstrate that ANGPT2 signaling activated after estrogen depletion paradoxically triggers ER+ tumor cell awakening from dormancy in their BM niche, partly indirectly via endothelial Tie2 receptor and partly directly via tumor cell surface integrin &1. PMID:27353038

  18. Radiation resistance: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their enigmatic pro-survival signaling.

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, Ira; Debbage, Paul; Kumar, Vinod; Skvortsov, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    Despite the fact that radiation therapy is a highly effective therapeutic approach, a small intratumoral cell subpopulation known as "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) is radiation-resistant and possesses specific molecular properties protecting it against radiation-induced damage. The exact mechanisms of this radioresistance are still not fully elucidated, but they relate to these cells' enhanced DNA repair capacities and their low intracellular ROS concentrations, resulting from their up-regulation of ROS scavengers. The low ROS content is accompanied by disturbances in cell cycle regulation, so it can be assumed that either CSCs are quiescent or dormant themselves, or that this cell population consists of at least two cell subpopulations: the normally and the slowly proliferating cells (quiescent or dormant cells). Slowly dividing CSCs show concomitant dysregulation of the signaling molecules mediating both cell cycle progression and maintenance of cell stemness. Despite a massive accumulation of data concerning the mechanisms underlying DNA damage response in CSCs, it represents a challenge to researchers in the era of personalized medicine to elucidate the role of intracellular ROS and of signaling pathways associated with the radiation resistance of these cells; there is a clear need to understand the molecular mechanisms helping CSCs to survive radiation exposure.

  19. The Modulation of Endothelial Cell Morphology, Function, and Survival Using Anisotropic Nanofibrillar Collagen Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ngan F.; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C.; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S.; Paukshto, Michael V.; Sun, John; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G.; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues. PMID:23480958

  20. Antioxidant metabolism during blood storage and its relationship to post-transfusion red cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Lachant, N.A.; Noble, N.A.; Myrhe, B.A.; Tanaka, K.R.

    1984-10-01

    The status of the erythrocyte antioxidant defense system and its relationship to post-transfusion red cell survival were determined in erythrocytes stored for 35 or 42 days in CPD-A1 anticoagulant with a saline-adenine-glucose additive. As storage progressed, there was a significant increase in incubated Heinz body formation (P less than .001) and a significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) stability (P less than .001). Stimulated pentose phosphate shunt activity also declined during storage (P less than .06), while unstimulated shunt activity remained unchanged. The increase in Heinz body formation was associated with decreased GSH stability (r . -.77, P less than .001), which in turn was associated with the decline in stimulated pentose shunt activity (r . .67, P less than .001). The changes in Heinz body formation (r . -.85), GSH stability (r . .83), and stimulated pentose shunt activity (r . .54) were all significantly (P less than .001) related to the decline in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of the erythrocyte. Red cell survival 24 hours after transfusion was significantly related to the GSH stability (r . .80, P less than .001) and to the ATP concentration (r . .76, P less than .005) on the day of transfusion. Thus, dysfunction of the erythrocyte antioxidant defense system occurs during blood storage and appears to be related, in part, to ATP depletion. The ability to maintain a normal reduced glutathione concentration during oxidant stress appears to be an important determinant of red cell survival in the peritransfusion period.

  1. Improved survival and function of rat cryopreserved islets by coculture with sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xue, Wujun; Tian, Xiaohui; Ding, Xiaoming; Tian, Puxun; Feng, Xinshun; Song, Yong; Luo, Xiaohui; Liu, Hongbao; Wang, Xiaohong; Ding, Chenguang

    2011-06-01

    In order to investigate how to improve the function and survival of cryopreserved islets, we cocultured cryopreserved thawed rat islets with rat Sertoli cells. After thawing, the islets were divided into the Sertoli cell coculture group and the control group. Using light and transmission electron microscopes, we examined the morphology of islets and measured their apoptosis index (AI) and insulin release stimulation index (SI). Moreover, we measured apoptosis protein and mRNA by western-blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and cytokine concentrations in supernatant by ELISA. We examined islet graft survival time in diabetic mice and detected insulin in grafts by immunohistochemistry. We found that the morphology, AI, and SI of the coculture group were all significantly improved. The relative expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 P20, P11, and caspase-7 in the coculture group were lower than those in the control group. Compared with the control group, the expression level of Bax was decreased, but that of Bcl-2 was increased. After transplantation, islet survival in the coculture group was similar to that of fresh islets but longer than that in the control group. These results suggest that coculture with rat Sertoli cells significantly improves the yield and function of rat cryopreserved thawed islets by effectively reducing islet apoptosis.

  2. Fibronectin peptides that bind PDGF-BB enhance survival of cells and tissue under stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fubao; Zhu, Jia; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Taira, Breena R.; McClain, Steve A.; Singer, Adam J.; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Stressors after injury from a multitude of factors can lead to cell death. We have identified four fibronectin (FN) peptides, two from the first FN type III repeat (FNIII1), one from the 13th FN type III repeat (FNIII13), and one from FN variable region (IIICS), that when tethered to a surface acted as platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) enhancers to promote cell survival. One of the FNIII1 peptides and its smallest (14mer) bioactive form (P12) were also active in solution. Specifically, P12 bound PDGF-BB (KD = 200nM), enhanced adult human dermal fibroblast (AHDF) survival under serum starvation, oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressors, and limited burn injury progression in a rat hot comb model. Furthermore, P12 inhibited ER stress-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Although many growth factors have been found to bind FN directly or indirectly, this is the first report to identify peptide sequences of growth factor-binding sites in FN. The finding of these novel peptides further delineated how the extracellular matrix protein FN can support cell survival. Since the peptide P12 is active in either soluble form or tethered to a substrate, it will have multifactorial uses as a bioactive in tissue engineering. PMID:24126844

  3. The modulation of endothelial cell morphology, function, and survival using anisotropic nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ngan F; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S; Paukshto, Michael V; Sun, John S; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G; Cooke, John P

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues.

  4. Sunitinib-induced hypothyroidism predicts progression-free survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Buda-Nowak, Anna; Kucharz, Jakub; Dumnicka, Paulina; Kuzniewski, Marek; Herman, Roman Maria; Zygulska, Aneta L; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2017-04-01

    Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) used in treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), gastrointestinal stromal tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. One of the most common side effects related to sunitinib is hypothyroidism. Recent trials suggest correlation between the incidence of hypothyroidism and treatment outcome in patients treated with TKI. This study evaluates whether development of hypothyroidism is a predictive marker of progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with mRCC treated with sunitinib. Twenty-seven patients diagnosed with clear cell mRCC, after nephrectomy and in 'good' or 'intermediate' MSKCC risk prognostic group, were included in the study. All patients received sunitinib as a first-line treatment on a standard schedule (initial dose 50 mg/day, 4 weeks