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Sample records for cell tight junctions

  1. Ouabain modulates epithelial cell tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Larre, Isabel; Lazaro, Amparo; Contreras, Ruben G.; Balda, Maria S.; Matter, Karl; Flores-Maldonado, Catalina; Ponce, Arturo; Flores-Benitez, David; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Castillo, Aída; Shoshani, Liora; Cereijido, Marcelino

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial cells treated with high concentrations of ouabain (e.g., 1 μM) retrieve molecules involved in cell contacts from the plasma membrane and detach from one another and their substrates. On the basis of this observation, we suggested that ouabain might also modulate cell contacts at low, nontoxic levels (10 or 50 nM). To test this possibility, we analyzed its effect on a particular type of cell–cell contact: the tight junction (TJ). We demonstrate that at concentrations that neither inhibit K+ pumping nor disturb the K+ balance of the cell, ouabain modulates the degree of sealing of the TJ as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and the flux of neutral 3 kDa dextran (JDEX). This modulation is accompanied by changes in the levels and distribution patterns of claudins 1, 2, and 4. Interestingly, changes in TER, JDEX, and claudins behavior are mediated through signal pathways containing ERK1/2 and c-Src, which have distinct effects on each physiological parameter and claudin type. These observations support the theory that at low concentrations, ouabain acts as a modulator of cell–cell contacts. PMID:20534449

  2. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  3. Tight junctions and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Norimasa; Murata, Masaki; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tobioka, Hirotoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Chiba, Hideki

    2003-09-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions adjacent to the apical end of the lateral membrane surface. They have two functions, the barrier (or gate) function and the fence function. The barrier function of tight junctions regulates the passage of ions, water, and various macromolecules, even of cancer cells, through paracellular spaces. The barrier function is thus relevant to edema, jaundice, diarrhea, and blood-borne metastasis. On the other hand, the fence function maintains cell polarity. In other words, tight junctions work as a fence to prevent intermixing of molecules in the apical membrane with those in the lateral membrane. This function is deeply involved in cancer cell biology, in terms of loss of cell polarity. Of the proteins comprising tight junctions, integral membrane proteins occludin, claudins, and JAMs have been recently discovered. Of these molecules, claudins are exclusively responsible for the formation of tight-junction strands and are connected with the actin cytoskeleton mediated by ZO-1. Thus, both functions of tight junctions are dependent on the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton as well as ATP. Mutations in the claudin14 and the claudin16 genes result in hereditary deafness and hereditary hypomagnesemia, respectively. Some pathogenic bacteria and viruses target and affect the tight-junction function, leading to diseases. In this review, the relationship between tight junctions and human diseases is summarized.

  4. Fibrinogen Induces Alterations of Endothelial Cell Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    PATIBANDLA, PHANI K.; TYAGI, NEETU; DEAN, WILLIAM L.; TYAGI, SURESH C.; ROBERTS, ANDREW M.; LOMINADZE, DAVID

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that an elevated content of fibrinogen (Fg) increased formation of filamentous actin and enhanced endothelial layer permeability. In the present work we tested the hypothesis that Fg binding to endothelial cells (ECs) alters expression of actin-associated endothelial tight junction proteins (TJP). Rat cardiac microvascular ECs were grown in gold plated chambers of an electrical cell-substrate impedance system, 8-well chambered, or in 12-well plates. Confluent ECs were treated with Fg (2 or 4 mg/ml), Fg (4 mg/ml) with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) kinase inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126), Fg (4 mg/ml) with anti-ICAM-1 antibody or BQ788 (endothelin type B receptor blocker), endothelin-1, endothelin-1 with BQ788, or medium alone for 24 h. Fg induced a dose-dependent decrease in EC junction integrity as determined by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Western blot analysis and RT-PCR data showed that the higher dose of Fg decreased the contents of TJPs, occludin, zona occluden-1 (ZO-1), and zona occluden-2 (ZO-2) in ECs. Fg-induced decreases in contents of the TJPs were blocked by PD98059, U0126, or anti-ICAM-1 antibody. While BQ788 inhibited endothelin-1-induced decrease in TEER, it did not affect Fg-induced decrease in TEER. These data suggest that Fg increases EC layer permeability via the MEK kinase signaling pathway by affecting occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2, TJPs, which are bound to actin filaments. Therefore, increased binding of Fg to its major EC receptor, ICAM-1, during cardiovascular diseases may increase microvascular permeability by altering the content and possibly subcellular localization of endothelial TJPs. PMID:19507189

  5. Chitosan encapsulation modulates the effect of capsaicin on the tight junctions of MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, M.; Pereira, S.; Pohl, L.; Ketelhut, S.; Kemper, B.; Gorzelanny, C.; Galla, H. -J.; Moerschbacher, B. M.; Goycoolea, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin has known pharmacological effects including the ability to reversibly open cellular tight junctions, among others. The aim of this study was to develop a strategy to enhance the paracellular transport of a substance with low permeability (FITC-dextran) across an epithelial cell monolayer via reversible opening of cellular tight junctions using a nanosystem comprised by capsaicin and of chitosan. We compared the biophysical properties of free capsaicin and capsaicin-loaded chitosan nanocapsules, including their cytotoxicity towards epithelial MDCK-C7 cells and their effect on the integrity of tight junctions, membrane permeability and cellular uptake. The cytotoxic response of MDCK-C7 cells to capsaicin at a concentration of 500 μM, which was evident for the free compound, is not observable following its encapsulation. The interaction between nanocapsules and the tight junctions of MDCK-C7 cells was investigated by impedance spectroscopy, digital holographic microscopy and structured illumination fluorescence microscopy. The nanocapsules modulated the interaction between capsaicin and tight junctions as shown by the different time profile of trans-epithelial electrical resistance and the enhanced permeability of monolayers incubated with FITC-dextran. Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy showed that the nanocapsules were internalized by MDCK-C7 cells. The capsaicin-loaded nanocapsules could be further developed as drug nanocarriers with enhanced epithelial permeability. PMID:25970096

  6. Chitosan encapsulation modulates the effect of capsaicin on the tight junctions of MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, M; Pereira, S; Pohl, L; Ketelhut, S; Kemper, B; Gorzelanny, C; Galla, H-J; Moerschbacher, B M; Goycoolea, F M

    2015-05-13

    Capsaicin has known pharmacological effects including the ability to reversibly open cellular tight junctions, among others. The aim of this study was to develop a strategy to enhance the paracellular transport of a substance with low permeability (FITC-dextran) across an epithelial cell monolayer via reversible opening of cellular tight junctions using a nanosystem comprised by capsaicin and of chitosan. We compared the biophysical properties of free capsaicin and capsaicin-loaded chitosan nanocapsules, including their cytotoxicity towards epithelial MDCK-C7 cells and their effect on the integrity of tight junctions, membrane permeability and cellular uptake. The cytotoxic response of MDCK-C7 cells to capsaicin at a concentration of 500 μM, which was evident for the free compound, is not observable following its encapsulation. The interaction between nanocapsules and the tight junctions of MDCK-C7 cells was investigated by impedance spectroscopy, digital holographic microscopy and structured illumination fluorescence microscopy. The nanocapsules modulated the interaction between capsaicin and tight junctions as shown by the different time profile of trans-epithelial electrical resistance and the enhanced permeability of monolayers incubated with FITC-dextran. Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy showed that the nanocapsules were internalized by MDCK-C7 cells. The capsaicin-loaded nanocapsules could be further developed as drug nanocarriers with enhanced epithelial permeability.

  7. Analysis of Tight Junction Formation and Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Foster, Carmen M; Retterer, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study segmentation of tight junctions and analyze the formation and integrity of tight junctions in large-scale confocal image stacks, a challenging biological problem because of the low spatial resolution images and the presence of breaks in tight junction structure. We present an automated, three-step processing approach for tight junction analysis. In our approach, we first localize each individual nucleus in the image by using thresholding, morphological filters and active contours. By using each nucleus position as a seed point, we automatically segment the cell body based on the active contour. We then use an intensity-based skeletonization algorithm to generate the boundary regions for each cell, and features are extracted from tight junctions associated with each cell to assess tight junction continuity. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically segment tight junctions and compute relevant features that provide a quantitative measure of tight junction formation to which the permeability of the cell monolayer can ultimately be correlated.

  8. Participation of plasma membrane proteins in the formation of tight junction by cultured epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Griepp, EB; Dolan, WJ; Robbins, ES; Sabatini, DD

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the transepithelial electrical resistance correlated with freeze-fracture observations have been used to study the process of tight junction formation under various experimental conditions in monolayers of the canine kidney epithelial cell line MDCK. Cells derived from previously confluent cultures and plated immediately after trypsin- EDTA dissociation develop a resistance that reaches its maximum value of several hundred ohms-cm(2) after approximately 24 h and falls to a steady-state value of 80-150 ohms- cm(2) by 48 h. The rise in resistance and the development of tight junctions can be completely and reversibly prevented by the addition of 10 μg/ml cycloheximide at the time of plating, but not when this inhibitor is added more than 10 h after planting. Thus tight junction formation consists of separable synthetic and assembly phases. These two phases can also be dissociated and the requirement for protein synthesis after plating eliminated if, following trypsinization, the cells are maintained in spinner culture for 24 h before plating. The requirement for protein synthesis is restored, however, if cells maintained in spinner culture are treated with trypsin before plating. Actinomycin D prevents development of resistance only in monolayers formed from cells derived from sparse rather than confluent cultures, but new mRNA synthesis is not required if cells obtained from sparse cultures are maintained for 24 h in spinner culture before plating. Once a steady-state resistance has been reached, its maintenance does not require either mRNA or protein synthesis; in fact, inhibition of protein synthesis causes a rise in the resistance over a 30-h period. Following treatments that disrupt the junctions in steady- state monolayers recovery of resistance also does not require protein synthesis. These observations suggest that proteins are involved in tight junction formation. Such proteins, which do not turn over rapidly under steady-state conditions

  9. Human alveolar epithelial cells expressing tight junctions to model the air-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Anna; Kletting, Stephanie; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Fischer, Ulrike; Meese, Eckart; Huwer, Hanno; Wirth, Dagmar; May, Tobias; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new human alveolar epithelial cell line (hAELVi - human Alveolar Epithelial Lentivirus immortalized) with type I-like characteristics and functional tight junctions, suitable to model the air-blood barrier of the peripheral lung. Primary human alveolar epithelial cells were immortalized by a novel regimen, grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports and characterized morphologically, biochemically and biophysically. hAELVi cells maintain the capacity to form tight intercellular junctions, with high trans-epithelial electrical resistance (> 1000 Ω*cm²). The cells could be kept in culture over several days, up to passage 75, under liquid-liquid as well as air-liquid conditions. Ultrastructural analysis and real time PCR revealed type I-like cell properties, such as the presence of caveolae, expression of caveolin-1, and absence of surfactant protein C. Accounting for the barrier properties, inter-digitations sealed with tight junctions and desmosomes were also observed. Low permeability of the hydrophilic marker sodium fluorescein confirmed the suitability of hAELVi cells for in vitro transport studies across the alveolar epithelium. These results suggest that hAELVi cells reflect the essential features of the air-blood barrier, as needed for an alternative to animal testing to study absorption and toxicity of inhaled drugs, chemicals and nanomaterials. PMID:26985677

  10. Modulation of tight junctions does not predict oral absorption of hydrophilic compounds: use of Caco-2 and Calu-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Amrita V; Morrison, Richard A; Mathias, Neil R; Dando, Sandra A; Marino, Anthony M; Chong, Saeho

    2007-08-01

    Permeability estimates using Caco-2 cells do not accurately predict the absorption of hydrophilic drugs that are primarily absorbed via the paracellular pathway. The objective of this study was to investigate whether modulation of tight junctions would help differentiation of paracellularly absorbed compounds. Tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers were manipulated using calcium depletion approaches to decrease the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of the monolayers, and permeability of hydrophilic compounds were measured under these conditions. Permeability of these compounds were also measured in Calu-3 cells, which have tighter junctions than Caco-2 cells. Calcium depletion loosened the tight junctions of Caco-2 cells to varying levels as measured by the decrease in TEER values of the monolayers. While the absolute permeability of all the model compounds increased as the tight junctions were loosened, the ratios of their permeability relative to mannitol permeability were similar. The permeability of these compounds in the tighter Calu-3 cells were also found to be similar to each other. Altering the tight junctions of Caco-2 cells to obtain leakier cell monolayers, or using a cell line with tighter junctions like Calu-3 cells, did not improve differentiation between well absorbed and poorly absorbed hydrophilic drugs. Mere manipulation of the tight junctions to increase or decrease transepithelial electrical resistance does not appear to be a viable approach to predict human absorption for hydrophilic compounds that are primarily absorbed via the paracellular pathway.

  11. PATJ connects and stabilizes apical and lateral components of tight junctions in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Michel, Didier; Arsanto, Jean-Pierre; Massey-Harroche, Dominique; Béclin, Christophe; Wijnholds, Jan; Le Bivic, André

    2005-09-01

    The Crumbs complex that also contains the cortical proteins Stardust and DPATJ (a homologue of PATJ), is crucial for the building of epithelial monolayers in Drosophila. Although loss of function of the Crumbs or Stardust genes prevents the stabilization of a belt of adherens junctions at the apico-lateral border of the cells, no phenotype has been described for the Dpatj gene and its role in epithelial morphogenesis and polarity remains unknown. We have produced downregulated PATJ stable lines of Caco2 to clarify its role in epithelial morphogenesis. In PATJ knockdown cells, Pals1 (a Stardust homologue) is no longer associated with tight junctions whereas Crumbs3 (Crb3) is accumulated into a compartment spatially close to the apical membrane and related to early endosomes. Furthermore, occludin and ZO-3, two proteins of tight junctions are mislocalized on the lateral membrane indicating that PATJ plays a novel role in the building of tight junctions by providing a link between their lateral and apical components. Thus, PATJ stabilizes the Crb3 complex and regulates the spatial concentration of several components at the border between the apical and lateral domains.

  12. Effects of adenine nucleotide and sterol depletion on tight junction structure and function in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ladino, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The antitumor agent Hadacidin (H), N-formyl-hydroxyamino-acetic acid, reversibly inhibited the multiplication of clone 4 Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells at a 4 mM concentration within 24-48 hours. Treated cells were arrested in the S phase of the cell cycle. Accompanying this action was a 16-fold increase in the area occupied b the cells and a refractoriness to trypsin treatment. To test whether this effect was due to an increase in tight junction integrity, electrical resistance (TER) was measured across H-treated monolayers. Addition of H at the onset of junction formation reversibly prevented the development of TER. ATP and cAMP levels were decreased by H, as well as the rate of ({sup 3}H)-leucine incorporation into protein. When 1 mM dibutyryl-cAMP (d.cAMP) and theophylline were added, H had no effect on cell division or protein synthesis, and TER was partially restored. The addition of 1 mM d.cAMP and 1 mM theophylline to control cultures decreased TER, indicating a biphasic effect on TER development/maintenance. In a separate study, the effect of sterol depletion on tight junctions formation/maintenance in wild-type MDCK cells was investigated.

  13. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  14. Influenza virus damages the alveolar barrier by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Short, Kirsty R; Kasper, Jennifer; van der Aa, Stijn; Andeweg, Arno C; Zaaraoui-Boutahar, Fatiha; Goeijenbier, Marco; Richard, Mathilde; Herold, Susanne; Becker, Christin; Scott, Dana P; Limpens, Ronald W A L; Koster, Abraham J; Bárcena, Montserrat; Fouchier, Ron A M; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Kuiken, Thijs

    2016-03-01

    A major cause of respiratory failure during influenza A virus (IAV) infection is damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier of the pulmonary alveolus. Damage to this barrier results in flooding of the alveolar lumen with proteinaceous oedema fluid, erythrocytes and inflammatory cells. To date, the exact roles of pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells in this process remain unclear.Here, we used an in vitro co-culture model to understand how IAV damages the pulmonary epithelial-endothelial barrier. Human epithelial cells were seeded on the upper half of a transwell membrane while human endothelial cells were seeded on the lower half. These cells were then grown in co-culture and IAV was added to the upper chamber.We showed that the addition of IAV (H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes) resulted in significant barrier damage. Interestingly, we found that, while endothelial cells mounted a pro-inflammatory/pro-coagulant response to a viral infection in the adjacent epithelial cells, damage to the alveolar epithelial-endothelial barrier occurred independently of endothelial cells. Rather, barrier damage was associated with disruption of tight junctions amongst epithelial cells, and specifically with loss of tight junction protein claudin-4.Taken together, these data suggest that maintaining epithelial cell integrity is key in reducing pulmonary oedema during IAV infection.

  15. Nuclear localization of the tight junction protein ZO-2 in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Islas, Socorro; Vega, Jesús; Ponce, Lissette; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2002-03-10

    The tight junction constitutes the major barrier to solute and water flow through the paracellular space of epithelia and endothelia. It is formed by transmembrane proteins and submembranous molecules such as the MAGUKs ZOs. We have previously found that several MAGUKs, including those of the tight (ZO-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3) and septate junction (tamou and Dlg), contain one or two nuclear sorting signals located at their first PDZ and GK domains. Now we show that these proteins also contain a nuclear export signal and focus our study on the nuclear membrane shuttling of ZO-2. In sparse cultures this molecule concentrates at the nucleus in clusters, where it partially colocalizes with splicing factor SC35. Nuclear staining diminishes as the monolayer acquires confluence through a process sensitive to the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B. Nuclear localization can be induced by impairing cell-cell contacts, by mechanical injury. ZO-2 that shuttles from the cell periphery into the nucleus is not newly synthesized but originates from a preexistent pool. The movement of this protein is mediated by the actin cytoskeleton.

  16. The tight junction protein ZO-2 blocks cell cycle progression and inhibits cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza; Tapia, Rocio; Huerta, Miriam; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther

    2009-05-01

    ZO-2 is an adaptor protein of the tight junction that belongs to the MAGUK protein family. ZO-2 is a dual localization protein that in sparse cultures is present at the cell borders and the nuclei, whereas in confluent cultures it is concentrated at the cell boundaries. Here we have studied whether ZO-2 is able to regulate the expression of cyclin D1 (CD1) and cell proliferation. We have demonstrated that ZO-2 negatively regulates CD1 transcription by interacting with c-Myc at an E box present in CD1 promoter. We have further found that ZO-2 transfection into epithelial MDCK cells triggers a diminished expression of CD1 protein and decreases the rate of cell proliferation in a wound-healing assay.

  17. The tight junction protein CAR regulates cardiac conduction and cell-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Lisewski, Ulrike; Shi, Yu; Wrackmeyer, Uta; Fischer, Robert; Chen, Chen; Schirdewan, Alexander; Jüttner, Rene; Rathjen, Fritz; Poller, Wolfgang; Radke, Michael H; Gotthardt, Michael

    2008-09-29

    The Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) is known for its role in virus uptake and as a protein of the tight junction. It is predominantly expressed in the developing brain and heart and reinduced upon cardiac remodeling in heart disease. So far, the physiological functions of CAR in the adult heart are largely unknown. We have generated a heart-specific inducible CAR knockout (KO) and found impaired electrical conduction between atrium and ventricle that increased with progressive loss of CAR. The underlying mechanism relates to the cross talk of tight and gap junctions with altered expression and localization of connexins that affect communication between CAR KO cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that CAR is not only relevant for virus uptake and cardiac remodeling but also has a previously unknown function in the propagation of excitation from the atrium to the ventricle that could explain the association of arrhythmia and Coxsackievirus infection of the heart.

  18. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  19. Crumbs 3b promotes tight junctions in an ezrin-dependent manner in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilston-Lünel, Andrew M.; Haley, Kathryn E.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Wang, Yanhua; Chatterton, Abigail L.D.; Moleirinho, Susana; Watson, Ailsa; Hundal, Harinder S.; Prystowsky, Michael B.; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Reynolds, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Crumbs 3 (CRB3) is a component of epithelial junctions, which has been implicated in apical-basal polarity, apical identity, apical stability, cell adhesion, and cell growth. CRB3 undergoes alternative splicing to yield two variants: CRB3a and CRB3b. Here, we describe novel data demonstrating that, as with previous studies on CRB3a, CRB3b also promotes the formation of tight junctions (TJs). However, significantly we demonstrate that the 4.1-ezrin–radixin–moesin-binding motif of CRB3b is required for CRB3b functionality and that ezrin binds to the FBM of CRB3b. Furthermore, we show that ezrin contributes to CRB3b functionality and the correct distribution of TJ proteins. We demonstrate that both CRB3 isoforms are required for the production of functionally mature TJs and also the localization of ezrin to the plasma membrane. Finally, we demonstrate that reduced CRB3b expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) correlates with cytoplasmic ezrin, a biomarker for aggressive disease, and shows evidence that while CRB3a expression has no effect, low CRB3b and high cytoplasmic ezrin expression combined may be prognostic for HNSCC. PMID:27190314

  20. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions.

  1. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions. PMID:17169347

  2. Claudin-11 and occludin are major contributors to Sertoli cell tight junction function, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mark J; Foo, Caroline FH; Dinger, Marcel E; Smooker, Peter M; Stanton, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ) is the key component of the blood-testis barrier, where it sequesters developing germ cells undergoing spermatogenesis within the seminiferous tubules. Hormonally regulated claudin-11 is a critical transmembrane protein involved in barrier function and its murine knockout results in infertility. We aimed to assess quantitatively the significance of the contribution of claudin-11 to TJ function, in vitro, using siRNA-mediated gene silencing. We also conducted an analysis of the contribution of occludin, another intrinsic transmembrane protein of the TJ. Silencing of claudin-11 and/or occludin was conducted using siRNA in an immature rat Sertoli cell culture model. Transepithelial electrical resistance was used to assess quantitatively TJ function throughout the culture. Two days after siRNA treatment, cells were fixed for immunocytochemical localization of junction proteins or lyzed for RT-PCR assessment of mRNA expression. Silencing of claudin-11, occludin, or both resulted in significant decreases in TJ function of 55% (P < 0.01), 51% (P < 0.01), and 62% (P < 0.01), respectively. Data were concomitant with significant decreases in mRNA expression and marked reductions in the localization of targeted proteins to the Sertoli cell TJ. We provide quantitative evidence that claudin-11 contributes significantly (P < 0.01) to Sertoli cell TJ function in vitro. Interestingly, occludin, which is hormonally regulated but not implicated in infertility until late adulthood, is also a significant (P < 0.01) contributor to barrier function. Our data are consistent with in vivo studies that clearly demonstrate a role for these proteins in maintaining normal TJ barrier structure and function. PMID:26585695

  3. Tight junction targeting and intracellular trafficking of occludin in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Marchant, Jonathan S; Ye, Dongmei; Ma, Thomas Y; Said, Hamid M

    2007-11-01

    Occludin, a transmembrane (TM)-spanning protein, is an integral component of the tight junctional (TJ) complexes that regulate epithelial integrity and paracellular barrier function. However, the molecular determinants that dictate occludin targeting and delivery to the TJs remain unclear. Here, using live cell imaging of yellow fluorescent protein-labeled occludin fragments, we resolved the intracellular trafficking of occludin-fusion proteins in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney and Caco-2 cells to delineate the regions within the occludin polypeptide that are important for occludin targeting to the TJs. Live cell confocal imaging showed that complete or partial truncation of the COOH-terminal tail of the occludin polypeptide did not prevent occludin targeting to the TJs in epithelial cell lines. Progressive truncations into the COOH-terminal tail decreased the efficiency of occludin expression; after the removal of the regions proximal to the fourth transmembrane domain (TM4), the efficiency of expression increased. However, further deletions into the TM4 abolished TJ targeting, which resulted in constructs that were retained intracellularly within the endoplasmic reticulum. The full-length occludin polypeptide trafficked to the cell surface within a heterogenous population of intracellular vesicles that delivered occludin to the plasma membrane in a microtubule- and temperature-dependent manner. In contrast, the steady-state localization of occludin at the cell surface was dependent on intact microfilaments but not microtubules.

  4. Tight junction between endothelial cells: the interaction between nanoparticles and blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Summary Since nanoparticles are now widely applied as food additives, in cosmetics and other industries, especially in medical therapy and diagnosis, we ask here whether nanoparticles can cause several adverse effects to human health. In this review, based on research on nanotoxicity, we mainly discuss the negative influence of nanoparticles on blood vessels in several aspects and the potential mechanism for nanoparticles to penetrate endothelial layers of blood vessels, which are the sites of phosphorylation of tight junction proteins (claudins, occludins, and ZO (Zonula occludens)) proteins, oxidative stress and shear stress. We propose a connection between the presence of nanoparticles and the regulation of the tight junction, which might be the key approach for nanoparticles to penetrate endothelial layers and then have an impact on other tissues and organs. PMID:27335757

  5. Tight junction between endothelial cells: the interaction between nanoparticles and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Since nanoparticles are now widely applied as food additives, in cosmetics and other industries, especially in medical therapy and diagnosis, we ask here whether nanoparticles can cause several adverse effects to human health. In this review, based on research on nanotoxicity, we mainly discuss the negative influence of nanoparticles on blood vessels in several aspects and the potential mechanism for nanoparticles to penetrate endothelial layers of blood vessels, which are the sites of phosphorylation of tight junction proteins (claudins, occludins, and ZO (Zonula occludens)) proteins, oxidative stress and shear stress. We propose a connection between the presence of nanoparticles and the regulation of the tight junction, which might be the key approach for nanoparticles to penetrate endothelial layers and then have an impact on other tissues and organs. PMID:27335757

  6. AMP-18 protects barrier function of colonic epithelial cells: role of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh-Reitz, Margaret M.; Huang, Erick F.; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Martin, Terence E.; Kartha, Sreedharan; Toback, F. Gary

    2005-01-01

    AMP-18, a novel gastric antrum mucosal protein, and a synthetic peptide of amino acids 77-97, have mitogenic and motogenic properties for epithelial cells. The possibility that AMP-18 is also protective was evaluated in the colonic mucosa of mice and monolayer cultures of human colonic epithelial Caco2/bbe (C2) cells. Administration of AMP peptide to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colonic injury delayed the onset of bloody diarrhea, and reduced weight loss. Treatment of C2 cells with AMP peptide protected monolayers against decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) induced by the oxidant monochloramine, indomethacin, or DSS. A molecular mechanism for these barrier-protective effects was sought by asking if AMP peptide acted on specific tight junction (TJ) proteins. Immunoblots of detergent-insoluble fractions of C2 cells treated with AMP peptide exhibited increased accumulation of specific TJ proteins. Occludin immunoreactivity was also increased in detergent-insoluble fractions obtained from colonic mucosal cells of mice injected with AMP peptide. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (CF) supported the capacity of AMP peptide to enhance accumulation of occludin and ZO-1 in TJ domains of C2 cell monolayers, and together with immunoblot analysis showed that the peptide protected against loss of these TJ proteins following oxidant injury. AMP peptide also protected against a fall in TER during disruption of actin filaments by cytochalasin D, and stabilized perijunctional actin during oxidant injury when assessed by CF. These findings suggest that AMP-18 could protect the intestinal mucosal barrier by acting on specific TJ proteins and stabilizing perijunctional actin. PMID:15961882

  7. Disruption of MDCK cell tight junctions by the free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Mineko; Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Navarro-García, Fernando; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; Sabanero, Myrna; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2013-02-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This parasite invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa. However, the mechanism of epithelium penetration is not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of N. fowleri trophozoites and the non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) tight junction proteins, including claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1, as well as on the actin cytoskeleton. Trophozoites from each of the free-living amoeba species were co-cultured with MDCK cells in a 1 : 1 ratio for 1, 3, 6 or 10 h. Light microscopy revealed that N. fowleri caused morphological changes as early as 3 h post-infection in an epithelial MDCK monolayer. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that after 10 h of co-culture, N. fowleri trophozoites induced epithelial cell damage, which was characterized by changes in the actin apical ring and disruption of the ZO-1 and claudin-1 proteins but not occludin. Western blot assays revealed gradual degradation of ZO-1 and claudin-1 as early as 3 h post-infection. Likewise, there was a drop in transepithelial electrical resistance that resulted in increased epithelial permeability and facilitated the invasion of N. fowleri trophozoites by a paracellular route. In contrast, N. gruberi did not induce alterations in MDCK cells even at 10 h post-infection. Based on these results, we suggest that N. fowleri trophozoites disrupt epithelial monolayers, which could enable their penetration of the olfactory epithelium and subsequent invasion of the central nervous system.

  8. Cdc42-dependent Modulation of Tight Junctions and Membrane Protein Traffic in Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Raul; Ruiz, Wily G.; Leung, Som-Ming; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Apodaca, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cells maintain the asymmetric composition of their apical and basolateral membrane domains by at least two different processes. These include the regulated trafficking of macromolecules from the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway to the appropriate membrane domain and the ability of the tight junction to prevent free mixing of membrane domain-specific proteins and lipids. Cdc42, a Rho family GTPase, is known to govern cellular polarity and membrane traffic in several cell types. We examined whether this protein regulated tight junction function in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and pathways that direct proteins to the apical and basolateral surface of these cells. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells that expressed dominant-active or dominant-negative mutants of Cdc42 under the control of a tetracycline-repressible system. Here we report that expression of dominant-active Cdc42V12 or dominant-negative Cdc42N17 altered tight junction function. Expression of Cdc42V12 slowed endocytic and biosynthetic traffic, and expression of Cdc42N17 slowed apical endocytosis and basolateral to apical transcytosis but stimulated biosynthetic traffic. These results indicate that Cdc42 may modulate multiple cellular pathways required for the maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. PMID:11514615

  9. The tight junction protein ZO-2 and Janus kinase 1 mediate intercellular communications in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Patecki, Margret; Kusch, Angelika; Korenbaum, Elena; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jak1 in vascular smooth muscle cells via ZO-2 N-terminal fragment. {yields} Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and ZO-2 localization to the sites of homotypic intercellular contacts. {yields} The urokinase receptor uPAR regulates ZO-2/Jak1 functional association. {yields} The ZO-2/Jak1/uPAR signaling complex is required for vascular smooth muscle cells functional network formation. -- Abstract: Recent evidence points to a multifunctional role of ZO-2, the tight junction protein of the MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like) family. Though ZO-2 has been found in cell types lacking tight junction structures, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), little is known about ZO-2 function in these cells. We provide evidence that ZO-2 mediates specific homotypic cell-to-cell contacts between VSMC. Using mass spectrometry we found that ZO-2 is associated with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak1. By generating specific ZO-2 constructs we further found that the N-terminal fragment of ZO-2 molecule is responsible for this interaction. Adenovirus-based expression of Jak1 inactive mutant demonstrated that Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. By means of RNA silencing, expression of Jak1 mutant form and fluorescently labeled ZO-2 fusion protein we further specified that active Jak1, but not Jak1 inactive mutant, mediates ZO-2 localization to the sites of intercellular contacts. We identified the urokinase receptor uPAR as a pre-requisite for these cellular events. Functional requirement of the revealed signaling complex for VSMC network formation was confirmed in experiments using Matrigel and in contraction assay. Our findings imply involvement of the ZO-2 tight junction independent signaling complex containing Jak1 and uPAR in VSMC intercellular communications. This mechanism may contribute to vascular remodeling in occlusive cardiovascular diseases and in arteriogenesis.

  10. Tight junctions and the regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2009-04-01

    Cell adhesion is a key regulator of cell differentiation. Cell interactions with neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix regulate gene expression, cell proliferation, polarity and apoptosis. Apical cell-cell junctions participate in these processes using different types of proteins, some of them exhibit nuclear and junctional localization and are called NACos for Nuclear Adhesion Complexes. Tight junctions are one type of such cell-cell junctions and several signaling complexes have been identified to associate with them. In general, expression of tight junction components suppresses proliferation to allow differentiation in a coordinated manner with adherens junctions and extracellular matrix adhesion. These tight junction components have been shown to affect several signaling and transcriptional pathways, and changes in the expression of tight junction proteins are associated with several disease conditions, such as cancer. Here, we will review how tight junction proteins participate in the regulation of gene expression and cell proliferation, as well as how they are regulated themselves by different mechanisms involved in gene expression and cell differentiation.

  11. aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at Ser285 to promote cell contact maturation and tight junction formation

    PubMed Central

    Iden, Sandra; Misselwitz, Steve; Peddibhotla, Swetha S.D.; Tuncay, Hüseyin; Rehder, Daniela; Gerke, Volker; Robenek, Horst; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    The PAR-3–atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)–PAR-6 complex has been implicated in the development of apicobasal polarity and the formation of tight junctions (TJs) in vertebrate epithelial cells. It is recruited by junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to primordial junctions where aPKC is activated by Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases. In this paper, we show that aPKC can interact directly with JAM-A in a PAR-3–independent manner. Upon recruitment to primordial junctions, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to promote the maturation of immature cell–cell contacts. In fully polarized cells, S285-phosphorylated JAM-A is localized exclusively at the TJs, and S285 phosphorylation of JAM-A is required for the development of a functional epithelial barrier. Protein phosphatase 2A dephosphorylates JAM-A at S285, suggesting that it antagonizes the activity of aPKC. Expression of nonphosphorylatable JAM-A/S285A interferes with single lumen specification during cyst development in three-dimensional culture. Our data suggest that aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to regulate cell–cell contact maturation, TJ formation, and single lumen specification. PMID:22371556

  12. The tight junction protein JAM-A functions as coreceptor for rotavirus entry into MA104 cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; Espinoza, Marco A; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-01-15

    Several molecules have been identified as receptors or coreceptors for rotavirus infection, including glycans, integrins, and hsc70. In this work we report that the tight junction proteins JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 play an important role during rotavirus entry into MA104 cells. JAM-A was found to function as coreceptor for rotavirus strains RRV, Wa, and UK, but not for rotavirus YM. Reassortant viruses derived from rotaviruses RRV and YM showed that the virus spike protein VP4 determines the use of JAM-A as coreceptor.

  13. Angelica archengelica extract induced perturbation of rat skin and tight junctional protein (ZO-1) of HaCaT cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, N.; Naz, S.; Tiwary, AK.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Herbal enhancers compared to the synthetic ones have shown less toxis effects. Coumarins have been shown at concentrations inhibiting phospoliphase C-Y (Phc-Y) are able to enhance tight junction (TJ) permeability due to hyperpoalation of Zonolous Occludense-1 (ZO-1) proteins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ethanolic extract of Angelica archengelica (AA-E) which contain coumarin on permeation of repaglinide across rat epidermis and on the tight junction plaque protein ZO-1 in HaCaT cells. Methods Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) from the rat skin treated with different concentrations of AA-E was assessed by Tewameter. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) on were performed on AA-E treated rat skin portions. The possibility of AA-E influence on the architecture of tight junctions by adverse effect on the cytoplasmic ZO-1 in HaCaT cells was investigated. Finally, the systemic delivery of repaglinide from the optimized transdermal formulation was investigated in rats. Results The permeation of repaglinide across excised rat epidermis was 7-fold higher in the presence of AA-E (5% w/v) as compared to propylene glycol:ethanol (7:3) mixture. The extract was found to perturb the lipid microconstituents in both excised and viable rat skin, although, the effect was less intense in the later. The enhanced permeation of repaglinide across rat epidermis excised after treatment with AA-E (5% w/v) for different periods was in concordance with the high TEWL values of similarly treated viable rat skin. Further, the observed increase in intercellular space, disordering of lipid structure and corneocyte detachment indicated considerable effect on the ultrastructure of rat epidermis. Treatment of HaCaT cell line with AA-E (0.16% w/v) for 6 hrs influenced ZO-1 as evidenced by reduced immunofluorescence of anti-TJP1 (ZO-1) antibody in Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy studies (CLSM) studies. The plasma

  14. Characterization of the tight junction protein ZO-2 localized at the nucleus of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Blanca Estela; Ponce, Arturo; Moreno, Jacqueline; Betanzos, Abigail; Huerta, Miriam; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2004-07-01

    ZO-2 is a MAGUK protein that in confluent epithelial sheets localizes at tight junctions (TJ) whereas in sparse cultures accumulates in clusters at the nucleus. Here, we have characterized several nuclear properties of ZO-2. We observe that ZO-2 is present in the nuclear matrix and co-immunoprecipitates with lamin B(1) and actin from the nuclei of sparse cultures. We show that ZO-2 presents several NLS at its amino region, that when deleted, diminish the nuclear import of the ZO-2 amino segment and impair the ability of the region to regulate the transcriptional activity of promoters controlled by AP-1. Several RS repeats are detected in the ZO-2 amino segment, however, their deletion does not preclude the display of a speckled nuclear pattern. ZO-2 displays two putative NES. However, only the second one appears to be functional, as when conjugated to ovalbumin (OV), it is able to translocate this protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a leptomycin B-sensitive way.

  15. Cortisol affects tight junction morphology between pavement cells of rainbow trout gills in single-seeded insert culture.

    PubMed

    Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Farkas, Julia; Salvenmoser, Willi; Pelster, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    A primary culture system of rainbow trout gill pavement cells grown on permeable support (single-seeded insert, SSI) was used to examine histological and physiological changes induced by the addition of the corticosteroid hormone cortisol. Pavement cell epithelia were cultured under symmetrical conditions (L15 apical/L15 basolateral) and developed a high transepithelial resistance (TER, 6.84 ± 1.99 kΩ cm(2), mean ± SEM) with a low phenol red diffusion rate (PRD, 0.15 ± 0.03 μmol l(-1)/day). Addition of cortisol to the basolateral compartment increased TER twofold and reduced PRD threefold over a 5-day period. A similar increase in TER could be seen after 24 h apical freshwater (FW) in control cultures. In cortisol-treated cultures FW exposure did not change TER, but PRD increased significantly. Histochemical staining of the cytoskeleton of cells in SSI culture revealed a morphological partitioning into a single mucosal layer of polarized, polygonal cells featuring cortical F-actin rings which were comparable to F-actin rings of epithelial cells on the lamellar and filamental surface, and several unorganized serosal layers of cells with F-actin stress fibers. Addition of cortisol increased cell density by 18% and in the mucosal layer it led to smaller, less polygonal cells with increased height and increased cell contact area. In transmission electron microscopic images two pairs of cytoplasmatic electron-dense structures confining the zonula occludens apically and basally toward the zonula adhaerens were found. Addition of cortisol increased the distance between those paired structures, hence led to deeper tight junctions. The cortisol-induced increase in barrier properties, therefore, involves a structural fortification of the tight junctions which was not generally modified by a short 24-h apical freshwater stress. These results identify cortisol as a regulator of tight junction morphology between pavement cells of euryhaline fish such as the

  16. Tight junction modulator and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Matsuhisa, Koji; Kondoh, Masuo; Takahashi, Azusa; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2009-05-01

    Recent progress in pharmaceutical technology based on genomic and proteomic research has provided many drug candidates, including not only chemicals but peptides, antibodies and nucleic acids. These candidates do not show pharmaceutical activity without their absorption into systemic flow and movement from the systemic flow into the target tissue. Epithelial and endothelial cell sheets play a pivotal role in the barrier between internal and external body and tissues. Tight junctions (TJs) between adjacent epithelial cells limit the movement of molecules through the intercellular space in epithelial and endothelial cell sheets. Thus, a promising strategy for drug delivery is the modulation of TJ components to allow molecules to pass through the TJ-based cellular barriers. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the development of TJ modulators and the possibility of absorption enhancers and drug-delivery systems based on TJ components.

  17. Activation of the Ca2+-sensing receptor induces deposition of tight junction components to the epithelial cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jouret, François; Wu, Jingshing; Hull, Michael; Rajendran, Vanathy; Mayr, Bernhard; Schöfl, Christof; Geibel, John; Caplan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily and plays essential roles in divalent ion homeostasis and cell differentiation. Because extracellular Ca2+ is essential for the development of stable epithelial tight junctions (TJs), we hypothesized that the CaSR participates in regulating TJ assembly. We first assessed the expression of the CaSR in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells at steady state and following manipulations that modulate TJ assembly. Next, we examined the effects of CaSR agonists and antagonists on TJ assembly. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that endogenous CaSR is located at the basolateral pole of MDCK cells. Stable transfection of human CaSR in MDCK cells further reveals that this protein co-distributes with β-catenin on the basolateral membrane. Switching MDCK cells from low-Ca2+ medium to medium containing a normal Ca2+ concentration significantly increases CaSR expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Exposure of MDCK cells maintained in low-Ca2+ conditions to the CaSR agonists neomycin, Gd3+ or R-568 causes the transient relocation of the tight junction components ZO-1 and occludin to sites of cell–cell contact, while inducing no significant changes in the expression of mRNAs encoding junction-associated proteins. Stimulation of CaSR also increases the interaction between ZO-1 and the F-actin-binding protein I-afadin. This effect does not involve activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase. By contrast, CaSR inhibition by NPS-2143 significantly decreases interaction of ZO-1 with I-afadin and reduces deposition of ZO-1 at the cell surface following a Ca2+ switch from 5 µM to 200 µM [Ca2+]e. Pre-exposure of MDCK cells to the cell-permeant Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM, similarly prevents TJ assembly caused by CaSR activation. Finally, stable transfection of MDCK cells with a cDNA encoding a human disease-associated gain-of-function mutant form of the CaSR increases the

  18. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains. PMID:19679145

  19. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization.

    PubMed

    McCall, Ingrid C; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W; Parkos, Charles A

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  20. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Ingrid C.; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A.; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  1. Tight junctions in the testis: new perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    In the testis, tight junctions (TJs) are found between adjacent Sertoli cells at the level of the blood–testis barrier (BTB) where they coexist with basal ectoplasmic specializations and desmosome-gap junctions. The BTB physically divides the seminiferous epithelium into two distinct compartments: a basal compartment where spermatogonia and early spermatocytes are found, and an adluminal compartment where more developed germ cells are sequestered from the systemic circulation. In order for germ cells (i.e. preleptotene spermatocytes) to enter the adluminal compartment, they must cross the BTB, a cellular event requiring the participation of several molecules and signalling pathways. Still, it is not completely understood how preleptotene spermatocytes traverse the BTB at stage VIII of the seminiferous epithelial cycle. In this review, we discuss largely how TJ proteins are exploited by viruses and cancer cells to cross endothelial and epithelial cells. We also discuss how this information may apply to future studies investigating the movement of preleptotene spermatocytes across the BTB. PMID:20403874

  2. The function of tight junctions in maintaining differences in lipid composition between the apical and the basolateral cell surface domains of MDCK cells.

    PubMed Central

    van Meer, G; Simons, K

    1986-01-01

    Tight junctions in epithelial cells have been postulated to act as barriers inhibiting lateral diffusion of lipids and proteins between the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains. To study the fence function of the tight junction in more detail, we have fused liposomes containing the fluorescent phospholipid N-Rh-PE into the apical plasma membrane of MDCK cells. Liposome fusion was induced by low pH and mediated by the influenza virus hemagglutinin, which was expressed on the apical cell surface after viral infection. Redistribution of N-Rh-PE to the basolateral surface, monitored at 0 degree C by fluorescence microscopy, appeared to be dependent on the transbilayer orientation of the fluorescent lipids in the plasma membrane. Asymmetric liposomes containing over 85% of the N-Rh-PE in the external bilayer leaflet, as shown by a phospholipase A2 assay, were generated by octyl beta-D-glucoside dialysis. When these asymmetric liposomes were fused with the apical plasma membrane, fluorescent lipid did not move to the basolateral side. Symmetric liposomes which contained the marker in both leaflets were obtained by freeze-thawing asymmetric liposomes or by reverse-phase evaporation. Upon fusion of these with the apical membrane, redistribution to the basolateral membrane occurred immediately. Redistribution could be observed with asymmetric liposomes only when the tight junctions were opened by incubation in a Ca2+-free medium. During the normal experimental manipulations the tight junctions remained intact since a high trans-epithelial electrical resistance was maintained over the cell monolayer. We conclude that the tight junction acts as a diffusion barrier for the fluorescent phospholipid N-Rh-PE in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane but not in the cytoplasmic leaflet. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3743548

  3. Vitamin D increases tight-junction conductance and paracellular Ca2+ transport in Caco-2 cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chirayath, M V; Gajdzik, L; Hulla, W; Graf, J; Cross, H S; Peterlik, M

    1998-02-01

    We investigated the effects of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] on paracellular intestinal Ca2+ absorption by determination of transepithelial electric resistance (TEER), as a measure of tight-junction ion permeability and bidirectional transepithelial 45Ca2+ fluxes in confluent Caco-2 cell cultures. The rise of TEER to steady-state levels of approximately 2,000 omega.cm2 was significantly attenuated by 1,25(OH)2D3 (by up to 50%) in a dose-dependent fashion between 10(-11) and 10(-8) M. Synthetic analogs of 1,25(OH)2D3, namely, 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-16-ene,23-yne-vitamin D3 and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-26,27-hexafluoro-16-ene,23-yne-vitamin D3, exhibited similar biopotency, whereas their genomically inactive 1-deoxy congeners were only marginally effective. Enhancement of transepithelial conductance of Caco-2 cell monolayers by vitamin D was accompanied by a significant increase in bidirectional transepithelial 45Ca2+ fluxes. Although 1,25(OH)2D3 also induced cellular 45Ca2+ uptake from the apical aspect of Caco-2 cell layers and upregulated the expression of calbindin-9kDa mRNA, no significant contribution of the Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase-mediated transcellular pathway to transepithelial Ca2+ transport could be detected. Therefore stimulation of Ca2+ fluxes across confluent Caco-2 cells very likely results from a genomic effect of vitamin D sterols on assembly and permeability of tight-junctional complexes.

  4. Symplekin, a novel type of tight junction plaque protein

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody we have identified and cDNA-cloned a novel type of protein localized, by light and electron microscopy, to the plaque associated with the cytoplasmic face of the tight junction- containing zone (zonula occludens) of polar epithelial cells and of Sertoli cells of testis, but absent from the junctions of vascular endothelia. The approximately 3.7-kb mRNA encodes a polypeptide of 1142 amino acids (calculated molecular weight 126.5 kD, pI 6.25), for which the name "symplekin" (from Greek sigma upsilon mu pi lambda epsilon kappa epsilon iota, nu, to tie together, to weave, to be intertwined) is proposed. However, both the mRNA and the protein can also be detected in a wide range of cell types that do not form tight junctions or are even completely devoid of any stable cell contacts. Careful analyses have revealed that the protein occurs in all these diverse cells in the nucleoplasm, and only in those cells forming tight junctions is it recruited, partly but specifically, to the plaque structure of the zonula occludens. We discuss symplekin as a representative of a group of dual residence proteins which occur and probably function in the nucleus as well as in the plaques exclusive for either tight junctions, adherens junctions, or desmosomes. PMID:8769423

  5. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Mechanical Barrier Function and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Qin, Guixin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Feifei; Che, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the role of soybean agglutinin (SBA) in mediating membrane permeability and the mechanical barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells. The IPEC-J2 cells were cultured and treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 mg/mL SBA. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were measured to evaluate membrane permeability. The results showed a significant decrease in TEER values (p < 0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and a pronounced increase in AP activity (p < 0.05). Cell growth and cell morphology were used to evaluate the cell viability. A significant cell growth inhibition (p < 0.05) and alteration of morphology were observed when the concentration of SBA was increased. The results of western blotting showed that the expression levels of occludin and claudin-3 were decreased by 31% and 64% compared to those of the control, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, immunofluorescence labeling indicated an obvious decrease in staining of these targets and changes in their localizations. In conclusion, SBA increased the membrane permeability, inhibited the cell viability and reduced the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-3), leading to a decrease in mechanical barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24189218

  6. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  7. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  8. The roles of tricellular tight junction protein lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor in malignancy of human endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Satohisa, Seiro; Kohno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Konno, Takumi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) has been identified as a novel molecular constituent of tricellular contacts that have a barrier function for the cellular sheet. LSR recruits tricellulin (TRIC), which is the first molecular component of tricellular tight junctions. Knockdown of LSR increases cell motility and invasion of certain cancer cells. However, the behavior and the roles of LSR in endometrial cancer remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the behavior and roles of LSR in normal and endometrial cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. In endometriosis and endometrial cancer, LSR was observed not only in the subapical region but also throughout the lateral region as well as in normal endometrial epithelial cells in the secretory phase, and LSR in the cancer was reduced in correlation with the malignancy. Knockdown of LSR by the siRNA in cells of the endometrial cancer cell line Sawano, induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation, while TRIC relocalized from the tricellular region to the bicellular region at the membrane. In Sawano cells and normal HEEs, a decrease of LSR induced by leptin and an increase of LSR induced by adiponectin and the drugs for type 2 diabetes metformin and berberine were observed via distinct signaling pathways including JAK2/STAT. In Sawano cells, metformin and berberine prevented cell migration and invasion induced by downregulation of LSR by the siRNA and leptin treatment. The dissection of the mechanism in the downregulation of endometrial LSR during obesity is important in developing new diagnostic and therapy for endometrial cancer. PMID:27036040

  9. Claudin 28b and F-actin are involved in rainbow trout gill pavement cell tight junction remodeling under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Egg, Margit; Schwerte, Thorsten; Pelster, Bernd

    2011-05-01

    Permeability of rainbow trout gill pavement cells cultured on permeable supports (single seeded inserts) changes upon exposure to freshwater or treatment with cortisol. The molecular components of this change are largely unknown, but tight junctions that regulate the paracellular pathway are prime candidates in this adaptational process. Using differential display polymerase chain reaction we found a set of 17 differentially regulated genes in trout pavement cells that had been exposed to freshwater apically for 24 h. Five genes were related to the cell-cell contact. One of these genes was isolated and identified as encoding claudin 28b, an integral component of the tight junction. Immunohistochemical reactivity to claudin 28b protein was concentrated in a circumferential ring colocalized to the cortical F-actin ring. To study the contribution of this isoform to changes in transepithelial resistance and Phenol Red diffusion under apical hypo-or hyperosmotic exposure we quantified the fluorescence signal of this claudin isoform in immunohistochemical stainings together with the fluorescence of phalloidin-probed F-actin. Upon hypo-osmotic stress claudin 28b fluorescence and epithelial tightness remained stable. Under hyperosmotic stress, the presence of claudin 28b at the junction significantly decreased, and epithelial tightness was severely reduced. Cortical F-actin fluorescence increased upon hypo-osmotic stress, whereas hyperosmotic stress led to a separation of cortical F-actin rings and the number of apical crypt-like pores increased. Addition of cortisol to the basolateral medium attenuated cortical F-actin separation and pore formation during hyperosmotic stress and reduced claudin 28b in junctions except after recovery of cells from exposure to freshwater. Our results showed that short-term salinity stress response in cultured trout gill cells was dependent on a dynamic remodeling of tight junctions, which involves claudin 28b and the supporting F-actin ring.

  10. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed.

  11. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients

    PubMed Central

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A.; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed. PMID:26226276

  12. The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jun, Fos and C/EBP transcription factors in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Betanzos, Abigail; Huerta, Miriam; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Azuara, Elisa; Amerena, José; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2004-01-01

    ZO-2 is a membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein present at the tight junction (TJ) of epithelial cells. While confluent monolayers have ZO-2 at their cellular borders, sparse cultures conspicuously show ZO-2 at the nuclei. To study the role of nuclear ZO-2, we tested by pull-down assays and gel shift analysis the interaction between ZO-2 GST fusion proteins and different transcription factors. We identified the existence of a specific interaction of ZO-2 with Fos, Jun and C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein). To analyze if this association is present "in vivo", we performed immunoprecipitation and immunolocalization experiments, which revealed an interaction of ZO-2 with Jun, Fos and C/EBP not only at the nucleus but also at the TJ region. To test if the association of ZO-2 with AP-1 (activator protein-1) modulates gene transcription, we performed reporter gene assays employing chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructs with promoters under the control of AP-1 sites. We observed that the co-transfected ZO-2 down-regulates CAT expression in a dose-dependent manner. Since ZO-2 is a multidomain protein, we proceeded to determine which region of the molecule is responsible for the modulation of gene expression, and observed that both the amino and the carboxyl domains are capable of inhibiting gene transcription.

  13. Possible involvement of phosphorylation of occludin in tight junction formation.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, A; Furuse, M; Saitou, M; Ando-Akatsuka, Y; Tsukita, S

    1997-06-16

    Occludin is an integral membrane protein localizing at tight junctions in epithelial and endothelial cells. Occludin from confluent culture MDCK I cells resolved as several (>10) bands between 62 and 82 kD in SDS-PAGE, of which two or three bands of the lowest Mr were predominant. Among these bands, the lower predominant bands were essentially extracted with 1% NP-40, whereas the other higher Mr bands were selectively recovered in the NP-40-insoluble fraction. Alkaline phosphatase treatment converged these bands of occludin both in NP-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions into the lowest Mr band, and phosphoamino acid analyses identified phosphoserine (and phosphothreonine weakly) in the higher Mr bands of occludin. These findings indicated that phosphorylation causes an upward shift of occludin bands and that highly phosphorylated occludin resists NP-40 extraction. When cells were grown in low Ca medium, almost all occludin was NP-40 soluble. Switching from low to normal Ca medium increased the amount of NP-40-insoluble occludin within 10 min, followed by gradual upward shift of bands. This insolubilization and the band shift correlated temporally with tight junction formation detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the anti-chicken occludin mAb, Oc-3, did not recognize the predominant lower Mr bands of occludin (non- or less phosphorylated form) but was specific to the higher Mr bands (phosphorylated form) on immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that this mAb mainly stained the tight junction proper of intestinal epithelial cells, whereas other anti-occludin mAbs, which can recognize the predominant lower Mr bands, labeled their basolateral membranes (and the cytoplasm) as well as tight junctions. Therefore, we conclude that non- or less phosphorylated occludin is distributed on the basolateral membranes and that highly phosphorylated occludin is selectively concentrated at tight juctions as the NP-40-insoluble form

  14. The rotavirus surface protein VP8 modulates the gate and fence function of tight junctions in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nava, Porfirio; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Islas, Socorro; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2004-11-01

    Rotaviruses constitute a major cause of diarrhea in young mammals. Rotaviruses utilize different integrins as cell receptors, therefore upon their arrival to the intestinal lumen their integrin receptors will be hidden below the tight junction (TJ), on the basolateral membrane. Here we have studied whether the rotavirus outer capsid proteins are capable of opening the paracellular space sealed by the TJ. From the outermost layer of proteins of the rotavirus, 60 spikes formed of protein VP4 are projected. VP4 is essential for virus-cell interactions and is cleaved by trypsin into peptides VP5 and VP8. Here we found that when these peptides are added to confluent epithelial monolayers (Madin-Darby canine kidney cells), VP8 is capable of diminishing in a dose dependent and reversible manner the transepithelial electrical resistance. VP5 exerted no effect. VP8 can also inhibit the development of newly formed TJs in a Ca-switch assay. Treatment with VP8 augments the paracellular passage of non-ionic tracers, allows the diffusion of a fluorescent lipid probe and the apical surface protein GP135, from the luminal to the lateral membrane, and triggers the movement of the basolateral proteins Na+-K+-ATPase, alphanubeta3 integrin and beta1 integrin subunit, to the apical surface. VP8 generates a freeze-fracture pattern of TJs characterized by the appearance of loose end filaments, that correlates with an altered distribution of several TJ proteins. VP8 given orally to diabetic rats allows the enteral administration of insulin, thus indicating that it can be employed to modulate epithelial permeability. PMID:15494377

  15. Transforming growth factor-alpha abrogates glucocorticoid-stimulated tight junction formation and growth suppression in rat mammary epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Buse, P; Woo, P L; Alexander, D B; Cha, H H; Reza, A; Sirota, N D; Firestone, G L

    1995-03-24

    The glucocorticoid and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) regulation of growth and cell-cell contact was investigated in the Con8 mammary epithelial tumor cell line derived from a 7,12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene-induced rat mammary adenocarcinoma. In Con8 cell monolayers cultured on permeable filter supports, the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, coordinately suppressed [3H]thymidine incorporation, stimulated monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and decreased the paracellular leakage of [3H]inulin or [14C]mannitol across the monolayer. These processes dose dependently correlated with glucocorticoid receptor occupancy and function. Constitutive production of TGF-alpha in transfected cells or exogenous treatment with TGF-alpha prevented the glucocorticoid growth suppression response and disrupted tight junction formation without affecting glucocorticoid responsiveness. Treatment with hydroxyurea or araC demonstrated that de novo DNA synthesis is not a requirement for the growth factor disruption of tight junctions. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the ZO-1 tight junction protein is localized exclusively at the cell periphery in dexamethasone-treated cells and that TGF-alpha caused-ZO-1 to relocalize from the cell periphery back to a cytoplasmic compartment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids can coordinately regulate growth inhibition and cell-cell contact of mammary tumor cells and that TGF-alpha, can override both effects of glucocorticoids. These results have uncovered a novel functional "cross-talk" between glucocorticoids and TGF-alpha which potentially regulates the proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

  16. Cytokines induce tight junction disassembly in airway cells via an EGFR-dependent MAPK/ERK1/2-pathway.

    PubMed

    Petecchia, Loredana; Sabatini, Federica; Usai, Cesare; Caci, Emanuela; Varesio, Luigi; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2012-08-01

    Epithelial barrier permeability is altered in inflammatory respiratory disorders by a variety of noxious agents through modifications of the epithelial cell structure that possibly involve tight junction (TJ) organization. To evaluate in vitro whether pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of respiratory disorders could alter TJ organization and epithelial barrier integrity, and to characterize the signal transduction pathway involved Calu-3 airway epithelial cells were exposed to TNF-a, IL-4 and IFN-g to assess changes in: (a) TJ assembly, that is, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 expression and localization, evaluated by confocal microscopy; (b) apoptotic activity, quantified using terminal transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling staining; (c) epithelial barrier integrity, detected as transmembrane electrical resistance and expressed as G(T) values; (d) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation, assessed by western blotting. Exposure to cytokines for 48 h induced a noticeable downregulation of the TJ transmembrane proteins. The degree ZO-1 and occludin colocalization was 62±2% in control cultures and significantly decreased in the presence of TNF-a (47±3%), IL-4 (43±1%) and INF-g (35±3%). Although no apoptosis induction was detected following exposure to cytokines, changes in the epithelial barrier integrity were observed, with a significant enhancement in paracellular conductance. G(T) values were, respectively, 1.030±0.0, 1.300±0.04, 1.260±0.020 and 2.220±0.015 (mS/cm²)1000 in control cultures and in those exposed to TNF-a, IFN-g and IL-4. The involvement of EGFR-dependent MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in cytokine-induced damage was demonstrated by a significant increase in threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2, already detectable after 5 min incubation. All these cytokine-induced changes were

  17. Mechanical tension induces lateral movement of intramembrane components of the tight junction: studies on mouse mammary cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Occluding junctions of mammary epithelial cells in nonproliferating primary culture occasionally display an atypical pattern of intramembrane strands oriented predominantly perpendicular, instead of roughly parallel, to the apical border of the junction. To test whether the orienting influence was a centripetal cytoskeletal tension often observed in epithelial sheets on fixed substrates, we seeded cells at low density; this allows them to spread maximally while forming a barely confluent pavement. The result was a fourfold increase in the percentage of junctions with the strongly aligned, atypical pattern. Closely similar configurations were observed as the earliest detectable effect of chelation of extracellular Ca++, which induced pronounced centripetal contraction of the cell body. Externally imposed tension, applied so as to stretch cells in one direction only, affected the positions of strands in stretched junctions as might be predicted, by flattening their undulations, increasing their alignment parallel to the apical border. Thus mechanical tension alone, whether inherent in the cytoskeleton or imposed on the cell surface by exogenous force, can cause coordinate lateral displacement of macromolecular assemblies within the membranes of both joined cells. PMID:6682108

  18. Mammalian tight junctions in the regulation of epithelial differentiation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Matter, Karl; Aijaz, Saima; Tsapara, Anna; Balda, Maria S

    2005-10-01

    Tight junctions are important for the permeability properties of epithelial and endothelial barriers as they restrict diffusion along the paracellular space. Recent observations have revealed that tight junctions also function in the regulation of epithelial proliferation and differentiation. They harbour evolutionarily conserved protein complexes that regulate polarisation and junction assembly. Tight junctions also recruit signalling proteins that participate in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. These signalling proteins include components that affect established signalling cascades and dual localisation proteins that can associate with junctions as well as travel to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression.

  19. The proinflammatory peptide substance P promotes blood-brain barrier breaching by breast cancer cells through changes in microvascular endothelial cell tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pedro L; Jiang, Shuxian; Fu, Yigong; Avraham, Shalom; Avraham, Hava Karsenty

    2014-03-01

    Neuropeptide substance P (SP) has been implicated in inflammation, pain, depression and breast cancer cell (BCC) growth. Here, we examined the role of SP in trafficking of BCCs (human MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-231BrM2 cells) across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) using in vitro and in vivo models. SP was secreted from BCCs and mediated adhesion and transmigration of BCCs across human BMECs (HBMECs) in vitro. SP induced activation of HBMECs, leading to secretion of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) from HBMECs, resulting in changes in localization and distribution of tight junction (TJ) ZO-1 (tight junction protein zonula occludins-1) and claudin-5 structures as well as increased permeability of HBMECs. Using spontaneous breast cancer metastasis mouse model (syngeneic) of GFP-4T1-BrM5 mammary tumor cells administered into mammary fat pads of Balb/c mice, SP inhibitor spantide III inhibited in vivo changes in permeability of the BBB and BMEC-TJs ZO-1 and claudin-5 structures as well as decreased tumor cell colonization in brain. Thus, SP secreted from BCCs induces transmigration of BCCs across the BBB, leading to activation of BMECs and secretion of TNF-α and Ang-2, resulting in BBB impairment and colonization of tumor cells in brain. Therefore, therapies based on SP inhibition in combination with other therapies may prevent breaching of the BBB by BCCs and their colonization in brain.

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates the assembly of epithelial tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ji; Young, Lawrence H.; Caplan, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a sensor of cellular energy status in all eukaryotic cells, is activated by LKB1-dependent phosphorylation. Recent studies indicate that activated LKB1 induces polarity in epithelial cells and that this polarization is accompanied by the formation of tight junction structures. We wished to determine whether AMPK also contributes to the assembly of tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarization process. We found that AMPK is activated during calcium-induced tight junction assembly. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside facilitates tight junction assembly under conditions of normal extracellular Ca2+ concentrations and initiates tight junction assembly in the absence of Ca2+ as revealed by the relocation of zonula occludens 1, the establishment of transepithelial electrical resistance, and the paracellular flux assay. Expression of a dominant negative AMPK construct inhibits tight junction assembly in MDCK cells, and this defect in tight junction assembly can be partially ameliorated by rapamycin. These results suggest that AMPK plays a role in the regulation of tight junction assembly. PMID:17088526

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates the assembly of epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ji; Young, Lawrence H; Caplan, Michael J

    2006-11-14

    AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a sensor of cellular energy status in all eukaryotic cells, is activated by LKB1-dependent phosphorylation. Recent studies indicate that activated LKB1 induces polarity in epithelial cells and that this polarization is accompanied by the formation of tight junction structures. We wished to determine whether AMPK also contributes to the assembly of tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarization process. We found that AMPK is activated during calcium-induced tight junction assembly. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside facilitates tight junction assembly under conditions of normal extracellular Ca2+ concentrations and initiates tight junction assembly in the absence of Ca2+ as revealed by the relocation of zonula occludens 1, the establishment of transepithelial electrical resistance, and the paracellular flux assay. Expression of a dominant negative AMPK construct inhibits tight junction assembly in MDCK cells, and this defect in tight junction assembly can be partially ameliorated by rapamycin. These results suggest that AMPK plays a role in the regulation of tight junction assembly. PMID:17088526

  2. Novel role of zonula occludens-1: A tight junction protein closely associated with the odontoblast differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jue; Shao, Meiying; Pan, Hongying; Wang, Huning; Cheng, Li; Yang, Hui; Hu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), a tight junction protein, contributes to the maintenance of the polarity of odontoblasts and junctional complex formation in odontoblast layer during tooth development. However, expression and possible role of ZO-1 in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) during repair process remains unknown. Here, we investigated the expression of ZO-1 in hDPCs and the relationship with odontoblast differentiation. We found the processes of two adjacent cells were fused and formed junction-like structure using scanning electron microscopy. Fluorescence immunoassay and Western blot confirmed ZO-1 expression in hDPCs. Especially, ZO-1 was high expressed at the cell-cell junction sites. More interestingly, ZO-1 accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia in migrating cells when a scratch assay was performed. Furthermore, ZO-1 gradual increased during odontoblast differentiation and ZO-1 silencing greatly inhibited the differentiation. ZO-1 binds directly to actin filaments and RhoA/ROCK signaling mainly regulates cell cytoskeleton, thus RhoA/ROCK might play a role in regulating ZO-1. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and Y-27632 were used to activate and inhibit RhoA/ROCK signaling, respectively, with or without mineralizing medium. In normal cultured hDPCs, RhoA activation increased ZO-1 expression and especially in intercellular contacts, whereas ROCK inhibition attenuated the effects induced by LPA. However, expression of ZO-1 was upregulated by Y-27632 but not significantly affected by LPA after odontoblast differentiation. Hence, ZO-1 highly expresses in cell-cell junctions and is related to odontoblast differentiation, which may contribute to dental pulp repair or even the formation of an odontoblast layer. RhoA/ROCK signaling is involved in the regulation of ZO-1. PMID:27109589

  3. Effects of Human Parvovirus B19 and Bocavirus VP1 Unique Region on Tight Junction of Human Airway Epithelial A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Ching; Shi, Ya-Fang; Yang, Jiann-Jou; Hsiao, Yuan-Chao; Tzang, Bor-Show; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2014-01-01

    As is widely recognized, human parvovirus B19 (B19) and human bocavirus (HBoV) are important human pathogens. Obviously, both VP1 unique region (VP1u) of B19 and HBoV exhibit the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity and are recognized to participate in the pathogenesis of lower respiratory tract illnesses. However, exactly how, both VP1u from B19 and HBoV affect tight junction has seldom been addressed. Therefore, this study investigates how B19-VP1u and HBoV-VP1u may affect the tight junction of the airway epithelial A549 cells by examining phospholipase A2 activity and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) as well as performing immunoblotting analyses. Experimental results indicate that TEER is more significantly decreased in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α (10 ng), two dosages of B19-VP1u and BoV-VP1u (400 ng and 4000 ng) or bee venom PLA2 (10 ng) than that of the control. Accordingly, more significantly increased claudin-1 and decreased occludin are detected in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α or both dosages of HBoV-VP1u than that of the control. Additionally, more significantly decreased Na+/K+ ATPase is observed in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α, high dosage of B19-VP1u or both dosages of BoV-VP1u than that of the control. Above findings suggest that HBoV-VP1u rather than B19 VP1u likely plays more important roles in the disruption of tight junction in the airway tract. Meanwhile, this discrepancy appears not to be associated with the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity. PMID:25268969

  4. Effects of human Parvovirus B19 and Bocavirus VP1 unique region on tight junction of human airway epithelial A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Ching; Shi, Ya-Fang; Yang, Jiann-Jou; Hsiao, Yuan-Chao; Tzang, Bor-Show; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2014-01-01

    As is widely recognized, human parvovirus B19 (B19) and human bocavirus (HBoV) are important human pathogens. Obviously, both VP1 unique region (VP1u) of B19 and HBoV exhibit the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity and are recognized to participate in the pathogenesis of lower respiratory tract illnesses. However, exactly how, both VP1u from B19 and HBoV affect tight junction has seldom been addressed. Therefore, this study investigates how B19-VP1u and HBoV-VP1u may affect the tight junction of the airway epithelial A549 cells by examining phospholipase A2 activity and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) as well as performing immunoblotting analyses. Experimental results indicate that TEER is more significantly decreased in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α (10 ng), two dosages of B19-VP1u and BoV-VP1u (400 ng and 4000 ng) or bee venom PLA2 (10 ng) than that of the control. Accordingly, more significantly increased claudin-1 and decreased occludin are detected in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α or both dosages of HBoV-VP1u than that of the control. Additionally, more significantly decreased Na+/K+ ATPase is observed in A549 cells by treatment with TNF-α, high dosage of B19-VP1u or both dosages of BoV-VP1u than that of the control. Above findings suggest that HBoV-VP1u rather than B19 VP1u likely plays more important roles in the disruption of tight junction in the airway tract. Meanwhile, this discrepancy appears not to be associated with the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like enzymatic activity.

  5. Mixture effects of nonylphenol and di-n-butyl phthalate (monobutyl phthalate) on the tight junctions between Sertoli cells in male rats in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Wang, Ruoyu; Xiang, Zou; Qian, Weiping; Han, Xiaodong; Li, Dongmei

    2014-12-01

    The estrogenic chemical nonylphenol (NP) and the antiandrogenic agent di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) are regarded as widespread environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) which at high doses in some species of laboratory animals have adverse effects on male reproduction and development. Given the ubiquitous coexistence of various classes of EEDs in the environment, their combined effects warrant investigation. In this study, we attempted to clarify the interactions of NP and DBP on tight junctions (TJs) between rat Sertoli cells. In the in vitro experiment, monobutyl phthalate (MBP), the active metabolite of DBP, was used instead of DBP. Sertoli cells were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats, and treated with NP and MBP, singly or combined. The morphology of Sertoli cells, and structure and functionality of TJs were measured. In the in vivo experiment, rats were gavaged on postnatal day 23-35 with a single or combined NP and DBP treatment. Testicular weight and morphology of TJs were recorded. These data indicated that NP and DBP/MBP, either in single or in combination, induced the structural and function changes of Sertoli cell tight junctions, both in vivo and in vitro. The combined effect on the regulation of TJ proteins at both the protein and gene levels was correlated to the effect exerted by NP, suggesting that the structure and function of Sertoli cells were more sensitive to exposure to NP than MBP.

  6. Claudins and the Modulation of Tight Junction Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Claudins are tight junction membrane proteins that are expressed in epithelia and endothelia and form paracellular barriers and pores that determine tight junction permeability. This review summarizes our current knowledge of this large protein family and discusses recent advances in our understanding of their structure and physiological functions. PMID:23589827

  7. Effect of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) on barrier functions of epithelial cell membranes: opening of tight junctions and competitive inhibition of P-gp-mediated efflux.

    PubMed

    Doo, Min-Ho; Li, Hong; Jang, Hye-In; Song, Im-Sook; Chung, Suk-Jae; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2005-09-30

    The effect of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) on selected barrier functions of biological membranes, such as tight junction and P-gp efflux pump of epithelial membranes, against the transport of xenobiotics was examined. The Caco-2 cell line was used to evaluate the transport of mannitol and daunomycin across the cell monolayer as well as the cellular uptake of daunomycin. In the presence of NPEs, the transport of mannitol was increased, with NP-9 showing a maximal effect, and the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was reduced. The onset of this effect of NP-9 was fairly rapid and reversible for a short term (e.g., 2 h) treatment, while irreversible for a long term (e.g., 72 h) treatment. In the presence of NP-9, the apical uptake of daunomycin was increased, suggesting competitive inhibition between NP-9 and daunomycin in the efflux via the P-gp system. However, a 72 h pretreatment of the cells with NP-9 (up to 1000 nM) did not affect the apparent cellular uptake of daunomycin, suggesting no significant effect of NPEs on the expression of P-gp. In conclusion, NPEs appear to rapidly open the tight junction of epithelial cell membranes and to competitively inhibit the efflux of P-gp substrates, thereby reducing the self-protection ability of the organism against xenobiotics or hazardous environmental compounds that are transported via the paracellular pathway (i.e., uptake) or the P-gp system (i.e., efflux).

  8. The Role of IRE-XBP1 Pathway in Regulation of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jacey H.; Wang, Joshua J.; Li, Junhua; Pfeffer, Bruce A.; Zhong, Yiming; Zhang, Sarah X.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) tight junctions play a pivotal role in maintaining the homeostatic environment of the neural retina. Herein, we investigated the role of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-responsive transcription factor, in regulation of RPE tight junctions. Methods Human RPE cell line (ARPE-19) and primary primate RPE cells were used for in vitro experiments and RPE-specific XBP1 knockout (KO) mice were used for in vivo study. Endoplasmic reticulum stress was induced by a sublethal dose of thapsigargin or tunicamycin. XBP1 activation was manipulated by IRE inhibitor 4μ8C, which suppresses XBP1 mRNA splicing. The integrity of tight junctions and the involvement of calcium-dependent RhoA/Rho kinase pathway were examined. Results Induction of ER stress by thapsigargin, but not tunicamycin, disrupted RPE tight junctions in ARPE-19 cells. Inhibition of XBP1 activation by 4μ8C resulted in a remarkable downregulation of tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and occludin) and defects in tight junction formation in the presence or absence of ER stress inducers. Overexpression of active XBP1 partially reversed 4μ8C-induced anomalies in tight junctions. Mechanistically, XBP1 inhibition resulted in increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, upregulation of RhoA expression, redistribution of F-actin, and tight junction damage, which was attenuated by Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. In vivo, deletion of XBP1 in the RPE resulted in defective RPE tight junctions accompanied by increased VEGF expression. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest a protective role of XBP1 in maintaining RPE tight junctions possibly through regulation of calcium-dependent RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and actin cytoskeletal reorganization. PMID:27701635

  9. Ablation of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells exacerbates Japanese encephalitis by regulating blood-brain barrier permeability and altering tight junction/adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), characterized by extensive neuroinflammation following infection with neurotropic JE virus (JEV), is becoming a leading cause of viral encephalitis due to rapid changes in climate and demography. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in restricting neuroinvasion of peripheral leukocytes and virus, thereby regulating the progression of viral encephalitis. In this study, we explored the role of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating BBB integrity and JE progression using a conditional depletion model of CD11c(hi) DCs. Transient ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs resulted in markedly increased susceptibility to JE progression along with highly increased neuro-invasion of JEV. In addition, exacerbated JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was closely associated with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2) in the brain. Moreover, our results revealed that the exacerbation of JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was correlated with enhanced BBB permeability and reduced expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules (claudin-5, ZO-1, occluding, JAMs). Ultimately, our data conclude that the ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs provided a subsidiary impact on BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules, thereby leading to exacerbated JE progression. These findings provide insight into the secondary role of CD11c(hi) DCs in JE progression through regulation of BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules. PMID:27638116

  10. Ablation of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells exacerbates Japanese encephalitis by regulating blood-brain barrier permeability and altering tight junction/adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), characterized by extensive neuroinflammation following infection with neurotropic JE virus (JEV), is becoming a leading cause of viral encephalitis due to rapid changes in climate and demography. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in restricting neuroinvasion of peripheral leukocytes and virus, thereby regulating the progression of viral encephalitis. In this study, we explored the role of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating BBB integrity and JE progression using a conditional depletion model of CD11c(hi) DCs. Transient ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs resulted in markedly increased susceptibility to JE progression along with highly increased neuro-invasion of JEV. In addition, exacerbated JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was closely associated with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2) in the brain. Moreover, our results revealed that the exacerbation of JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was correlated with enhanced BBB permeability and reduced expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules (claudin-5, ZO-1, occluding, JAMs). Ultimately, our data conclude that the ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs provided a subsidiary impact on BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules, thereby leading to exacerbated JE progression. These findings provide insight into the secondary role of CD11c(hi) DCs in JE progression through regulation of BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules.

  11. Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Induces Tight Junction Disruptions and Loss of Transepithelial Resistance Across Porcine Vas Deferens Epithelial Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Pierucci-Alves, Fernando; Yi, Sheng; Schultz, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial cells lining the male excurrent duct contribute to male fertility by employing a number of physiological mechanisms that generate a luminal microenvironment conducive to spermatozoa maturation and storage. Among these mechanisms, male duct epithelia establish intercellular tight junctions that constitute a barrier to paracellular diffusion of water, solutes, large molecules, and cells. Mechanisms regulating the male duct epithelial barrier remain unidentified. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) is a regulatory cytokine present in high concentrations in human semen. This study examined whether TGFB has any effects on epithelial function exhibited by primary cultures of porcine vas deferens epithelia. TGFB1 exposure caused a 70%–99% decrease in basal transepithelial electrical resistance (RTE, a sensitive indicator of barrier integrity), while a significant decrease in anion secretory response to forskolin was detected at the highest levels of TGFB1 exposure employed. SB431542, a selective TGFB receptor I (TGFBR1) inhibitor, prevented decreases in barrier function. Results also demonstrated that TGFB1 exposure modifies the distribution pattern of tight junction proteins occludin and claudin 7. TGFBR1 is localized at the apical border of the native porcine vas deferens epithelium. Pharmacological inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 11 (also known as p38-MAPK) did not alter the effect of TGFB1 on RTE significantly. These data suggest that epithelia lining the vas deferens are subject to disruptions in the physical barrier if active TGFB becomes bioavailable in the luminal fluid, which might be expected to compromise fertility. PMID:21957188

  12. Tight Junction Defects in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetto, Anna; Rafaels, Nicholas M.; McGirt, Laura Y.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Georas, Steve N.; Cheadle, Chris; Berger, Alan E.; Zhang, Kunzhong; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Yoshida, Takeshi; Boguniewicz, Mark; Hata, Tissa; Schneider, Lynda C.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Gallo, Richard L.; Novak, Natalija; Weidinger, Stephan; Beaty, Terri H.; Leung, Donald Y.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beck, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by dry skin and a hyperreactive immune response to allergens, two cardinal features that are caused in part by epidermal barrier defects. Tight junctions (TJ) reside immediately below the stratum corneum and regulate the selective permeability of the paracellular pathway. Objective We evaluated the expression/function of the TJ protein, claudin-1 in epithelium from AD and nonatopic (NA) subjects and screened two American populations for SNPs in CLDN1. Methods Expression profiles of nonlesional epithelium from extrinsic AD, NA and psoriasis subjects were generated using Illumina’s BeadChips. Dysregulated intercellular proteins were validated by tissue staining and qPCR. Bioelectric properties of epithelium were measured in Ussing chambers. Functional relevance of claudin-1 was assessed using a knockdown approach in primary human keratinocytes (PHK). Twenty seven haplotype-tagging SNPs in CLDN1 were screened in two independent AD populations. Results We observed strikingly reduced expression of the TJ proteins claudin-1 and -23 only in AD, which were validated at the mRNA and protein levels. Claudin-1 expression inversely correlated with Th2 biomarkers. We observed a remarkable impairment of the bioelectric barrier function in AD epidermis. In vitro, we confirmed that silencing claudin-1 expression in human keratinocytes diminishes TJ function while enhancing keratinocyte proliferation. Finally, CLDN1 haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms revealed associations with AD in two North American populations. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that an impaired epidermal TJ is a novel feature of skin barrier dysfunction and immune dysregulation observed in AD, and that CLDN1 may be a new susceptibility gene in this disease. PMID:21163515

  13. Definitive Evidence for the existence of tight junctions in invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lane, NJ; Chandler, HJ

    1980-01-01

    Extensive and unequivocal tight junctions are here reported between the lateral borders of the cellular layer that circumscribes the arachnid (spider) central nervous system. This account details the features of these structures, which form a beltlike reticulum that is more complex than the simple linear tight junctions hitherto found in invertebrate tissues and which bear many of the characteristics of vertebrate zonulae occludentes. We also provide evidence that these junctions form the basis of a permeability barrier to exogenous compounds. In thin sections, the tight junctions are identifiable as punctate points of membrane apposition; they are seen to exclude the stain and appear as election- lucent moniliform strands along the lines of membrane fusion in en face views of uranyl-calcium-treated tissues. In freeze-fracture replicas, the regions of close membrane apposition exhibit P-face (PF) ridges and complementary E-face (EF) furrows that are coincident across face transitions, although slightly offset with respect to one another. The free inward diffusion of both ionic and colloidal lanthanum is inhibited by these punctate tight junctions so that they appear to form the basis of a circumferential blood-brain barrier. These results support the contention that tight junctions exist in the tissues of the invertebrata in spite of earlier suggestions that (a) they are unique to vertebrates and (b) septate junctions are the equivalent invertebrate occluding structure. The component tight junctional 8- to 10-nm-particulate PF ridges are intimately intercalated with, but clearly distinct from, inverted gap junctions possessing the 13-nm EF particles typical of arthropods. Hence, no confusion can occur as to which particles belong to each of the two junctional types, as commonly happens with vertebrate tissues, especially in the analysis of developing junctions. Indeed, their coexistance in this way supports the idea, over which there has been some controversy, that

  14. Erp29 Attenuates Cigarette Smoke Extract–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Mitigates Tight Junction Damage in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuangxin; Wang, Joshua J.; Jing, Guangjun; Li, Junhua; Jin, Chenjin; Yu, Qiang; Falkowski, Marek W.; Zhang, Sarah X.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29) is a novel chaperone that was recently found decreased in human retinas with AMD. Herein, we examined the effect of ERp29 on cigarette smoke–induced RPE apoptosis and tight junction disruption. Methods Cultured human RPE (HRPE) cells (ARPE-19) or mouse RPE eyecup explants were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for short (up to 24 hours) or long (up to 3 weeks) periods. Expression of ERp29 was up- and downregulated by adenovirus and siRNA, respectively. Endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, apoptosis, and cell death, the expression and distribution of tight junction protein ZO-1, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), and F-actin expression were examined. Results Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 was significantly increased by short-term exposure to CSE in ARPE-19 cells or eyecup explants but was reduced after 3-week exposure. Overexpression of ERp29 increased the levels of GRP78, p58IPK, and Nrf-2, while reducing p-eIF2α and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and protected RPE cells from CSE-induced apoptosis. In contrast, knockdown of ERp29 decreased the levels of p58IPK and Nrf2, but increased p-eIF2α and CHOP and exacerbated CSE-triggered cell death. In addition, overexpression of ERp29 attenuated CSE-induced reduction in ZO-1 and enhanced the RPE barrier function, as measured by TEER. Knockdown of ERp29 decreased the level of ZO-1 protein. These effects were associated with changes in the expression of cytoskeleton F-actin. Conclusions Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 attenuates CSE-induced ER stress and enhances cell viability and barrier integrity of RPE cells, and therefore may act as a protective mechanism for RPE survival and activity. PMID:26431474

  15. Poly-L-arginine-Induced internalization of tight junction proteins increases the paracellular permeability of the Caco-2 cell monolayer to hydrophilic macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Keiko; Uchida, Masaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Oshima, Shinji; Ohshima, Shinji; Juni, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Jun; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether poly-L-arginine (PLA) enhances the paracellular permeability of the Caco-2 monolayer to hydrophilic macromolecules and clarified the disposition of tight junction (TJ) proteins. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran (FD-4) permeation were determined after treatment with PLA. TJ proteins were visualized using immunofluorescence microscopy after PLA exposure and depletion, and their expression levels were determined. The barrier function of TJs was also evaluated by measuring the alterations in the TEER and in the localization of TJ proteins. PLA induced an increase in hydrophilic macromolecule, FD-4, permeation through Caco-2 cell monolayers and a decrease in the TEER in a concentration-dependent manner, without any significant impact on the cell viability. This increased paracellular permeability induced by PLA was found to be internalized of claudin-4, ZO-1, tricellulin and mainly occludin from cell-cell junction to the subcellular space. ZO-1 appeared to play an important role in the reconstitution of TJ strand structures following PLA depletion. These results indicate that the PLA led to the internalization of TJ proteins to the subcellular space, subsequently increasing the permeability of the Caco-2 cell monolayer to FD-4 via a paracellular route.

  16. Lactic Acid Bacteria Improves Peyer's Patch Cell-Mediated Immunoglobulin A and Tight-Junction Expression in a Destructed Gut Microbial Environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jeung, Woonhee; Choi, Il-Dong; Jeong, Ji-Woong; Lee, Dong Eun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Kim, Geun-Bae; Hong, Seong Soo; Shim, Jae-Jung; Lee, Jung Lyoul; Sim, Jae-Hun; Ahn, Young-Tae

    2016-06-28

    To evaluate the effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on Peyer's patch cells, mice were treated with a high dose of kanamycin to disturb the gut microbial environment. The overarching goal was to explore the potential of LAB for use as a dietary probiotic that buffers the negative consequences of antibiotic treatment. In vitro, LAB stimulated the production of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from isolated Peyer's patch cells. Inflammation-related genes (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8) were up-regulated in Caco-2 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), while tight-junction-related genes (ZO-1 and occludin) were down-regulated; the effects of LPS on inflammatory gene and tight-junction gene expression were reversed by treatment with LAB. Mice treated with a high dose of kanamycin showed increased serum IgE levels and decreases in serum IgA and fecal IgA levels; the number of Peyer's patch cells decreased with kanamycin treatment. However, subsequent LAB treatment was effective in reducing the serum IgE level and recovering the serum IgA and fecal IgA levels, as well as the number of Peyer's patch cells. In addition, ZO-1 and occludin mRNA levels were up-regulated in the ileum tissues of mice receiving LAB treatment. Lactic acid bacteria can enhance the intestinal immune system by improving the integrity of the intestinal barrier and increasing the production of IgA in Peyer's patches. Lactic acid bacteria should be considered a potential probiotic candidate for improving intestinal immunity, particularly in mitigating the negative consequences of antibiotic use.

  17. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  18. Deficiency of angulin-2/ILDR1, a tricellular tight junction-associated membrane protein, causes deafness with cochlear hair cell degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tomohito; Katsuno, Tatsuya; Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Tricellular tight junctions seal the extracellular spaces of tricellular contacts, where the vertices of three epithelial cells meet, and are required for the establishment of a strong barrier function of the epithelial cellular sheet. Angulins and tricellulin are known as specific protein components of tricellular tight junctions, where angulins recruit tricellulin. Mutations in the genes encoding angulin-2/ILDR1 and tricellulin have been reported to cause human hereditary deafness DFNB42 and DFNB49, respectively. To investigate the pathogenesis of DFNB42, we analyzed mice with a targeted disruption of Ildr1, which encodes angulin-2/ILDR1. Ildr1 null mice exhibited profound deafness. Hair cells in the cochlea of Ildr1 null mice develop normally, but begin to degenerate by two weeks after birth. Tricellulin localization at tricellular contacts of the organ of Corti in the cochlea was retained in Ildr1 null mice, but its distribution along the depth of tricellular contacts was affected. Interestingly, compensatory tricellular contact localization of angulin-1/LSR was observed in the organ of Corti in Ildr1 null mice although it was hardly detected in the organ of Corti in wild-type mice. The onset of hair cell degeneration in Ildr1 null mice was earlier than that in the reported Tric mutant mice, which mimic one of the tricellulin mutations in DFNB49 deafness. These results indicate that the angulin-2/ILDR1 deficiency causes the postnatal degenerative loss of hair cells in the cochlea, leading to human deafness DFNB42. Our data also suggest that angulin family proteins have distinct functions in addition to their common roles of tricellulin recruitment and that the function of angulin-2/ILDR1 for hearing cannot be substituted by angulin-1/LSR.

  19. H. pylori-encoded CagA disrupts tight junctions and induces invasiveness of AGS gastric carcinoma cells via Cdx2-dependent targeting of Claudin-2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Chen, Hui-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Deng, Xi-Yun; Xi, Yin-Xue; He, Qing; Peng, Tie-Li; Chen, Jie; Chen, Wei; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu; Chen, Min-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori encoded CagA is presently the only known virulence factor that is injected into gastric epithelial cells where it destroys apical junctional complexes and induces dedifferentiation of gastric epithelial cells, leading to H. pylori-related gastric carcinogensis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which CagA mediates these changes. Caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2) is an intestine-specific transcription factor highly expressed in multistage tissues of dysplasia and cancer. One specific target of Cdx2, Claudin-2, is involved in the regulation of tight junction (TJ) permeability. In this study, our findings showed that the activity of Cdx2 binding to Cdx binding sites of CdxA (GTTTATG) and CdxB (TTTTAGG) of probes corresponding to claudin-2 flanking region increased in AGS cells, infected with CagA positive wild-type strain of H. pylori, compared to CagA negative isogenic mutant-type strain. Moreover, Cdx2 upregulated claudin-2 expression at transcriptional level and translational level. In the meantime, we found that TJs of AGS cells, infected with CagA positive wild-type strain of H. pylori, compared to CagA negative isogenic mutant-type strain, were more severely destroyed, leading to wider cell gap, interference of contact, scattering and highly elevated migration of cells. Herein, this study is firstly demonstrated that H. pylori-encoded CagA disrupts TJs and induces invasiveness of AGS gastric carcinoma cells via Cdx2-dependent targeting of Claudin-2. This provides a new mechanism whereby CagA induced dedifferentiation of AGS cells, leading to malignant behavior of biology. PMID:24287273

  20. In vivo assembly of tight junctions in fetal rat liver.

    PubMed

    Montesano, R; Friend, D S; Perrelet, A; Orci, L

    1975-11-01

    Examination of glutaraldehyde-fixed, freeze-fractured livers from 14-15-day rat fetuses provided the basis for the following observations. Membrane particles align in otherwise poorly particulated areas of the presumptive pericanalicular plasma membrane (A face), frequently forming a discontinuous "honey-comb" network joining small particle islands. Even at this early stage, contiguous B-fracture faces contain furrows, rather than rows of pits, distinguishing the linear particle aggregates on the A face as developing tight junctions rather than gap junctions. Short segments of these linear arrays merge with smooth ridges clearly identifiable as segments of discontinuous tight junctions. With the continuing confluence of particulate and smooth ridge segments, mature tight junctions become fully appreciable. We conclude that tight junctions form de novo by the alignment and fusion of separate particles into beaded ridges which, in turn, become confluent and are transformed into continuous smooth ones. At 21 days of fetal life, most of the images of assembly have disappeared, and the liver reveals well-formed bile canaliculi sealed by mature tight junctions. PMID:1194351

  1. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier.

    PubMed

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-10-28

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection.

  2. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection. PMID:26523106

  3. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao; Jin, Zhu-Qiu

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  4. Tricellulin is a tight-junction protein necessary for hearing.

    PubMed

    Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M; Fanning, Alan S; Lagziel, Ayala; Kitajiri, Shin-ichiro; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Khan, Shaheen N; Chattaraj, Parna; Friedman, Penelope L; Anderson, James M; Belyantseva, Inna A; Forge, Andrew; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B

    2006-12-01

    The inner ear has fluid-filled compartments of different ionic compositions, including the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces of the organ of Corti; the separation from one another by epithelial barriers is required for normal hearing. TRIC encodes tricellulin, a recently discovered tight-junction (TJ) protein that contributes to the structure and function of tricellular contacts of neighboring cells in many epithelial tissues. We show that, in humans, four different recessive mutations of TRIC cause nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB49), a surprisingly limited phenotype, given the widespread tissue distribution of tricellulin in epithelial cells. In the inner ear, tricellulin is concentrated at the tricellular TJs in cochlear and vestibular epithelia, including the structurally complex and extensive junctions between supporting and hair cells. We also demonstrate that there are multiple alternatively spliced isoforms of TRIC in various tissues and that mutations of TRIC associated with hearing loss remove all or most of a conserved region in the cytosolic domain that binds to the cytosolic scaffolding protein ZO-1. A wild-type isoform of tricellulin, which lacks this conserved region, is unaffected by the mutant alleles and is hypothesized to be sufficient for structural and functional integrity of epithelial barriers outside the inner ear. PMID:17186462

  5. Indomethacin induces increase in gastric epithelial tight junction permeability via redistribution of occludin and activation of p38 MAPK in MKN-28 Cells.

    PubMed

    Thakre-Nighot, Meghali; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2016-01-01

    Tight Junctions (TJ) create a paracellular barrier that is compromised when nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) injure the gastric epithelium, leading to increased permeability. However, the mechanism of NSAID-induced gastric injury is unclear. Here, we examined the effect of indomethacin on barrier function and TJ in gastric MKN-28 cells. In concentration response studies, 500 µm indomethacin induced a significant decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER; 380 vs. 220 Ω·cm(2) for control and indomethacin-treated cells respectively, p < 0.05), and increased dextran permeability by 0.2 vs 1.2 g/l (p < 0.05). These changes in barrier function were completely ameliorated by the p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB-203580) but not by JNK inhibitor (SP-600125) or MEK/ERK inhibitor (PD-98059). SiRNA knock down of p38 MAPK prevented the loss of barrier function caused by indomethacin in MKN-28 cells. Western analyses of TJ proteins revealed that expression of occludin was reduced by indomethacin, whereas there was no change in other TJ proteins. The loss of occludin expression induced by indomethacin was prevented by inhibition of p38 MAPK but not JNK or ERK and also by siRNA of p38 MAPK. Immunofluorescence revealed disruption of occludin localization at the site of the tight junction in indomethacin-treated cells, and this was attenuated by inhibition of p38 MAPK. NSAID injury to murine gastric mucosa on Ussing chambers revealed that indomethacin caused a significant drop in TER and increased paracellular permeability. Pretreatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly attenuated the disruption of barrier function, but JNK and MEK/ERK inhibition had no effect. Western blot analysis on gastric mucosa reveled loss of TJ protein occludin by indomethacin, which was prevented by inhibition of p38 MAPK. This data suggests that indomethacin compromises the gastric epithelial barrier via p38 MAPK inducing occludin alterations in the TJs. PMID:27583191

  6. Claudin-21 Has a Paracellular Channel Role at Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroo; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Kashihara, Hiroka; Yamazaki, Yuji; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Takeuchi, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Claudin protein family members, of which there are at least 27 in humans and mice, polymerize to form tight junctions (TJs) between epithelial cells, in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner. Claudins have a paracellular barrier function. In addition, certain claudins function as paracellular channels for small ions and/or solutes by forming selective pores at the TJs, although the specific claudins involved and their functional mechanisms are still in question. Here we show for the first time that claudin-21, which is more highly expressed in the embryonic than the postnatal stages, acts as a paracellular channel for small cations, such as Na+, similar to the typical channel-type claudins claudin-2 and -15. Claudin-21 also allows the paracellular passage of larger solutes. Our findings suggest that claudin-21-based TJs allow the passage of small and larger solutes by both paracellular channel-based and some additional mechanisms. PMID:26729464

  7. Trends in drug delivery through tissue barriers containing tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tscheik, Christian; Blasig, Ingolf E.; Winkler, Lars

    2013-01-01

    A limitation in the uptake of many drugs is the restricted permeation through tissue barriers. There are two general ways to cross barriers formed by cell layers: by transcytosis or by diffusion through the intercellular space. In the latter, tight junctions (TJs) play the decisive role in the regulation of the barrier permeability. Thus, transient modulation of TJs is a potent strategy to improve drug delivery. There have been extensive studies on surfactant-like absorption enhancers. One of the most effective enhancers found is sodium caprate. However, this modulates TJs in an unspecific fashion. A novel approach would be the specific modulation of TJ-associated marvel proteins and claudins, which are the main structural components of the TJs. Recent studies have identified synthetic peptidomimetics and RNA interference techniques to downregulate the expression of targeted TJ proteins. This review summarizes current progress and discusses the impact on TJs' barrier function. PMID:24665392

  8. 21-Benzylidene digoxin: a proapoptotic cardenolide of cancer cells that up-regulates Na,K-ATPase and epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Sayonarah C; Pessoa, Marco T C; Neves, Luiza D R; Alves, Silmara L G; Silva, Luciana M; Santos, Herica L; Oliveira, Soraya M F; Taranto, Alex G; Comar, Moacyr; Gomes, Isabella V; Santos, Fabio V; Paixão, Natasha; Quintas, Luis E M; Noël, François; Pereira, Antonio F; Tessis, Ana C S C; Gomes, Natalia L S; Moreira, Otacilio C; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Varotti, Fernando P; Blanco, Gustavo; Villar, Jose A F P; Contreras, Rubén G; Barbosa, Leandro A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotonic steroids are used to treat heart failure and arrhythmia and have promising anticancer effects. The prototypic cardiotonic steroid ouabain may also be a hormone that modulates epithelial cell adhesion. Cardiotonic steroids consist of a steroid nucleus and a lactone ring, and their biological effects depend on the binding to their receptor, Na,K-ATPase, through which, they inhibit Na+ and K+ ion transport and activate of several intracellular signaling pathways. In this study, we added a styrene group to the lactone ring of the cardiotonic steroid digoxin, to obtain 21-benzylidene digoxin (21-BD), and investigated the effects of this synthetic cardiotonic steroid in different cell models. Molecular modeling indicates that 21-BD binds to its target Na,K-ATPase with low affinity, adopting a different pharmacophoric conformation when bound to its receptor than digoxin. Accordingly, 21-DB, at relatively high µM amounts inhibits the activity of Na,K-ATPase α1, but not α2 and α3 isoforms. In addition, 21-BD targets other proteins outside the Na,K-ATPase, inhibiting the multidrug exporter Pdr5p. When used on whole cells at low µM concentrations, 21-BD produces several effects, including: 1) up-regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression and activity in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, which is not found for digoxin, 2) cell specific changes in cell viability, reducing it in HeLa and RKO cancer cells, but increasing it in normal epithelial MDCK cells, which is different from the response to digoxin, and 3) changes in cell-cell interaction, altering the molecular composition of tight junctions and elevating transepithelial electrical resistance of MDCK monolayers, an effect previously found for ouabain. These results indicate that modification of the lactone ring of digoxin provides new properties to the compound, and shows that the structural change introduced could be used for the design of cardiotonic steroid with novel functions.

  9. Phosphatidylcholine passes through lateral tight junctions for paracellular transport to the apical side of the polarized intestinal tumor cell-line CaCo2.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Wolfgang; Staffer, Simone; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Wannhoff, Andreas; Bach, Margund; Gauss, Annika

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in intestinal mucus, indicative of a specific transport system across the mucosal epithelium to the intestinal lumen. To elucidate this transport mechanism, we employed a transwell tissue culture system with polarized CaCo2 cells. It was shown that PC could not substantially be internalized by the cells. However, after basal application of increasing PC concentrations, an apical transport of 47.1±6.3nmolh(-1)mMPC(-1) was observed. Equilibrium distribution studies with PC applied in equal concentrations to the basal and apical compartments showed a 1.5-fold accumulation on the expense of basal PC. Disruption of tight junctions (TJ) by acetaldehyde or PPARγ inhibitors or by treatment with siRNA to TJ proteins suppressed paracellular transport by at least 50%. Transport was specific for the choline containing the phospholipids PC, lysoPC and sphingomyelin. We showed that translocation is driven by an electrochemical gradient generated by apical accumulation of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) through CFTR. Pretreatment with siRNA to mucin 3 which anchors in the apical plasma membrane of mucosal cells inhibited the final step of luminal PC secretion. PC accumulates in intestinal mucus using a paracellular, apically directed transport route across TJs. PMID:27365309

  10. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Goyer, Marianne; Loiselet, Alicia; Bon, Fabienne; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ) formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin), we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ.

  11. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Goyer, Marianne; Loiselet, Alicia; Bon, Fabienne; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ) formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin), we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. PMID:26933885

  12. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Fabienne; L’Ollivier, Coralie; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ) formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin), we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. PMID:26933885

  13. Expression of Tight Junction Molecule In The Human Serum-Induced Aggregation of Human Abdominal Adipose-Derived Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, A Young; Yun, Sujin; Yang, HyeJin; Lim, Yoon Hwa; Kim, Haekwon

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that human abdominal adipose derived-stem cells (ADSCs) could aggregate during the high-density culture in the presence of human serum (HS). In the present study, we observed that human cord blood serum (CBS) and follicular fluid (HFF) also induced aggregation. Similarly, porcine serum could induce aggregation whereas bovine and sheep sera induced little aggregation. qRT-PCR analyses demonstrated that, compared to FBS-cultured ADSCs, HScultured cells exhibited higher level of mRNA expression of CLDN3, -6, -7, -15, and -16 genes among the tight junction proteins. ADSCs examined at the time of aggregation by culture with HS, BSA, HFF, CBS, or porcine serum showed significantly higher level of mRNA expression of JAM2 among JAM family members. In contrast, cells cultured in FBS, bovine serum or sheep serum, showed lower level of JAM2 expression. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that the aggregates of HS-cultured cells (HS-Agg) showed intense staining against the anti-JAM2 antibody whereas neither non-aggregated cells (HS-Ex) nor FBS-cultured cells exhibited weak staining. Western blot results showed that HS-Agg expressed JAM2 protein more prominently than HS-Ex and FBS-cultured cells, both of latter reveled weaker intensity. These results suggest that the aggregation property of ADSCs during high-density culture would be dependent on the specific components of serum, and that JAM2 molecule could play a role in the animal sera-induced aggregation in vitro. PMID:25949191

  14. Estrogen Modulates Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Rat Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung-Jin; Ahn, Kyuyoun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to investigate the localization of tight junctions and the modulation of zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1, occludin and claudin-1 expression by estrogen in castrated female rat vagina. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230–240 g, n = 45) were divided into three groups and subjected to a sham operation (control group, n = 15), bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx group, n = 15), or bilateral ovariectomy followed by daily subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg/day, Ovx + Est group, n = 15). The cellular localization and expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Expression of ZO-1 was diffuse in all groups, with the highest intensity in the superficial epithelium in the control group. Occludin was localized in the intermediate and basal epithelium. Claudin-1 was most intense in the superficial layer of the vaginal epithelium in the control group. Expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 was significantly decreased after ovariectomy and was restored to the level of the control after estrogen replacement. Conclusions. Tight junctions are distinctly localized in rat vagina, and estrogen modulates the expression of tight junctions. Further researches are needed to clarify the functional role of tight junctions in vaginal lubrication. PMID:27127786

  15. Pores in the epidermis: aquaporins and tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Brandner, J M

    2007-12-01

    Water homeostasis of the epidermis is important for the appearance and physical properties of the skin, as well as for water balance in the body. It depends on several factors, e.g. barrier quality, uptake of water into the epidermis, concentration of water-retaining humectants, and external humidity. Aquaporins (AQPs) are pores in the plasmamembranes of cells. Monomeric AQPs form barrel-like structures that are primarily water selective, some AQPs also transport glycerol and possibly other small solutes. In the epidermis, AQP3 is the predominant AQP. It is localized mainly in basal but also in suprabasal layers of the epidermis and is permeable for water as well as for glycerol, a humectant. Mice deficient in AQP3 exhibit reduced stratum corneum (SC) hydration and impaired SC barrier recovery after SC removal. In skin diseases associated with elevated transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and reduced SC hydration, altered expression of AQP3 was shown. Tight junctions (TJ) are cell-cell junctions, which play a central role in sealing the intercellular space of cell sheets and thereby establishing a paracellular barrier. Within the TJ, pores are postulated to exist, which allow the controlled diffusion of water and solutes via the paracellular pathway. In the epidermis, TJ structures were demonstrated in the stratum granulosum whereas TJ proteins were found in all viable layers. Mice which overexpress or are deficient of key-proteins of TJ die soon after birth because of a tremendous TEWL. In various skin diseases that are accompanied by elevated TEWL and reduced skin hydration, staining patterns of TJ proteins are altered. This review will summarize our current knowledge of the involvement of AQPs and TJ in the water homeostasis of the epidermis. PMID:18489380

  16. The role of tight junctions in mammary gland function.

    PubMed

    Stelwagen, Kerst; Singh, Kuljeet

    2014-03-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are cellular structures that facilitate cell-cell communication and are important in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of epithelia. It is only during the last two decades that the molecular make-up of TJ is becoming unravelled, with two major transmembrane-spanning structural protein families, called occludin and claudins, being the true constituents of the TJ. These TJ proteins are linked via specific scaffolding proteins to the cell's cytoskeleton. In the mammary gland TJ between adjacent secretory epithelial cells are formed during lactogenesis and are instrumental in establishing and maintaining milk synthesis and secretion, whereas TJ integrity is compromised during mammary involution and also as result of mastitis and periods of mammary inflamation (including mastitis). They prevent the paracellular transport of ions and small molecules between the blood and milk compartments. Formation of intact TJ at the start of lactation is important for the establishment of the lactation. Conversely, loss of TJ integrity has been linked to reduced milk secretion and mammary function and increased paracellular transport of blood components into the milk and vice versa. In addition to acting as a paracellular barrier, the TJ is increasingly linked to playing an active role in intracellular signalling. This review focusses on the role of TJ in mammary function of the normal, non-malignant mammary gland, predominantly in ruminants, the major dairy producing species.

  17. MicroRNA-205 Targets Tight Junction-related Proteins during Urothelial Cellular Differentiation *

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Pei-Jung Katy; Chi, Lang-Ming; Chen, Chien-Lun; Liang, Chih-Lung; Lin, Chung-Tzu; Chang, Yu-Xun; Chen, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian bladder urothelium classified as basal, intermediate, and terminally differentiated umbrella cells offers one of the most effective permeability barrier functions known to exist in nature because of the formation of apical uroplakin plaques and tight junctions. To improve our understanding of urothelial differentiation, we analyzed the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of mouse urinary tissues and by TaqMan miRNA analysis of microdissected urothelial layers and in situ miRNA-specific hybridization to determine the dependence of these miRNAs on the differentiation stage. Our in situ hybridization studies revealed that miR-205 was enriched in the undifferentiated basal and intermediate cell layers. We then used a quantitative proteomics approach to identify miR-205 target genes in primary cultured urothelial cells subjected to antagomir-mediated knockdown of specific miRNAs. Twenty-four genes were reproducibly regulated by miR-205; eleven of them were annotated as cell junction- and tight junction-related molecules. Western blot analysis demonstrated that antagomir-induced silencing of miR-205 in primary cultured urothelial cells elevated the expression levels of Tjp1, Cgnl1, and Cdc42. Ectopic expression of miR-205 in MDCK cells inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins and the formation of tight junctions. miR-205- knockdown urothelial cells showed alterations in keratin synthesis and increases of uroplakin Ia and Ib, which are the urothelial differentiation products. These results suggest that miR-205 may contribute a role in regulation of urothelial differentiation by modulating the expression of tight junction-related molecules. PMID:24912853

  18. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  19. West Nile virus infection causes endocytosis of a specific subset of tight junction membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zaikun; Waeckerlin, Regula; Urbanowski, Matt D; van Marle, Guido; Hobman, Tom C

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a blood-borne pathogen that causes systemic infections and serious neurological disease in human and animals. The most common route of infection is mosquito bites and therefore, the virus must cross a number of polarized cell layers to gain access to organ tissue and the central nervous system. Resistance to trans-cellular movement of macromolecules between epithelial and endothelial cells is mediated by tight junction complexes. While a number of recent studies have documented that WNV infection negatively impacts the barrier function of tight junctions, the intracellular mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. In the present study, we report that endocytosis of a subset of tight junction membrane proteins including claudin-1 and JAM-1 occurs in WNV infected epithelial and endothelial cells. This process, which ultimately results in lysosomal degradation of the proteins, is dependent on the GTPase dynamin and microtubule-based transport. Finally, infection of polarized cells with the related flavivirus, Dengue virus-2, did not result in significant loss of tight junction membrane proteins. These results suggest that neurotropic flaviviruses such as WNV modulate the host cell environment differently than hemorrhagic flaviviruses and thus may have implications for understanding the molecular basis for neuroinvasion.

  20. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions

    PubMed Central

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the ‘apical junctional complex—AJC’ with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the ‘Junctional Adhesion Molecules’ (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers. PMID:25610754

  1. Brain Invasion by Mouse Hepatitis Virus Depends on Impairment of Tight Junctions and Beta Interferon Production in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bleau, Christian; Filliol, Aveline; Samson, Michel

    2015-01-01

    CoVs may gain access to the CNS at the BBB level. Herein we report for the first time that CoVs exhibit the ability to cross the BBB according to strain virulence. BBB invasion by CoVs correlates with virus-induced disruption of tight junctions on BMECs, leading to BBB dysfunction and enhanced permeability. We provide evidence that production of IFN-β by BMECs during CoV infection may prevent BBB breakdown and brain viral invasion. PMID:26202229

  2. Modulation of Tight Junction Structure and Function by Kinases and Phosphatases Targeting Occludin

    PubMed Central

    Dörfel, Max Johannes; Huber, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) typically represent the most apical contacts in epithelial and endothelial cell layers where they play an essential role in the separation of extracellular or luminal spaces from underlying tissues in the body. Depending on the protein composition, TJs define the barrier characteristics and in addition maintain cell polarity. Two major families of integral membrane proteins form the typical TJ strand network, the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein (TAMP) family members occludin, tricellulin, and MarvelD3 as well as a specific set of claudins. Occludin was the first identified member of these tetraspanins and is now widely accepted as a regulator of TJ assembly and function. Therefore, occludin itself has to be tightly regulated. Phosphorylation of occludin appears to be of central importance in this context. Here we want to summarize current knowledge on the kinases and phosphatases directly modifying occludin, and their role in the regulation of TJ structure, function, and dynamics. PMID:22315516

  3. Rapid remodeling of tight junctions during paracellular diapedesis in a human model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Winger, Ryan C; Koblinski, Jennifer E; Kanda, Takashi; Ransohoff, Richard M; Muller, William A

    2014-09-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM; diapedesis) is a critical event in immune surveillance and inflammation. Most TEM occurs at endothelial cell borders (paracellular). However, there is indirect evidence to suggest that, at the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), leukocytes migrate directly through the endothelial cell body (transcellular). Why leukocytes migrate through the endothelial cell body rather than the cell borders is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the tightness of endothelial cell junctions influences the pathway of diapedesis, we developed an in vitro model of the BBB that possessed 10-fold higher electrical resistance than standard culture conditions and strongly expressed the BBB tight junction proteins claudin-5 and claudin-3. We found that paracellular TEM was still the predominant pathway (≥98%) and TEM was dependent on PECAM-1 and CD99. We show that endothelial tight junctions expressing claudin-5 are dynamic and undergo rapid remodeling during TEM. Membrane from the endothelial lateral border recycling compartment is mobilized to the exact site of tight junction remodeling. This preserves the endothelial barrier by sealing the intercellular gaps with membrane and engaging the migrating leukocyte with unligated adhesion molecules (PECAM-1 and CD99) as it crosses the cell border. These findings provide new insights into leukocyte-endothelial interactions at the BBB and suggest that tight junctions are more dynamic than previously appreciated. PMID:25063869

  4. The Chlamydia trachomatis Protease CPAF Contains a Cryptic PDZ-Like Domain with Similarity to Human Cell Polarity and Tight Junction PDZ-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Rui; Valdivia, Raphael H.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    The need for more effective anti-chlamydial therapeutics has sparked research efforts geared toward further understanding chlamydial pathogenesis mechanisms. Recent studies have implicated the secreted chlamydial serine protease, chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF) as potentially important for chlamydial pathogenesis. By mechanisms that remain to be elucidated, CPAF is directed to a discrete group of substrates, which are subsequently cleaved or degraded. While inspecting the previously solved CPAF crystal structure, we discovered that CPAF contains a cryptic N-terminal PSD95 Dlg ZO-1 (PDZ) domain spanning residues 106–212 (CPAF106-212). This PDZ domain is unique in that it bears minimal sequence similarity to canonical PDZ-forming sequences and displays little sequence and structural similarity to known chlamydial PDZ domains. We show that the CPAF106-212 sequence is homologous to PDZ domains of human tight junction proteins. PMID:26829550

  5. A Model of Tight Junction Function In CNS Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Alexander; Devaux, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    The insulative properties of myelin sheaths in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS) are widely thought to derive from the high resistance and low capacitance of the constituent membranes. Although this view adequately accounts for myelin function in large diameter PNS fibers, it poorly reflects the behavior of small fibers that are prominent in many regions of the CNS. Herein, we develop a computational model to more accurately represent conduction in small fibers. By incorporating structural features that, hitherto, have not been simulated, we demonstrate that myelin tight junctions improve saltatory conduction by reducing current flow through the myelin, limiting axonal membrane depolarization and restraining the activation of ion channels beneath the myelin sheath. Accordingly, our simulations provide a novel view of myelin by which tight junctions minimize charging of the membrane capacitance and lower the membrane time constant to improve the speed and accuracy of transmission in small diameter fibers. This study establishes possible mechanisms whereby TJs affect conduction in the absence of overt perturbations to myelin architecture and may in part explain the tremor and gait abnormalities observed in Claudin 11-null mice. PMID:20102674

  6. The effect of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) cysteine protease actinidin on the occludin tight junction network in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cavic, Milena; Grozdanovic, Milica M; Bajic, Aleksandar; Jankovic, Radmila; Andjus, Pavle R; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2014-10-01

    Actinidin, a kiwifruit cysteine protease, is a marker allergen for genuine sensitization to this food allergen source. Inhalatory cysteine proteases have the capacity for disruption of tight junctions (TJs) enhancing the permeability of the bronchial epithelium. No such properties have been reported for allergenic food proteases so far. The aim was to determine the effect of actinidin on the integrity of T84 monolayers by evaluating its action on the TJ protein occludin. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence were employed for the detection of occludin protein alterations. Gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Breach of occludin network was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance, blue dextran leakage and passage of allergens from the apical to basolateral compartment. Actinidin exerted direct proteolytic cleavage of occludin; no alteration of occludin gene expression was detected. There was a reduction of occludin staining upon actinidin treatment as a consequence of its degradation and dispersion within the membrane. There was an increase in permeability of the T84 monolayer resulting in reduced transepithelial resistance, blue dextran leakage and passage of allergens actinidin and thaumatin-like protein from the apical to basolateral compartment. Opening of TJs by actinidin may increase intestinal permeability and contribute to the process of sensitization in kiwifruit allergy.

  7. Effects of beta-lactoglobulin on the tight-junctional stability of Caco-2-SF monolayer.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K; Nakayama, T; Shimizu, M

    1998-09-01

    The mechanisms for tight-junction (TJ) stabilization by beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) were studied. Treatment of Caco-2-SF cells with inhibitors for some enzymes in the intracellular signal transduction pathways and a cytoskeleton-disturbing agent (cytochalasin D) reduced the TJ-stabilizing activity of beta-Lg. So beta-Lg is suggested to modulate the cytoskeletal structure through the activation of phospholipase C and protein kinase C, resulting in the TJ stabilization.

  8. Secretion of Alpha-Hemolysin by Escherichia coli Disrupts Tight Junctions in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Du, Zhengyu; Struve, Carsten; Charbon, Godefroid; Karczewski, Jurgen; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Wells, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The potential of Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to damage the integrity of the intestinal epithelium was investigated. Methods: E. coli strains isolated from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls were tested for virulence capacity by molecular techniques and cytotoxic assays and transepithelial electric resistance (TER). E. coli isolate p19A was selected, and deletion mutants were created for alpha-hemolysin (α-hemolysin) (hly) clusters and cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (cnf1). Probiotic E. coli Nissle and pathogenic E. coli LF82 were used as controls. Results: E. coli strains from patients with active UC completely disrupted epithelial cell tight junctions shortly after inoculation. These strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are all α-hemolysin positive. In contrast, probiotic E. coli Nissle, pathogenic E. coli LF82, four E. coli from patients with inactive UC and three E. coli strains from healthy controls did not disrupt tight junctions. E. coli p19A WT as well as cnf1, and single loci of hly mutants from cluster I and II were all able to damage Caco-2 (Heterogeneous human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell tight junctions. However, this phenotype was lost in a mutant with knockout (Δ) of both hly loci (P<0.001). Conclusions: UC-associated E. coli producing α-hemolysin can cause rapid loss of tight junction integrity in differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers. This effect was abolished in a mutant unable to express α-hemolysin. These results suggest that high Hly expression may be a mechanism by which specific strains of E. coli pathobionts can contribute to epithelial barrier dysfunction and pathophysiology of disease in IBD. PMID:26938480

  9. Modulation of tight junction properties relevant to fluid transport across rabbit corneal endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Kuang, Kunyan; Smith, Randall W.; Rittenband, David; Iserovich, Pavel; Diecke, F.P.J.; Fischbarg, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Paracellular junctions could play an important role in corneal endothelial fluid transport. In this study we explored the effects of different reagents on the tight junctional barrier by assessing the translayer specific electrical resistance (TER) across rabbit corneal endothelial preparations and cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells (CRCEC) monolayers, the paracellular permeability (Papp) for fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dextrans across CRCEC, and fluid transport across deepithelialized rabbit corneal endothelial preparations. Palmitoyl carnitine (PC), poly-L-lysine (PLL), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and dibutyryl adenosine 3’:5’–cyclic monophosphate (dB-cAMP), were used to modulate corneal endothelial fluid transport and tight junctions (TJs). After seeding, the TER across CRCEC reached maximal values (29.2 ± 1.0 Ω·cm2) only after the 10th day. PC (0.1 mM) caused decreases both in TER (by 40%) and fluid transport (swelling rate: 18.5 ± 0.3 μm/h), and an increase in Papp. PLL resulted in increased TER rose and Papp but decreased fluid transport (swelling rate: 10 ± 0.3 μm/h). dB-cAMP (0.1 mM) and ATP (0.1 mM) decreased TER by 16% and 6%, increased Papp slightly, and stimulated fluid transport; the rates of de-swelling (in μm/h) were −5.4 ± 0.3 and −12.1 ± 0.4, respectively. PC might cause the junctions to open up unspecifically and thus increase passive leak. PLL is a known junctional charge modifier that may be adding steric hindrance to the tight junctions. The results with dB-cAMP and ATP are consistent with fluid transport via the paracellular route. PMID:17320078

  10. Blood-brain barrier tight junction disruption in human immunodeficiency virus-1 encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Dallasta, L M; Pisarov, L A; Esplen, J E; Werley, J V; Moses, A V; Nelson, J A; Achim, C L

    1999-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in regulating cell trafficking through the central nervous system (CNS) due to several unique anatomical features, including the presence of interendothelial tight junctions that form impermeable seals between the cells. Previous studies have demonstrated BBB perturbations during human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (HIVE); however, the basis of these permeability changes and its relationship to infiltration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected monocytes, a critical event in the pathogenesis of the disease, remains unclear. In this study, we examined CNS tissue from HIV-1-seronegative patients and HIV-1-infected patients, both with and without encephalitis, for alterations in BBB integrity via immunohistochemical analysis of the tight junction membrane proteins, occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Significant tight junction disruption (P < 0.001), as demonstrated by fragmentation or absence of immunoreactivity for occludin and ZO-1, was observed within vessels from subcortical white matter, basal ganglia, and, to a lesser extent, cortical gray matter in patients who died with HIVE. These alterations were also associated with accumulation of activated, HIV-1-infected brain macrophages, fibrinogen leakage, and marked astrocytosis. In contrast, no significant changes (P > 0.05) were observed in cerebellar tissue from patients with HIVE compared to HIV-seronegative patients or HIV-1-infected patients without encephalitis. Our findings demonstrate that tight junction disruption is a key feature of HIVE that occurs in regions of histopathological alterations in association with perivascular accumulation of activated HIV-1-infected macrophages, serum protein extravasation, and marked astrocytosis. We propose that disruption of this key BBB structure serves as the main route of HIV-1-infected monocyte entry into the CNS.

  11. Mode of action of claudin peptidomimetics in the transient opening of cellular tight junction barriers.

    PubMed

    Staat, Christian; Coisne, Caroline; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Wolburg, Hartwig; Engelhardt, Britta; Blasig, Ingolf E

    2015-06-01

    In epithelial/endothelial barriers, claudins form tight junctions, seal the paracellular cleft, and limit the uptake of solutes and drugs. The peptidomimetic C1C2 from the C-terminal half of claudin-1's first extracellular loop increases drug delivery through epithelial claudin-1 barriers. However, its molecular and structural mode of action remains unknown. In the present study, >100 μM C1C2 caused paracellular opening of various barriers with different claudin compositions, ranging from epithelial to endothelial cells, preferentially modulating claudin-1 and claudin-5. After 6 h incubation, C1C2 reversibly increased the permeability to molecules of different sizes; this was accompanied by redistribution of claudins and occludin from junctions to cytosol. Internalization of C1C2 in epithelial cells depended on claudin-1 expression and clathrin pathway, whereby most C1C2 was retained in recyclosomes >2 h. In freeze-fracture electron microscopy, C1C2 changed claudin-1 tight junction strands to a more parallel arrangement and claudin-5 strands from E-face to P-face association - drastic and novel effects. In conclusion, C1C2 is largely recycled in the presence of a claudin, which explains the delayed onset of barrier and junction loss, the high peptide concentration required and the long-lasting effect. Epithelial/endothelial barriers are specifically modulated via claudin-1/claudin-5, which can be targeted to improve drug delivery. PMID:25907035

  12. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of tight junction permeability made of claudin-16 and claudin-19 dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Renigunta, Vijayaram; Zhou, Yi; Sunq, Abby; Wang, Jinzhi; Yang, Jing; Renigunta, Aparna; Baker, Lane A.; Hou, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    The molecular nature of tight junction architecture and permeability is a long-standing mystery. Here, by comprehensive biochemical, biophysical, genetic, and electron microscopic analyses of claudin-16 and -19 interactions—two claudins that play key polygenic roles in fatal human renal disease, FHHNC—we found that 1) claudin-16 and -19 form a stable dimer through cis association of transmembrane domains 3 and 4; 2) mutations disrupting the claudin-16 and -19 cis interaction increase tight junction ultrastructural complexity but reduce tight junction permeability; and 3) no claudin hemichannel or heterotypic channel made of claudin-16 and -19 trans interaction can exist. These principles can be used to artificially alter tight junction permeabilities in various epithelia by manipulating selective claudin interactions. Our study also emphasizes the use of a novel recording approach based on scanning ion conductance microscopy to resolve tight junction permeabilities with submicrometer precision. PMID:26446843

  13. Strain-dependent augmentation of tight-junction barrier function in human primary epidermal keratinocytes by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium lysates.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Reshma; McBain, Andrew J; O'Neill, Catherine A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we investigated whether probiotic lysates can modify the tight-junction function of human primary keratinocytes. The keratinocytes were grown on cell culture inserts and treated with lysates from Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus fermentum, or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. With the exception of L. fermentum (which decreased cell viability), all strains markedly enhanced tight-junction barrier function within 24 h, as assessed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). However, B. longum and L. rhamnosus GG were the most efficacious, producing dose-dependent increases in resistance that were maintained for 4 days. These increases in TEER correlated with elevated expression of tight-junction protein components. Neutralization of Toll-like receptor 2 abolished both the increase in TEER and expression of tight-junction proteins induced by B. longum, but not L. rhamnosus GG. These data suggest that some bacterial strains increase tight-junction function via modulation of protein components but the different pathways involved may vary depending on the bacterial strain. PMID:23770906

  14. Strain-Dependent Augmentation of Tight-Junction Barrier Function in Human Primary Epidermal Keratinocytes by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium Lysates

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Reshma; McBain, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether probiotic lysates can modify the tight-junction function of human primary keratinocytes. The keratinocytes were grown on cell culture inserts and treated with lysates from Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus fermentum, or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. With the exception of L. fermentum (which decreased cell viability), all strains markedly enhanced tight-junction barrier function within 24 h, as assessed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). However, B. longum and L. rhamnosus GG were the most efficacious, producing dose-dependent increases in resistance that were maintained for 4 days. These increases in TEER correlated with elevated expression of tight-junction protein components. Neutralization of Toll-like receptor 2 abolished both the increase in TEER and expression of tight-junction proteins induced by B. longum, but not L. rhamnosus GG. These data suggest that some bacterial strains increase tight-junction function via modulation of protein components but the different pathways involved may vary depending on the bacterial strain. PMID:23770906

  15. p38 MAPK Regulates Cavitation and Tight Junction Function in the Mouse Blastocyst

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christine E.; Watson, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Blastocyst formation is essential for implantation and maintenance of pregnancy and is dependent on the expression and coordinated function of a series of proteins involved in establishing and maintaining the trans-trophectoderm ion gradient that enables blastocyst expansion. These consist of Na/K-ATPase, adherens junctions, tight junctions (TJ) and aquaporins (AQP). While their role in supporting blastocyst formation is established, the intracellular signaling pathways that coordinate their function is unclear. The p38 MAPK pathway plays a role in regulating these proteins in other cell types and is required for embryo development at the 8–16 cell stage, but its role has not been investigated in the blastocyst. Hypothesis p38 MAPK regulates blastocyst formation by regulating blastocyst formation gene expression and function. Methods Embryos were cultured from the early blastocyst stage for 12 h or 24 h in the presence of a potent and specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB 220025. Blastocyst expansion, hatching, gene family expression and localization, TJ function and apoptosis levels were analyzed. Results Inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway reduced blastocyst expansion and hatching, increased tight junction permeability, affected TJP1 localization, reduced Aqp3 expression, and induced a significant increase in apoptosis. Conclusion The p38 MAPK pathway coordinates the overall events that regulate blastocyst formation. PMID:23593143

  16. Tight junction alterations of respiratory epithelium following long-term NO2 exposure and recovery.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R E; Solano, D; Kleinerman, J

    1986-01-01

    Acute exposure to NO2 is reported to disrupt tight junctions in lung epithelium. We have studied the effects of chronic NO2 exposure and recovery breathing clean air to tight junctions of distal airway and alveolar epithelium. Syrian Golden hamsters were exposed to NO2 (30 PPM) for 5 or 9 months and a group of those animals for 9 months were allowed to recover breathing clean air for 3 or 9 months. Animals were sacrificed after 5 and 9 months of NO2 exposure and after 3, and 9 mos. recovery breathing clean air. The lungs were carefully removed, inflation fixed with glutaraldehyde and then processed for freeze fracture and transmission electron microscopy of ultra-thin epon sections. Evaluation of tight junctions of bronchioles and alveoli were disrupted in ultrathin sections and freeze fracture replicas during the period of NO2 exposure. Fibril number, length, degree of fragmentation and orientation were different from age matched controls. The bronchiolar tight junctional fibrils were quantitatively reduced in number and fragmented into much smaller fibril lengths. Alveolar tight junctions were qualitatively disrupted in a similar fashion, however, the sites of damage were focal. During recovery tight junctions in bronchioles did not regain normal fibril number, orientation and continuity, based on quantitative assessment, observed in age matched controls. Alveolar tight junctions remained focally altered. This data indicated that chronic NO2 altered morphologic characteristics of epithelial tight junctions of the lung throughout the period of exposure. The repair process during recovery did not restore the normal tight junction ultrastructural organization observed in age controls. This persistent deviation from the normal is likely to alter and compromise airway epithelial barrier function in the lungs of these hamsters. PMID:3780600

  17. Isoflurane ameliorates acute lung injury by preserving epithelial tight junction integrity

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Joshua A.; Macias, Alvaro A.; Amador-Munoz, Diana; Vera, Miguel Pinilla; Isabelle, Colleen; Guan, Jiazhen; Magaoay, Brady; Velandia, Margarita Suarez; Coronata, Anna; Lee, Awapuhi; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isoflurane may be protective in pre-clinical models of lung injury but its use in patients with lung injury remains controversial and the mechanism of its protective effects remains unclear. We hypothesized that this protection is mediated at the level of alveolar tight junctions and investigated the possibility in a two-hit model of lung injury that mirrors human acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Wild-type mice were treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to nebulized endotoxin (n=8) or saline control (n=9) then allowed to recover for 24 hrs prior to mechanical ventilation (MV, tidal volume 15 mL/kg, 2 hrs) producing ventilator-induced lung injury. Mouse lung epithelial cells were similarly treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Cells were cyclically stretched the following day to mirror the MV protocol used in vivo. Results Mice treated with isoflurane following exposure to inhaled endotoxin and prior to MV exhibited significantly less physiologic lung dysfunction. These effects appeared to be mediated by decreased vascular leak, but not altered inflammatory indices. Mouse lung epithelial cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and cyclic stretch and lungs harvested from mice following treatment with lipopolysaccharide and MV had decreased levels of a key tight junction protein (i.e. zona occludens 1) that was rescued by isoflurane treatment. Conclusions Isoflurane rescued lung injury induced by a two-hit model of endotoxin exposure followed by MV by maintaining the integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier possibly by modulating the expression of a key tight junction protein. PMID:26068207

  18. Structural basis for disruption of claudin assembly in tight junctions by an enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Takehiro; Shinya, Naoko; Ito, Kaori; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The food-poisoning bacterium Clostridium perfringens produces an enterotoxin (~35 kDa) that specifically targets human claudin-4, among the 26 human claudin proteins, and causes diarrhea by fluid accumulation in the intestinal cavity. The C-terminal domain of the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE, ~15 kDa) binds tightly to claudin-4, and disrupts the intestinal tight junction barriers. In this study, we determined the 3.5-Å resolution crystal structure of the cell-free synthesized human claudin-4•C-CPE complex, which is significantly different from the structure of the off-target complex of an engineered C-CPE with mouse claudin-19. The claudin-4•C-CPE complex structure demonstrated the mechanism underlying claudin assembly disruption. A comparison of the present C-CPE-bound structure of claudin-4 with the enterotoxin-free claudin-15 structure revealed sophisticated C-CPE-induced conformation changes of the extracellular segments, induced on the foundation of the rigid four-transmembrane-helix bundle structure. These conformation changes provide a mechanistic model for the disruption of the lateral assembly of claudin molecules. Furthermore, the present novel structural mechanism for selecting a specific member of the claudin family can be used as the foundation to develop novel medically important technologies to selectively regulate the tight junctions formed by claudin family members in different organs. PMID:27647526

  19. Structural basis for disruption of claudin assembly in tight junctions by an enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Takehiro; Shinya, Naoko; Ito, Kaori; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The food-poisoning bacterium Clostridium perfringens produces an enterotoxin (~35 kDa) that specifically targets human claudin-4, among the 26 human claudin proteins, and causes diarrhea by fluid accumulation in the intestinal cavity. The C-terminal domain of the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE, ~15 kDa) binds tightly to claudin-4, and disrupts the intestinal tight junction barriers. In this study, we determined the 3.5-Å resolution crystal structure of the cell-free synthesized human claudin-4•C-CPE complex, which is significantly different from the structure of the off-target complex of an engineered C-CPE with mouse claudin-19. The claudin-4•C-CPE complex structure demonstrated the mechanism underlying claudin assembly disruption. A comparison of the present C-CPE-bound structure of claudin-4 with the enterotoxin-free claudin-15 structure revealed sophisticated C-CPE-induced conformation changes of the extracellular segments, induced on the foundation of the rigid four-transmembrane-helix bundle structure. These conformation changes provide a mechanistic model for the disruption of the lateral assembly of claudin molecules. Furthermore, the present novel structural mechanism for selecting a specific member of the claudin family can be used as the foundation to develop novel medically important technologies to selectively regulate the tight junctions formed by claudin family members in different organs. PMID:27647526

  20. CFTR interacts with ZO-1 to regulate tight junction assembly and epithelial differentiation through the ZONAB pathway.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ye Chun; Wang, Yan; Da Silva, Nicolas; Kim, Bongki; Diao, Rui Ying; Hill, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Breton, Sylvie

    2014-10-15

    Mutations in CFTR lead to dysfunction of tubular organs, which is currently attributed to impairment of its conductive properties. We now show that CFTR regulates tight junction assembly and epithelial cell differentiation through modulation of the ZO-1-ZONAB pathway. CFTR colocalizes with ZO-1 at the tight junctions of trachea and epididymis, and is expressed before ZO-1 in Wolffian ducts. CFTR interacts with ZO-1 through the CTFR PDZ-binding domain. In a three-dimensional (3D) epithelial cell culture model, CFTR regulates tight junction assembly and is required for tubulogenesis. CFTR inhibition or knockdown reduces ZO-1 expression and induces the translocation of the transcription factor ZONAB (also known as YBX3) from tight junctions to the nucleus, followed by upregulation of the transcription of CCND1 and downregulation of ErbB2 transcription. The epididymal tubules of cftr(-/-) and cftr(ΔF508) mice have reduced ZO-1 levels, increased ZONAB nuclear expression, and decreased epithelial cell differentiation, illustrated by the reduced expression of apical AQP9 and V-ATPase. This study provides a new paradigm for the etiology of diseases associated with CFTR mutations, including cystic fibrosis.

  1. Butyrate promotes the recovering of intestinal wound healing through its positive effect on the tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Fan, P X; Li, L S; Qiao, S Y; Zhang, G L; Li, D F

    2012-12-01

    Postweaning diarrhea is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in weanling piglets. Feeding sodium butyrate to weanling piglets decreased the incidence of diarrhea, but the mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The present study was to evaluate the effect of sodium butyrate on diarrhea in relation to wound healing of intestinal barrier using IPEC-J2 cell model. Cultured cells were scratched to induce wound and then were treated with 4 mM sodium butyrate. The results showed that supplementation of the cells with sodium butyrate significantly promoted the process of wound healing, indicating the protective effects of butyrate on the intestinal mucosa. Butyrate treatment enhanced mRNA expression of the intestinal mucosal tight junction proteins occludin and zonula occluden protein-1 (P < 0.05), which suggested that the promotion of wound healing by butyrate is related to the maintenance of the function of the intestinal barrier. In addition, in the butyrate-treated group, intestinal total superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (P < 0.05), two of the main antioxidant enzymes, as well as glutathione (P < 0.05), one of the nonenzymatic antioxidant components, were enhanced whereas the malondialdehyde level, a marker of free radical mediated lipid peroxidation injury, was decreased (P < 0.05) compared with the control group. Collectively, these results indicate that dietary sodium butyrate might, at least partly, play an important role in recovering the intestinal tight junctions having a positive effect on maintaining the gut integrity.

  2. Exploring tight junction alteration using double fluorescent probe combination of lanthanide complex with gold nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Na; Yuan, Lan; Li, Na; Wang, Junxia; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions play a key role in restricting or regulating passage of liquids, ions and large solutes through various biological barriers by the paracellular route. Changes in paracellular permeation indicate alteration of the tight junction. However, it is very difficult to obtain the structural change information by measuring paracellular flux based on transepithelial electrical resistance or using fluorescein-labeled dextrans. Here we show that the BSA and GSH stabilized gold nanoclusters exhibit marginal cytotoxicity and pass through the MDCK monolayer exclusively through the paracellular pathway. We propose a double fluorescence probe strategy, the combination of a proven paracellular indicator (europium complex) with fluorescent gold nanoclusters. We calculate changes of structural parameters in tight junctions based on determination of the diffusion coefficients of the probes. Two different types of tight junction openers are used to validate our strategy. Results show that EDTA disrupts tight junction structures and induces large and smooth paracellular pore paths with an average radius of 17 nm, but vanadyl complexes induce paths with the radius of 6 nm. The work suggests that the double fluorescence probe strategy is a useful and convenient approach for in vitro investigation of tight junction structural alternations caused by pharmacological or pathological events. PMID:27574102

  3. Hepatic immunohistochemical localization of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in rat models of cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. M.; Glade, J. L.; Stevenson, B. R.; Boyer, J. L.; Mooseker, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    Structural alterations in hepatocyte tight junctions accompanying cholestasis were investigated using immunolocalization of ZO-1, the first known protein component of the tight junction. Disruption in the paracellular barrier function of the tight junction has been proposed to allow reflux of bile into the blood. Cholestasis was induced in 210 to 235 g male Sprague-Dawley rats either by five consecutive daily subcutaneous injections of 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (0.5 mg/kg/d in propylene glycol) or ligation of the common bile duct for 72 hours. The structural organization of the tight junction was assessed in each model by indirect immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase staining for ZO-1 on frozen sections of liver and compared with controls. In control, sham-operated, and estradiol-injected animals, ZO-1 localizes in a uniform continuous manner along the margins of the canaliculi. In contrast, bile duct ligation results in the appearance of numerous discontinuities in ZO-1 staining accompanied by dilation or collapse of the lumenal space. Tissue content of the ZO-1 protein, as determined by quantitative immunoblotting, was unaffected in either cholestatic model compared with controls. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of the tight junction can be assessed from immunostaining patterns of ZO-1 in frozen sections of cholestatic livers. Under these experimental conditions, the organization of the tight junction at the level of the ZO-1 protein is altered by bile duct obstruction but not by ethinyl estradiol. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2719075

  4. Exploring tight junction alteration using double fluorescent probe combination of lanthanide complex with gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Na; Yuan, Lan; Li, Na; Wang, Junxia; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions play a key role in restricting or regulating passage of liquids, ions and large solutes through various biological barriers by the paracellular route. Changes in paracellular permeation indicate alteration of the tight junction. However, it is very difficult to obtain the structural change information by measuring paracellular flux based on transepithelial electrical resistance or using fluorescein-labeled dextrans. Here we show that the BSA and GSH stabilized gold nanoclusters exhibit marginal cytotoxicity and pass through the MDCK monolayer exclusively through the paracellular pathway. We propose a double fluorescence probe strategy, the combination of a proven paracellular indicator (europium complex) with fluorescent gold nanoclusters. We calculate changes of structural parameters in tight junctions based on determination of the diffusion coefficients of the probes. Two different types of tight junction openers are used to validate our strategy. Results show that EDTA disrupts tight junction structures and induces large and smooth paracellular pore paths with an average radius of 17 nm, but vanadyl complexes induce paths with the radius of 6 nm. The work suggests that the double fluorescence probe strategy is a useful and convenient approach for in vitro investigation of tight junction structural alternations caused by pharmacological or pathological events. PMID:27574102

  5. Exploring tight junction alteration using double fluorescent probe combination of lanthanide complex with gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Na; Yuan, Lan; Li, Na; Wang, Junxia; Yang, Xiaoda

    2016-08-01

    Tight junctions play a key role in restricting or regulating passage of liquids, ions and large solutes through various biological barriers by the paracellular route. Changes in paracellular permeation indicate alteration of the tight junction. However, it is very difficult to obtain the structural change information by measuring paracellular flux based on transepithelial electrical resistance or using fluorescein-labeled dextrans. Here we show that the BSA and GSH stabilized gold nanoclusters exhibit marginal cytotoxicity and pass through the MDCK monolayer exclusively through the paracellular pathway. We propose a double fluorescence probe strategy, the combination of a proven paracellular indicator (europium complex) with fluorescent gold nanoclusters. We calculate changes of structural parameters in tight junctions based on determination of the diffusion coefficients of the probes. Two different types of tight junction openers are used to validate our strategy. Results show that EDTA disrupts tight junction structures and induces large and smooth paracellular pore paths with an average radius of 17 nm, but vanadyl complexes induce paths with the radius of 6 nm. The work suggests that the double fluorescence probe strategy is a useful and convenient approach for in vitro investigation of tight junction structural alternations caused by pharmacological or pathological events.

  6. Lymphocytes accelerate epithelial tight junction assembly: role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK).

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Chen, Hao; Yu, Sidney; Zhang, Li; Caplan, Michael J; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2010-01-01

    The tight junctions (TJs), characteristically located at the apicolateral borders of adjacent epithelial cells, are required for the proper formation of epithelial cell polarity as well as for sustaining the mucosal barrier to the external environment. The observation that lymphocytes are recruited by epithelial cells to the sites of infection [1] suggests that they may play a role in the modulation of epithelial barrier function and thus contribute to host defense. To test the ability of lymphocytes to modulate tight junction assembly in epithelial cells, we set up a lymphocyte-epithelial cell co-culture system, in which Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, a well-established model cell line for studying epithelial TJ assembly [2], were co-cultured with mouse lymphocytes to mimic an infection state. In a typical calcium switch experiment, the TJ assembly in co-culture was found to be accelerated compared to that in MDCK cells alone. This accelaration was found to be mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK activation was independent of changes in cellular ATP levels but it was found to be activated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. Forced suppression of AMPK, either with a chemical inhibitor or by knockdown, abrogated the accelerating effect of lymphocytes on TJ formation. Similar results were also observed in a co-culture with lymphocytes and Calu-3 human airway epithelial cells, suggesting that the activation of AMPK may be a general mechanism underlying lymphocyte-accelerated TJ assembly in different epithelia. These results suggest that signals from lymphocytes, such as cytokines, facilitate TJ assembly in epithelial cells via the activation of AMPK. PMID:20808811

  7. Acute regulation of tight junction ion selectivity in human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Andrea N.; Itani, Omar A.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Electrolyte transport through and between airway epithelial cells controls the quantity and composition of the overlying liquid. Many studies have shown acute regulation of transcellular ion transport in airway epithelia. However, whether ion transport through tight junctions can also be acutely regulated is poorly understood both in airway and other epithelia. To investigate the paracellular pathway, we used primary cultures of differentiated human airway epithelia and assessed expression of claudins, the primary determinants of paracellular permeability, and measured transepithelial electrical properties, ion fluxes, and La3+ movement. Like many other tissues, airway epithelia expressed multiple claudins. Moreover, different cell types in the epithelium expressed the same pattern of claudins. To evaluate tight junction regulation, we examined the response to histamine, an acute regulator of airway function. Histamine stimulated a rapid and transient increase in the paracellular Na+ conductance, with a smaller increase in Cl− conductance. The increase was mediated by histamine H1 receptors and depended on an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These results suggest that ion flow through the paracellular pathway can be acutely regulated. Such regulation could facilitate coupling of the passive flow of counter ions to active transcellular transport, thereby controlling net transepithelial salt and water transport. PMID:19208806

  8. Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Stimulates Expression of Blood-Testis-Barrier Proteins Claudin-3 and -5 and Tight Junction Formation via a Gnα11-Coupled Receptor in Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Dietze, Raimund; Shihan, Mazen; Kirch, Ulrike; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is a circulating sulfated steroid considered to be a pro-androgen in mammalian physiology. Here we show that at a physiological concentration (1 μM), DHEAS induces the phosphorylation of the kinase Erk1/2 and of the transcription factors CREB and ATF-1 in the murine Sertoli cell line TM4. This signaling cascade stimulates the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-3 and claudin-5. As a consequence of the increased expression, tight junction connections between neighboring Sertoli cells are augmented, as demonstrated by measurements of transepithelial resistance. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2, CREB, or ATF-1 is not affected by the presence of the steroid sulfatase inhibitor STX64. Erk1/2 phosphorylation was not observed when dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) was used instead of DHEAS. Abrogation of androgen receptor (AR) expression by siRNA did not affect DHEAS-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation, nor did it change DHEAS-induced stimulation of claudin-3 and claudin-5 expression. All of the above indicate that desulfation and conversion of DHEAS into a different steroid hormone is not required to trigger the DHEAS-induced signaling cascade. All activating effects of DHEAS, however, are abolished when the expression of the G-protein Gnα11 is suppressed by siRNA, including claudin-3 and -5 expression and TJ formation between neighboring Sertoli cells as indicated by reduced transepithelial resistance. Taken together, these results are consistent with the effects of DHEAS being mediated through a membrane-bound G-protein-coupled receptor interacting with Gnα11 in a signaling pathway that resembles the non-classical signaling pathways of steroid hormones. Considering the fact that DHEAS is produced in reproductive organs, these findings also suggest that DHEAS, by acting as an autonomous steroid hormone and influencing the formation and dynamics of the TJ at the blood-testis barrier, might play a crucial role for the

  9. Three-junction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Ludowise, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  10. Fluid transport across leaky epithelia: central role of the tight junction and supporting role of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Fischbarg, Jorge

    2010-10-01

    The mechanism of epithelial fluid transport remains unsolved, which is partly due to inherent experimental difficulties. However, a preparation with which our laboratory works, the corneal endothelium, is a simple leaky secretory epithelium in which we have made some experimental and theoretical headway. As we have reported, transendothelial fluid movements can be generated by electrical currents as long as there is tight junction integrity. The direction of the fluid movement can be reversed by current reversal or by changing junctional electrical charges by polylysine. Residual endothelial fluid transport persists even when no anions (hence no salt) are being transported by the tissue and is only eliminated when all local recirculating electrical currents are. Aquaporin (AQP) 1 is the only AQP present in these cells, and its deletion in AQP1 null mice significantly affects cell osmotic permeability (by ∼40%) but fluid transport much less (∼20%), which militates against the presence of sizable water movements across the cell. In contrast, AQP1 null mice cells have reduced regulatory volume decrease (only 60% of control), which suggests a possible involvement of AQP1 in either the function or the expression of volume-sensitive membrane channels/transporters. A mathematical model of corneal endothelium we have developed correctly predicts experimental results only when paracellular electro-osmosis is assumed rather than transcellular local osmosis. Our evidence therefore suggests that the fluid is transported across this layer via the paracellular route by a mechanism that we attribute to electro-osmotic coupling at the junctions. From our findings we have developed a novel paradigm for this preparation that includes 1) paracellular fluid flow; 2) a crucial role for the junctions; 3) hypotonicity of the primary secretion; and 4) an AQP role in regulation rather than as a significant water pathway. These elements are remarkably similar to those proposed by the

  11. A Differentiation-dependent Splice Variant of Myosin Light Chain Kinase, MLCK1, Regulates Epithelial Tight Junction Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Clayburgh, Daniel R.; Rosen, Shari; Witkowski, Edwina D.; Wang, Fengjun; Blair, Stephanie; Dudek, Steven; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Alverdy, John C.; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2005-01-01

    Activation of Na+-nutrient cotransport leads to increased tight junction permeability in intestinal absorptive (villus) enterocytes. This regulation requires myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK). We examined the spatiotemporal segregation of MLCK isoform function and expression along the crypt-villus axis and found that long MLCK, which is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, accounts for 97 ± 4% of MLC kinase activity in interphase intestinal epithelial cells. Expression of the MLCK1 isoform is limited to well differentiated enterocytes, both in vitro and in vivo, and this expression correlates closely with development of Na+-nutrient cotransport-dependent tight junction regulation. Consistent with this role, MLCK1 is localized to the perijunctional actomyosin ring. Furthermore, specific knockdown of MLCK1 using siRNA reduced tight junction permeability in monolayers with active Na+-glucose cotransport, confirming a functional role for MLCK1. These results demonstrate unique physiologically relevant patterns of expression and subcellular localization for long MLCK isoforms and show that MLCK1 is the isoform responsible for tight junction regulation in absorptive enterocytes. PMID:15507455

  12. A differentiation-dependent splice variant of myosin light chain kinase, MLCK1, regulates epithelial tight junction permeability.

    PubMed

    Clayburgh, Daniel R; Rosen, Shari; Witkowski, Edwina D; Wang, Fengjun; Blair, Stephanie; Dudek, Steven; Garcia, Joe G N; Alverdy, John C; Turner, Jerrold R

    2004-12-31

    Activation of Na(+)-nutrient cotransport leads to increased tight junction permeability in intestinal absorptive (villus) enterocytes. This regulation requires myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK). We examined the spatiotemporal segregation of MLCK isoform function and expression along the crypt-villus axis and found that long MLCK, which is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, accounts for 97 +/- 4% of MLC kinase activity in interphase intestinal epithelial cells. Expression of the MLCK1 isoform is limited to well differentiated enterocytes, both in vitro and in vivo, and this expression correlates closely with development of Na(+)-nutrient cotransport-dependent tight junction regulation. Consistent with this role, MLCK1 is localized to the perijunctional actomyosin ring. Furthermore, specific knockdown of MLCK1 using siRNA reduced tight junction permeability in monolayers with active Na(+)-glucose cotransport, confirming a functional role for MLCK1. These results demonstrate unique physiologically relevant patterns of expression and subcellular localization for long MLCK isoforms and show that MLCK1 is the isoform responsible for tight junction regulation in absorptive enterocytes.

  13. Effect of High Dietary Tryptophan on Intestinal Morphology and Tight Junction Protein of Weaned Pig

    PubMed Central

    Tossou, Myrlene Carine B.; Bai, Miaomiao; Chen, Shuai; Cai, Yinghua; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Liu, Hongbin; Adebowale, Tolulope O.; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Long, Lina; Tarique, Hussain; Oso, Abimbola O.; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) plays an essential role in pig behavior and growth performances. However, little is known about Trp's effects on tight junction barrier and intestinal health in weaned pigs. In the present study, twenty-four (24) weaned pigs were randomly assigned to one of the three treatments with 8 piglets/treatments. The piglets were fed different amounts of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) as follows: 0.0%, 0.15, and 0.75%, respectively, named zero Trp (ZTS), low Trp (LTS), and high Trp (HTS), respectively. No significant differences were observed in average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and gain: feed (G/F) ratio between the groups. After 21 days of the feeding trial, results showed that dietary Trp significantly increased (P < 0.05) crypt depth and significantly decreased (P < 0.05) villus height to crypt depth ratio (VH/CD) in the jejunum of pig fed HTS. In addition, pig fed HTS had higher (P < 0.05) serum diamine oxidase (DAO) and D-lactate. Furthermore, pig fed HTS significantly decreased mRNA expression of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 but not claudin-1 in the jejunum. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes and goblet cells were not significantly different (P > 0.05) between the groups. Collectively, these data suggest that dietary Trp supplementation at a certain level (0.75%) may negatively affect the small intestinal structure in weaned pig. PMID:27366740

  14. Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression for the maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chang; Ogle, Sally A; Schumacher, Michael A; Schilling, Neal; Tokhunts, Robert A; Orr-Asman, Melissa A; Miller, Marian L; Robbins, David J; Hollande, Frederic; Zavros, Yana

    2010-12-01

    In the stomach, strictly regulated cell adherens junctions are crucial in determining epithelial cell differentiation. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates epithelial cell differentiation in the adult stomach. We sought to identify whether Shh plays a role in regulating adherens junction protein E-cadherin as a mechanism for epithelial cell differentiation. Mouse nontumorigenic gastric epithelial (IMGE-5) cells treated with Hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Shh 5E1 antibody or transduced with short hairpin RNA against Skinny Hedgehog (IMGE-5(Ski)) were cultured. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (HKCre/Shh(KO)) was used to identify further changes in adherens and tight junctions. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in IMGE-5 cells caused loss of E-cadherin expression accompanied by disruption of F-actin cortical expression and relocalization of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Loss of E-cadherin was also associated with increased proliferation in IMGE-5(Ski) cells and increased expression of the mucous neck cell lineage marker MUC6. Compared with membrane-expressed E-cadherin and ZO-1 protein in controls, dissociation of E-cadherin/β-catenin and ZO-1/occludin protein complexes was observed in HKCre/Shh(KO) mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression that is required for the maintenance of F-actin cortical expression and stability of tight junction protein ZO-1.

  15. USP9x-mediated deubiquitination of EFA6 regulates de novo tight junction assembly

    PubMed Central

    Théard, Delphine; Labarrade, Florian; Partisani, Mariagrazia; Milanini, Julie; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Fon, Edward A; Wood, Stephen A; Franco, Michel; Luton, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    In epithelial cells, the tight junction (TJ) functions as a permeability barrier and is involved in cellular differentiation and proliferation. Although many TJ proteins have been characterized, little is known about the sequence of events and temporal regulation of TJ assembly in response to adhesion cues. We report here that the deubiquitinating enzyme USP9x has a critical function in TJ biogenesis by controlling the levels of the exchange factor for Arf6 (EFA6), a protein shown to facilitate TJ formation, during a narrow temporal window preceding the establishment of cell polarity. At steady state, EFA6 is constitutively ubiquitinated and turned over by the proteasome. However, at newly forming contacts, USP9x-mediated deubiquitination protects EFA6 from proteasomal degradation, leading to a transient increase in EFA6 levels. Consistent with this model, USP9x and EFA6 transiently co-localize at primordial epithelial junctions. Furthermore, knockdown of either EFA6 or USP9x impairs TJ biogenesis and EFA6 overexpression rescues TJ biogenesis in USP9x-knockdown cells. As the loss of cell polarity is a critical event in the metastatic spread of cancer, these findings may help to understand the pathology of human carcinomas. PMID:20339350

  16. Kidney versus Liver Specification of SLC and ABC Drug Transporters, Tight Junction Molecules, and Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Martovetsky, Gleb; Bush, Kevin T; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2016-07-01

    The hepatocyte nuclear factors, Hnf1a and Hnf4a, in addition to playing key roles in determining hepatocyte fate, have been implicated as candidate lineage-determining transcription factors in the kidney proximal tubule (PT) [Martovetsky et. al., (2012) Mol Pharmacol 84:808], implying an additional level of regulation that is potentially important in developmental and/or tissue-engineering contexts. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) transduced with Hnf1a and Hnf4a form tight junctions and express multiple PT drug transporters (e.g., Slc22a6/Oat1, Slc47a1/Mate1, Slc22a12/Urat1, Abcg2/Bcrp, Abcc2/Mrp2, Abcc4/Mrp4), nutrient transporters (e.g., Slc34a1/NaPi-2, Slco1a6), and tight junction proteins (occludin, claudin 6, ZO-1/Tjp1, ZO-2/Tjp2). In contrast, the coexpression (with Hnf1a and Hnf4a) of GATA binding protein 4 (Gata4), as well as the forkhead box transcription factors, Foxa2 and Foxa3, in MEFs not only downregulates PT markers but also leads to upregulation of several hepatocyte markers, including albumin, apolipoprotein, and transferrin. A similar result was obtained with primary mouse PT cells. Thus, the presence of Gata4 and Foxa2/Foxa3 appears to alter the effect of Hnf1a and Hnf4a by an as-yet unidentified mechanism, leading toward the generation of more hepatocyte-like cells as opposed to cells exhibiting PT characteristics. The different roles of Hnf4a in the kidney and liver was further supported by reanalysis of ChIP-seq data, which revealed Hnf4a colocalization in the kidney near PT-enriched genes compared with those genes enriched in the liver. These findings provide valuable insight, not only into the developmental, and perhaps organotypic, regulation of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions, but also for regenerative medicine strategies aimed at restoring the function of the liver and/or kidney (acute kidney injury, AKI; chronic kidney disease, CKD).

  17. The Effects of Glucagon-like Peptide-2 on the Tight Junction and Barrier Function in IPEC-J2 Cells through Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Protein Kinase B–Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Changsong; Jia, Gang; Deng, Qiuhong; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Guangmang; Wang, Kangning

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is important for intestinal barrier function and regulation of tight junction (TJ) proteins, but the intracellular mechanisms of action remain undefined. The purpose of this research was to determine the protective effect of GLP-2 mediated TJ and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stressed IPEC-J2 cells and to test the hypothesis that GLP-2 regulate TJ and TER through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in IPEC-J2 cells. Wortmannin and LY294002 are specific inhibitors of PI3K. The results showed that 100 μg/mL LPS stress decreased TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1 and zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) mRNA, proteins expressions (p<0.01) respectively. GLP-2 (100 nmol/L) promote TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1, and zo-1 mRNA, proteins expressions in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells (p<0.01) respectively. In normal cells, both wortmannin and LY294002, PI3K inhibitors, prevented the mRNA and protein expressions of Akt and mTOR increase induced by GLP-2 (p<0.01) following with the significant decreasing of occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 mRNA and proteins expressions and TER (p<0.01). In conclusion, these results indicated that GLP-2 can promote TJ’s expression and TER in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells and GLP-2 could regulate TJ and TER through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. PMID:26954146

  18. The serine protease-mediated increase in intestinal epithelial barrier function is dependent on occludin and requires an intact tight junction.

    PubMed

    Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Iablokov, Vadim; Zaheer, Raza; Colarusso, Pina; Turner, Jerrold R; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2016-09-01

    Barrier dysfunction is a characteristic of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Understanding how the tight junction is modified to maintain barrier function may provide avenues for treatment of IBD. We have previously shown that the apical addition of serine proteases to intestinal epithelial cell lines causes a rapid and sustained increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), but the mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that serine proteases increase barrier function through trafficking and insertion of tight junction proteins into the membrane, and this could enhance recovery of a disrupted monolayer after calcium switch or cytokine treatment. In the canine epithelial cell line, SCBN, we showed that matriptase, an endogenous serine protease, could potently increase TER. Using detergent solubility-based cell fractionation, we found that neither trypsin nor matriptase treatment changed levels of tight junction proteins at the membrane. In a fast calcium switch assay, serine proteases did not enhance the rate of recovery of the junction. In addition, serine proteases could not reverse barrier disruption induced by IFNγ and TNFα. We knocked down occludin in our cells using siRNA and found this prevented the serine protease-induced increase in TER. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we found serine proteases induce a greater mobile fraction of occludin in the membrane. These data suggest that a functional tight junction is needed for serine proteases to have an effect on TER, and that occludin is a crucial tight junction protein in this mechanism. PMID:27492333

  19. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27003989

  20. Quantitative analysis of tight junctions and the uptake of /sup 99m/Tc in human gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Nir, I.; Kohn, S.; Doron, Y.; Israel, O.; Front, D.

    1986-01-01

    The structural dimensions of capillary tight junctions and the uptake of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate in human gliomas were studied. Quantitative analysis revealed a correlation between the uptake of radionuclides and the length of endothelial tight junctions. It is suggested that brain scintigraphy might be used for the selection of malignant brain tumors with altered tight junctions which might be accessible to chemotherapy with water-soluble agents.

  1. Regulation of tight junction permeability by sodium caprate in human keratinocytes and reconstructed epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Kuroda, Shohei; Kida, Naoko; Murata, Michiyo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2009-04-03

    Tight junctions (TJs) restrict paracellular flux of water and solutes in epithelia and endothelia. In epidermis, the physiological role of TJs is not fully understood. In this study, sodium caprate (C10), which dilates intestinal TJs, was applied to cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and reconstructed human epidermis to investigate the effects of C10 on epidermal TJs. C10 treatment decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and increased paracellular permeability, although Western blots showed that the expression of TJ-related transmembrane proteins was not decreased. The effects of C10 were reversible. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immuno-replica electron microscopy showed that the localization of TJ strands were disintegrated, concomitant with the dispersion and/or disappearance of TJ-related molecules from the cell surface. These findings suggest that C10 impairs barrier function by physically disrupting TJ conformation in the epidermis. Furthermore, these results also show that proper localization of the molecules on the cellular membrane is important for TJ barrier function.

  2. Tight Junctions: A Barrier to the Initiation and Progression of Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Kieran; Offiah, Gozie; McSherry, Elaine A.; Hopkins, Ann M.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that arises from epithelial cells lining the breast ducts and lobules. Correct adhesion between adjacent epithelial cells is important in determining the normal structure and function of epithelial tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that dysregulated cell-cell adhesion is associated with many cancers. This review will focus on one cell-cell adhesion complex, the tight junction (TJ), and summarize recent evidence that TJs may participate in breast cancer development or progression. We will first outline the protein composition of TJs and discuss the functions of the TJ complex. Secondly we will examine how alterations in these functions might facilitate breast cancer initiation or progression; by focussing on the regulatory influence of TJs on cell polarity, cell fate and cell migration. Finally we will outline how pharmacological targeting of TJ proteins may be useful in limiting breast cancer progression. Overall we hope to illustrate that the relationship between TJ alterations and breast cancer is a complex one; but that this area offers promise in uncovering fundamental mechanisms linked to breast cancer progression. PMID:19920867

  3. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2) are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ) constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins. PMID:27077008

  4. Meprin A impairs epithelial barrier function, enhances monocyte migration, and cleaves the tight junction protein occludin

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jialing; Yura, Renee E.; Matters, Gail L.; Bradley, S. Gaylen; Shi, Pan; Tian, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases are highly expressed at the luminal interface of the intestine and kidney and in certain leukocytes. Meprins cleave a variety of substrates in vitro, including extracellular matrix proteins, adherens junction proteins, and cytokines, and have been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases. The linkage between results in vitro and pathogenesis, however, has not been elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether meprins are determinative factors in disrupting the barrier function of the epithelium. Active meprin A or meprin B applied to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers increased permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran and disrupted immunostaining of the tight junction protein occludin but not claudin-4. Meprin A, but not meprin B, cleaved occludin in MDCK monolayers. Experiments with recombinant occludin demonstrated that meprin A cleaves the protein between Gly100 and Ser101 on the first extracellular loop. In vivo experiments demonstrated that meprin A infused into the mouse bladder increased the epithelium permeability to sodium fluorescein. Furthermore, monocytes from meprin knockout mice on a C57BL/6 background were less able to migrate through an MDCK monolayer than monocytes from their wild-type counterparts. These results demonstrate the capability of meprin A to disrupt epithelial barriers and implicate occludin as one of the important targets of meprin A that may modulate inflammation. PMID:23804454

  5. Delivery of berberine using chitosan/fucoidan-taurine conjugate nanoparticles for treatment of defective intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Jung; Don, Trong-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can cause defective intestinal barrier function and play an important role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, a nanocarrier based on chitosan and fucoidan was developed for oral delivery of berberine (Ber). A sulfonated fucoidan, fucoidan-taurine (FD-Tau) conjugate, was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The FD-Tau conjugate was self-assembled with berberine and chitosan (CS) to form Ber-loaded CS/FD-Tau complex nanoparticles with high drug loading efficiency. Berberine release from the nanoparticles had fast release in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4), while the release was slow in simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 2.0). The effect of the berberine-loaded nanoparticles in protecting intestinal tight-junction barrier function against nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines released from LPS-stimulated macrophage was evaluated by determining the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability of a model macromolecule fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) in a Caco-2 cells/RAW264.7 cells co-culture system. Inhibition of redistribution of tight junction ZO-1 protein by the nanoparticles was visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The results suggest that the nanoparticles may be useful for local delivery of berberine to ameliorate LPS-induced intestinal epithelia tight junction disruption, and that the released berberine can restore barrier function in inflammatory and injured intestinal epithelial. PMID:25421323

  6. Caveolin-1–dependent occludin endocytosis is required for TNF-induced tight junction regulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marchiando, Amanda M.; Shen, Le; Graham, W. Vallen; Weber, Christopher R.; Schwarz, Brad T.; Austin, Jotham R.; Raleigh, David R.; Guan, Yanfang; Watson, Alastair J.M.; Montrose, Marshall H.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial paracellular barrier function, determined primarily by tight junction permeability, is frequently disrupted in disease. In the intestine, barrier loss can be mediated by tumor necrosis factor (α) (TNF) signaling and epithelial myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activation. However, TNF induces only limited alteration of tight junction morphology, and the events that couple structural reorganization to barrier regulation have not been defined. We have used in vivo imaging and transgenic mice expressing fluorescent-tagged occludin and ZO-1 fusion proteins to link occludin endocytosis to TNF-induced tight junction regulation. This endocytosis requires caveolin-1 and is essential for structural and functional tight junction regulation. These data demonstrate that MLCK activation triggers caveolin-1–dependent endocytosis of occludin to effect structural and functional tight junction regulation. PMID:20351069

  7. Autophagy enhances intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier function by targeting claudin-2 protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Prashant K; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Ma, Thomas Y

    2015-03-13

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway and is considered to be an essential cell survival mechanism. Defects in autophagy are implicated in many pathological processes, including inflammatory bowel disease. Among the innate defense mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, a defective tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated as a key pathogenic factor in the causation and progression of inflammatory bowel disease by allowing increased antigenic permeation. The cross-talk between autophagy and the TJ barrier has not yet been described. In this study, we present the novel finding that autophagy enhances TJ barrier function in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient starvation-induced autophagy significantly increased transepithelial electrical resistance and reduced the ratio of sodium/chloride paracellular permeability. Nutrient starvation reduced the paracellular permeability of small-sized urea but not larger molecules. The role of autophagy in the modulation of paracellular permeability was confirmed by pharmacological induction as well as pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. Consistent with the autophagy-induced reduction in paracellular permeability, a marked decrease in the level of the cation-selective, pore-forming TJ protein claudin-2 was observed after cell starvation. Starvation reduced the membrane presence of claudin-2 and increased its cytoplasmic, lysosomal localization. Therefore, our data show that autophagy selectively reduces epithelial TJ permeability of ions and small molecules by lysosomal degradation of the TJ protein claudin-2.

  8. Autophagy Enhances Intestinal Epithelial Tight Junction Barrier Function by Targeting Claudin-2 Protein Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Nighot, Prashant K.; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway and is considered to be an essential cell survival mechanism. Defects in autophagy are implicated in many pathological processes, including inflammatory bowel disease. Among the innate defense mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, a defective tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated as a key pathogenic factor in the causation and progression of inflammatory bowel disease by allowing increased antigenic permeation. The cross-talk between autophagy and the TJ barrier has not yet been described. In this study, we present the novel finding that autophagy enhances TJ barrier function in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient starvation-induced autophagy significantly increased transepithelial electrical resistance and reduced the ratio of sodium/chloride paracellular permeability. Nutrient starvation reduced the paracellular permeability of small-sized urea but not larger molecules. The role of autophagy in the modulation of paracellular permeability was confirmed by pharmacological induction as well as pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. Consistent with the autophagy-induced reduction in paracellular permeability, a marked decrease in the level of the cation-selective, pore-forming TJ protein claudin-2 was observed after cell starvation. Starvation reduced the membrane presence of claudin-2 and increased its cytoplasmic, lysosomal localization. Therefore, our data show that autophagy selectively reduces epithelial TJ permeability of ions and small molecules by lysosomal degradation of the TJ protein claudin-2. PMID:25616664

  9. Alix-mediated assembly of the actomyosin–tight junction polarity complex preserves epithelial polarity and epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Yvan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Gomero, Elida; Wakefield, Randall; Horner, Linda; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Han, Young-Goo; Solecki, David; Frase, Sharon; Bongiovanni, Antonella; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell polarity and epithelial barrier relies on the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton and proper positioning/assembly of intercellular junctions. However, how these processes are regulated is poorly understood. Here we reveal a key role for the multifunctional protein Alix in both processes. In a knockout mouse model of Alix, we identified overt structural changes in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and in the ependyma, such as asymmetrical cell shape and size, misplacement and abnormal beating of cilia, blebbing of the microvilli. These defects culminate in excessive cell extrusion, enlargement of the lateral ventricles and hydrocephalus. Mechanistically, we find that by interacting with F-actin, the Par complex and ZO-1, Alix ensures the formation and maintenance of the apically restricted actomyosin–tight junction complex. We propose that in this capacity Alix plays a role in the establishment of apical–basal polarity and in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier. PMID:27336173

  10. Der p 1 facilitates transepithelial allergen delivery by disruption of tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Wan, H; Winton, H L; Soeller, C; Tovey, E R; Gruenert, D C; Thompson, P J; Stewart, G A; Taylor, G W; Garrod, D R; Cannell, M B; Robinson, C

    1999-07-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens are important factors in the increasing prevalence of asthma. The lung epithelium forms a barrier that allergens must cross before they can cause sensitization. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that the cysteine proteinase allergen Der p 1 from fecal pellets of the HDM Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus causes disruption of intercellular tight junctions (TJs), which are the principal components of the epithelial paracellular permeability barrier. In confluent airway epithelial cells, Der p 1 led to cleavage of the TJ adhesion protein occludin. Cleavage was attenuated by antipain, but not by inhibitors of serine, aspartic, or matrix metalloproteinases. Putative Der p 1 cleavage sites were found in peptides from an extracellular domain of occludin and in the TJ adhesion protein claudin-1. TJ breakdown nonspecifically increased epithelial permeability, allowing Der p 1 to cross the epithelial barrier. Thus, transepithelial movement of Der p 1 to dendritic antigen-presenting cells via the paracellular pathway may be promoted by the allergen's own proteolytic activity. These results suggest that opening of TJs by environmental proteinases may be the initial step in the development of asthma to a variety of allergens.

  11. Tight junction CLDN2 gene is a direct target of the vitamin D receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-guo; Wu, Shaoping; Lu, Rong; Zhou, David; Zhou, Jingsong; Carmeliet, Geert; Petrof, Elaine; Claud, Erika C; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The breakdown of the intestinal barrier is a common manifestation of many diseases. Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D and its receptor VDR may regulate intestinal barrier function. Claudin-2 is a tight junction protein that mediates paracellular water transport in intestinal epithelia, rendering them "leaky". Using whole body VDR(-/-) mice, intestinal epithelial VDR conditional knockout (VDR(ΔIEC)) mice, and cultured human intestinal epithelial cells, we demonstrate here that the CLDN2 gene is a direct target of the transcription factor VDR. The Caudal-Related Homeobox (Cdx) protein family is a group of the transcription factor proteins which bind to DNA to regulate the expression of genes. Our data showed that VDR-enhances Claudin-2 promoter activity in a Cdx1 binding site-dependent manner. We further identify a functional vitamin D response element (VDRE) 5΄-AGATAACAAAGGTCA-3΄ in the Cdx1 site of the Claudin-2 promoter. It is a VDRE required for the regulation of Claudin-2 by vitamin D. Absence of VDR decreased Claudin-2 expression by abolishing VDR/promoter binding. In vivo, VDR deletion in intestinal epithelial cells led to significant decreased Claudin-2 in VDR(-/-) and VDR(ΔIEC) mice. The current study reveals an important and novel mechanism for VDR by regulation of epithelial barriers. PMID:26212084

  12. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  13. Changes in intestinal tight junction permeability associated with industrial food additives explain the rising incidence of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases is increasing along with the expansion of industrial food processing and food additive consumption. The intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junction, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self-antigens. As a result, particular attention is being placed on the role of tight junction dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD. Tight junction leakage is enhanced by many luminal components, commonly used industrial food additives being some of them. Glucose, salt, emulsifiers, organic solvents, gluten, microbial transglutaminase, and nanoparticles are extensively and increasingly used by the food industry, claim the manufacturers, to improve the qualities of food. However, all of the aforementioned additives increase intestinal permeability by breaching the integrity of tight junction paracellular transfer. In fact, tight junction dysfunction is common in multiple autoimmune diseases and the central part played by the tight junction in autoimmune diseases pathogenesis is extensively described. It is hypothesized that commonly used industrial food additives abrogate human epithelial barrier function, thus, increasing intestinal permeability through the opened tight junction, resulting in entry of foreign immunogenic antigens and activation of the autoimmune cascade. Future research on food additives exposure-intestinal permeability-autoimmunity interplay will enhance our knowledge of the common mechanisms associated with autoimmune progression.

  14. The role of aquaporin and tight junction proteins in the regulation of water movement in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2013-01-01

    Teleost fish living in freshwater are challenged by passive water influx; however the molecular mechanisms regulating water influx in fish are not well understood. The potential involvement of aquaporins (AQP) and epithelial tight junction proteins in the regulation of transcellular and paracellular water movement was investigated in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). We observed that the half-time for saturation of water influx (K(u)) was 4.3±0.9 min, and reached equilibrium at approximately 30 min. These findings suggest a high turnover rate of water between the fish and the environment. Water influx was reduced by the putative AQP inhibitor phloretin (100 or 500 μM). Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that AQP1a1 protein was expressed in cells on the yolk sac epithelium. A substantial number of these AQP1a1-positive cells were identified as ionocytes, either H⁺-ATPase-rich cells or Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase-rich cells. AQP1a1 appeared to be expressed predominantly on the basolateral membranes of ionocytes, suggesting its potential involvement in regulating ionocyte volume and/or water flux into the circulation. Additionally, translational gene knockdown of AQP1a1 protein reduced water influx by approximately 30%, further indicating a role for AQP1a1 in facilitating transcellular water uptake. On the other hand, incubation with the Ca²⁺-chelator EDTA or knockdown of the epithelial tight junction protein claudin-b significantly increased water influx. These findings indicate that the epithelial tight junctions normally act to restrict paracellular water influx. Together, the results of the present study provide direct in vivo evidence that water movement can occur through transcellular routes (via AQP); the paracellular routes may become significant when the paracellular permeability is increased.

  15. Structural and Functional Regulation of Tight Junctions by RhoA and Rac1 Small GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Schneeberger, Eveline E.; James Nelson, W.

    1998-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) govern ion and solute diffusion through the paracellular space (gate function), and restrict mixing of membrane proteins and lipids between membrane domains (fence function) of polarized epithelial cells. We examined roles of the RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in regulating TJ structure and function in MDCK cells using the tetracycline repressible transactivator to regulate RhoAV14, RhoAN19, Rac1V12, and Rac1N17 expression. Both constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA or Rac1 perturbed TJ gate function (transepithelial electrical resistance, tracer diffusion) in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Freeze-fracture EM and immunofluoresence microscopy revealed abnormal TJ strand morphology and protein (occludin, ZO-1) localization in RhoAV14 and Rac1V12 cells. However, TJ strand morphology and protein localization appeared normal in RhoAN19 and Rac1N17 cells. All mutant GTPases disrupted the fence function of the TJ (interdomain diffusion of a fluorescent lipid), but targeting and organization of a membrane protein in the apical membrane were unaffected. Expression levels and protein complexes of occludin and ZO-1 appeared normal in all mutant cells, although ZO-1 was more readily solubilized from RhoAV14-expressing cells with Triton X-100. These results show that RhoA and Rac1 regulate gate and fence functions of the TJ, and play a role in the spatial organization of TJ proteins at the apex of the lateral membrane. PMID:9660866

  16. Escherichia coli STb enterotoxin dislodges claudin-1 from epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Hassan; Dubreuil, J Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli produce various heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins. STb is a low molecular weight heat-resistant toxin responsible for diarrhea in farm animals, mainly young pigs. A previous study demonstrated that cells having internalized STb toxin induce epithelial barrier dysfunction through changes in tight junction (TJ) proteins. These modifications contribute probably to the diarrhea observed. To gain insight into the mechanism of increased intestinal permeability following STb exposure we treated human colon cells (T84) with purified STb toxin after which cells were harvested and proteins extracted. Using a 1% Nonidet P-40-containing solution we investigated the distribution of claudin-1, a major structural and functional TJ protein responsible for the epithelium impermeability, between membrane (NP40-insoluble) and the cytoplasmic (NP-40 soluble) location. Using immunoblot and confocal microscopy, we observed that treatment of T84 cell monolayers with STb induced redistribution of claudin-1. After 24 h, cells grown in Ca++-free medium treated with STb showed about 40% more claudin-1 in the cytoplasm compare to the control. Switching from Ca++-free to Ca++-enriched medium (1.8 mM) increased the dislodgement rate of claudin-1 as comparable quantitative delocalization was observed after only 6 h. Medium supplemented with the same concentration of Mg++ or Zn++ did not affect the dislodgement rate compared to the Ca++-free medium. Using anti-phosphoserine and anti-phosphothreonine antibodies, we observed that the loss of membrane claudin-1 was accompanied by dephosphorylation of this TJ protein. Overall, our findings showed an important redistribution of claudin-1 in cells treated with STb toxin. The loss of phosphorylated TJ membrane claudin-1 is likely to be involved in the increased permeability observed. The mechanisms by which these changes are brought about remain to be elucidated.

  17. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Che, Dongsheng; Bao, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group), all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The d-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO) was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, d-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0–0.2%) in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no affects. PMID:22272087

  18. Headache under simulated microgravity is related to endocrine, fluid distribution, and tight junction changes.

    PubMed

    Feuerecker, Matthias; van Oosterhout, Willebrordus P J; Feuerecker, Benedikt; Matzel, Sandra; Schelling, Gustav; Rehm, Markus; Vein, Alla A; Choukèr, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Head-down-tilted bed rest (HDTBR) induces headaches similar to headaches during space flights. The objective of this investigation was to study hematological, endocrinological, fluid changes and tight junctions in HDTBR-induced headaches as a proxy for space headache. The randomized crossover HDTBR design by the European Space Agency included 12 healthy, nonheadache male subjects. Before, during, and after confined HDTBR periods, epinephrine (urine), cortisol (saliva), hematological, endothelium markers, and fluid distribution parameters were measured. Headaches were assessed with a validated headache questionnaire. Compared with baseline, HDTBR in all subjects was associated with higher hematocrit, hemoglobin, and epinephrine levels, higher erythrocyte counts, and lower relative plasma volumes (all P < 0.05). In total, 26 headache episodes occurred. In subjects with headaches during HDTBR, epinephrine levels were exaggerated (vs headache-free subjects; HDTBR day 3; 5.1 ± 1.7 vs 3.4 ± 2.4; P = 0.023), cortisol levels were decreased (vs headache-free subjects; HDTBR day 1; 0.37 ± 0.16 vs 0.50 ± 0.20; P < 0.001) and the tight junction marker zonulin was elevated (vs headache-free subjects in HDTBR days 1, 3, 5; P < 0.05). HDTBR induces hemoconcentration and fluid redistribution in all subjects. During headache episodes, endocrinological changes, fluid distribution, and tight junctions were more pronounced, suggesting an additional role in headache pathophysiology. PMID:26761382

  19. Oncostatin M induces upregulation of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes coinciding with changes in morphology and function of tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Masafumi; Kojima, Takashi . E-mail: ktakashi@sapmed.ac.jp; Lan, Mengdong; Son, Seiichi; Murata, Masaki; Osanai, Makoto; Chiba, Hideki; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2007-05-15

    In rodent livers, integral tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, -5 and -14 are detected and play crucial roles in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi away from the blood circulation. Claudin-2 shows a lobular gradient increasing from periportal to pericentral hepatocytes, whereas claudin-1 and -3 are expressed in the whole liver lobule. Although claudin-2 expression induces cation-selective channels in tight junctions of epithelial cells, the physiological functions and regulation of claudin-2 in hepatocytes remain unclear. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in the differentiation of hepatocytes that induces formation of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in fetal hepatocytes. In this study, we examined whether OSM could induce expression and function of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes, immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes. In the immortalized mouse and primary cultured proliferative rat hepatocytes, treatment with OSM markedly increased mRNA and protein of claudin-2 together with formation of developed networks of TJ strands. The increase of claudin-2 enhanced the paracellular barrier function which depended on molecular size. The increase of claudin-2 expression induced by OSM in rodent hepatocytes was regulated through distinct signaling pathways including PKC. These results suggest that expression of claudin-2 in rodent hepatocytes may play a specific role as controlling the size of paracellular permeability in the barrier to keep bile in bile canaculi.

  20. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:26910760

  1. Bile salts disrupt human esophageal squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2012-07-15

    Reflux of acid and bile acids contributes to epithelial tissue injury in gastro-esophageal reflux disease. However, the influence of refluxed material on human esophageal stratified epithelial barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of acid and bile acids on barrier function and TJ protein distribution using a newly developed air-liquid interface (ALI) in vitro culture model of stratified squamous epithelium based on primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). Under ALI conditions, HEECs formed distinct epithelial layers on Transwell inserts after 7 days of culture. The epithelial layers formed TJ, and the presence of claudin-1, claudin-4, and occludin were detected by immunofluorescent staining. The NP-40-insoluble fraction of these TJ proteins was significantly higher by day 7 of ALI culture. Exposure of HEECs to pH 2, and taurocholic acid (TCA) and glycocholic acid (GCA) at pH 3, but not pH 4, for 1 h decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increased paracellular permeability. Exposure of cell layers to GCA (pH 3) and TCA (pH 3) for 1 h also markedly reduced the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and -4. We found that deoxycholic acid (pH 7.4 or 6, 1 h) and pepsin (pH 3, 24 h) significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability. Based on these findings, ALI-cultured HEECs represent a new in vitro model of human esophageal stratified epithelium and are suitable for studying esophageal epithelial barrier functions. Using this model, we demonstrated that acid, bile acids, and pepsin disrupt squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating TJ proteins. These results provide new insights into understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  2. “You Shall Not Pass”—tight junctions of the blood brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Hans-Christian; Krizbai, István A.; Bauer, Hannelore; Traweger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The structure and function of the barrier layers restricting the free diffusion of substances between the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and the systemic circulation is of great medical interest as various pathological conditions often lead to their impairment. Excessive leakage of blood-borne molecules into the parenchyma and the concomitant fluctuations in the microenvironment following a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during ischemic/hypoxic conditions or because of an autoimmune disease are detrimental to the physiological functioning of nervous tissue. On the other hand, the treatment of neurological disorders is often hampered as only minimal amounts of therapeutic agents are able to penetrate a fully functional BBB or blood cerebrospinal fluid barrier. An in-depth understanding of the molecular machinery governing the establishment and maintenance of these barriers is necessary to develop rational strategies allowing a controlled delivery of appropriate drugs to the CNS. At the basis of such tissue barriers are intimate cell-cell contacts (zonulae occludentes, tight junctions) which are present in all polarized epithelia and endothelia. By creating a paracellular diffusion constraint TJs enable the vectorial transport across cell monolayers. More recent findings indicate that functional barriers are already established during development, protecting the fetal brain. As an understanding of the biogenesis of TJs might reveal the underlying mechanisms of barrier formation during ontogenic development numerous in vitro systems have been developed to study the assembly and disassembly of TJs. In addition, monitoring the stage-specific expression of TJ-associated proteins during development has brought much insight into the “developmental tightening” of tissue barriers. Over the last two decades a detailed molecular map of transmembrane and cytoplasmic TJ-proteins has been identified. These proteins not only form a cell-cell

  3. Tight junction protein Par6 interacts with an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1/stardust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hurd, Toby W; Margolis, Ben

    2004-07-16

    Tight junctions are the structures in mammalian epithelial cells that separate the apical and basolateral membranes and may also be important in the establishment of cell polarity. Two evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complexes, Crumbs-PALS1 (Stardust)-PATJ and Cdc42-Par6-Par3-atypical protein kinase C, have been implicated in the assembly of tight junctions and in polarization of Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. These two complexes have been linked physically and functionally by an interaction between PALS1 and Par6. Here we identify an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1 as the Par6 binding site and identify valine and aspartic acid residues in this region as essential for interacting with the PDZ domain of Par6. We have also characterized, in more detail, the amino terminus of Drosophila Stardust and demonstrate that the interaction mechanism between Stardust and Drosophila Par6 is evolutionarily conserved. Par6 interferes with PATJ in binding PALS1, and these two interactions do not appear to function synergistically. Taken together, these results define the molecular mechanisms linking two conserved polarity complexes.

  4. Poly(I:C) Induces Human Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Disrupting Tight Junction Expression of Claudin-5

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Yun; Stuart, Christine; Takeda, Kazuyo; D’Agnillo, Felice; Golding, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are often accompanied by pulmonary microvascular leakage and vascular endothelial dysfunction via mechanisms that are not completely defined. Here, we investigated the effect of the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) commonly used to simulate viral infections, on the barrier function and tight junction integrity of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Poly(I:C) stimulated IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, and IFNβ production in conjunction with the activation of NF-κB and IRF3 confirming the Poly(I:C)-responsiveness of these cells. Poly(I:C) increased endothelial monolayer permeability with a corresponding dose- and time-dependent decrease in the expression of claudin-5, a transmembrane tight junction protein and reduction of CLDN5 mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed disappearance of membrane-associated claudin-5 and co-localization of cytoplasmic claudin-5 with lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. Chloroquine and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of TLR3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively, protected against the loss of claudin-5. Together, these findings provide new insight on how dsRNA-activated signaling pathways may disrupt vascular endothelial function and contribute to vascular leakage pathologies. PMID:27504984

  5. Lipopolysaccharide disrupts the milk-blood barrier by modulating claudins in mammary alveolar tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ken; Oyama, Shoko; Numata, Atsushi; Rahman, Md Morshedur; Kumura, Haruto

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, is the most costly common disease in the dairy industry, and is caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli. The bacteria invade the mammary alveolar lumen and disrupt the blood-milk barrier. In normal mammary gland, alveolar epithelial tight junctions (TJs) contribute the blood-milk barrier of alveolar epithelium by blocking the leakage of milk components from the luminal side into the blood serum. In this study, we focused on claudin subtypes that participate in the alveolar epithelial TJs, because the composition of claudins is an important factor that affects TJ permeability. In normal mouse lactating mammary glands, alveolar TJs consist of claudin-3 without claudin-1, -4, and -7. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis, alveolar TJs showed 2-staged compositional changes in claudins. First, a qualitative change in claudin-3, presumably caused by phosphorylation and participation of claudin-7 in alveolar TJs, was recognized in parallel with the leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin (FITC-albumin) via the alveolar epithelium. Second, claudin-4 participated in alveolar TJs with claudin-3 and claudin-7 12 h after LPS injection. The partial localization of claudin-1 was also observed by immunostaining. Coinciding with the second change of alveolar TJs, the severe disruption of the blood-milk barrier was recognized by ectopic localization of β-casein and much leakage of FITC-albumin. Furthermore, the localization of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the luminal side and NFκB activation by LPS was observed in the alveolar epithelial cells. We suggest that the weakening and disruption of the blood-milk barrier are caused by compositional changes of claudins in alveolar epithelial TJs through LPS/TLR4 signaling.

  6. Effects of chitosan-nanoparticle-mediated tight junction opening on the oral absorption of endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Sonaje, Kiran; Lin, Kun-Ju; Tseng, Michael T; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Su, Fang-Yi; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2011-11-01

    Recently, we reported a pH-responsive nanoparticle (NP) system shelled with chitosan (CS), which could effectively increase the oral absorption of insulin and produce a hypoglycemic effect, presumably due to the CS-mediated tight junction (TJ) opening. It has been often questioned whether CS can also enhance the absorption of endotoxins present in the small intestine. To address this concern, we studied the effect of CS NPs on the absorption of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the most commonly found toxin in the gastrointestinal tract. To follow their biodistribution by the single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography, LPS and insulin were labeled with (99m)Tc-pertechnetate ((99m)Tc-LPS) and (123)iodine ((123)I-insulin), respectively. The (99m)Tc-LPS was ingested 1 h prior to the administration of the (123)I-insulin-loaded NPs to mimic the physiological conditions. The confocal and TEM micrographs show that the orally administered CS NPs were able to adhere and infiltrate through the mucus layer, approach the epithelial cells and mediate to open their TJs. The radioactivity associated with LPS was mainly restricted to the gastrointestinal tract, whereas (123)I-insulin started to appear in the urinary bladder at 3 h post administration. This observation indicates that the insulin-loaded in CS NPs can traverse across the intestinal epithelium and enter the systemic circulation, whereas LPS was unable to do so, probably because of the charge repulsion between the anionic LPS in the form of micelles and the negatively charged mucus layer. Our in vivo toxicity study further confirms that the enhancement of paracellular permeation by CS NPs did not promote the absorption of LPS. These results suggest that CS NPs can be used as a safe carrier for oral delivery of protein drugs.

  7. The junctions that don't fit the scheme: special symmetrical cell-cell junctions of their own kind.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen; Barth, Mareike; Pieperhoff, Sebastian

    2009-10-01

    Immunocytochemical, electron-, and immunoelectron-microscopical studies have revealed that, in addition to the four major "textbook categories" of cell-cell junctions (gap junctions, tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes), a broad range of other junctions exists, such as the tiny puncta adhaerentia minima, the taproot junctions (manubria adhaerentia), the plakophilin-2-containing adherens junctions of mesenchymal or mesenchymally derived cell types including malignantly transformed cells, the composite junctions (areae compositae) of the mature mammalian myocardium, the cortex adhaerens of the eye lens, the interdesmosomal "sandwich" or "stud" junctions in the subapical layers of stratified epithelia and the tumors derived therefrom, and the complexus adhaerentes of the endothelial and virgultar cells of the lymph node sinus. On the basis of their sizes and shapes, other morphological criteria, and their specific molecular ensembles, these junctions and the genes that encode them cannot be subsumed under one of the major categories mentioned above but represent special structures in their own right, appear to serve special functions, and can give rise to specific pathological disorders. PMID:19680692

  8. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption. PMID:27606286

  9. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption. PMID:27606286

  10. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption.

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor Disrupts Claudin-5 Endothelial Tight Junction Barriers in Two Distinct NF-κB-Dependent Phases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Paul R.; Kim, Richard K.; Pober, Jordan S.; Kluger, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Capillary leak in severe sepsis involves disruption of endothelial cell tight junctions. We modeled this process by TNF treatment of cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) monolayers, which unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells form claudin-5-dependent tight junctions and a high-resistance permeability barrier. Continuous monitoring with electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing revealed that TNF disrupts tight junction-dependent HDMEC barriers in discrete steps: an ~5% increase in transendothelial electrical resistance over 40 minutes; a decrease to ~10% below basal levels over 2 hours (phase 1 leak); an interphase plateau of 1 hour; and a major fall in transendothelial electrical resistance to < 70% of basal levels by 8–10 hours (phase 2 leak), with EC50 values of TNF for phase 1 and 2 leak of ~30 and ~150 pg/ml, respectively. TNF leak is reversible and independent of cell death. Leak correlates with disruption of continuous claudin-5 immunofluorescence staining, myosin light chain phosphorylation and loss of claudin-5 co-localization with cortical actin. All these responses require NF-κB signaling, shown by inhibition with Bay 11 or overexpression of IκB super-repressor, and are blocked by H-1152 or Y-27632, selective inhibitors of Rho-associated kinase that do not block other NF-κB-dependent responses. siRNA combined knockdown of Rho-associated kinase-1 and -2 also prevents myosin light chain phosphorylation, loss of claudin-5/actin co-localization, claudin-5 reorganization and reduces phase 1 leak. However, unlike H-1152 and Y-27632, combined Rho-associated kinase-1/2 siRNA knockdown does not reduce the magnitude of phase 2 leak, suggesting that H-1152 and Y-27632 have targets beyond Rho-associated kinases that regulate endothelial barrier function. We conclude that TNF disrupts TJs in HDMECs in two distinct NF-κB-dependent steps, the first involving Rho-associated kinase and the second likely to involve an as yet

  12. Probiotics modify tight-junction proteins in an animal model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Briskey, David; Heritage, Mandy; Jaskowski, Lesley-Anne; Peake, Jonathan; Gobe, Glenda; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Crawford, Darrell; Campbell, Catherine; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have investigated the effects of a multispecies probiotic preparation containing a combination of probiotic bacterial genera that included Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli and a Streptococcus in a mouse model of high-fat diet or obesity-induced liver steatosis. Methods: Three groups of C57B1/6J mice were fed either a standard chow or a high-fat diet for 20 weeks, while a third group was fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks and then concomitantly administered probiotics for a further 10 weeks. Serum, liver and large bowel samples were collected for analysis. Results: The expression of the tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 was reduced (p < 0.05) in high-fat diet-fed mice compared to chow-fed mice. Probiotic supplementation helped to maintain tight ZO-1 and ZO-2 expression compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05), but did not restore ZO-1 or ZO-2 expression compared with chow-fed mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics had significant steatosis development compared with chow-fed mice (p < 0.05); steatosis was less severe in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group. Hepatic triglyceride concentration was higher in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics compared with the chow group (p < 0.05), and was lower in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05). Compared with chow-fed mice, serum glucose, cholesterol concentration and the activity of alanine transaminase were higher (p < 0.05), whereas serum triglyceride concentration was lower (p < 0.05) in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics. Conclusions: Supplementation with a multispecies probiotic formulation helped to maintain tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2, and reduced hepatic triglyceride concentration compared with a high-fat diet alone. PMID:27366215

  13. CK2-dependent phosphorylation of occludin regulates the interaction with ZO-proteins and tight junction integrity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a ubiquitously expressed Ser/Thr kinase with multiple functions in the regulation of cell proliferation and transformation. In targeting adherens and tight junctions (TJs), CK2 modulates the strength and dynamics of epithelial cell-cell contacts. Occludin previously was identified as a substrate of CK2, however the functional consequences of CK2-dependent occludin phosphorylation on TJ function were unknown. Results Here, we present evidence that phosphorylation of a Thr400-XXX-Thr404-XXX-Ser408 motif in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of human occludin regulates assembly/disassembly and barrier properties of TJs. In contrast to wildtype and T400A/T404A/S408A-mutated occludin, a phospho-mimetic Occ-T400E/T404E/S408E construct was impaired in binding to ZO-2. Interestingly, pre-phosphorylation of a GST-Occ C-terminal domain fusion protein attenuated binding to ZO-2, whereas, binding to ZO-1 was not affected. Moreover, Occ-T400E/T404E/S408E showed delayed reassembly into TJs in Ca2+-switch experiments. Stable expression of Occ-T400E/T404E/S408E in MDCK C11 cells augments barrier properties in enhancing paracellular resistance in two-path impedance spectroscopy, whereas expression of wildtype and Occ-T400A/T404A/S408A did not affect transepithelial resistance. Conclusions These results suggest an important role of CK2 in epithelial tight junction regulation. The occludin sequence motif at amino acids 400–408 apparently represents a hotspot for Ser/Thr-kinase phosphorylation and depending on the residue(s) which are phosphorylated it differentially modulates the functional properties of the TJ. PMID:23758859

  14. Organization of multiprotein complexes at cell–cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of stable cell–cell contacts is required for the generation of barrier-forming sheets of epithelial and endothelial cells. During various physiological processes like tissue development, wound healing or tumorigenesis, cellular junctions are reorganized to allow the release or the incorporation of individual cells. Cell–cell contact formation is regulated by multiprotein complexes which are localized at specific structures along the lateral cell junctions like the tight junctions and adherens junctions and which are targeted to these site through their association with cell adhesion molecules. Recent evidence indicates that several major protein complexes exist which have distinct functions during junction formation. However, this evidence also indicates that their composition is dynamic and subject to changes depending on the state of junction maturation. Thus, cell–cell contact formation and integrity is regulated by a complex network of protein complexes. Imbalancing this network by oncogenic proteins or pathogens results in barrier breakdown and eventually in cancer. Here, I will review the molecular organization of the major multiprotein complexes at junctions of epithelial cells and discuss their function in cell–cell contact formation and maintenance. PMID:18365233

  15. β-Conglycinin Reduces the Tight Junction Occludin and ZO-1 Expression in IPEC-J2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Han, Rui; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Soybean allergy presents a health threat to humans and animals. The mechanism by which food/feed allergen β-conglycinin injures the intestinal barrier has not been well understood. In this study, the changes of epithelial permeability, integrity, metabolic activity, the tight junction (TJ) distribution and expression induced by β-conglycinin were evaluated using IPEC-J2 model. The results showed a significant decrease of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (p < 0.001) and metabolic activity (p < 0.001) and a remarkable increase of alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity (p < 0.001) in a dose-dependent manner. The expression levels of tight junction occludin and ZO-1 were decreased (p < 0.05). The reduced fluorescence of targets and change of cellular morphology were recorded. The tight junction occludin and ZO-1 mRNA expression linearly declined with increasing β-conglycinin (p < 0.001). PMID:24473141

  16. Ischemia-reperfusion impairs blood-brain barrier function and alters tight junction protein expression in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Threlkeld, S W; Cummings, E E; Juan, I; Makeyev, O; Besio, W G; Gaitanis, J; Banks, W A; Sadowska, G B; Stonestreet, B S

    2012-12-13

    The blood-brain barrier is a restrictive interface between the brain parenchyma and the intravascular compartment. Tight junctions contribute to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Hypoxic-ischemic damage to the blood-brain barrier could be an important component of fetal brain injury. We hypothesized that increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia depend upon the duration of reperfusion and that decreases in tight junction proteins are associated with the ischemia-related impairment in blood-brain barrier function in the fetus. Blood-brain barrier function was quantified with the blood-to-brain transfer constant (K(i)) and tight junction proteins by Western immunoblot in fetal sheep at 127 days of gestation without ischemia, and 4, 24, or 48 h after ischemia. The largest increase in K(i) (P<0.05) was 4 h after ischemia. Occludin and claudin-5 expressions decreased at 4 h, but returned toward control levels 24 and 48 h after ischemia. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 decreased after ischemia. Inverse correlations between K(i) and tight junction proteins suggest that the decreases in tight junction proteins contribute to impaired blood-brain barrier function after ischemia. We conclude that impaired blood-brain barrier function is an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the fetus, and that increases in quantitatively measured barrier permeability (K(i)) change as a function of the duration of reperfusion after ischemia. The largest increase in permeability occurs 4 h after ischemia and blood-brain barrier function improves early after injury because the blood-brain barrier is less permeable 24 and 48 than 4 h after ischemia. Changes in the tight junction molecular composition are associated with increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia.

  17. MicroRNAs as regulators of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions: implication for intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kenji; Iwamoto, Takuya; Okuda, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions in the small intestine function as an absorption barrier and sometimes as a facilitator of orally administered drugs. The expression of these proteins often fluctuates and thereby causes individual pharmacokinetic variability. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small non-coding RNAs, have recently emerged as a new class of gene regulator. MiRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to target mRNA to suppress its translation or regulate its degradation. They have been shown to be key regulators of proteins associated with pharmacokinetics. Moreover, the role of miRNAs on the expression of some proteins expressed in the small intestine has recently been clarified. In this review, we summarize current knowledge regarding the role of miRNAs in the regulation of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions as well as its implication for intestinal barrier function. MiRNAs play vital roles in the differentiation, architecture, and barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells, and directly and/or indirectly regulate the expression and function of proteins associated with drug absorption in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the variation of miRNA expression caused by pathological and physiological conditions as well as genetic factors should affect the expression of these proteins. Therefore, miRNAs could be significant factors affecting inter- and intra-individual variations in the pharmacokinetics and intestinal absorption of drugs. Overall, miRNAs could be promising targets for personalized pharmacotherapy or other attractive therapies through intestinal absorption of drugs.

  18. Tight junction modulation of the blood brain barrier: CNS delivery of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Greene, Chris; Campbell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) represents a major obstacle for targeted drug delivery to the brain for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Significant advances in barrier research over the past decade has led to the discovery of an increasing number of structural and regulatory proteins in tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ). These discoveries are providing the framework for the development of novel TJ modulators which can act specifically and temporarily to alter BBB function and regulate paracellular uptake of molecules. TJ modulators that have shown therapeutic potential in preclinical models include claudin-5 and occludin siRNAs, peptides derived from zonula occludens toxin as well as synthetic peptides targeting the extracellular loops of TJs. Adding to the array of modulating agents are novel mechanisms of BBB regulation such as focused ultrasound (FUS). This review will give a succinct overview of BBB biology and TJ modulation in general. Novel insights into BBB regulation in health and disease will also be summarized.

  19. Effects of negative pressures on epithelial tight junctions and migration in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chin; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Lu, Yun-Mei; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2010-08-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy has recently gained popularity in chronic wound care. This study attempted to explore effects of different negative pressures on epithelial migration in the wound-healing process. The electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique was used to create a 5 x 10(-4) cm(2) wound in the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells. The wounded cells were cultured in a negative pressure incubator at ambient pressure (AP) and negative pressures of 75 mmHg (NP(75)), 125 mmHg (NP(125)), and 175 mmHg (NP(175)). The effective time (ET), complete wound healing time (T(max)), healing rate (R(heal)), cell diameter, and wound area over time at different pressures were evaluated. Traditional wound-healing assays were prepared for fluorescent staining of cells viability, cell junction proteins, including ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and actins. Amount of cell junction proteins at AP and NP(125) was also quantified. In MDCK cells, the ET (1.25 +/- 0.27 h), T(max) (1.76 +/- 0.32 h), and R(heal) (2.94 +/- 0.62 x 10(-4) cm(2)/h) at NP(125) were significantly (P < 0.01) different from those at three other pressure conditions. In HaCaT cells, the T(max) (7.34 +/- 0.29 h) and R(heal) (6.82 +/- 0.26 x 10(-5) cm(2)/h) at NP(125) were significantly (P < 0.01) different from those at NP(75). Prominent cell migration features were identified in cells at the specific negative pressure. Cell migration activities at different pressures can be documented with the real-time wound-healing measurement system. Negative pressure of 125 mmHg can help disassemble the cell junction to enhance epithelial migration and subsequently result in quick wound closure.

  20. ClC-2 is required for rapid restoration of epithelial tight junctions in ischemic-injured murine jejunum

    SciTech Connect

    Nighot, Prashant K.; Moeser, Adam J.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Ghashghaei, Troy; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims: Involvement of the epithelial chloride channel ClC-2 has been implicated in barrier recovery following ischemic injury, possibly via a mechanism involving ClC-2 localization to the tight junction. The present study investigated mechanisms of intestinal barrier repair following ischemic injury in ClC-2{sup -/-} mice. Methods: Wild type, ClC-2 heterozygous and ClC-2{sup -/-} murine jejunal mucosa was subjected to complete ischemia, after which recovery of barrier function was monitored by measuring in vivo blood-to-lumen clearance of {sup 3}H-mannitol. Tissues were examined by light and electron microscopy. The role of ClC-2 in re-assembly of the tight junction during barrier recovery was studied by immunoblotting, immunolocalization and immunoprecipitation. Results: Following ischemic injury, ClC-2{sup -/-} mice had impaired barrier recovery compared to wild type mice, defined by increases in epithelial paracellular permeability independent of epithelial restitution. The recovering ClC-2{sup -/-} mucosa also had evidence of ultrastructural paracellular defects. The tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-1 shifted significantly to the detergent soluble membrane fraction during post-ischemic recovery in ClC-2{sup -/-} mice whereas wild type mice had a greater proportion of junctional proteins in the detergent insoluble fraction. Occludin was co-immunoprecipitated with ClC-2 in uninjured wild type mucosa, and the association between occludin and ClC-2 was re-established during ischemic recovery. Based on immunofluorescence studies, re-localization of occludin from diffuse sub-apical areas to apical tight junctions was impaired in ClC-2{sup -/-} mice. Conclusions: These data demonstrate a pivotal role of ClC-2 in recovery of the intestinal epithelium barrier by anchoring assembly of tight junctions following ischemic injury.

  1. Mutations in the Tight-Junction Gene Claudin 19 (CLDN19) Are Associated with Renal Magnesium Wasting, Renal Failure, and Severe Ocular Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Martin; Schaller, André; Seelow, Dominik; Pandey, Amit V.; Waldegger, Siegfried; Lesslauer, Annegret; Vitzthum, Helga; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Luk, John M.; Becker, Christian; Schlingmann, Karl P.; Schmid, Marcel; Rodriguez-Soriano, Juan; Ariceta, Gema; Cano, Francisco; Enriquez, Ricardo; Jüppner, Harald; Bakkaloglu, Sevcan A.; Hediger, Matthias A.; Gallati, Sabina; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Nürnberg, Peter; Weber, Stefanie

    2006-01-01

    Claudins are major components of tight junctions and contribute to the epithelial-barrier function by restricting free diffusion of solutes through the paracellular pathway. We have mapped a new locus for recessive renal magnesium loss on chromosome 1p34.2 and have identified mutations in CLDN19, a member of the claudin multigene family, in patients affected by hypomagnesemia, renal failure, and severe ocular abnormalities. CLDN19 encodes the tight-junction protein claudin-19, and we demonstrate high expression of CLDN19 in renal tubules and the retina. The identified mutations interfere severely with either cell-membrane trafficking or the assembly of the claudin-19 protein. The identification of CLDN19 mutations in patients with chronic renal failure and severe visual impairment supports the fundamental role of claudin-19 for normal renal tubular function and undisturbed organization and development of the retina. PMID:17033971

  2. Occludin oligomeric assembly at tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier is disrupted by peripheral inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Gwen; Seelbach, Melissa J.; Staatz, William D.; Nametz, Nicole; Quigley, Carolyn; Campos, Chris R.; Brooks, Tracy A.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) dynamically alter paracellular diffusion of blood-borne substances from the peripheral circulation to the CNS in response to external stressors, such as pain, inflammation, and hypoxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of λ-carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammatory pain (i.e., hyperalgesia) on the oligomeric assembly of the key TJ transmembrane protein, occludin. Oligomerization of integral membrane proteins is a critical step in TJ complex assembly that enables the generation of tightly packed, large multiprotein complexes capable of physically obliterating the interendothelial space to inhibit paracellular diffusion. Intact microvessels isolated from rat brains were fractionated by detergent-free density gradient centrifugation, and gradient fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate—polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/Western blot. Injection of λ-carrageenan into the rat hind paw produced after 3 h a marked change in the relative amounts of oligomeric, dimeric, and monomeric occludin isoforms associated with different plasma membrane lipid raft domains and intracellular compartments in endothelial cells at the BBB. Our findings suggest that increased BBB permeability (i.e., leak) associated with λ-carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammatory pain is promoted by the disruption of disulfide-bonded occludin oligomeric assemblies, which renders them incapable of forming an impermeant physical barrier to paracellular transport. PMID:18647175

  3. Tight junction gene expression in gastrointestinal tract of dairy calves with coccidiosis and treated with glucagon-like peptide-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective permeability of the intestinal epithelium and efficient nutrient absorption are important functions for proper growth and development of calves. Damage to the intestinal mucosa can give rise to harmful long-term health effects and reduce productivity of the mature animal. Tight junction pr...

  4. Infusions of casein hydrolyzates into the mammary gland disrupt tight junction integrity and induce involution in cows.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Shapiro, F; Leitner, G; Silanikove, N

    2003-04-01

    Milk stasis triggers local stimuli, which make the tight junctions leak and trigger involution. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that casein hydrolyzates compromise tight junction integrity and dry-off milk secretion in dairy cows. Six repeated doses of casein hydrolyzates after each milking during 3 d caused drastic changes in mammary secretion and composition, which were associated with irreversible cessation of milk secretion. No such changes were recorded in the control glands that had been treated with nonhydrolyzed casein. Treatment with casein hydrolyzates disturbed tight junction integrity within 8 h (as indicated by changes in Na+ and K+ concentrations), reduced the concentrations of lactose precipitously, activated the plasmin activator-plasminogen-plasmin system, and induced the secretion of immunoglobulin type G and lactoferrin. At the end of the 3-d treatments, we stopped milking the experimental and control glands. Milk composition 19 d later was similar in the experimental and control glands and was consistent with the composition expected in fully involuted glands. We conclude that casein hydrolyzates are among the milk-borne factors that cause the disruption of tight junction integrity and induce involution in cows. The process induced by casein hydrolyzate was more rapid and synchronized than the involution induced at drying-off. PMID:12741550

  5. Comparative analysis of theophylline and cholera toxin in rat colon reveals an induction of sealing tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Markov, Alexander G; Falchuk, Evgeny L; Kruglova, Natalia M; Rybalchenko, Oksana V; Fromm, Michael; Amasheh, Salah

    2014-11-01

    Claudin tight junction proteins have been identified to primarily determine intestinal epithelial barrier properties. While functional contribution of single claudins has been characterized in detail, information on the interplay with secretory mechanisms in native intestinal epithelium is scarce. Therefore, effects of cholera toxin and theophylline on rat colon were analyzed, including detection of sealing claudins. Tissue specimens were stripped off submucosal tissue layers and mounted in Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (ISC) and transepithelial resistance (TER) were recorded. In parallel, expression and localization of claudins was analyzed and histological studies were performed employing hematoxylin-eosin staining and light and electron microscopy. Theophylline induced a strong increase of ISC in colon tissue specimens. In parallel, a decrease of TER was observed. In contrast, cholera toxin did not induce a significant increase of ISC, whereas an increase of TER was detected after 120 min. Western blots of membrane fractions revealed an increase of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and theophylline induced an increase of claudin-4. In accordance, confocal laser-scanning microscopy exhibited increased signals of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and increased signals of claudin-4 after incubation with theophylline, within tight junction complexes. Morphological analyses revealed no general changes of tight junction complexes, but intercellular spaces were markedly widened after incubation with cholera toxin and theophylline. We conclude that cholera toxin and theophylline have different effects on sealing tight junction proteins in native colon preparations, which may synergistically contribute to transport functions, in vitro.

  6. Silver nanoparticles induce tight junction disruption and astrocyte neurotoxicity in a rat blood–brain barrier primary triple coculture model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liming; Dan, Mo; Shao, Anliang; Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Cuiping; Yokel, Robert A; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Niwa, Masami; Watanabe, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) can enter the brain and induce neurotoxicity. However, the toxicity of Ag-NPs on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the underlying mechanism(s) of action on the BBB and the brain are not well understood. Method To investigate Ag-NP suspension (Ag-NPS)-induced toxicity, a triple coculture BBB model of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established. The BBB permeability and tight junction protein expression in response to Ag-NPS, NP-released Ag ions, and polystyrene-NP exposure were investigated. Ultrastructural changes of the microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Global gene expression of astrocytes was measured using a DNA microarray. Results A triple coculture BBB model of primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established, with the transendothelial electrical resistance values >200 Ω·cm2. After Ag-NPS exposure for 24 hours, the BBB permeability was significantly increased and expression of the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 was decreased. Discontinuous TJs were also observed between microvascular endothelial cells. After Ag-NPS exposure, severe mitochondrial shrinkage, vacuolations, endoplasmic reticulum expansion, and Ag-NPs were observed in astrocytes by TEM. Global gene expression analysis showed that three genes were upregulated and 20 genes were downregulated in astrocytes treated with Ag-NPS. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that the 23 genes were associated with metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, response to stimuli, cell death, the MAPK pathway, and so on. No GO term and KEGG pathways were changed in the released-ion or polystyrene-NP groups. Ag-NPS inhibited the antioxidant defense of the astrocytes by increasing thioredoxin interacting protein, which inhibits the Trx system, and

  7. The Tight Junction Associated Signalling Proteins ZO-1 and ZONAB Regulate Retinal Pigment Epithelium Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bainbridge, James W. B.; Balaggan, Kamaljit S.; Mowat, Freya; West, Emma L.; Munro, Peter M. G.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S.; Ali, Robin R.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion regulates the development and function of epithelia by providing mechanical support and by guiding cell proliferation and differentiation. The tight junction (TJ) protein zonula occludens (ZO)-1 regulates cell proliferation and gene expression by inhibiting the activity of the Y-box transcription factor ZONAB in cultured epithelial cells. We investigated the role of this TJ-associated signalling pathway in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in vivo by lentivirally-mediated overexpression of ZONAB, and knockdown of its cellular inhibitor ZO-1. Both overexpression of ZONAB or knockdown of ZO-1 resulted in increased RPE proliferation, and induced ultrastructural changes of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that transduced RPE monolayers were disorganised with increased pyknosis and monolayer breaks, correlating with increased expression of several EMT markers. Moreover, fluorescein angiography analysis demonstrated that the increased proliferation and EMT-like phenotype induced by overexpression of ZONAB or downregulation of ZO-1 resulted in RPE dysfunction. These findings demonstrate that ZO-1 and ZONAB are critical for differentiation and homeostasis of the RPE monolayer and may be involved in RPE disorders such as proliferative vitroretinopathy and atrophic age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21209887

  8. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  9. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced decrease in the tight and adherens junctions: relation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Joyce; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Reyes, José Luis; Loredo, María L; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pinzón, Enrique; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Saraí; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol and cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent that induces nephrotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and decrease in renal tight junction (TJ) proteins. The potential effect of curcumin against alterations in TJ structure and function has not been evaluated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study explored whether curcumin is able to prevent the cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased expression of the TJ and adherens junction (AJ) proteins occludin, claudin-2 and E-cadherin in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin (200 mg kg(-1)) was administered in three doses, and rats were sacrificed 72 h after cisplatin administration. Curcumin was able to scavenge, in a concentration-dependent way, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite anion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Cisplatin-induced renal damage was associated with alterations in plasma creatinine, expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and of kidney injury molecule-1, histological damage, increase in apoptosis, fibrosis (evaluated by transforming growth factor β1, collagen I and IV and α-smooth muscle actin expressions), increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress (evaluated by Hsp70/72 expression, protein tyrosine nitration, superoxide anion production in isolated glomeruli and proximal tubules, and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and gp91(phox), protein kinase C β2, and Nrf2) as well as by decreased expression of occludin, claudin-2, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Curcumin treatment prevented all the above-described alterations. The protective effect of curcumin against cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased proteins of the TJ and AJ was associated with the prevention of glomerular and proximal tubular superoxide anion production induced by NADPH oxidase activity.

  10. A high-grain diet causes massive disruption of ruminal epithelial tight junctions in goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-hua; Xu, Ting-ting; Liu, Yu-jie; Zhu, Wei-yun; Mao, Sheng-yong

    2013-08-01

    Alterations in rumen epithelial tight junctions (TJs) at the tissue and molecular levels during high-grain (HG) diet feeding are unknown. Here, 10 male goats were randomly assigned to either a hay diet (0% grain; n = 5) or HG diet group (65% grain; n = 5) to characterize the changes in ruminal epithelial structure and TJ protein expression and localization using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence. After 7 wk of feeding, ruminal free LPS in HG group increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared with the hay group, and free LPS in the peripheral blood was detectable with concentrations of 0.8 ± 0.20 EU/ml, while not detectable in the control, suggesting a leakage of LPS into the blood in the HG group. Correspondingly, the HG-fed goats showed profound alterations in ruminal epithelial structure and TJ proteins, depicted by marked epithelial cellular damage and intercellular junction erosion, down-regulation of TJ proteins claudin-4, occludin, and zonula occludens-1 mRNA and protein expression, as well as redistribution of claudin-1, claudin-4, and occludin. Furthermore, these changes in TJ proteins in the HG group were coupled with the upregulation of mRNA levels for the cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in the ruminal epithelia. These results demonstrated for the first time that the HG diet feeding caused disruption of ruminal epithelial TJs that was associated with a local inflammatory response in the rumen epithelium. These findings may provide new insights into understanding the role of TJ proteins in the ruminal epithelial immune homeostasis of ruminants. PMID:23739344

  11. Treponema pallidum Invades Intercellular Junctions of Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. Denee; Navab, Mahamad; Haake, David A.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1988-05-01

    The pathogenesis of syphilis reflects invasive properties of Treponema pallidum, but the actual mode of tissue invasion is unknown. We have found two in vitro parallels of treponemal invasiveness. We tested whether motile T. pallidum could invade host cells by determining the fate of radiolabeled motile organisms added to a HeLa cell monolayer; 26% of treponemes associated with the monolayer in a trypsin-resistant niche, presumably between the monolayer and the surface to which it adhered, but did not attain intracellularity. Attachment of T. pallidum to cultured human and rabbit aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was 2-fold greater than to HeLa cells. We added T. pallidum to aortic endothelial cells grown on membrane filters under conditions in which tight intercellular junctions had formed. T. pallidum was able to pass through the endothelial cell monolayers without altering tight junctions, as measured by electrical resistance. In contrast, heat-killed T. pallidum and the nonpathogen Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter failed to penetrate the monolayer. Transmission electron micrographs of sections of the monolayer showed T. pallidum in intercellular junctions. Our in vitro observations suggest that these highly motile spirochetes may leave the circulation by invading the junctions between endothelial cells.

  12. Role of occludin, a tight junction protein, in blastocoel formation, and in the paracellular permeability and differentiation of trophectoderm in preimplantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinmee; Gye, Myung Chan; Kim, Moon Kyoo

    2004-04-30

    Tight junctions (TJ) are critical for blastocoel formation in mammalian embryos. The present study aimed to examine the role of tight junctions in the differentiation of the trophectoderm (TE), and in the pluripotency of blastomeres, as well as in the formation and integrity of the blastocoel. We examined the effect of occludin antibody on blastocoel formation, blastocyst permeability, and expression of H19 and Oct-4, markers of TE differentiation and blastomere pluripotency, respectively. Eight-cell mouse embryos and morulae were cultured in the presence or absence of occludin antibody for 31 h. Occludin antibody inhibited blastocoel formation and increased permeability of the TE of nascent and expanding blastocysts to FITC-dextran (4 kDa), a permeability tracer. At the same time Oct-4 expression increased while expression of H19 became barely detectable. These observations indicate that occludin is involved in establishing the blastocoel, as well as in maintaining its impermeability, and that the development of tight junction is critical for TE formation in mouse embryos.

  13. Localization and Function of Pals1-associated Tight Junction Protein in Drosophila Is Regulated by Two Distinct Apical Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Sun, Rui; Krahn, Michael P

    2015-05-22

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) and its intracellular adaptor protein Pals1 (Stardust, Sdt in Drosophila) play a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells in various organisms. In contrast, the multiple PDZ domain-containing protein Pals1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ), which has been described to form a complex with Crb/Sdt, is not essential for apical basal polarity or for the stability of the Crb/Sdt complex in the Drosophila epidermis. Here we show that, in the embryonic epidermis, Sdt is essential for the correct subcellular localization of PATJ in differentiated epithelial cells but not during cellularization. Consistently, the L27 domain of PATJ is crucial for the correct localization and function of the protein. Our data further indicate that the four PDZ domains of PATJ function, to a large extent, in redundancy, regulating the function of the protein. Interestingly, the PATJ-Sdt heterodimer is not only recruited to the apical cell-cell contacts by binding to Crb but depends on functional Bazooka (Baz). However, biochemical experiments show that PATJ associates with both complexes, the Baz-Sdt and the Crb-Sdt complex, in the mature epithelium of the embryonic epidermis, suggesting a role of these two complexes for the function of PATJ during the development of Drosophila.

  14. Localization and Function of Pals1-associated Tight Junction Protein in Drosophila Is Regulated by Two Distinct Apical Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arnab; Sun, Rui; Krahn, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) and its intracellular adaptor protein Pals1 (Stardust, Sdt in Drosophila) play a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells in various organisms. In contrast, the multiple PDZ domain-containing protein Pals1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ), which has been described to form a complex with Crb/Sdt, is not essential for apical basal polarity or for the stability of the Crb/Sdt complex in the Drosophila epidermis. Here we show that, in the embryonic epidermis, Sdt is essential for the correct subcellular localization of PATJ in differentiated epithelial cells but not during cellularization. Consistently, the L27 domain of PATJ is crucial for the correct localization and function of the protein. Our data further indicate that the four PDZ domains of PATJ function, to a large extent, in redundancy, regulating the function of the protein. Interestingly, the PATJ-Sdt heterodimer is not only recruited to the apical cell-cell contacts by binding to Crb but depends on functional Bazooka (Baz). However, biochemical experiments show that PATJ associates with both complexes, the Baz-Sdt and the Crb-Sdt complex, in the mature epithelium of the embryonic epidermis, suggesting a role of these two complexes for the function of PATJ during the development of Drosophila. PMID:25847234

  15. Claudin-11 Tight Junctions in Myelin Are a Barrier to Diffusion and Lack Strong Adhesive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Andrew R.; Breglio, Andrew; Maheras, Kathleen J.; LeDuc, Geraldine; Cristiglio, Viviana; Demé, Bruno; Gow, Alexander; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The radial component is a network of interlamellar tight junctions (TJs) unique to central nervous system myelin. Ablation of claudin-11, a TJ protein, results in the absence of the radial component and compromises the passive electrical properties of myelin. Although TJs are known to regulate paracellular diffusion, this barrier function has not been directly demonstrated for the radial component, and some evidence suggests that the radial component may also mediate adhesion between myelin membranes. To investigate the physical properties of claudin-11 TJs, we compared fresh, unfixed Claudin 11-null and control nerves using x-ray and neutron diffraction. In Claudin 11-null tissue, we detected no changes in myelin structure, stability, or membrane interactions, which argues against the notion that myelin TJs exhibit significant adhesive properties. Moreover, our osmotic stressing and D2O-H2O exchange experiments demonstrate that myelin lacking claudin-11 is more permeable to water and small osmolytes. Thus, our data indicate that the radial component serves primarily as a diffusion barrier and elucidate the mechanism by which TJs govern myelin function. PMID:26445439

  16. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients.

  17. Could tight junctions regulate the barrier function of the aged skin?

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Marek; Bílková, Zuzana; Muthný, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The skin is known to be the largest organ in human organism creating interface with outer environment. The skin provides protective barrier against pathogens, physical and chemical insults, and against uncontrolled loss of water. The barrier function was primarily attributed to the stratum corneum (SC) but recent studies confirmed that epidermal tight junctions (TJs) also play important role in maintaining barrier properties of the skin. Independent observations indicate that barrier function and its recovery is impaired in aged skin. However, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) values remains rather unchanged in elderly population. UV radiation as major factor of photoageing impairs TJ proteins, but TJs have great self-regenerative potential. Since it may be possible that TJs can compensate TEWL in elderly due to its regenerative and compensatory capabilities, important question remains to be answered: how are TJs regulated during skin ageing? This review provides an insight into TJs functioning as epidermal barrier and summarizes current knowledge about the impact of ageing on the barrier function of the skin and epidermal TJs.

  18. Casein-derived phosphopeptides disrupt tight junction integrity, and precipitously dry up milk secretion in goats.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Avi; Shapiro, Fira; Mabjeesh, Sameer J; Silanikove, Nissim

    2002-04-26

    Mammary involution is triggered by local stimuli, but the precise mechanism has not been defined. Milk stasis accumulate local signals, which makes the tight junctions (TJ) leaky. The aim of the study was to check the hypothesis that casein hydrolyzates (CNH) compromise TJ integrity and dry up milk secretion. A single dose of CNH transiently (12 to 24 h) compromised TJ integrity in the treatedudder. This was associated by a transient (12 to 96 h) decline in milk secretion. No such changes were recorded in the contralateral gland that served as a control. Four repeated doses of CNH after each milking caused drastic changes in mammary secretion and composition, which were associated with irreversible cessation of milk secretion within 96 h. No such changes were recorded in goats treated with de-phosphorylated casein (control). We conclude that CNH are the milk-borne factors that cause the disruption of TJ integrity and induction of involution, and that the serine-Ps in the CNHs are essential for the excretion of biological activity. PMID:12269377

  19. Adaptive evolution of tight junction protein claudin-14 in echolocating whales.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; He, Guimei; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-11-10

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved specialized ultrasonic hearing for echolocation. Recent findings have suggested that several genes including Prestin, Tmc1, Pjvk and KCNQ4 appear to have undergone molecular adaptations associated with the evolution of this ultrasonic hearing in mammals. Here we studied the hearing gene Cldn14, which encodes the claudin-14 protein and is a member of tight junction proteins that functions in the organ of Corti in the inner ear to maintain a cationic gradient between endolymph and perilymph. Particular mutations in human claudin-14 give rise to non-syndromic deafness, suggesting an essential role in hearing. Our results uncovered two bursts of positive selection, one in the ancestral branch of all toothed whales and a second in the branch leading to the delphinid, phocoenid and ziphiid whales. These two branches are the same as those previously reported to show positive selection in the Prestin gene. Furthermore, as with Prestin, the estimated hearing frequencies of whales significantly correlate with numbers of branch-wise non-synonymous substitutions in Cldn14, but not with synonymous changes. However, in contrast to Prestin, we found no evidence of positive selection in bats. Our findings from Cldn14, and comparisons with Prestin, strongly implicate multiple loci in the acquisition of echolocation in cetaceans, but also highlight possible differences in the evolutionary route to echolocation taken by whales and bats.

  20. Claudin-11 Tight Junctions in Myelin Are a Barrier to Diffusion and Lack Strong Adhesive Properties.

    PubMed

    Denninger, Andrew R; Breglio, Andrew; Maheras, Kathleen J; LeDuc, Geraldine; Cristiglio, Viviana; Demé, Bruno; Gow, Alexander; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    The radial component is a network of interlamellar tight junctions (TJs) unique to central nervous system myelin. Ablation of claudin-11, a TJ protein, results in the absence of the radial component and compromises the passive electrical properties of myelin. Although TJs are known to regulate paracellular diffusion, this barrier function has not been directly demonstrated for the radial component, and some evidence suggests that the radial component may also mediate adhesion between myelin membranes. To investigate the physical properties of claudin-11 TJs, we compared fresh, unfixed Claudin 11-null and control nerves using x-ray and neutron diffraction. In Claudin 11-null tissue, we detected no changes in myelin structure, stability, or membrane interactions, which argues against the notion that myelin TJs exhibit significant adhesive properties. Moreover, our osmotic stressing and D2O-H2O exchange experiments demonstrate that myelin lacking claudin-11 is more permeable to water and small osmolytes. Thus, our data indicate that the radial component serves primarily as a diffusion barrier and elucidate the mechanism by which TJs govern myelin function.

  1. Characterization of tight junctions and their disruption by UVB in human epidermis and cultured keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Takuo; Hachiya, Akira; Kusaka, Ayumi; Sriwiriyanont, Penkanok; Visscher, Marty O; Morita, Kazumasa; Muto, Masahiko; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shintaro

    2011-03-01

    It has not been confirmed whether tight junctions (TJs) function as a paracellular permeability barrier in adult human skin. To clarify this issue, we performed a TJ permeability assay using human skin obtained from abdominal plastic surgery. Occludin, a marker protein of TJs, was expressed in the granular layer, in which a subcutaneously injected paracellular tracer, Sulfo-NHS-LC-Biotin (556.59 Da), was halted. Incubation with ochratoxin A decreased the expression of claudin-4, an integral membrane protein of TJs, and the diffusion of paracellular tracer was no longer prevented at the TJs. These results demonstrate that human epidermis possesses TJs that function as an intercellular permeability barrier at least against small molecules (∼550 Da). UVB irradiation of human skin xenografts and human skin equivalents (HSEs) resulted in functional deterioration of TJs. Immunocytochemical staining of cultured keratinocytes showed that occludin was localized into dot-like shapes and formed a discontinuous network when exposed to UVB irradiation. Furthermore, UVB irradiation downregulated the active forms of Rac1 and atypical protein kinase C, suggesting that their inactivation caused functional deterioration of TJs. In conclusion, TJs function as a paracellular barrier against small molecules (∼550 Da) in human epidermis and are functionally deteriorated by UVB irradiation. PMID:21160495

  2. Adaptation of the jejunal mucosa in the experimental blind loop syndrome: changes in paracellular conductance and tight junction structure.

    PubMed

    Schulzke, J D; Fromm, M; Bentzel, C J; Menge, H; Riecken, E O

    1987-01-01

    Self-filling blind loops of rat jejunum exhibit hyperregenerative transformation of the mucosa. We used this experimental model to characterise mechanisms, which may occur under similar conditions in man (stagnant loop syndrome). Epithelial and subepithelial resistance were measured in the Ussing-chamber by voltage divider ratio measurements after positioning a microelectrode between epithelium and subepithelial tissue layers. In the blind loop, epithelial resistance increased from 8 +/- 1 to 23 +/- 1 omega cm2 and subepithelial resistance from 39 +/- 4 to 86 +/- 8 omega cm2 as compared with control jejunum. The increase in the subepithelial resistance was paralleled anatomically by an increase in the thickness of the subepithelial tissue layers from 63 +/- 4 microns to 177 +/- 19 microns. Ultrastructural analysis of the tight junction area by freeze fracture electron microscopy revealed an increase in the total junctional 'depth' in the crypts from 243 +/- 9 nm in control jejunum to 396 +/- 17 nm in the blind loop, while the number of horizontally oriented 'strands' remained unchanged. Villus tight junctions did not differ between blind loop and control. We interpret the alterations in the self-filling blind loop as an adaptive response of the epithelium which reduces backleakage of already absorbed electrolytes across the tight junction into the intestinal lumen. This mechanism is suitable to support the intestine in maintaining body electrolyte and water contents during cellular electrolyte malabsorption.

  3. Regulation of tight junction proteins occludin and claudin 5 in the primate ovary during the ovulatory cycle and after inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Rodewald, M; Herr, D; Fraser, H M; Hack, G; Kreienberg, R; Wulff, C

    2007-11-01

    Ovarian follicular and corpus luteum development, including angiogenesis, are characterized by cell-cell rearrangements that may require dynamic changes in cell-cell adhesion. The present study investigates the expression of tight junction proteins occludin and claudin 5 during follicular and luteal development in the primate ovary and after inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by VEGF trap treatment. Occludin was localized to the plasma membrane of granulosa cells. During follicular development occludin staining decreased significantly (P < 0.05) and disappeared completely by the ovulatory stage. After inhibition of VEGF, occludin staining was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the granulosa of secondary and tertiary follicles compared with controls. Claudin 5 was exclusively localized to the theca vasculature. A significant (P < 0.05) increase in staining was detected from the pre-antral to the antral and ovulatory stage. However, dual staining with CD31 revealed that within the theca endothelium the amount of claudin 5 remained constant during follicular development. Treatment with VEGF trap throughout the follicular phase revealed a lack of claudin 5 staining in the theca interna but no difference was observed in the remaining theca externa vasculature. In the corpus luteum, claudin 5 was also localized in the vasculature. Treatment with VEGF trap in the mid-luteal phase resulted in a significant increase in staining (P < 0.05). These results led us to hypothesize that tight junctions are involved in regulation of follicular growth, antrum transition and follicular angiogenesis which is compromised by VEGF inhibition. VEGF may influence luteal vascular permeability by regulation of the endothelial specific tight junction protein claudin 5.

  4. Protein Kinase Cβ Phosphorylates Occludin Regulating Tight Junction Trafficking in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Induced Permeability In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Frey, Tiffany; Lin, Chengmao; Antonetti, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–induced breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier requires protein kinase C (PKC)β activation. However, the molecular mechanisms related to this process remain poorly understood. In this study, the role of occludin phosphorylation and ubiquitination downstream of PKCβ activation in tight junction (TJ) trafficking and endothelial permeability was investigated. Treatment of bovine retinal endothelial cells and intravitreal injection of PKCβ inhibitors as well as expression of dominant-negative kinase was used to determine the contribution of PKCβ to endothelial permeability and occludin phosphorylation at Ser490 detected with a site-specific antibody. In vitro kinase assay was used to demonstrate direct occludin phosphorylation by PKCβ. Ubiquitination was measured by immunoblotting after occludin immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopy revealed organization of TJ proteins. The results reveal that inhibition of VEGF-induced PKCβ activation blocks occludin Ser490 phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and TJ trafficking in retinal vascular endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo and prevents VEGF-stimulated vascular permeability. Occludin Ser490 is a direct target of PKCβ, and mutating Ser490 to Ala (S490A) blocks permeability downstream of PKCβ. Therefore, PKCβ activation phosphorylates occludin on Ser490, leading to ubiquitination required for VEGF-induced permeability. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism for PKCβ targeted inhibitors in regulating vascular permeability. PMID:22438576

  5. EMP-induced alterations of tight junction protein expression and disruption of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Ding, Gui-Rong; Qiu, Lian-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Li, Kang-Chu; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Jia-Xing; Li, Yu-Rong; Guo, Guo-Zhen

    2010-07-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical to maintain cerebral homeostasis. In this study, we examined the effects of exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the functional integrity of BBB and, on the localization and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins (occludin and ZO-1) in rats. Animals were sham or whole-body exposed to EMP at 200 kV/m for 400 pulses. The permeability of BBB in rat cerebral cortex was examined by using Evans Blue (EB) and lanthanum nitrate as vascular tracers. The localization and expression of TJ proteins were assessed by western blot and immunofluorescence analysis, respectively. The data indicated that EMP exposure caused: (i) increased permeability of BBB, and (ii) altered localization as well as decreased levels of TJ protein ZO-1. These results suggested that the alteration of ZO-1 may play an important role in the disruption of tight junctions, which may lead to dysfunction of BBB after EMP exposure.

  6. Endotoxemia alters tight junction gene and protein expression in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Eadon, Michael T; Hack, Bradley K; Xu, Chang; Ko, Benjamin; Toback, F Gary; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2012-09-15

    Intact tight junctional (TJ) proteins are required for tubular ion transport and waste excretion. Disruption of TJs may contribute to a decreased glomerular filtration rate in acute kidney injury (AKI) via tubular backleak. The effect of LPS-mediated AKI on murine TJs has not been studied extensively. We hypothesized LPS endotoxin administration to mice would disrupt tubular TJ proteins including zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and claudins. ZO-1 and occludin immunofluorescence 24 h post-LPS revealed a marked change in localization from the usual circumferential fencework pattern to one with substantial fragmentation. Renal ZO-1 expression was significantly reduced 24 h after LPS (decrease of 56.1 ± 7.4%, P < 0.001), with subsequent recovery. ZO-1 mRNA expression was increased 24 h post-LPS (4.34 ± 0.87-fold, P = 0.0019), suggesting disruption of ZO-1 protein is not mediated by transcriptional regulation, but rather by degradation or changes in translation. Similarly, claudin-4 protein expression was decreased despite elevated mRNA. LPS administration resulted in dephosphorylation of occludin and fragmented tubular redistribution. Protein expression of claudin-1, and -3 was increased after LPS. ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1, -3, and -4 gene expression were increased 48 h after LPS, suggesting a renal response to strengthen TJs following injury. Interestingly, reduced mRNA expression was found only for claudin-8. This study provides further support that LPS-induced AKI is associated with structural injury and is not merely due to hemodynamic changes.

  7. Expression of tight junction molecules in breast carcinomas analysed by array PCR and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Szász, Attila Marcell; Juhász, Eva; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Harsányi, László; Molnár, István Arthur; Baranyai, Zsolt; Besznyák, István; Zaránd, Attila; Salamon, Ferenc; Kulka, Janina

    2012-07-01

    In the past few decades an enormous amount of data became known to clarify the molecular composition and architecture of tight junctions (TJs). Despite the efforts, the expression and function of several TJ genes and proteins in breast carcinoma are still not known and some of the data are contradictory. The expression of forty-four TJ associated genes was examined at mRNA level in eighteen invasive ductal breast carcinoma samples and corresponding normal breast tissues by using low density array PCR. Expressions of claudins (CLDNs) 5, 10, 16, 17, and 18, and ZO-1, ZO-2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry as well. Using immunohistochemical phenotype as a surrogate for the genetic subtype, 11 luminal A, 3 luminal B, 3 triple negative and one HER2+ cases were included. Ten genes were significantly downregulated in tumors compared with normal breast tissues (CLDNs 5, 10, 16, 18, 19, CTNNAL1, JAM-B, ZO-1, ZO-2 and PARD3), whereas one gene (CLDN17) was significantly up-regulated in tumors when compared with normal breast. At protein level CLDNs 5, 10, 16, 18, ZO-1 and ZO-2 were downregulated in tumors as compared with normal breast tissue. CLDN17 showed variable expression in tumor tissues in comparison to normal breast. In the single HER2+ tumor when compared with the other subtypes CLDNs 5, 16, 17, 18, CTNNAL1, JAM-B, ZO-1, ZO-2 and PARD3 genes were found to be upregulated. We found altered TJ genes and proteins whose expression has not yet been associated with breast carcinoma. Our findings show a tendency of TJ genes and proteins to be downregulated in breast cancer. Further studies are necessary to examine whether the downregulation of the above mentioned TJ associated genes and proteins may contribute to the malignant progression of invasive ductal breast carcinomas.

  8. Increased iNOS activity is essential for intestinal epithelial tight junction dysfunction in endotoxemic mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaonan; Fink, Mitchell P; Yang, Runkuan; Delude, Russell L

    2004-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased production of nitric oxide (NO.) associated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation leads to functionally significant alterations in the expression and/or targeting of key tight junction (TJ) proteins in ileal and colonic epithelium. Wild-type or inducible NO. synthase (iNOS) knockout male C57B1/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with 2 mg/kg Escherichia coli O111:B4 LPS. iNOS was inhibited using intraperitoneal L-N(6)-(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NIL; 5 mg/kg). Immunoblotting of total protein and NP-40 insoluble proteins revealed decreased expression and decreased TJ localization, respectively, of the TJ proteins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2, ZO-3, and/or occludin in ileal mucosa and colonic mucosa (total protein only) after injection of C57B1/6J mice with LPS. Immunohistochemistry showed deranged distribution of ZO-1 and occludin in both tissues from endotoxemic mice. Endotoxemia was associated with evidence of gut epithelial barrier dysfunction evidenced by increased ileal mucosal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (Mr=4 kDa) and increased bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes. Pharmacologic inhibition of iNOS activity using L-NIL or genetic ablation of the iNOS gene ameliorated LPS-induced changes in TJ protein expression and gut mucosal barrier function. These results support the view that at least one mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal epithelial dysfunction secondary to systemic inflammation is increased iNOS-dependent NO. production leading to altered expression and localization of key TJ proteins.

  9. Solar Cells With Multiple Small Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improving efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on decreasing p/n junction area in relation to total surface area of cell. Because of reduced junction area, surface leakage drops and saturation current density decreases. Surface passivation helps to ensure short-circuit current remains at high value and response of cells to blue light increases.

  10. An Atypical PKC Directly Associates and Colocalizes at the Epithelial Tight Junction with ASIP, a Mammalian Homologue of Caenorhabditis elegans Polarity Protein PAR-3

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yasushi; Hirose, Tomonori; Tamai, Yoko; Hirai, Syu-ichi; Nagashima, Yoji; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Tabuse, Yo; Kemphues, Kenneth J.; Ohno, Shigeo

    1998-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental to differentiation and function of most cells. Studies in mammalian epithelial cells have revealed that the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity depends upon cell adhesion, signaling networks, the cytoskeleton, and protein transport. Atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isotypes PKCζ and PKCλ have been implicated in signaling through lipid metabolites including phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphates, but their physiological role remains elusive. In the present study we report the identification of a protein, ASIP (atypical PKC isotype–specific interacting protein), that binds to aPKCs, and show that it colocalizes with PKCλ to the cell junctional complex in cultured epithelial MDCKII cells and rat intestinal epithelia. In addition, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that ASIP localizes to tight junctions in intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, ASIP shows significant sequence similarity to Caenorhabditis elegans PAR-3. PAR-3 protein is localized to the anterior periphery of the one-cell embryo, and is required for the establishment of cell polarity in early embryos. ASIP and PAR-3 share three PDZ domains, and can both bind to aPKCs. Taken together, our results suggest a role for a protein complex containing ASIP and aPKC in the establishment and/or maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. The evolutionary conservation of the protein complex and its asymmetric distribution in polarized cells from worm embryo to mammalian-differentiated cells may mean that the complex functions generally in the organization of cellular asymmetry. PMID:9763423

  11. Claudin 11 inter-sertoli tight junctions in the testis of the korean soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus maackii).

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Jin; Ha, Cheol Min; Lee, Jae Eun; Gye, Myung Chan

    2015-04-01

    Expression of claudin 11 (CLDN11), a tight junction (TJ) protein, was examined in the Korean soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus maackii) testis. Spermatogenesis began during the breeding season and peaked at the end of the breeding season. Spermiation started in summer and peaked in autumn. The deduced amino acid sequence of P. maackii CLDN11 was similar to those of avian and mammalian species. During the nonbreeding season when spermatogenesis and testosterone production were active, testicular Cldn11 levels were high. In the seminiferous epithelium, strong, wavy CLDN11 strands parallel to the basement membrane delaminate the spermatogonia, and early spermatocytes are in the open compartment. Otherwise, CLDN11 was found beneath the early spermatocytes and in the Sertoli cell cytoplasm. Punctate zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) immunoreactivity was found within the CLDN11 strands parallel to the basement membrane or at the outermost periphery of the seminiferous epithelium close to the basal lamina. During the breeding season, when circulating testosterone levels and spermatogenic activity was low, testicular CLDN11 level was lower than those during the nonbreeding season. CLDN11 was found at apicolateral contact sites between adjacent Sertoli cells devoid of the postmeiotic germ cells. At this time, lanthanum tracer diffused to the adluminal compartment of seminiferous epithelium. In cultured testis tissues, testosterone propionate significantly increased the level of Cldn11 mRNA. In P. maackii testis, CLDN11 participates in the development of the blood-testis barrier (BTB), where the CLDN11 expression was coupled with spermatogenic activity and circulating androgen levels, indicating the conserved nature of TJs expressing CLDN11 at the BTB in amniotes.

  12. MAPK interacts with occludin and mediates EGF-induced prevention of tight junction disruption by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Basuroy, Shyamali; Seth, Ankur; Elias, Bertha; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Rao, Radhakrishna

    2006-01-01

    The MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway is a major intracellular signalling pathway involved in EGF (epithelial growth factor) receptor-mediated cell growth and differentiation. A novel function of MAPK activity in the mechanism of EGF-mediated protection of TJs (tight junctions) from H2O2 was examined in Caco-2 cell monolayers. EGF-mediated prevention of H2O2-induced increase in paracellular permeability was associated with the prevention of H2O2-induced Tyr-phosphorylation, Thr-dephosphorylation and cellular redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 (zonula occludin-1). EGF also prevented H2O2-induced disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the dissociation of occludin and ZO-1 from the actin-rich detergent-insoluble fractions. MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase, where ERK stands for extracellular signal related kinase) inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, completely blocked these protective effects of EGF on TJs. EGF rapidly increased the levels of phosphorylated MEK (p-MEK) in detergent-soluble fractions and phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) in detergent-insoluble fractions. p-ERK was colocalized and co-immunoprecipitated with occludin. GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assay showed that the C-terminal tail of occludin binds to p-ERK in Caco-2 cell extracts. Pair-wise binding studies using recombinant proteins demonstrated that ERK1 directly interacts with the C-terminal tail of occludin. Therefore the present study shows that ERK interacts with the C-terminal region of occludin and mediates the prevention of H2O2-induced disruption of TJs by EGF. PMID:16134968

  13. Opening of the blood-brain barrier tight junction due to shock wave induced bubble collapse: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Goliaei, Ardeshir; Adhikari, Upendra; Berkowitz, Max L

    2015-08-19

    Passage of a shock wave across living organisms may produce bubbles in the blood vessels and capillaries. It was suggested that collapse of these bubbles imposed by an impinging shock wave can be responsible for the damage or even destruction of the blood-brain barrier. To check this possibility, we performed molecular dynamics computer simulations on systems that contained a model of tight junction from the blood-brain barrier. In our model, we represent the tight junction by two pairs of interacting proteins, claudin-15. Some of the simulations were done in the absence of a nanobubble, some in its presence. Our simulations show that when no bubble is present in the system, no damage to tight junction is observed when the shock wave propagates across it. In the presence of a nanobubble, even when the impulse of the shock wave is relatively low, the implosion of the bubble causes serious damage to our model tight junction.

  14. THE CELL JUNCTION IN A LAMELLIBRANCH GILL CILIATED EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Satir, P.; Gilula, N. B.

    1970-01-01

    The junctional complex in the gill epithelium of the freshwater mussel (Elliptio complanatus) consists of an intermediary junction followed by a 2–3 µ long septate junction. Homologous and heterologous cell pairs are connected by this junction. After fixation with 1% OsO4 containing 1% potassium pyroantimonate, electron microscopy of the gill reveals deposits of electron-opaque precipitate, specifically and consistently localized along cellular membranes. In both junctional and nonjunctional membrane regions, the precipitate usefully outlines the convolutions without obliterating the 150 A intercellular space, which suggests the rarity or absence of either vertebrate-type gap or tight junctions along the entire cell border. The precipitate appears on the cytoplasmic side of the limiting unit membranes of frontal (F), laterofrontal (LF), intermediate (I), lateral (L), and postlateral (PL) cells. The membrane surfaces of certain vesicles of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, of multivesicular bodies, and of mitochondrial cristae contain precipitate, as does the nucleolus. In other portions of the cell, precipitate is largely absent. The amount of over-all deposition is variable and depends on the treatment of the tissue prior to fixation. Deposition is usually enhanced by pretreatment with 40 mM NaCl as opposed to 40 mM KCl, which suggests that the precipitate is in part sodium pyroantimonate. Treatment with 0.2 mM ouabain does not enhance deposition. Regional differentiation of cell membranes with respect to their ability to precipitate pyroantimonate is found in at least three instances: (a) between the ciliary membranes and other portions of the cell membrane: the precipitate terminates abruptly at the ciliary base, (b) between the LF and I cell borders: the precipitate is asymmetric, favoring the LF side of the junction, and (c) between the septate junctional membrane and adjacent membrane: the precipitate occurs periodically throughout the septate junction

  15. Development of an Innovative Intradermal siRNA Delivery System Using a Combination of a Functional Stearylated Cytoplasm-Responsive Peptide and a Tight Junction-Opening Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ibaraki, Hisako; Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki; Seta, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    As a new category of therapeutics for skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD), nucleic acids are gaining importance in the clinical setting. Intradermal administration is noninvasive and improves patients' quality of life. However, intradermal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is difficult because of two barriers encountered in the skin: intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum and tight junctions in the stratum granulosum. Tight junctions are the major barrier in AD; therefore, we focused on functional peptides to devise an intradermal siRNA delivery system for topical skin application. In this study, we examined intradermal siRNA permeability in the tape-stripped (20 times) back skin of mice or AD-like skin of auricles treated with 6-carboxyfluorescein-aminohexyl phosphoramidite (FAM)-labeled siRNA, the tight junction modulator AT1002, and the functional cytoplasm-responsive stearylated peptide STR-CH₂R₄H₂C by using confocal laser microscopy. We found that strong fluorescence was observed deep and wide in the epidermis and dermis of back skin and AD-like ears after siRNA with STR-CH₂R₄H₂C and AT1002 treatment. After 10 h from administration, brightness of FAM-siRNA was significantly higher for STR-CH₂R₄H₂C + AT1002, compared to other groups. In addition, we confirmed the nontoxicity of STR-CH₂R₄H₂C as a siRNA carrier using PAM212 cells. Thus, our results demonstrate the applicability of the combination of STR-CH₂R₄H₂C and AT1002 for effective intradermal siRNA delivery. PMID:27669207

  16. Immunosuppressant MPA Modulates Tight Junction through Epigenetic Activation of MLCK/MLC-2 Pathway via p38MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niamat; Pantakani, D. V. Krishna; Binder, Lutz; Qasim, Muhammad; Asif, Abdul R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an important immunosuppressive drug (ISD) prescribed to prevent graft rejection in the organ transplanted patients, however, its use is also associated with adverse side effects like sporadic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. Recently, we reported the MPA induced tight junctions (TJs) deregulation which involves MLCK/MLC-2 pathway. Here, we investigated the global histone acetylation as well as gene-specific chromatin signature of several genes associated with TJs regulation in Caco-2 cells after MPA treatment. Results: The epigenetic analysis shows that MPA treatment increases the global histone acetylation levels as well as the enrichment for transcriptional active histone modification mark (H3K4me3) at promoter regions of p38MAPK, ATF-2, MLCK, and MLC-2. In contrast, the promoter region of occludin was enriched for transcriptional repressive histone modification mark (H3K27me3) after MPA treatment. In line with the chromatin status, MPA treatment increased the expression of p38MAPK, ATF-2, MLCK, and MLC-2 both at transcriptional and translational level, while occludin expression was negatively influenced. Interestingly, the MPA induced gene expression changes and functional properties of Caco-2 cells could be blocked by the inhibition of p38MAPK using a chemical inhibitor (SB203580). Conclusions: Collectively, our results highlight that MPA disrupts the structure of TJs via p38MAPK-dependent activation of MLCK/MLC-2 pathway that results in decreased integrity of Caco-2 monolayer. These results led us to suggest that p38MAPK-mediated lose integrity of epithelial monolayer could be the possible cause of GI disturbance (barrier dysfunction) in the intestine, leading to leaky style diarrhea observed in the organ-transplanted patients treated with MPA. PMID:26733876

  17. Downregulation of gap junctions in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leithe, Edward; Sirnes, Solveig; Omori, Yasufumi; Rivedal, Edgar

    2006-12-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular plasma membrane domains enriched in channels that allow direct exchange of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junction channels are composed of a family of transmembrane proteins called connexin. Connexins play important roles in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cancer cells usually have downregulated levels of gap junctions, and several lines of evidence suggest that loss of gap junctional intercellular communication is an important step in carcinogenesis. In support of this hypothesis are studies showing that reexpression of connexins in cancer cells causes normalization of cell growth control and reduced tumor growth. To gain a more detailed understanding of the role of connexins as tumor suppressors, a clearer picture of the mechanisms involved in loss of gap junctions in cancer cells is needed. Furthermore, defining the mechanisms involved in downregulation of connexins in carcinogenesis will be an important step toward utilizing the potential of connexins as targets in cancer prevention and therapy. Various mechanisms are involved in the loss of gap junctions in cancer cells, ranging from loss of connexin gene transcription to aberrant trafficking of connexin proteins. This review will discuss our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in the downregulation of gap junctions in cancer cells. PMID:17425504

  18. Listeria monocytogenes Invades the Epithelial Junctions at Sites of Cell Extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Pentecost, Mickey; Otto, Glen

    2006-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes invasive disease by crossing the intestinal epithelial barrier. This process depends on the interaction between the bacterial surface protein Internalin A and the host protein E-cadherin, located below the epithelial tight junctions at the lateral cell-to-cell contacts. We used polarized MDCK cells as a model epithelium to determine how L. monocytogenes breaches the tight junctions to gain access to this basolateral receptor protein. We determined that L. monocytogenes does not actively disrupt the tight junctions, but finds E-cadherin at a morphologically distinct subset of intercellular junctions. We identified these sites as naturally occurring regions where single senescent cells are expelled and detached from the epithelium by extrusion. The surrounding cells reorganize to form a multicellular junction that maintains epithelial continuity. We found that E-cadherin is transiently exposed to the lumenal surface at multicellular junctions during and after cell extrusion, and that L. monocytogenes takes advantage of junctional remodeling to adhere to and subsequently invade the epithelium. In intact epithelial monolayers, an anti-E-cadherin antibody specifically decorates multicellular junctions and blocks L. monocytogenes adhesion. Furthermore, an L. monocytogenes mutant in the Internalin A gene is completely deficient in attachment to the epithelial apical surface and is unable to invade. We hypothesized that L. monocytogenes utilizes analogous extrusion sites for epithelial invasion in vivo. By infecting rabbit ileal loops, we found that the junctions at the cell extrusion zone of villus tips are the specific target for L. monocytogenes adhesion and invasion. Thus, L. monocytogenes exploits the dynamic nature of epithelial renewal and junctional remodeling to breach the intestinal barrier. PMID:16446782

  19. Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule-2 Reduces Intestinal Epithelial Tight-Junction Damage and Mortality in Septic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Shi, Qiankun; Wang, Xiang; Yuan, Shoutao; Wang, Guozheng; Ji, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Objective Damage to intestinal epithelial tight junctions plays an important role in sepsis. Recently we found that Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule-2 (CORM-2) is able to protect LPS-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage and in this study we will investigate if CORM-2 could protect intestinal epithelial tight junctions in the rat cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. Materials and Methods The CLP model was generated using male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats according to standard procedure and treated with CORM-2 or inactive CORM-2 (iCORM-2), 8 mg/kg, i.v. immediately after CLP induction and euthanized after 24h or 72h (for mortality rate only). Morphological changes were investigated using both transmission electron and confocal microscopy. The levels of important TJ proteins and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) were examined using Western blotting. Cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α were measured using ELISA kits. The overall intestinal epithelial permeability was evaluated using FD-4 as a marker. Results CORM-2, but not iCORM-2, significantly reduced sepsis-induced damage of intestinal mucosa (including TJ disruption), TJ protein reduction (including zonula occludens-l (ZO-1), claudin-1 and occludin), MLC phosphorylation and proinflammatory cytokine release. The overall outcomes showed that CORM-2 suppressed sepsis-induced intestinal epithelial permeability changes and reduced mortality rate of those septic rats. Conclusions Our data strongly suggest that CORM-2 could be a potential therapeutic reagent for sepsis by suppressing inflammation, restoring intestinal epithelial barrier and reducing mortality. PMID:26720630

  20. The transmembrane protein occludin of epithelial tight junctions is a functional target for serine peptidases from faecal pellets of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

    PubMed

    Wan, H; Winton, H L; Soeller, C; Taylor, G W; Gruenert, D C; Thompson, P J; Cannell, M B; Stewart, G A; Garrod, D R; Robinson, C

    2001-02-01

    There have been only a few studies of how allergens cross the airway epithelium to cause allergic sensitization. House dust mite fecal pellets (HDMFP) contain several proteolytic enzymes. Group 1 allergens are cysteine peptidases, whilst those of groups 3, 6 and 9 have catalytic sites indicative of enzymes that mechanistically behave as serine peptidases. We have previously shown that the group 1 allergen Der p 1 leads to cleavage of tight junctions (TJs), allowing allergen delivery to antigen presenting cells. In this study we determined whether HDMFP serine peptidases similarly compromise the airway epithelium by attacking TJs, desmosomes and adherens junctions. Experiments were performed in monolayers of MDCK, Calu-3 or 16HBE14o-epithelial cells. Cell junction morphology was examined by 2-photon molecular excitation microscopy and digital image analysis. Barrier function was measured as mannitol permeability. Cleavage of cell adhesion proteins was studied by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. HDMFP serine peptidases led to a progressive cleavage of TJs and increased epithelial permeability. Desmosomal puncta became more concentrated. Cleavage of TJs involved proteolysis of the TJ proteins, occludin and ZO-1. This was associated with activation of intracellular proteolysis of ZO-1. In contrast to occludin, E-cadherin of adherens junctions was cleaved less extensively. Although Calu-3 and 16HBE14o-cells expressed tethered ligand receptors for serine peptidases, these were not responsible for transducing the changes in TJs. HDMFP serine peptidases cause cleavage of TJs. This study identifies a second general class of HDM peptidase capable of increasing epithelial permeability and thereby creating conditions that would favour transepithelial delivery of allergens.

  1. CHOLESTEROL DEPLETION ALTERS DETERGENT-SPECIFIC SOLUBILITY PROFILES OF SELECTED TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEINS AND THE PHOSPHORYLATION OF OCCLUDIN

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Robert D.; Francis, Stacy A.; McCarthy, Karin M.; Casas, Elizabeth; Thiele, Christoph; Schneeberger, Eveline E.

    2007-01-01

    Differential centrifugation of Triton X-100 or CHAPS lysates from control and cholesterol (CH) depleted MDCK II cells, segregated integral tight junction (TJ) proteins associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) into two groups. Group A proteins (occludin, claudin-2 and -3) were detected in large, intermediate and small aggregates in both detergents, whereas group B proteins (claudin-1, -4 and -7) were observed in small aggregates in TX-100 and in intermediate and small aggregates in CHAPS. Depletion of CH altered the distribution of group A and B proteins among the three size categories in a detergent-specific manner. In lysates produced with octyl glucoside, a detergent that selectively extracts proteins from DRMs, group A proteins were undetectable in large aggregates and CH depletion did not alter the distribution of either group A or B proteins in intermediate or small aggregates. Neither occludin (group A) nor claudin-1 (group B) was in intimate enough contact with CH to be cross-linked to [3H]-photo-cholesterol. However, antibodies to either TJ protein co-immunoprecipitated caveolin-1, a CH-binding protein. Unlike claudins, occludin’s presence in TJs and DRMs did not require palmitoylation. Equilibrium density centrifugation on discontinuous OptiPrep gradients revealed detergent-related differences in the densities of TJ-bearing DRMs. There was little or no change in those densities after CH depletion. Removing CH from the plasma membrane increased tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of occludin, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) within 30 min. After 2 h of CH efflux, phospho-occludin levels and TER fell below control values. We conclude that the association of integral TJ proteins with DRMS, pelleted at low speeds, is partially CH dependent. However, the buoyant density of TJ-associated DRMs is a function of the detergent used and is insensitive to decreases in CH. PMID:17574235

  2. Genetic analysis of genes related to tight junction function in the Korean population with non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-A; Kim, Ye-Ri; Sagong, Borum; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Jae Woong; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Jinwook; Park, Hong-Joon; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential components of eukaryotic cells, and serve as paracellular barriers and zippers between adjacent tissues. TJs are critical for normal functioning of the organ of Corti, a part of the inner ear that causes loss of sensorineural hearing when damaged. To investigate the relation between genes involved in TJ function and hereditary loss of sensorineural hearing in the Korean population, we selected the TJP2 and CLDN14 genes as candidates for gene screening of 135 Korean individuals. The TJP2 gene, mutation of which causes autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), lies at the DFNA51 locus on chromosome 9. The CLDN14 gene, mutation of which causes autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL), lies at the DFNB29 locus on chromosome 21. In the present study, we conducted genetic analyses of the TJP2 and CLDN14 genes in 87 unrelated patients with ADNSHL and 48 unrelated patients with either ARNSHL or potentially sporadic hearing loss. We identified two pathogenic variations, c.334G>A (p.A112T) and c.3562A>G (p.T1188A), and ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TJP2 gene. We found eight non-pathogenic variations in the CLDN14 gene. These findings indicate that, whereas mutation of the TJP2 gene might cause ADNSHL, CLDN14 is not a major causative gene for ARNSHL in the Korean population studied. Our findings may improve the understanding of the genetic cause of non-syndromic hearing loss in the Korean population.

  3. Tight Junction–Associated Signaling Pathways Modulate Cell Proliferation in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jayagopal, Ashwath; Yang, Jin-Long; Haselton, Frederick R.; Chang, Min S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the role of tight junction (TJ)–associated signaling pathways in the proliferation of uveal melanoma. Methods. Human uveal melanoma cell lines overexpressing the TJ molecule blood vessel epicardial substance (Bves) were generated. The effects of Bves overexpression on TJ protein expression, cell proliferation, and cell cycle distribution were quantified. In addition, localization and transcription activity of the TJ-associated protein ZO-1–associated nucleic acid binding protein (ZONAB) were evaluated using immunofluorescence and bioluminescence reporter assays to study the involvement of Bves signaling in cell proliferation-associated pathways. Results. Bves overexpression in uveal melanoma cell lines resulted in increased expression of the TJ proteins occludin and ZO-1, reduced cell proliferation, and increased sequestration of ZONAB at TJs and reduced ZONAB transcriptional activity. Conclusions. TJ proteins are present in uveal melanoma, and TJ-associated signaling pathways modulate cell signaling pathways relevant to proliferation in uveal melanoma. PMID:20861479

  4. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  5. Shear-induced reorganization of renal proximal tubule cell actin cytoskeleton and apical junctional complexes.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yi; Gotoh, Nanami; Yan, Qingshang; Du, Zhaopeng; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Tong; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2008-08-12

    In this study, we demonstrate that fluid shear stress (FSS)-induced actin cytoskeletal reorganization and junctional formation in renal epithelial cells are nearly completely opposite the corresponding changes in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) [Thi MM et al. (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:16483-16488]. Mouse proximal tubule cells (PTCs) were subjected to 5 h of FSS (1 dyn/cm(2)) to investigate the dynamic responses of the cytoskeletal distribution of filamentous actin (F-actin), ZO-1, E-cadherin, vinculin, and paxillin to FSS. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that FSS caused basal stress fiber disruption, more densely distributed peripheral actin bands (DPABs), and the formation of both tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). A dramatic reinforcement of vinculin staining was found at the cell borders as well as the cell interior. These responses were abrogated by the actin-disrupting drug, cytochalasin D. To interpret these results, we propose a "junctional buttressing" model for PTCs in which FSS enables the DPABs, TJs, and AJs to become more tightly connected. In contrast, in the "bumper-car" model for ECs, all junctional connections were severely disrupted by FSS. This "junctional buttressing" model explains why a FSS of only 1/10 of that used in the EC study can cause a similarly dramatic, cytoskeletal response in these tall, cuboidal epithelial cells; and why junctional buttressing between adjacent cells may benefit renal epithelium in maximizing flow-activated, brush border-dependent, transcellular salt and water reabsorption. PMID:18685100

  6. Gold Nanoparticles Increase Endothelial Paracellular Permeability by Altering Components of Endothelial Tight Junctions, and Increase Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Hao; Shyu, Ming-Kwang; Jhan, Cheng; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Liu, Chen-Wei; Lee, Chen-Chen; Chen, Ruei-Ming; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) are being increasingly used as constituents in cosmetics, biosensors, bioimaging, photothermal therapy, and targeted drug delivery. This elevated exposure to Au-NPs poses systemic risks in humans, particularly risks associated with the biodistribution of Au-NPs and their potent interaction with biological barriers. We treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells with Au-NPs and comprehensively examined the expression levels of tight junction (TJ) proteins such as occludin, claudin-5, junctional adhesion molecules, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), as well as endothelial paracellular permeability and the intracellular signaling required for TJ organization. Moreover, we validated the effects of Au-NPs on the integrity of TJs in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and obtained direct evidence of their influence on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in vivo. Treatment with Au-NPs caused a pronounced reduction of PKCζ-dependent threonine phosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1, which resulted in the instability of endothelial TJs and led to proteasome-mediated degradation of TJ components. This impairment in the assembly of TJs between endothelial cells increased the permeability of the transendothelial paracellular passage and the BBB. Au-NPs increased endothelial paracellular permeability in vitro and elevated BBB permeability in vivo. Future studies must investigate the direct and indirect toxicity caused by Au-NP-induced endothelial TJ opening and thereby address the double-edged-sword effect of Au-NPs.

  7. CAR regulates epithelial cell junction stability through control of E-cadherin trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Penny E.; Hicks, Alexander; Nastos, Theodoros; Santis, George; Parsons, Maddy

    2013-01-01

    CAR (Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor) is the primary docking receptor for typeB coxsackie viruses and subgroup C adenoviruses. CAR is a member of the JAM family of adhesion receptors and is located to both tight and adherens junctions between epithelial cells where it can assemble adhesive contacts through homodimerisation in trans. However, the role of CAR in controlling epithelial junction dynamics remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that levels of CAR in human epithelial cells play a key role in determining epithelial cell adhesion through control of E-cadherin stability at cell-cell junctions. Mechanistically, we show that CAR is phosphorylated within the C-terminus by PKCδ and that this in turn controls Src-dependent endocytosis of E-cadherin at cell junctions. This data demonstrates a novel role for CAR in regulating epithelial homeostasis. PMID:24096322

  8. ZO-3, a Novel Member of the MAGUK Protein Family Found at the Tight Junction, Interacts with ZO-1 and Occludin

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Julie; Gu, Lijie; Wittchen, Erika S.; Hibbard, Jennifer; Stevenson, Bruce R.

    1998-01-01

    A 130-kD protein that coimmunoprecipitates with the tight junction protein ZO-1 was bulk purified from Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and subjected to partial endopeptidase digestion and amino acid sequencing. A resulting 19–amino acid sequence provided the basis for screening canine cDNA libraries. Five overlapping clones contained a single open reading frame of 2,694 bp coding for a protein of 898 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 98,414 daltons. Sequence analysis showed that this protein contains three PSD-95/SAP90, discs-large, ZO-1 (PDZ) domains, a src homology (SH3) domain, and a region similar to guanylate kinase, making it homologous to ZO-1, ZO-2, the discs large tumor suppressor gene product of Drosophila, and other members of the MAGUK family of proteins. Like ZO-1 and ZO-2, the novel protein contains a COOH-terminal acidic domain and a basic region between the first and second PDZ domains. Unlike ZO-1 and ZO-2, this protein displays a proline-rich region between PDZ2 and PDZ3 and apparently contains no alternatively spliced domain. MDCK cells stably transfected with an epitope-tagged construct expressed the exogenous polypeptide at an apparent molecular mass of ∼130 kD. Moreover, this protein colocalized with ZO-1 at tight junctions by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. In vitro affinity analyses demonstrated that recombinant 130-kD protein directly interacts with ZO-1 and the cytoplasmic domain of occludin, but not with ZO-2. We propose that this protein be named ZO-3. PMID:9531559

  9. Efficient mucus permeation and tight junction opening by dissociable "mucus-inert" agent coated trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Xi; Shan, Wei; Li, Lian; Zhong, Jiaju; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2016-01-28

    Oral administration of protein drugs is greatly impeded by the lack of drug carriers that can efficiently overcome the absorption barriers of mucosa tissue, which consists of not only epithelium but also a blanket of mucus gel. We herein report a novel self-assembled nanoparticle (NP) platform for oral delivery of insulin by facilitating the efficient permeation through both of these two barriers. The NP possesses a core composed of insulin and trimethyl chitosan (TMC), and a dissociable "mucus-inert" hydrophilic coating of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide copolymer (pHPMA) derivative. The NPs exhibited free Brownian motion and excellent permeability in mucus, which enabled the access of the NP core to the epithelial cell surface underneath the mucus. Moreover, investigation of NP behavior showed that the pHPMA molecules started to dissociate as the NP permeates through mucus, and the TMC NP core was then exposed to facilitate transepithelial transport via paracellular pathway. The pHPMA coating significantly improved transepithelial transport of TMC-based NP and their ability to open tight junctions between the mucus-secreting epithelial cells. Moreover, in diabetic rats, pHPMA coated NPs generated a prominent hypoglycemic response following oral administration, and exhibited a relative bioavailability 2.8-fold higher than that of uncoated TMC-based NPs. Our study provided the evidence of using pHPMA as "mucus-inert" agent to enhance mucus permeation of TMC-based NPs, and validated a novel strategy to overcome the multiple absorption barriers using NP platform with dissociable hydrophilic coating and TMC-based core possessing tight junction-opening ability.

  10. The multiple junction edge illuminated solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. I.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Riley, T. J.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The multiple junction edge illuminated solar cell was devised for high voltage low current applications. Devices to be flight tested in early 1974 with 96 series connected PNN+ junctions in a 2 cm X 2.3 cm size deliver 36 volts at 1 milliampere. Test data of M-J cells fabricated with resistivities of 10, 50, 100, 200, 450, and 1000 ohm cm silicon are presented and problem areas are discussed. An additional potential application of the M-J cell lies in ultilization of its high intensity performance that has been demonstrated at levels in excess of 100 AMO suns.

  11. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  12. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  13. Modulation of tight junction barrier function by outer membrane proteins of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: role of F-actin and junctional adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Puthenedam, Manjula; Williams, Peter H; Lakshmi, B S; Balakrishnan, Arun

    2007-08-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of infantile diarrhea. In this work we investigated the effect of outer membrane proteins (OMP) of EPEC on barrier integrity and the role of actin, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) and signaling pathways contributing to these changes. Barrier function was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). OMP of wild type EPEC, eaeA and maltoporin mutants decreased TER levels of Caco-2 cells. The OMP of espB mutant was deficient in decreasing TER of Caco-2 cells. The proteinase K-digested wild type OMP and EAF mutant OMP did not cause any change in barrier function. Our previous studies have demonstrated that EPEC OMP induced changes in cadherin junctions of Caco-2 cells. Immunofluorescence revealed disruption in actin cytoskeleton by EPEC OMP. However, no change in expression of junctional adhesion molecule-1 was observed. NF-kappaB inhibitor slightly blocked the decrease in TER and protected against actin disruption while ERK1/2 inhibitor had no effect in blocking these changes. In conclusion, our data suggest that the OMP of EPEC alter intestinal barrier function by disrupting actin cytoskeleton and signaling pathways like NF-kappaB may have a role in regulating barrier changes.

  14. Toxicants target cell junctions in the testis: Insights from the indazole-carboxylic acid model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous types of junctions in the seminiferous epithelium which are integrated with, and critically dependent on the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. These include the basal tight junctions between Sertoli cells that form the main component of the blood–testis barrier, the basal ectoplasmic specializations (basal ES) and basal tubulobulbar complexes (basal TBC) between Sertoli cells; as well as apical ES and apical TBC between Sertoli cells and the developing spermatids that orchestrate spermiogenesis and spermiation. These junctions, namely TJ, ES, and TBC interact with actin microfilament-based cytoskeleton, which together with the desmosomal junctions that interact with the intermediate filament-based cytoskeleton plus the highly polarized microtubule-based cytoskeleton are working in concert to move spermatocytes and spermatids between the basal and luminal aspect of the seminiferous epithelium. In short, these various junctions are structurally complexed with the actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeleton or intermediate filaments of the Sertoli cell. Studies have shown toxicants (e.g., cadmium, bisphenol A (BPA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), phthalates, and glycerol), and some male contraceptives under development (e.g., adjudin, gamendazole), exert their effects, at least in part, by targeting cell junctions in the testis. The disruption of Sertoli–Sertoli cell and Sertoli–germ cell junctions, results in the loss of germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. Adjudin, a potential male contraceptive under investigation in our laboratory, produces loss of spermatids from the seminiferous tubules through disruption of the Sertoli cell spermatid junctions and disruption of the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. The molecular and structural changes associated with adjudin administration are described, to provide an example of the profile of changes caused by disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell and also Sertoli cell-cell junctions. PMID:26413399

  15. Tight Junction Proteins and Oxidative Stress in Heavy Metals-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals. PMID:23710457

  16. Tight junction proteins and oxidative stress in heavy metals-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E ( α -tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals.

  17. The Role of the Tight Junction in Paracellular Fluid Transport across Corneal Endothelium. Electro-osmosis as a Driving Force.

    PubMed

    Fischbarg, J; Diecke, F P J; Iserovich, P; Rubashkin, A

    2006-03-01

    The mechanism of epithelial fluid transport is controversial and remains unsolved. Experimental difficulties pose obstacles for work on a complex phenomenon in delicate tissues. However, the corneal endothelium is a relatively simple system to which powerful experimental tools can be applied. In recent years our laboratory has developed experimental evidence and theoretical insights that illuminate the mechanism of fluid transport across this leaky epithelium. Our evidence points to fluid being transported via the paracellular route by a mechanism requiring junctional integrity, which we attribute to electro-osmotic coupling at the junctions. Fluid movements can be produced by electrical currents. The direction of the movement can be reversed by current reversal or by changing junctional electrical charges by polylysine. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) is the only AQP present in these cells, and its deletion in AQP1 null mice significantly affects cell osmotic permeability but not fluid transport, which militates against the presence of sizable water movements across the cell. By contrast, AQP1 null mice cells have reduced regulatory volume decrease (only 60% of control), which suggests a possible involvement of AQP1 in either the function or the expression of volume-sensitive membrane channels/transporters. A mathematical model of corneal endothelium predicts experimental results only when based on paracellular electro-osmosis, and not when transcellular local osmosis is assumed instead. Our experimental findings in corneal endothelium have allowed us to develop a novel paradigm for this preparation that includes: (1) paracellular fluid flow; (2) a crucial role for the junctions; (3) hypotonicity of the primary secretion; (4) an AQP role in regulation and not as a significant water pathway. These elements are remarkably similar to those proposed by the Hill laboratory for leaky epithelia. PMID:16868674

  18. S0 Tight Loop Studies on ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Fumio; Konomi, T.; Saito, Kenji; Bice, Damon; Crawford, Anthony C.; Geng, Rongli

    2009-11-01

    We have continued high gradient R&D of ICHIRO 9-cell cavities at KEK. ICHIRO 9-cell cavity #5 (I9#5) that has no end groups on beam tube to focus on high gradient sent to Jlab as S0 tight loop study. Surface treatments and vertical test were repeated 3 times at Jlab, and then I9#5 sent back to KEK. We also repeated surface treatments and test at KEK. Maximum gradients were 36.5MV/m at Jlab, and 33.7MV/m at KEK so far. Now we are struggling with the puzzle why the results of singles do not work well on 9-cell cavities.

  19. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  20. Electroacupuncture Treatment Improves Neurological Function Associated with Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins in Rats with Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-min; Xu, Hong; Sun, Hua; Chen, Su-hui; Wang, Fu-ming

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to develop effective neuroprotective therapy to reduce brain damage and related behavioral deficits in stroke patients are of great significance. Electroacupuncture (EA), which derives from traditional Chinese medicine, may be effective as a complementary and alternative method for promoting recovery of neurological function and quality of life. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: (1) sham, (2) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model groups of 2 h MCAO followed by 1, 3, 5, or 7 d of reperfusion, and (3) EA groups of 2 h MCAO followed by 1, 3, 5, or 7 d of reperfusion. EA groups received EA therapy by needling at GV20 and left ST36. The results show that EA therapy improved the neurological function and reduced infarct volume, confirmed by modified neurological severity scores and TTC staining. Real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot assay verified that EA upregulated the expression of tight junction (TJ) claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occluding-1 from 1 to 7 d after reperfusion. Our findings suggest that EA reduces brain damage and related behavioral deficits via upregulation of the TJ proteins. PMID:25009574

  1. Impaired Tight Junctions in Atopic Dermatitis Skin and in a Skin-Equivalent Model Treated with Interleukin-17

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Takuo; Tobiishi, Megumi; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Ota, Yukiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Tight junction (TJ) dysfunction in the stratum granulosum leads to aberrant barrier function of the stratum corneum (SC) in the epidermis. However, it is unclear whether TJs are perturbed in atopic dermatitis (AD), a representative aberrant SC-related skin disease, and whether some factors related to AD pathogenesis induce TJ dysfunction. To address these issues, we investigated the alterations of TJs in AD skin and the effects of Th2 and Th17 cytokines on TJs in a skin-equivalent model. The levels of TJ proteins were determined in the epidermis of nonlesional and lesional skin sites of AD. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the levels of zonula occludens 1 were decreased in the nonlesional sites of AD, and the levels of zonula occludens 1 and claudin-1 were decreased in the lesional sites relative to the levels in skin from healthy subjects. Next, we examined the effects of interleukin (IL)-4, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-17, and IL-22 on the TJ barrier in a skin-equivalent model. Only IL-17 impaired the TJ barrier. Furthermore, we observed a defect in filaggrin monomer degradation in the IL-17–treated skin model. Thus, TJs are dysfunctional in AD, at least partly, due to the effect of IL-17, which may result in an aberrant SC barrier. PMID:27588419

  2. Impaired Tight Junctions in Atopic Dermatitis Skin and in a Skin-Equivalent Model Treated with Interleukin-17.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Takuo; Tobiishi, Megumi; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Ota, Yukiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Tight junction (TJ) dysfunction in the stratum granulosum leads to aberrant barrier function of the stratum corneum (SC) in the epidermis. However, it is unclear whether TJs are perturbed in atopic dermatitis (AD), a representative aberrant SC-related skin disease, and whether some factors related to AD pathogenesis induce TJ dysfunction. To address these issues, we investigated the alterations of TJs in AD skin and the effects of Th2 and Th17 cytokines on TJs in a skin-equivalent model. The levels of TJ proteins were determined in the epidermis of nonlesional and lesional skin sites of AD. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the levels of zonula occludens 1 were decreased in the nonlesional sites of AD, and the levels of zonula occludens 1 and claudin-1 were decreased in the lesional sites relative to the levels in skin from healthy subjects. Next, we examined the effects of interleukin (IL)-4, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-17, and IL-22 on the TJ barrier in a skin-equivalent model. Only IL-17 impaired the TJ barrier. Furthermore, we observed a defect in filaggrin monomer degradation in the IL-17-treated skin model. Thus, TJs are dysfunctional in AD, at least partly, due to the effect of IL-17, which may result in an aberrant SC barrier. PMID:27588419

  3. Effects of elevated circulating cortisol levels on hydromineral status and gill tight junction protein abundance in the stenohaline goldfish.

    PubMed

    Chasiotis, Helen; Kelly, Scott P

    2012-01-15

    A role for cortisol in the regulation of hydromineral balance and gill tight junction (TJ) protein transcript abundance in the stenohaline freshwater goldfish was investigated. Intraperitoneal cortisol implants (50, 100, 200, 400 μg cortisol/g body weight) were used to dose-dependently elevate circulating cortisol levels over a 4 day period. Elevated cortisol did not significantly alter serum osmolality, serum Na(+) or muscle water content, however serum glucose and gill Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity were significantly increased and serum Cl(-) levels were significantly reduced when compared to control groups. Transcript levels for glucocorticoid receptor 1 (GR1) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the gill remained unchanged by cortisol treatment, however glucocorticoid receptor 2 (GR2) mRNA abundance was significantly down-regulated. Conversely, cortisol treatment significantly increased transcript and protein abundance of the TJ protein occludin in goldfish gill tissue, as well as mRNA abundance for claudin e, 7 and 8d. Goldfish tissue expression profiles demonstrated that transcripts encoding for these claudins are particularly abundant in the gill. Overall, results suggest a 'tightened' gill epithelium in response to elevated cortisol levels in goldfish. However, negative autoregulation of gill GR2 transcript suggests a lessened capacity to respond to cortisol and thus a potentially 'dampened' corticosteroid-mediated effect in the gill. Reduced systemic Cl(-) levels also suggest that sustained cortisol elevation in goldfish may have a detrimental effect on other ionoregulatory tissues.

  4. Polycystin-2 activity is controlled by transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif and PALS1-associated tight junction protein.

    PubMed

    Duning, Kerstin; Rosenbusch, Deike; Schlüter, Marc A; Tian, Yuemin; Kunzelmann, Karl; Meyer, Nina; Schulze, Ulf; Markoff, Arseni; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Weide, Thomas

    2010-10-29

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent monogenic cause of kidney failure, characterized by the development of renal cysts. ADPKD is caused by mutations of the polycystin-1 (PC1) or polycystin-2 (PC2) genes. PC2 encodes a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, and its dysfunction has been implicated in cyst development. The transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is required for the integrity of renal cilia. Its absence results in the development of renal cysts in a knock-out mouse model. TAZ directly interacts with PC2, and it has been suggested that another yet unidentified PDZ domain protein may be involved in the TAZ/PC2 interaction. Here we describe a novel interaction of TAZ with the multi-PDZ-containing PALS1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ). TAZ interacts with both the N-terminal PDZ domains 1-3 and the C-terminal PDZ domains 8-10 of PATJ, suggesting two distinct TAZ binding domains. We also show that the C terminus of PC2 strongly interacts with PDZ domains 8-10 and to a weaker extent with PDZ domains 1-3 of PATJ. Finally, we demonstrate that both TAZ and PATJ impair PC2 channel activity when co-expressed with PC2 in oocytes of Xenopus laevis. These results implicate TAZ and PATJ as novel regulatory elements of the PC2 channel and might thus be involved in ADPKD pathology.

  5. STUDIES ON AN EPITHELIAL (GLAND) CELL JUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Werner R.; Kanno, Yoshinobu

    1964-01-01

    Membrane permeability of an epithelial cell junction (Drosophila salivary gland) was examined with intracellular microelectrodes and with fluorescent tracers. In contrast to the non-junctional cell membrane surface, which has a low permeability to ions (10-4 mho/cm2), the junctional membrane surface is highly permeable. In fact, it introduces no substantial restriction to ion flow beyond that in the cytoplasm; the resistance through a chain of cells (150 Ω cm) is only slightly greater than in extruded cytoplasm (100 Ω cm). The diffusion resistance along the intercellular space to the exterior, on the other hand, is very high. Here, there exists an ion barrier of, at least, 104Ω cm2. As a result, small ions and fluorescein move rather freely from one cell to the next, but do not leak appreciably through the intercellular space to the exterior. The organ here, rather than the single cell, appears to be the unit of ion environment. The possible underlying structural aspects are discussed. PMID:14206423

  6. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  7. Effects of oral glutamine supplementation on exercise-induced gastrointestinal permeability and tight junction protein expression.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah N; Lanphere, Kathryn R; Kravitz, Len; Mermier, Christine M; Schneider, Suzanne; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope L

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of this study are threefold: 1) to assess whether 7 days of oral glutamine (GLN) supplementation reduces exercise-induced intestinal permeability; 2) whether supplementation prevents the proinflammatory response; and 3) whether these changes are associated with upregulation of the heat shock response. On separate occasions, eight human subjects participated in baseline testing and in GLN and placebo (PLA) supplementation trials, followed by a 60-min treadmill run. Intestinal permeability was higher in the PLA trial compared with baseline and GLN trials (0.0604 ± 0.047 vs. 0.0218 ± 0.008 and 0.0272 ± 0.007, respectively; P < 0.05). IκBα expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher 240 min after exercise in the GLN trial compared with the PLA trial (1.411 ± 0.523 vs. 0.9839 ± 0.343, respectively; P < 0.05). In vitro using the intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2, we measured effects of GLN supplementation (0, 4, and 6 mM) on heat-induced (37° or 41.8°C) heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), and occludin expression. HSF-1 and HSP70 levels increased in 6 mM supplementation at 41°C compared with 0 mM at 41°C (1.785 ± 0.495 vs. 0.6681 ± 0.290, and 1.973 ± 0.325 vs. 1.133 ± 0.129, respectively; P < 0.05). Occludin levels increased after 4 mM supplementation at 41°C and 6 mM at 41°C compared with 0 mM at 41°C (1.236 ± 0.219 and 1.849 ± 0.564 vs. 0.7434 ± 0.027, respectively; P < 0.001). GLN supplementation prevented exercise-induced permeability, possibly through HSF-1 activation. PMID:24285149

  8. Limiting process in shallow junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Rittner, E.

    1979-01-01

    In extending the violet and nonreflective cell technology to lower resistivities, several processes limiting output power were encountered. The most important was the dark diffusion current due to recombination at the front grid contacts. After removal of this problem by reduction of the silicon metal contact area (to 0.14 percent of the total area), the electric field enhanced junction recombination current J sub r was the main limitation. Alteration of the diffusion profile to reduce the junction field is shown to be an effective means of influencing J sub r. The remaining problems are the bulk recombination in the n+ layer and the surface recombination at the oxide-silicon interface; both of these problems are aggravated by band-narrowing resulting from heavy doping in the diffused layer. Experimental evidence for the main limitations is shown, where increased diffusion temperature is seen to reduce both the influence of the front grid contacts and the junction electric field by increasing the junction depth. The potential for further significant improvement in efficiency appears to be high.

  9. Solar-Cell-Junction Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, S. N.; Armini, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    System under development reduces equipment costs. Processing system will produce solar-cell junctions on 4 in. (10.2 cm) round silicon wafers at rate of 10 to seventh power per year. System includes non-mass-analyzed ion implanter, microcomputer-controlled, pulsed-electron-beam annealer, and wafertransport system with vacuum interlock. These features eliminate large, expensive magnet and plates, circuitry, and power source otherwise needed for scanning.

  10. Changes in integrity of the gill during histidine deficiency or excess due to depression of cellular anti-oxidative ability, induction of apoptosis, inflammation and impair of cell-cell tight junctions related to Nrf2, TOR and NF-κB signaling in fish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Feng, Lin; Qu, Biao; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    integrity of fish gill by disrupted fish antioxidant defenses and regulating the expression of tight junction protein, cytokines, apoptosis, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, Nrf2, Keap1 and apoptosis-related genes in the fish gills. PMID:27394967

  11. Changes in integrity of the gill during histidine deficiency or excess due to depression of cellular anti-oxidative ability, induction of apoptosis, inflammation and impair of cell-cell tight junctions related to Nrf2, TOR and NF-κB signaling in fish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Feng, Lin; Qu, Biao; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    integrity of fish gill by disrupted fish antioxidant defenses and regulating the expression of tight junction protein, cytokines, apoptosis, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, Nrf2, Keap1 and apoptosis-related genes in the fish gills.

  12. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  13. Neisseria gonorrhoeae induced disruption of cell junction complexes in epithelial cells of the human genital tract.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tirado, Carolina; Maisey, Kevin; Rodríguez, Felipe E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Imarai, Mónica

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, have developed mechanisms to alter epithelial barriers in order to reach subepithelial tissues for host colonization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of gonococci on cell junction complexes of genital epithelial cells of women. Polarized Ishikawa cells, a cell line derived from endometrial epithelium, were used for experimental infection. Infected cells displayed a spindle-like shape with an irregular distribution, indicating potential alteration of cell-cell contacts. Accordingly, analysis by confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation revealed that gonococci induced redistribution of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and its adapter protein β-catenin from the membrane to a cytoplasmic pool, with no significant differences in protein levels. In contrast, gonococcal infection did not induce modification of either expression or distribution of the tight junction proteins Occludin and ZO-1. Similar results were observed for Fallopian tube epithelia. Interestingly, infected Ishikawa cells also showed an altered pattern of actin cytoskeleton, observed in the form of stress fibers across the cytoplasm, which in turn matched a strong alteration on the expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein component of extracellular matrix. Interestingly, using western blotting, activation of the ERK pathway was detected after gonococcal infection while p38 pathway was not activated. All effects were pili and Opa independent. Altogether, results indicated that gonococcus, as a mechanism of pathogenesis, induced disruption of junction complexes with early detaching of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the adherens junction complex, followed by a redistribution and reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. PMID:22146107

  14. Dietary calcium concentration and cereals differentially affect mineral balance and tight junction proteins expression in jejunum of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Mann, Evelyne; Ertl, Reinhard; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wagner, Martin; Klein, Dieter; Ritzmann, Mathias; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-04-14

    Ca plays an essential role in bone development; however, little is known about its effect on intestinal gene expression in juvenile animals. In the present study, thirty-two weaned pigs (9·5 (SEM 0·11) kg) were assigned to four diets that differed in Ca concentration (adequate v. high) and cereal composition (wheat-barley v. maize) to assess the jejunal and colonic gene expression of nutrient transporters, tight junction proteins, cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, nutrient digestibility, Ca balance and serum acute-phase response. To estimate the impact of mucosal bacteria on colonic gene expression, Spearman's correlations between colonic gene expression and bacterial abundance were computed. Faecal Ca excretion indicated that more Ca was available along the intestinal tract of the pigs fed high Ca diets as compared to the pigs fed adequate Ca diets (P> 0.05). High Ca diets decreased jejunal zonula occludens 1 (ZO1) and occludin (OCLN) expression, up-regulated jejunal expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and down-regulated colonic GLUT2 expression as compared to the adequate Ca diets (P< 0.05). Dietary cereal composition up-regulated jejunal TLR2 expression and interacted (P= 0.021) with dietary Ca on colonic IL1B expression; high Ca concentration up-regulated IL1B expression with wheat-barley diets and down-regulated it with maize diets. Spearman's correlations (r> 0·35; P< 0·05) indicated an association between operational taxonomic units assigned to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and bacterial metabolites and mucosal gene expression in the colon. The present results indicate that high Ca diets have the potential to modify the jejunal and colonic mucosal gene expression response which, in turn, interacts with the composition of the basal diet and mucosa-associated bacteria in weaned pigs. PMID:25761471

  15. Green tea polyphenols alleviate early BBB damage during experimental focal cerebral ischemia through regulating tight junctions and PKCalpha signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been supposed that green tea polyphenols (GTPs) have neuroprotective effects on brain damage after brain ischemia in animal experiments. Little is known regarding GTPs’ protective effects against the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after ischemic stroke. We investigated the effects of GTPs on the expression of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1, and the corresponding cellular mechanisms involved in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Methods Male Wistar rats were subjected to a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 0, 30, 60, and 120 min. GTPs (400 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered by intragastric gavage twice a day for 30 days prior to MCAO. At different time points, the expression of claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1, and PKCα signaling pathway in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were evaluated. Results GTPs reduced BBB permeability at 60 min and 120 min after ischemia as compared with the vehicle group. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that GTPs could reverse the opening of tight junction (TJ) barrier at 60 min and 120 min after MACO. The decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were significantly prevented by treatment with GTPs at the same time points after ischemia in rats. Furthermore, GTPs could attenuate the increase in the expression levels of PKCα mRNA and protein caused by cerebral ischemia. Conclusions These results demonstrate that GTPs may act as a potential neuroprotective agent against BBB damage at the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia through the regulation of TJ and PKCα signaling. PMID:23870286

  16. Vertical-junction solar cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-20

    The goal of this program was to develop and evaluate an acceptable coversliding technology for vertical-junction solar cells. The technical program was divided into the following sub-tasks: 1.0. to fabricate 80 vertical junction cells of most recent configuration for evaluation as individual samples and for test-module assembly. 2.1. to develop a satisfactory method for coversliding V.J. cells to withstand deep thermal cycle in space. 2.2. to establish welding parameters for V.J. cells and evaluate their weldability. 3.0. Using techniques from 2.1 and 2.2 four modules (4 cell each) to be fabricated and thermal cycled in dry nitrogen (115 c to +125 c 25 cycles) and thermal vacuum tested at 135 c. 4.0. based on results of tasks 2 and 3, two six cell modules to be designed: 1 soldered, 1 welded, and design to be discussed with COTR prior to finalization and 5.0. final design to be fabricated subjected to a thermal vacuum test at +135 c, thermal cycled -115 c to + 125 c, and characterized by I-V measurements and delivered to NRL for testing and evaluation.

  17. Chronic type 2 diabetes reduces the integrity of the blood-brain barrier by reducing tight junction proteins in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    YOO, Dae Young; YIM, Hee Sun; JUNG, Hyo Young; NAM, Sung Min; KIM, Jong Whi; CHOI, Jung Hoon; SEONG, Je Kyung; YOON, Yeo Sung; KIM, Dae Won; HWANG, In Koo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes-induced hyperglycemia on the integrity of the blood–brain barrier and tight junction markers in the rat hippocampus. Forty-week-old diabetic (Zucker diabetic fatty, ZDF) rats and littermate control (Zucker lean control, ZLC) rats were used in this study. We evaluated the integrity of the blood–brain barrier by measuring sodium fluorescein extravasation and blood vessel ultrastructure. In addition, tight junction markers, such as zona occludens-1, occludin and claudin-5, were quantified by western blot analysis. ZDF rats showed significantly increased sodium fluorescein leakage in the hippocampus. Tight junction markers, such as occludin and claudin-5, were significantly decreased in the hippocampi of ZDF rats compared to those of ZLC rats. In addition, ZDF rats showed ultrastructural changes with phagocytic findings in the blood vessels. These results suggest that chronic untreated diabetes impairs the permeability of the hippocampal blood–brain barrier by down-regulating occludin and claudin-5, indicating that chronic untreated diabetes may cause hippocampus-dependent dysfunction. PMID:26876499

  18. Ouabain Stimulates a Na+/K+-ATPase-Mediated SFK-Activated Signalling Pathway That Regulates Tight Junction Function in the Mouse Blastocyst

    PubMed Central

    Giannatselis, Holly; Calder, Michele; Watson, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The Na+/K+-ATPase plays a pivotal role during preimplantation development; it establishes a trans-epithelial ionic gradient that facilitates the formation of the fluid-filled blastocyst cavity, crucial for implantation and successful pregnancy. The Na+/K+-ATPase is also implicated in regulating tight junctions and cardiotonic steroid (CTS)-induced signal transduction via SRC. We investigated the expression of SRC family kinase (SFK) members, Src and Yes, during preimplantation development and determined whether SFK activity is required for blastocyst formation. Embryos were collected following super-ovulation of CD1 or MF1 female mice. RT-PCR was used to detect SFK mRNAs encoding Src and Yes throughout preimplantation development. SRC and YES protein were localized throughout preimplantation development. Treatment of mouse morulae with the SFK inhibitors PP2 and SU6656 for 18 hours resulted in a reversible blockade of progression to the blastocyst stage. Blastocysts treated with 10−3 M ouabain for 2 or 10 minutes and immediately immunostained for phosphorylation at SRC tyr418 displayed reduced phosphorylation while in contrast blastocysts treated with 10−4 M displayed increased tyr418 fluorescence. SFK inhibition increased and SFK activation reduced trophectoderm tight junction permeability in blastocysts. The results demonstrate that SFKs are expressed during preimplantation development and that SFK activity is required for blastocyst formation and is an important mediator of trophectoderm tight junction permeability. PMID:21901128

  19. MicroRNA-30a increases tight junction protein expression to suppress the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis by targeting Slug in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yao, Chung-Chin; Chao, Jui-I; Chen, Po-Ming; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Chu, Hou-Wei; Shen, Chen-Yang; Cheng, Chun-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transition is a prerequisite for conferring metastatic potential during tumor progression. microRNA-30a (miR-30a) expression was significantly lower in aggressive breast cancer cell lines compared with non-invasive breast cancer and non-malignant mammary epithelial cell lines. In contrast, miR-30a overexpression reversed the mesenchymal appearance of cancer cells to result in a cobblestone-like epithelial phenotype. We identified Slug, one of the master regulators of EMT, as a target of miR-30a using in silico prediction. Reporter assays indicated that miR-30a could bind to the 3′-untranslted region of Slug mRNA. Furthermore, we linked miR-30a to increased expression of claudins, a family of tight junction transmembrane proteins. An interaction between Slug and E-box in the claudin promoter sequences was reduced upon miR-30a overexpression, further leading to reduction of filopodia formation and decreased invasiveness/metastasis capabilities of breast cancer cells. Consistently, delivery of miR-30a in xenografted mice decreased tumor invasion and migration. In patients with breast cancer, a significantly elevated risk of the miR-30alow/CLDN2low/FSCNhigh genotype was observed, linking to a phenotypic manifestation of larger tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and advanced tumor stage among patients. In conclusion, the miR-30a/Slug axis inhibits mesenchymal tumor development by interfering with metastatic cancer cell programming and may be a potential target for therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26918943

  20. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network

    PubMed Central

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  1. Dexamethasone potentiates in vitro blood-brain barrier recovery after primary blast injury by glucocorticoid receptor-mediated upregulation of ZO-1 tight junction protein.

    PubMed

    Hue, Christopher D; Cho, Frances S; Cao, Siqi; Dale Bass, Cameron R; Meaney, David F; Morrison, Barclay

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the frequent incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) in recent military conflicts, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapies for bTBI-related pathologies. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been reported to occur after primary blast exposure, making restoration of BBB function and integrity a promising therapeutic target. We tested the hypothesis that treatment with dexamethasone (DEX) after primary blast injury potentiates recovery of an in vitro BBB model consisting of mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3). DEX treatment resulted in complete recovery of transendothelial electrical resistance and hydraulic conductivity 1 day after injury, compared with 3 days for vehicle-treated injured cultures. Administration of RU486 (mifepristone) inhibited effects of DEX, confirming that barrier restoration was mediated by glucocorticoid receptor signaling. Potentiated recovery with DEX treatment was accompanied by stronger zonula occludens (ZO)-1 tight junction immunostaining and expression, suggesting that increased ZO-1 expression was a structural correlate to BBB recovery after blast. Interestingly, augmented ZO-1 protein expression was associated with specific upregulation of the α(+) isoform but not the α(-) isoform. This is the first study to provide a mechanistic basis for potentiated functional recovery of an in vitro BBB model because of glucocorticoid treatment after primary blast injury.

  2. Sodium Butyrate Promotes Reassembly of Tight Junctions in Caco-2 Monolayers Involving Inhibition of MLCK/MLC2 Pathway and Phosphorylation of PKCβ2

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Wei; Wu, Xiujuan; Wang, Kang; Wang, Wenjing; Wang, Yumei; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Li; Peng, Luying

    2016-01-01

    As a physiological small molecular product from the microbial fermentation of dietary fibers, butyrate plays an important role in maintaining intestinal health. Our previous works have proved that the effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) on the intestinal barrier function is mediated by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, the detailed pathway involved remains unknown. Using the calcium switch assay in the Caco-2 cell monolayer model, we found here that NaB activated AMPK mainly by increasing the calcium level, but not the ATP concentration, via promoting store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Upon the activation of AMPK, NaB promoted the reassembly of tight junctions (TJs) based on reducing the phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC2) at Ser19 and increasing phosphorylation of protein kinase C β2 (PKCβ2) at Ser660. Inhibiting (protein kinase C β) PKCβ blocked the reassembly of TJs induced by NaB in the barrier monolayer model. These results indicated that NaB could activate the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) pathway to mediate AMPK phosphorylating, which then inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC2 and promoted the phosphorylation of PKCβ2, respectively, so that the downstream molecules of AMPK coordinately contributed to the reassembly of TJs in the Caco-2 barrier model. These results suggested a potential mechanism of butyrate for intestine homeostasis and protection. PMID:27735862

  3. Lipopolysaccharide causes an increase in intestinal tight junction permeability in vitro and in vivo by inducing enterocyte membrane expression and localization of TLR-4 and CD14.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuhong; Al-Sadi, Rana; Said, Hamid M; Ma, Thomas Y

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play an essential role in the inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel disease. A defective intestinal tight junction (TJ) barrier is an important pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory conditions of the gut. Despite its importance in mediating intestinal inflammation, the physiological effects of LPS on the intestinal epithelial barrier remain unclear. The major aims of this study were to determine the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of LPS (0 to 1 ng/mL) on intestinal barrier function using an in vitro (filter-grown Caco-2 monolayers) and an in vivo (mouse intestinal perfusion) intestinal epithelial model system. LPS, at physiologically relevant concentrations (0 to 1 ng/mL), in the basolateral compartment produced a time-dependent increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability without inducing cell death. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS (0.1 mg/kg), leading to clinically relevant plasma concentrations, also caused a time-dependent increase in intestinal permeability in vivo. The LPS-induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability was mediated by an increase in enterocyte membrane TLR-4 expression and a TLR-4-dependent increase in membrane colocalization of membrane-associated protein CD14. In conclusion, these studies show for the first time that LPS causes an increase in intestinal permeability via an intracellular mechanism involving TLR-4-dependent up-regulation of CD14 membrane expression.

  4. Early Activation of MAPK p44/42 Is Partially Involved in DON-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier Function and Tight Junction Network.

    PubMed

    Springler, Alexandra; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the plant pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, is one of the most common mycotoxins, contaminating cereal and cereal-derived products. Although worldwide contamination of food and feed poses health threats to humans and animals, pigs are particularly susceptible to this mycotoxin. DON derivatives, such as deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1), are produced by bacterial transformation of certain intestinal bacteria, which are naturally occurring or applied as feed additives. Intestinal epithelial cells are the initial barrier against these food- and feed-borne toxins. The present study confirms DON-induced activation of MAPK p44/42 and inhibition of p44/42 by MAPK-inhibitor U0126 monoethanolate. Influence of DON and DOM-1 on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), viability and expression of seven tight junction proteins (TJ), as well as the potential of U0126 to counteract DON-induced effects, was assessed. While DOM-1 showed no effect, DON significantly reduced TEER of differentiated IPEC-J2 and decreased expression of claudin-1 and -3, while leaving claudin-4; ZO-1, -2, and -3 and occludin unaffected. Inhibition of p44/42 counteracted DON-induced TEER decrease and restored claudin-3, but not claudin-1 expression. Therefore, effects of DON on TEER and claudin-3 are at least partially p44/42 mediated, while effects on viability and claudin-1 are likely mediated via alternative pathways. PMID:27618100

  5. Reduction of brain barrier tight junctional proteins by lead exposure: role of activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src via chaperon GRP78.

    PubMed

    Song, Han; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Xue-Feng; Liu, Xin-Qin; Luo, Wen-Jing; Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Lead (Pb) has long been recognized as a neurodevelopmental toxin. Developing blood-brain barrier (BBB) is known to be a target of Pb neurotoxicity; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recent evidence suggests that intracellular nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase Src regulates tight junctional proteins (TJPs). This study was designed to investigate whether Pb acted on the Src-mediated cascade event leading to an altered TJP expression at BBB. Rats aged 20-22 days were exposed to Pb in drinking water (0, 100, 200, and 300 ppm Pb) for eight weeks. Electron microscopic and Western blot analyses revealed a severe leakage of BBB and significantly decreased expressions of TJP occludin and ZO-1. When cultured brain endothelial RBE4 cells were exposed to 10μM Pb for 24 h, expressions of phosphor-Src and an upstream regulator GRP78 were significantly increased by 6.42-fold and 8.29-fold (p < 0.01), respectively. Inactivation of Src pathway by a Src-specific inhibitor reversed Pb-induced downregulation of occludin, but not ZO-1; small interfering RNA knockdown of GRP78 attenuated Pb-induced Src phosphorylation and occludin reduction. Furthermore, Pb exposure caused redistribution of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to cytosol and toward cell member. However, the data from immunoneutralization studies did not show the involvement of cell-surface GRP78 in regulating Src phosphorylation upon Pb exposure, suggesting that the cytosolic GRP78, rather than cell-surface GRP78, was responsible to Pb-induced Src activation and ensuing occludin reduction. Taken together, this study provides the evidence of a novel linkage of GRP78, Src activation to downregulation of occludin, and BBB disruption during Pb exposure.

  6. Triple junction polymer solar cells for photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Esiner, Serkan; van Eersel, Harm; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2013-06-01

    A triple junction polymer solar cell in a novel 1 + 2 type configuration provides photoelectrochemical water splitting in its maximum power point at V ≈ 1.70 V with an estimated solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency of 3.1%. The triple junction cell consists of a wide bandgap front cell and two identical small bandgap middle and back cells.

  7. Studies of silicon pn junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications of the basic Shockley equations that result from the random and nonrandom spatial variations of the chemical composition of a semiconductor were developed. These modifications underlie the existence of the extensive emitter recombination current that limits the voltage over the open circuit of solar cells. The measurement of parameters, series resistance and the base diffusion length is discussed. Two methods are presented for establishing the energy bandgap narrowing in the heavily-doped emitter region. Corrections that can be important in the application of one of these methods to small test cells are examined. Oxide-charge-induced high-low-junction emitter (OCI-HLE) test cells which exhibit considerably higher voltage over the open circuit than was previously seen in n-on-p solar cells are described.

  8. Processus and recessus adhaerentes: giant adherens cell junction systems connect and attract human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wuchter, Patrick; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Straub, Beate K; Grund, Christine; Kuhn, Caecilia; Krause, Ulf; Seckinger, Anja; Peitsch, Wiebke K; Spring, Herbert; Ho, Anthony D; Franke, Werner W

    2007-06-01

    Substrate-adherent cultured cells derived from human bone marrow or umbilical cord blood ("mesenchymal stem cells") are of special interest for regenerative medicine. We report that such cells, which can display considerable heterogeneity with respect to their cytoskeletal protein complement, are often interconnected by special tentacle-like cell processes contacting one or several other cells. These processus adhaerentes, studded with many (usually small) puncta adhaerentia and varying greatly in length (up to more than 400 microm long), either contact each other in the intercellular space ("ET touches") or insert in a tight-fitting manner into deep plasma membrane invaginations (recessus adhaerentes), thus forming a novel kind of long (up to 50 microm) continuous cuff-like junction (manubria adhaerentia). The cell processes contain an actin microfilament core that is stabilized with ezrin, alpha-actinin, and myosin and accompanied by microtubules, and their adhering junctions are characterized by a molecular complement comprising the transmembrane glycoproteins N-cadherin and cadherin-11, in combination with the cytoplasmic plaque proteins alpha- and beta-catenin, together with p120(ctn), plakoglobin, and afadin. The processes are also highly dynamic and rapidly foreshorten as cell colonies approach a denser state of cell packing. These structures are obviously able to establish cell-cell connections, even over long distances, and can form deep-rooted and tight cell-cell adhesions. The possible relationship to similar cell processes in the embryonic primary mesenchyme and their potential in cell sorting and tissue formation processes in the body are discussed. PMID:17372769

  9. 40.8% Efficient Inverted Triple-Junction Solar Cell with Two Independently Metamorphic Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Olavarria, W. J.; Moriarty, T. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Romero, M. J.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.

    2008-01-01

    A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 40.8% at 326 suns concentration is demonstrated in a monolithically grown, triple-junction III-V solar cell structure in which each active junction is composed of an alloy with a different lattice constant chosen to maximize the theoretical efficiency. The semiconductor structure was grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy in an inverted configuration with a 1.83 eV Ga{sub .51}In{sub .49}P top junction lattice-matched to the GaAs substrate, a metamorphic 1.34 eV In{sub .04}Ga{sub .96}As middle junction, and a metamorphic 0.89 eV In{sub .37}Ga{sub .63}As bottom junction. The two metamorphic junctions contained approximately 1 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -2} and 2-3 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} threading dislocations, respectively.

  10. Effect of various absorption enhancers based on tight junctions on the intestinal absorption of forsythoside A in Shuang-Huang-Lian, application to its antivirus activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Zhu, Xuan Xuan; Yin, Ai Ling; Cai, Bao Chang; Wang, Hai Dan; Di, Liuqing; Shan, Jin Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Forsythoside A (FTA), one of the main active ingredients in Shuang–Huang–Lian (SHL), possesses strong antibacterial, antioxidant and antiviral effects, and its pharmacological effects was higher than that of other ingredients, but the absolute bioavailability orally was approximately 0.72%, which was significantly low, influencing clinical efficacies of its oral preparations seriously. Materials and Methods: In vitro Caco-2 cell and in vivo pharmacokinetics study were simultaneously performed to investigate the effects of absorption enhancers based on tight junctions: sodium caprate and water-soluble chitosan on the intestinal absorption of FTA, and the eventual mucosal epithelial damage resulted from absorption enhancers was evaluated by MTT test and morphology observation, respectively. The pharmacological effects such as antivirus activity improvement by absorption enhancers were verified by MDCK damage inhibition rate after influenza virus propagation. Results: The observations from in vitro Caco-2 cell showed that the absorption of FTA in SHL could be improved by absorption enhancers. Meanwhile, the absorption enhancing effect of water-soluble chitosan may be almost saturable up to 0.0032% (w/v), and sodium caprate at concentrations up to 0.64 mg/mL was safe, but water-soluble chitosan at different concentrations was all safe for these cells. In pharmacokinetics study, water-soluble chitosan at dosage of 50 mg/kg improved the bioavailability of FTA in SHL to the greatest extent, and was safe for gastrointestine from morphological observation. Besides, treatment with SHL with water-soluble chitosan at dosage of 50 mg/kg prevented MDCK damage after influenza virus propagation better significantly than that of control. Conclusion: Water-soluble chitosan at dosage of 50 mg/kg might be safe and effective absorption enhancer for improving the bioavailability of FTA and the antivirus activity in vitro in SHL. PMID:24695554

  11. Effects of intercellular junction protein expression on intracellular ice formation in mouse insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Adam Z; Karlsson, Jens O M

    2013-11-01

    The development of cryopreservation procedures for tissues has proven to be difficult in part because cells within tissue are more susceptible to intracellular ice formation (IIF) than are isolated cells. In particular, previous studies suggest that cell-cell interactions increase the likelihood of IIF by enabling propagation of ice between neighboring cells, a process thought to be mediated by gap junction channels. In this study, we investigated the effects of cell-cell interactions on IIF using three genetically modified strains of the mouse insulinoma cell line MIN6, each of which expressed key intercellular junction proteins (connexin-36, E-cadherin, and occludin) at different levels. High-speed video cryomicroscopy was used to visualize the freezing process in pairs of adherent cells, revealing that the initial IIF event in a given cell pair was correlated with a hitherto unrecognized precursor phenomenon: penetration of extracellular ice into paracellular spaces at the cell-cell interface. Such paracellular ice penetration occurred in the majority of cell pairs observed, and typically preceded and colocalized with the IIF initiation events. Paracellular ice penetration was generally not observed at temperatures >-5.65°C, which is consistent with a penetration mechanism via defects in tight-junction barriers at the cell-cell interface. Although the maximum temperature of paracellular penetration was similar for all four cell strains, genetically modified cells exhibited a significantly higher frequency of ice penetration and a higher mean IIF temperature than did wild-type cells. A four-state Markov chain model was used to quantify the rate constants of the paracellular ice penetration process, the penetration-associated IIF initiation process, and the intercellular ice propagation process. In the initial stages of freezing (>-15°C), junction protein expression appeared to only have a modest effect on the kinetics of propagative IIF, and even cell strains

  12. Presence of functional gap junctions in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond C B; Pébay, Alice; Nguyen, Linh T V; Koh, Karen L L; Pera, Martin F

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow both chemical and electrical signaling between two adjacent cells. Gap junction intercellular communication has been implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell migration, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell apoptosis. This study aimed to determine the presence and functionality of gap junctions in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Using reverse transcription--polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry, we demonstrate that human ES cells express two gap junction proteins, connexin 43 and connexin 45. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of three phosphorylated forms (nonphosphorylated [NP], P1, and P2) of connexin 43, NP being prominent. Moreover, scrape loading/dye transfer assay indicates that human ES cells are coupled through functional gap junctions that are inhibited by protein kinase C activation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibition.

  13. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  14. Dietary salt loading and ion-poor water exposure provide insight into the molecular physiology of the rainbow trout gill epithelium tight junction complex.

    PubMed

    Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-08-01

    This study utilized dietary salt loading and ion-poor water (IPW) exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to further understand the role of fish gill epithelium tight junction (TJ) physiology in salt and water balance. Gill morphology, biochemistry and molecular physiology were examined, with an emphasis on genes encoding TJ proteins. Fish were either fed a control or salt-enriched diet (~10 % NaCl) for 4 weeks prior to IPW exposure for 24 h. Serum [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and muscle moisture content were unaltered by salt feeding, but changed in response to IPW irrespective of diet. Dietary salt loading altered the morphology (reduced Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive cell numbers and surface exposure of mitochondrion-rich cells), biochemistry (decreased vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase activity) and molecular physiology (decreased nkaα1a and cftrII mRNA abundance) of the gill in a manner indicative of reduced active ion uptake activity. But in control fish and not salt-fed fish, gill mRNA abundance of nkaα1c increased and nbc decreased after IPW exposure. Genes encoding TJ proteins were typically either responsive to salt feeding or IPW, but select genes responded to combined experimental treatment (e.g. IPW responsive but only if fish were salt-fed). Therefore, using salt feeding and IPW exposure, new insights into what factors influence gill TJ proteins and the role that specific TJ proteins might play in regulating the barrier properties of the gill epithelium have been acquired. In particular, evidence suggests that TJ proteins in the gill epithelium, or the regulatory networks that control them, respond independently to external or internal stimuli. PMID:27083431

  15. The surface epithelium of teleostean fish gills. Cellular and junctional adaptations of the chloride cell in relation to salt adaptation

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Various species of teleostean fishes were adapted to fresh or salt water and their gill surface epithelium was examined using several techniques of electron microscopy. In both fresh and salt water the branchial epithelium is mostly covered by flat respiratory cells. They are characterized by unusual outer membrane fracture faces containing intramembranous particles and pits in various stages of ordered aggregation. Freeze fracture studies showed that the tight junctions between respiratory cells are made of several interconnecting strands, probably representing high resistance junctions. The organization of intramembranous elements and the morphological characteristics of the junctions do not vary in relation to the external salinity. Towards the base of the secondary gill lamellae, the layer of respiratory cells is interrupted by mitochondria-rich cells ("chloride cells"), also linked to respiratory cells by multistranded junctions. There is a fundamental reorganization of the chloride cells associated with salt water adaptation. In salt water young adjacent chloride cells send interdigitations into preexisting chloride cells. The apex of the seawater chloride cell is therefore part of a mosaic of sister cells linked to surrounding respiratory cells by multistranded junctions. The chloride cells are linked to each other by shallow junctions made of only one strand and permeable to lanthanum. It is therefore suggested that salt water adaptation triggers a cellular reorganization of the epithelium in such a way that leaky junctions (a low resistance pathway) appear at the apex of the chloride cells. Chloride cells are characterized by an extensive tubular reticulum which is an extension of the basolateral plasma membrane. It is made of repeating units and is the site of numerous ion pumps. The presence of shallow junctions in sea water-adapted fish makes it possible for the reticulum to contact the external milieu. In contrast in the freshwater-adapted fish the

  16. Role of autophagy in the regulation of epithelial cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Prashant; Ma, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism by which bulk cytoplasmic material, including soluble macromolecules and organelles, is targeted for lysosomal degradation. The role of autophagy in diverse cellular processes such as metabolic stress, neurodegeneration, cancer, aging, immunity, and inflammatory diseases is being increasingly recognized. Epithelial cell junctions play an integral role in the cell homeostasis via physical binding, regulating paracellular pathways, integrating extracellular cues into intracellular signaling, and cell-cell communication. Recent data indicates that cell junction composition is very dynamic. The junctional protein complexes are actively regulated in response to various intra- and extra-cellular clues by intracellular trafficking and degradation pathways. This review discusses the recent and emerging information on how autophagy regulates various epithelial cell junctions. The knowledge of autophagy regulation of epithelial junctions will provide further rationale for targeting autophagy in a wide variety of human disease conditions. PMID:27583189

  17. Junctional abnormalities in human airway epithelial cells expressing F508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brandon; Moriarty, Hannah K.; Kim, Agnes H.; McCarty, Nael A.; Koval, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a profound impact on airway physiology. Accumulating evidence suggests that intercellular junctions are impaired in CF. We examined changes to CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function, tight junctions, and gap junctions in NuLi-1 (CFTRwt/wt) and CuFi-5 (CFTRΔF508/ΔF508) cells. Cells were studied at air-liquid interface (ALI) and compared with primary human bronchial epithelial cells. On the basis of fluorescent lectin binding, the phenotype of the NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells at week 8 resembled that of serous, glycoprotein-rich airway cells. After week 7, CuFi-5 cells possessed 130% of the epithelial Na+ channel activity and 17% of the CFTR activity of NuLi-1 cells. In both cell types, expression levels of CFTR were comparable to those in primary airway epithelia. Transepithelial resistance of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells stabilized during maturation in ALI culture, with significantly lower transepithelial resistance for CuFi-5 than NuLi-1 cells. We also found that F508del CFTR negatively affects gap junction function in the airway. NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells express the connexins Cx43 and Cx26. While both connexins were properly trafficked by NuLi-1 cells, Cx43 was mistrafficked by CuFi-5 cells. Cx43 trafficking was rescued in CuFi-5 cells treated with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), as assessed by intracellular dye transfer. 4-PBA-treated CuFi-5 cells also exhibited an increase in forskolin-induced CFTR-mediated currents. The Cx43 trafficking defect was confirmed using IB3-1 cells and found to be corrected by 4-PBA treatment. These data support the use of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells to examine the effects of F508del CFTR expression on tight junction and gap junction function in the context of serous human airway cells. PMID:26115671

  18. Air pollution and children: neural and tight junction antibodies and combustion metals, the role of barrier breakdown and brain immunity in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vojdani, Aristo; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Friedle, Albrecht; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Sarathi-Mukherjee, Partha; Martínez-Aguirre, Xavier; Park, Su-Bin; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children are exposed to concentrations of air pollutants, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5), above safety standards. In the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) megacity, children show an early brain imbalance in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune response-associated genes, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We investigated serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibodies to neural and tight junction proteins and environmental pollutants in 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 y with high versus low air pollution exposures. We also measured metals in serum and CSF. MCMA children showed significantly higher serum actin IgG, occludin/zonulin 1 IgA, IgG, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein IgG and IgM (p < 0.01), myelin basic protein IgA and IgG, S-100 IgG and IgM, and cerebellar IgG (p < 0.001). Serum IgG antibodies to formaldehyde, benzene, and bisphenol A, and concentrations of Ni and Cd were significantly higher in exposed children (p < 0.001). CSF MBP antibodies and nickel concentrations were higher in MCMA children (p = 0.03). Air pollution exposure damages epithelial and endothelial barriers and is a robust trigger of tight junction and neural antibodies. Cryptic 'self' tight junction antigens can trigger an autoimmune response potentially contributing to the neuroinflammatory and Alzheimer and Parkinson's pathology hallmarks present in megacity children. The major factor determining the impact of neural antibodies is the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Defining the air pollution linkage of the brain/immune system interactions and damage to physical and immunological barriers with short and long term neural detrimental effects to children's brains ought to be of pressing importance for public health. PMID:25147109

  19. Air pollution and children: neural and tight junction antibodies and combustion metals, the role of barrier breakdown and brain immunity in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vojdani, Aristo; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Friedle, Albrecht; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Sarathi-Mukherjee, Partha; Martínez-Aguirre, Xavier; Park, Su-Bin; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children are exposed to concentrations of air pollutants, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5), above safety standards. In the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) megacity, children show an early brain imbalance in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune response-associated genes, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We investigated serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibodies to neural and tight junction proteins and environmental pollutants in 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 y with high versus low air pollution exposures. We also measured metals in serum and CSF. MCMA children showed significantly higher serum actin IgG, occludin/zonulin 1 IgA, IgG, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein IgG and IgM (p < 0.01), myelin basic protein IgA and IgG, S-100 IgG and IgM, and cerebellar IgG (p < 0.001). Serum IgG antibodies to formaldehyde, benzene, and bisphenol A, and concentrations of Ni and Cd were significantly higher in exposed children (p < 0.001). CSF MBP antibodies and nickel concentrations were higher in MCMA children (p = 0.03). Air pollution exposure damages epithelial and endothelial barriers and is a robust trigger of tight junction and neural antibodies. Cryptic 'self' tight junction antigens can trigger an autoimmune response potentially contributing to the neuroinflammatory and Alzheimer and Parkinson's pathology hallmarks present in megacity children. The major factor determining the impact of neural antibodies is the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Defining the air pollution linkage of the brain/immune system interactions and damage to physical and immunological barriers with short and long term neural detrimental effects to children's brains ought to be of pressing importance for public health.

  20. Tight junctions in differentiating ameloblasts and odontoblasts differentially express ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 in early odontogenesis of rat molars.

    PubMed

    João, Silvia M A; Arana-Chavez, Victor E

    2004-04-01

    Little is known about the expression of associated proteins during the assembly of tight junctions (TJs). We studied the distribution of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 between differentiating ameloblasts and odontoblasts in molar tooth germs from 1- to 3-day-old rats by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Immunoreactivity for ZO-1 was strong at proximal and distal junctional complexes of differentiating ameloblasts, while it was weak and punctuate at the distal region of differentiating odontoblasts. Occludin was immunoreactive at distal and proximal complexes of early differentiating ameloblasts and at distal regions of differentiating odontoblasts. However, in more advanced stages, occludin was only evident at the proximal complex of ameloblasts. Claudin-1 was strongly detected at the proximal complex but it was weak at distal complex of late differentiating ameloblasts. Thus, our results showed that ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 are differentially expressed as TJs assemble for regulating polarity and/or paracellular permeability in differentiating ameloblasts and odontoblasts.

  1. Mammary epithelial cell phagocytosis downstream of TGF-β3 is characterized by adherens junction reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Fornetti, J; Flanders, K C; Henson, P M; Tan, A-C; Borges, V F; Schedin, P

    2016-01-01

    After weaning, during mammary gland involution, milk-producing mammary epithelial cells undergo apoptosis. Effective clearance of these dying cells is essential, as persistent apoptotic cells have a negative impact on gland homeostasis, future lactation and cancer susceptibility. In mice, apoptotic cells are cleared by the neighboring epithelium, yet little is known about how mammary epithelial cells become phagocytic or whether this function is conserved between species. Here we use a rat model of weaning-induced involution and involuting breast tissue from women, to demonstrate apoptotic cells within luminal epithelial cells and epithelial expression of the scavenger mannose receptor, suggesting conservation of phagocytosis by epithelial cells. In the rat, epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is increased during involution, a pathway known to promote phagocytic capability. To test whether TGF-β enhances the phagocytic ability of mammary epithelial cells, non-transformed murine mammary epithelial EpH4 cells were cultured to achieve tight junction impermeability, such as occurs during lactation. TGF-β3 treatment promoted loss of tight junction impermeability, reorganization and cleavage of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin (E-cad), and phagocytosis. Phagocytosis correlated with junction disruption, suggesting junction reorganization is necessary for phagocytosis by epithelial cells. Supporting this hypothesis, epithelial cell E-cad reorganization and cleavage were observed in rat and human involuting mammary glands. Further, in the rat, E-cad cleavage correlated with increased γ-secretase activity and β-catenin nuclear localization. In vitro, pharmacologic inhibitors of γ-secretase or β-catenin reduced the effect of TGF-β3 on phagocytosis to near baseline levels. However, β-catenin signaling through LiCl treatment did not enhance phagocytic capacity, suggesting a model in which both reorganization of cell junctions and

  2. Polychlorinated biphenyls impair blood-brain barrier integrity via disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female Wistar rats: neuropotential role of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, K; Prabha, R Lakshmi; Saranya, K; Bavithra, S; Krishnamoorthy, G; Arunakaran, J

    2013-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) comprise a ubiquitous class of toxic substances associated with carcinogenic and tumor-promoting effects as well as neurotoxic properties. Reactive oxygen species, which is produced from PCBs, alters blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which is paralleled by cytoskeletal rearrangements and redistribution and disappearance of tight junction proteins (TJPs) like claudin-5 and occludin. Quercetin, a potent antioxidant present in onion and other vegetables, appears to protect brain cells against oxidative stress, a tissue-damaging process associated with Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of quercetin on oxidative stress markers and transcription of transmembrane and cytoplasmic accessory TJPs on cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female rats exposed to PCBs. Rats were divided into the following four groups. Group I: received only vehicle (corn oil) intraperitoneally (i.p.); group II: received Aroclor 1254 at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (bwt)/day (i.p); group III: received Aroclor 1254 (i.p.) and simultaneously quercetin 50 mg/kg bwt/day through gavage and group IV: received quercetin alone gavage. From the experiment, the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were observed to increase significantly in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus as 50%, 25% and 20%, respectively, after exposure to PCB, and the messenger RNA expression of TJP in rats exposed to PCBs is decreased and is retrieved to the normal level simultaneously in quercetin-treated rats. Hence, quercetin can be used as a preventive medicine to PCBs exposure and prevents neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5′-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9.

  4. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Litkouhi, Babak; Kwong, Joseph; Lo, Chun-Min; Smedley, James G; McClane, Bruce A; Aponte, Margarita; Gao, Zhijian; Sarno, Jennifer L; Hinners, Jennifer; Welch, William R; Berkowitz, Ross S; Mok, Samuel C; Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2007-01-01

    Background Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ) protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4-expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. Methods Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular) resistance (Rb) in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. Results Claudin-4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. Conclusions C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies. PMID:17460774

  5. Gap Junctions between Photoreceptor Cells in the Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Raviola, Elio; Gilula, Norton B.

    1973-01-01

    In the outer plexiform layer of the retina the synaptic endings of cone cells make specialized junctions with each other and with the endings of rod cells. The ultrastructure of these interreceptor junctions is described in retinas of monkeys, rabbits, and turtles, in thin sections of embedded specimens and by the freeze-fracturing technique. Cone-to-rod junctions are ribbon-like areas of close membrane approximation. On either side of the narrowing of the intercellular space, the junctional membranes contain a row of particles located on the fracture face A (cytoplasmic leaflet), while the complementary element, a row of single depressions, is located on fracture face B. The particle rows are surrounded by a membrane region that is devoid of particulate inclusions and bears an adherent layer of dense cytoplasmic material. Cone-to-cone junctions in some places are identical to cone-to-rod junctions, while in other places they closely resemble typical gap junctions (nexus). Interreceptor junctions, therefore, represent a morphological variant of the gap junction, and probably mediate electrotonic coupling between neighboring photoreceptor cells. Images PMID:4198274

  6. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jianguo

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  7. Development of cell junctions in sea-urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, E; Howard, L

    1983-07-01

    The development of cell junctions in sea-urchin embryos has been investigated using thin sections, lanthanum-tracer and freeze-fracture techniques. Three types of desmosomes are present: belt desmosomes and spot desmosomes, which attach cells to each other, and hemi-desmosomes, which attach cells to the basement membrane. Two types of septate junctions are present: the straight, unbranched, double-septum septate, which is present in epithelial cells throughout embryogenesis, and the pleated, anastomosing, single-septum septate. The latter is formed only on cells that have invaginated to the interior of the embryo to form the digestive tract. The pleated junctions are shown to replace the straight junctions that were originally present before the cells migrated to the interior. It is suggested that these pleated septates may be specialized for digestive processes, since they are developed just prior to feeding and are retained in the adult intestine. Tricellular junctions, which join the bicellular junctions of three adjoining cells, have been identified in the embryo and in the adult intestine. Evidence for the presence of gap junctions was not obtained, but there are indications of their presence.

  8. Studies of silicon p-n junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    To provide theoretical support for investigating different ways to obtain high open-circuit voltages in p-n junction silicon solar cells, an analytical treatment of heavily doped transparent-emitter devices is presented that includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, a doping concentration gradient, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. Topics covered include: (1) experimental determination of bandgap narrowing in the emitter of silicon p-n junction devices; (2) heavily doped transparent regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors; (3) high-low-emitter solar cell; (4) determination of lifetimes and recombination currents in p-n junction solar cells; (5) MOS and oxide-charged-induced BSF solar cells; and (6) design of high efficiency solar cells for space and terrestrial applications.

  9. Improved High/Low Junction Silicon Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Pao, S. C.; Lindholm, F. A.; Fossum, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Method developed to raise value of open-circuit voltage in silicon solar cells by incorporating high/low junction in cell emitter. Power-conversion efficiency of low-resistivity silicon solar cell considerably less than maximum theoretical value mainly because open-circuit voltage is smaller than simple p/n junction theory predicts. With this method, air-mass-zero opencircuit voltage increased from 600 mV level to approximately 650 mV.

  10. Spatial and temporal relationships between cadherins and PECAM-1 in cell-cell junctions of human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The integrity of the endothelial layer, which lines the entire cavity of the vascular system, depends on tight adhesion of the cells to the underlying basement membrane as well as to each other. It has been previously shown that such interactions occur via membrane receptors that determine the specificity, topology, and mechanical properties of the surface adhesion. Cell-cell junctions between endothelial cells, in culture and in situ, involve both Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent mechanisms that are mediated by distinct adhesion molecules. Ca(2+)- dependent cell-cell adhesion occurs mostly via members of the cadherin family, which locally anchor the microfilament system to the plasma membrane, in adherens junctions. Ca(2+)-independent adhesions were reported to mainly involve members of the Ig superfamily. In this study, we performed three-dimensional microscopic analysis of the relative subcellular distributions of these two endothelial intercellular adhesion systems. We show that cadherins are located at adjacent (usually more apical), yet clearly distinct domains of the lateral plasma membrane, compared to PECAM-1. Moreover, cadherins were first organized in adherens junctions within 2 h after seeding of endothelial cells, forming multiple lateral patches which developed into an extensive belt-like structure over a period of 24 h. PECAM-1 became associated with surface adhesions significantly later and became progressively associated with the cadherin-containing adhesions. Cadherins and PECAM-1 also differed in their detergent extractability, reflecting differences in their mode of association with the cytoskeleton. Moreover, the two adhesion systems could be differentially modulated since short treatment with the Ca2+ chelator EGTA, disrupted the cadherin junctions leaving PECAM-1 apparently intact. These results confirm that endothelial cells possess distinct intercellular contact mechanisms that differ in their spatial and temporal organization as well as

  11. SIP1/ZEB2 induces EMT by repressing genes of different epithelial cell–cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Vandewalle, Cindy; Comijn, Joke; De Craene, Bram; Vermassen, Petra; Bruyneel, Erik; Andersen, Henriette; Tulchinsky, Eugene; Van Roy, Frans; Berx, Geert

    2005-01-01

    SIP1/ZEB2 is a member of the δEF-1 family of two-handed zinc finger nuclear factors. The expression of these transcription factors is associated with epithelial mesenchymal transitions (EMT) during development. SIP1 is also expressed in some breast cancer cell lines and was detected in intestinal gastric carcinomas, where its expression is inversely correlated with that of E-cadherin. Here, we show that expression of SIP1 in human epithelial cells results in a clear morphological change from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype. Induction of this epithelial dedifferentiation was accompanied by repression of several cell junctional proteins, with concomitant repression of their mRNA levels. Besides E-cadherin, other genes coding for crucial proteins of tight junctions, desmosomes and gap junctions were found to be transcriptionally regulated by the transcriptional repressor SIP1. Moreover, study of the promoter regions of selected genes by luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that repression is directly mediated by SIP1. These data indicate that, during epithelial dedifferentiation, SIP1 represses in a coordinated manner the transcription of genes coding for junctional proteins contributing to the dedifferentiated state; this repression occurs by a general mechanism mediated by Smad Interacting Protein 1 (SIP1)-binding sites. PMID:16314317

  12. Myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML7 improves vascular endothelial dysfunction via tight junction regulation in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaowen; Wang, Xiaobian; Wan, Yufeng; Zhou, Qing; Zhu, Huaqing; Wang, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) is an important factor in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis (AS). Previous studies have demonstrated that endothelial permeability is increased in diet‑induced AS. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The present study aimed to analyze whether the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML7 is able to improve VED and AS by regulating the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zona occludens (ZO)‑1 and occludin via mechanisms involving MLCK and MLC phosphorylation in high‑fat diet‑fed rabbits. New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: Control group, AS group and ML7 group. The rabbits were fed a standard diet (control group), a high‑fat diet (AS group) or a high‑fat diet supplemented with 1 mg/kg/day ML7 (ML7 group). After 12 weeks, endothelium‑dependent relaxation and endothelium‑independent relaxation were measured using high-frequency ultrasound. Administration of a high‑fat diet significantly increased the levels of serum lipids and inflammatory markers in the rabbits in the AS group, as compared with those in the rabbits in the control group. Furthermore, a high‑fat diet contributed to the formation of a typical atherosclerotic plaque, as well as an increase in endothelial permeability and VED. These symptoms of AS were significantly improved following treatment with ML7, as demonstrated in the ML7 group. Hematoxylin & eosin and immunohistochemical staining indicated that ML7 was able to decrease the expression of MLCK and MLC phosphorylation in the arterial wall of rabbits fed a high‑fat diet. A similar change was observed for the TJ proteins ZO‑1 and occludin. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that ML7 increased the expression levels of occludin in the precipitate, but reduced its expression in the supernatant of lysed aortas. These results indicated that occludin, which is a dynamic protein at the TJ

  13. Myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML7 improves vascular endothelial dysfunction via tight junction regulation in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, XIAOWEN; WANG, XIAOBIAN; WAN, YUFENG; ZHOU, QING; ZHU, HUAQING; WANG, YUAN

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) is an important factor in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis (AS). Previous studies have demonstrated that endothelial permeability is increased in diet-induced AS. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The present study aimed to analyze whether the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML7 is able to improve VED and AS by regulating the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zona occludens (ZO)-1 and occludin via mechanisms involving MLCK and MLC phosphorylation in high-fat diet-fed rabbits. New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: Control group, AS group and ML7 group. The rabbits were fed a standard diet (control group), a high-fat diet (AS group) or a high-fat diet supplemented with 1 mg/kg/day ML7 (ML7 group). After 12 weeks, endothelium-dependent relaxation and endothelium-independent relaxation were measured using high-frequency ultrasound. Administration of a high-fat diet significantly increased the levels of serum lipids and inflammatory markers in the rabbits in the AS group, as compared with those in the rabbits in the control group. Furthermore, a high-fat diet contributed to the formation of a typical atherosclerotic plaque, as well as an increase in endothelial permeability and VED. These symptoms of AS were significantly improved following treatment with ML7, as demonstrated in the ML7 group. Hematoxylin & eosin and immunohistochemical staining indicated that ML7 was able to decrease the expression of MLCK and MLC phosphorylation in the arterial wall of rabbits fed a high-fat diet. A similar change was observed for the TJ proteins ZO-1 and occludin. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that ML7 increased the expression levels of occludin in the precipitate, but reduced its expression in the supernatant of lysed aortas. These results indicated that occludin, which is a dynamic protein at the TJ, is associated with

  14. Reciprocal influence of connexins and apical junction proteins on their expressions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickaël; Spray, David C.; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Membranes of adjacent cells form intercellular junctional complexes to mechanically anchor neighbour cells (anchoring junctions), to seal the paracellular space and to prevent diffusion of integral proteins within the plasma membrane (tight junctions) and to allow cell-to-cell diffusion of small ions and molecules (gap junctions). These different types of specialised plasma membrane microdomains, sharing common adaptor molecules, particularly zonula occludens proteins, frequently present intermingled relationships where the different proteins co-assemble into macromolecular complexes and their expressions are co-ordinately regulated. Proteins forming gap junction channels (connexins, particularly) and proteins fulfilling cell attachment or forming tight junction strands mutually influence expression and functions of one another. PMID:19046940

  15. Gap Junctions and Biophysical Regulation of Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Communication between osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes is integral to their ability to build and maintain the skeletal system and respond to physical signals. Various physiological mechanisms, including nerve communication, hormones, and cytokines, play an important role in this process. More recently, the important role of direct, cell–cell communication via gap junctions has been established. In this review, we demonstrate the integral role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in skeletal physiology and bone cell mechanosensing. PMID:23762015

  16. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.K.; Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  17. The active Zot domain (aa 288–293) increases ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation, alters interaction between ZO-1 and its binding partners, and induces tight junction disassembly through proteinase activated receptor 2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, Simeon E.; Rai, Usha; Tripathi, Amit; Thakar, Manjusha; De Leo, Luigina; Di Toro, Nicola; Not, Tarcisio; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Puche, Adam C.; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Fasano, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae-derived zonula occludins toxin (Zot) is a multifunctional protein that reversibly disassembles intestinal tight junctions (tjs). Zot structure-function analysis has mapped this activity to aa 288–293, named AT1002. AT1002 reduced transepithelial electrical resistance across rat small intestine, ex vivo, as did Zot and its processed mature form, ΔG. AT1002 increased in vivo permeability to sugar tracers, whereas scrambled control peptides did not. Binding and barrier assays in proteinase activated receptor (PAR)2-expressing and PAR2-null cells established AT1002 activity to be PAR2 dependent. Coincident with the increased intestinal permeability, confocal microscopy of AT1002-exposed rat intestinal IEC6 cells revealed displacement of ZO-1 and occludin from intercellular boundaries. In coimmunoprecipitation assays, AT1002 decreased ZO-1-occludin and ZO-1-claudin 1 interactions coincident with PKCα-dependent ZO-1 serine/threonine phosphorylation. Further, AT1002 increased serine phosphorylation of myosin 1C and, at the same time, transiently diminished its association with ZO-1. The COOH-terminal domain of ZO-1 was required for its association with myosin 1C. These data indicate that the NH2-terminal portion of active Zot contains a PAR2-activating motif, FCIGRL, that increases PKCα-dependent ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation. These modifications provoke selective disengagement of ZO-1 from its binding partners, occludin, claudin 1, and myosin 1C, coincident with opening of tjs.—Goldblum, S. E., Rai, U., Tripathi, A., Thakar, M., De Leo, L., Di Toro, N., Not, T., Ramachandran, R., Puche, A. C., Hollenberg, M. D., Fasano, A. The active Zot domain (aa 288–293) increases ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation, alters interaction between ZO-1 and its binding partners, and induces tight junction disassembly through proteinase activated receptor 2 activation. PMID:20852064

  18. Effect of dietary isoleucine on the immunity, antioxidant status, tight junctions and microflora in the intestine of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Feng, Lin; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Weidan; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Yongan; Zhou, Xiaoqiu

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary isoleucine (Ile) on the immune response, antioxidant status, tight junctions, and microbial population in the intestine of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). A total of 1200 juvenile Jian carp with average initial weight 6.9 ± 0.03 g were fed semi-purified isonitrogenous diets containing 4.2 (unsupplemented control group), 7.0, 9.5, 11.9, 13.9 and 16.9 g Ile kg(-1) diet for 60 days. Results indicated that Ile supplementation decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl content, and the amounts of Escherichia coli and Aeromonas in the intestine (P < 0.05), and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione content and the amounts of Lactobacillus and Bacillus in the intestine (P < 0.05). Furthermore, real time polymerase chain reaction revealed that relative mRNA expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu-ZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), CAT, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) in the intestine were increased with increasing of dietary Ile up to a certain point (P < 0.05). Conversely, the relative mRNA expression of occludin, claudin-3, claudin-7, TNF-α, IL-10, Kelch-like-ECH- associated protein 1 (Keap1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) in the intestine showed a downward trend (P < 0.05). In conclusion, dietary Ile improves intestinal immune function, antioxidant capacity and microbial population, and regulates gene expression of antioxidant enzyme, tight junctions, Nrf2, Keap1, p38 and ERK1 in the intestine of Jian carp.

  19. Histidine Prevents Cu-Induced Oxidative Stress and the Associated Decreases in mRNA from Encoding Tight Junction Proteins in the Intestine of Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Wu, Pei; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a common heavy metal pollutant in aquatic environments that originates from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. The present study investigated whether Cu causes oxidative damage and induces changes in the expression of genes that encode tight junction (TJ) proteins, cytokines and antioxidant-related genes in the intestine of the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). We demonstrated that Cu decreases the survival rate of fish and increases oxidative damage as measured by increases in malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents. Cu exposure significantly decreased the expression of genes that encode the tight junction proteins, namely, claudin (CLDN)-c, -3 and -15 as well as occludin and zonula occludens-1, in the intestine of fish. In addition, Cu exposure increases the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, specifically, IL-8, TNF-α and its related signalling factor (nuclear factor kappa B, NF-κB), which was partly correlated to the decreased mRNA levels of NF-κB inhibitor protein (IκB). These changes were associated with Cu-induced oxidative stress detected by corresponding decreases in glutathione (GSH) content, as well as decreases in the copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and mRNA levels, which were associated with the down-regulated antioxidant signalling factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels, and the Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein1 (Keap1) mRNA levels in the intestine of fish. Histidine supplementation in diets (3.7 up to 12.2 g/kg) blocked Cu-induced changes. These results indicated that Cu-induced decreases in intestinal TJ proteins and cytokine mRNA levels might be partially mediated by oxidative stress and are prevented by histidine supplementation in fish diet. PMID:27280406

  20. Expression of claudins, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 in canine organs.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Changhwan; Shin, Da-Hye; Lee, Dongoh; Kang, Su-Myung; Seok, Ju-Hyung; Kang, Hee Young; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-10-01

    Tight junctions are the outermost structures of intercellular junctions and are classified as transmembrane proteins. These factors form selective permeability barriers between cells, act as paracellular transporters and regulate structural and functional polarity of cells. Although tight junctions have been previously studied, comparison of the transcriptional‑translational levels of these molecules in canine organs remains to be investigated. In the present study, organ‑specific expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 was examined in the canine duodenum, lung, liver and kidney. Results of immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the tight junctions were localized in intestinal villi and glands of the duodenum, bronchiolar epithelia and alveolar walls of the lung, endometrium and myometrium of the hepatocytes, and the distal tubules and glomeruli of the kidney. These results suggest that tight junctions are differently expressed in organs, and therefore may be involved in organ‑specific functions to maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:27600198

  1. Expression of claudins, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 in canine organs

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Changhwan; Shin, Da-Hye; Lee, Dongoh; Kang, Su-Myung; Seok, Ju-Hyung; Kang, Hee Young; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions are the outermost structures of intercellular junctions and are classified as transmembrane proteins. These factors form selective permeability barriers between cells, act as paracellular transporters and regulate structural and functional polarity of cells. Although tight junctions have been previously studied, comparison of the transcriptional-translational levels of these molecules in canine organs remains to be investigated. In the present study, organ-specific expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 was examined in the canine duodenum, lung, liver and kidney. Results of immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the tight junctions were localized in intestinal villi and glands of the duodenum, bronchiolar epithelia and alveolar walls of the lung, endometrium and myometrium of the hepatocytes, and the distal tubules and glomeruli of the kidney. These results suggest that tight junctions are differently expressed in organs, and therefore may be involved in organ-specific functions to maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:27600198

  2. Functionally Active Gap Junctions between Connexin 43-Positive Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gabashvili, A N; Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Levinskii, A B; Mel'nikov, P A; Cherepanov, S A; Chekhonin, V P

    2015-05-01

    The formation of functional gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and cells of low-grade rat glioma C6 cells was studied in in vitro experiments. Immunocytochemical analysis with antibodies to connexin 43 extracellular loop 2 showed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as C6 glioma cells express the main astroglial gap junction protein connexin 43. Analysis of migration activity showed that mesenchymal stem cells actively migrate towards C6 glioma cells. During co-culturing, mesenchymal stem cells and glioma C6 form functionally active gap junctions mediating the transport of cytoplasmic dye from glioma cells to mesenchymal stem cells in the opposite direction. Fluorometry showed that the intensity of transport of low-molecular substances through heterologous gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and glioma cells is similar to that through homologous gap junctions between glioma cells. This phenomenon can be used for the development of new methods of cell therapy of high-grade gliomas.

  3. The morphologic characteristics of intercellular junctions between normal human liver cells and cells from patients with extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Robenek, H.; Herwig, J.; Themann, H.

    1980-01-01

    In freeze-fracture replicas the bile canaliculi of normal human livers showed a lumen of rather constant size with parallel margins. The zonula occludens consists of a complex anastomosing network of intramembranous ridges on the P face and complementary grooves of the E face of the plasmalemma of liver parenchymal cells. The zonula occludens is usually composed of three to five ridges running parallel to the lumen of the bile canaliculus that are surrounded by a looser meshwork of variable orientation. All tight junctions observed in control replicas appeared as continuous barriers without any disruptions. Extrahepatic cholestasis produced considerable morphologic alterations in the canaliculi and tight junctions. The lumen of the canliculi enlarged, and the microvilli disappeared. Side branches, irregularities, and outpouchings of the canalicular membrane extending into the cytoplasm of the hepatocytes were frequently observed. The complexity of the branching pattern and the number of strands in the zonulae occludentes changed extensively. Junctional strands away from their usual pericanalicular location were present on the lateral surface of the plasma membrane. The altered zonulae occludents contain regions in which the strands had a fragmented appearance or were completely absent. These discontinuities in the junctional meshwork provide a direct pathway between the lumen of the bile canaliculus and the intercellular space. They strongly suggest a leakage of the canaliculosinusoidal barrier. Of further interest is the diffuse aggregation of the usually randomly distributed intramembranous particles of the P face of the plasmalemma. The aggregates consist of 10-50 individual particles. Concomitantly, the desmosomes appeared to be more numerous than normally. The number and structure of gap junctions remained unaffected. The results of this investigation are discussed in relation to those obtained after experimental bile duct ligation in rats. Images Figure 8

  4. Intracellular cytoskeleton and junction proteins of endothelial cells in the porcine iris microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Yu, Paula K; Cringle, Stephen J; Sun, Xinghuai; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Recently we reported studies of the iris microvasculature and its endothelial cells using intra-luminal micro-perfusion, fixation, and silver staining, suggesting that the iris vascular endothelium may be crucial for maintaining homeostasis in the ocular anterior segment. Here we present information regarding the intracellular structure and cell junctions of the iris endothelium. Thirty-seven porcine eyes were used for this study. The temporal long posterior ciliary artery was cannulated to assess the iris microvascular network and its endothelium using intra-luminal micro-perfusion, fixation, and staining with phalloidin for intracellular cytoskeleton f-actin, and with antibodies against claudin-5 and VE-cadherin for junction proteins. Nuclei were counterstained with Hoechst. The iris was flat-mounted for confocal imaging. The iris microvasculature was studied for its distribution, branch orders and endothelial morphometrics with endothelial cell length measured for each vessel order. Our results showed that morphometrics of the iris microvasculature was comparable with our previous silver staining. Abundant stress fibres and peripheral border staining were seen within the endothelial cells in larger arteries. An obvious decrease in cytoplasmic stress fibres was evident further downstream in the smaller arterioles, and they tended to be absent from capillaries and veins. Endothelial intercellular junctions throughout the iris vasculature were VE-cadherin and claudin-5 immuno-positive, indicating the presence of both adherent junctions and tight junctions between vascular endothelial cells throughout the iris microvasculature. Unevenness of claudin-5 staining was noted along the endothelial cell borders in almost every order of vessels, especially in veins and small arterioles. Our results suggest that significant heterogeneity of intracellular structure and junction proteins is present in different orders of the iris vasculature in addition to vascular diameter

  5. Tunnel junctions for InP-on-Si solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keavney, C.; Vernon, S.; Haven, V.

    1991-01-01

    Growing, by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, a tunnel junction is described, which makes possible and ohmic back contact in an n-on-p InP solar cell on a silicon substrate. The junction between heavily doped layers of p-type InGaAs and n-type InP shows resistance low enough not to affect the performance of these cells. InP solar cells made on n-type Si substrates with this structure were measured with an efficiency of 9.9 percent. Controls using p-type GaAs substrates showed no significant difference in cell performance, indicating that the resistance associated with the tunnel junction is less than about 0.1 ohm/sq cm.

  6. Development and fabrication of a solar cell junction processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A processing system capable of producing solar cell junctions by ion implantation followed by pulsed electron beam annealing was developed and constructed. The machine was to be capable of processing 4-inch diameter single-crystal wafers at a rate of 10(7) wafers per year. A microcomputer-controlled pulsed electron beam annealer with a vacuum interlocked wafer transport system was designed, built and demonstrated to produce solar cell junctions on 4-inch wafers with an AMI efficiency of 12%. Experiments showed that a non-mass-analyzed (NMA) ion beam could implant 10 keV phosphorous dopant to form solar cell junctions which were equivalent to mass-analyzed implants. A NMA ion implanter, compatible with the pulsed electron beam annealer and wafer transport system was designed in detail but was not built because of program termination.

  7. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Marr, Isabell; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability.

  8. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Mirja R.; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  9. Intestinal barrier analysis by assessment of mucins, tight junctions, and α-defensins in healthy C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice.

    PubMed

    Volynets, Valentina; Rings, Andreas; Bárdos, Gyöngyi; Ostaff, Maureen J; Wehkamp, Jan; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier is gaining increasing attention because it is related to intestinal homeostasis and disease. Different parameters have been used in the past to assess intestinal barrier functions in experimental studies; however most of them are poorly defined in healthy mice. Here, we compared a number of barrier markers in healthy mice, established normal values and correlations. In 48 mice (24 C57BL/6J, 24 BALB/cJ background), we measured mucus thickness, and expression of mucin-2, α-defensin-1 and -4, zonula occludens-1, occludin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, claudin-1, 2 and -5. We also analyzed claudin-3 and fatty acid binding protein-2 in urine and plasma, respectively. A higher expression of mucin-2 protein was found in the colon compared to the ileum. In contrast, the α-defensins-1 and -4 were expressed almost exclusively in the ileum. The protein expression of the tight junction molecules claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens-1 did not differ between colon and ileum, although some differences occurred at the mRNA level. No age- or gender-related differences were found. Differences between C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice were found for α-defensin-1 and -4 mRNA expression, and for urine and plasma marker concentrations. The α-defensin-1 mRNA correlated with claudin-5 mRNA, whereas α-defensin-4 mRNA correlated with claudin-3 concentrations in urine. In conclusion, we identified a number of murine intestinal barrier markers requiring tissue analyses or measurable in urine or plasma. We provide normal values for these markers in mice of different genetic background. Such data might be helpful for future animal studies in which the intestinal barrier is of interest. PMID:27583194

  10. VEGF and Angiopoietin-1 exert opposing effects on cell junctions by regulating the Rho GEF Syx

    PubMed Central

    Ngok, Siu P.; Geyer, Rory; Liu, Miaoliang; Kourtidis, Antonis; Agrawal, Sudesh; Wu, Chuanshen; Seerapu, Himabindu Reddy; Lewis-Tuffin, Laura J.; Moodie, Karen L.; Huveldt, Deborah; Marx, Ruth; Baraban, Jay M.; Storz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Ang1 (Angiopoietin-1) have opposing effects on vascular permeability, but the molecular basis of these effects is not fully known. We report in this paper that VEGF and Ang1 regulate endothelial cell (EC) junctions by determining the localization of the RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Syx. Syx was recruited to junctions by members of the Crumbs polarity complex and promoted junction integrity by activating Diaphanous. VEGF caused translocation of Syx from cell junctions, promoting junction disassembly, whereas Ang1 maintained Syx at the junctions, inducing junction stabilization. The VEGF-induced translocation of Syx from EC junctions was caused by PKD1 (protein kinase D1)-mediated phosphorylation of Syx at Ser806, which reduced Syx association to its junctional anchors. In support of the pivotal role of Syx in regulating EC junctions, syx−/− mice had defective junctions, resulting in vascular leakiness, edema, and impaired heart function. PMID:23253477

  11. Testicular cell junction: a novel target for male contraception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-01-01

    Even though various contraceptive methods are widely available, the number of unwanted pregnancies is still on the rise in developing countries, pressurizing the already resource limited nations. One of the major underlying reasons is the lack of effective, low cost, and safe contraceptives for couples. During the past decade, some studies were performed using animal models to decipher if the Sertoli-germ cell junction in the testis is a target for male fertility regulation. Some of these study models were based on the use of hormones and/or chemicals to disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis (e.g., androgen-based implants or pills) and others utilized a panel of chemical entities or synthetic peptides to perturb spermatogenesis either reversibly or non-reversibly. Among them, adjudin, a potential male contraceptive, is one of the compounds exerting its action on the unique adherens junctions, known as ectoplasmic specializations, in the testis. Since the testis is equipped with inter-connected cell junctions, an initial targeting of one junction type may affect the others and these accumulative effects could lead to spermatogenic arrest. This review attempts to cover an innovative theme on how male infertility can be achieved by inducing junction instability and defects in the testis, opening a new window of research for male contraceptive development. While it will still take much time and effort of intensive investigation before a product can reach the consumable market, these findings have provided hope for better family planning involving men.

  12. Low-high junction theory applied to solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Recent use of alloying techniques for rear contact formation has yielded a new kind of silicon solar cell, the back surface field (BSF) cell, with abnormally high open circuit voltage and improved radiation resistance. Several analytical models for open circuit voltage based on the reverse saturation current are formulated to explain these observations. The zero SRV case of the conventional cell model, the drift field model, and the low-high junction (LHJ) model can predict the experimental trends. The LHJ model applies the theory of the low-high junction and is considered to reflect a more realistic view of cell fabrication. This model can predict the experimental trends observed for BSF cells. Detailed descriptions and derivations for the models are included. The correspondences between them are discussed. This modeling suggests that the meaning of minority carrier diffusion length measured in BSF cells be reexamined.

  13. Curcumin protects against the intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury: involvement of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and TNF-α related mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuying; Guo, Ruixue; Kong, Yu; Wei, Xinliang; Wang, Weiwei; Shi, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Present study aimed to investigate the eff ect of curcumin-pretreatment on intestinal I/R injury and on intestinal mucosa barrier. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into: sham, I/R, and curcumin groups (n=10). Animals in curcumin group were pretreated with curcumin by gastric gavage (200 mg/kg) for 2 days before I/R. Small intestine tissues were prepared for Haematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) staining. Serum diamine oxidase (DAO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were measured. Expression of intestinal TNF-α and tight junction protein (ZO-1) proteins was detected by Western blot and/or immunohistochemistry. Serum DAO level and serum and intestinal TNF-α leves were signifi cantly increased after I/R, and the values were markedly reduced by curcumin pretreatment although still higher than that of sham group (p<0.05 or p<0.001). H&E staining showed the significant injury to intestinal mucosa following I/R, and curcumin pretreatment signifi cantly improved the histological structure of intestinal mucosa. I/R insult also induced significantly down-regulated expression of ZO-1, and the eff ect was dramatically attenuated by curcumin-pretreatment. Curcumin may protect the intestine from I/R injury through restoration of the epithelial structure, promotion of the recovery of intestinal permeability, as well as enhancement of ZO-1 protein expression, and this eff ect may be partly attributed to the TNF-α related pathway. PMID:26937210

  14. Activation of epidermal toll-like receptor 2 enhances tight junction function – Implications for atopic dermatitis and skin barrier repair

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, I-Hsin; Carpenter-Mendini, Amanda; Yoshida, Takeshi; McGirt, Laura Y.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Gallo, Richard L.; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Leung, Donald Y.; Georas, Steve N.; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal tight junction (TJ) defects and a propensity for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) skin infections. S. aureus is sensed by many pattern recognition receptors including toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. We hypothesized that an effective innate immune response will include skin barrier repair and that this response is impaired in AD subjects. S. aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PGN) and synthetic TLR2 agonists enhanced TJ barrier and increased expression of TJ proteins, CLDN1, CLDN23, occludin and ZO-1 in primary human keratinocytes. A TLR2 agonist enhanced skin barrier recovery in human epidermis wounded by tape-stripping. Tlr2−/− mice had a delayed and incomplete barrier recovery following tape-stripping. AD subjects had reduced epidermal TLR2 expression as compared to nonatopic (NA) subjects, which inversely correlated (r= 0.654, P= 0.0004) with transepidermal water loss (TEWL). These observations indicate that TLR2 activation enhances skin barrier in murine and human skin and is an important part of a wound repair response. Reduced epidermal TLR2 expression observed in AD patients may play a role in their incompetent skin barrier. PMID:23223142

  15. Surface-modified PLGA nanosphere with chitosan improved pulmonary delivery of calcitonin by mucoadhesion and opening of the intercellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Kuno, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Shohei; Takeuchi, Hirofumi; Kawashima, Yoshiaki

    2005-02-01

    Surface-modified DL-lactide/glycolide copolymer (PLGA) nanospheres with chitosan (CS) were prepared by the emulsion solvent diffusion method for pulmonary delivery of peptide, i.e., elcatonin. The nanosphere suspension was successfully aerosolized with a nebulizer similar to the drug solution, whereas the microsphere suspensions could not be aerosolized. After pulmonary administration, CS-modified PLGA nanospheres were more slowly eliminated from the lungs than unmodified PLGA nanospheres. CS-modified PLGA nanospheres loaded with elcatonin reduced blood calcium levels to 80% of the initial calcium concentration and prolonged the pharmacological action to 24 h, which was a significantly longer duration of action than that by CS-unmodified nanospheres. These results were attributed to the retention of nanospheres adhered to the bronchial mucus and lung tissue and sustained drug release at the adherence site. In addition, CS and CS on the surface of the nanospheres enhanced the absorption of drug. The rank order of the absorption of the model drugs with CS solution was carboxyfluorescein>FITC-dextran-4 (FD-4; Mw. 4000)>FD-21 (Mw. 21,000)>FD70 (Mw. 70,000), which corresponded to the molecular weights ([Mw.] given in parentheses). The absorption-enhancing effect may have been caused by opening the intercellular tight junctions.

  16. The effect of omega- 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on endothelial tight junction occludin expression in rat aorta during lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Krizak, Jakub; Frimmel, Karel; Bernatova, Iveta; Navarova, Jana; Sotnikova, Ruzena; Okruhlicova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Occludin is essential for proper assembly of tight junctions (TJs) which regulate paracellular endothelial permeability. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (Ω-3 PUFA) protect endothelial barrier function against injury. Materials and Methods: We examined anti-inflammatory effect of Ω-3 PUFA intake (30 mg/kg/day for 10 days) on expression and location of occludin in the aorta of adult Wistar rats after a single dose of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli, 1 mg/kg). The ultrastructure of TJs after LPS administration was also investigated. We measured plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and CD68 expression and determined the total activity of NO synthase (NOS) in the aortic tissue. Results: LPS induced a significant decrease of occludin expression accompanied by structural alterations of TJs. Levels of CRP, MDA, CD68 and NOS activity were elevated after LPS injection compared to controls indicating presence of moderate inflammation. Ω-3 PUFA supplementation did not affect occludin expression in treated inflammatory group. However they reduced CRP and MDA concentration and CD68 expression, but conversely, they increased NOS activity compared to inflammatory group. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a single dose of LPS could have a long-term impact on occludin expression and thus contribute to endothelial barrier dysfunction. 10-day administration of Ω-3 PUFA had partial anti-inflammatory effects on health of rats without any effect on occludin expression. PMID:27114799

  17. Prostaglandin E2 Produced by Entamoeba histolytica Signals via EP4 Receptor and Alters Claudin-4 to Increase Ion Permeability of Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lejeune, Manigandan; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amebic dysentery characterized by severe watery diarrhea. Unfortunately, the parasitic factors involved in the pathogenesis of diarrhea are poorly defined. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a host lipid mediator associated with diarrheal diseases. Intriguingly, E. histolytica produces and secretes this inflammatory molecule. We investigated the mechanism whereby ameba-derived PGE2 induces the onset of diarrhea by altering ion permeability of paracellular tight junctions (TJs) in colonic epithelia. PGE2 decreased barrier integrity of TJs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as measured by transepithelial resistance. PGE2 signals were selectively transduced via the EP4 receptor. Furthermore, PGE2 signaling decreased TJ integrity, as revealed by EP receptor-specific agonist and antagonist studies. Loss of mucosal barrier integrity corresponded with increased ion permeability across TJs. Subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy studies highlighted a significant spatial alteration of an important TJ protein, claudin-4, that corresponded with increased sodium ion permeability through TJs toward the lumen. Moreover, PGE2-induced luminal chloride secretion was a prerequisite for alterations at TJs. Thus, the gradient of NaCl created across epithelia could serve as a trigger for osmotic water flow that leads to diarrhea. Our results highlight a pathological role for E. histolytica-derived PGE2 in the onset of diarrhea. PMID:21683675

  18. Exogenous GDF9 but not Activin A, BMP15 or TGFβ alters tight junction protein transcript abundance in zebrafish ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Clelland, Eric S; Kelly, Scott P

    2011-04-01

    The tight junction (TJ) complex plays an important role in regulating paracellular permeability and provides mechanical stability in vertebrate epithelia and endothelia. In zebrafish ovarian follicles, TJ complexes in the follicular envelope degenerate as the follicles develop towards maturation. In the current study, transcript abundance of claudins (cldn d, g, h, 1, and 12) and occludins (ocln, and ocln b) were assessed in mid-vitellogenic follicles in response to treatment with exogenous growth factors that are reported to be involved in zebrafish follicle development (i.e. Activin A, BMP15, GDF9 and TGFβ). Exogenous GDF9 reduced the transcript abundance of cldn g, ocln and ocln b in mid-vitellogenic follicles, whereas Activin A, BMP15, and TGFβ had no effect. Subsequent studies with GDF9 revealed that this factor did not alter TJ protein transcript abundance in pre-vitellogenic follicles but did increase the abundance of ocln b in fully grown (maturing) follicles. GDF9 was also seen to increase the abundance of StAR mRNA in all but primary stage follicles. These data suggest a role for GDF9 in the regulation of TJ integrity in zebrafish ovarian follicles, perhaps in the facilitation of ovulation, and support a previously postulated role for GDF9 in zebrafish ovarian follicle development. In addition, data also support the idea that endocrine factors play an important role in the regulation of TJ proteins during ovarian follicle development.

  19. Papain Degrades Tight Junction Proteins of Human Keratinocytes In Vitro and Sensitizes C57BL/6 Mice via the Skin Independent of its Enzymatic Activity or TLR4 Activation.

    PubMed

    Stremnitzer, Caroline; Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Willensdorfer, Anna; Starkl, Philipp; Pieper, Mario; König, Peter; Mildner, Michael; Tschachler, Erwin; Reichart, Ursula; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2015-07-01

    Papain is commonly used in food, pharmaceutical, textile, and cosmetic industries and is known to induce occupational allergic asthma. We have previously shown that the papain-like cysteine protease Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 1 from house dust mite exhibits percutaneous sensitization potential. We aimed here to investigate the potential of papain itself in epicutaneous sensitization. The effects of papain on tight junction (TJ) proteins were tested in vitro in human primary keratinocytes. Using C57BL/6 wild-type and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficient mice, we analyzed the sensitization potential of papain, its effects on the skin barrier, and immune cell recruitment. Our results show that papain affects the skin barrier by increasing transepidermal water loss, degrading TJ proteins and inducing vasodilation. When topically applied, papain exhibited a high epicutaneous inflammatory potential by recruiting neutrophils, mast cells, and CD3-positive cells and by induction of a TH2-biased antibody response. However, its high potency for specific sensitization via the skin was TLR4 independent and, in spite of its capacity to degrade epidermal TJ proteins, does not rely on its enzymatic function. From our data, we conclude that papain has all features to act as a strong allergen via the skin.

  20. Papain Degrades Tight Junction Proteins of Human Keratinocytes In Vitro and Sensitizes C57BL/6 Mice via the Skin Independent of its Enzymatic Activity or TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Willensdorfer, Anna; Starkl, Philipp; Pieper, Mario; König, Peter; Mildner, Michael; Tschachler, Erwin; Reichart, Ursula; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Papain is commonly used in food, pharmaceutical, textile, and cosmetic industries and is known to induce occupational allergic asthma. We have previously shown that the papain-like cysteine protease Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 1 from house dust mite exhibits percutaneous sensitization potential. We aimed here to investigate the potential of papain itself in epicutaneous sensitization. The effects of papain on tight junction (TJ) proteins were tested in vitro in human primary keratinocytes. Using C57BL/6 wild-type and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficient mice, we analyzed the sensitization potential of papain, its effects on the skin barrier, and immune cell recruitment. Our results show that papain affects the skin barrier by increasing transepidermal water loss, degrading TJ proteins and inducing vasodilation. When topically applied, papain exhibited a high epicutaneous inflammatory potential by recruiting neutrophils, mast cells, and CD3-positive cells and by induction of a TH2-biased antibody response. However, its high potency for specific sensitization via the skin was TLR4 independent and, in spite of its capacity to degrade epidermal TJ proteins, does not rely on its enzymatic function. From our data, we conclude that papain has all features to act as a strong allergen via the skin. PMID:25705851

  1. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D.; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K. C.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction. PMID:27436542

  2. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D.; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K. C.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction.

  3. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction. PMID:27436542

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase 9-induced increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction permeability contributes to the severity of experimental DSS colitis.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Prashant; Al-Sadi, Rana; Rawat, Manmeet; Guo, Shuhong; Watterson, D Martin; Ma, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic role for matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP-9) in inflammatory bowel disease. Although loss of epithelial barrier function has been shown to be a key pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function and intestinal inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and MMP-9(-/-) mice were subjected to experimental dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis by administration of 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. The mouse colonic permeability was measured in vivo by recycling perfusion of the entire colon using fluorescently labeled dextran. The DSS-induced increase in the colonic permeability was accompanied by an increase in intestinal epithelial cell MMP-9 expression in WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in intestinal permeability and the severity of DSS colitis was found to be attenuated in MMP-9(-/-) mice. The colonic protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and phospho-MLC was found to be significantly increased after DSS administration in WT mice but not in MMP-9(-/-) mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic permeability and colonic inflammation was attenuated in MLCK(-/-) mice and MLCK inhibitor ML-7-treated WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic surface epithelial cell MLCK mRNA was abolished in MMP-9(-/-) mice. Lastly, increased MMP-9 protein expression was detected within the colonic surface epithelial cells in ulcerative colitis cases. These data suggest a role of MMP-9 in modulation of colonic epithelial permeability and inflammation via MLCK.

  5. Efficient tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Furlan, Alice; Hendriks, Koen H; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2013-04-17

    We demonstrate tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 8.9% and 9.6% that use a newly designed, high molecular weight, small band gap semiconducting polymer and a matching wide band gap polymer.

  6. Design considerations for the Tandem Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzen, W. T.; Carbajal, B. G.; Hardy, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Structure and operation of the tandem junction cell (TJC) are described. The impact of using only back contacts is discussed. A model is presented which explains operation of the TJC in terms of transistor action. The model is applied to predict TJC performance as a function of physical parameters.

  7. Efficient tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Furlan, Alice; Hendriks, Koen H; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2013-04-17

    We demonstrate tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 8.9% and 9.6% that use a newly designed, high molecular weight, small band gap semiconducting polymer and a matching wide band gap polymer. PMID:23544881

  8. Low-high junction theory applied to solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Recent use of alloying techniques for rear contact formation has yielded a new kind of silicon solar cell, the back surface field (BSF) cell, with abnormally high open-circuit voltage and improved radiation resistance. Several analytical models for open-circuit voltage based on the reverse saturation current are formulated to explain these observations. The zero surface recombination velocity (SRV) case of the conventional cell model, the drift field model, and the low-high junction (LHJ) model can predict the experimental trends. The LHJ model applies the theory of the low-high junction and is considered to reflect a more realistic view of cell fabrication. This model can predict the experimental trends observed for BSF cells.

  9. Tandem junction amorphous semiconductor photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, V.L.

    1983-06-07

    A photovoltaic stack comprising at least two p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells in optical series, said cells separated by a transparent ohmic contact layer(s), provides a long optical path for the absorption of photons while preserving the advantageous field-enhanced minority carrier collection arrangement characteristic of p[sup +]i n[sup +] cells. 3 figs.

  10. Tandem junction amorphous semiconductor photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1983-01-01

    A photovoltaic stack comprising at least two p.sup.+ i n.sup.+ cells in optical series, said cells separated by a transparent ohmic contact layer(s), provides a long optical path for the absorption of photons while preserving the advantageous field-enhanced minority carrier collection arrangement characteristic of p.sup.+ i n.sup.+ cells.

  11. Research on gallium arsenide diffused junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrego, J. M.; Ghandi, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using bulk GaAs for the fabrication of diffused junction solar cells was determined. The effects of thermal processing of GaAs was studied, and the quality of starting bulk GaAs for this purpose was assessed. These cells are to be made by open tube diffusion techniques, and are to be tested for photovoltaic response under AMO conditions.

  12. A device model for the tandem junction solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzen, W. T.; Chiang, S. Y.; Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    A conceptual device model has been developed to explain operation of the tandem junction cell (TJC) when back contacts only are used. Operation and parameters of the cell are explained by transistor action. Experimental observations are presented which confirm that current is collected for carrier generation in the front uncontacted n(plus) region. The model should be useful as a guideline to optimize the TJC by application of transistor design principles.

  13. Intestinal immune function, antioxidant status and tight junction proteins mRNA expression in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) fed riboflavin deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of riboflavin on intestinal immunity, tight junctions and antioxidant status of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Fish were fed diets containing graded levels of riboflavin (0.63-10.04 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. The study indicated that riboflavin deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and contents of complement component 3 and reduced glutathione in the intestine of fish (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, riboflavin deficiency increased reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents and catalase activity (P < 0.05) in the intestine of fish. Furthermore, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to investigate mRNA expression patterns and found that the mRNA levels of interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1, Occludin, zonula occludens 1, Claudin-b and Claudin-c, inhibitor protein κBα, target of rapamycin, ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 and NF-E2-related factor 2, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were decreased (P < 0.05) in the intestine of fish fed riboflavin-deficient diet. Conversely, the mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 8, nuclear factor kappa B p65, Ikappa B kinase β, Ikappa B kinase γ, Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1b, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, myosin light chain kinase and Claudin-12 were increased (P < 0.05) in the intestine of fish fed riboflavin-deficient diet. In conclusion, riboflavin deficiency decreased immunity and structural integrity of fish intestine. The optimum riboflavin level for intestinal acid phosphatase activity of young grass carp was estimated to be 6.65 mg/kg diet.

  14. Exposure to vehicle emissions results in altered blood brain barrier permeability and expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tight junction proteins in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traffic-generated air pollution-exposure is associated with adverse effects in the central nervous system (CNS) in both human exposures and animal models, including neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. While alterations in the blood brain barrier (BBB) have been implicated as a potential mechanism of air pollution-induced CNS pathologies, pathways involved have not been elucidated. Objectives To determine whether inhalation exposure to mixed vehicle exhaust (MVE) mediates alterations in BBB permeability, activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and −9, and altered tight junction (TJ) protein expression. Methods Apolipoprotein (Apo) E−/− and C57Bl6 mice were exposed to either MVE (100 μg/m3 PM) or filtered air (FA) for 6 hr/day for 30 days and resulting BBB permeability, expression of ROS, TJ proteins, markers of neuroinflammation, and MMP activity were assessed. Serum from study mice was applied to an in vitro BBB co-culture model and resulting alterations in transport and permeability were quantified. Results MVE-exposed Apo E−/− mice showed increased BBB permeability, elevated ROS and increased MMP-2 and −9 activity, compared to FA controls. Additionally, cerebral vessels from MVE-exposed mice expressed decreased levels of TJ proteins, occludin and claudin-5, and increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin (IL)-1β in the parenchyma. Serum from MVE-exposed animals also resulted in increased in vitro BBB permeability and altered P-glycoprotein transport activity. Conclusions These data indicate that inhalation exposure to traffic-generated air pollutants promotes increased MMP activity and degradation of TJ proteins in the cerebral vasculature, resulting in altered BBB permeability and expression of neuroinflammatory markers. PMID:24344990

  15. Sputtered Metal Oxide Broken Gap Junctions for Tandem Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Forrest

    Broken gap metal oxide junctions have been created for the first time by sputtering using ZnSnO3 for the n-type material and Cu 2O or CuAlO2 for the p-type material. Films were sputtered from either ceramic or metallic targets at room temperature from 10nm to 220nm thick. The band structure of the respective materials have theoretical work functions which line up with the band structure for tandem CIAGS/CIGS solar cell applications. Multiple characterization methods demonstrated consistent ohmic I-V profiles for devices on rough surfaces such as ITO/glass and a CIAGS cell. Devices with total junction specific contact resistance of under 0.001 Ohm-cm2 have been achieved with optical transmission close to 100% using 10nm films. Devices showed excellent stability up to 600°C anneals over 1hr using ZnSnO3 and CuAlO2. These films were also amorphous -a great diffusion barrier during top cell growth at high temperatures. Rapid Thermal Anneal (RTA) demonstrated the ability to shift the band structure of the whole device, allowing for tuning it to align with adjacent solar layers. These results remove a key barrier for mass production of multi-junction thin film solar cells.

  16. CHLORAL HYDRATE DECREASES GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN RAT LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloral hydrate decreases gap junction communication in rat liver epithelial cells

    Gap junction communication (GJC) is involved in controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Connexins (Cx) that make up these junctions are composed of a closely related group of m...

  17. Towards understanding junction degradation in cadmium telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nardone, Marco

    2014-06-21

    A degradation mechanism in cadmium telluride (CdTe/CdS) solar cells is investigated using time-dependent numerical modeling to simulate various temperature, bias, and illumination stress conditions. The physical mechanism is based on defect generation rates that are proportional to nonequilibrium charge carrier concentrations. It is found that a commonly observed degradation mode for CdTe/CdS solar cells can be reproduced only if defects are allowed to form in a narrow region of the absorber layer close to the CdTe/CdS junction. A key aspect of this junction degradation is that both mid-gap donor and shallow acceptor-type defects must be generated simultaneously in response to photo-excitation or applied bias. The numerical approach employed here can be extended to study other mechanisms for any photovoltaic technology.

  18. Junction Transport in Epitaxial Film Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D. L.; Li, J. V.; Teplin, C. W.; Stradins, P.; Branz, H. M.

    2011-07-01

    We report our progress toward low-temperature HWCVD epitaxial film silicon solar cells on inexpensive seed layers, with a focus on the junction transport physics exhibited by our devices. Heterojunctions of i/p hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si) on our n-type epitaxial crystal Si on n++ Si wafers show space-charge-region recombination, tunneling or diffusive transport depending on both epitaxial Si quality and the applied forward voltage.

  19. Development and fabrication of a solar cell junction processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, S.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell junction processing system was developed and fabricated. A pulsed electron beam for the four inch wafers is being assembled and tested, wafers were successfully pulsed, and solar cells fabricated. Assembly of the transport locks is completed. The transport was operated successfully but not with sufficient reproducibility. An experiment test facility to examine potential scaleup problems associated with the proposed ion implanter design was constructed and operated. Cells were implanted and found to have efficiency identical to the normal Spire implant process.

  20. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-08-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  1. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  2. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-08-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins.

  3. Intercellular junctions between palisade nerve endings and outer root sheath cells of rat vellus hairs.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, T; Inoué, T

    2000-05-15

    Hair follicles have a longitudinal set of sensory nerve endings called palisade nerve endings (PN). We examined the junctional structures between the PN and outer root sheath (ORS) cells of hair follicles in the rat external ear. Transmission electron microscopy of serial thin sections showed that the processes of the ORS cells penetrated the basal lamina of the hair follicle, forming intercellular junctions with the PN (PN-ORS junctions). Two types of junctions were found: junctions between nerve endings and ORS cells (N-ORS junctions) and those between Schwann cell processes and ORS cells (S-ORS junctions). The N-ORS junctions had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was attached to the nerve ending (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the nerve ending (type II). The S-ORS junctions also had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was abutted on the Schwann cell process (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the Schwann cell process (type II). Vesicles, coated pits, coated vesicles, and endosomes were sometimes seen in nerve endings, Schwann cells, and ORS cells near the junctions. Computer-aided reconstruction of the serial thin sections displayed the three-dimensional structure of these junctions. These results suggested that the PN-ORS junctions provided direct relationships between the PN and ORS in at least four different patterns. The discovery of these junctions shows the PN-ORS relationship to be closer than previously realized. We speculate that these junctions may have roles in attachment of the PN to the ORS, contributing to increases in the sensitivity of the PN, and in chemical signaling between the PN and ORS.

  4. Morphologic examination of mesenchymal cells in healing wounds of normal and tight skin mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hembry, R. M.; Bernanke, D. H.; Hayashi, K.; Trelstad, R. L.; Ehrlich, H. P.

    1986-01-01

    The healing process of an open wound as effected by wound contraction is complete by 3 weeks in the normal mouse. In contrast, its onset is delayed by 3 weeks and complete healing requires 6 weeks in the tight skin mouse (TSM), a mutant mouse strain with the autosomal dominant gene for tight skin. Possible mechanisms for this delay were evaluated. The frequency and distribution of myofibroblasts were studied during the 3-week delay in wound contraction by actin staining and electron microscopy. It was determined, by electron microscopy and phalloidin staining, that myofibroblasts were found in high density in noncontracting TSM wounds. Electron microscopy showed, however, that these myofibroblasts were surrounded by a pericellular matrix that separated their surface from adjacent collagen fibers. No pericellular matrix was found around cells in granulation tissue of normal mice. At 3 weeks, as TSM wounds began to contract, the number and intensity of cells stained by phalloidin in this tissue was less than that seen earlier. The pericellular matrix was fragmented at this time, and cell surface and collagen fiber associations were apparent. Finally, at 5 weeks, when wound contraction was well developed in the TSM, only a small area in the center of the healing wound beneath the epidermis contained phalloidin-positive myofibroblasts. Electron-microscopic examination of the residual granulation tissue at this time revealed the complete absence of the pericellular matrix. It is postulated that during the 3-week delay in wound closure, the presence of a localized pericellular matrix prevents the interaction between cells and collagen fibers necessary for the reorganization of collagen. It is also thought that the tightly adherent uninjured skin surrounding the healing wound may cause delayed wound closure. There was no evidence that the absence of myofibroblasts is responsible for delayed wound contraction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID

  5. Cell membrane and cell junctions in differentiation of preimplanted mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, L; Fernández, S; López, T

    1976-12-01

    Cell membrane and cell junctions in differentiation of preimplanted mouse embryos, (membrana celular y uniones celulares en la diferenciación del embrión de ratón antes de la implantación). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 130-134, 1976. The development of cell junctions that seal the peripheral blastomeres could be a decisive step in the differentiation of morulae into blastocysts. The appearance of these junctions is studied by electron microscopy of late morulae and initial blastocysts. Zonulae occludentes as well as impermeability to lanthanum emulsion precedes the appearance of the blastocel and hence might be considered as one of its necessary causes.

  6. High efficiency triple-junction amorphous solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, T.; Terazono, S.; Sasaki, H.; Kawabata, K.; Itagaki, T.

    A fabrication technique for high-efficiency triple-junction a-SiGe:H and a-Si:H pin solar cells is described. The interfacial characteristics of the a-SiGe:H pin cell, which is used for the bottom cell, have been improved by inserting graded bandgap layers at both p/i and n/i interfaces. The photoconductivity of the a-SiGe:H film, prepared by diluting the silane and germane discharge with a large amount of H2 gas, has also been improved. For the a-Si:H pin cell, Vocs as high as 0.99 V have been achieved by optimizing deposition conditions for the microc-Si:H p-layer and a-Si:H i-layer. Thickness of each layer in the triple-junction cell has been adjusted to get maximum output current. A cell with conversion efficiency of 10.6 percent has been obtained for a cell size of 100 sq cm.

  7. Corticomedullary difference in the effects of dietary Ca²⁺ on tight junction properties in thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop.

    PubMed

    Plain, Allein; Wulfmeyer, Vera C; Milatz, Susanne; Klietz, Adrian; Hou, Jianghui; Bleich, Markus; Himmerkus, Nina

    2016-02-01

    The thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL) drives an important part of the reabsorption of divalent cations. This reabsorption occurs via the paracellular pathway formed by the tight junction (TJ), which in the TAL shows cation selectivity. Claudins, a family of TJ proteins, determine the permeability and selectivity of this pathway. Mice were fed with normal or high-Ca(2+) diet, and effects on the reabsorptive properties of cortical and medullary TAL segments were analysed by tubule microdissection and microperfusion. Claudin expression was investigated by immunostaining and quantitative PCR. We show that the TAL adapted to high Ca(2+) load in a sub-segment-specific manner. In medullary TAL, transcellular NaCl transport was attenuated. The transepithelial voltage decreased from 10.9 ± 0.6 mV at control diet to 8.3 ± 0.5 mV at high Ca(2+) load, thereby reducing the driving force for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) uptake. Cortical TAL showed a reduction in paracellular Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) permeabilities from 8.2 ± 0.7 to 6.2 ± 0.5 ∙ 10(-4) cm/s and from 4.8 ± 0.5 to 3.0 ± 0.2 · 10(-4) cm/s at control and high-Ca(2+) diet, respectively. Expression, localisation and regulation of claudins 10, 14, 16 and 19 differed along the corticomedullary axis: Towards the cortex, the main site of divalent cation reabsorption in TAL, high-Ca(2+) intake led to a strong upregulation of claudin-14 within TAL TJs while claudin-16 and -19 were unaltered. Towards the inner medulla, only claudin-10 was present in TAL TJ strands. In summary, high-Ca(2+) diet induced a reduction of divalent cation reabsorption via a diminution of NaCl transport and driving force in mTAL and via decreased paracellular permeabilities in cTAL. We reveal an important regulatory pattern along the corticomedullary axis and improve the understanding how the kidney disposes of detrimental excess Ca(2+).

  8. Junctional communication is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using an in vitro model in which a confluent monolayer of capillary endothelial cells is mechanically wounded, gap junction-mediated intercellular communication has been studied by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow. Approximately 40-50% of the cells in a nonwounded confluent monolayer were coupled in groups of four to five cells (basal level). Basal levels of communication were also observed in sparse and preconfluent cultures, but were reduced in postconfluent monolayers. 30 min after wounding, coupling was markedly reduced between cells lining the wound. Communication at the wound was partially reestablished by 2 h, exceeded basal levels after 6 h and reached a maximum after 24 h, at which stage approximately 90% of the cells were coupled in groups of six to seven cells. When the wound had closed (after 8 d), the increase in communication was no longer observed. Induction of wound-associated communication was unaffected by exposure of the cells to the DNA synthesis inhibitor mitomycin C, but was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. The induction of wound-associated communication was also inhibited when migration was prevented by placing the cells immediately after wounding at 22 degrees C or after exposure to cytochalasin D, suggesting that the increase in communication is dependent on cells migrating into the wound area. In contrast, migration was not prevented when coupling was blocked by exposure of the cells to retinoic acid, although this agent did disrupt the characteristic sheet-like pattern of migration typically seen during endothelial repair. These results suggest that junctional communication may play an important role in wound repair, possibly by coordinating capillary endothelial cell migration. PMID:2592412

  9. MgcRacGAP restricts active RhoA at the cytokinetic furrow and both RhoA and Rac1 at cell–cell junctions in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Breznau, Elaina B.; Semack, Ansley C.; Higashi, Tomohito; Miller, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    Localized activation of Rho GTPases is essential for multiple cellular functions, including cytokinesis and formation and maintenance of cell–cell junctions. Although MgcRacGAP (Mgc) is required for spatially confined RhoA-GTP at the equatorial cortex of dividing cells, both the target specificity of Mgc's GAP activity and the involvement of phosphorylation of Mgc at Ser-386 are controversial. In addition, Mgc's function at cell–cell junctions remains unclear. Here, using gastrula-stage Xenopus laevis embryos as a model system, we examine Mgc's role in regulating localized RhoA-GTP and Rac1-GTP in the intact vertebrate epithelium. We show that Mgc's GAP activity spatially restricts accumulation of both RhoA-GTP and Rac1-GTP in epithelial cells—RhoA at the cleavage furrow and RhoA and Rac1 at cell–cell junctions. Phosphorylation at Ser-386 does not switch the specificity of Mgc's GAP activity and is not required for successful cytokinesis. Furthermore, Mgc regulates adherens junction but not tight junction structure, and the ability to regulate adherens junctions is dependent on GAP activity and signaling via the RhoA pathway. Together these results indicate that Mgc's GAP activity down-regulates the active populations of RhoA and Rac1 at localized regions of epithelial cells and is necessary for successful cytokinesis and cell–cell junction structure. PMID:25947135

  10. Theoretical performance of multi-junction solar cells combining III-V and Si materials.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Ian; O'Mahony, Donagh; Corbett, Brian; Morrison, Alan P

    2012-09-10

    A route to improving the overall efficiency of multi-junction solar cells employing conventional III-V and Si photovoltaic junctions is presented here. A simulation model was developed to consider the performance of several multi-junction solar cell structures in various multi-terminal configurations. For series connected, 2-terminal triple-junction solar cells, incorporating an AlGaAs top junction, a GaAs middle junction and either a Si or InGaAs bottom junction, it was found that the configuration with a Si bottom junction yielded a marginally higher one sun efficiency of 41.5% versus 41.3% for an InGaAs bottom junction. A significant efficiency gain of 1.8% over the two-terminal device can be achieved by providing an additional terminal to the Si bottom junction in a 3-junction mechanically stacked configuration. It is shown that the optimum performance can be achieved by employing a four-junction series-connected mechanically stacked device incorporating a Si subcell between top AlGaAs/GaAs and bottom In0.53Ga0.47As cells.

  11. Mechanically Stacked Four-Junction Concentrator Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; King, Richard R.; Chiu, Philip T.; France, Ryan M.; Duda, Anna; Olavarria, Waldo J.; Young, Michelle; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-06-14

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Because the component cells are each grown lattice-matched to suitable substrates, this technique allows alloys of different lattice constants to be combined without the structural defects introduced when using metamorphic buffers. Here we present results on the fabrication and performance of four-junction mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems, grown on GaAs and InP substrates, respectively. The two tandems were bonded together with a low-index, transparent epoxy that acts as an omni-directional reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the sub-bandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and thus higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without enhanced internal optics; all four subcells exhibit excellent material quality. The device was fabricated with four contact terminals so that each tandem can be operated at its maximum power point, which raises the cumulative efficiency and decreases spectral sensitivity. Efficiencies exceeding 38% at one-sun have been demonstrated. Eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for the concentrator cells. We will discuss the performance of one-sun and concentrator versions of the device, and compare the results to recently fabricated monolithic four-junction cells.

  12. Self-Organizing Actomyosin Patterns on the Cell Cortex at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K.; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  13. Self-organizing actomyosin patterns on the cell cortex at epithelial cell-cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S; Gomez, Guillermo A; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  14. Development of thin wraparound junction silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art technologies was applied to fabricate 50 micro thick 2x4 cm, coplanar back contact (CBC) solar cells with AMO efficiency above 12%. A requirement was that the cells have low solar absorptance. A wraparound junction (WAJ) with wraparound metallization was chosen. This WAJ approach avoided the need for very complex fixturing, especially during rotation of the cells for providing adequate contacts over dielectric edge layers. The contact adhesion to silicon was considered better than to an insulator. It is indicated that shunt resistance caused by poor WAJ diode quality, and series resistance from the WAJ contact, give good cell performance. The cells developed reached 14 percent AMO efficiency (at 25 C), with solar absorptance values of 0.73. Space/cell environmental tests were performed on these cells and the thin CSC cells performed well. The optimized design configuration and process sequence were used to make 50 deliverable CBC cells. These cells were all above 12 percent efficiency and had an average efficiency of -13 percent. Results of environmental tests (humidity-temperature, thermal shock, and contact adherence) are also given.

  15. AlGaAs/InGaAlP tunnel junctions for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    SHARPS,P.R.; LI,N.Y.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Optimization of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs dual and GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge triple junction cells, and development of future generation monolithic multi-junction cells will involve the development of suitable high bandgap tunnel junctions. There are three criteria that a tunnel junction must meet. First, the resistance of the junction must be kept low enough so that the series resistance of the overall device is not increased. For AMO, 1 sun operation, the tunnel junction resistance should be below 5 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}-cm. Secondly, the peak current density for the tunnel junction must also be larger than the J{sub sc} of the cell so that the tunnel junction I-V curve does not have a deleterious effect on the I-V curve of the multi-junction device. Finally, the tunnel junction must be optically transparent, i.e., there must be a minimum of optical absorption of photons that will be collected by the underlying subcells. The paper reports the investigation of four high bandgap tunnel junctions grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  16. Aberrant distribution of junctional complex components in retinoic acid receptor alpha-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sanny S W; Choi, Cindy; Wang, Xiangyuan; Hallock, Loretta; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2009-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα)-deficient mice are sterile, with abnormalities in the progression of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether defective retinoid signaling involved at least in part, disrupted cell-cell interactions. Hypertonic fixation approaches revealed defects in the integrity of the Sertoli-cell barrier in the tubules of RARα-deficient testes. Dye transfer experiments further revealed that coupling between cells from the basal to adluminal compartments was aberrant. There were also differences in the expression of several known retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes encoding structural components of tight junctions and gap junctions. Immunostaining demonstrated a delay in the incorporation of zonula occludens (ZO-1), a peripheral component protein of tight junctions, into the Sertoli cell tight junctions. Markedly reduced expression of connexin-40 in mutant pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids was found by in situ hybridization. An ectopic distribution of vimentin and disrupted cyclic expression of vimentin, which is usually tightly regulated during spermiogenesis, was found in RARα-deficient testes at all ages examined. Thus, the specific defects in spermiogenesis in RARα-deficient testes may correlate with a disrupted cyclic expression of RA-responsive structural components, including vimentin, a down-regulation of connexin-40 in spermatogenic cells, and delayed assembly of ZO-1 into Sertoli cell tight junctions. Interestingly, bioinformatic analysis revealed that many genes that are components of tight junctions and gap junctions contained potential retinoic acid response element binding sites. PMID:19937743

  17. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C. . E-mail: jsaez@bio.puc.cl

    2006-06-15

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels.

  18. Lens ion homeostasis relies on the assembly and/or stability of large connexin 46 gap junction plaques on the broad sides of differentiating fiber cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Catherine; Nowak, Roberta B.; Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Biswas, Sondip K.; Lo, Woo-Kuen; Mathias, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens consists of layers of tightly packed fiber cells, forming a transparent and avascular organ that is important for focusing light onto the retina. A microcirculation system, facilitated by a network of gap junction channels composed of connexins 46 and 50 (Cx46 and Cx50), is hypothesized to maintain and nourish lens fiber cells. We measured lens impedance in mice lacking tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1, an actin pointed-end capping protein), CP49 (a lens-specific intermediate filament protein), or both Tmod1 and CP49. We were surprised to find that simultaneous loss of Tmod1 and CP49, which disrupts cytoskeletal networks in lens fiber cells, results in increased gap junction coupling resistance, hydrostatic pressure, and sodium concentration. Protein levels of Cx46 and Cx50 in Tmod1−/−;CP49−/− double-knockout (DKO) lenses were unchanged, and electron microscopy revealed normal gap junctions. However, immunostaining and quantitative analysis of three-dimensional confocal images showed that Cx46 gap junction plaques are smaller and more dispersed in DKO differentiating fiber cells. The localization and sizes of Cx50 gap junction plaques in DKO fibers were unaffected, suggesting that Cx46 and Cx50 form homomeric channels. We also demonstrate that gap junction plaques rest in lacunae of the membrane-associated actin-spectrin network, suggesting that disruption of the actin-spectrin network in DKO fibers may interfere with gap junction plaque accretion into micrometer-sized domains or alter the stability of large plaques. This is the first work to reveal that normal gap junction plaque localization and size are associated with normal lens coupling conductance. PMID:25740157

  19. Tight regulation of diacylglycerol-mediated signaling is critical for proper invariant NKT cell development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shudan; Wu, Jinhong; Srivatsan, Sruti; Gorentla, Balachandra; Shin, Jinwook; Xu, Li; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Type I natural killer T (NKT) cells, or iNKT cells, express a semi-invariant T cell receptor characterized by its unique V α 14-Jα 18 usage (iV α 14TCR). Upon interaction with glycolipid/CD1d complexes, the iV α 14TCRs transduce signals that are essential for iNKT selection and maturation. However, it remains unclear how these signals are regulated and how important such regulations are during iNKT development. Diacylglycerol (DAG) is an essential second messenger downstream of the TCR that activates the PKCθ-IKKα/β-NFκB pathway, known to be crucial for iNKT development, as well as the RasGRP1-Ras-Erk1/2 pathway in T cells. DAG kinases (DGKs) play an important role in controlling intracellular DAG concentration and thereby negatively regulate DAG signaling. Here we report that simultaneous absence of DAG kinase α and ζ causes severe defects in iNKT development, coincident with enhanced IKK-NFκB and Ras-Erk1/2 activation. Moreover, constitutive IKKβ and Ras activities also result in iNKT developmental defects. Thus, DAG-mediated signaling is not only essential but also needs to be tightly regulated for proper iNKT cell development. PMID:21775687

  20. 1.00 MeV proton radiation resistance studies of single-junction and single gap dual-junction amorphous-silicon alloy solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdulaziz, Salman; Payson, J. S.; Li, Yang; Woodyard, James R.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation resistance of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H single-junction and a-Si:H dual-junction solar cells was conducted. The cells were irradiated with 1.00-MeV protons with fluences of 1.0 x 10 to the 14th, 5.0 x 10 to the 14th and 1.0 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm and characterized using I-V and quantum efficiency measurements. The radiation resistance of single-junction cells cannot be used to explain the behavior of dual-junction cells at a fluence of 1.0 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm. The a-Si H single-junction cells degraded the least of the three cells; a-SiGe:H single-junction cells showed the largest reduction in short-circuit current, while a-Si:H dual-junction cells exhibited the largest degradation in the open-circuit voltage. The quantum efficiency of the cells degraded more in the red part of the spectrum; the bottom junction degrades first in dual-junction cells.

  1. Cell swelling-induced ATP release is tightly dependent on intracellular calcium elevations

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Francis; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical stresses release ATP from a variety of cells by a poorly defined mechanism(s). Using custom-designed flow-through chambers, we investigated the kinetics of cell swelling-induced ATP secretion, cell volume and intracellular calcium changes in epithelial A549 and 16HBE14o− cells, and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Fifty per cent hypotonic shock triggered transient ATP release from cell confluent monolayers, which consistently peaked at around 1 min 45 s for A549 and NIH/3T3, and at 3 min for 16HBE14o− cells, then declined to baseline within the next 15 min. Whereas the release time course had a similar pattern for the three cell types, the peak rates differed significantly (294 ± 67, 70 ± 22 and 17 ± 2.8 pmol min−1 (106 cells)−1, for A549, 16HBE14o− and NIH/3T3, respectively). The concomitant volume changes of substrate-attached cells were analysed by a 3-dimensional cell shape reconstruction method based on images acquired from two perpendicular directions. The three cell types swelled at a similar rate, reaching maximal expansion in 1 min 45 s, but differed in the duration of the volume plateau and regulatory volume decrease (RVD). These experiments revealed that ATP release does not correlate with either cell volume expansion and the expected activation of stretch-sensitive channels, or with the activation of volume-sensitive, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid-inhibitable anion channels during RVD. By contrast, ATP release was tightly synchronized, in all three cell types, with cytosolic calcium elevations. Furthermore, loading A549 cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA significantly diminished ATP release (71% inhibition of the peak rate), while the calcium ionophore ionomycin triggered ATP release in the absence of cell swelling. Lowering the temperature to 10°C almost completely abolished A549 cell swelling-induced ATP release (95% inhibition of the peak rate). These results strongly suggest that calcium-dependent exocytosis plays a

  2. Sinterless contacts to shallow junction InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Fatemi, N. S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    In the past, the achievement of good electrical contact to InP has inevitably been accompanied by mechanical degradation of the InP itself. Most contact systems require heat treatment after metal deposition that results in the dissolution of substantial amounts of InP into the metallization. Devices such as the solar cell, where shallow junctions are the rule, can be severely degraded if the damage to the semiconductor substrate is not precisely controlled. Two contact systems are described that provide low contact resistance to InP solar cells that do not require subjecting the current carrying metallization to a post deposition sintering process. It is shown that these two systems, one nickel based and the other silver based, provide contact resistivity values in the low 10(exp -6) ohm sq cm range, as fabricated, without the need for sintering.

  3. Heterogeneity, Cell Biology and Tissue Mechanics of Pseudostratified Epithelia: Coordination of Cell Divisions and Growth in Tightly Packed Tissues.

    PubMed

    Strzyz, P J; Matejcic, M; Norden, C

    2016-01-01

    Pseudostratified epithelia (PSE) are tightly packed proliferative tissues that are important precursors of the development of diverse organs in a plethora of species, invertebrate and vertebrate. PSE consist of elongated epithelial cells that are attached to the apical and basal side of the tissue. The nuclei of these cells undergo interkinetic nuclear migration (IKNM) which leads to all mitotic events taking place at the apical surface of the epithelium. In this review, we discuss the intricacies of proliferation in PSE, considering cell biological, as well as the physical aspects. First, we summarize the principles governing the invariability of apical nuclear migration and apical cell division as well as the importance of apical mitoses for tissue proliferation. Then, we focus on the mechanical and structural features of these tissues. Here, we discuss how the overall architecture of pseudostratified tissues changes with increased cell packing. Lastly, we consider possible mechanical cues resulting from these changes and their potential influence on cell proliferation.

  4. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions.

  5. Correction of defective CFTR/ENaC function and tightness of cystic fibrosis airway epithelium by amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Annalucia; Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Diana, Anna; Paracchini, Valentina; Di Gioia, Sante; Seia, Manuela; Casavola, Valeria; Colombo, Carla; Conese, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, with most of the mortality given by the lung disease. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hAMSCs) hold great promise for regenerative medicine in the field of lung disease; however, their potential as therapeutics for CF lung disease has not been fully explored. In the present study, hAMSCs were analysed in co-cultures on Transwell filters with CF immortalized airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o- line) at different ratios to exploit their potency to resume basic defects associated with CF. The results show that F-actin content was increased in co-cultures as compared with CF cells and actin was reorganized to form stress fibres. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that co-cultures had a tendency of increased expression of occludin and ZO-1 at the intercellular borders, paralleled by a decrease in dextran permeability, suggestive of more organized tight junctions (TJs). Spectrofluorometric analysis of CFTR function demonstrated that hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures resumed chloride transport, in line with the appearance of the mature Band C of CFTR protein by Western blotting. Moreover, hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures, at a 1:5 ratio, showed a decrease in fluid absorption, as opposed to CFBE cell monolayers that displayed a great rate of fluid resorption from the apical side. Our data show that human amniotic MSCs can be used in co-culture with CF respiratory epithelial cells to model their engraftment into the airways and have the potential to resume a tight epithelium with partial correction of the CF phenotype.

  6. Correction of defective CFTR/ENaC function and tightness of cystic fibrosis airway epithelium by amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Annalucia; Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Diana, Anna; Paracchini, Valentina; Di Gioia, Sante; Seia, Manuela; Casavola, Valeria; Colombo, Carla; Conese, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, with most of the mortality given by the lung disease. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hAMSCs) hold great promise for regenerative medicine in the field of lung disease; however, their potential as therapeutics for CF lung disease has not been fully explored. In the present study, hAMSCs were analysed in co-cultures on Transwell filters with CF immortalized airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o- line) at different ratios to exploit their potency to resume basic defects associated with CF. The results show that F-actin content was increased in co-cultures as compared with CF cells and actin was reorganized to form stress fibres. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that co-cultures had a tendency of increased expression of occludin and ZO-1 at the intercellular borders, paralleled by a decrease in dextran permeability, suggestive of more organized tight junctions (TJs). Spectrofluorometric analysis of CFTR function demonstrated that hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures resumed chloride transport, in line with the appearance of the mature Band C of CFTR protein by Western blotting. Moreover, hAMSC-CFBE co-cultures, at a 1:5 ratio, showed a decrease in fluid absorption, as opposed to CFBE cell monolayers that displayed a great rate of fluid resorption from the apical side. Our data show that human amniotic MSCs can be used in co-culture with CF respiratory epithelial cells to model their engraftment into the airways and have the potential to resume a tight epithelium with partial correction of the CF phenotype. PMID:24894806

  7. ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCTED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS.
    OBJECTIVE: We have shown that functional gap junction communication as measured by Lucifer yellow dye transfer (DT) in Clone-9 rat liver epithelial cells, c...

  8. GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATON IN A TRANSFECTED HUMAN CELL LINE: ACTION OF MELATONIN AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICTION IN TRANSFECTED HUMAN CELL LINE: ACTION OF MELATONIN AND MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    OBJECTIVE: We previously showed that functional gap junction communication (GJC), as monitored by dye transfer (DT), could be enhanced in mouse C3H 10T112 cells and in mouse...

  9. Studies of silicon p-n junction solar cells. [open circuit photovoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    Single crystal silicon p-n junction solar cells made with low resistivity substrates show poorer solar energy conversion efficiency than traditional theory predicts. The physical mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy are identified and characterized. The open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of about 0.1 ohm/cm substrate resistivity is investigated under AMO (one sun) conditions.

  10. Comparative performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.; Parat, K. K.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by open tube capped diffusion, and closed tube uncapped diffusion, of sulfur into Czochralski grown p-type substrates. Air mass zero, total area, efficiencies ranged from 10 to 14.2 percent, the latter value attributed to cells processed by capped diffusion. The radiation resistance of these latter cells was slightly better, under 1 MeV electron irradiation. However, rather than being process dependent, the difference in radiation resistance could be attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. In agreement with previous results, both cells exhibited radiation resistance superior to that of gallium arsenide. The lowest temperature dependency of maximum power was exhibited by the cells prepared by open tube capped diffusion. Contrary to previous results, no correlation was found between open circuit voltage and the temperature dependency of Pmax. It was concluded that additional process optimization was necessary before concluding that one process was better than another.

  11. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development. PMID:27043020

  12. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development. PMID:27043020

  13. Induced junction solar cell and method of fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.; Chern, S. S.; Li, S. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An induced junction solar cell is fabricated on a p-type silicon substrate by first diffusing a grid of criss-crossed current collecting n+ stripes and thermally growing a thin SiO2 film, and then, using silicon-rich chemical vapor deposition (CVD), producing a layer of SiO2 having inherent defects, such as silicon interstices, which function as deep traps for spontaneous positive charges. Ion implantation increases the stable positive charge distribution for a greater inversion layer in the p-type silicon near the surface. After etching through the oxide to parallel collecting stripes, a pattern of metal is produced consisting of a set of contact stripes over the exposed collecting stripes and a diamond shaped pattern which functions as a current collection bus. Then the reverse side is metallized.

  14. The nuclear and adherent junction complex component protein ubinuclein negatively regulates the productive cycle of Epstein-Barr virus in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gruffat, Henri; Lupo, Julien; Morand, Patrice; Boyer, Véronique; Manet, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) productive cycle is initiated by the expression of the viral trans-activator EB1 (also called Zebra, Zta, or BZLF1), which belongs to the basic leucine zipper transcription factor family. We have previously identified the cellular NACos (nuclear and adherent junction complex components) protein ubinuclein (Ubn-1) as a partner for EB1, but the function of this complex has never been studied. Here, we have evaluated the consequences of this interaction on the EBV productive cycle and find that Ubn-1 overexpression represses the EBV productive cycle whereas Ubn-1 downregulation by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases virus production. By a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we show that Ubn-1 blocks EB1-DNA interaction. We also show that in epithelial cells, relocalization and sequestration of Ubn-1 to the tight junctions of nondividing cells allow increased activation of the productive cycle. We propose a model in which Ubn-1 is a modulator of the EBV productive cycle: in proliferating epithelial cells, Ubn-1 is nuclear and inhibits activation of the productive cycle, whereas in differentiated cells, Ubn-1 is sequestrated to tight junctions, thereby allowing EB1 to fully function in the nucleus.

  15. Investigation of multi-junction solar cells using electrostatic force microscopy methods.

    PubMed

    Moczała, M; Sosa, N; Topol, A; Gotszalk, T

    2014-06-01

    Multi-junction III-V solar cells are designed to have a much broader absorption of the solar spectrum than Si-based or single junctions, thus yield the highest conversion. The conversion efficiency can be further scaled with sun concentration. The ability of high conversion efficiencies makes multi-junction prime candidates for fine-tuning explorations aimed at getting closer to the theoretical efficiencies. In this paper, we report on electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) measurements of the built-in potential of multi-junction III-V semiconductor-based solar cells. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was employed to qualitatively study the width and electrical properties of individual junctions, i.e., built-in potential, activity, and thickness of the p-n junctions. In addition, the voltage drops across individual solar cell p-n junctions were measured using Kelvin probe microscopy under various operation conditions: dark; illuminated; short-circuit; and biased. We present a method which enables the measurement of a working structure, while focusing on the electrical characteristics of an individual junction by virtue of selecting the spectral range of the illumination used. We show that these pragmatic studies can provide a feedback to improve photovoltaic device design, particularly of operation under a current mismatched situation. This new analysis technique offers additional insights into behavior of the multi-junction solar cell and shows promise for further progress in this field.

  16. p120-Catenin is essential for N-cadherin-mediated formation of proper junctional structure, thereby establishing cell polarity in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Chisa; Yoshioka, Masato; Tominaga, Sachiko; Osaka, Yoshinori; Obata, Shuichi; Suzuki, Shintaro T

    2010-01-01

    The role of p120-catenin in the function of classical cadherins is still enigmatic despite various studies. To elucidate its role, we examined the effect of p120-catenin on the N-cadherin-mediated localization of junctional proteins in epithelial cells in this study. Cadherin-deficient MIA PaCa-2 epithelial cells did not show linear localization of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. When N-cadherin was expressed in these cells, however, the resultant transfectant cells revealed strong cell adhesion activity and linear localization of ZO-1, occludin, and N-cadherin in the lateral membrane. When the p120-catenin-binding site of N-cadherin was disrupted, the linear localization of ZO-1 and occludin disappeared, and the mutant N-cadherin became localized more diffusely in the transfectant, although the cell adhesion activity did not change much. Knockdown of p120-catenin also resulted in the very weak localization of ZO-1 and occludin. A similar effect of p120-catenin on the localization of junctional proteins was obtained under more dynamic conditions in a wound healing assay. Moreover, p120-catenin was essential for the regulation of centrosome orientation in this healing assay. Taken together, the present data indicate that p120-catenin is essential for N-cadherin-mediated formation of proper junctional structures and thereby the establishment of the cell polarity. Similar results were obtained when E-cadherin mutants comparable to those of N-cadherin were used, suggesting that p120-catenin plays the same role in the function of other classical cadherins.

  17. DICER Regulates the Formation and Maintenance of Cell-Cell Junctions in the Mouse Seminiferous Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Hanna Maria; Yadav, Ram Prakash; Da Ros, Matteo; Chalmel, Frédéric; Zimmermann, Céline; Toppari, Jorma; Nef, Serge; Kotaja, Noora

    2015-12-01

    The endonuclease DICER that processes micro-RNAs and small interfering RNAs is essential for normal spermatogenesis and male fertility. We previously showed that the deletion of Dicer1 gene in postnatal spermatogonia in mice using Ngn3 promoter-driven Cre expression caused severe defects in the morphogenesis of haploid spermatid to mature spermatozoon, including problems in cell polarization and nuclear elongation. In this study, we further analyzed the same mouse model and revealed that absence of functional DICER in differentiating male germ cells induces disorganization of the cell-cell junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. We detected discontinuous and irregular apical ectoplasmic specializations between elongating spermatids and Sertoli cells. The defective anchoring of spermatids to Sertoli cells caused a premature release of spermatids into the lumen. Our findings may help also explain the abnormal elongation process of remaining spermatids because these junctions and the correct positioning of germ cells in the epithelium are critically important for the progression of spermiogenesis. Interestingly, cell adhesion-related genes were generally upregulated in Dicer1 knockout germ cells. Claudin 5 ( Cldn5 ) was among the most upregulated genes and we show that the polarized localization of CLAUDIN5 in the apical ectoplasmic specializations was lost in Dicer1 knockout spermatids. Our results suggest that DICER-dependent pathways control the formation and organization of cell-cell junctions in the seminiferous epithelium via the regulation of cell adhesion-related genes. PMID:26510868

  18. Heart of glass anchors Rasip1 at endothelial cell-cell junctions to support vascular integrity

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Gingras, Alexandre R; Knight, James DR; Liu, Jian J; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    Heart of Glass (HEG1), a transmembrane receptor, and Rasip1, an endothelial-specific Rap1-binding protein, are both essential for cardiovascular development. Here we performed a proteomic screen for novel HEG1 interactors and report that HEG1 binds directly to Rasip1. Rasip1 localizes to forming endothelial cell (EC) cell-cell junctions and silencing HEG1 prevents this localization. Conversely, mitochondria-targeted HEG1 relocalizes Rasip1 to mitochondria in cells. The Rasip1-binding site in HEG1 contains a 9 residue sequence, deletion of which abrogates HEG1’s ability to recruit Rasip1. HEG1 binds to a central region of Rasip1 and deletion of this domain eliminates Rasip1’s ability to bind HEG1, to translocate to EC junctions, to inhibit ROCK activity, and to maintain EC junctional integrity. These studies establish that the binding of HEG1 to Rasip1 mediates Rap1-dependent recruitment of Rasip1 to and stabilization of EC cell-cell junctions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11394.001 PMID:26780829

  19. Improvement of conversion efficiency for multi-junction solar cells by incorporation of Au nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Yang, M D; Liu, Y K; Shen, J L; Wu, C H; Lin, C A; Chang, W H; Wang, H H; Yeh, H I; Chan, W H; Parak, W J

    2008-09-29

    We studied the photoluminescence (PL) and photovoltaic current-voltage characteristics of the three-junction InGaP/InGaAs/Ge solar cells by depositing Au nanoclusters on the cell surface. The increases of the PL intensity and short-circuit current after incorporation of Au nanoclusters are evident. An increase of 15.3% in energy conversion efficiency (from 19.6 to 22.6%) is obtained for the three-junction solar cells in which Au nanoclusters have been incorporated. We suggest that the increased light trapping due to radiative scattering from Au nanoclusters is responsible for improving the performance of the three-junction solar cells.

  20. Thiamin deficiency induces impaired fish gill immune responses, tight junction protein expression and antioxidant capacity: Roles of the NF-κB, TOR, p38 MAPK and Nrf2 signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ling-Mei; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the effects of dietary thiamin deficiency on immune responses, tight junctions, antioxidant capacity and related signaling molecules in the gills of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Fish were fed diets that contained 0.12-2.04 mg thiamin kg(-1) for 8 weeks. We found that dietary thiamin deficiency resulted in reduced complement 3 content, lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, mRNA levels of hepcidin, liver-expressed antimicrobial peptides 2, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interleukin (IL)-10, inhibitor protein-κBα (IκBα), ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 and target of rapamycin (TOR) and increased expression of interferon-γ2, tumor necrosis factor-α, TGF-β2, IL-1β, IL-8, IκB kinases (IKKβ and IKKγ) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65). Our findings showed that thiamin deficiency reduced the immune status of fish gills. Furthermore, thiamin deficiency resulted in reduced mRNA transcript levels of claudin b, claudin 3, claudin 12, zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and occludin and increased mRNA transcript levels of claudin 15a, myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in fish gill tissues. These data suggested that thiamin deficiency disrupted tight junction-mediated fish gill barrier function. Additionally, reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels and both the activities and expression levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferases and glutathione reductase, as well as NF-E2-related factor 2 gene expression in fish gills, were lower in fish fed a thiamin-deficient diet. By contrast, thiamin deficiency increased levels of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) and Keap1b mRNA transcript expression in fish gills. Taken together, our findings indicated that thiamin deficiency impaired fish gill health by effects on the expression of genes encoding cytokines, tight junction proteins

  1. Deficiency of dietary niacin impaired gill immunity and antioxidant capacity, and changes its tight junction proteins via regulating NF-κB, TOR, Nrf2 and MLCK signaling pathways in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Quan; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary niacin on gill immunity, tight junction proteins, antioxidant system and related signaling molecules mRNA expression, young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) were fed six diets containing graded levels of niacin (3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. The study indicated that niacin deficiency decreased lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, and complement 3 content, and caused oxidative damage that might be partly due to the decreased copper, zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities and reduced glutathione content in fish gills (P < 0.05). Moreover, the relative mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides (liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 and Hepcidin), anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1), tight junction proteins (Occludin, zonula occludens 1, Claudin-15 and -3), signaling molecules (inhibitor of κBα (IκBα), target of rapamycin (TOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)) and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in niacin-deficient diet group. Conversely, the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ2, and interleukin 1β), signaling molecules (nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase α, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ, Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1b, myosin light chain kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in fish gills fed niacin-deficient diet. Interestingly, the varying niacin levels of 3.95-55.01 mg/kg diet had no effect on the mRNA level of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a, Claudin-c and -12 in fish gills (P > 0.05). In conclusion, niacin deficiency decreased gill immunity, impaired gill antioxidant system, as well as regulated mRNA expression of gill tight junction proteins and related signaling

  2. Molecular definition of red cell Rh haplotypes by tightly linked SphI RFLPs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Reid, M.E.; Chen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The Rh blood group system of human red cells contains five major antigens D, C/c, and E/e (the latter four designated {open_quotes}non-D{close_quotes}) that are specified by eight gene complexes known as Rh haplotypes. In this paper, we report on the mapping of the RH locus and identification of a set of SphI RFLPs that are tightly linked with the Rh structural genes. Using exon-specific probes, we have localized the SphI cleavage sites resulting in these DNA markers and derived a comprehensive map for the RH locus. It was found that the SphI fragments encompassing exons 4-7 of the Rh genes occur in four banding patterns or frameworks that correspond to the distribution and segregation of the common Rh haplotypes. This linkage disequilibrium allowed a genotype-phenotype correlation and direct determination of Rh zygosity related to the Rh-positive or Rh-negative status (D/D, D/d, and d/d). Studies on the occurrence of SphI RFLPs in a number of rare Rh variants indicated that Rh phenotypic diversity has taken place on different haplotype backgrounds and has arisen by diverse genetic mechanisms. The molecular definition of Rh haplotypes by SphI RFLP frameworks should provide a useful procedure for genetic counseling and prenatal assessment of Rh alloimmunization. 32 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Molecular definition of red cell Rh haplotypes by tightly linked SphI RFLPs.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H; Reid, M E; Chen, Y; Coghlan, G; Okubo, Y

    1996-01-01

    The Rh blood group system of human red cells contains five major antigens D, C/c, and E/e (the latter four designated "non-D") that are specified by eight gene complexes known as Rh haplotypes. In this paper, we report on the mapping of RH locus and identification of a set of SphI RFLPs that are tightly linked with the Rh structural genes. Using exon-specific probes, we have localized the SphI cleavage sites resulting in these DNA markers and derived a comprehensive map for the RH locus. It was found that the SphI fragments encompassing exons 4-7 of the Rh genes occur in four banding patterns or frameworks that correspond to the distribution and segregation of the common Rh haplotypes. This linkage disequilibrium allowed a genotype-phenotype correlation and direct determination of Rh zygosity related to the Rh-positive or Rh-negative status (D/D, D/d, and d/d). Studies on the occurrence of SphI RFLPs in a number of rare Rh variants indicated that Rh phenotypic diversity has taken place on different haplotype backgrounds and has arisen by diverse genetic mechanisms. The molecular definition of Rh haplotypes by SphI RFLP frameworks should provide a useful procedure for genetic counseling and prenatal assessment of Rh alloimmunization.

  4. Gap-Junctional Single-Channel Permeability for Fluorescent Tracers in Mammalian Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Reiner

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a simple dye transfer method that allows quantification of the gap-junction permeability of small cultured cells. Fluorescent dyes (calcein and Lucifer yellow) were perfused into one cell of an isolated cell pair using a patch-type micropipette in the tight-seal whole cell configuration. Dye spreading into the neighboring cells was monitored using a low-light charge-coupled device camera. Permeation rates for calcein and Lucifer yellow were then estimated by fitting the time course of the fluorescence intensities in both cells. For curve fitting, we used a set of model equations derived from a compartment model of dye distribution. The permeation rates were correlated to the total ionic conductance of the gap junction measured immediately after the perfusion experiment. Assuming that dye permeation is through a unit-conductance channel, we were then able to calculate the single-channel permeance for each tracer dye. We have applied this technique to HeLa cells stably transfected with rat-Cx46 and Cx43, and to BICR/M1Rk cells, a rat mammary tumor cell line that has very high dye coupling through endogenous Cx43 channels. Scatter plots of permeation rates versus junctional conductance did not show a strictly linear correlation of ionic versus dye permeance, as would have been expected for a simple pore. Instead, we found that the data scatter within a wide range of different single-channel permeances. In BICR/M1Rk cells, the lower limiting single-channel permeance is 2.2 ± 2.0 × 10−12 mm3/s and the upper limit is 50 × 10−12 mm3/s for calcein and 6.8 ± 2.8 × 10−12 mm3/s and 150 × 10−12 mm3/s for Lucifer yellow, respectively. In HeLa-Cx43 transfectants we found 2.0 ± 2.4 × 10−12 mm3/s and 95 × 10−12 mm3/s for calcein and 2.1 ± 6.8 × 10−12 mm3/s and 80 × 10−12 mm3/s for Lucifer yellow, and in HeLa-Cx46 transfectants 1.7 ± 0.3 × 10−12 mm3/s and 120 × 10−12 mm3/s for calcein and 1.3 ± 1.1 × 10−12 mm3/s and 34 × 10

  5. Simvastatin protects Sertoli cells against cisplatin cytotoxicity through enhanced gap junction intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingzhi; Peng, Jianxin; Huang, Huansen; Wang, Qin; Yu, Meiling; Tao, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Cisplatin, an important chemotherapeutic agent against testicular germ cell cancer, induces testicular toxicity on Leydig and Sertoli cells, leading to serious side-effects such as azoospermia and infertility. In a previous study, it was found that simvastatin enhanced the sensitivity of Leydig tumor cells to chemotherapeutic toxicity through the enhancement of gap junction functions. In the present study, the effect of simvastatin on the sensitivity of normal Sertoli cells to cisplatin and the role of gap junctions in such effects was investigated. The results showed that, simvastatin attenuated cisplatin toxicity only when cells exhibited high-density culture where gap junctional formation was possible. When gap junction function was decreased by the gap junction inhibitor or by siRNA targeting connexin 43, the protective effect of simvastatin to cisplatin toxicity was substantially attenuated. Simvastatin also enhanced gap junction functions between Sertoli cells. This effect was mediated by the reduction of PKC-mediated connexin phosphorylation, thereby increasing connexin 43 membrane localization. Thus, simvastatin-induced enhancement of gap junction‑mediated intercellular communication attenuated cisplatin toxicity on Sertoli cells. This result indicated that enhancement of gap junction function by simvastatin may have bilateral beneficial effects on cisplatin‑based chemotherapy, enhancing cisplatin killing on cancer while ameliorating the reproduction toxicity.

  6. A role of junction-mediated interactions in cells of the male reproductive tract: impact of prenatal, neonatal, and prepubertal exposure to anti-androgens on adult reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hejmej, Anna; Bilinska, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Male sexual development and male reproductive functions are dependent on the normal action of androgens, and an unbalanced ratio of the active androgens can lead to varying degrees of structural and functional abnormalities within the reproductive organs. Endocrine balance can be disturbed by environmental and pharmaceutical anti-androgens (i.e. vinclozolin, phthalates, procymidone, and flutamide) that antagonize normal androgen action. Such chemical compounds enter the cell, bind to the receptor and inactivate transcription leading to disruption of androgen-mediated signaling. Assembling and functioning of cell junctions in hormone-dependent tissues, such as testis, epididymis and prostate appeared to be controlled by steroid hormones, predominantly by androgens. This review presents recent findings on the tight junction proteins mainly responsible for normal functioning of the barrier within the testis, epididymis and prostate, anchoring junction proteins that play a crucial role in normal cell-cell adhesion, and gap junction proteins through which intercellular communication takes place in the male reproductive tract. The review gives examples of animal models that are used in endocrine disruption studies with a focus on the author's own data from studies in the pig.

  7. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  8. Lactobacillus sakei OK67 ameliorates high-fat diet-induced blood glucose intolerance and obesity in mice by inhibiting gut microbiota lipopolysaccharide production and inducing colon tight junction protein expression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Min; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Woo, Kyung Hee; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    A high-fat diet (HFD) induces obesity and the associated increases in blood glucose and inflammation through changes in gut microbiota, endotoxemia, and increased gut permeability. To counteract this, researchers have suggested that the use of probiotics that suppress production of proinflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we tested whether Lactobacillus sakei OK67, which inhibits gut microbiota LPS production selected from among the lactic acid bacteria isolated from kimchi, exerted antihypoglycemic or anti-inflammatory effects in HFD-fed mice. Mice were randomly divided into 2 groups and fed an HFD or a low-fat diet for 4 weeks. These groups were further subdivided; 1 subgroup was treated with L sakei OK67 and fed the experimental diet for 4.5 weeks, whereas the other subgroup was fed the experimental diet alone. L sakei OK67 treatment lowered HFD-elevated LPS levels in blood and colonic fluid and significantly decreased HFD-elevated fasting blood glucose levels and the area under the curve in an oral glucose tolerance test. L sakei OK67 treatment inhibited HFD-induced body and epididymal fat weight gains, suppressed HFD-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β expression and nuclear factor-κB activation in the colon, and significantly increased HFD-suppressed interleukin-10 and tight junction protein expression in the colon. Oral administration of L sakei OK67 significantly downregulated HFD-induced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, fatty acid synthase, and tumor necrosis factor-α in adipose tissue. In addition, L sakei OK67 treatment strongly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activation in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. We report that L sakei OK67 ameliorates HFD-induced hyperglycemia and obesity by reducing inflammation and increasing the expression of colon tight junction proteins in mice. PMID:27001279

  9. The impaired intestinal mucosal immune system by valine deficiency for young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with decreasing immune status and regulating tight junction proteins transcript abundance in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on the growth, intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance and gene expression of immune-related signaling molecules in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Six iso-nitrogenous diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3-19.1 g kg(-)(1) diet) were fed to the fish for 8 weeks. The results showed that percentage weight gain (PWG), feed intake and feed efficiency of fish were the lowest in fish fed the valine-deficient diet (P < 0.05). In addition, valine deficiency decreased lysozyme, acid phosphatase activities and complement 3 content in the intestine (P < 0.05), down-regulated mRNA levels of interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β1, IκBα and target of rapamycin (TOR) (P < 0.05), and up-regulated tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8 and nuclear factor κB P65 (NF-κB P65) gene expression (P < 0.05). Additionally, valine deficiency significantly decreased transcript of Occludin, Claudin b, Claudin c, Claudin 3, and ZO-1 (P < 0.05), and improved Claudin 15 expression in the fish intestine (P < 0.05). However, valine did not have a significant effect on expression of Claudin 12 in the intestine of grass carp (P > 0.05). In conclusion, valine deficiency decreased fish growth and intestinal immune status, as well as regulated gene expression of tight junction proteins, NF-κB P65, IκBα and TOR in the fish intestine. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of lysozyme activity or PWG, the dietary valine requirement of young grass carp (268-679 g) were established to be 14.47 g kg(-1) diet (4.82 g 100 g(-1) CP) or 14.00 g kg(-1) diet (4.77 g 100 g(-1) CP), respectively.

  10. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  11. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  12. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Hwang, Jung Shan; Wolf, Alexander; Böttger, Angelika; Shimizu, Hiroshi; David, Charles N; Gojobori, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia. PMID:24394722

  13. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Hwang, Jung Shan; Wolf, Alexander; Böttger, Angelika; Shimizu, Hiroshi; David, Charles N.; Gojobori, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  14. Connexin32 gap junction channels in stably transfected cells: unitary conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, A P; Eghbali, B; Spray, D C

    1991-01-01

    Pairs of SKHep1 cells, which are derived from a highly metastatic human hepatoma, were studied using the whole cell voltage clamp technique with patch-type electrodes containing CsCl as the major ionic species. In 12 of 81 cell pairs, current flow through junctional membranes was detectable; in the remaining 69 cell pairs, junctional conductance was less than the noise limit of our recording apparatus (worst case: 10 pS). Macroscopic junctional conductance (gj) in the small percentage of pairs where it was detectable ranged from 100 to 600 pS. Unitary junctional conductance (gamma j) determined in the lowest conductance pairs or after reducing conductance with a short exposure to the uncoupling agent halothane was 25-35 pS. To study properties of gap junction channels formed of connexin32, the parental SKHep1 cell line was stably transfected with a plasmid containing cDNA that encodes connexin32, the major gap junction protein of rat liver cells. In 85 of 98 pairs of voltage clamped connexin32-transfected SKHep1 cells, macroscopic gj was greater than 1 nS; gj increased with time after dissociation (from 1.8 +/- 0.6 [mean +/- SE; n = 7] nS at 2 h after plating to 9.3 +/- 2.2 [n = 9] nS, the maximal value, at 24 h). Unitary conductance of gap junction channels between pairs of transfected SKHep1 cells was measured in low conductance pairs and after reducing gj by exposure to halothane or heptanol. Histograms of gamma j values in transfected cells, in 10 experiments where greater than 100 transitions were measurable, displayed two peaks; 120-130 pS and 25-35 pS. The smaller size corresponded to channels that were occasionally detected in the parental cells. We therefore conclude that connexin32 forms gap junctions channels of the 120-130 pS size class. PMID:1722119

  15. Recent Progress and Spectral Robustness Study for Mechanically Stacked Multi-junction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Flamand, Giovanni; Poortmans, Jef

    2010-10-01

    Multi-terminal mechanically stacked multi-junction solar cells are an attractive candidate for terrestrial concentrator photovoltaics applications. Unlike monolithically integrated multi-junction solar cells which require current matching, all the available photon currents can be fully extracted from each junction of a mechanically stacked solar cell. Therefore, it has a high performance potential, and more importantly is less sensitive to spectrum variations. Lower losses due to current mismatch translate into a higher annual energy output for the mechanical stack. This paper presents the baseline processing developed at imec for the mechanical stacking process, and the most recent cell results by means of this technology. A GaAs-Ge dual-junction mechanically stacked multi-junction solar cell is demonstrated, with 24.7% plus 2.52% under AM1.5g, and 27.7% plus 4.42% under 30Suns concentration. In addition, spectral sensitivity is studied for both monolithically stacked and mechanically stacked solar cells, to learn the influence of spectrum variations on multi-junction solar cell performance. SMARTS model is used to predict the spectral irradiances, with solar radiation and meteorological elements from typical meteorological year 3 (TMY3) data set. The generated spectra are then fed into TCAD numerical simulation tool, to simulate the device performance. The simulation results show a reduced spectral sensitivity for mechanically stacked cell, and there is a 6% relative gain in annual energy production for the site studied (Las Vegas), compared with the monolithic stack.

  16. Effect of junctional adhesion molecule-2 expression on cell growth, invasion and migration in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, HUISHAN; YU, HEFEN; MARTIN, TRACEY A.; ZHANG, YUXIANG; CHEN, GANG; JIANG, WEN G.

    2016-01-01

    The junctional adhesion molecule (JAMs) family belongs to the immunoglobulin subfamily involved in the formation of tight junctions (TJ) in both endothelial and epithelial cells. Aberrant expression of JAM-2 is associated with cancer progression but little work has been carried out in discovering how this affects changes in cell behaviour. The present study aimed to examine the expression of JAM-2 in human colon cancer specimens and cell lines and its role in the development of colon cancer. JAM-2 expression in human colon cancer specimens (normal, n=75; cancer, n=94) and cell lines was analysed using quantitative real-time PCR and conventional RT-PCR. Colon cancer cells were stably transfected with a mammalian expression vector to overexpress JAM-2-Flag. The effect on growth, adhesion and migration following overexpression of JAM-2 was then investigated using in vitro models. TJ function was assessed using a trans-epithelial resistance assay (TER, with an EVOM voltammeter). JAM-2 was lowly expressed in colon cancer cells such as RKO, HT115. JAM-2 overexpression in RKO cells (RKO-JAM-2) and HT115 cells (HT115-JAM-2) showed retarded adhesion (P<0.05). An in vivo tumour model showed that RKO-JAM-2 had significantly reduced growth (P<0.05), invasion (P<0.05) and migration (P<0.05) as well as in HT115-JAM-2, except on proliferation and migration. Expression of JAM-2 resulted in a significant increase in TER and decrease in permeability of polarized monolayers (P<0.05). Further analysis of JAM-2 transcript levels against clinical aspects demonstrated that the decreasing JAM-2 expression correlated to disease progression, metastasis and poor survival. Taken together, JAM-2 may function as a putative tumour suppressor in the progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer. PMID:26782073

  17. Remodeling of Cell-Cell Junctions in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Saffitz, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a primary myocardial disorder characterized by a high incidence of ventricular arrhythmias often preceding the onset of ventricular remodeling and dysfunction. Approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with AC have one or more mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins, although non-desmosomal genes have also been associated with the disease. Increasing evidence implicates remodeling of intercalated disk proteins reflecting abnormal responses to mechanical load and aberrant cell signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of AC. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding disease mechanisms in AC that have come from studies of human myocardium and experimental models. PMID:24460198

  18. Experimental determination of series resistance of p-n junction diodes and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. J.; Pao, S. C.; Neugroschel, A.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Various methods for determining the series resistance of p-n junction diodes and solar cells are described and compared. New methods involving the measurement of the ac admittance are shown to have certain advantages over methods proposed earlier.

  19. Highly efficient organic multi-junction solar cells with a thiophene based donor material

    SciTech Connect

    Meerheim, Rico Körner, Christian; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-11

    The efficiency of organic solar cells can be increased by serial stacked subcells even upon using the same absorber material. For the multi-junction devices presented here, we use the small molecule donor material DCV5T-Me. The subcell currents were matched by optical transfer matrix simulation, allowing an efficiency increase from 8.3% for a single junction up to 9.7% for a triple junction cell. The external quantum efficiency of the subcells, measured under appropriate light bias illumination, is spectrally shifted due to the microcavity of the complete stack, resulting in a broadband response and an increased cell current. The increase of the power conversion efficiency upon device stacking is even stronger for large area cells due to higher influence of the resistance of the indium tin oxide anode, emphasizing the advantage of multi-junction devices for large-area applications.

  20. Chloral hydrate decreases gap junction communications in rat liver epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gap junction communication (GJC) is involved in controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Alterations in GJC are associated with carcinogenesis, but the mechanisms involvedareunknown.Chloralhydrate(CH), a by-productofchlorinedisinfection ofwater,is carcinogenic in mice,...

  1. An efficient triple-junction polymer solar cell having a power conversion efficiency exceeding 11%.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yoshimura, Ken; Ohya, Kenichiro; You, Jingbi; Gao, Jing; Hong, Zirou; Yang, Yang

    2014-08-27

    Tandem solar cells have the potential to improve photon conversion efficiencies (PCEs) beyond the limits of single-junction devices. In this study, a triple-junction tandem design is demonstrated by employing three distinct organic donor materials having bandgap energies ranging from 1.4 to 1.9 eV. Through optical modeling, balanced photon absorption rates are achieved and, thereby, the photo-currents are matched among the three subcells. Accordingly, an efficient triple-junction tandem organic solar cell can exhibit a record-high PCE of 11.5%.

  2. An efficient triple-junction polymer solar cell having a power conversion efficiency exceeding 11%.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yoshimura, Ken; Ohya, Kenichiro; You, Jingbi; Gao, Jing; Hong, Zirou; Yang, Yang

    2014-08-27

    Tandem solar cells have the potential to improve photon conversion efficiencies (PCEs) beyond the limits of single-junction devices. In this study, a triple-junction tandem design is demonstrated by employing three distinct organic donor materials having bandgap energies ranging from 1.4 to 1.9 eV. Through optical modeling, balanced photon absorption rates are achieved and, thereby, the photo-currents are matched among the three subcells. Accordingly, an efficient triple-junction tandem organic solar cell can exhibit a record-high PCE of 11.5%. PMID:25043698

  3. NMII forms a contractile transcellular sarcomeric network to regulate apical cell junctions and tissue geometry.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Seham; Fujita, Tomoki; Millis, Bryan A; Kozin, Elliott; Ma, Xuefei; Kawamoto, Sachiyo; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hisa, Yasuo; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Kachar, Bechara

    2013-04-22

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) is thought to be the master integrator of force within epithelial apical junctions, mediating epithelial tissue morphogenesis and tensional homeostasis. Mutations in NMII are associated with a number of diseases due to failures in cell-cell adhesion. However, the organization and the precise mechanism by which NMII generates and responds to tension along the intercellular junctional line are still not known. We discovered that periodic assemblies of bipolar NMII filaments interlace with perijunctional actin and α-actinin to form a continuous belt of muscle-like sarcomeric units (∼400-600 nm) around each epithelial cell. Remarkably, the sarcomeres of adjacent cells are precisely paired across the junctional line, forming an integrated, transcellular contractile network. The contraction/relaxation of paired sarcomeres concomitantly impacts changes in apical cell shape and tissue geometry. We show differential distribution of NMII isoforms across heterotypic junctions and evidence for compensation between isoforms. Our results provide a model for how NMII force generation is effected along the junctional perimeter of each cell and communicated across neighboring cells in the epithelial organization. The sarcomeric network also provides a well-defined target to investigate the multiple roles of NMII in junctional homeostasis as well as in development and disease.

  4. Use of high-temperature gas-tight electrochemical cells to measure electronic transport and thermodynamics in metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Ma, B.; Park, E.T.

    1997-10-01

    By using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors can perform high-temperature coulometric titration and measure electronic transport properties to determine the electronic defect structure of metal oxides. This technique reduces the time and expense required for conventional thermogravimetric measurements. The components of the gas-tight coulometric titration cell are an oxygen sensor, Pt/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Pt, and an encapsulated metal oxide sample. Based on cell design, both transport and thermodynamic measurements can be performed over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures (pO{sub 2} = 10{sup {minus}35} to 1 atm). This paper describes the high-temperature gas-tight electrochemical cells used to determine electronic defect structures and transport properties for pure and doped-oxide systems, such as YSZ, doped and pure ceria (Ca-CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}), copper oxides, and copper-oxide-based ceramic superconductors, transition metal oxides, SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x}, and BaTiO{sub 3}.

  5. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1994-01-01

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  6. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  7. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells.

    PubMed

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M; Matarredona, Esperanza R; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain.

  8. A generic concept to overcome bandgap limitations for designing highly efficient multi-junction photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Li, Ning; Fecher, Frank W; Gasparini, Nicola; Ramirez Quiroz, Cesar Omar; Bronnbauer, Carina; Hou, Yi; Radmilović, Vuk V; Radmilović, Velimir R; Spiecker, Erdmann; Forberich, Karen; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-07-16

    The multi-junction concept is the most relevant approach to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction photovoltaic cells. The record efficiencies of several types of solar technologies are held by series-connected tandem configurations. However, the stringent current-matching criterion presents primarily a material challenge and permanently requires developing and processing novel semiconductors with desired bandgaps and thicknesses. Here we report a generic concept to alleviate this limitation. By integrating series- and parallel-interconnections into a triple-junction configuration, we find significantly relaxed material selection and current-matching constraints. To illustrate the versatile applicability of the proposed triple-junction concept, organic and organic-inorganic hybrid triple-junction solar cells are constructed by printing methods. High fill factors up to 68% without resistive losses are achieved for both organic and hybrid triple-junction devices. Series/parallel triple-junction cells with organic, as well as perovskite-based subcells may become a key technology to further advance the efficiency roadmap of the existing photovoltaic technologies.

  9. A generic concept to overcome bandgap limitations for designing highly efficient multi-junction photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fei; Li, Ning; Fecher, Frank W.; Gasparini, Nicola; Quiroz, Cesar Omar Ramirez; Bronnbauer, Carina; Hou, Yi; Radmilović, Vuk V.; Radmilović, Velimir R.; Spiecker, Erdmann; Forberich, Karen; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-07-01

    The multi-junction concept is the most relevant approach to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction photovoltaic cells. The record efficiencies of several types of solar technologies are held by series-connected tandem configurations. However, the stringent current-matching criterion presents primarily a material challenge and permanently requires developing and processing novel semiconductors with desired bandgaps and thicknesses. Here we report a generic concept to alleviate this limitation. By integrating series- and parallel-interconnections into a triple-junction configuration, we find significantly relaxed material selection and current-matching constraints. To illustrate the versatile applicability of the proposed triple-junction concept, organic and organic-inorganic hybrid triple-junction solar cells are constructed by printing methods. High fill factors up to 68% without resistive losses are achieved for both organic and hybrid triple-junction devices. Series/parallel triple-junction cells with organic, as well as perovskite-based subcells may become a key technology to further advance the efficiency roadmap of the existing photovoltaic technologies.

  10. A generic concept to overcome bandgap limitations for designing highly efficient multi-junction photovoltaic cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Li, Ning; Fecher, Frank W.; Gasparini, Nicola; Quiroz, Cesar Omar Ramirez; Bronnbauer, Carina; Hou, Yi; Radmilović, Vuk V.; Radmilović, Velimir R.; Spiecker, Erdmann; Forberich, Karen; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    The multi-junction concept is the most relevant approach to overcome the Shockley–Queisser limit for single-junction photovoltaic cells. The record efficiencies of several types of solar technologies are held by series-connected tandem configurations. However, the stringent current-matching criterion presents primarily a material challenge and permanently requires developing and processing novel semiconductors with desired bandgaps and thicknesses. Here we report a generic concept to alleviate this limitation. By integrating series- and parallel-interconnections into a triple-junction configuration, we find significantly relaxed material selection and current-matching constraints. To illustrate the versatile applicability of the proposed triple-junction concept, organic and organic-inorganic hybrid triple-junction solar cells are constructed by printing methods. High fill factors up to 68% without resistive losses are achieved for both organic and hybrid triple-junction devices. Series/parallel triple-junction cells with organic, as well as perovskite-based subcells may become a key technology to further advance the efficiency roadmap of the existing photovoltaic technologies. PMID:26177808

  11. Interaction of Ubinuclein-1, a nuclear and adhesion junction protein, with the 14-3-3 epsilon protein in epithelial cells: implication of the PKA pathway.

    PubMed

    Conti, Audrey; Sueur, Charlotte; Lupo, Julien; Brazzolotto, Xavier; Burmeister, Wim P; Manet, Evelyne; Gruffat, Henri; Morand, Patrice; Boyer, Véronique

    2013-03-01

    Ubinuclein-1 is a NACos (Nuclear and Adhesion junction Complex components) protein which shuttles between the nucleus and tight junctions, but its function in the latter is not understood. Here, by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal analysis, we show that Ubinuclein-1 interacts with the 14-3-3ɛ protein both in HT29 colon cells, and AGS gastric cells. This interaction is mediated by an Ubinuclein-1 phosphoserine motif. We show that the arginine residues (R56, R60 and R132) which form the 14-3-3ɛ ligand binding site are responsible for the binding of 14-3-3ɛ to phosphorylated Ubinuclein-1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in vitro Ubinuclein-1 can be directly phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. This in vitro phosphorylation allows binding of wildtype 14-3-3ɛ. Moreover, treatment of the cells with inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, KT5720 or H89, modifies the subcellular localization of Ubinuclein-1. Indeed, KT5720 and H89 greatly increase the staining of Ubinuclein-1 at the tight junctions in AGS gastric cells. In the presence of the kinase inhibitor KT5720, the amount of Ubinuclein-1 in the NP40 insoluble fraction is increased, together with actin. Moreover, treatment of the cells with KT5720 or H89 induces the concentration of Ubinuclein-1 at tricellular intersections of MDCK cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate novel cell signaling trafficking by Ubinuclein-1 via association with 14-3-3ɛ following Ubinuclein-1 phosphorylation by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase-A.

  12. Device characterization for design optimization of 4 junction inverted metamorphic concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, John F.; France, Ryan M.; Steiner, Myles A.; Friedman, Daniel J.; García, Iván

    2014-09-26

    Quantitative electroluminescence (EL) and luminescent coupling (LC) analysis, along with more conventional characterization techniques, are combined to completely characterize the subcell JV curves within a fourjunction (4J) inverted metamorphic solar cell (IMM). The 4J performance under arbitrary spectral conditions can be predicted from these subcell JV curves. The internal radiative efficiency (IRE) of each junction has been determined as a function of current density from the external radiative efficiency using optical modeling, but this required the accurate determination of the individual junction current densities during the EL measurement as affected by LC. These measurement and analysis techniques can be applied to any multijunction solar cell. The 4J IMM solar cell used to illustrate these techniques showed excellent junction quality as exhibited by high IRE and a one-sun AM1.5D efficiency of 36.3%. This device operates up to 1000 suns without limitations due to any of the three tunnel junctions.

  13. Cytoplasmic bridges and gap junctions in an insect cell line (Aedes albopictus).

    PubMed

    Bukauskas, F F; Kempf, C; Weingart, R

    1992-11-01

    Cell pairs of an insect cell line (Aedes albopictus, clone C6/36) were used study simultaneously the diffusional and electrical properties of intercellular junctions. Diffusion studies involved injection of fluorescent molecules into one cell of a cell pair and visual inspection of their intercellular redistribution. Electrical measurements involved a dual voltage clamp method and whole-cell recording with patch pipette. The voltage clamp protocol was aimed at examining the dependency of the junctional conductance, gj, on membrane potential, Vm. Cell pairs exhibiting a voltage-dependent gj were found to allow intercellular diffusion of Lucifer Yellow CH (molecular mass, 443 Da), but not of FITC-dextran (molecular mass, 4,400 Da). This response pattern is consistent with the presence of gap junctions in the intercellular junctions. Cell pairs showing no voltage dependence of gj were found to permit intercellular diffusion of both Lucifer Yellow CH and FITC-dextran (dextran labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate). This behaviour is compatible with the presence of cytoplasmic bridges connecting the two adjacent cells. Hence, in culture the cells investigated express two kinds of intercellular structures, gap junctions and cytoplasmic bridges.

  14. Recovery of shallow junction GaAs solar cells damaged by electron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. H.; Conway, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells operated in space are subject to degradation from electron and proton radiation damage. It has been found that for deep junction p-GaAlAs/p-GaAs solar cells some of the electron radiation damage is removed by annealing the cells at 200 C. The reported investigation shows that shallow junction p-GaAlAs/p-GaAs/n-GaAs heteroface solar cells irradiated with 1 MeV electrons show a more complete recovery of short-circuit current than do the deep junction cells. The heteroface p-GaAlAs/p-GaAs/n-GaAs solar cells studied were fabricated using the etch-back epitaxy process.

  15. Polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells with frozen p-i-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Yu, G.; Heeger, A.J. |

    1997-09-01

    The p-i-n junction in a polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) is stabilized by cooling the device below the glass transition temperature of the ion-transport polymer. LECs with frozen p-i-n junctions exhibit typical light emitting diode (LED) behavior including diode rectification, unipolar light emission (same polarity as that used for generating the junction), and fast response. The freezeout of ion motion allows polymer LECs to be driven at bias voltages well beyond the electrochemical stability window, and thereby extends the potential applications of polymer LECs to high pixel density, column-row addressable displays. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Laboratory instrumentation and techniques for characterizing multi-junction solar cells for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Multi-junction solar cells are attractive for space applications because they can be designed to convert a larger fraction of AMO into electrical power at a lower cost than single-junction cells. The performance of multi-junction cells is much more sensitive to the spectral irradiance of the illuminating source than single-junction cells. The design of high efficiency multi-junction cells for space applications requires matching the optoelectronic properties of the junctions to AMO spectral irradiance. Unlike single-junction cells, it is not possible to carry out quantum efficiency measurements using only a monochromatic probe beam and determining the cell short-circuit current assuming linearity of the quantum efficiency. Additionally, current-voltage characteristics can not be calculated from measurements under non-AMO light sources using spectral-correction methods. There are reports in the literature on characterizing the performance of multi junction cells by measuring and convoluting the quantum efficiency of each junction with the spectral irradiance; the technique is of limited value for the characterization of cell performance under AMO power-generating conditions. We report the results of research to develop instrumentation and techniques for characterizing multi junction solar cells for space . An integrated system is described which consists of a standard lamp, spectral radiometer, dual-source solar simulator, and personal computer based current-voltage and quantum efficiency equipment. The spectral radiometer is calibrated regularly using the tungsten-halogen standard lamp which has a calibration based on NIST scales. The solar simulator produces the light bias beam for current-voltage and cell quantum efficiency measurements. The calibrated spectral radiometer is used to 'fit' the spectral irradiance of the dual-source solar simulator to WRL AMO data. The quantum efficiency apparatus includes a monochromatic probe beam for measuring the absolute cell

  17. Immunity decreases, antioxidant system damages and tight junction changes in the intestine of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) during folic acid deficiency: Regulation of NF-κB, Nrf2 and MLCK mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-04-01

    This investigation used the same growth trial as the previous study, which showed that folic acid deficiency retarded growth in young grass carp (the percent weight gain of Groups 1-6 were 102.32 ± 3.41%, 137.25 ± 10.48%, 179.78 ± 3.95%, 164.33 ± 3.21%, 143.35 ± 8.12% and 115.28 ± 2.66%) [1]. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary folic acid on the immune response, antioxidant status and tight junctions in the intestine of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp were fed diets containing graded levels of folic acid at 0.10, 0.47, 1.03, 1.48, 1.88 and 3.12 mg kg(-1) diet for 8 weeks. The results indicated that acid phosphatase and lysozyme activities, and the complement component 3 content in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) were decreased with folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P < 0.05). Folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) up-regulated interleukin 1β, interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor α, nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κB p65), IκB kinase α (IKK-α), IKK-β and IKK-γ gene expression, meanwhile down-regulated interleukin 10, transforming growth factor β, IκB and target of rapamycin gene expression in the PI, MI and DI (P < 0.05). These data suggested that folic acid deficiency decreased fish intestinal innate immune function may be partly contributed to the regulation of NF-κB p65 pathway. Moreover, the activities and corresponding gene expression of glutathione content, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione s-transferases and glutathione reductase in fish intestine were depressed by deficient folic acid diet (0.1 mg kg(-1)) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, folic acid deficiency (0.1 mg kg(-1)) down-regulated NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene expression, up-regulated Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) and Keap1b gene expression in fish intestine (P < 0.05). These data indicated

  18. Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells consisting of identical subcells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haipeng; Bartynski, Andrew N; Greaney, Matthew J; Thompson, Mark E; Brutchey, Richard L

    2014-10-22

    Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells with identical subcells based on P3HT:CdSe nanocrystal bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) are reported for the first time showing 2-fold and 3-fold increases of open-circuit voltage (VOC), respectively, relative to the single-junction cell. A combination of nanocrystalline ZnO and pH-neutral PEDOT:PSS is used as the interconnecting layer, and the thicknesses of subcells are optimized with the guidance of optical simulations. As a result, the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) exhibits a significant increase from 2.0% (VOC = 0.57 V) in single-junction devices to 2.7% (champion 3.1%, VOC = 1.28 V) in tandem devices and 2.3% (VOC = 1.98 V) in triple-junction devices.

  19. Identification of RecQL1 as a Holliday junction processing enzyme in human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    LeRoy, Gary; Carroll, Robert; Kyin, Saw; Seki, Masayuki; Cole, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides an effective way to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is required for genetic recombination. During the process of homologous recombination, a heteroduplex DNA structure, or a ‘Holliday junction’ (HJ), is formed. The movement, or branch migration, of this junction is necessary for recombination to proceed correctly. In prokaryotes, the RecQ protein or the RuvA/RuvB protein complex can promote ATP-dependent branch migration of Holliday junctions. Much less is known about the processing of Holliday junctions in eukaryotes. Here, we identify RecQL1 as a predominant ATP-dependent, HJ branch migrator present in human nuclear extracts. A reduction in the level of RecQL1 induced by RNA interference in HeLa cells leads to an increase in sister chromatid exchange. We propose that RecQL1 is involved in the processing of Holliday junctions in human cells. PMID:16260474

  20. Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells consisting of identical subcells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haipeng; Bartynski, Andrew N; Greaney, Matthew J; Thompson, Mark E; Brutchey, Richard L

    2014-10-22

    Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells with identical subcells based on P3HT:CdSe nanocrystal bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) are reported for the first time showing 2-fold and 3-fold increases of open-circuit voltage (VOC), respectively, relative to the single-junction cell. A combination of nanocrystalline ZnO and pH-neutral PEDOT:PSS is used as the interconnecting layer, and the thicknesses of subcells are optimized with the guidance of optical simulations. As a result, the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) exhibits a significant increase from 2.0% (VOC = 0.57 V) in single-junction devices to 2.7% (champion 3.1%, VOC = 1.28 V) in tandem devices and 2.3% (VOC = 1.98 V) in triple-junction devices. PMID:25233268

  1. Gap junctions and other mechanisms of cell-cell communication regulate basal insulin secretion in the pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Benninger, R K P; Head, W Steven; Zhang, Min; Satin, Leslie S; Piston, David W

    2011-11-15

    Cell-cell communication in the islet of Langerhans is important for the regulation of insulin secretion. Gap-junctions coordinate oscillations in intracellular free-calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and insulin secretion in the islet following elevated glucose. Gap-junctions can also ensure that oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) ceases when glucose is at a basal levels. We determine the roles of gap-junctions and other cell-cell communication pathways in the suppression of insulin secretion under basal conditions. Metabolic, electrical and insulin secretion levels were measured from islets lacking gap-junction coupling following deletion of connexion36 (Cx36(-/-)), and these results were compared to those obtained using fully isolated β-cells. K(ATP) loss-of-function islets provide a further experimental model to specifically study gap-junction mediated suppression of electrical activity. In isolated β-cells or Cx36(-/-) islets, elevations in [Ca(2+)](i) persisted in a subset of cells even at basal glucose. Isolated β-cells showed elevated insulin secretion at basal glucose; however, insulin secretion from Cx36(-/-) islets was minimally altered. [Ca(2+)](i) was further elevated under basal conditions, but insulin release still suppressed in K(ATP) loss-of-function islets. Forced elevation of cAMP led to PKA-mediated increases in insulin secretion from islets lacking gap-junctions, but not from islets expressing Cx36 gap junctions. We conclude there is a redundancy in how cell-cell communication in the islet suppresses insulin release. Gap junctions suppress cellular heterogeneity and spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) signals, while other juxtacrine mechanisms, regulated by PKA and glucose, suppress more distal steps in exocytosis. Each mechanism is sufficiently robust to compensate for a loss of the other and still suppress basal insulin secretion.

  2. Dietary phenylalanine-improved intestinal barrier health in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with increased immune status and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Li, Wen; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Wu, Pei; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    The present work evaluated the effects of dietary phenylalanine (Phe) on the intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance, and the gene expression of immune- and antioxidant-related signalling molecules in the intestine. In addition, the dietary Phe (and Phe + Tyr) requirement of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) was also estimated. Fish were fed fish meal-casein-gelatin based diets (302.3 g crude protein kg(-1)) containing 3.4 (basal diet), 6.1, 9.1, 11.5, 14.0 and 16.8 g Phe kg(-1) with a fixed amount of 10.7 g tyrosine kg(-1) for 8 weeks. The results showed that Phe deficiency or excess Phe reduced the lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities and complement C 3 content in the intestine (P < 0.05). Moreover, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin and claudin c mRNA levels were highest in the fish fed the diet containing 11.5 g Phe kg(-1) (P < 0.05). However, claudin 12 and claudin b mRNA levels were not significantly affected by dietary Phe (P > 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), target of rapamycin (TOR) and inhibitor of nuclear factor κBα (IκBα) in proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) increased as dietary Phe increased up to 6.1, 9.1, 11.5 and 14.0 g kg(-1), respectively (P < 0.05). However, interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) mRNA levels showed opposite tendencies. In addition, the mRNA level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly lower in the intestinal tissue of the group fed a diet with Phe levels of 16.8 g kg(-1) than in those of other groups (P < 0.05). The expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene was increased as dietary Phe increased up to 9.1 g kg(-1) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Phe improved intestinal immune status, and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, and Nrf2 in the fish

  3. Changes in barrier health status of the gill for grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) during valine deficiency: Regulation of tight junction protein transcript, antioxidant status and apoptosis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Luo, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on tight junction protein transcription, antioxidant status and apoptosis on grass carp gills (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Fish were fed six different experimental diets containing graded levels of valine (4.3, 8.0, 10.6, 13.1, 16.7, 19.1 g/kg). The results indicated that valine deficiency decreased Claudin b, Claudin 3, Occludin and ZO-1 transcription and increased Claudin 15 expression in the fish gill (P < 0.05). These effects were partly due to the down-regulation of interleukin 10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and IκB α and the up-regulation of relative mRNA expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor κB P65 (NF-κB P65) (P < 0.05). However, valine deficiency and valine supplementation did not have a significant effect on Claudin c and Claudin 12 expression in grass carp gills (P > 0.05). Valine deficiency also disrupted antioxidant status in the gill by decreasing anti-superoxide radicals and hydroxyl radical capacity, glutathione contents and the activities and mRNA levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (P < 0.05). These results may be ascribed to the down-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), target of rapamycin (TOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and the up-regulation of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) (P < 0.05). Additionally, valine deficiency induced DNA fragmentation via the up-regulation of Caspase 3, Caspase 8 and Caspase 9 expressions (P < 0.05). These results may be ascribed to the improvement in ROS levels in the fish gill (P < 0.05). Taken together, the results showed that valine deficiency impaired the structural integrity of fish gill by disrupted fish antioxidant defenses and regulating the expression of tight junction protein, cytokines, antioxidant

  4. Performance evaluation of multi-junction solar cells by spatially resolved electroluminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lijing; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Shanshan; Cao, Yiyan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Heng; Kang, Junyong

    2015-02-01

    An electroluminescence microscopy combined with a spectroscopy was developed to visually analyze multi-junction solar cells. Triple-junction solar cells with different conversion efficiencies were characterized by using this system. The results showed that the mechanical damages and material defects in solar cells can be clearly distinguished, indicating a high-resolution imaging. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements demonstrated that different types of defects or damages impacted cell performance in various degrees and the electric leakage mostly degraded the EQE. Meanwhile, we analyzed the relationship between electroluminescence intensity and short-circuit current density J SC. The results indicated that the gray value of the electroluminescence image corresponding to the intensity was almost proportional to J SC. This technology provides a potential way to evaluate the current matching status of multi-junction solar cells.

  5. Performance evaluation of multi-junction solar cells by spatially resolved electroluminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lijing; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Shanshan; Cao, Yiyan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Heng; Kang, Junyong

    2015-01-01

    An electroluminescence microscopy combined with a spectroscopy was developed to visually analyze multi-junction solar cells. Triple-junction solar cells with different conversion efficiencies were characterized by using this system. The results showed that the mechanical damages and material defects in solar cells can be clearly distinguished, indicating a high-resolution imaging. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements demonstrated that different types of defects or damages impacted cell performance in various degrees and the electric leakage mostly degraded the EQE. Meanwhile, we analyzed the relationship between electroluminescence intensity and short-circuit current density J SC. The results indicated that the gray value of the electroluminescence image corresponding to the intensity was almost proportional to J SC. This technology provides a potential way to evaluate the current matching status of multi-junction solar cells.

  6. Dysregulation of junctional adhesion molecule-A via p63/GATA-3 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kakuki, Takuya; Kurose, Makoto; Takano, Ken-ichi; Kondoh, Atsushi; Obata, Kazufumi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Miyata, Ryo; Kaneko, Yakuto; Konno, Takumi; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Kohno, Takayuki; Himi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A), which belongs to the IgG superfamily, is a tight junction molecule associated with epithelial and endothelial barrier function. Overexpression of JAM-A is also closely associated with invasion and metastasis of cancers such as breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. However, little is known about the mechanism in overexpression of JAM-A in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the present study, we found high expression of JAM-A at the protein and mRNA levels in HNSCC tissues, including those of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx, together with high protein expression of β-catenin, p63, ΔNp63 and GATA-3. Furthermore, in ELISA, a significant increase of soluble JAM-A in the sera of HNSCC patients was observed compared to healthy subjects. Knockdown of JAM-A by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation, invasion and migration in the HNSCC cell line Detroit562 in vitro. JAM-A expression in Detroit562 was increased via a distinct signal transduction pathway including NF-κB. Expression of JAM-A, β-catenin, p63 and ΔNp63 in Detroit562 was decreased under hypoxia. Knockdown of p63, ΔNp63 or GATA-3 by siRNAs reduced JAM-A expression in Detroit562. In primary cultured HNSCC cells in which CK7, p63, ΔNp63 and GATA-3 were detected, JAM-A expression was decreased by knockdown of p63 or ΔNp63. These results indicate that JAM-A is a biomarker of malignancy in HNSCC and that plasma soluble JAM-A may contribute to serum-based diagnosis of HNSCC. The mechanism of dysregulation of JAM-A via p63/GATA-3 is important in possible molecular targeted therapy for HNSCC. PMID:27036044

  7. Analysis of a four lamp flash system for calibrating multi-junction solar cells under concentrated light

    SciTech Connect

    Schachtner, Michael Prado, Marcelo Loyo; Reichmuth, S. Kasimir; Siefer, Gerald; Bett, Andreas W.

    2015-09-28

    It has been known for a long time that the precise characterization of multi-junction solar cells demands spectrally tunable solar simulators. The calibration of innovative multi-junction solar cells for CPV applications now requires tunable solar simulators which provide high irradiation levels. This paper describes the commissioning and calibration of a flash-based four-lamp simulator to be used for the measurement of multi-junction solar cells with up to four subcells under concentrated light.

  8. Design High-Efficiency III-V Nanowire/Si Two-Junction Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, D; He, S; Li, X

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we report the electrical simulation results of a proposed GaInP nanowire (NW)/Si two-junction solar cell. The NW physical dimensions are determined for optimized solar energy absorption and current matching between each subcell. Two key factors (minority carrier lifetime, surface recombination velocity) affecting power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the solar cell are highlighted, and a practical guideline to design high-efficiency two-junction solar cell is thus provided. Considering the practical surface and bulk defects in GaInP semiconductor, a promising PCE of 27.5 % can be obtained. The results depict the usefulness of integrating NWs to construct high-efficiency multi-junction III-V solar cells.

  9. A cell junction pathology of neural stem cells leads to abnormal neurogenesis and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M; Vío, Karin; González, César; Ortloff, Alexander; Bátiz, Luis F; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, María C; Muñoz, Rosa I; Ortega, Eduardo; Jaque, Jaime; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María D; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Most cells of the developing mammalian brain derive from the ventricular (VZ) and the subventricular (SVZ) zones. The VZ is formed by the multipotent radial glia/neural stem cells (NSCs) while the SVZ harbors the rapidly proliferative neural precursor cells (NPCs). Evidence from human and animal models indicates that the common history of hydrocephalus and brain maldevelopment starts early in embryonic life with disruption of the VZ and SVZ. We propose that a "cell junction pathology" involving adherent and gap junctions is a final common outcome of a wide range of gene mutations resulting in proteins abnormally expressed by the VZ cells undergoing disruption. Disruption of the VZ during fetal development implies the loss of NSCs whereas VZ disruption during the perinatal period implies the loss of ependyma. The process of disruption occurs in specific regions of the ventricular system and at specific stages of brain development. This explains why only certain brain structures have an abnormal development, which in turn results in a specific neurological impairment of the newborn. Disruption of the VZ of the Sylvian aqueduct (SA) leads to aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus, while disruption of the VZ of telencephalon impairs neurogenesis. We are currently investigating whether grafting of NSCs/neurospheres from normal rats into the CSF of hydrocephalic mutants helps to diminish/repair the outcomes of VZ disruption.

  10. Investigation of modified p-n junctions in crystalline silicon on glass solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausch, D.; Werner, M.; Naumann, V.; Schneider, J.; Hagendorf, C.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper various methods for studying p-n junctions in thin film solar cells are applied with the aim to localize and investigate defects on a microscopic scale. Different electron and ion beam characterization methods are introduced to determine the p-n junction position using two different examples from crystalline silicon on glass thin film technology. In a first example, planview and cross section electron beam induced current measurements revealed that oxygen rich columnar growth at textured substrates strongly disturbs the p-n junction. In a second example, diffusion from glass substrate is identified by ToF-SIMS to influence the electrical and structural characteristics of the thin Si layer resulting in a modified p-n junction. A model describing the formation of both defect structures is introduced.

  11. NREL, CSEM Jointly Set New Efficiency Record with Dual-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Scientists set a new world record for converting non-concentrated sunlight into electricity using a dual-junction III-V/Si solar cell. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) scientists have collaborated to create a novel tandem solar cell that operates at 29.8% conversion efficiency under non-concentrator (1-sun) conditions. In comparison, the 1-sun efficiency of a silicon (Si) single-junction solar cell is probably still a few years away from converging on its practical limit of about 26%.

  12. Light-splitting photovoltaic system utilizing two dual-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Kanglin; Yang, Hui; Lu, Shulong; Dong, Jianrong; Zhou, Taofei; Wang, Rongxin; Jiang, Desheng

    2010-12-15

    There are many difficulties limiting the further development of monolithic multi-junction solar cells, such as the growth of lattice-mismatched material and the current matching constraint. As an alternative approach, the light-splitting photovoltaic system is investigated intensively in different aspects, including the energy loss mechanism and the choice of energy bandgaps of solar cells. Based on the investigation, a two-dual junction system has been implemented employing lattice-matched GaInP/GaAs and InGaAsP/InGaAs cells grown epitaxially on GaAs and InP substrates, respectively. (author)

  13. Mic13 Is Essential for Formation of Crista Junctions in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ruchika; Strecker, Valentina; Urbach, Jennifer; Wittig, Ilka; Reichert, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are connected to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions which are implicated in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, and import of lipids and proteins. The MICOS complex determines formation of crista junctions. We performed complexome profiling and identified Mic13, also termed Qil1, as a subunit of the MICOS complex. We show that MIC13 is an inner membrane protein physically interacting with MIC60, a central subunit of the MICOS complex. Using the CRISPR/Cas method we generated the first cell line deleted for MIC13. These knockout cells show a complete loss of crista junctions demonstrating that MIC13 is strictly required for the formation of crista junctions. MIC13 is required for the assembly of MIC10, MIC26, and MIC27 into the MICOS complex. However, it is not needed for the formation of the MIC60/MIC19/MIC25 subcomplex suggesting that the latter is not sufficient for crista junction formation. MIC13 is also dispensable for assembly of respiratory chain complexes and for maintaining mitochondrial network morphology. Still, lack of MIC13 resulted in a moderate reduction of mitochondrial respiration. In summary, we show that MIC13 has a fundamental role in crista junction formation and that assembly of respiratory chain supercomplexes is independent of mitochondrial cristae shape. PMID:27479602

  14. Mic13 Is Essential for Formation of Crista Junctions in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ruchika; Strecker, Valentina; Urbach, Jennifer; Wittig, Ilka; Reichert, Andreas S

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are connected to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions which are implicated in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, and import of lipids and proteins. The MICOS complex determines formation of crista junctions. We performed complexome profiling and identified Mic13, also termed Qil1, as a subunit of the MICOS complex. We show that MIC13 is an inner membrane protein physically interacting with MIC60, a central subunit of the MICOS complex. Using the CRISPR/Cas method we generated the first cell line deleted for MIC13. These knockout cells show a complete loss of crista junctions demonstrating that MIC13 is strictly required for the formation of crista junctions. MIC13 is required for the assembly of MIC10, MIC26, and MIC27 into the MICOS complex. However, it is not needed for the formation of the MIC60/MIC19/MIC25 subcomplex suggesting that the latter is not sufficient for crista junction formation. MIC13 is also dispensable for assembly of respiratory chain complexes and for maintaining mitochondrial network morphology. Still, lack of MIC13 resulted in a moderate reduction of mitochondrial respiration. In summary, we show that MIC13 has a fundamental role in crista junction formation and that assembly of respiratory chain supercomplexes is independent of mitochondrial cristae shape. PMID:27479602

  15. Tight Junction Protein 1 Modulates Proteasome Capacity and Proteasome Inhibitor Sensitivity in Multiple Myeloma via EGFR/JAK1/STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-Ding; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Lin, Heather; Mulligan, George; Li, Bin; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee W; Qi, Lin; Xu, Jianliang; Hunziker, Walter; Barlogie, Bart; Usmani, Saad Z; Zhang, Qing; Crowley, John; Hoering, Antje; Shah, Jatin J; Weber, Donna M; Manasanch, Elisabet E; Thomas, Sheeba K; Li, Bing-Zong; Wang, Hui-Han; Zhang, Jiexin; Kuiatse, Isere; Tang, Jin-Le; Wang, Hua; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Milan, Enrico; Cenci, Simone; Ma, Wen-Cai; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Davis, Richard Eric; Yang, Lin; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2016-05-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have revolutionized outcomes in multiple myeloma, but they are used empirically, and primary and secondary resistance are emerging problems. We have identified TJP1 as a determinant of plasma cell proteasome inhibitor susceptibility. TJP1 suppressed expression of the catalytically active immunoproteasome subunits LMP7 and LMP2, decreased proteasome activity, and enhanced proteasome inhibitor sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. This occurred through TJP1-mediated suppression of EGFR/JAK1/STAT3 signaling, which modulated LMP7 and LMP2 levels. In the clinic, high TJP1 expression in patient myeloma cells was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of responding to bortezomib and a longer response duration, supporting the use of TJP1 as a biomarker to identify patients most likely to benefit from proteasome inhibitors. PMID:27132469

  16. A Functional Assay for Gap Junctional Examination; Electroporation of Adherent Cells on Indium-Tin Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Geletu, Mulu; Guy, Stephanie; Firth, Kevin; Raptis, Leda

    2014-01-01

    In this technique, cells are cultured on a glass slide that is partly coated with indium-tin oxide (ITO), a transparent, electrically conductive material. A variety of molecules, such as peptides or oligonucleotides can be introduced into essentially 100% of the cells in a non-traumatic manner.  Here, we describe how it can be used to study intercellular, gap junctional communication. Lucifer yellow penetrates into the cells when an electric pulse, applied to the conductive surface on which they are growing, causes pores to form through the cell membrane. This is electroporation. Cells growing on the nonconductive glass surface immediately adjacent to the electroporated region do not take up Lucifer yellow by electroporation but do acquire the fluorescent dye as it is passed to them via gap junctions that link them to the electroporated cells. The results of the transfer of dye from cell to cell can be observed microscopically under fluorescence illumination. This technique allows for precise quantitation of gap junctional communication. In addition, it can be used for the introduction of peptides or other non-permeant molecules, and the transfer of small electroporated peptides via gap junctions to inhibit the signal in the adjacent, non-electroporated cells is a powerful demonstration of signal inhibition. PMID:25350637

  17. Tracking Epithelial Cell Junctions in C. elegans Embryogenesis With Active Contours Guided by SIFT Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Yu; Gonçalves, Monira; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Cosman, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of cell shape in live samples is an important goal in developmental biology. Automated or semiautomated segmentation and tracking of cell nuclei has been successfully implemented in several biological systems. Segmentation and tracking of cell surfaces has been more challenging. Here, we present a new approach to tracking cell junctions in the developing epidermis of C. elegans embryos. Epithelial junctions as visualized with DLG-1::GFP form lines at the subapical circumference of differentiated epidermal cells and delineate changes in epidermal cell shape and position. We develop and compare two approaches for junction segmentation. For the first method (projection approach), 3-D cell boundaries are projected into 2D for segmentation using active contours with a nonintersecting force, and subsequently tracked using scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) flow. The resulting 2-D tracked boundaries are then back-projected into 3-D space. The second method (volumetric approach) uses a 3-D extended version of active contours guided by SIFT flow in 3-D space. In both methods, cell junctions are manually located at the first time point and tracked in a fully automated way for the remainder of the video. Using these methods, we have generated the first quantitative description of ventral epidermal cell movements and shape changes during epidermal enclosure. PMID:24771564

  18. Relative Roles of Gap Junction Channels and Cytoplasm in Cell-to-Cell Diffusion of Fluorescent Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranyos, Richard G. A.; Caveney, Stanley; Miller, James G.; Petersen, Nils O.

    1987-04-01

    Intercellular (tissue) diffusion of molecules requires cytoplasmic diffusion and diffusion through gap junctional (or cell-to-cell) channels. The rates of tissue and cytoplasmic diffusion of fluorescent tracers, expressed as an effective diffusion coefficient, De, and a cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient, Dcyt, have been measured among the developing epidermal cells of a larval beetle, Tenebrio molitor L., to determine the contribution of the junctional channels to intercellular diffusion. Tracer diffusion was measured by injecting fluorescent tracers into cells and quantitating the rate of subsequent spread into adjacent cells. Cytoplasmic diffusion was determined by fluorescence photobleaching. These experiments show that gap junctional channels constitute approximately 70-80% of the total cell-to-cell resistance to the diffusion of organic tracers at high concentrations in this tissue. At low concentrations, however, the binding of tracer to cytoplasm slows down the cytoplasmic diffusion, which may limit intercellular diffusion.

  19. Microfluidic application-specific integrated device for monitoring direct cell-cell communication via gap junctions between individual cell pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Philip J.; Hung, Paul J.; Shaw, Robin; Jan, Lily; Lee, Luke P.

    2005-05-01

    Direct cell-cell communication between adjacent cells is vital for the development and regulation of functional tissues. However, current biological techniques are difficult to scale up for high-throughput screening of cell-cell communication in an array format. In order to provide an effective biophysical tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of gap junctions that underlie intercellular communication, we have developed a microfluidic device for selective trapping of cell-pairs and simultaneous optical characterizations. Two different cell populations can be brought into membrane contact using an array of trapping channels with a 2μm by 2μm cross section. Device operation was verified by observation of dye transfer between mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) placed in membrane contact. Integration with lab-on-a-chip technologies offers promising applications for cell-based analytical tools such as drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and soft-state biophysical devices for the study of gap junction protein channels in cellular communications. Understanding electrical transport mechanisms via gap junctions in soft membranes will impact quantitative biomedical sciences as well as clinical applications.

  20. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, P<0.05) following a 2h incubation with oxaliplatin. Adding carbenoxolone to the oxaliplatin-treated cultures reversed oxaliplatin-evoked coupling to baseline (P<0.05). Immunostaining showed no difference between expression of connexin 43 in control and oxaliplatin-treated cultures. Our findings indicated that oxaliplatin-increased gap junction-mediated coupling between satellite glial cells in primary cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia, and carbenoxolone reversed this effect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment. PMID:25999145

  1. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, P<0.05) following a 2h incubation with oxaliplatin. Adding carbenoxolone to the oxaliplatin-treated cultures reversed oxaliplatin-evoked coupling to baseline (P<0.05). Immunostaining showed no difference between expression of connexin 43 in control and oxaliplatin-treated cultures. Our findings indicated that oxaliplatin-increased gap junction-mediated coupling between satellite glial cells in primary cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia, and carbenoxolone reversed this effect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment.

  2. The Environmental Performance at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) of High Efficiency Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert; Davis, Gregory; Distefano, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    A number of JPL missions, either active or in the p l d g stages, require the accurate LILT flew intensity - low temperate) climate of triple-junction solar. Although triple ignition LILT pe