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Sample records for cell toll-like receptor-2

  1. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Daniela S.; Soria, Javier A.; Gaviglio, Emilia A.; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Cancela, Liliana M.; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C.; Wang, Ji Ming; Iribarren, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and become activated in pathological conditions, resulting in microgliosis, manifested by increased cell numbers and inflammation in the affected regions. Thus, controlling microgliosis is important to prevent pathological damage to the brain. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to microglial survival. We observed that activation of microglial cells with peptidoglycan (PGN) from Staphylococcus aureus and other TLR2 ligands results in cell activation followed by the induction of autophagy and autophagy-dependent cell death. In C57BL/6J mice, intracerebral injection of PGN increased the autophagy of microglial cells and reduced the microglial/macrophage cell number in brain parenchyma. Our results demonstrate a novel role of TLRs in the regulation of microglial cell activation and survival, which are important for the control of microgliosis and associated inflammatory responses in the CNS.—Arroyo, D. S., Soria, J. A., Gaviglio, E. A., Garcia-Keller, C., Cancela, L. M., Rodriguez-Galan, M. C., Wang, J. M., Iribarren, P. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy. PMID:23073832

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Daniela S; Soria, Javier A; Gaviglio, Emilia A; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Cancela, Liliana M; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C; Wang, Ji Ming; Iribarren, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and become activated in pathological conditions, resulting in microgliosis, manifested by increased cell numbers and inflammation in the affected regions. Thus, controlling microgliosis is important to prevent pathological damage to the brain. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to microglial survival. We observed that activation of microglial cells with peptidoglycan (PGN) from Staphylococcus aureus and other TLR2 ligands results in cell activation followed by the induction of autophagy and autophagy-dependent cell death. In C57BL/6J mice, intracerebral injection of PGN increased the autophagy of microglial cells and reduced the microglial/macrophage cell number in brain parenchyma. Our results demonstrate a novel role of TLRs in the regulation of microglial cell activation and survival, which are important for the control of microgliosis and associated inflammatory responses in the CNS. PMID:23073832

  3. Activation of toll-like receptor-2 by endogenous matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulates dendritic-cell-mediated inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Gallois, Anne; Idoyaga, Juliana; Merad, Miriam; Tung, Navpreet; Monu, Ngozi; Saenger, Yvonne; Fu, Yichun; Ravindran, Rajesh; Pulendran, Bali; Jotereau, Francine; Trombetta, Sergio; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2014-12-11

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is involved in several physiological mechanisms, including wound healing and tumor progression. We show that MMP-2 directly stimulates dendritic cells (DCs) to both upregulate OX40L on the cell surface and secrete inflammatory cytokines. The mechanism underlying DC activation includes physical association with Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), leading to NF-κB activation, OX40L upregulation on DCs, and ensuing TH2 differentiation. Significantly, MMP-2 polarizes T cells toward type 2 responses in vivo, in a TLR2-dependent manner. MMP-2-dependent type 2 polarization may represent a key immune regulatory mechanism for protection against a broad array of disorders, such as inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases, which can be hijacked by tumors to evade immunity.

  4. Activation of Toll-like receptor-2 by endogenous matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulates dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Gallois, Anne; Idoyaga, Juliana; Merad, Miriam; Tung, Navpreet; Monu, Ngozi; Saenger, Yvonne; Fu, Yichun; Nair, Rajesh; Pulendran, Bali; Jotereau, Francine; Trombetta, Sergio; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is involved in several physiological mechanisms, including wound healing and tumor progression. We show that MMP-2 directly stimulates dendritic cells (DCs) to both up-regulate OX40L on the cell surface and secrete inflammatory cytokines. The mechanism underlying DC activation includes physical association with Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), leading to NF-κB activation, OX40L up-regulation on DCs and ensuing TH2 differentiation. Significantly, MMP-2 polarizes T cells towards type-2 responses in vivo, in a TLR2-dependent manner. MMP-2-dependent type-2 polarization may represent a key immune regulatory mechanism to protect against a broad array of disorders, such as inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune diseases, which can be hijacked by tumors to evade immunity. PMID:25466255

  5. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated modulation of growth and functions of regulatory T cells by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Saeki, A; Segawa, T; Abe, T; Sugiyama, M; Arimoto, T; Hara, H; Hasebe, A; Ohtani, M; Tanizume, N; Ohuchi, M; Kataoka, H; Kawanami, M; Yokoyama, A; Shibata, K

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether oral streptococci modulate the growth and functions of regulatory T cells. Heat-killed cells of wild-type strains of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans induced the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) -mediated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, but their lipoprotein-deficient strains did not. Stimulation with these streptococci resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in splenocytes derived from both TLR2(+/+) and TLR2(-/-) mice, but the level of increase in TLR2(+/+) splenocytes was stronger than that in TLR2(-/-) splenocytes. Both strains of S. gordonii enhanced the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells isolated from TLR2(+/+) mice at the same level as those from TLR2(-/-) mice in an interleukin-2-independent manner. However, wild-type and lipoprotein-deficient strains of both streptococci did not enhance the suppressive activity of the isolated regulatory T cells in vitro, but rather inhibited it. TLR ligands also inhibited the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Inhibition of the suppressive activity was recovered by the addition of anti-IL-6 antibody. Pretreatment of antigen-presenting cells with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 enhanced the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. These results suggested that interleukin-6 produced by antigen-presenting cells inhibits the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Wild-type strain, but not lipoprotein-deficient strain, of S. gordonii reduced the frequency of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the acute infection model, whereas both strains of S. gordonii increased it in the chronic infection model mice. Hence, this study suggests that oral streptococci are capable of modulating the growth and functions of regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Mast cell toll-like receptor 2 signaling is crucial for effective killing of Francisella tularensis1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Annette R.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M. N.; Navara, Christopher S.; Klose, Karl E.; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Chambers, James P.; Berton, Michael T.; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is critical for early host defense against pathogens, but the contribution of mast cell TLR-mediated mechanisms and subsequent effector functions during pulmonary infection is largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that mast cells, through the production of IL-4, effectively control Francisella tularensis replication. In this study, the highly human virulent strain of F. tularensis SCHU S4 and the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) were utilized to investigate the contribution of mast cell-TLR regulation of Francisella. Mast cells required TLR2 for effective bacterial killing, regulation of the hydrolytic enzyme cathepsin L, and for coordination and trafficking of MHCII and lysosomal associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2). Infected TLR2−/− mast cells, in contrast to WT and TLR4−/−, lacked detectable IL-4 and displayed increased cell death with a 2–3 log increase of F. tularensis replication, but could be rescued with recombinant IL-4 treatment. Importantly, MHCII and LAMP2 localization with labeled F. tularensis in the lungs was greater in WT than in TLR2−/− mice. These results provide evidence for the important effector contribution of mast cells and TLR2-mediated signaling on early innate processes in the lung following pulmonary F. tularensis infection and provide additional insight into possible mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens modulate respiratory immune defenses. PMID:22529298

  7. Ligand-induced differential cross-regulation of Toll-like receptors 2, 4 and 5 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Aubel, Rémon A M H; Keestra, A Marijke; Krooshoop, Daniëlle J E B; van Eden, Willem; van Putten, Jos P M

    2007-07-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, TLR4 and TLR5 are primary mucosal sensors of microbial patterns. Dissection of the cross-talk between TLRs in intestinal cells has thus far been hampered by the lack of functional TLR2 and TLR4 in in vitro model systems. Here we report that the mouse intestinal epithelial cell line mIC(cl2) expresses these TLRs and that receptor expression and function are regulated by environmental TLR stimuli. Our results show that stimulation of TLR5 by bacterial flagellin resulted in upregulated TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA and concomitant sensitization of the cells for subsequent TLR2 (Pam(3)CSK(4)) and TLR4 (LPS) stimulation. Exposure to low amounts of either Pam(3)CSK(4) or LPS in turn downregulated TLR5 mRNA and attenuated subsequent flagellin-mediated NF-kappaB activation, pointing to a negative feedback mechanism. Pam(3)CSK(4) and LPS also downregulated TLR4 mRNA but upregulated TLR2 mRNA and sensitized cells for subsequent TLR2 stimulation. Inhibition of the phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway only affected LPS-mediated TLR cross-talk indicating that differential TLR cross-regulation was conferred via different mechanisms. Together, our results demonstrate that the expression and function of TLR in intestinal cells are highly dynamic and tightly regulated in response to encountered bacterial stimuli. PMID:17493681

  8. Serum Amyloid A Promotes E-Selectin Expression via Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the periodontium. Recent studies suggest an association between periodontal and cardiovascular diseases. However, the detailed molecular mechanism is unknown. A previous study has demonstrated that experimental periodontitis induces serum amyloid A (SAA) in the liver and peripheral blood of ApoE-deficient mice as an atherosclerosis model. SAA is an acute-phase protein that affects systemic inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate the atherosclerosis-onset mechanism using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) stimulated by SAA in vitro. Atherosclerosis PCR array and qPCR analyses showed upregulation of adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and E-selectin in HAECs upon SAA stimulation. In addition, the results demonstrated that Toll-like receptor, TLR2, could serve as an important receptor of SAA in HAECs. Furthermore, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against TLR2 inhibited the upregulation of adhesion molecules in HAECs stimulated by SAA. Our results suggest that SAA stimulates the expression of adhesion molecules via TLR2. SAA could be an important molecule for atherosclerosis induced by periodontal disease. PMID:27799725

  9. Enhancement of toll-like receptor 2-mediated immune responses by AIMP1, a novel cytokine, in mouse dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene; Hong, Hye-Jin; Cho, Daeho; Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Tae Sung

    2011-09-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-interacting protein 1 (AIMP1) is a novel pleiotropic cytokine that was identified initially from Meth A-induced fibrosarcoma. It is expressed in the salivary glands, small intestine and large intestine, and is associated with the innate immune system. Previously, we demonstrated that AIMP1 might function as a regulator of innate immune responses by inducing the maturation and activation of bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs). Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are major pathogen-recognition receptors that are constitutively expressed on DCs. In this study, we attempted to determine whether AIMP1 is capable of regulating the expression of TLRs, and also capable of affecting the TLR-mediated activation of DCs. Expression of TLR1, -2, -3 and -7 was highly induced by AIMP1 treatment in BM-DCs, whereas the expression of other TLRs was either down-regulated or remained unchanged. In particular, the expression of the TLR2 protein was up-regulated by AIMP1 in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, and was suppressed upon the addition of BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB. AIMP1 was also shown to increase nuclear factor-κB binding activity. Importantly, AIMP1 enhanced the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-12, and the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on BM-DCs when combined with lipoteichoic acid or Pam3Cys, two well-known TLR2 agonists. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the AIMP1 protein enhances TLR2-mediated immune responses via the up-regulation of TLR2 expression.

  10. Enhancement of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated immune responses by AIMP1, a novel cytokine, in mouse dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene; Hong, Hye-Jin; Cho, Daeho; Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Tae Sung

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-interacting protein 1 (AIMP1) is a novel pleiotropic cytokine that was identified initially from Meth A-induced fibrosarcoma. It is expressed in the salivary glands, small intestine and large intestine, and is associated with the innate immune system. Previously, we demonstrated that AIMP1 might function as a regulator of innate immune responses by inducing the maturation and activation of bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs). Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are major pathogen-recognition receptors that are constitutively expressed on DCs. In this study, we attempted to determine whether AIMP1 is capable of regulating the expression of TLRs, and also capable of affecting the TLR-mediated activation of DCs. Expression of TLR1, -2, -3 and -7 was highly induced by AIMP1 treatment in BM-DCs, whereas the expression of other TLRs was either down-regulated or remained unchanged. In particular, the expression of the TLR2 protein was up-regulated by AIMP1 in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, and was suppressed upon the addition of BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB. AIMP1 was also shown to increase nuclear factor-κB binding activity. Importantly, AIMP1 enhanced the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-12, and the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on BM-DCs when combined with lipoteichoic acid or Pam3Cys, two well-known TLR2 agonists. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the AIMP1 protein enhances TLR2-mediated immune responses via the up-regulation of TLR2 expression. PMID:21711348

  11. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated peptidoglycan uptake by immature intestinal epithelial cells from apical side and exosome-associated transcellular transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Heng-Fu; Wang, Xiao; Tang, Yi; Koti, Viola; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is a potent immune adjuvant derived from bacterial cell walls. Previous investigations suggest that intestinal epithelium may absorb peptidoglycan from the lumen. Nonetheless, how peptidoglycan is taken up and crosses intestinal epithelium remains largely unclear. Here, we first characterized peptidoglycan transport in vitro using IEC-18 and HT29-CL19A cells, which represent less mature epithelial cells in intestinal crypts. With fluorescent microscopy, we visualized internalization of dual-labeled peptidoglycan by enterocytes. Engulfed peptidoglycan was found to form a complex with peptidoglycan recognition protein-3, which may facilitate delivering peptidoglycan in vivo. Utilizing electronic microscopy, we revealed that uptake of apical peptidoglycan across intestinal epithelial monolayers was involved in phagocytosis, multivesicular body formation, and exosome secretion. We also studied transport of peptidoglycan using the transwell system. Our data indicated that apically loaded peptidoglycan was exocytosed to the basolateral compartment with exosomes by HT29-CL19A cells. The peptidoglycan-contained basolateral exosome extracts induced macrophage activation. Through gavaging mice with labeled peptidoglycan, we found that luminal peptidoglycan was taken up by columnar epithelial cells in crypts of the small intestine. Furthermore, we showed that pre-confluent immature but not post-confluent mature C2BBe1 cells engulfed peptidoglycan via a toll-like receptor 2-dependent manner. Together, our findings suggest that (1) crypt-based immature intestinal epithelial cells play an important role in transport of luminal peptidoglycan over the intestinal epithelium; and (2) luminal peptidoglycan is transcytosed across intestinal epithelia via a toll-like receptor 2-meciated phagocytosis-multivesicular body-exosome pathway. The absorbed peptidoglycan and its derivatives may facilitate maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:20020500

  12. Patency of Litomosoides sigmodontis infection depends on Toll-like receptor 4 whereas Toll-like receptor 2 signalling influences filarial-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Maria B; Schulz, Sandy; Krupp, Vanessa; Ritter, Manuel; Wiszniewsky, Katharina; Arndts, Kathrin; Tamadaho, Ruth S E; Endl, Elmar; Hoerauf, Achim; Layland, Laura E

    2016-04-01

    BALB/c mice develop a patent state [release of microfilariae (Mf), the transmission life-stage, into the periphery] when exposed to the rodent filariae Litomosoides sigmodontis. Interestingly, only a portion of the infected mice become patent, which reflects the situation in human individuals infected with Wuchereria bancrofti. Since those individuals had differing filarial-specific profiles, this study compared differences in immune responses between Mf(+) and Mf(-) infected BALB/c mice. We demonstrate that cultures of total spleen or mediastinal lymph node cells from Mf(+) mice produce significantly more interleukin-5 (IL-5) to filarial antigens but equal levels of IL-10 when compared with Mf(-) mice. However, isolated CD4(+) T cells from Mf(+) mice produced significantly higher amounts of all measured cytokines, including IL-10, when compared with CD4(+) T-cell responses from Mf(-) mice. Since adaptive immune responses are influenced by triggering the innate immune system we further studied the immune profiles and parasitology in infected Toll-like receptor-2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) and TLR4(-/-) BALB/c mice. Ninety-three per cent of L. sigmodontis-exposed TLR4(-/-) BALB/c mice became patent (Mf(+)) although worm numbers remained comparable to those in Mf(+) wild-type controls. Lack of TLR2 had no influence on patency outcome or worm burden but infected Mf(+) mice had significantly lower numbers of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and dampened peripheral immune responses. Interestingly, in vitro culturing of CD4(+) T cells from infected wild-type mice with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived TLR2(-/-) dendritic cells resulted in an overall diminished cytokine profile to filarial antigens. Hence, triggering TLR4 or TLR2 during chronic filarial infection has a significant impact on patency and efficient CD4(+) T-cell responses, respectively. PMID:26714796

  13. Patency of Litomosoides sigmodontis infection depends on Toll-like receptor 4 whereas Toll-like receptor 2 signalling influences filarial-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Maria B; Schulz, Sandy; Krupp, Vanessa; Ritter, Manuel; Wiszniewsky, Katharina; Arndts, Kathrin; Tamadaho, Ruth S E; Endl, Elmar; Hoerauf, Achim; Layland, Laura E

    2016-04-01

    BALB/c mice develop a patent state [release of microfilariae (Mf), the transmission life-stage, into the periphery] when exposed to the rodent filariae Litomosoides sigmodontis. Interestingly, only a portion of the infected mice become patent, which reflects the situation in human individuals infected with Wuchereria bancrofti. Since those individuals had differing filarial-specific profiles, this study compared differences in immune responses between Mf(+) and Mf(-) infected BALB/c mice. We demonstrate that cultures of total spleen or mediastinal lymph node cells from Mf(+) mice produce significantly more interleukin-5 (IL-5) to filarial antigens but equal levels of IL-10 when compared with Mf(-) mice. However, isolated CD4(+) T cells from Mf(+) mice produced significantly higher amounts of all measured cytokines, including IL-10, when compared with CD4(+) T-cell responses from Mf(-) mice. Since adaptive immune responses are influenced by triggering the innate immune system we further studied the immune profiles and parasitology in infected Toll-like receptor-2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) and TLR4(-/-) BALB/c mice. Ninety-three per cent of L. sigmodontis-exposed TLR4(-/-) BALB/c mice became patent (Mf(+)) although worm numbers remained comparable to those in Mf(+) wild-type controls. Lack of TLR2 had no influence on patency outcome or worm burden but infected Mf(+) mice had significantly lower numbers of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and dampened peripheral immune responses. Interestingly, in vitro culturing of CD4(+) T cells from infected wild-type mice with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived TLR2(-/-) dendritic cells resulted in an overall diminished cytokine profile to filarial antigens. Hence, triggering TLR4 or TLR2 during chronic filarial infection has a significant impact on patency and efficient CD4(+) T-cell responses, respectively.

  14. Infection of Mast Cells with Live Streptococci Causes a Toll-Like Receptor 2- and Cell-Cell Contact-Dependent Cytokine and Chemokine Response ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rönnberg, Elin; Guss, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are strongly implicated in immunity toward bacterial infection, but the molecular mechanisms by which MCs contribute to the host response are only partially understood. We addressed this issue by examining the direct effects of a Gram-positive pathogen, Streptococcus equi, on bone marrow-derived MCs (BMMCs). Ultrastructural analysis revealed extensive formation of dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum in response to bacterial infection, indicating strong induction of protein synthesis. However, the BMMCs did not show signs of extensive degranulation, and this was supported by only slow release of histamine in response to infection. Coculture of live bacteria with BMMCs caused a profound secretion of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL7/MCP-3, CXCL2/MIP-2, CCL5/RANTES, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-12, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, as shown by antibody-based cytokine/chemokine arrays and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In contrast, heat-inactivated bacteria caused only minimal cytokine/chemokine release. The cytokine/chemokine responses were substantially attenuated in Toll-like receptor 2-deficient BMMCs and were strongly dependent on cell-cell contacts between bacteria and BMMCs. Gene chip microarray analysis confirmed a massively upregulated expression of the genes coding for the secreted cytokines and chemokines and also identified a pronounced upregulation of numerous additional genes, including transcription factors, signaling molecules, and proteases. Together, the present study outlines MC-dependent molecular events associated with Gram-positive infection and thus provides an advancement in our understanding of how MCs may contribute to host defense toward bacterial insults. PMID:19933827

  15. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Targeted Rectification of Impaired CD8+ T Cell Functions in Experimental Leishmania donovani Infection Reinstates Host Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Syamdas; Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Kumar Jha, Mukesh; Das, Shibali; Halder, Kuntal; Bhattacharyya Majumdar, Suchandra; Saha, Bhaskar; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite, causes the disease visceral leishmanisis (VL), characterized by inappropriate CD8+ T-cell activation. Therefore, we examined whether the Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand Ara-LAM, a cell wall glycolipid from non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis, would restore CD8+ T-cell function during VL. We observed that by efficient upregulation of TLR2 signaling-mediated NF-κB translocation and MAPK signaling in CD8+ T-cells (CD25+CD28+IL-12R+IFN-γR+), Ara-LAM triggered signaling resulted in the activation of T-bet, which in turn, induced transcription favourable histone modification at the IFN-γ, perforin, granzyme-B promoter regions in CD8+ T-cells. Thus, we conclude that Ara-LAM induced efficient activation of effector CD8+ T-cells by upregulating the expression of IFN-γ, perforin and granzyme-B in an NF-κB and MAPK induced T-bet dependent manner in VL. PMID:26559815

  16. A Toll-like receptor 2 agonist-fused antigen enhanced antitumor immunity by increasing antigen presentation and the CD8 memory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiao-Chieh; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    The induction of long-lived effector CD8+ T cells is key to the development of efficient cancer vaccines. In this study, we demonstrated that a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-fused antigen increased antigen presentation via TLR2 signaling and induced effector memory-like CD8+ T cells against cancer after immunization. The N-terminus of ovalbumin (OVA) was biologically fused with a bacterial lipid moiety TLR2 agonist to produce a recombinant lipidated ovalbumin (rlipo-OVA). We demonstrated that rlipo-OVA activated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) maturation and increased antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I via TLR2. After immunization, rlipo-OVA skewed the immune response towards T helper (Th) 1 and induced OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Moreover, immunization with rlipo-OVA induced higher numbers of effector memory (CD44+CD62L−) CD8+ T cells compared with recombinant ovalbumin (rOVA) alone or rOVA mixed with the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4. Accordingly, the CD27+CD43+ effector memory CD8+ T cells expressed high levels of the long-lived CD127 marker. The administration of rlipo-OVA could inhibit tumor growth, but the anti-tumor effects were lost after the depletion of CD8 or CD127 cells in vivo. These findings suggested that the TLR2 agonist-fused antigen induced long-lived memory CD8+ T cells for efficient cancer therapy. PMID:27127171

  17. Characterization, expression analysis and localization pattern of toll-like receptor 1 (tlr1) and toll-like receptor 2 (tlr2) genes in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    PubMed

    He, L B; Wang, H; Luo, L F; Jiang, S H; Liu, L Y; Li, Y M; Huang, R; Liao, L J; Zhu, Z Y; Wang, Y P

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the toll-like receptor 1 (tlr1) and toll-like receptor 2 (tlr2) genes of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella were cloned and characterized. tlr1 and tlr2 were found to be highly expressed in immune system organs such as spleen, middle kidney and heart kidney. The expression level of tlr1 and tlr2 was found to be up-regulated at the later stage of viral challenge process. Moreover, subcellular localization indicated that Tlr1 and Tlr2 shared similar localization pattern and both of them may locate in the plasma membrane of transfected cells. PMID:27221024

  18. The immunologically active oligosaccharides isolated from wheatgrass modulate monocytes via Toll-like receptor-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Che; Lin, Chih-Ru; Tsai, Hsien-Yu; Chen, Chia-Jung; Li, Wen-Tai; Yu, Hui-Ming; Ke, Yi-Yu; Hsieh, Wei-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Ying-Ta; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chen, Shui-Tein; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-06-14

    Wheatgrass is one of the most widely used health foods, but its functional components and mechanisms remain unexplored. Herein, wheatgrass-derived oligosaccharides (WG-PS3) were isolated and found to induce CD69 and Th1 cytokine expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In particular, WG-PS3 directly activated the purified monocytes by inducing the expression of CD69, CD80, CD86, IL-12, and TNF-α but affected NK and T cells only in the presence of monocytes. After further purification and structural analysis, maltoheptaose was identified from WG-PS3 as an immunomodulator. Maltoheptaose activated monocytes via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) signaling, as discovered by pretreatment of blocking antibodies against Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and also determined by click chemistry. This study is the first to reveal the immunostimulatory component of wheatgrass with well defined molecular structures and mechanisms. PMID:23629653

  19. Cutaneous innate immune sensing of Toll-like receptor 2-6 ligands suppresses T cell immunity by inducing myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Skabytska, Yuliya; Wölbing, Florian; Günther, Claudia; Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Chen, Ko-Ming; Guenova, Emmanuella; Demircioglu, Doruk; Kempf, Wolfgang E; Volz, Thomas; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Schaller, Martin; Röcken, Martin; Götz, Friedrich; Biedermann, Tilo

    2014-11-20

    Skin is constantly exposed to bacteria and antigens, and cutaneous innate immune sensing orchestrates adaptive immune responses. In its absence, skin pathogens can expand, entering deeper tissues and leading to life-threatening infectious diseases. To characterize skin-driven immunity better, we applied living bacteria, defined lipopeptides, and antigens cutaneously. We found suppression of immune responses due to cutaneous infection with Gram-positive S. aureus, which was based on bacterial lipopeptides. Skin exposure to Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-6-binding lipopeptides, but not TLR2-1-binding lipopeptides, potently suppressed immune responses through induction of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Investigating human atopic dermatitis, in which Gram-positive bacteria accumulate, we detected high MDSC amounts in blood and skin. TLR2 activation in skin resident cells triggered interleukin-6 (IL-6), which induced suppressive MDSCs, which are then recruited to the skin suppressing T cell-mediated recall responses such as dermatitis. Thus, cutaneous bacteria can negatively regulate skin-driven immune responses by inducing MDSCs via TLR2-6 activation.

  20. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 mediate the capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells to support the proliferation and differentiation of CD34{sup +} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xingbing; Cheng, Qiansong; Li, Lailing; Wang, Jian; Xia, Liang; Xu, Xiucai; Sun, Zimin

    2012-02-01

    Bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are multipotent, nonhematopoietic progenitors in a hematopoietic microenvironment and indispensable for regulating hematopoiesis. Several studies have reported that toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to modulate their biological functions. In this study, we investigated the possible role(s) of TLRs in mediating the hematopoiesis-supporting role of human BM-MSCs. Human BM-MSCs were analyzed for mRNA expression of TLR1-10 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. TLR1-6, but not TLR7-10 were expressed by BM-MSCs. The protein expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was also confirmed by flow cytometry. We further explored the role of TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the capacity of BM-MSCs to support the proliferation and differentiation of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells obtained from cord blood. BM-MSCs increased proliferation of CD34{sup +} cells and promoted the differentiation towards the myeloid lineage 7 or 14 days after co-culture, as well as colony formation by those cells and the production of interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-8, IL-11, stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF), macrophage CSF and granulocyte-macrophage CSF, if MSCs had been stimulated with TLR2 agonist (PAM{sub 3}CSK{sub 4}) or TLR4 agonist (LPS). Interestingly, although these effects were elevated in a different degree, a synergistic effect was not observed in BM-MSCs co-stimulated with PAM{sub 3}CSK{sub 4} and LPS. Together, our findings suggest that TLR2 and TLR4 signaling may indirectly regulate hematopoiesis by modulating BM-MSCs' functions. The increased hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation could be mediated, at least in part, by augmented hematopoiesis-related cytokine production of BM-MSCs.

  1. Kinase RIP3 is dispensable for normal NF-kappa Bs, signaling by the B-cell and T-cell receptors, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, and Toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kim; Sun, Xiaoqing; Dixit, Vishva M

    2004-02-01

    RIP3 is a member of the RIP kinase family. It is expressed in the embryo and in multiple adult tissues, including most hemopoietic cell lineages. Several studies have implicated RIP3 in the regulation of apoptosis and NF-kappa B signaling, but whether RIP3 promotes or attenuates activation of the NF-kappa B family of transcription factors has been controversial. We have generated RIP3-deficient mice by gene targeting and find RIP3 to be dispensable for normal mouse development. RIP3-deficient cells showed normal sensitivity to a variety of apoptotic stimuli and were indistinguishable from wild-type cells in their ability to activate NF-kappa B signaling in response to the following: human tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which selectively engages mouse TNF receptor 1; cross-linking of the B- or T-cell antigen receptors; peptidoglycan, which activates Toll-like receptor 2; and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which stimulates Toll-like receptor 4. Consistent with these observations, RIP3-deficient mice exhibited normal antibody production after immunization with a T-dependent antigen and normal interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-6, and TNF production after LPS treatment. Thus, we can exclude RIP3 as an essential modulator of NF-kappa B signaling downstream of several receptor systems.

  2. Association of Toll-like receptor 2 polymorphisms with gout

    PubMed Central

    CAI, YAN; PENG, YI-HUA; TANG, ZHONG; GUO, XIAO-LAN; QING, YU-FENG; LIANG, SU-HUA; JIANG, HONG; DANG, WANG-TAI; MA, QIANG; HE, CHENG; ZHOU, JING-GUO

    2014-01-01

    Gout is the most common autoinflammatory arthritis characterized by elevated serum urate and recurrent attacks of intra-articular crystal deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) in tissues. The pathogenesis of gout has not been fully determined, although certain genetic factors are involved in the development of gout. Accumulated data suggested that MSU crystal-induced inflammation is a paradigm of innate immunity. As Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the underlying mechanisms of the innate immune response, the present study aimed to investigate whether TLR2 polymorphisms are associated with gout. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (Arg677Trp and Arg753Gln, rs5743708) in TLR2 were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and the −196 to −174 del polymorphism was investigated using the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction in 431 individuals (215 patients with gout and 216 healthy controls). TLR2 Arg677Trp and Arg753Gln genotyping indicated that all the positive samples were of the wild-type genotype. No significant differences in genotype (χ2=1.686, P=0.430) and allele (χ2=1.430, P=0.232) frequencies of the −196 to −174 del polymorphism between the patients with gout and the control groups was observed. Our results suggested that the TLR2 Arg677Trp, Arg753Gln and the −196 to −174 del polymorphisms were not associated with susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis. PMID:24649113

  3. TLR4 Deters Perfusion Recovery and Upregulates Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) in Ischemic Skeletal Muscle and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Benabou, Kelly; Cui, Xiangdong; Madia, Marissa; Tzeng, Edith; Billiar, Timothy; Watkins, Simon; Sachdev, Ulka

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in regulating muscle regeneration and angiogenesis in response to ischemia. TLR2 knockout mice exhibit pronounced skeletal muscle necrosis and abnormal vessel architecture after femoral artery ligation, suggesting that TLR2 signaling is protective during ischemia. TLR4, an important receptor in inflammatory signaling, has been shown to regulate TLR2 expression in other systems. We hypothesize that a similar relationship between TLR4 and TLR2 may exist in hindlimb ischemia in which TLR4 upregulates TLR2, a mediator of angiogenesis and perfusion recovery. We examined the expression of TLR2 in unstimulated and in TLR-agonist treated endothelial cells (ECs). TLR2 expression (low in control ECs) was upregulated by lipopolysaccharide, the danger signal high mobility group box-1, and hypoxia in a TLR4-dependent manner. Endothelial tube formation on Matrigel as well as EC permeability was assessed as in vitro measures of angiogenesis. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that ECs lacking TLR4 formed more tubes, whereas TLR2 knockdown ECs exhibited attenuated tube formation. TLR2 also mediated EC permeability, an initial step during angiogenesis, in response to high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) that is released by cells during hypoxic injury. In vivo, ischemia-induced upregulation of TLR2 required intact TLR4 signaling that mediated systemic inflammation, as measured by local and systemic IL-6 levels. Similar to our in vitro findings, vascular density and limb perfusion were both enhanced in the absence of TLR4 signaling, but not if TLR2 was deleted. These findings indicate that TLR2, in the absence of TLR4, improves angiogenesis and perfusion recovery in response to ischemia. PMID:26181630

  4. Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces bone morphogenetic protein-2 in coronary artery endothelial cells via Toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Ao, Lihua; Shi, Yi; Johnson, Thomas R; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2011-04-01

    Vascular calcification is a common complication in atherosclerosis. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) plays an important role in atherosclerotic vascular calcification. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on BMP-2 protein expression in human coronary artery endothelial cells (CAECs), the roles of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 in oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression, and the signaling pathways involved. Human CAECs were stimulated with oxLDL. The roles of TLR2 and TLR4 in oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression were determined by pretreatment with neutralizing antibody, siRNA, and overexpression. Stimulation with oxLDL increased cellular BMP-2 protein levels in a dose-dependent manner (40-160 μg/ml). Pretreatment with neutralizing antibodies against TLR2 and TLR4 or silencing of these two receptors reduced oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression. Overexpression of TLR2 and TLR4 enhanced the cellular BMP-2 response to oxLDL. Furthermore, oxLDL was co-localized with TLR2 and TLR4. BMP-2 expression was associated with activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Inhibition of NF-κB and ERK1/2 reduced BMP-2 expression whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In conclusion, oxLDL induces BMP-2 expression through TLR2 and TLR4 in human CAECs. The NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in the signaling mechanism. These findings underscore an important role for TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the BMP-2 response to oxLDL in human CAECs and indicate that these two immunoreceptors contribute to the mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic vascular calcification. PMID:21325271

  5. Substance P primes lipoteichoic acid- and Pam3CysSerLys4-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tancowny, Brian P; Karpov, Victor; Schleimer, Robert P; Kulka, Marianna

    2010-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide with neuroimmunoregulatory activity that may play a role in susceptibility to infection. Human mast cells, which are important in innate immune responses, were analysed for their responses to pathogen-associated molecules via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the presence of SP. Human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were activated by SP and TLR ligands including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and mast cell leukotriene and chemokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gene expression by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Mast cell degranulation was determined using a β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) assay. SP treatment of LAD2 up-regulated mRNA for TLR2, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9 while anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) stimulation up-regulated expression of TLR4 only. Flow cytometry and western blot confirmed up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR8. Pretreatment of LAD2 with SP followed by stimulation with Pam3CSK4 or LTA increased production of leukotriene C4 (LTC(4) ) and interleukin (IL)-8 compared with treatment with Pam3CSK4 or LTA alone (>2-fold; P<0·01). SP alone activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) nuclear translocation but also augmented Pam3CSK4 and LTA-mediated 5-LO translocation. Pam3CSK4, LPS and LTA did not induce LAD2 degranulation. SP primed LTA and Pam3CSK4-mediated activation of JNK, p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activated the nuclear translocation of c-Jun, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and cyclic-AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. Pretreatment with SP followed by LTA stimulation synergistically induced production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 protein. SP primes TLR2-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating TLR expression and

  6. Structure-Activity Relationships in Toll-like Receptor-2 agonistic Diacylthioglycerol Lipopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenyan; Li, Rongti; Malladi, Subbalakshmi S.; Warshakoon, Hemamali J.; Kimbrell, Matthew R.; Amolins, Michael W.; Ukani, Rehman; Datta, Apurba; David, Sunil A.

    2010-01-01

    The N-termini of bacterial lipoproteins are acylated with a (S)-(2,3-bisacyloxypropyl)cysteinyl residue. Lipopeptides derived from lipoproteins activate innate immune responses by engaging Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and are highly immunostimulatory and yet without apparent toxicity in animal models. The lipopeptides may therefore be useful as potential immunotherapeutic agents. Previous structure-activity relationships in such lipopeptides have largely been obtained using murine cells and it is now clear that significant species-specific differences exist between human and murine TLR responses. We have examined in detail the role of the highly conserved Cys residue as well as the geometry and stereochemistry of the Cys-Ser dipeptide unit. (R)-diacylthioglycerol analogues are maximally active in reporter gene assays using human TLR2. The Cys-Ser dipeptide unit represents the minimal part-structure, but its stereochemistry was found not to be a critical determinant of activity. The thioether bridge between the diacyl and dipeptide units is crucial, and replacement by an oxoether bridge results in a dramatic decrease in activity. PMID:20302301

  7. Toll-Like Receptor 2 and NLRP3 Cooperate To Recognize a Functional Bacterial Amyloid, Curli

    PubMed Central

    Rapsinski, Glenn J.; Wynosky-Dolfi, Meghan A.; Oppong, Gertrude O.; Tursi, Sarah A.; Wilson, R. Paul; Brodsky, Igor E.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloids are proteins with cross-β-sheet structure that contribute to pathology and inflammation in complex human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes, and secondary amyloidosis. Bacteria also produce amyloids as a component of their extracellular matrix during biofilm formation. Recently, several human amyloids were shown to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to the activation of caspase 1 and production of interleukin 1β (IL-1β). In this study, we investigated the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by bacterial amyloids using curli fibers, produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli. Here, we show that curli fibers activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to the production of IL-1β via caspase 1 activation. Investigation of the underlying mechanism revealed that activation of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) by curli fibers is critical in the generation of IL-1β. Interestingly, activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by curli fibers or by amyloid β of Alzheimer's disease does not cause cell death in macrophages. Overall, these data identify a cross talk between TLR2 and NLRP3 in response to the bacterial amyloid curli and generation of IL-1β as a product of this interaction. PMID:25422268

  8. Stearidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids inhibit interleukin-6 expression in ob/ob mouse adipose stem cells via toll-like receptor-2-mediated pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increases in adipose tissue weight positively correlates with increased circulating inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). We previously have shown that adipose stem cell produce significantly higher levels of IL-6 when compared to other cell types in the adipose tissue in genetically ...

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum reduces Streptococcus pyogenes virulence by modulating the IL-17, IL-23 and Toll-like receptor 2/4 expressions in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Antonietta; Losacco, Antonio; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Domenico, Marina Di; Bevilacqua, Nazario

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a common colonizer of the mucosal layers in the mouth, nose, and pharynx but it is also a major Gram-positive human pathogen that causes infections ranging from pharyngitis to severe systemic diseases. The lactobacilli colonize the oral tracts and are known to protect against colonization by many pathogens. Epithelial cells participate in the innate host defense by expressing a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and TLRs in the interaction with microorganisms. The potentially probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum was investigated for its capacity to influence the innate immune response of HEp-2 and A549 epithelial cells to S. pyogenes infection. In both epithelial cell types, pre-treatment with L. plantarum showed inhibition of S. pyogenes growth and a greater decrease in IL-17 and IL-23 levels compared to the control. Pre-treatment with the anti-TLR2/4 antibody abolished the inhibitory effects of L. plantarum on IL-17 and IL-23 production following S. pyogenes infection, indicating that L. plantarum downregulates TLR2/4-dependent IL-17 and IL-23 production. Overall, our findings suggest that in epithelial cell cultures with S. pyogenes, cytokine responses are modulated by the presence of L. plantarum through the induction of TLR2/TLR4.

  10. Polysaccharide Agaricus blazei Murill stimulates myeloid derived suppressor cell differentiation from M2 to M1 type, which mediates inhibition of tumour immune-evasion via the Toll-like receptor 2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Lingyun; Zhu, Xiangxiang; Wang, Yuehua; Liu, WenWei; Gong, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in tumor-bearing animals and play a critical negative role during tumor immunotherapy. Strategies for inhibition of MDSCs are expected to improve cancer immunotherapy. Polysaccharide Agaricus blazei Murill (pAbM) has been found to have anti-cancer activity, but the underlying mechanism of this is poorly understood. Here, pAbM directly activated the purified MDSCs through inducing the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-12, tumour necrosis factor and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CD86, MHC II, and pSTAT1 of it, and only affected natural killer and T cells in the presence of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) monocytic MDSCs. On further analysis, we demonstrated that pAbM could selectively block the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) signal of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs and increased their M1-type macrophage characteristics, such as producing IL-12, lowering expression of Arginase 1 and increasing expression of iNOS. Extensive study showed that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs by pAbM treatment had less ability to convert the CD4(+) CD25(-) cells into CD4(+) CD25(+) phenotype. Moreover, result from selective depletion of specific cell populations in xenograft mice model suggested that the anti-tumour effect of pAbM was dependent on Gr-1(+ ) CD11b(+) monocytes, nether CD8(+) T cells nor CD4(+) T cells. In addition to, pAbM did not inhibit tumour growth in TLR2(-/-) mice. All together, these results suggested that pAbM, a natural product commonly used for cancer treatment, was a specific TLR2 agonist and had potent anti-tumour effects through the opposite of the suppressive function of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs.

  11. Borrelia garinii Induces CXCL13 Production in Human Monocytes through Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Tobias A.; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Popp, Bernadette; Kastenbauer, Stefan; Fingerle, Volker; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested an important role for the B-cell-attracting chemokine CXCL13 in the B-cell-dominated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infiltrate in patients with neuroborreliosis (NB). High levels of CXCL13 were present in the CSF of NB patients. It has not been clear, however, whether high CSF CXCL13 titers are specific for NB or are a characteristic of other spirochetal diseases as well. Furthermore, the mechanisms leading to the observed CXCL13 expression have not been identified yet. Here we describe similarly elevated CSF CXCL13 levels in patients with neurosyphilis, while pneumococcal meningitis patient CSF do not have high CXCL13 levels. In parallel, challenge of human monocytes in vitro with two of the spirochetal causative organisms, Borrelia garinii (the Borrelia species most frequently found in NB patients) and Treponema pallidum, but not challenge with pneumococci, induced CXCL13 release. This finding implies that a common spirochetal motif is a CXCL13 inducer. Accordingly, we found that the lipid moiety N-palmitoyl-S-(bis[palmitoyloxy]propyl)cystein (Pam3C) (three palmitoyl residues bound to N-terminal cysteine) of the spirochetal lipoproteins is critical for the CXCL13 induction in monocytes. As the Pam3C motif is known to signal via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and an anti-TLR2 monoclonal antibody blocked CXCL13 production of human monocytes incubated with B. garinii, this suggests that TLR2 is a major mediator of Borrelia-induced secretion of CXCL13 from human monocytes. PMID:17562761

  12. Epithelial Cells Augment Barrier Function via Activation of the Toll-Like Receptor 2/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pathway upon Recognition of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Curli Fibrils in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Oppong, Gertrude O.; Rapsinski, Glenn J.; Newman, Tiffanny N.; Nishimori, Jessalyn H.; Biesecker, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Curli fibrils, the best-characterized functional bacterial amyloids, are an important component of enterobacterial biofilms. We have previously shown that curli fibrils are recognized by the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)/TLR1 heterodimer complex. Utilizing polarized T-84 cells, an intestinal epithelial cell line derived from colon carcinoma grown on semipermeable tissue culture inserts, we determined that infection with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium csgBA mutant, which does not express curli, resulted in an increase in intestinal barrier permeability and an increase in bacterial translocation compared to infection with curliated wild-type S. Typhimurium. When the TLR2 downstream signaling molecule phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) was blocked using wortmannin or LY294002, the difference in disruption of the intestinal epithelium and bacterial translocation was no longer observed. Additionally, disruption of polarized T-84 cells treated basolaterally with the TLR5 ligand flagellin was prevented when the polarized cells were simultaneously treated with the synthetic TLR2/TLR1 ligand Pam3CSK4 or with purified curli fibrils in the apical compartment. Similar to in vitro observations, C57BL/6 mice infected with the csgBA mutant suffered increased disruption of the intestinal epithelium and therefore greater dissemination of the bacteria to the mesenteric lymph nodes than mice infected with wild-type S. Typhimurium. The differences in disruption of the intestinal epithelium and bacterial dissemination in the mice infected with csgBA mutant or wild-type S. Typhimurium were not apparent in TLR2-deficient mice. Overall, these studies report for the first time that activation of the TLR2/PI3K pathway by microbial amyloids plays a critical role in regulating the intestinal epithelial barrier as well as monitoring bacterial translocation during infection. PMID:23208603

  13. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative

  14. Serine dipeptide lipids of Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation: Relationship to Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Nemati, Reza; Anstadt, Emily; Liu, Yaling; Son, Young; Zhu, Qiang; Yao, Xudong; Clark, Robert B; Rowe, David W; Nichols, Frank C

    2015-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen strongly associated with loss of attachment and supporting bone for teeth. We have previously shown that the total lipid extract of P. gingivalis inhibits osteoblast differentiation through engagement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis engage both mouse and human TLR2. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether these serine lipids inhibit osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo and whether TLR2 engagement is involved. Osteoblasts were obtained from calvaria of wild type or TLR2 knockout mouse pups that also express the Col2.3GFP transgene. Two classes of serine dipeptide lipids, termed Lipid 654 and Lipid 430, were tested. Osteoblast differentiation was monitored by cell GFP fluorescence and osteoblast gene expression and osteoblast function was monitored as von Kossa stained mineral deposits. Osteoblast differentiation and function were evaluated in calvarial cell cultures maintained for 21 days. Lipid 654 significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation and this inhibition was dependent on TLR2 engagement. Lipid 430 also significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation but these effects were only partially attributed to engagement of TLR2. More importantly, Lipid 430 stimulated TNF-α and RANKL gene expression in wild type cells but not in TLR2 knockout cells. Finally, osteoblast cultures were observed to hydrolyze Lipid 654 to Lipid 430 and this likely occurs through elevated PLA2 activity in the cultured cells. In conclusion, our results show that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation and function at least in part through engagement of TLR2. The Lipid 430 serine class also increased the expression of genes that could increase osteoclast activity. We conclude that Lipid 654 and Lipid 430 have the potential

  15. IMPDHII Protein Inhibits Toll-like Receptor 2-mediated Activation of NF-κB*

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, Julie; Rossi, Anne-Lise; Grimaldi, David; Belaidouni, Nadia; Chafey, Philippe; Clary, Guilhem; Courtine, Emilie; Pene, Frederic; Mira, Jean-Paul; Claessens, Yann-Erick; Chiche, Jean-Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) plays an essential role in innate immunity by the recognition of a large variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. It induces its recruitment to lipid rafts induces the formation of a membranous activation cluster necessary to enhance, amplify, and control downstream signaling. However, the exact composition of the TLR2-mediated molecular complex is unknown. We performed a proteomic analysis in lipopeptide-stimulated THP1 and found IMPDHII protein rapidly recruited to lipid raft. Whereas IMPDHII is essential for lymphocyte proliferation, its biologic function within innate immune signal pathways has not been established yet. We report here that IMPDHII plays an important role in the negative regulation of TLR2 signaling by modulating PI3K activity. Indeed, IMPDHII increases the phosphatase activity of SHP1, which participates to the inactivation of PI3K. PMID:21460227

  16. Microbial Patterns Signaling via Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 5 Contribute to Epithelial Repair, Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Behr, Jürgen; Bals, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) continuously interact with microorganisms and detect their presence via different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Ligation of epithelial TLRs by pathogens is usually associated with the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and antimicrobial factors. In this study, using human airway ECs as a model, we found that detection of microbial patterns via epithelial TLRs directly regulates tissue homeostasis. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and microbial patterns signaling via TLR2 and TLR5 induce a set of non-immune epithelial responses including cell migration, wound repair, proliferation, and survival of primary and cancerous ECs. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) gene targeting, receptor-tyrosine kinase microarray and inhibition studies, we determined that TLR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediate the stimulating effect of microbial patterns on epithelial repair. Microbial patterns signaling via Toll-like receptors 2 and 5 contribute to epithelial repair, growth and survival. This effect is independent of hematopoietic and other cells as well as inflammatory cytokines suggesting that epithelia are able to regulate their integrity in an autonomous non-inflammatory manner by sensing microbes directly via TLRs. PMID:18167552

  17. GENES, IN ADDITION TO TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 2, PLAY A ROLE IN ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streptococcus infection in human populations continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mic...

  18. A critical role of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and its' in vivo ligands in radio-resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fu; Zhang, Chaoxiong; Zhou, Chuanfeng; Sun, Weimin; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Pei; Han, Jiaqi; Xian, Linfeng; Bai, Dongchen; Liu, Hu; Cheng, Ying; Li, Bailong; Cui, Jianguo; Cai, Jianming; Liu, Cong

    2015-08-13

    The role of Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) in radio-resistance remained largely unknown. TLR2 knockout (TLR2(-/-)) mice received radiation of 6.5 Gy, and then were studied. We found that radiation resulted in more severe mortality and morbidity rates in TLR2(-/-) mice. The cause of death in TLR2(-/-) mice may be severe and persistent bone marrow cell loss. Injection of the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 into wild type (WT) mice induced radio-resistance. Myd88(-/-) mice were more susceptible to radiation. In conclusion, our data indicate that, similar to TLR4, TLR2 plays a critical role in radio-resistance.

  19. Evolution of an intronic microsatellite polymorphism in Toll-like receptor 2 among primates.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jae-Joon; Adams, Amelia A; Kim, Ju Han; Holland, Steven M

    2006-09-01

    Nonhuman primates express varying responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: New World monkeys appear to be resistant to tuberculosis (TB) while Old World monkeys seem to be particularly susceptible. The aim of this study was to elucidate the presence of the regulatory guanine-thymine (GT) repeat polymorphisms in intron 2 of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) associated with the development of TB in humans and to determine any variations in these microsatellite polymorphisms in primates. We sequenced the region encompassing the regulatory GT repeat microsatellites in intron 2 of TLR2 in 12 different nonhuman primates using polymerase chain reaction amplification, TA cloning, and automatic sequencing. The nonhuman primates included for this study were as follows: chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), bonobo (Pan paniscus), gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), Celebes ape (Macaca nigra), rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), pigtail macaque (Macaca nemestrina), patas monkey (Erythrocebus patas), spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi), Woolly monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha), tamarin (Saguinus labiatus), and ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). Nucleotide sequences encompassing the regulatory GT repeat region are similar across species and are completely conserved in great apes. However, Old World monkeys lack GT repeats altogether, while New World monkeys and ring-tailed lemurs have much more complex structures around the position of the repeats. In conclusion, the genetic structures encompassing the regulatory GT repeats in intron 2 of human TLR2 are similar among nonhuman primates. The sequence is most conserved in New World monkeys and less in Old World monkeys. PMID:16912902

  20. Toll-like receptor 2 activation depends on lipopeptide shedding by bacterial surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Hanzelmann, Dennis; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Hertlein, Tobias; Stevanovic, Stefan; Macek, Boris; Wolz, Christiane; Götz, Friedrich; Otto, Michael; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis caused by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is a major fatal disease but its molecular basis remains elusive. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been implicated in the orchestration of inflammation and sepsis but its role appears to vary for different pathogen species and clones. Accordingly, Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates differ substantially in their capacity to activate TLR2. Here we show that strong TLR2 stimulation depends on high-level production of phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides in response to the global virulence activator Agr. PSMs are required for mobilizing lipoproteins, the TLR2 agonists, from the staphylococcal cytoplasmic membrane. Notably, the course of sepsis caused by PSM-deficient S. aureus is similar in wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice, but TLR2 is required for protection of mice against PSM-producing S. aureus. Thus, a crucial role of TLR2 depends on agonist release by bacterial surfactants. Modulation of this process may lead to new therapeutic strategies against Gram-positive infections. PMID:27470911

  1. A Role for the Adaptor Proteins TRAM and TRIF in Toll-like Receptor 2 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Nadra J.; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Stenvik, Jørgen; Orning, M. Pontus A.; Zeid-Kilani, Maria V.; Bugge, Marit; Bergstroem, Bjarte; Conlon, Joseph; Husebye, Harald; Hise, Amy G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Espevik, Terje; Lien, Egil

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in sensing invading microbes by host innate immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides, and lipopolysaccharide activates TLR4. TLR2 and TLR4 signal via the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptors MyD88 and MAL, leading to NF-κB activation. TLR4 also utilizes the adaptors TRAM and TRIF, resulting in activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3. Here, we report a new role for TRAM and TRIF in TLR2 regulation and signaling. Interestingly, we observed that TLR2-mediated induction of the chemokine Ccl5 was impaired in TRAM or TRIF deficient macrophages. Inhibition of endocytosis reduced Ccl5 release, and the data also suggested that TRAM and TLR2 co-localize in early endosomes, supporting the hypothesis that signaling may occur from an intracellular compartment. Ccl5 release following lipoprotein challenge additionally involved the kinase Tbk-1 and Irf3, as well as MyD88 and Irf1. Induction of Interferon-β and Ccl4 by lipoproteins was also partially impaired in cells lacking TRIF cells. Our results show a novel function of TRAM and TRIF in TLR2-mediated signal transduction, and the findings broaden our understanding of how Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptor proteins may participate in signaling downstream from TLR2. PMID:25505250

  2. Bovine colostrum enhances natural killer cell activity and immune response in a mouse model of influenza infection and mediates intestinal immunity through toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eric B; Mallet, Jean-François; Duarte, Jairo; Matar, Chantal; Ritz, Barry W

    2014-04-01

    Oral administration of bovine colostrum affects intestinal immunity, including an increased percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. However, effects on NK cell cytotoxic activity and resistance to infection as well as a potential mechanism remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of bovine colostrum (La Belle, Inc, Bellingham, WA) on the NK cytotoxic response to influenza infection and on toll-like receptor (TLR) activity in a primary intestinal epithelial cell culture. We hypothesized that colostrum would increase NK cell activity and that TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking would reduce interleukin 6 production by epithelial cells in response to contact stimulation with colostrum. Four-month-old female C57BL/6 mice were supplemented with 1 g of colostrum per kilogram of body weight before and after infection with influenza A virus (H1N1). Animals were assessed for weight loss, splenic NK cell activity, and lung virus titers. Colostrum-supplemented mice demonstrated less reduction in body weight after influenza infection, indicating a less severe infection, increased NK cell cytotoxicity, and less virus burden in the lungs compared with controls. Colostrum supplementation enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity and improved the immune response to primary influenza virus infection in mice. To investigate a potential mechanism, a primary culture of small intestine epithelial cells was then stimulated with colostrum. Direct activation of epithelial cells resulted in increased interleukin 6 production, which was inhibited with TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking antibodies. The interaction between colostrum and immunity may be dependent, in part, on the interaction of colostrum components with innate receptors at the intestinal epithelium, including TLR-2 and TLR-4. PMID:24774068

  3. Bovine colostrum enhances natural killer cell activity and immune response in a mouse model of influenza infection and mediates intestinal immunity through toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eric B; Mallet, Jean-François; Duarte, Jairo; Matar, Chantal; Ritz, Barry W

    2014-04-01

    Oral administration of bovine colostrum affects intestinal immunity, including an increased percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. However, effects on NK cell cytotoxic activity and resistance to infection as well as a potential mechanism remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of bovine colostrum (La Belle, Inc, Bellingham, WA) on the NK cytotoxic response to influenza infection and on toll-like receptor (TLR) activity in a primary intestinal epithelial cell culture. We hypothesized that colostrum would increase NK cell activity and that TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking would reduce interleukin 6 production by epithelial cells in response to contact stimulation with colostrum. Four-month-old female C57BL/6 mice were supplemented with 1 g of colostrum per kilogram of body weight before and after infection with influenza A virus (H1N1). Animals were assessed for weight loss, splenic NK cell activity, and lung virus titers. Colostrum-supplemented mice demonstrated less reduction in body weight after influenza infection, indicating a less severe infection, increased NK cell cytotoxicity, and less virus burden in the lungs compared with controls. Colostrum supplementation enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity and improved the immune response to primary influenza virus infection in mice. To investigate a potential mechanism, a primary culture of small intestine epithelial cells was then stimulated with colostrum. Direct activation of epithelial cells resulted in increased interleukin 6 production, which was inhibited with TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking antibodies. The interaction between colostrum and immunity may be dependent, in part, on the interaction of colostrum components with innate receptors at the intestinal epithelium, including TLR-2 and TLR-4.

  4. Nerve Growth Factor Is Regulated by Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Human Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Krock, Emerson; Currie, J Brooke; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Haglund, Lisbet

    2016-02-12

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes to the development of chronic pain associated with degenerative connective tissue pathologies, such as intervertebral disc degeneration and osteoarthritis. However, surprisingly little is known about the regulation of NGF in these conditions. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors classically associated with innate immunity but more recently were found to be activated by endogenous alarmins such as fragmented extracellular matrix proteins found in degenerating discs or cartilage. In this study we investigated if TLR activation regulates NGF and which signaling mechanisms control this response in intervertebral discs. TLR2 agonists, TLR4 agonists, or IL-1β (control) treatment increased NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and IL-1β gene expression in human disc cells isolated from healthy, pain-free organ donors. However, only TLR2 activation or IL-1β treatment increased NGF protein secretion. TLR2 activation increased p38, ERK1/2, and p65 activity and increased p65 translocation to the cell nucleus. JNK activity was not affected by TLR2 activation. Inhibition of NF-κB, and to a lesser extent p38, but not ERK1/2 activity, blocked TLR2-driven NGF up-regulation at both the transcript and protein levels. These results provide a novel mechanism of NGF regulation in the intervertebral disc and potentially other pathogenic connective tissues. TLR2 and NF-κB signaling are known to increase cytokines and proteases, which accelerate matrix degradation. Therefore, TLR2 or NF-κB inhibition may both attenuate chronic pain and slow the degenerative progress in vivo. PMID:26668319

  5. Increased expression of CD25, CD83, and CD86, and secretion of IL-12, IL-23, and IL-10 by human dendritic cells incubated in the presence of Toll-like receptor 2 ligands and Giardia duodenalis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effects of Giardia duodenalis on dendritic cell (DC) functions may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic giardiasis. G. duodenalis lysate has been shown to inhibit the activation of murine DCs through the ligands of various Toll-like receptors (TLRs), including TLR2 and TLR4. Our study aimed at translating these findings to human DCs. Findings As described previously for murine DCs, also human DCs were only weakly activated by the parasite itself. LPS-stimulated DCs incubated in the presence of G. duodenalis lysate produced less IL-12/23p40 (p = 0.002), IL-12p70 (p = 0.011), and IL-23 (p = 0.004), but more IL-10 (p = 0.006) than cells incubated in the absence of the parasite. Concomitantly, the expression of CD25, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR was reduced on G. duodenalis-incubated DCs as compared to control cells. In contrast, human DCs stimulated through TLR2 in combination with TLR1 or TLR6 and G. duodenalis lysate secreted significantly more IL-12/23p40 (p = 0.006), IL-23 (p = 0.002), and IL-10 (p = 0.014) than cells stimulated through TLR2 ligands alone. Ligands for TLR2/TLR1 or TLR2/TLR6 also induced enhanced extracellular expression of CD25, CD83, and CD86 (p < 0.05). Conclusions In contrast to murine DCs, human DCs incubated in the presence of G. duodenalis and stimulated through TLR2 show increased activation as compared to cells incubated in the absence of the parasite. Thus, TLR2 ligands, e.g., delivered by probiotic lactobacilli, might be beneficial in human giardiasis through an adjuvant effect on the induction of cellular immune responses against G. duodenalis. PMID:24499474

  6. Insights into Soluble Toll-Like Receptor 2 as a Downregulator of Virally Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Henrick, Bethany M.; Yao, Xiao-Dan; Taha, Ameer Y.; German, J. Bruce; Rosenthal, Kenneth Lee

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish pathogens from self-antigens is one of the most important functions of the immune system. However, this simple self versus non-self assignment belies the complexity of the immune response to threats. Immune responses vary widely and appropriately according to a spectrum of threats and only recently have the mechanisms for controlling this highly textured process emerged. A primary mechanism by which this controlled decision-making process is achieved is via Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and the subsequent activation of the immune response coincident with the presence of pathogenic organisms or antigens, including lipid mediators. While immune activation is important, the appropriate regulation of such responses is also critical. Recent findings indicate a parallel pathway by which responses to both viral and bacterial infections is controlled via the secretion of soluble TLR2 (sTLR2). sTLR2 is able to bind a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). sTLR2 has been detected in many bodily fluids and is thus ubiquitous in sites of pathogen appearance. Interestingly, growing evidence suggests that sTLR2 functions to sequester PAMPs and DAMPs to avoid immune activation via detection of cellular-expressed TLRs. This immune regulatory function would serve to reduce the expression of the molecules required for cellular entry, and the recruitment of target cells following infection with bacteria and viruses. This review provides an overview of sTLR2 and the research regarding the mechanisms of its immune regulatory properties. Furthermore, the role of this molecule in regulating immune activation in the context of HIV infection via sTLR2 in breast milk provides actionable insights into therapeutic targets across a variety of infectious and inflammatory states. PMID:27531999

  7. Heat stress upregulation of Toll-like receptors 2/4 and acute inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) of Bama miniature pigs: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ju, X-H; Xu, H-J; Yong, Y-H; An, L-L; Jiao, P-R; Liao, M

    2014-09-01

    Global warming is a challenge to animal health, because of increased heat stress, with subsequent induction of immunosuppression and increased susceptibility to disease. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that act as sentinels of pathogen invasion and tissue damage. Ligation of TLRs results in a signaling cascade and production of inflammatory cytokines, which eradicate pathogens and maintain the health of the host. We hypothesized that the TLR signaling pathway plays a role in immunosuppression in heat-stressed pigs. We explored the changes in the expression of TLR2, TLR4 and the concentration of acute inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-2, IL-8, IL-12 and IFN-γ in Bama miniature pigs subjected to 21 consecutive days of heat stress, both in vitro and in vivo models. The results showed that heat stress induced the upregulation of cortisol in the plasma of pigs (P<0.05); TLR4 mRNA was elevated, but IL-2 was reduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, P<0.05). The white blood cell count and the percentage of granulocytes (eosinophilic+basophilic) decreased significantly in heat-stressed pigs (P<0.05). In the in vitro model (PBMC heat shocked for 1 h followed by a 9 h recovery period), TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression also increased, as did the concentration of IL-12 in supernatants. However, IFN-γ was significantly reduced in PBMC culture supernatants (P<0.05). We concluded that a consecutive heat stress period elevated the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in PBMC and increased the plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines. These data indicate that TLR activation and dysregulation of cytokine expression in response to prolonged heat stress may be associated with immunosuppression and increased susceptibility to antigenic challenge in Bama miniature pigs.

  8. Association of Toll-like receptors 2, 3, and 4 genes polymorphisms with periapical pathosis risk

    PubMed Central

    Özan, Ülkü; Ocak, Zeynep; Özan, Fatih; Oktay, Elif-Aybala; Şahman, Halil; Yikilgan, İhsan; Oruçoğlu, Hasan; Er, Kürşat

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gene variations of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, 3, and 4 on genetic susceptibility to periapical pathosis. Material and Methods One hundred patients were included in the study and divided into two groups as follows; Control Group (n=50) that have root canal treatment and no periapical lesion, Patient Group (n=50) that have root canal treatment and periapical lesion. TLR2 Arg753Gln, TLR3 (c.1377C/T) and TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP. Genotypical analysis of control and patient groups were investigated to disclose whether there is any association between periapical lesions and gene variations. Results There are no significant statistical differences between control and patient groups according to TLR 2 and 4 gene sequence. On the contrary, CC allele detected 74% for TLR 3 in patient group, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.005). Conclusions According to these results, it can be suggested that patients with Toll-like receptor 3 gene polymorphisms could be susceptible to periapical pathosis. Key words:Toll-like receptors, periapical pathosis, endodontics. PMID:27031066

  9. The acylation state of mycobacterial lipomannans modulates innate immunity response through toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Gilleron, Martine; Nigou, Jérôme; Nicolle, Delphine; Quesniaux, Valérie; Puzo, Germain

    2006-01-01

    Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens by professional phagocytes via toll-like receptors (TLR) contributes to controlling chronic M. tuberculosis infection. Lipomannans (LM), which are major lipoglycans of the mycobacterial envelope, were recently described as agonists of TLR2 with potent activity on proinflammatory cytokine regulation. LM correspond to a heterogeneous population of acyl- and glyco-forms. We report here the purification and the complete structural characterization of four LM acyl-forms from Mycobacterium bovis BCG using MALDI MS and 2D (1)H-(31)P NMR analyses. All this biochemical work provided the tools to investigate the implication of LM acylation degree on its proinflammatory activity. The latter was ascribed to the triacylated LM form, essentially an agonist of TLR2, using TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers for signaling. Altogether, these findings shed more light on the molecular basis of LM recognition by TLR.

  10. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates ischemia-reperfusion injury of the small intestine in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Kobata, Atsushi; Takeda, Shogo; Nadatani, Yuji; Otani, Koji; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) recognizes conserved molecular patterns associated with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, and detects some endogenous ligands. Previous studies demonstrated that in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the small intestine, the TLR2-dependent signaling exerted preventive effects on the damage in young mice, but did not have a significant effect in neonatal mice. We investigated the role of TLR2 in adult ischemia-reperfusion injury in the small intestine. Wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice at 16 weeks of age were subjected to intestinal I/R injury. Some wild-type mice received anti-Ly-6G antibodies to deplete circulating neutrophils. In wild-type mice, I/R induced severe small intestinal injury characterized by infiltration by inflammatory cells, disruption of the mucosal epithelium, and mucosal bleeding. Compared to wild-type mice, TLR2 knockout mice exhibited less severe mucosal injury induced by I/R, with a 35%, 33%, and 43% reduction in histological grading score and luminal concentration of hemoglobin, and the numbers of apoptotic epithelial cells, respectively. The I/R increased the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and the levels of mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the small intestine of the wild-type mice by 3.3-, 3.2-, and 13.0-fold, respectively. TLR2 deficiency significantly inhibited the I/R-induced increase in MPO activity and the expression of mRNAs for TNF-α and ICAM-1, but did not affect the expression of COX-2 mRNA. I/R also enhanced TLR2 mRNA expression by 2.9-fold. TLR2 proteins were found to be expressed in the epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and endothelial cells. Neutrophil depletion prevented intestinal I/R injury in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that TLR2 may mediate I/R injury of the small intestine in adult mice via induction of inflammatory mediators

  11. Association of Toll-like receptor 2 Arg753Gln and Toll-like receptor 1 Ile602Ser single-nucleotide polymorphisms with leptospirosis in an Argentine population.

    PubMed

    Cédola, Maia; Chiani, Yosena; Pretre, Gabriela; Alberdi, Lucrecia; Vanasco, Bibiana; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2015-06-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), a member of the Toll-like receptor family, plays an important role in the recognition of and subsequent immune response activation against leptospirosis in humans. The genetic polymorphism in TLR2 of an arginine to glutamine substitution at residue 753 (Arg753Gln) has been associated with a negative influence on TLR2 function, which may, in turn, determine the innate host response to Leptospira spp. This bacterium signals through TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers in human cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the Arg753Gln single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the TLR2 gene, and the isoleucine to serine transversion at position 602 (Ile602Ser) of the TLR1 gene (previously associated with Lyme disease), in leptospirosis patients compared to healthy controls, carrying out a retrospective case/control study. The TLR2 polymorphism adenine (A) allele was observed in 7.3% of leptospirosis patients but was not found in the control group, whereas the guanine (G) allele of the TLR1 polymorphism was found in 63.6% of patients and 41.6% of controls. Susceptibility to leptospirosis disease was increased 10.57-fold for carriers of the TLR2 G/A genotype (P=0.0493) and 3.85-fold for carriers of the TLR1 G/G genotype (P=0.0428). Furthermore, the risk of developing hepatic insufficiency and jaundice was increased 18.86- and 27.60-fold for TLR2 G/A carriers, respectively. Similarly, the risk of developing jaundice was increased 12.67-fold for TLR1 G allele carriers (G/G and T/G genotypes). In conclusion, the present data suggest that the TLR2 Arg753Gln and TLR1 Ile602Ser SNPs influence the risk of developing leptospirosis and its severity.

  12. Colonic mucosal DNA methylation, immune response, and microbiome patterns in Toll-like receptor 2-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Kellermayer, Richard; Dowd, Scot E.; Harris, R. Alan; Balasa, Alfred; Schaible, Tiffany D.; Wolcott, Randy D.; Tatevian, Nina; Szigeti, Reka; Li, Zhijie; Versalovic, James; Smith, C. Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The connection between intestinal microbiota and host physiology is increasingly becoming recognized. The details of this dynamic interaction, however, remain to be explored. Toll-like receptor 2 (Tlr2) is important for its role in bacterial recognition, intestinal inflammation, and obesity-related metabolic changes. Therefore, we sought to determine the epigenomic and metagenomic consequences of Tlr2 deficiency in the colonic mucosa of mice to gain insights into biological pathways that shape the interface between the gut microbiota and the mammalian host. Colonic mucosa from wild type (WT) and Tlr2−/− C57BL/6 mice was interrogated by microarrays specific for DNA methylation and gene expression. The mucosal microbiome was studied by next-generation pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The expression of genes involved in immune processes was significantly modified by the absence of Tlr2, a number of which correlated with DNA methylation changes. The epigenomic and transcriptomic modifications associated with alteration in mucosal microbial composition. Several bacterial species, including members of the Firmicutes were significantly different in abundance between WT and Tlr2−/− animals. This manuscript highlights the intimate interrelationships between expression of immune-related genes and immunity pathways in the host with compositional and functional differences of the mammalian microbiome.—Kellermayer, R., Dowd, S. E., Harris, R. A., Balasa, A., Schaible, T. D., Wolcott, R. D., Tatevian, N., Szigeti, R., Li, Z., Versalovic, J., Smith, C. W. Colonic mucosal DNA methylation, immune response, and microbiome patterns in Toll-like receptor 2-knockout mice. PMID:21228220

  13. Characterization and expression analysis of Toll-like receptor 2 gene in large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ze-Jun; Jia, Qiao-Jing; Yao, Cui-Luan

    2015-05-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) plays an important role in innate immune responses. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of the full-length cDNA sequence of toll-like receptor 2 in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea (LcTLR2). The LcTLR2 cDNA contains a 5'-terminal untranslated region (5'-UTR) of 135 bp, an open reading frame (ORF) of 2478 bp encoding a polypeptide of 825 amino acid residues and a 3'-UTR of 50 bp. Subcellular localization analysis suggested that the LcTLR2-pEGFP was mainly expressed in cytoplasm. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed a broad expression of LcTLR2 in most examined tissues, with the most predominant expression in blood, followed by spleen, and the weakest expression in stomach. The expression levels of LcTLR2 after injection with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and poly inosinic:cytidylic (polyI:C) were investigated in spleen, head-kidney and liver. Our results showed that LcTLR2 transcripts increased significantly after all the three immune challenges (p < 0.05). However, compared with polyI:C and LPS, higher expression levels of LcTLR2 were induced in all examined tissues after V. parahaemolyticus stimulation. In addition, the expression levels of LcTLR2 after flagellin, polyI:C, peptidoglycan (PGN) and LPS challenge in LCK were investigated, our findings showed that high LcTLR2 transcripts were induced after flagellin and PGN stimulation, suggesting that LcTLR2 might play a vital role in fish defense against bacterial infection. Furthermore, compared with LPS, flagellin and peptidoglycan might play an important role in LcTLR2 induction in large yellow croaker. PMID:25687392

  14. Toll like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLR) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) we have investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni corrected level P≤0.001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.85); P=0.001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex, was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR 1.41 (95% CI 1.09–1.83), P=0.010); female donor: (HR 2.78 (95% CI 1.43–5.41), P=0.003), DFS (male donor: HR 1.45 (95% CI 1.12–1.87), P=0.005; female donor: HR 2.34 (95% CI 1.18–4.65), P=0.015) and treatment related mortality (male donor: HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.09–2.04), P=0.012; female donor: HR 3.12 (95% CI 1.44–6.74), P=0.004). In conclusion our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  15. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni-corrected level P ≤ .001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.47 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.16 to 1.85]; P = .001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.09 to 1.83], P = .010; female donor: HR, 2.78 [95% CI, 1.43 to 5.41], P = .003), disease-free survival (male donor: HR, 1.45 [95% CI, 1.12 to 1.87], P = .005; female donor: HR, 2.34 [95% CI, 1.18 to 4.65], P = .015), and treatment-related mortality (male donor: HR, 1.49 [95% CI, 1.09 to 2.04], P = .012; female donor: HR, 3.12 [95% CI, 1.44 to 6.74], P = .004). In conclusion, our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  16. Molecular evolution of bovine Toll-like receptor 2 suggests substitutions of functional relevance

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that polymorphism in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes might be associated with disease resistance or susceptibility traits in livestock. Polymorphic sites affecting TLR function should exhibit signatures of positive selection, identified as a high ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions (ω). Phylogeny based models of codon substitution based on estimates of ω for each amino acid position can therefore offer a valuable tool to predict sites of functional relevance. We have used this approach to identify such polymorphic sites within the bovine TLR2 genes from ten Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle breeds. By analysing TLR2 gene phylogeny in a set of mammalian species and a subset of ruminant species we have estimated the selective pressure on individual sites and domains and identified polymorphisms at sites of putative functional importance. Results The ω were highest in the mammalian TLR2 domains thought to be responsible for ligand binding and lowest in regions responsible for heterodimerisation with other TLR-related molecules. Several positively-selected sites were detected in or around ligand-binding domains. However a comparison of the ruminant subset of TLR2 sequences with the whole mammalian set of sequences revealed that there has been less selective pressure among ruminants than in mammals as a whole. This suggests that there have been functional changes during ruminant evolution. Twenty newly-discovered non-synonymous polymorphic sites were identified in cattle. Three of them were localised at positions shaped by positive selection in the ruminant dataset (Leu227Phe, His305Pro, His326Gln) and in domains involved in the recognition of ligands. His326Gln is of particular interest as it consists of an exchange of differentially-charged amino acids at a position which has previously been shown to be crucial for ligand binding in human TLR2. Conclusion Within bovine TLR2, polymorphisms at amino

  17. The role of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in the pathogenesis of feline pyometra.

    PubMed

    Jursza, E; Kowalewski, M P; Boos, A; Skarzynski, D J; Socha, P; Siemieniuch, M J

    2015-03-01

    Pyometra is the most common uterine disease in queens. To protect itself from infection, the female reproductive tract possesses several immune mechanisms that are based on germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (toll-like receptors [TLRs]). The aim of our study was to examine endometrial immunolocalization of TLR2/4, study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α on messenger RNA expression of both receptors in pyometric queens, and compare these patterns between estrous cycling queens and those hormonally treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Thirty-six queens, ranging in age from 7 months to 11 years, were allocated into seven groups (anestrus, estrus, mid-diestrus and late diestrus, short-term and long-term hormonally treated queens, and pyometric queens). At the messenger RNA level, the real-time polymerase chain reaction was applied, whereas at the TLR2/4 protein level, the expression was tested by immunohistochemistry. In queens at estrus, gene expression of TLR2 was upregulated after stimulation of endometrial explants by TNF (P < 0.001) and by TNF together with the LPS (P < 0.01). Moreover, gene expression of TLR2 was significantly upregulated after stimulation by TNF (P < 0.001) and LPS (P < 0.01) explants derived from queens that had been long-term hormonally treated with MPA. Endometrial gene expression of TLR4 was significantly upregulated after incubation of explants with TNF (P < 0.001) in queens at estrus and with LPS (P < 0.05) in queens short-term hormonally treated with MPA. Immunolocalization reported that TLR2/4 receptors are mainly localized in the surface and glandular epithelia. These data show that short-term and especially long-term administration of progesterone derivatives impairs TLRs in the endometrial epithelium, presumably enabling pathogens to break through this first natural barrier and thereby increase the risk of pyometra development. PMID:25481489

  18. Live and heat-killed probiotic Lactobacillus casei Lbs2 protects from experimental colitis through Toll-like receptor 2-dependent induction of T-regulatory response.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhupesh Kumar; Saha, Piu; Banik, George; Saha, Dhira Rani; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar; Das, Santasabuj

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of inflammatory disorders of the intestine caused by dysregulated T-cell mediated immune response against commensal microflora. Probiotics are reported as therapeutically effective against IBD. However, variable efficacy of the live probiotic strains, difference in survival and persistence in the gut between the strains and the lack of insight into the mechanisms of probiotic action limit optimal therapeutic efficacy. Our aims were to evaluate the lactobacillus strains isolated from the North Indian population for the generation of regulatory cells and cytokines in the intestine, to study their effects on pro-inflammatory mediators in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease and to explore the underlying mechanisms of their actions. Among the selected lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus casei Lbs2 (MTCC5953) significantly suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-alpha, IL-6) secretion. Both live and heat-killed Lbs2 polarized Th0 cells to T-regulatory (Treg) cells in vitro, increased the frequency of FoxP3(+) Treg cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and alleviated macroscopic and histopathological features of colitis in probiotic-fed mice. Moreover, the levels of IL-12, TNF-alpha and IL-17A were suppressed, while IL-10 and TGF-beta levels were augmented in the colonic tissues of Lbs2-treated mice. The induced Treg (iTreg) cells secreted IL-10 and TGF-beta and exerted suppressive effects on the proliferation of effector T-cells. Adoptive transfer of iTreg cells ameliorated the disease manifestations of murine colitis and suppressed the levels of TNF-alpha and IL-17A. Finally, Lbs2 effects were mediated by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation on the dendritic cells. This study identified live and heat-killed Lbs2 as putative therapeutic candidates against IBD and highlighted their Toll-like receptor 2-dependent immunomodulatory and regulatory function. PMID:27107798

  19. Soluble CD14 and toll-like receptor-2 are potential salivary biomarkers for oral lichen planus and burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Kodumudi, Krithika N; Zunt, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) and burning mouth syndrome (BMS) are chronic conditions affecting the oral mucosa characterized by pain and burning sensation. Saliva plays a significant role in the maintenance of physical and functional integrity of normal oral mucosa. Identification of potential "salivary biomarkers" for early diagnosis and/or monitoring of human diseases is being explored. We investigated the soluble forms of innate immune associated proteins CD14 and toll-like receptor-2 in unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) as potential biomarkers for OLP and BMS. Our results suggest that the levels of sCD14 and sTLR-2 in UWS were upregulated in OLP and BMS respectively. In addition, oral epithelial cells in the saliva of patients with OLP and BMS exhibited elevated levels of CD14 mRNA and decreased levels of TLR-2 mRNA. Interestingly, presence of co-existent oral candidiasis nullified these changes.

  20. Influence of Intron II microsatellite polymorphism in human toll-like receptor 2 gene in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, Naveen Chandra; Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Devalraju, Kamakshi Prudhula; Jain, Suman; SivaSai, Krovvidi S R; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Jonnalagada, Subbanna; Anandaraj, M P J S

    2013-08-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by the obligate intracellular organism Mycobacterium leprae. TLR2 plays a key role when activated by M. leprae lipoproteins initiating protective responses which induce bacterial killing and therefore control of disease spread. Microsatellite polymorphisms in intron2 of TLR2 gene have been reported to be associated with development of clinical features of several infectious diseases. The study aims to evaluate the influence of GT microsatellite on the expression of TLR2 which could make humans prone to M. leprae infections. A total of 279 individuals were enrolled in the study, 88 were leprosy patients, 95 were house hold contacts (HHC) and 96 were healthy controls (HC). Genotyping was done using PCR-Sequencing method. TLR2 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured using ELISA in MLSA stimulated cell culture supernatants. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Square (χ(2)) test and t-tests. Allele/genotype of TLR2 microsatellite which includes longer GT repeats was associated with low TLR2 mRNA expression and high IL-10 production while that including shorter GT repeats was associated with high TLR2 mRNA expression and low IL-10 production. High IL10 producing allele of TLR2 microsatellite might predispose house hold contacts to leprosy. PMID:23619473

  1. Divergent impact of Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency on repair mechanisms in healthy muscle versus Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Liang, Feng; Divangahi, Maziar; Qureshi, Salman T; Petrof, Basil J

    2016-05-01

    Injury to skeletal muscle, whether acute or chronic, triggers macrophage-mediated innate immunity in a manner which can be either beneficial or harmful for subsequent repair. Endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) are released by damaged tissues and might play an important role in activating the innate immune system following muscle injury. To test this hypothesis, we compared macrophage behaviour and muscle repair mechanisms in mice lacking TLR2 under conditions of either acute (cardiotoxin-induced) or chronic (mdx mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; DMD) muscle damage. In previously healthy muscle subjected to acute damage, TLR2 deficiency reduced macrophage numbers in the muscle post-injury but did not alter the expression pattern of the prototypical macrophage polarization markers iNOS and CD206. In addition, there was abnormal persistence of necrotic fibres and impaired regeneration in TLR2-/- muscles after acute injury. In contrast, TLR2 ablation in chronically diseased muscles of mdx mice not only resulted in significantly reduced macrophage numbers but additionally modified their phenotype by shifting from inflammatory (iNOS(pos) CD206(neg) ) to more anti-inflammatory (iNOS(neg) CD206(pos) ) characteristics. This decrease in macrophage-mediated inflammation was associated with ameliorated muscle histopathology and improved force-generating capacity of the dystrophic muscle. Our results suggest that the role of TLR2 in macrophage function and skeletal muscle repair depends greatly upon the muscle injury context, and raise the possibility that inhibition of TLR2 could serve as a useful therapeutic measure in DMD. PMID:26800321

  2. Divergent impact of Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency on repair mechanisms in healthy muscle versus Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Liang, Feng; Divangahi, Maziar; Qureshi, Salman T; Petrof, Basil J

    2016-05-01

    Injury to skeletal muscle, whether acute or chronic, triggers macrophage-mediated innate immunity in a manner which can be either beneficial or harmful for subsequent repair. Endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) are released by damaged tissues and might play an important role in activating the innate immune system following muscle injury. To test this hypothesis, we compared macrophage behaviour and muscle repair mechanisms in mice lacking TLR2 under conditions of either acute (cardiotoxin-induced) or chronic (mdx mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; DMD) muscle damage. In previously healthy muscle subjected to acute damage, TLR2 deficiency reduced macrophage numbers in the muscle post-injury but did not alter the expression pattern of the prototypical macrophage polarization markers iNOS and CD206. In addition, there was abnormal persistence of necrotic fibres and impaired regeneration in TLR2-/- muscles after acute injury. In contrast, TLR2 ablation in chronically diseased muscles of mdx mice not only resulted in significantly reduced macrophage numbers but additionally modified their phenotype by shifting from inflammatory (iNOS(pos) CD206(neg) ) to more anti-inflammatory (iNOS(neg) CD206(pos) ) characteristics. This decrease in macrophage-mediated inflammation was associated with ameliorated muscle histopathology and improved force-generating capacity of the dystrophic muscle. Our results suggest that the role of TLR2 in macrophage function and skeletal muscle repair depends greatly upon the muscle injury context, and raise the possibility that inhibition of TLR2 could serve as a useful therapeutic measure in DMD.

  3. Concomitant inhibition of renin angiotensin system and Toll-like receptor 2 attenuates renal injury in unilateral ureteral obstructed mice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sarah; Jeong, Jin Young; Chang, Yoon Kyung; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki Ryang; Lim, Beom Jin; Lee, Kang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: There has been controversy about the role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in renal injury following ureteric obstruction. Although inhibition of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) reduces TLR2 expression in mice, the exact relationship between TLR2 and RAS is not known. The aim of this study was to determine whether the RAS modulates TLR2. Methods: We used 8-week-old male wild type (WT) and TLR2-knockout (KO) mice on a C57Bl/6 background. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was induced by complete ligation of the left ureter. Angiotensin (Ang) II (1,000 ng/kg/min) and the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren (25 mg/kg/day) were administrated to mice using an osmotic minipump. Molecular and histologic evaluations were performed. Results: Ang II infusion increased mRNA expression of TLR2 in WT mouse kidneys (p < 0.05). The expression of renin mRNA in TLR2-KO UUO kidneys was significantly higher than that in WT UUO kidneys (p < 0.05). There were no differences in tissue injury score or mRNA expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), osteopontin (OPN), or transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) between TLR2-KO UUO and WT UUO kidneys. However, aliskiren decreased the tissue injury score and mRNA expression of TLR2, MCP-1, OPN, and TGF-β in WT UUO kidneys (p < 0.05). Aliskiren-treated TLR2-KO UUO kidneys showed less kidney injury than aliskiren-treated WT UUO kidneys. Conclusions: TLR2 deletion induced activation of the RAS in UUO kidneys. Moreover, inhibition of both RAS and TLR2 had an additive ameliorative effect on UUO injury of the kidney. PMID:26932402

  4. Altered behaviour and cognitive function following combined deletion of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in mice.

    PubMed

    Too, Lay Khoon; McGregor, Iain S; Baxter, Alan G; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2016-04-15

    Activation of the immune system due to infection or aging is increasingly linked to impaired neuropsychological function. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2, TLR4) are well-characterised for their role in inflammatory events, and their combined activation has been implicated in neurological diseases. We therefore determined whether TLR2 and TLR4 double gene knockout (GKO) mice showed modified behaviour and cognitive function during a 16-day test sequence that employed the automated IntelliCage test system. The IntelliCage features a home cage environment in which groups of mice live and where water reward is gained through performing various tasks centred on drinking stations in each corner of the apparatus. All mice were tested twice, one month apart (the first sequence termed "R1"and the second "R2"). There were fewer corner visits and nosepokes in TLR2/4 GKO compared to wild-type mice during early exploration in R1, suggesting elevated neophobia in GKO mice. Reduced exploration persisted over subsequent test modules during the dark phase. TLR2/4 GKO mice also displayed increased corner visits during drinking sessions compared to non-drinking sessions, but this was not associated with increased drinking. In subsequent, more complex test modules, TLR2/4 GKO mice had unimpaired spatial learning, but showed markedly poorer performance in a visual discrimination reversal task compared to wild-type mice. These results indicated subtle impairments in behaviour and cognitive functions due to double deficiency in TLR2 and TLR4. These finding are highly relevant to understanding the combined actions of TLR2 and TLR4 on neurological status in a range of different disease conditions.

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates high-fat diet-induced impairment of vasodilator actions of insulin

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Hae-Suk; Hwang, Daniel H.; Quon, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by a chronic proinflammatory state that leads to endothelial dysfunction. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) stimulate Toll-like receptors (TLR) that promote metabolic insulin resistance. However, it is not known whether TLR2 mediates impairment of vascular actions of insulin in response to high-fat diet (HFD) to cause endothelial dysfunction. siRNA knockdown of TLR2 in primary endothelial cells opposed palmitate-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and splicing of X box protein 1 (XBP-1). Inhibition of unfolding protein response (UPR) reduced SFA-stimulated expression of TNFα. Thus, SFA stimulates UPR and proinflammatory response through activation of TLR2 in endothelial cells. Knockdown of TLR2 also opposed impairment of insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of eNOS and subsequent production of NO. Importantly, insulin-stimulated vasorelaxation of mesenteric arteries from TLR2 knockout mice was preserved even on HFD (in contrast with results from arteries examined in wild-type mice on HFD). We conclude that TLR2 in vascular endothelium mediates HFD-stimulated proinflammatory responses and UPR that accompany impairment of vasodilator actions of insulin, leading to endothelial dysfunction. These results are relevant to understanding the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular complications of diabetes and obesity. PMID:23531618

  6. Membrane-Associated Proteins of a Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Neisseria meningitidis Activate the Inflammatory Response through Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Ingalls, Robin R.; Lien, Egil; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2001-01-01

    The recent isolation of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant of Neisseria meningitidis has allowed us to explore the roles of other gram-negative cell wall components in the host response to infection. The experiments in this study were designed to examine the ability of this mutant strain to activate cells. Although it was clearly less potent than the parental strain, we found the LPS-deficient mutant to be a capable inducer of the inflammatory response in monocytic cells, inducing a response similar to that seen with Staphylococcus aureus. Cellular activation by the LPS mutant was related to expression of CD14, a high-affinity receptor for LPS and other microbial products, as well as Toll-like receptor 2, a member of the Toll family of receptors recently implicated in host responses to gram-positive bacteria. In contrast to the parental strain, the synthetic LPS antagonist E5564 did not inhibit the LPS-deficient mutant. We conclude that even in the absence of LPS, the gram-negative cell wall remains a potent inflammatory stimulant, utilizing signaling pathways independent of those involved in LPS signaling. PMID:11254578

  7. Knockout of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 Prevents Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trentin-Sonoda, Mayra; da Silva, Rogério Cirino; Kmit, Fernanda Vieira; Abrahão, Mariana Vieira; Monnerat Cahli, Gustavo; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Muzi-Filho, Humberto; Silva, Paulo André; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda Freire; Vieyra, Adalberto; Medei, Emiliano; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the pathways linked to Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLRs) are involved in renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J, TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice were subjected to left kidney ischemia for 60 min followed by reperfusion for 5, 8, 12 and 15 days. Proton density magnetic resonance showed alterations in the injured kidney from WT mice, together with signs of parenchymal edema and higher levels of vimentin mRNA, accompanied by: (i) small, but significant, increase in serum urea after 24 h, (ii) 100% increase in serum creatinine at 24 h. A serum peak of inflammatory cytokines occurred after 5 days of reperfusion. Heart weight/body weight and heart weight/tibia length ratios increased after 12 and 15 days of reperfusion, respectively. Cardiac hypertrophy markers, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and α-actin, left ventricle mass, cardiac wall thickness and myocyte width increased after 15 days of reperfusion, together with longer QTc and action potential duration. Cardiac TLRs, MyD88, HSP60 and HSP70 mRNA levels also increased. After 15 days of reperfusion, absence of TLRs prevented cardiac hypertrophy, as reflected by similar values of left ventricular cardiac mass and heart weight/body weight ratio compared to the transgenic Sham. Renal tissular injury also ameliorated in both knockout mice, as revealed by the comparison of their vimentin mRNA levels with those found in the WT on the same day after I/R. The I/R TLR2-/- group had TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β levels similar to the non-I/R group, whereas the TLR4-/- group conserved the p-NF-κB/NF- κB ratio contrasting with that found in TLR2-/-. We conclude: (i) TLRs are involved in renal I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy; (ii) absence of TLRs prevents I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy, despite renal lesions seeming to evolve towards those of chronic disease; (iii) TLR2 and TLR4 selectively regulate the systemic inflammatory profile and NF- κB activation. PMID

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Stimulation of Osteoblasts Mediates Staphylococcus Aureus Induced Bone Resorption and Osteoclastogenesis through Enhanced RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Ali; Lindholm, Catharina; Lerner, Ulf H

    2016-01-01

    Severe Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections pose an immense threat to population health and constitute a great burden for the health care worldwide. Inter alia, S. aureus septic arthritis is a disease with high mortality and morbidity caused by destruction of the infected joints and systemic bone loss, osteoporosis. Toll-Like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune cell receptors recognizing a variety of microbial molecules and structures. S. aureus recognition via TLR2 initiates a signaling cascade resulting in production of various cytokines, but the mechanisms by which S. aureus causes rapid and excessive bone loss are still unclear. We, therefore, investigated how S. aureus regulates periosteal/endosteal osteoclast formation and bone resorption. S. aureus stimulation of neonatal mouse parietal bone induced ex vivo bone resorption and osteoclastic gene expression. This effect was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) without significant change in osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression. Bone resorption induced by S. aureus was abolished by OPG. S. aureus increased the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines and prostaglandins in the parietal bones but the stimulatory effect of S. aureus on bone resorption and Tnfsf11 mRNA expression was independent of these cytokines and prostaglandins. Stimulation of isolated periosteal osteoblasts with S. aureus also resulted in increased expression of Tnfsf11 mRNA, an effect lost in osteoblasts from Tlr2 knockout mice. S. aureus stimulated osteoclastogenesis in isolated periosteal cells without affecting RANKL-stimulated resorption. In contrast, S. aureus inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in bone marrow macrophages. These data show that S. aureus enhances bone resorption and periosteal osteoclast formation by increasing osteoblast RANKL production through TLR2. Our study indicates the importance of using different in vitro approaches for studies of how S

  9. Three promoters with different tissue specificity and pathogen inducibility express the toll-like-receptor 2 (TLR2)-encoding gene in cattle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guangjun; Xu, Tianle; Brand, Bodo; Petzl, Wolfram; Shen, Xiangzhen; Seyfert, Hans-Martin

    2015-09-15

    Toll-like-receptor 2 (TLR2) is a dominant receptor for perceiving presence of bacterial pathogens. The promoter controlling its tissue specific and infection induced expression in cattle was unknown. We structurally defined with 5'-RACE experiments three promoters (P1-3) controlling TLR2 expression in udder, liver and other tissues of cows suffering from E. coli mastitis. P1 is 5'-adjacent to exon 1 as defined by the prototypical TLR2 cDNA sequence. Exon 1 is spliced to the protein-encoding exon 2. P2 and P3 reside in intron 1, express exon 1A and exon 1B, respectively which are each spliced to exon 2. Infection induced massively (>30-fold) activity of P1 and P2, but not of P3 in udders and also somewhat in liver. However, the GC-rich housekeeping promoter P3 expressed exon1B in many tissues providing the wealth of TLR2-encoding transcripts. Similar induction data were obtained after challenging primary cultures of mammary epithelial cells (pbMEC) with E. coli. Reporter gene analyses in pbMEC and the liver cell line HepG2 collectively validated that P1 and constructs containing segments from P2/P3 are in principle capable to drive gene expression. Our structural data provide the basis for more detailed molecular analyses of the infection and tissue specific regulation of TLR2 expression. PMID:26235600

  10. Toll-Like Receptor-1 and Receptor-2 and Beta-Defensin in Postcholecystectomy Bile Duct Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Hermosillo-Sandoval, José Manuel; Villanueva-Pérez, Martha Arisbeth; Román-Pintos, Luis Miguel; García-Iglesias, Trinidad; Rodríguez-Carrizalez, Adolfo Daniel; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto Germán

    2015-01-01

    Postcholecystectomy bile duct injuries (BDI) produce hepatic cholestasis and cause infection of the biliary tract. The biliary cells participate in secreting cytokines and in expression of immune response receptors. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) conduct signalling and activate the innate and adaptive inflammatory response. The objective was to determine the serum levels of TLR-2 and the expression of TLR-1 and TLR-2 and β-defensin in liver biopsies of postcholecystectomy BDI patients. A transverse, analytical study with 2 groups was done. One group included healthy volunteers (control group) and other included 25 postcholecystectomy BDI patients with complete biliary obstruction. Using the Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) technique, serum levels of TLR-2 were determined, and with immunofluorescence the morphologic analysis of TLR-1 and TLR-2 and β-defensin in liver biopsies of postcholecystectomy BDI patients was performed. The average TLR-2 serum level in the control group was 0.0 pg/mL and in the BDI group, 0.023 ± 0.0045 pg/mL (P < 0.0001, bilateral Mann Whitney U). Immunofluorescence was used to determine the expression in liver biopsies, blood vessels, bile ducts, and hepatic parenchyma where 12 hepatic biopsies were positive for TLR-1 with average of 3213057.74 ± 1071019.25 μm2; and 7 biopsies were positive for β-defensin with an average of 730364.33 ± 210838.02 μm2; and 6 biopsies positive for TLR-2, obtaining an average of 3354364.24 ± 838591.06 μm2. In conclusion, TLR-1 and TLR-2 and β-defensin play an important role in the innate antimicrobial defense of the hepatobiliary system. PMID:25755667

  11. Toll-like receptor 2 and -4 are involved in the pathogenesis of the Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Du, Yamei; Zhang, Guojun; Zhang, Zaiqiang; Wang, Qian; Ma, Ruimin; Zhang, Limin; Fan, Fei; Li, Youran; Wang, Meng; Lv, Hong; Kang, Xixiong

    2015-08-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune disorder of the peripheral nervous system characterized by weakness in the limbs. To date, numerous hypotheses have been suggested to explain the pathogenesis of GBS; however, the pathogenesis of GBS remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4 and GBS. Therefore, the mRNA of TLR2, TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor (MyD)88 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with GBS and healthy controls was assessed. To confirm the function of TLR2 and TLR4 in the pathogenesis of GBS, PBMCs derived from patients with GBS and healthy controls were cultured with various TLR agonists. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β were measured in the culture supernatant and fasting serum was obtained for the detection of anti-ganglioside antibodies. The results revealed that the mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB were significantly increased in patients with GBS compared with those in healthy controls (P=0.003, 0.017, 0.032 and 0.015, respectively). PBMCs from patients with GBS secreted higher levels of TNF-α and IL-1β than those from control subjects. The positive rate of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM anti-ganglioside antibodies in patients with severe GBS was 42.86%, which was markedly higher than rates found in patients with mild GBS (9.09 and 18.18%, respectively). The results of the present study demonstrated that TLR2 and TLR4 are involved in the pathogenesis of GBS and that they and their associated signaling pathways may be targets for the treatment of GBS.

  12. Argon Mediates Anti-Apoptotic Signaling and Neuroprotection via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai; Roesslein, Martin; Wellner, Franziska; Auwärter, Volker; Kempf, Jürgen; Loop, Torsten; Buerkle, Hartmut; Goebel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently, the noble gas argon attracted significant attention due to its neuroprotective properties. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. There is growing evidence that the extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is involved in Argon´s protective effect. We hypothesized that argon mediates its protective effects via the upstream located toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4. Methods Apoptosis in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) was induced using rotenone. Argon treatment was performed after induction of apoptosis with different concentrations (25, 50 and 75 Vol% in oxygen 21 Vol%, carbon dioxide and nitrogen) for 2 or 4 hours respectively. Apoptosis was analyzed using flow cytometry (annexin-V (AV)/propidiumiodide (PI)) staining, caspase-3 activity and caspase cleavage. TLR density on the cells’ surface was analyzed using FACS and immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of TLR signaling and extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were assessed by western blot, activity assays and FACS analysis. Results Argon 75 Vol% treatment abolished rotenone-induced apoptosis. This effect was attenuated dose- and time-dependently. Argon treatment was accompanied with a significant reduction of TLR2 and TLR4 receptor density and protein expression. Moreover, argon mediated increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated after inhibition of TLR signaling. ERK1/2 and TLR signaling inhibitors abolished the anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective effects of argon. Immunohistochemistry results strengthened these findings. Conclusion These findings suggest that argon-mediated anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective effects are mediated via inhibition of TLR2 and TLR4. PMID:26624894

  13. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 2 in human platelets induces a thromboinflammatory response through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Blair, Price; Rex, Sybille; Vitseva, Olga; Beaulieu, Lea; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Hayashi, Chie; Genco, Caroline A; Iafrati, Mark; Freedman, Jane E

    2009-02-13

    Cells of the innate immune system use Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to initiate the proinflammatory response to microbial infection. Recent studies have shown acute infections are associated with a transient increase in the risk of vascular thrombotic events. Although platelets play a central role in acute thrombosis and accumulating evidence demonstrates their role in inflammation and innate immunity, investigations into the expression and functionality of platelet TLRs have been limited. In the present study, we demonstrate that human platelets express TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6. Incubation of isolated platelets with Pam(3)CSK4, a synthetic TLR2/TLR1 agonist, directly induced platelet aggregation and adhesion to collagen. These functional responses were inhibited in TLR2-deficient mice and, in human platelets, by pretreatment with TLR2-blocking antibody. Stimulation of platelet TLR2 also increased P-selectin surface expression, activation of integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), generation of reactive oxygen species, and, in human whole blood, formation of platelet-neutrophil heterotypic aggregates. TLR2 stimulation also activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt signaling pathway in platelets, and inhibition of PI3-K significantly reduced Pam(3)CSK4-induced platelet responses. In vivo challenge with live Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that uses TLR2 for innate immune signaling, also induced significant formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates in wild-type but not TLR2-deficient mice. Together, these data provide the first demonstration that human platelets express functional TLR2 capable of recognizing bacterial components and activating the platelet thrombotic and/or inflammatory pathways. This work substantiates the role of platelets in the immune and inflammatory response and suggests a mechanism by which bacteria could directly activate platelets.

  14. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 3 EXPRESSION AND SIGNALING IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our previous studies have shown that prior exposure of respiratory epithelial cells to an aqueous-trapped solution of DE (DEas) enhances the susceptibility to Influenza infections. Here we examined the effect of DEas on the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) pathway, which is responsib...

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system.

  16. Microbial Amyloids Induce Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 Responses via Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation in the Intestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Nishimori, Jessalyn H.; Newman, Tiffanny N.; Oppong, Gertrude O.; Rapsinski, Glenn J.; Yen, Jui-Hung; Biesecker, Steven G.; Wilson, R. Paul; Butler, Brian P.; Winter, Maria G.; Tsolis, Renee M.; Ganea, Doina

    2012-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)/TLR1 receptor complex responds to amyloid fibrils, a common component of biofilm material produced by members of the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. To determine whether this TLR2/TLR1 ligand stimulates inflammatory responses when bacteria enter intestinal tissue, we investigated whether expression of curli amyloid fibrils by the invasive enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium contributes to T helper 1 and T helper 17 responses by measuring cytokine production in the mouse colitis model. A csgBA mutant, deficient in curli production, elicited decreased expression of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 in the cecal mucosa compared to the S. Typhimurium wild type. In TLR2-deficient mice, IL-17A and IL-22 expression was blunted during S. Typhimurium infection, suggesting that activation of the TLR2 signaling pathway contributes to the expression of these cytokines. T cells incubated with supernatants from bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) treated with curli fibrils released IL-17A in a TLR2-dependent manner in vitro. Lower levels of IL-6 and IL-23 production were detected in the supernatants of the TLR2-deficient BMDCs treated with curli fibrils. Consistent with this, three distinct T-cell populations—CD4+ T helper cells, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, and γδ T cells—produced IL-17A in response to curli fibrils in the intestinal mucosa during S. Typhimurium infection. Notably, decreased IL-6 expression by the dendritic cells and decreased IL-23 expression by the dendritic cells and macrophages were observed in the cecal mucosa of mice infected with the curli mutant. We conclude that TLR2 recognition of bacterial amyloid fibrils in the intestinal mucosa represents a novel mechanism of immunoregulation, which contributes to the generation of inflammatory responses, including production of IL-17A and IL-22, in response to bacterial entry into the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23027540

  17. Activation of NF-κB by nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae is mediated by toll-like receptor 2-TAK1-dependent NIK–IKKα/β–IκBα and MKK3/6–p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Xu, Haidong; Wang, Beinan; Han, Jiahuai; Kai, Hirofumi; Gu, Xin-Xing; Murphy, Timothy F.; Lim, David J.; Li, Jian-Dong

    2001-01-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important human pathogen in both children and adults. In children, it causes otitis media, the most common childhood infection and the leading cause of conductive hearing loss in the United States. In adults, it causes lower respiratory tract infections in the setting of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NTHi-induced infections remain undefined, but they may involve activation of NF-κB, a transcriptional activator of multiple host defense genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Here, we show that NTHi strongly activates NF-κB in human epithelial cells via two distinct signaling pathways, NF-κB translocation-dependent and -independent pathways. The NF-κB translocation-dependent pathway involves activation of NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK)–IKKα/β complex leading to IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, whereas the NF-κB translocation-independent pathway involves activation of MKK3/6–p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. Bifurcation of NTHi-induced NIK–IKKα/β-IκBα and MKK3/6–p38 MAP kinase pathways may occur at transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 (TAK1). Furthermore, we show that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is required for NTHi-induced NF-κB activation. In addition, several key inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α are up-regulated by NTHi. Finally, P6, a 16-kDa lipoprotein highly conserved in the outer membrane of all NTHi and H. influenzae type b strains, appears to also activate NF-κB via similar signaling pathways. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NTHi activates NF-κB via TLR2–TAK1-dependent NIK–IKKα/β-IκBα and MKK3/6–p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways. These studies may bring new insights into molecular pathogenesis of NTHi-induced infections and open up new therapeutic targets for

  18. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  19. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Godin, Adriana M; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C S; Machado, Renes R; Maier, Steven F; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P; Fiebich, Bernd L; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2013-05-24

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline's positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline's antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca(2+); Mg(2+)) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75 mg/kg, 47.50mg/kg or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca(2+) chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca(2+) chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  20. Expression of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 and Related Cytokines in Patients with Hepatic Cystic and Alveolar Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Ma, Hai-Zhang; Apaer, Shadike; Zhang, Heng; Aierken, Amina; Li, Yu-Peng; Lin, Ren-Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Jin-Hui; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the important role of Toll-like receptors in various parasitic infections. This study aims to explore expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and related cytokines in patients with human cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE). 78 subjects including AE group (N = 28), CE group (N = 22), and healthy controls (HC, N = 28) were enrolled in this study. The mRNA expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4 in blood and hepatic tissue and plasma levels related cytokines were detected by using ELISA. Median levels of TLR2 mRNA in AE and CE groups were significantly elevated as compared with that in healthy control group. Median levels of TLR4 expression were increased in AE and CE. Plasma concentration levels of IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10 were slightly increased in AE and CE groups compared with those in HC group with no statistical differences (p > 0.05). The IL-23 concentration levels were significantly higher in AE and CE groups than that in HC subjects with statistical significance. The increased expression of TLR2 and IL-23 might play a potential role in modulating tissue infiltrative growth of the parasite and its persistence in the human host. PMID:26635448

  1. Developmental Onset of Bilirubin-induced Neurotoxicity Involves Toll-like Receptor 2-dependent Signaling in Humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1 Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Chen, Shujuan; Nguyen, Nghia; Tukey, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Biological and signaling events that connect developmentally induced hyperbilirubinemia to bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction (BIND) and CNS toxicity in humans are poorly understood. In mammals, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) is the sole enzyme responsible for bilirubin glucuronidation, a rate-limiting step necessary for bilirubin metabolism and clearance. Humanized mice that express the entire UGT1 locus (hUGT1) and the UGT1A1 gene, develop neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, with 8–10% of hUGT1 mice succumbing to CNS damage, a phenotype that is presented by uncontrollable seizures. We demonstrate that neuroinflammation and reactive gliosis are prominent features of bilirubin brain toxicity, and a disturbed redox status resulting from activation of NADPH oxidase is an important contributing mechanism found in BIND. Using knock-out mice and primary brain cells, we connect a key pattern recognition receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), to hyperbilirubinemia-induced signaling. We illustrate a requirement for TLR2 signaling in regulating gliosis, proinflammatory mediators, and oxidative stress when neonatal mice encounter severe hyperbilirubinemia. TLR2-mediated gliosis strongly correlates with pronounced neuroinflammation in the CNS with up-regulation of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, creating a pro-inflammatory CNS environment. Gene expression and immunohistochemistry staining show that hUGT1/Tlr2−/− mice fail to activate glial cells, proinflammatory cytokines, and stress response genes. In addition, bilirubin-induced apoptosis was significantly enhanced by blocking TLR2 signaling indicating its anti-apoptotic property. Consequently, a higher neonatal death rate (57.1%) in hUGT1/Tlr2−/− mice was observed when compared with hUGT1 mice (8.7%). These results suggest that TLR2 signaling and microglia neuroinflammation are linked to a repair and/or protection mode against BIND. PMID:24403077

  2. Local activation of uterine Toll-like receptor 2 and 2/6 decreases embryo implantation and affects uterine receptivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier Arturo; Caballero, Ignacio; Montazeri, Mehrnaz; Maslehat, Nasim; Elliott, Sarah; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Raul; Calle, Alexandra; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex interaction between maternal endometrium and embryonic structures. Failure to implant is highly recurrent and impossible to diagnose. Inflammation and infections in the female reproductive tract are common causes of infertility, embryo loss, and preterm labor. The current work describes how the activation of endometrial Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 2/6 reduces embryo implantation chances. We developed a morphometric index to evaluate the effects of the TLR 2/6 activation along the uterine horn (UH). TLR 2/6 ligation reduced the endometrial myometrial and glandular indexes and increased the luminal index. Furthermore, TLR 2/6 activation increased the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in UH lavages in the preimplantation day and IL-1 receptor antagonist in the implantation day. The engagement of TLR 2/6 with its ligand in the UH during embryo transfer severely affected the rate of embryonic implantation (45.00% ± 6.49% vs. 16.69% ± 5.01%, P < 0.05, control vs. test, respectively). Furthermore, this interference with the embryo implantation process was verified using an in vitro model of human embryo implantation where trophoblast spheroids failed to adhere to a monolayer of TLR 2- and TLR 2/6-activated endometrial cells. The inhibition of TLR receptors 2 and 6 in the presence of their specific ligands restored the ability of the spheroids to bind to the endometrial cells. In conclusion, the activation of the innate immune system in the uterus at the time of implantation interfered with the endometrial receptivity and reduced the chances of implantation success.

  3. Local activation of uterine Toll-like receptor 2 and 2/6 decreases embryo implantation and affects uterine receptivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier Arturo; Caballero, Ignacio; Montazeri, Mehrnaz; Maslehat, Nasim; Elliott, Sarah; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Raul; Calle, Alexandra; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex interaction between maternal endometrium and embryonic structures. Failure to implant is highly recurrent and impossible to diagnose. Inflammation and infections in the female reproductive tract are common causes of infertility, embryo loss, and preterm labor. The current work describes how the activation of endometrial Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 2/6 reduces embryo implantation chances. We developed a morphometric index to evaluate the effects of the TLR 2/6 activation along the uterine horn (UH). TLR 2/6 ligation reduced the endometrial myometrial and glandular indexes and increased the luminal index. Furthermore, TLR 2/6 activation increased the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in UH lavages in the preimplantation day and IL-1 receptor antagonist in the implantation day. The engagement of TLR 2/6 with its ligand in the UH during embryo transfer severely affected the rate of embryonic implantation (45.00% ± 6.49% vs. 16.69% ± 5.01%, P < 0.05, control vs. test, respectively). Furthermore, this interference with the embryo implantation process was verified using an in vitro model of human embryo implantation where trophoblast spheroids failed to adhere to a monolayer of TLR 2- and TLR 2/6-activated endometrial cells. The inhibition of TLR receptors 2 and 6 in the presence of their specific ligands restored the ability of the spheroids to bind to the endometrial cells. In conclusion, the activation of the innate immune system in the uterus at the time of implantation interfered with the endometrial receptivity and reduced the chances of implantation success. PMID:24621922

  4. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) expression in astrocytes is induced by TNF-α- and NF-κB-dependent pathways†

    PubMed Central

    Phulwani, Nirmal K.; Esen, Nilufer; Md. Syed, Mohsin; Kielian, Tammy

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in CNS innate immune responses as evident by their ability to produce a wide array of inflammatory mediators upon exposure to diverse stimuli. Although we have established that astrocytes utilize Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to signal inflammatory mediator production in response to S. aureus, a common etiological agent of CNS infections, the signal transduction pathways triggered by this pathogen and how TLR2 expression is regulated remain undefined. Three disparate inhibitors that block distinct steps in the NF-κB pathway, namely SC-514, BAY 11-7082, and CAPE, attenuated nitric oxide (NO), TNF-α, and CXCL2 release from S. aureus-activated astrocytes. Among these proinflammatory mediators, autocrine/paracrine TNF-α was pivotal for augmenting TLR2 expression, since receptor levels were not elevated in astrocytes isolated from TNF-α knockout (KO) mice upon bacterial exposure. Since TLR2 is critical for signaling astrocytic cytokine production in response to S. aureus, we evaluated the effect of TNF-α loss on proinflammatory mediator release. Interestingly, among the molecules assayed, only NO production was significantly attenuated in TNF-α KO astrocytes compared to WT cells. Similar results were obtained following LPS treatment, suggesting that TNF-α is an important regulator of astrocytic TLR2 expression and NO release in response to diverse microbial stimuli. In addition, NF-κB inhibitors attenuated TNF-α-induced TLR2 expression in astrocytes. Overall this study suggests that two important anti-bacterial effector molecules, TLR2 and NO, are regulated, in part, by NF-κB-dependent autocrine/paracrine effects of TNF-α in astrocytes. PMID:18768838

  5. Toll-Like Receptor-Dependent Immune Complex Activation of B Cells and Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Moody, Krishna L; Uccellini, Melissa B; Avalos, Ana M; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Viglianti, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    High titers of autoantibodies reactive with DNA/RNA molecular complexes are characteristic of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In vitro and in vivo studies have implicated the endosomal Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in the activation of the corresponding autoantibody producing B cells. Importantly, TLR9/TLR7-deficiency results in the inability of autoreactive B cells to proliferate in response to DNA/RNA-associated autoantigens in vitro, and in marked changes in the autoantibody repertoire of autoimmune-prone mice. Uptake of DNA/RNA-associated autoantigen immune complexes (ICs) also leads to activation of dendritic cells (DCs) through TLR9 and TLR7. The initial studies from our lab involved ICs formed by a mixture of autoantibodies and cell debris released from dying cells in culture. To better understand the nature of the mammalian ligands that can effectively activate TLR7 and TLR9, we have developed a methodology for preparing ICs containing defined DNA fragments that recapitulate the immunostimulatory activity of the previous "black box" ICs. As the endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 function optimally from intracellular acidic compartments, we developed a facile methodology to monitor the trafficking of defined DNA ICs by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. These reagents reveal an important role for nucleic acid sequence, even when the ligand is mammalian DNA and will help illuminate the role of IC trafficking in the response.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Mediates Fatal Immunopathology in Mice During Treatment of Secondary Pneumococcal Pneumonia Following Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Karlström, Åsa; Heston, Sarah M.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2011-01-01

    Host inflammatory responses contribute to the significant immunopathology that occurs during treatment of secondary bacterial pneumonia following influenza. We undertook the present study to determine the mechanisms underlying disparate outcomes in a mouse model with β-lactam and macrolide antibiotics. Lysis of superinfecting bacteria by ampicillin caused an extensive influx of neutrophils into the lungs resulting in a consolidative pneumonia, necrotic lung damage, and significant mortality. This was mediated through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and was independent of TLR4 and the Streptococcus pneumoniae cytotoxin pneumolysin. Treatment with azithromycin prevented neutrophil accumulation and rescued mice from subsequent mortality. This effect was independent of the antibacterial activity of this macrolide since dual therapy with ampicillin and azithromycin against an azithromycin-resistant strain also was able to cure secondary pneumonia. These data suggest that strategies for eliminating bacteria without lysis coupled with immunomodulation of inflammation should be pursued clinically. PMID:21900488

  7. Toll-like receptor 2 participates in the response to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoth, J Jason; Hudson, William P; Brownlee, Noel A; Yoza, Barbara K; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E

    2007-10-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We report that Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. To show this, we use a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans based on histologic, morphologic, and biochemical criteria of acute lung injury. The inflammatory response to pulmonary contusion in our mouse model is characterized by pulmonary edema, neutrophil transepithelial migration, and increased expression of the innate immunity proinflammatory cytokines IL 1beta and IL 6, the adhesion intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. Compared with wild-type animals, contused Tlr2(-/-) mice have significantly reduced pulmonary edema and neutrophilia. These findings are associated with decreased levels of circulating chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. In contrast, systemic IL 6 levels remain elevated in the TLR2-deficient phenotype. These results show that TLR2 has a primary role in the neutrophil response to acute lung injury. We suggest that an unidentified noninfectious ligand generated by pulmonary contusion acts via TLR2 to generate inflammatory responses.

  8. Possible evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus and periodontal disease association mediated by Toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Marques, C P C; Maor, Y; de Andrade, M S; Rodrigues, V P; Benatti, B B

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) participate in the innate immune response and trigger the immune responses of the body. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unknown aetiology, characterized by an excessive autoimmune response in the body affecting the connective tissues. The disease is possibly triggered by both environmental aetiological factors and pathological organic processes such as exposure to sunlight, chronic infectious processes and genetic factors. Conversely, periodontal disease is an infectious disease caused by microorganisms in the oral cavity, resulting in a chronic inflammatory process which continuously stimulates the immune response, thus causing damage to the periodontal tissues. The expression of both TLR-2 and TLR-4 receptors are increased in both SLE and periodontal disease. Periodontitis might trigger excessive activation of immune response occurring in SLE by maintaining a high expression of TLRs, leading in turn to the acceleration of the onset and progression of autoimmune reactions. In addition, periodontal treatment is able to reduce the expression of these receptors and therefore the symptoms of SLE. Here we discuss the possible interaction between SLE and periodontitis, and suggest further studies evaluating common features in both factors that could explored, due to morbidity and mortality of SLE and the high incidence of periodontal infections around the world. PMID:26386242

  9. Toll-like receptors-2 and 4 are overexpressed in an experimental model of particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Roberto D; Nich, Christophe; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Li, Chenguang; Swank, Katherine R; Gibon, Emmanuel; Rao, Allison J; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major cause of failure of total joint replacements (TJR) in the mid- and long term. As sentinels of the innate immune system, macrophages are central to the recognition and initiation of the inflammatory cascade, which results in the activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and danger-associated molecular patterns. Experimentally, polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene (PE) particles have been shown to activate macrophages via the TLR pathway. The specific TLRs involved in PE particle-induced osteolysis remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TLR-2, -4, and -9 mediated responses play a critical role in the development of PE wear particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium model. To test this hypothesis, we first demonstrated that PE particles caused observable osteolysis, visible by microCT and bone histomorphometry when the particles were applied to the calvarium of C57BL/6 mice. The number of TRAP positive osteoclasts was significantly greater in the PE-treated group when compared to the control group without particles. Finally, using immunohistochemistry, TLR-2 and TLR-4 were highly expressed in PE particle-induced osteolytic lesions, whereas TLR-9 was downregulated. TLR-2 and -4 may represent novel therapeutic targets for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and accompanying TJR failure. PMID:24115330

  10. Toll-like Receptors-2 and 4 are overexpressed in an experimental model of particle-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Roberto D.; Nich, Christophe; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Li, Chenguang; Swank, Katherine R.; Gibon, Emmanuel; Rao, Allison J.; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major cause of failure of total joint replacements (TJR) in the mid- and long-term. As sentinels of the innate immune system, macrophages are central to the recognition and initiation of the inflammatory cascade which results in the activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Experimentally, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) particles have been shown to activate macrophages via the TLR pathway. The specific TLRs involved in PE particle-induced osteolysis remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TLR-2, -4 and -9 mediated responses play a critical role in the development of PE wear particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium model. To test this hypothesis, we first demonstrated that PE particles caused observable osteolysis, visible by microCT and bone histomorphometry when the particles were applied to the calvarium of C57BL/6 mice. The number of TRAP positive osteoclasts was significantly greater in the PE-treated group when compared to the control group without particles. Finally, using immunohistochemistry, TLR-2 and TLR-4 were highly expressed in PE particle-induced osteolytic lesions, whereas TLR-9 was downregulated. TLR-2 and -4 may represent novel therapeutic targets for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and accompanying TJR failure. PMID:24115330

  11. Intratumoural injection of the toll-like receptor-2/6 agonist ‘macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2' in patients with pancreatic carcinoma: a phase I/II trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Welsch, T; Jäger, D; Mühlradt, P F; Büchler, M W; Märten, A

    2007-01-01

    This phase I/II trial examined safety and efficacy of the toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist MALP-2 in combination with gemcitabine in patients with incompletely resectable pancreas carcinomas. MALP-2 is a toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist, acts as an immunological adjuvant, and has been described recently to prolong survival in a mouse model of an orthotopic, syngeneic pancreas tumour. Male and female patients with incompletely resectable pancreas carcinomas were eligible while those with R0 or R1 resections or with peritoneal carcinosis were excluded. Ten patients were injected intratumourally during surgery with 20–30 μg MALP-2 followed by postoperative chemotherapy. Samples were taken from peripheral blood and wound secretion, and assayed for cell content, cytokine and CRP levels, and NK activity. An MALP-2 dose of 20 μg was well tolerated. Clear signs of local MALP-2 effects were presented by the influx of lymphocytes and monocytes in wound secretions, and abolishment of inhibition of NK activity. The actual mean survival is 17.1±4.2 months; the median survival being 9.3 months. Two patients are still alive after 31 months. Up to 20 μg MALP-2 was well tolerated, and no systemic side effects were noted. The mean survival of 17.1 months is remarkably high. PMID:17667928

  12. Milk Matters: Soluble Toll-Like Receptor 2 (sTLR2) in Breast Milk Significantly Inhibits HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Henrick, Bethany M.; Nag, Kakon; Yao, Xiao-Dan; Drannik, Anna G.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.; Rosenthal, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of infants who breastfeed from their HIV-positive mothers remain uninfected despite constant and repeated exposure to virus over weeks to years. This phenomenon is not fully understood but has been closely linked to innate factors in breast milk (BM). Most recently we have focused on one such innate factor, soluble Toll-like receptor 2 (sTLR2) for its significant contribution as an inhibitor of inflammation triggered by bacterial and viral antigens. We hypothesized that sTLR2 in BM inhibits immune activation/inflammation and HIV-1 infection. sTLR2 protein profiles were analyzed in HIV-uninfected BM and showed dramatic variability in expression concentration and predominant sTLR2 forms between women. sTLR2 immunodepleted BM, versus mock-depleted BM, incubated with Pam3CSK4 lead to significant increases in IL-8 production in a TLR2-dependant fashion in U937, HEK293-TLR2, and Caco-2. Importantly, TLR2-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibody addition to BM prior to cell-free R5 HIV-1 addition led to significantly (P<0.01, P<0.001, respectively) increased HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl reporter cells. To confirm these findings, sTLR2-depletion in BM led to significantly (P<0.001) increased HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells. Notably, immunodepletion does not allow for the complete removal of sTLR2 from BM, thus functional testing shown here may underestimate the total effect elicited by sTLR2 against HIV-1 and synthetic bacterial ligand. This study provides evidence for the first time that sTLR2 in BM may provide a dual protective role for infants breastfeeding from their HIV-infected mothers by; (1) immunomodulating pro-inflammatory responses to bacterial ligands, and (2) directly inhibiting cell-free HIV-1 infection. Thus, sTLR2 in BM may be critical to infant health and prove beneficial in decreasing vertical HIV-1 transmission to infants. PMID:22792230

  13. Assessment of Toll-like receptor 2, 4 and 9 SNP genotypes in canine sino-nasal aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The exact aetiology of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) is unknown. In man, dysfunction in innate immunity, particularly in the function of pattern recognition receptors, is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory sino-nasal disease and in fungal diseases. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and these diseases have been identified. Similarly, in dogs SNPs in genes encoding TLRs may be important in the pathogenesis of SNA. The aims of the present study were (1) to identify the presence of non-synonymous SNPs in the coding regions of the TLR2, 4 and 9 genes in dogs suffering from SNA, and (2) to investigate the SNP genotypes in dogs with SNA compared with a control population. Results Direct sequencing of nine dogs of various breeds with SNA revealed two non-synonymous SNPs in the coding region of TLR2, eight in TLR4 and four in TLR9. These non-synonymous SNPs were further evaluated in a case-control study of affected Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Rottweilers and Beaucerons. Genotyping was performed using a combination of allele-specific primers and hydrolysis probe assays in 31 dogs with SNA and 31controls. No significant difference in minor allele frequency was identified between these groups, for all studied SNPs, in any of the four breeds. Conclusions These findings do not support a role for non-synonymous SNPs in the TLR 2, 4 and 9 coding regions in the pathogenesis of canine SNA, but do not exclude a role for innate immunity in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25266752

  14. Different patterns of Toll-like receptor 2 polymorphisms in populations of various ethnic and geographic origins.

    PubMed

    Ioana, M; Ferwerda, B; Plantinga, T S; Stappers, M; Oosting, M; McCall, M; Cimpoeru, A; Burada, F; Panduru, N; Sauerwein, R; Doumbo, O; van der Meer, J W M; van Crevel, R; Joosten, L A B; Netea, M G

    2012-05-01

    Upon the invasion of the host by microorganisms, innate immunity is triggered through pathogen recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied class of PRRs, and they recognize specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from various microorganisms. A large number of studies have shown that genetic variation in TLRs may influence susceptibility to infections. We assessed the genetic variation of TLR2, which encodes one of the most important TLRs, in various populations around the globe and correlated it with changes in the function of the molecule. The three best-known nonsynonymous TLR2 polymorphisms (1892C>A, 2029C>T, and 2258G>A) were assessed in different populations from the main continental masses: Romanians, Vlax-Roma, Dutch (European populations), Han Chinese (East Asia), Dogon, Fulani (Africa), and Trio Indians (America). The 2029C>T polymorphism was absent in both European and non-European populations, with the exception of the Vlax-Roma, suggesting that this polymorphism most likely arose in Indo-Aryan people after migration into South Asia. The 1892C>A polymorphism that was found exclusively in European populations, but not in Asian, African, or American volunteers, probably occurred in proto-Indo-Europeans. Interestingly, 2258G>A was present only in Europeans, including Vlax-Roma, but at a very low frequency. The differential pattern of the TLR2 polymorphisms in various populations may explain some of the differences in susceptibility to infections between these populations.

  15. Polymorphisms of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in chronically infected hepatitis C patients from north-east Croatia.

    PubMed

    Perić, Magdalena; Bošnjak, Zinka; Šarkanj, Bojan; Barbić, Jerko; Antolović-Požgain, Arlen; Ružman, Nataša; Roksandić-Križan, Ivana; Vuković, Dubravka

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is caused by an inadequate immune response. Experimental data suggest that the impaired activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 contributes to chronic infection. We assessed the distribution of three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TLR2 (Arg753Gln) and TLR4 (Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile) genes in individuals from north-east Croatia and their effect on the outcome of antiviral therapy. The study consisted of 60 chronically infected patients and 40 healthy subjects. TLR polymorphisms were determined by the PCR-based melting curve analysis. HCV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array Hepatitis C Virus Genotyping Test. Thirty-three patients were treated with standard interferon and ribavirin therapy, and their viral load was evaluated at weeks 28 and 53 after the beginning of therapy. The majority of chronic infections were caused by genotype 1 (77%), followed by genotypes 3 (15%) and 4 (7%). Patients with genotype 1 had higher viral loads than patients infected with other genotypes (P = 0.0428). Healthy individuals and patients with chronic infection had similar frequencies of TLR2-Arg753Gln and TLR4-Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile SNPs. Heterozygous and homozygous TLR4-Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile polymorphisms correlated with higher viral loads and delayed responses to antiviral therapy. We have provided the first evidence that TLR4 polymorphisms influence the success of antiviral therapy in our region. This suggests that therapeutic strategies should be adjusted not only according to HCV genotype but also to individual TLR polymorphism(s).

  16. Soluble Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Hydrocephalus following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sokół, Bartosz; Jankowski, Roman; Hołysz, Marcin; Więckowska, Barbara; Jagodziński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling begins early in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and plays a key role in inflammation following cerebral aneurysm rupture. Available studies suggest significance of endogenous first-line blockers of a TLR pathway—soluble TLR2 and 4. Methods Eighteen patients with SAH and acute hydrocephalus underwent endovascular coiling and ventriculostomy; sTLR2 and 4 levels were assayed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected on post-SAH days 0–3, 5, and 10–12. Release kinetics were defined. CSF levels of sTLR2 and 4 were compared with a control group and correlated with the clinical status on admission, the findings on imaging, the degree of systemic inflammation and the outcome following treatment. Results None of study group showed detectable levels of sTLR2 and 4 on post-SAH day 0–3. 13 patients showed increased levels in subsequent samples. In five SAH patients sTLR2 and 4 levels remained undetectable; no distinctive features of this group were found. On post-SAH day 5 the strongest correlation was found between sTLR2 level and haemoglobin level on admission (cc = -0.498, P = 0.037). On post-SAH day 10–12 the strongest correlation was revealed between sTLR2 and treatment outcome (cc = -0.501, P = 0.076). Remaining correlations with treatment outcome, status at admission, imaging findings and inflammatory markers on post-SAH day 5 and 10–12 were negligible or low (-0.5 ≤ cc ≤ 0.5). Conclusions In the majority of cases, rupture of a cerebral aneurysm leads to delayed release of soluble TLR forms into CSF. sTLR2 and 4 seem to have minor role in human post-SAH inflammation due to delayed release kinetics and low levels of these protein. PMID:27223696

  17. High glucose induces inflammatory cytokine through protein kinase C-induced toll-like receptor 2 pathway in gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shao-Yun; Wei, Cong-Cong; Shang, Ting-Ting; Lian, Qi; Wu, Chen-Xuan; Deng, Jia-Yin

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose increased NF-{kappa}B p65 nuclear activity, IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC-{alpha}/{delta}-TLR2 pathway is involved in periodontal inflammation under high glucose. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune response and inflammation, especially in periodontitis. Meanwhile, hyperglycemia can induce inflammation in diabetes complications. However, the activity of TLRs in periodontitis complicated with hyperglycemia is still unclear. In the present study, high glucose (25 mmol/l) significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts (p < 0.05). Also, high glucose increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 nuclear activity, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-l{beta} (IL-1{beta}) levels. Protein kinase C (PKC)-{alpha} and {delta} knockdown with siRNA significantly decreased TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 expression (p < 0.05), whereas inhibition of PKC-{beta} had no effect on TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 under high glucose (p < 0.05). Additional studies revealed that TLR2 knockdown significantly abrogated high-glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Collectively, these data suggest that high glucose stimulates TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta} secretion via inducing TLR2 through PKC-{alpha} and PKC-{delta} in human gingival fibroblasts.

  18. 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D, Vitamin D Receptor and Toll-like Receptor 2 Polymorphisms in Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Ajay; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Prakash, Shantanu; Kumar, Neeraj; Garg, Rajiv; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene abnormalities confer susceptibility to tuberculosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), such asTLR-2, are also important mediators of inflammatory response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We evaluated serum vitamin D, and VDR and TLR-2 gene polymorphisms in patients with spinal tuberculosis. This study comprised of 3 groups: spinal tuberculosis, pulmonary tuberculosis, and controls (each with 106 subjects). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure vitamin D levels, and polymerase chain reaction-sequencing method was used to analyze VDR and TLR-2 gene polymorphisms. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly more prevalent in patients with spinal tuberculosis (P < 0.001) and pulmonary tuberculosis (P = 0.011), versus controls. The heterozygous and mutant genotypes of VDR TaqI gene were significantly associated with spinal tuberculosis (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] 4.74 [2.45–9.18]) and pulmonary tuberculosis (P < 0.001; OR 3.52 [1.80–6.88]) when compared with controls. The heterozygous and mutant variants of VDR ApaI gene were significantly more common in patients with spinal tuberculosis in comparison with patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (P < 0.001; OR 2.90 [1.65–5.10]) and controls (P < 0.001; OR 6.56 [3.41–12.61]). We did not observe any significantly different results for TLR-2 gene polymorphisms. Vitamin D deficiency, VDR, and TLR-2 polymorphisms did not affect the 6-month disability. Vitamin D deficiency and VDR gene polymorphisms are significantly more prevalent in people with pulmonary and spinal tuberculosis. They may, in isolation or collectively, confer susceptibility to pulmonary and spinal tuberculosis. PMID:27124026

  19. Enhanced Platelet Toll-like Receptor 2 and 4 Expression in Acute Coronary Syndrome and Stable Angina Pectoris.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Kadri Murat; Kocyigit, Duygu; Yalcin, Muhammed Ulvi; Canpinar, Hande; Oto, Mehmet Ali; Ozer, Necla; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Guc, Dicle; Aytemir, Kudret

    2015-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that toll-like receptors (TLR) are involved in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular disease. Enhanced expression of these receptors on monocytes has been shown in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, expression on platelets in this group of patients has not been evaluated yet. We aimed to demonstrate the possible relationship of platelet TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions with stable coronary artery disease and ACS pathogenesis. In this observational case-control study, 40 patients diagnosed with ACS (unstable angina pectoris, non-ST-segment elevation and ST-segment elevation ACS), 40 patients diagnosed with stable coronary artery disease, and 40 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal coronary arteries were involved. Platelet TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions were evaluated by flow cytometry in peripheral venous blood samples obtained before coronary angiography. A total of 120 patients (60.7 ± 12.3 years, 50% men) were included. Median platelet TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions were greater in patients with ACS compared to those with stable angina pectoris and normal coronary arteries (29.5% vs 10.5% vs 3.0%, p <0.001 and 40.5% vs 11.5% vs 3.0%, p <0.001, respectively). Median platelet TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions were also greater in patients with stable angina pectoris compared to those with normal coronary arteries (p <0.05). In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating enhanced TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions on platelets in patients with ACS. These findings may suggest that platelet TLR expression as a novel potential prophylactic and therapeutic target in ACS.

  20. Susceptibility to paratuberculosis infection in cattle is associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor 2 which modulate immune responses against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Koets, A; Santema, W; Mertens, H; Oostenrijk, D; Keestra, M; Overdijk, M; Labouriau, R; Franken, P; Frijters, A; Nielen, M; Rutten, V

    2010-03-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic intestinal infection in ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map). To study the role of host genetics in disease susceptibility, the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) gene, selected based on its potential role in immunity to mycobacterial infections, was analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and their potential association with disease. For SNP discovery and to study SNP association with disease, a case-control study including 24 cows from farms with paratuberculosis was conducted. Sequence analysis of the TLR2 genes from 12 paratuberculosis-infected animals and 12 age-matched healthy herd mates revealed 21 different SNP. The TLR2-1903 T/C SNP was significantly associated with resistance to Map. This and four additional TLR2 SNP were studied in a subsequent observational field study with 553 cows from farms with paratuberculosis. The allelic distribution of the TLR2-1903 T/C SNP was confirmed to be significantly different between the infected and non-infected animals. For the TLR2-1903 T/C SNP the odds ratio was calculated, and similar to the dominance model in the association study, the CT and CC genotypes were compared to the TT genotype. Cows with the TLR2-1903 T/C mutation (i.e., the CT and CC genotypes) were at 1.7 (95% CI: 1.2, 2.8) times the odds of being Map-infected compared to cows with the TT genotype. In in vitro functional assays, monocyte-derived macrophages from animals with a TLR2-1903 TT genotype produced more IL12p40 and IL1beta when stimulated with Map compared to cells derived from TLR2-1903 CT and CC genotypes. Also, T cell proliferative responses to mycobacterial antigens were higher in animals with a TLR2-1903 TT genotype. In conclusion, we have found a significant association between SNP TLR2-1903 T/C in the bovine TLR2 gene and bovine paratuberculosis infection. This SNP and other genetic markers could be useful in marker-assisted breeding strategies as an additional tool

  1. The localization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the endometrium and the cervix of dogs at different stages of the oestrous cycle and with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Chotimanukul, S; Sirivaidyapong, S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to localize and evaluate the role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the endometrium and cervix of bitches at different stages of the oestrous cycle and in bitches with pyometra. Sixty-seven nulliparous dogs, ranging in age from 1 to 13 years, were allocated amongst five groups (pro-oestrus; n = 7, oestrus; n = 10, dioestrus; n = 16, anoestrus; n = 11, pyometra; n = 23). Blood samples were collected for the measurement of progesterone concentration. The mean progesterone concentration was analysed as a parameter for validating the stage of the oestrous cycle in bitches. Tissues collected from uterine horn and cervix were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for immunohistochemical examination of TLR2. The expression of TLR2 was assessed semi-quantitatively. No pathological changes were found in the uterine samples of healthy dogs. In bitches with pyometra, the glandular epithelium expressed TLR2 more intensely than the surface epithelium. The expression of TLR2 in the glandular epithelium was also significantly higher in healthy dogs at oestrus, dioestrus and dogs with pyometra compared with anoestrous dogs (p < 0.01). The expression of TLR2 in the stroma was not observed in the group of healthy dogs at all stages. The surface epithelium of cervix in dogs with pyometra expressed TLR2 significantly more intensely than did the stoma, whereas the expression of TLR2 during oestrus and dioestrus was absent in the stroma of cervix. This study provides the first report of immunohistochemical localization of TLR2 in the canine reproductive tract. In the present study, TLR2 was expressed in endometrial epithelium but was absent in the endometrial stroma of healthy dogs at all oestrous cycle stages. These findings suggest differential expression of TLR in endometrial cells. On the other hand, the lack of TLR2 in the stroma of healthy uteri of dogs may predispose to infection from the invading pathogens once the epithelial cells have been destroyed by the

  2. Leishmania donovani-Induced Prostaglandin E2 Generation Is Critically Dependent on Host Toll-Like Receptor 2-Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Amrita; Majumder, Saikat; Das, Shibali; Ghosh, Sweta; Biswas, Satabdi; Majumdar, Subrata

    2016-10-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the second-largest parasitic killer disease after malaria. During VL, the protozoan Leishmania donovani induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation within host macrophages to aid parasite survival. PGE2 significantly influences leishmanial pathogenesis, as L. donovani proliferation is known to be attenuated in PGE2-inhibited macrophages. Here, we report for the first time that signaling via macrophage Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) plays an instrumental role in inducing PGE2 release from L. donovani-infected macrophages. This signaling cascade, mediated via the TLR2-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathway, was found to be indispensable for activation of two major enzymes required for PGE2 generation: cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2). Inhibition of cPLA2, but not secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) or calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2), arrested L. donovani infection. During infection, cPLA2 activity increased >7-fold in a calcium-dependent and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent manner, indicating that elevation of intracellular calcium and ERK-mediated phosphorylation was necessary for L. donovani-induced cPLA2 activation. For transcriptional upregulation of cyclooxygenase 2, activation of the calcium-calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling was required in addition to the TLR2-PI3K-PLC pathway. Detailed studies by site-directed mutagenesis of potential NFAT binding sites and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that the binding of macrophage NFATc2, at the -73/-77 site on the cox2 promoter, induced L. donovani-driven cox2 transcriptional activation. Collectively, these findings highlight the contribution of TLR2 downstream signaling toward activation of cPLA2 and Cox2 and illustrate how the TLR2-PI3K-PLC pathway acts in a concerted manner with calcium-calcineurin-NFATc2 signaling to modulate PGE2 release

  3. Control of B-cell responses by Toll-like receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2005-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) detect microbial infection and have an essential role in the induction of immune responses. TLRs can directly induce innate host defence responses, but the mechanisms of TLR-mediated control of adaptive immunity are not fully understood. Although TLR-induced dendritic cell maturation is required for activation of T-helper (TH) cells, the role of TLRs in B-cell activation and antibody production in vivo is not yet known. Here we show that activation and differentiation of TH cells is not sufficient for the induction of T-dependent B-cell responses. We find that, in addition to CD4+ T-cell help, generation of T-dependent antigen-specific antibody responses requires activation of TLRs in B cells.

  4. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus–target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14+ monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14+ human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14+ monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14+ CD16+ activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14high CD16+ monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14high CD16+, indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in order to control both intense

  5. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-06-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus-target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14(+) monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14(+) human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR(+) monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14(+) monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14(+) CD16(+) activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14(high) CD16(+) monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14(high) CD16(+), indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in

  6. Very low frequencies of Toll-like receptor 2 supposed-2029T and 2258A (RS5743708) mutant alleles in southern Brazilian critically ill patients: would it be a lack of worldwide-accepted clinical applications of Toll-like receptor 2 variants?

    PubMed

    Thurow, Helena Strelow; Sarturi, Cladinara Roberts; Fallavena, Paulo Roberto Vargas; Paludo, Francis Jackson de Oliveira; Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Graebin, Pietra; de Souza, Vinícius Carolino; Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Nóbrega, Otávio de Tolêdo; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2010-06-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a recognition receptor for the widest repertoire of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Two polymorphisms of TLR2 could be linked to reduced nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) activation and to increased risk of infection (supposed-2029C>T and 2258G>A). We investigated the supposed-2029C>T and 2258G>A TLR2 polymorphisms in 422 critically ill patients of European origin from southern Brazil (295 with sepsis and 127 without sepsis) and reviewed 33 studies on these polymorphisms, conducting a quality assessment with a score system. Among our patients we found only one heterozygote (1/422) for the supposed-2029C>T and none for the 2258G>A (0/422) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We were unable to find a clinical application of supposed-2029T and 2258A allele analyses in our southern Brazilian population. Our review detected that current TLR2 SNP assays had very controversial and contradictory results derived from reports with a variety of investigation quality criteria. We suggest that, if analyzed alone, the supposed-2029C>T and 2258G>A TLR2 SNP are not good candidates for genetic markers in studies that search for direct or indirect clinical applications between genotype and phenotype. Future efforts to improve the knowledge and to provide other simultaneous genetic markers might reveal a more effective TLR2 effect on the susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  7. Role of inflammatory cells and toll-like receptors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Anusha N; Monaco, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The primary cause of cerebrovascular disease is atherosclerosis, to which many factors contribute. At first many saw atherosclerosis as a lipid-driven disease. Recently inflammation has appeared as a significant factor in the disease. Innate immune cells, for example monocytes and macrophages, are important in atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied family of receptor in the immune system. TLR engagement with their ligands stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production and foam cell generation. Recently certain TLRs have shown a protective role in atherosclerosis. In this review, we analyse innate immunity, focusing on TLR signalling and macrophages, in atherosclerosis and acute cerebrovascular complications, and thereby discuss their potential as therapeutic targets.

  8. Toll like receptor 2 and CC chemokine receptor 5 cluster in the lipid raft enhances the susceptibility of Leishmania donovani infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Suchandra Bhattacharyya; Bhattacharya, Parna; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumder, Saikat; Banerjee, Sayantan; Majumdar, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    In experimental visceral leishmaniasis the causative obligate protozoan parasite, L. donovani invades and multiplies inside of macrophages, one of the sentries of the mammalian immune system. The initial host-parasite interaction between the Leishmania promastigote and the macrophage takes place at the plasma membrane interface. To trace any possible interaction between Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) during early Leishmania-macrophage interactions, it was observed that the expression of both TLR2 and CCR5 were significantly increased, along with their recruitment to the lipid raft. TLR2 silencing attenuates CCR5 expression and restricts L. donovani infection, indicating a regulatory role of TLR2 and CCR5 during infection. Silencing of CCR5 and TLR2 markedly reduced the number of intracellular parasites in macrophages by host protective cytokine responses, while raft disruption using beta-MCD affected TLR2/CCR5 cross-talk and resulted in a significant reduction in parasite invasion. In vivo RNA interference of TLR2 and CCR5 using shRNA plasmids rendered protection in Leishmania donovani-infected mice. Thus, this study for the first time demonstrates the importance of TLR2/CCR5 crosstalk as a significant determinant of Leishmania donovani entry in host macrophages.

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Mediates In Vivo Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and Modulates Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Piermattei, Alessia; Migliara, Giuseppe; Di Sante, Gabriele; Foti, Maria; Hayrabedyan, Soren Bohos; Papagna, Angela; Geloso, Maria Concetta; Corbi, Maddalena; Valentini, Mariagrazia; Sgambato, Alessandro; Delogu, Giovanni; Constantin, Gabriela; Ria, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria display pro- and anti-inflammatory effects in human and experimental pathology. We show here that both effects are mediated by Toll-like receptor 2 (Tlr2), by exploiting a previously characterized Tlr2 variant (Met82Ile). Tlr2 82ile promoted self-specific proinflammatory polarization as well as expansion of ag-specific FoxP3+ Tregs, while Tlr2 82met impairs the expansion of Tregs and reduces the production of IFN-γ and IL-17 proinflammatory cytokines. Preferential dimerization with Tlr1 or Tlr6 could not explain these differences. In silico, we showed that Tlr2 variant Met82Ile modified the binding pocket for peptidoglycans and participated directly to a putative binding pocket for sugars and cadherins. The distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory actions impacted severity, extent of remission, and distribution of the lesions within the central nervous system of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, Tlr2 has a janus function in vivo as mediator of the role of bacterial products in balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses. PMID:27252700

  10. Mechanisms for the activation of Toll-like receptor 2/4 by saturated fatty acids and inhibition by docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Daniel H; Kim, Jeong-A; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-08-15

    Saturated fatty acids can activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 but polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibit the activation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipopetides, ligands for TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, are acylated by saturated fatty acids. Removal of these fatty acids results in loss of their ligand activity suggesting that the saturated fatty acyl moieties are required for the receptor activation. X-ray crystallographic studies revealed that these saturated fatty acyl groups of the ligands directly occupy hydrophobic lipid binding domains of the receptors (or co-receptor) and induce the dimerization which is prerequisite for the receptor activation. Saturated fatty acids also induce the dimerization and translocation of TLR4 and TLR2 into lipid rafts in plasma membrane and this process is inhibited by DHA. Whether saturated fatty acids induce the dimerization of the receptors by interacting with these lipid binding domains is not known. Many experimental results suggest that saturated fatty acids promote the formation of lipid rafts and recruitment of TLRs into lipid rafts leading to ligand independent dimerization of the receptors. Such a mode of ligand independent receptor activation defies the conventional concept of ligand induced receptor activation; however, this may enable diverse non-microbial molecules with endogenous and dietary origins to modulate TLR-mediated immune responses. Emerging experimental evidence reveals that TLRs play a key role in bridging diet-induced endocrine and metabolic changes to immune responses.

  11. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Mediates In Vivo Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and Modulates Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, Alessia; Migliara, Giuseppe; Di Sante, Gabriele; Foti, Maria; Hayrabedyan, Soren Bohos; Papagna, Angela; Geloso, Maria Concetta; Corbi, Maddalena; Valentini, Mariagrazia; Sgambato, Alessandro; Delogu, Giovanni; Constantin, Gabriela; Ria, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria display pro- and anti-inflammatory effects in human and experimental pathology. We show here that both effects are mediated by Toll-like receptor 2 (Tlr2), by exploiting a previously characterized Tlr2 variant (Met82Ile). Tlr2 82ile promoted self-specific proinflammatory polarization as well as expansion of ag-specific FoxP3(+) Tregs, while Tlr2 82met impairs the expansion of Tregs and reduces the production of IFN-γ and IL-17 proinflammatory cytokines. Preferential dimerization with Tlr1 or Tlr6 could not explain these differences. In silico, we showed that Tlr2 variant Met82Ile modified the binding pocket for peptidoglycans and participated directly to a putative binding pocket for sugars and cadherins. The distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory actions impacted severity, extent of remission, and distribution of the lesions within the central nervous system of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, Tlr2 has a janus function in vivo as mediator of the role of bacterial products in balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses. PMID:27252700

  12. Structural Determination and Toll-like Receptor 2-dependent Proinflammatory Activity of Dimycolyl-diarabino-glycerol from Mycobacterium marinum*

    PubMed Central

    Elass-Rochard, Elisabeth; Rombouts, Yoann; Coddeville, Bernadette; Maes, Emmanuel; Blervaque, Renaud; Hot, David; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann

    2012-01-01

    Although it was identified in the cell wall of several pathogenic mycobacteria, the biological properties of dimycolyl-diarabino-glycerol have not been documented yet. In this study an apolar glycolipid, presumably corresponding to dimycolyl-diarabino-glycerol, was purified from Mycobacterium marinum and subsequently identified as a 5-O-mycolyl-β-Araf-(1→2)-5-O-mycolyl-α-Araf-(1→1′)-glycerol (designated Mma_DMAG) using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry analyses. Lipid composition analysis revealed that mycolic acids were dominated by oxygenated mycolates over α-mycolates and devoid of trans-cyclopropane functions. Highly purified Mma_DMAG was used to demonstrate its immunomodulatory activity. Mma_DMAG was found to induce the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β) in human macrophage THP-1 cells and to trigger the expression of ICAM-1 and CD40 cell surface antigens. This activation mechanism was dependent on TLR2, but not on TLR4, as demonstrated by (i) the use of neutralizing anti-TLR2 and -TLR4 antibodies and by (ii) the detection of secreted alkaline phosphatase in HEK293 cells co-transfected with the human TLR2 and secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase reporter genes. In addition, transcriptomic analyses indicated that various genes encoding proinflammatory factors were up-regulated after exposure of THP-1 cells to Mma_DMAG. Importantly, a wealth of other regulated genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, including chemokines/cytokines and their respective receptors, adhesion molecules, and metalloproteinases, were found to be modulated by Mma_DMAG. Overall, this study suggests that DMAG may be an active cell wall glycoconjugate driving host-pathogen interactions and participating in the immunopathogenesis of mycobacterial infections. PMID:22798072

  13. Toll like receptor 2 knock-out attenuates carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis by downregulating MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lingling; Xue, Ruyi; Tang, Wenqing; Wu, Weibin; Hu, Tingting; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Gu, Jianxin; Chen, She; Zhang, Si

    2014-06-01

    Innate immune signaling associated with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is a key pathway involved in the progression of liver fibrosis. In this study, we reported that TLR2 is required for hepatic fibrogenesis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). After CCl4 treatment, TLR2(-/-) mice had reduced liver enzyme levels, diminished collagen deposition, decreased inflammatory infiltration and impaired activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) than wild type (WT) mice. Furthermore, after CCl4 treatment, TLR2(-/-) mice demonstrated downregulated expression of profibrotic and proinflammatory genes and impaired mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation than WT mice. Collectively, our data indicate that TLR2 deficiency protects against CCl4-induced liver fibrosis.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  15. [The correlation study between the changes of intestinal mucosa predominant bacteria and Toll-like receptor 2, Toll-like receptor 4 gene expressions in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients].

    PubMed

    Guo, W T; Liu, P; Dong, L N; Wang, J P

    2016-07-01

    Based on high throughput sequencing and PCR detection technology, this study has found out that intestinal microbial diversity was impaired and the quantities of two main bacteria flora (Bacteroidetes and Clostridium) were significantly reduced in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS). Meanwhile mucosal expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 were significantly enhanced, which was inversely correlated with the reduction of Bacteroidetes and Clostridium. Thus, it suggests that D-IBS may be associated with TLR signal transduction triggered by the intestinal dysbacteriosis. PMID:27373290

  16. Differential immunomodulatory activity of tumor cell death induced by cancer therapeutic toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Klein, Johanna C; Wild, Clarissa A; Lang, Stephan; Brandau, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands stimulate defined immune cell subsets and are currently tested as novel immunotherapeutic agents against cancer with, however, varying clinical efficacy. Recent data showed the expression of TLR receptors also on tumor cells. In this study we investigated immunological events associated with the induction of tumor cell death by poly(I:C) and imiquimod. A human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line was exposed to poly(I:C) and imiquimod, which were delivered exogenously via culture medium or via electroporation. Cell death and cell biological consequences thereof were analyzed. For in vivo analyses, a human xenograft and a syngeneic immunocompetent mouse model were used. Poly(I:C) induced cell death only if delivered by electroporation into the cytosol. Cell death induced by poly(I:C) resulted in cytokine release and activation of monocytes in vitro. Monocytes activated by the supernatant of cancer cells previously exposed to poly(I:C) recruited significantly more Th1 cells than monocytes exposed to control supernatants. If delivered exogenously, imiquimod also induced tumor cell death and some release of interleukin-6, but cell death was not associated with release of Th1 cytokines, interferons, monocyte activation and Th1 recruitment. Interestingly, intratumoral injection of poly(I:C) triggered tumor cell death in tumor-bearing mice and reduced tumor growth independent of TLR signaling on host cells. Imiquimod did not affect tumor size. Our data suggest that common cancer therapeutic RNA compounds can induce functionally diverse types of cell death in tumor cells with implications for the use of TLR ligands in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27034235

  17. Expression of toll-like receptors on human rectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tchórzewski, Marcin; Lewkowicz, Przemysław; Dziki, Adam; Tchórzewski, Henryk

    2014-06-01

    The innate immune system uses Toll-like receptors (TLR) to detect the presence of pathogen patterns thus allowing for rapid host defense responses. Stimulation of TLR results in inflammatory response and regulatory cytokine production affecting acquired immunity. The aim of the study was an evaluation of TLR2 and TLR4 expression on the surface of human colon cancer cells in primary culture with or without autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Surgical specimens of colon cancer were processed to obtain cancer cells. Cancer cells separation was conducted first by mechanical tissue disintegration and than by gradient centrifugation to obtain 95 % cell confluence. By staining the isolated cells the pathologist determined them as adenocarcinoma. Colon cancer cells were then co-cultured in 24 h culture alone or together with autologous lymphocytes. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed for detection of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA in colon cancer and normal colon epithelial cells using commercially available primers. Resting as well as phytohemagglutinin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated cells were tested. Receptor proteins on cancer cells were examined by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 mRNA was detected in cancer cells. Autologous lymphocytes do not exert any effect on these receptors expression. TLR4 mRNA expression was not observed in normal colon epithelial cells. TLR2 mRNA was present on LPS stimulated cancer cells as well as on resting and stimulated lymphocytes. Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 receptor proteins on colon cancer cells were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 may be responsible for uncontrolled tumor growth under LPS stimulation in human colon environment.

  18. Central role of endogenous Toll-like receptor-2 activation in regulating inflammation, reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent neointimal formation after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Tetsuro . E-mail: Tetsuro_Shishido@URMC.Rochester.edu; Nozaki, Naoki; Takahashi, Hiroki; Arimoto, Takanori; Niizeki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yo; Abe, Jun-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2006-07-14

    Background: It is now evident that inflammation after vascular injury has significant impact on the restenosis after revascularization procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, and bypass grafting. However, the mechanisms that regulate inflammation and repair after vascular injury are incompletely understood. Here, we report that vascular injury-mediated cytokine expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as subsequent neointimal formation requires Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) mediated signaling pathway in vivo. Methods and results: Vascular injury was induced by cuff-placement around the femoral artery in non-transgenic littermates (NLC) and TLR-2 knockout (TLR-2KO) mice. After cuff-placement in NLC mice, expression of TLR-2 was significantly increased in both smooth muscle medial layer and adventitia. Interestingly, we found that inflammatory genes expression such as tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were markedly decreased in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. In addition, ROS production after vascular injury was attenuated in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. Since we observed the significant role of endogenous TLR-2 activation in regulating inflammatory responses and ROS production after vascular injury, we determined whether inhibition of endogenous TLR-2 activation can inhibit neointimal proliferation after vascular injury. Neointimal hyperplasia was markedly suppressed in TLR-2KO mice compared with WT mice at both 2 and 4 weeks after vascular injury. Conclusions: These findings suggested that endogenous TLR-2 activation might play a central role in the regulation of vascular inflammation as well as subsequent neointimal formation in injured vessels.

  19. Curdlan activates dendritic cells through dectin-1 and toll-like receptor 4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Ki Hun; Yun, Jieun; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2016-10-01

    Curdlan, a β-1,3-glucan isolated from Alcaligenes faecalis, is an agonist of dectin-1 in various immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). However, whether curdlan also activates DCs through other receptors remains unknown. In this study, we found that curdlan activates DCs through dectin-1 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Curdlan increased the expression levels of surface molecules (CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC-I/II), the production of cytokines (IL-12, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-β), migration toward MIP-3β, and allogeneic T cell stimulation activity of DCs. Curdlan increased the phosphorylation of Syk, Raf-1, Akt, MAPKs, IKK, and NF-κB p65 in DCs. However, curdlan only slightly activated DCs transfected with small interfering RNAs against dectin-1 or TLR4 and C3H/HeJ DCs, which have non-functional TLR4, in comparison with control DCs. Curdlan increased antitumor activity of DCs in a syngeneic tumor model. In summary, our data show that curdlan activates DCs through dectin-1 and TLR4 signaling and the combination of curdlan and DCs efficiently inhibit tumor growth in mice.

  20. RANTES expression induced by Toll-like receptor 4 ligand in rat airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, Kaori; Tamaoka, Meiyo; Takayama, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Sumi, Yuki; Inase, Naohiko; Yoshizawa, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) have been reported to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and take part in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation. Though TLRs were found to activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in airway epithelial cells, little is known about the association of TLR ligands with EGFR signaling pathways in ASMCs. Using primary cultured ASMCs from Brown Norway rats, TLR4, eotaxin, and RANTES mRNA were examined by real-time quantitative RT-PCR after stimulation with the TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The concentration of RANTES protein in culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. The effect of EGFR signaling inhibitors on RANTES expression was examined as well. Phosphorylation of EGFR after stimulation was examined by Western Blotting. Rat ASMCs expressed TLR4 and eotaxin, and LPS upregulated RANTES production. The EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor GM6001 inhibited RANTES expression induced by LPS. LPS phosphorylated EGFR. TLR4 activation can induce RANTES expression via EGFR transactivation and PI3K/Akt pathway in rat ASMCs. MMP-induced EGFR proligand cleavage and ligand binding to EGFR seem to be involved in this pathway. These findings may be critical in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation by airway infection. PMID:23896774

  1. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  2. Differential activation of the Toll-like receptor 2/6 complex by lipoproteins of Streptococcus suis serotypes 2 and 9.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Rebel, Johanna M J; Smits, Mari A; van Putten, Jos P M; Smith, Hilde E

    2010-07-14

    Streptococcus suis causes invasive infections in pigs and occasionally in humans. Worldwide, S. suis serotype 2 is most frequently isolated from diseased piglets, but the less virulent serotype 9 is emerging, at least in Europe. We compared the activation of human Toll-like receptors (hTLRs) by S. suis serotype 2 and 9 strains to better understand the role of the innate immune response in fighting S. suis infections. Neither live nor heat-killed log phase grown S. suis activated the hTLR1/2, hTLR2/6 and hTLR4/MD-2 complexes. However, the hTLR2/6 complex was specifically activated by both serotypes after disruption of the cell wall synthesis using penicillin. Activation levels of the hTLR2/6 complex were higher for serotype 9 strains compared to serotype 2 strains suggesting intrinsic differences in cell wall composition between both serotypes. The hTLR2/6 activating fractions decreased in molecular size after digestion with proteinase K and were sensitive for lipoprotein lipase digestion and NaOH hydrolysis, indicating lipoprotein(s) as active component(s). Overall, our results indicate that S. suis lipoproteins activate TLR2/6 but not TLR1/2 and that the clinically different serotypes 2 and 9 display differential release of TLR ligand when cell wall integrity is compromised.

  3. Modulation of Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells Activity by Toll-Like Receptors: Implications on Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    DelaRosa, Olga; Lombardo, Eleuterio

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of special interest as therapeutic agents in the settings of both chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Toll-like receptors (TLR) ligands have been linked with the perpetuation of inflammation in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases due to the permanent exposure of the immune system to TLR-specific stimuli. Therefore, MSCs employed in therapy can be potentially exposed to TLR ligands, which may modulate MSC therapeutic potential in vivo. Recent results demonstrate that MSCs are activated by TLR ligands leading to modulation of the differentiation, migration, proliferation, survival, and immunosuppression capacities. However inconsistent results among authors have been reported suggesting that the source of MSCs, TLR stimuli employed or culture conditions play a role. Notably, activation by TLR ligands has not been reported to modulate the “immunoprivileged” phenotype of MSCs which is of special relevance regarding the use of allogeneic MSC-based therapies. In this review, we discuss the available data on the modulation of MSCs activity through TLR signalling. PMID:20628526

  4. Regulation of angiogenesis, mural cell recruitment and adventitial macrophage behavior by Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Alfred C; Ligresti, Giovanni; Fogel, Eric; Zorzi, Penelope; Smith, Kelly; Nicosia, Roberto F

    2014-01-01

    The angiogenic response to injury can be studied by culturing rat or mouse aortic explants in collagen gels. Gene expression studies show that aortic angiogenesis is preceded by an immune reaction with overexpression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-inducible genes. TLR1, 3, and 6 are transiently upregulated at 24 h whereas TLR2, 4, and 8 expression peaks at 24 h but remains elevated during angiogenesis and vascular regression. Expression of TLR5, 7 and 9 steadily increases over time and is highest during vascular regression. Studies with isolated cells show that TLRs are expressed at higher levels in aortic macrophages compared to endothelial or mural cells with the exception of TLR2 and TLR9 which are more abundant in the aortic endothelium. LPS and other TLR ligands dose dependently stimulate angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor production. TLR9 ligands also influence the behavior of nonendothelial cell types by blocking mural cell recruitment and inducing formation of multinucleated giant cells by macrophages. TLR9-induced mural cell depletion is associated with reduced expression of the mural cell recruiting factor PDGFB. The spontaneous angiogenic response of the aortic rings to injury is reduced in cultures from mice deficient in myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule of TLRs, and following treatment with an inhibitor of the NFκB pathway. These results suggest that the TLR system participates in the angiogenic response of the vessel wall to injury and may play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory angiogenesis in reactive and pathologic processes.

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 regulates the barrier function of human bronchial epithelial monolayers through atypical protein kinase C zeta, and an increase in expression of claudin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathy, Sakthikumar; Esmaeili, Farnaz; Paschoud, Serge; Sublet, Emmanuelle; Citi, Sandra; Borchard, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 in maintaining the integrity of the airway epithelial barrier using the human bronchial epithelial cell line Calu-3. Activation of TLR2 by its ligands, Pam3CysSK4 and Peptidoglycan showed a concentration dependent increase in epithelial barrier function, as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). This was confirmed by a decrease in paracellular flux of fluorescein sodium. This TLR2 induced increase in TEER was significantly reduced by pretreatment with polyclonal anti-human TLR2-neutralizing antibody. TLR2 stimulation in Calu-3 cell monolayers resulted in an increased expression of the tight junction proteins claudin-1 and ZO-1, and a decreased expression of occludin, at both the mRNA and protein levels. A pseudosubstrate inhibitor to PKCζ significantly prevented the TLR2 mediated increase in barrier function. It also prevented the increase in claudin-1 in a concentration dependent manner up to 1 µM. TLR2 stimulation led to an increase in phosphorylation of atypical PKC ζ, which was prevented by the pseudosubstrate inhibitor in a concentration dependent manner. Taken together, our observations support a model whereby increased tight junction barrier function induced by activation of TLR2 occurs through increased expression of claudin-1, and through modulation of PKC ζ activity. PMID:25101232

  6. Activation of Toll-Like Receptors 2 by High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Monocytes from Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sadat-Hatamnezhad, Leila; Tanomand, Asghar; Mahmoudi, Javad; Shotorbani, Siamak Sandoghchian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of death all around the world, and ischemic stroke is considered to be the most common stroke type. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important molecules for detection of both pathogen invasion and tissue damage. In this regard, the purpose of this study was to assess the expression level of TLR2 on monocytes in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the expression change profile following high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) stimulation. Methods: A total of 30 patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled from November 2013 to September 2014. The real-time PCR and ELISA assays were applied to detect the concentrations of TLR2 mRNAs. Results: TLR2 expression was found to be increased in patients with ischemic stroke, as compared to the healthy control group (P<0.001). Also, anti-TLR2 antibodies were able to decrease the expression levels of IL-17, IL-6 and IL-33. This result implies that the enhanced TLR2 pathway and Th17 cell polarization may be due to HMGB1 stimulation in ischemic stroke. Conclusion: Further clinical studies are needed for development of a new treatment strategy to inhibit the HMGB1 pathway, thus preventing the inflammation in ischemic stroke patients. PMID:27040385

  7. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  8. Relative Expression of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 7 mRNA in Peripheral Blood of Patients With Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan-Manshadi, Mahdi; Hadinedoushan, Hossein; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kazem; Zare, Fateme; Eslami, Gilda; Mirghanizade-Bafghi, Seyyed Ali; Akhondi-Meybodi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen affecting an estimated 120 – 170 million individuals in the world. Toll-Like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and stimulate immune responses. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the mRNA expression level of TLR2 and TLR7 in HCV-infected patients in comparison with normal controls. Patients and Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with HCV infection and nineteen sex and age-matched healthy controls were studied in a case-controlled research. Results: Our results showed that the expressions of TLR7 in HCV infected samples were significantly increased in comparison those of the controls (P = 0.02), while the expression of TLR2 was similar between the case and the control group (P = 0.8). There were no associations between the expression levels of TLR2 and TLR7 with HCV viral load and HCV genotypes. Also, there was no association between viral load and genotypes of the virus. Conclusions: Our findings showed that HCV infection could lead to increased expression level of TLR7 mRNA in peripheral blood cells of HCV infected samples. The viral load and genotypes of HCV did not affect the mRNA expression levels of TLR2 and TLR7. PMID:26834788

  9. Receptor for advanced glycation end products regulates adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin sensitivity in mice: involvement of Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Monden, Masayo; Koyama, Hidenori; Otsuka, Yoshiko; Morioka, Tomoaki; Mori, Katsuhito; Shoji, Takuhito; Mima, Yohei; Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya; Shioi, Atsushi; Emoto, Masanori; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Inaba, Masaaki

    2013-02-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been shown to be involved in adiposity as well as atherosclerosis even in nondiabetic conditions. In this study, we examined mechanisms underlying how RAGE regulates adiposity and insulin sensitivity. RAGE overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes using adenoviral gene transfer accelerated adipocyte hypertrophy, whereas inhibitions of RAGE by small interfering RNA significantly decrease adipocyte hypertrophy. Furthermore, double knockdown of high mobility group box-1 and S100b, both of which are RAGE ligands endogenously expressed in 3T3-L1 cells, also canceled RAGE-medicated adipocyte hypertrophy, implicating a fundamental role of ligands-RAGE ligation. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by RAGE overexpression is associated with suppression of glucose transporter type 4 and adiponectin mRNA expression, attenuated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and insulin-stimulated signaling. Toll-like receptor (Tlr)2 mRNA, but not Tlr4 mRNA, is rapidly upregulated by RAGE overexpression, and inhibition of Tlr2 almost completely abrogates RAGE-mediated adipocyte hypertrophy. Finally, RAGE(-/-) mice exhibited significantly less body weight, epididymal fat weight, epididymal adipocyte size, higher serum adiponectin levels, and higher insulin sensitivity than wild-type mice. RAGE deficiency is associated with early suppression of Tlr2 mRNA expression in adipose tissues. Thus, RAGE appears to be involved in mouse adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin sensitivity, whereas Tlr2 regulation may partly play a role.

  10. Presence of toll like receptor-2 in spleen, lymph node and thymus of Swiss albino mice and its modulation by Staphylococcus aureus and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. .

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Chandrayee; Prakash, Nune Ravi; Manna, Sunil Kumar; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are a family of pattern recognition receptors identifying pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). They play a critical role in the innate immune response during the initial interaction between the infecting microorganism and phagocytic cells. Here, we verified the presence of TLR-2 in spleen, lymph node and thymus of Swiss albino mice and their modulation after infection with Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. It was seen that TLR-2 gene transcribed to its respective mRNA on S. aureus infection, in thymus, spleen and lymph node of mice but their levels and mode of expression varied. When challenged with LPS no prominent changes in the expression of TLR-2 receptor was observed but its expression increased gradually with time in the thymus, spleen and lymph node of S. aureus infected mice. TLR-2 expression was also found enhanced in infected splenic macrophages. By studying the serum cytokine profile the functionality of the receptor was measured. The results indicate the presence of TLR-2 in thymus, spleen and lymph node of Swiss albino strain of mice and that they are modulated by S. aureus.

  11. Activation of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4/MD2 by Neisseria is independent of capsule and lipooligosaccharide (LOS) sialylation but varies widely among LOS from different strains.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, Alison C; Jarvis, Gary A; John, Constance M; Jack, Dominic L; Dower, Steven K; Read, Robert C

    2003-07-01

    Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) structure and capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis each greatly influence the virulence of the organism and the quality of host innate immune responses. In this study, we found that production of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by a human monocyte-derived cell line (THP-1) exposed to strains of N. meningitidis lacking capsule and/or with truncated LOS was similar to that elicited by the isogenic wild-type strain. These mutants also exhibited no difference in induction of the interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoter in a transfected HeLa cell system of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4/MD2 signaling. However, purified LOS from diverse strains of Neisseria (both N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae) caused widely variant levels of IL-8 promoter induction in cells expressing MD2 that correlated with the production of TNF from THP-1 cells. These data suggest that although modification of the oligosaccharide chain of LOS and/or absence of capsule do not affect cell signaling mediated by TLR4/MD2, fine-structural differences in the LOS do influence signaling through TLR4/MD2 and, through this pathway, influence some of the proinflammatory responses elicited by Neisseria.

  12. Toll-like receptor ligand activation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dearman, Rebecca J; Cumberbatch, Marie; Maxwell, Gavin; Basketter, David A; Kimber, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the initiation of primary immune responses. The pattern of Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression on various subsets of these cells has been shown to differ, suggestive of distinct roles in influencing immune responses. We have examined here the responses of immature DCs derived from murine bone marrow (BMDCs) to a range of TLR ligands. BMDCs cultured for 6 days in the presence of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor were stimulated for 24 hr with ligands to TLR1-2 [Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 (PAM)], TLR2-6 (macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2); zymosan or peptidoglycan (PG)], TLR3 (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid), TLR4 [lipopolysaccharide R515 (LPS)], TLR5 (flagellin), TLR7 (polyuridylic acid) and TLR9 [CpG ODN2395 (CpG)]. DC activation was monitored using membrane marker expression and analysis of culture supernatants for cytokine/chemokine release. Ligands to TLR3 and TLR7 failed to activate BMDCs. All other TLR ligands caused elevated expression of membrane markers. PAM, MALP-2 and LPS induced high-level expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Treatment with CpG was associated with a preferential type 1 cytokine and chemokine profile. Zymosan and PG were proinflammatory but also skewed towards a type 2 pattern of cytokines and chemokines. In contrast, flagellin did not cause marked secretion by BMDCs of cytokines or chemokines. These data for BMDCs are largely consistent with the reported TLR repertoire of freshly isolated murine Langerhans cells. In addition, murine BMDCs show selective responses to TLR ligands with respect to general activation, with differentiated cytokine patterns suggestive of potential priming for divergent immune responses. PMID:18778283

  13. Toll-Like Receptors on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Drive their Migration and Immunomodulating Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Coffelt, Seth B.; Waterman, Ruth S.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are under study as therapeutic delivery agents that assist in the repair of damaged tissues. To achieve the desired clinical outcomes for this strategy requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that drive the recruitment, migration and engraftment of hMSCs to the targeted tissues. It is known that hMSCs are recruited to sites of stress or inflammation to fulfill their repair function. It is recognized that toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate stress responses of other bone marrow-derived cells. This study explored the role of TLRs in mediating stress responses of hMSCs. Accordingly, the presence of TLRs in hMSCs was established initially by RT-PCR assays. Flow cytometry and fluorescence immunocytochemical analyses confirmed these findings. The stimulation of hMSCs with TLR agonists led to the activation of downstream signaling pathways, including NF-κB, AKT and MAPK. Consequently, activation of these pathways triggered the induction and secretion of cytokines, chemokines and related TLR gene products as established from cDNA array, immunoassay and cytokine antibody array analyses. Interestingly, the unique patterns of affected genes, cytokines and chemokines measured, identify these receptors as critical players in the clinically established immunomodulation, observed for hMSCs. Lastly, hMSCs migration was promoted by TLR ligand exposure as demonstrated by transwell migration assays. Conversely, disruption of TLRs by neutralizing TLR antibodies compromised hMSCs migration. This study defines a novel TLR-driven stress and immune modulating response for hMSCs that is critical to consider in the design of stem cell-based therapies. PMID:17916800

  14. Toll-like receptors expression and interferon-γ production by NK cells in human sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction During the course of infection, natural killer (NK) cells contribute to innate immunity by producing cytokines, particularly interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). In addition to their beneficial effects against infection, NK cells may play a detrimental role during systemic inflammation, causing lethality during sepsis. Little is known on the immune status of NK cells in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis in terms of cell surface markers expression and IFN-γ production. Methods We investigated 27 sepsis patients and 11 patients with non-infectious SIRS. CD56bright and CD56dim NK cell subsets were identified by flow cytometry and Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, TLR9, CX3CR1, CD16 and CD69 expression were analyzed, as well as ex vivo IFN-γ production by NK cells in whole blood samples. Results We first showed that in NK cells from healthy controls, TLR2 and TLR4 expression is mainly intracellular, similarly to TLR9. Intracellular levels of TLR2 and TLR4, in both CD56bright and CD56dim NK cell subsets from sepsis patients, were increased compared to healthy subjects. In addition, the percentage of CD69+ cells was higher among NK cells of sepsis patients. No difference was observed for TLR9, CX3CR1, and CD16 expression. The ex vivo stimulation by TLR4 or TLR9 agonists, or whole bacteria in synergy with accessory cytokines (IL-15+IL-18), resulted in significant production of IFN-γ by NK cells of healthy controls. In contrast, for SIRS and sepsis patients this response was dramatically reduced. Conclusions This study reports for the first time an intracellular expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in human NK cells. Surface TLR4 expression allows discriminating sepsis and SIRS. Furthermore, during these pathologies, NK cells undergo an alteration of their immune status characterized by a profound reduction of their capacity to release IFN-γ. PMID:23098236

  15. Adjuvant for vaccine immunotherapy of cancer--focusing on Toll-like receptor 2 and 3 agonists for safely enhancing antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Shime, Hiroaki; Takeda, Yohei; Tatematsu, Megumi; Takashima, Ken; Matsumoto, Misako

    2015-12-01

    Immune-enhancing adjuvants usually targets antigen (Ag)-presenting cells to tune up cellular and humoral immunity. CD141(+) dendritic cells (DC) represent the professional Ag-presenting cells in humans. In response to microbial pattern molecules, these DCs upgrade the maturation stage sufficient to improve cross-presentation of exogenous Ag, and upregulation of MHC and costimulators, allowing CD4/CD8 T cells to proliferate and liberating cytokines/chemokines that support lymphocyte attraction and survival. These DCs also facilitate natural killer-mediated cell damage. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their signaling pathways in DCs play a pivotal role in DC maturation. Therefore, providing adjuvants in addition to Ag is indispensable for successful vaccine immunotherapy for cancer, which has been approved in comparison with antimicrobial vaccines. Mouse CD8α(+) DCs express TLR7 and TLR9 in addition to the TLR2 family (TLR1, 2, and 6) and TLR3, whereas human CD141(+) DCs exclusively express the TLR2 family and TLR3. Although human and mouse plasmacytoid DCs commonly express TLR7/9 to respond to their agonists, the results on mouse adjuvant studies using TLR7/9 agonists cannot be simply extrapolated to human adjuvant immunotherapy. In contrast, TLR2 and TLR3 are similarly expressed in both human and mouse Ag-presenting DCs. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin peptidoglycan and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid are representative agonists for TLR2 and TLR3, respectively, although they additionally stimulate cytoplasmic sensors: their functional specificities may not be limited to the relevant TLRs. These adjuvants have been posted up to a certain achievement in immunotherapy in some cancers. We herein summarize the history and perspectives of TLR2 and TLR3 agonists in vaccine-adjuvant immunotherapy for cancer.

  16. Investigation of Toll-Like Receptor-2 (2258G/A) and Interferon Gamma (+874T/A) Gene Polymorphisms among Infertile Women with Female Genital Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhanothu, Venkanna; Lakshmi, Vemu; Theophilus, Jane P.; Rozati, Roya; Badhini, Prabhakar; Vijayalaxmi, Boda

    2015-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) coordinate with a diverse array of cellular programs through the transcriptional regulation of immunologically relevant genes and play an important role in immune system, reproductive physiology and basic pathology. Alterations in the functions of TLR2 2258G (guanine)/ A, IFN-γ (+874T/A) and signalling molecules that result from polymorphisms are often associated with susceptibility or resistance, which may, in turn, establish the innate host response to various infectious diseases. Presently, we proposed to investigate the risk of common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of TLR2 and IFN-γ genes, for their effect on infertility in women with female genital tuberculosis (FGTB) and healthy women as controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Genotyping of TLR2 and IFN-γ gene polymorphisms was performed by amplification refractory mutation system multi-gene/multi-primer polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in 175 FGTB patients and 100 healthy control women (HCW). The TLR2 polymorphism [adenine (A) allele] was observed in 57.7 and 58.0% of FGTB patients and HCW, respectively. The IFN-γ (+874T/A) polymorphism (A allele) was significant in 74.3 and 71.0% of FGTB patients and HCW, respectively, while the odds ratios for the AA and TA genotypes for predisposition of FGTB were found to be 0.304 and 1.650 in HCW, respectively. The SNP of TLR2 was not associated with FGTB but the SNP of IFN-γ was found to be associated with mycobacteria infections and to induce infertility. Conclusions/Significance At present, we hypothesize that infertile women with FGTB and HCW without tuberculosis (TB) have identical frequency of TLR variants, which may be adequate in the production of IFN-γ in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Thus, the study appears to be the first of its kind reporting a mutation in the IFN-γ gene [+874 T (thymine) to A] responsible for

  17. Oligosaccharides of Hyaluronan Activate Dendritic Cells via Toll-like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Termeer, Christian; Benedix, Frauke; Sleeman, Jonathon; Fieber, Christina; Voith, Ursula; Ahrens, Thomas; Miyake, Kensuke; Freudenberg, Marina; Galanos, Christopher; Simon, Jan Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Low molecular weight fragmentation products of the polysaccharide of Hyaluronic acid (sHA) produced during inflammation have been shown to be potent activators of immunocompetent cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Here we report that sHA induces maturation of DCs via the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, a receptor complex associated with innate immunity and host defense against bacterial infection. Bone marrow–derived DCs from C3H/HeJ and C57BL/10ScCr mice carrying mutant TLR-4 alleles were nonresponsive to sHA-induced phenotypic and functional maturation. Conversely, DCs from TLR-2–deficient mice were still susceptible to sHA. In accordance, addition of an anti–TLR-4 mAb to human monocyte–derived DCs blocked sHA-induced tumor necrosis factor α production. Western blot analysis revealed that sHA treatment resulted in distinct phosphorylation of p38/p42/44 MAP-kinases and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, all components of the TLR-4 signaling pathway. Blockade of this pathway by specific inhibitors completely abrogated the sHA-induced DC maturation. Finally, intravenous injection of sHA-induced DC emigration from the skin and their phenotypic and functional maturation in the spleen, again depending on the expression of TLR-4. In conclusion, this is the first report that polysaccharide degradation products of the extracellular matrix produced during inflammation might serve as an endogenous ligand for the TLR-4 complex on DCs. PMID:11781369

  18. Metalloproteinase-dependent TLR2 ectodomain shedding is involved in soluble toll-like receptor 2 (sTLR2) production.

    PubMed

    Langjahr, Patricia; Díaz-Jiménez, David; De la Fuente, Marjorie; Rubio, Estefhany; Golenbock, Douglas; Bronfman, Francisca C; Quera, Rodrigo; González, María-Julieta; Hermoso, Marcela A

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, a type I membrane receptor that plays a key role in innate immunity, recognizes conserved molecules in pathogens, and triggering an inflammatory response. It has been associated with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Soluble TLR2 (sTLR2) variants have been identified in human body fluids, and the TLR2 ectodomain can negatively regulate TLR2 activation by behaving as a decoy receptor. sTLR2 generation does not involve alternative splicing mechanisms, indicating that this process might involve a post-translational modification of the full-length receptor; however, the specific mechanism has not been studied. Using CD14+ peripheral human monocytes and the THP-1 monocytic leukemia-derived cell line, we confirm that sTLR2 generation increases upon treatment with pro-inflammatory agents and requires a post-translational mechanism. We also find that the constitutive and ligand-induced release of sTLR2 is sensitive to pharmacological metalloproteinase activator and inhibitors leading us to conclude that metalloproteinase TLR2 shedding contributes to soluble receptor production. By expressing human TLR2 in ADAM10- or ADAM17-deficient MEF cells, we find both enzymes to be implicated in TLR2 ectodomain shedding. Moreover, using a deletion mutant of the TLR2 juxtamembrane region, we demonstrate that this domain is required for sTLR2 generation. Functional analysis suggests that sTLR2 generated by metalloproteinase activation inhibitsTLR2-induced cytokine production by this monocytic leukemia-derived cell line. The identification of the mechanisms involved in regulating the availability of soluble TLR2 ectodomain and cell surface receptors may contribute further research on TLR2-mediated processes in innate immunity and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25531754

  19. Metalloproteinase-Dependent TLR2 Ectodomain Shedding is Involved in Soluble Toll-Like Receptor 2 (sTLR2) Production

    PubMed Central

    Langjahr, Patricia; Díaz-Jiménez, David; De la Fuente, Marjorie; Rubio, Estefhany; Golenbock, Douglas; Bronfman, Francisca C.; Quera, Rodrigo; González, María-Julieta; Hermoso, Marcela A.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, a type I membrane receptor that plays a key role in innate immunity, recognizes conserved molecules in pathogens, and triggering an inflammatory response. It has been associated with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Soluble TLR2 (sTLR2) variants have been identified in human body fluids, and the TLR2 ectodomain can negatively regulate TLR2 activation by behaving as a decoy receptor. sTLR2 generation does not involve alternative splicing mechanisms, indicating that this process might involve a post-translational modification of the full-length receptor; however, the specific mechanism has not been studied. Using CD14+ peripheral human monocytes and the THP-1 monocytic leukemia-derived cell line, we confirm that sTLR2 generation increases upon treatment with pro-inflammatory agents and requires a post-translational mechanism. We also find that the constitutive and ligand-induced release of sTLR2 is sensitive to pharmacological metalloproteinase activator and inhibitors leading us to conclude that metalloproteinase TLR2 shedding contributes to soluble receptor production. By expressing human TLR2 in ADAM10- or ADAM17-deficient MEF cells, we find both enzymes to be implicated in TLR2 ectodomain shedding. Moreover, using a deletion mutant of the TLR2 juxtamembrane region, we demonstrate that this domain is required for sTLR2 generation. Functional analysis suggests that sTLR2 generated by metalloproteinase activation inhibitsTLR2-induced cytokine production by this monocytic leukemia-derived cell line. The identification of the mechanisms involved in regulating the availability of soluble TLR2 ectodomain and cell surface receptors may contribute further research on TLR2-mediated processes in innate immunity and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25531754

  20. T cells induce extended class II MHC compartments in dendritic cells in a Toll-like receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Boes, Marianne; Bertho, Nicolas; Cerny, Jan; Op den Brouw, Marjolein; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Ploegh, Hidde

    2003-10-15

    Interaction of Ag-loaded dendritic cells with Ag-specific CD4 T cells induces the formation of long tubular class II MHC-positive compartments that polarize toward the T cell. We show involvement of a Toll-like receptor-mediated signal in this unusual form of intracellular class II MHC trafficking. First, wild-type dendritic cells loaded with LPS-free Ag failed to show formation of class II-positive tubules upon Ag-specific T cell engagement, but did so upon supplementation of the Ag with low concentrations of LPS. Second, Ag-loaded myeloid differentiation factor 88 -deficient dendritic cells failed to form these tubules upon interaction with T cells, regardless of the presence of LPS. Finally, inclusion of a cell-permeable peptide that blocks TNFR-associated factor 6 function, downstream of myeloid differentiation factor 88, blocked T cell-dependent tubulation. A Toll-like receptor-dependent signal is thus required to allow Ag-loaded dendritic cells to respond to T cell contact by formation of extended endosomal compartments. This activation does not result in massive translocation of class II MHC molecules to the cell surface.

  1. Total glucosides of paeony attenuate renal tubulointerstitial injury in STZ-induced diabetic rats: role of Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Li; Su, Shuang-Quan; Xu, Xing-Xin; Wu, Yong-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggested that macrophages induce tubulointerstitial injury. Total glucosides of paeony (TGP), extracted from Paeonia lactiflora, has presented anti-inflammatory activities in diabetic kidney disease. This research will investigate the protective effect of TGP on renal tubulointerstitium and its mechanism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. TGP was administered orally at a dose of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1) for 8 weeks. Tubulointerstitial injury was quantified, followed by immunohistochemistry analysis of renal α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), E-cadherin (E-cad) expression, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p-p-65(+), Toll-like receptor (TLR)2(+), and ED-1(+) cell infiltration in renal tubulointerstitium. Renal TLR2(+) macrophages were detected by double immunohistochemical staining. Western blotting was used to detect the TLR2 expression. Histologically, there was marked accumulation of TLR2(+), NF-κB-p-p-65(+), ED-1(+) cells, and ED-1(+)TLR2(+) cells (macrophages) in the diabetic kidney and TGP treatment could alleviate it. Accompanying with that, the tubulointerstitial injury was ameliorated, α-SMA expression was lower, and E-cad expression was higher compared with the diabetic rats. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of TLR2 protein was significantly increased in the kidney of the diabetic rats, whereas TGP treatment reduced it. Our study showed that TGP could prevent renal tubulointerstitium injury in diabetic rats through a mechanism that may be at least partly correlated with suppression of increased macrophage infiltration and the expression of TLR2. PMID:24739281

  2. TRIF mediates Toll-like receptor 5-induced signaling in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Im, Eunok; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Rhee, Sang Hoon

    2010-11-26

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) associate with adaptor molecules (MyD88, Mal/TIRAP, TRAM, and TRIF) to mediate signaling of host-microbial interaction. For instance, TLR4 utilizes the combination of both Mal/TIRAP-MyD88 (MyD88-dependent pathway) and TRAM-TRIF (MyD88-independent pathway). However, TLR5, the specific receptor for flagellin, is known to utilize only MyD88 to elicit inflammatory responses, and an involvement of other adaptor molecules has not been suggested in TLR5-dependent signaling. Here, we found that TRIF is involved in mediating TLR5-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), specifically JNK1/2 and ERK1/2, activation in intestinal epithelial cells. TLR5 activation by flagellin permits the physical interaction between TLR5 and TRIF in human colonic epithelial cells (NCM460), whereas TLR5 does not interact with TRAM upon flagellin stimulation. Both primary intestinal epithelial cells from TRIF-KO mice and TRIF-silenced NCM460 cells significantly reduced flagellin-induced NFκB (p105 and p65), JNK1/2, and ERK1/2 activation compared with control cells. However, p38 activation by flagellin was preserved in these TRIF-deficient cells. TRIF-KO intestinal epithelial cells exhibited substantially reduced inflammatory cytokine (keratinocyte-derived cytokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 3α, and IL-6) expression upon flagellin, whereas control cells from TRIF-WT mice showed robust cytokine expression by flagellin. Compare with TRIF-WT mice, TRIF-KO mice were resistant to in vivo intestinal inflammatory responses: flagellin-mediated exacerbation of colonic inflammation and dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis. We conclude that in addition to MyD88, TRIF mediates TLR5-dependent responses and, thereby regulates inflammatory responses elicited by flagellin/TLR5 engagement. Our findings suggest an important role of TRIF in regulating host-microbial communication via TLR5 in the gut epithelium.

  3. Toll-Like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR9 play opposing roles in host innate immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Renhui; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved host proteins that are essential for effective host defense against pathogens. However, recent studies suggest that some TLRs can negatively regulate immune responses. We observed here that TLR2 and TLR9 played opposite roles in regulating innate immunity against oral infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice. While TLR9-/- mice exhibited shortened survival, an increased cytokine storm, and more severe Salmonella hepatitis than wild-type (WT) mice, TLR2-/- mice exhibited the opposite phenomenon. Further studies demonstrated that TLR2 deficiency and TLR9 deficiency in macrophages both disrupted NK cell cytotoxicity against S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages by downregulating NK cell degranulation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production through decreased macrophage expression of the RAE-1 NKG2D ligand. But more importantly, we found that S. Typhimurium-infected TLR2-/- macrophages upregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, resulting in a lower bacterial load than that in WT macrophages in vitro and livers in vivo as well as low proinflammatory cytokine levels. In contrast, TLR9-/- macrophages showed decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression concomitant with a high bacterial load in the macrophages and in livers of TLR9-/- mice. TLR9-/- macrophages were also more susceptible than WT macrophages to S. Typhimurium-induced necroptosis in vitro, likely contributing to bacterial spread and transmission in vivo. Collectively, these findings indicate that TLR2 negatively regulates anti-S. Typhimurium immunity, whereas TLR9 is vital to host defense and survival against S. Typhimurium invasion. TLR2 antagonists or TLR9 agonists may thus serve as potential anti-S. Typhimurium therapeutic agents.

  4. Involvement of toll-like receptor 2 and 4 in association between dyslipidemia and osteoclast differentiation in apolipoprotein E deficient rat periodontium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia increases circulating levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and this may induce alveolar bone loss through toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dyslipidemia on osteoclast differentiation associated with TLR2 and TLR4 in periodontal tissues using a rat dyslipidemia (apolipoprotein E deficient) model. Methods Levels of plasma OxLDL, and the cholesterol and phospholipid profiles in plasma lipoproteins were compared between apolipoprotein E-deficient rats (16-week-old males) and wild-type (control) rats. In the periodontal tissue, we evaluated the changes in TLR2, TLR4, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression. Results Apolipoprotein E-deficient rats showed higher plasma levels of OxLDL than control rats (p<0.05), with higher plasma levels of total cholesterol (p<0.05) and LDL-cholesterol (p<0.05) and lower plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.05). Their periodontal tissue also exhibited a higher ratio of RANKL-positive cells and a higher number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts than control rats (p<0.05). Furthermore, periodontal gene expression of TLR2, TLR4 and RANKL was higher in apolipoprotein E-deficient rats than in control rats (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings underscore the important role for TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the osteoclast differentiation on alveolar bone response to dyslipidemia. PMID:23295061

  5. Effects of P-MAPA immunomodulator on Toll-like receptor 2, ROS, nitric oxide, MAPKp38 and IKK in PBMC and macrophages from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Melo, L M; Perosso, J; Almeida, B F M; Silva, K L O; Somenzari, M A; de Lima, V M F

    2014-02-01

    Leishmania (L.) chagasi is the etiologic agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) that can be transmitted to humans and dogs. VL in Brazil represents a serious public health problem; therefore, it is important to study new alternatives to treat infected dogs. In dogs, the therapeutic arsenal against canine VL is limited. The immunomodulator protein aggregate magnesium-ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride (P-MAPA) improves immunocompetence when the immune system is impaired, but its dependence on Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the mechanisms involved in immune response remain unclear. The in vitro action of P-MAPA on the expression of TLR2 and TLR4, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and IKK phosphorylation was studied in mononuclear cells from peripheral blood and macrophages from healthy and Leishmania-infected dogs. The PBMC or macrophages were isolated and cultured with different concentrations of P-MAPA (20,100 and 200 μg/ml) in a humid environment at 37°C with 5% CO(2). Observation revealed that Leishmania-infected dogs showed a decrease in TLR2 in macrophages compared with healthy dogs and in induction with P-MAPA. ROS were increased in PBMCs from Leishmania spp.-infected dogs compared with healthy dogs and P-MAPA improved ROS production. NO production was increased in culture supernatant from macrophages stimulated by P-MAPA in both healthy and Leishmania spp. infected dogs. Treatment of macrophages from healthy dogs with immunomodulatory P-MAPA induced p38 MAPK and IKK phosphorylation, suggesting signal transduction by this pathway. These findings suggest that P-MAPA has potential as a therapeutic drug in the treatment of canine visceral leishmaniasis.

  6. Opposing effects of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 on synaptic stability in the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glial cells are involved in the synaptic elimination process that follows neuronal lesions, and are also responsible for mediating the interaction between the nervous and immune systems. Neurons and glial cells express Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which may affect the plasticity of the central nervous system (CNS). Because TLRs might also have non-immune functions in spinal-cord injury (SCI), we aimed to investigate the influence of TLR2 and TLR4 on synaptic plasticity and glial reactivity after peripheral nerve axotomy. Methods The lumbar spinal cords of C3H/HePas wild-type (WT) mice, C3H/HeJ TLR4-mutant mice, C57BL/6J WT mice, and C57BL/6J TLR2 knockout (KO) mice were studied after unilateral sciatic nerve transection. The mice were killed via intracardiac perfusion, and the spinal cord was processed for immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), western blotting, cell culture, and reverse transcriptase PCR. Primary cultures of astrocytes from newborn mice were established to study the astrocyte response in the absence of TLR2 and the deficiency of TLR4 expression. Results The results showed that TLR4 and TLR2 expression in the CNS may have opposite effects on the stability of presynaptic terminals in the spinal cord. First, TLR4 contributed to synaptic preservation of terminals in apposition to lesioned motor neurons after peripheral injury, regardless of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) expression. In addition, in the presence of TLR4, there was upregulation of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and downregulation of interleukin-6, but no morphological differences in glial reactivity were seen. By contrast, TLR2 expression led to greater synaptic loss, correlating with increased astrogliosis and upregulation of pro-inflammatory interleukins. Moreover, the absence of TLR2 resulted in the upregulation of neurotrophic factors and MHC I expression. Conclusion TLR4 and TLR2 in the CNS may have opposite effects on the

  7. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin induces CCL5 secretion via the Toll-like receptor 2-NF-kappaB and -Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia; Trejo, Artemisa; Pérez, Aline

    2008-02-01

    In response to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), CC chemokines are secreted from host cells to attract components of the innate and adaptive immune systems to the site of infection. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been shown to recognize M. bovis BCG and to initiate signaling pathways that result in enhanced secretion of CC chemokines. Despite the essential requirement of TLR2 in M. bovis BCG infection, the mechanisms by which it induces secretion of CC chemokines are not well defined. In this study, we report that stimulation of HEK293 cells expressing human TLR2 with M. bovis BCG resulted in increased CCL2 and CCL5 secretion, as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. M. bovis BCG infection resulted in the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition of JNK activity had a significant effect on M. bovis BCG-dependent CCL5 secretion in TLR2-expressing cells but no effect on M. bovis BCG-dependent CCL2 secretion from infected HEK293 cells expressing human TLR2. The M. bovis BCG-induced CCL5 release was attenuated by sulfasalazine (a well-described inhibitor of NF-kappaB activity), BAY 11-7082 (an IkappaB phosphorylation inhibitor), and ALLN (a well-described inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation that prevents degradation of IkappaB and eventually results in a lack of translocated NF-kappaB in the nucleus). In addition, stimulation of TLR2-expressing cells with M. bovis BCG resulted in translocation of NF-kappaB subunits from the cytoplasmic to the nuclear fraction, and stimulation of cells with M. bovis BCG activated IkappaB kinase alphabeta. These findings indicate that M. bovis BCG induces CCL5 production through mechanisms that include a TLR2-dependent component that requires JNK and NF-kappaB activities.

  8. Type III secretion needle proteins induce cell signaling and cytokine secretion via Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Danielle L; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S; Nilles, Matthew L

    2014-06-01

    Pathogens are recognized by hosts by use of various receptors, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and Nod-like receptor (NLR) families. Ligands for these varied receptors, including bacterial products, are identified by the immune system, resulting in development of innate immune responses. Only a couple of components from type III secretion (T3S) systems are known to be recognized by TLR or NLR family members. Known T3S components that are detected by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are (i) flagellin, detected by TLR5 and NLRC4 (Ipaf); and (ii) T3S rod proteins (PrgJ and homologs) and needle proteins (PrgI and homologs), detected by NAIP and the NLRC4 inflammasome. In this report, we characterize the induction of proinflammatory responses through TLRs by the Yersinia pestis T3S needle protein, YscF, the Salmonella enterica needle proteins PrgI and SsaG, and the Shigella needle protein, MxiH. More specifically, we determine that the proinflammatory responses occur through TLR2 and -4. These data support the hypothesis that T3S needles have an unrecognized role in bacterial pathogenesis by modulating immune responses. PMID:24643544

  9. Type III Secretion Needle Proteins Induce Cell Signaling and Cytokine Secretion via Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Danielle L.; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens are recognized by hosts by use of various receptors, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and Nod-like receptor (NLR) families. Ligands for these varied receptors, including bacterial products, are identified by the immune system, resulting in development of innate immune responses. Only a couple of components from type III secretion (T3S) systems are known to be recognized by TLR or NLR family members. Known T3S components that are detected by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are (i) flagellin, detected by TLR5 and NLRC4 (Ipaf); and (ii) T3S rod proteins (PrgJ and homologs) and needle proteins (PrgI and homologs), detected by NAIP and the NLRC4 inflammasome. In this report, we characterize the induction of proinflammatory responses through TLRs by the Yersinia pestis T3S needle protein, YscF, the Salmonella enterica needle proteins PrgI and SsaG, and the Shigella needle protein, MxiH. More specifically, we determine that the proinflammatory responses occur through TLR2 and -4. These data support the hypothesis that T3S needles have an unrecognized role in bacterial pathogenesis by modulating immune responses. PMID:24643544

  10. Targeting Toll-like receptor signaling in plasmacytoid dendritic cells and autoreactive B cells as a therapy for lupus.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Petar S

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in lupus and on possibilities to treat lupus using TLR modulating inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotides (INH-ODNs). TLRs bridge innate and adaptive immune responses and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Of particular interest are TLR3, -7, -8, and -9, which are localized intracellularly. These TLRs recognize single-stranded or double-stranded RNA or hypomethylated CpG-DNA. Exposure to higher order CpG-DNA ligands or to immune complexed self-RNA triggers activation of autoreactive B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. INH-ODNs were recently developed that block all downstream signaling events in TLR9-responsive cells. Some of these INH-ODNs can also target TLR7 signaling pathways. Based on their preferential cell reactivity, we classify INH-ODNs into class B and class R. Class B ('broadly reactive') INH-ODNs target a broad range of TLR-expressing cells. Class R ('restricted') INH-ODNs easily form DNA duplexes or higher order structures, and are preferentially recognized by autoreactive B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, rather than by non-DNA specific follicular B cells. Both classes of INH-ODNs can block animal lupus. Hence, therapeutic application of these novel INH-ODNs in human lupus, particularly class R INH-ODNs, may result in more selective and disease-specific immunosuppression.

  11. Tenascin-C Produced by Oxidized LDL-Stimulated Macrophages Increases Foam Cell Formation through Toll-like Receptor-4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; He, Yong; Li, Bo; Liu, Jun; Ren, Yingang; Han, Wei; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in which both innate and adaptive immunity are involved. Although there have been major advances in the involvement of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD36 in the initiation and development of this disease, detailed mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that tenascin-C (TN-C) can stimulate foam cell formation and this can be inhibited by a TLR4-blocking antibody or CD36 gene silencing. Our results identify TN-C-TLR4 activation as a common molecular mechanism in oxLDL-stimulated foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. In addition, CD36 is the major scavenger receptor responsible for the TN-C-mediated foam cell formation. Taken together, we have identified that TN-C produced by oxLDL-stimulated macrophages increases foam cell formation through TLR4 and scavenger receptor CD36. PMID:22699754

  12. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling by follicular dendritic cells is pivotal for germinal center onset and affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Garin, Alexandre; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Contie, Mathias; Figge, Marc Thilo; Buatois, Vanessa; Gunzer, Matthias; Toellner, Kai-Michael; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H

    2010-07-23

    Germinal centers (GCs) are specialized microenvironments where antigen-activated B cells undergo proliferation, immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination, somatic hypermutation (SHM), and affinity maturation. Within GCs, follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are key players in driving these events via direct interaction with GC B cells. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FDCs express and upregulate Toll-like-receptor (TLR) 4 in situ during germinal center reactions, confirm that their maturation is driven by TLR4, and associate the role of FDC-expressed TLR4 with quantitative and qualitative affects of GC biology. In iterative cycles of predictions by in silico modeling subsequently verified by in vivo experiments, we demonstrated that TLR4 signaling modulates FDC activation, strongly impacting SHM and generation of Ig class-switched high-affinity plasma and memory B cells. Thus, our data place TLR4 in the heart of adaptive humoral immunity, providing further insight into mechanisms driving GCs arising in both health and disease.

  13. Polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase π 1 and toll-like receptors 2 and 9: Association with breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    AL-HARRAS, MOHAMMAD F.; HOUSSEN, MAHA E.; SHAKER, MOHAMED E.; FARAG, KAMEL; FAROUK, OMAR; MONIR, REHAN; EL-MAHDY, RASHA; ABO-HASHEM, EKBAL M.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes and innate immune receptors have been implicated in the development of various types of cancer. The present study aimed to investigate whether polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase π 1 (GSTP1) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 9 are associated with susceptibility to breast cancer among females. The study was conducted on 72 Egyptian female patients with breast cancer, along with 100 healthy volunteers. Polymorphisms of GSTP1 (codon 105 Ile/Val) and TLR9 rs187084 (1237T/C) genes were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, while the −196 to −174 deletion/insertion (del/ins) polymorphism of TLR2 was detected by PCR. The results indicated a decrease in GSTP1 Val allele frequency in breast cancer patients compared with healthy controls, at rates of 22.9 vs. 32.5%, respectively. In addition, the breast cancer group demonstrated a decreased TLR9 C allele frequency compared with the control group, at rates of 36.1 vs. 51.5%, respectively (P=0.0047). A non-significant difference was detected in the frequency of the TLR2 −196 to −174 del allele in breast cancer patients when compared to normal controls. In conclusion, these results suggested that the GSTP1 Val and TLR9 1237C alleles, but not TLR2 −196 to −174 del, are likely to be associated with breast cancer development among females. PMID:26998146

  14. Pharmacological analysis of signal transduction pathways required for oxidative burst in chicken heterophils stimulated by a Toll-like receptor 2 agonist.

    PubMed

    Farnell, Morgan B; He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth; Kogut, Michael H

    2003-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the innate immune response of avian heterophils. We previously used the pharmacological inhibitors genistein, verapamil, chelerythrine, and pertussis toxin to investigate the upstream signaling events involved in TLR2-mediated oxidative burst in chicken heterophils. Only chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, was found to significantly inhibit oxidative burst stimulated by the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA). In the present study, we used selective pharmacological inhibitors to investigate the roles of phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3-K), phospholipase C (PLC), calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC), extra-cellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear translocation factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) on TLR2-mediated oxidative burst. U-73122 (a PLC inhibitor), wortmannin (a PI3-K inhibitor), PD 98059 (an ERK inhibitor), Gö 6976 (a PKC inhibitor) and Bay 11-7082 (a NF-kappaB inhibitor) significantly decreased LTA-stimulated oxidative burst in heterophils by 77%, 30%, 36%, 78%, and 61%, respectively. Activated TLR2 utilizes PI3-K, PLC, PKC, ERK, and NF-kappaB as signaling factors that mediate the oxidative burst of chicken heterophils.

  15. Activation of epidermal toll-like receptor 2 enhances tight junction function – Implications for atopic dermatitis and skin barrier repair

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, I-Hsin; Carpenter-Mendini, Amanda; Yoshida, Takeshi; McGirt, Laura Y.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Gallo, Richard L.; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Leung, Donald Y.; Georas, Steve N.; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal tight junction (TJ) defects and a propensity for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) skin infections. S. aureus is sensed by many pattern recognition receptors including toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. We hypothesized that an effective innate immune response will include skin barrier repair and that this response is impaired in AD subjects. S. aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PGN) and synthetic TLR2 agonists enhanced TJ barrier and increased expression of TJ proteins, CLDN1, CLDN23, occludin and ZO-1 in primary human keratinocytes. A TLR2 agonist enhanced skin barrier recovery in human epidermis wounded by tape-stripping. Tlr2−/− mice had a delayed and incomplete barrier recovery following tape-stripping. AD subjects had reduced epidermal TLR2 expression as compared to nonatopic (NA) subjects, which inversely correlated (r= 0.654, P= 0.0004) with transepidermal water loss (TEWL). These observations indicate that TLR2 activation enhances skin barrier in murine and human skin and is an important part of a wound repair response. Reduced epidermal TLR2 expression observed in AD patients may play a role in their incompetent skin barrier. PMID:23223142

  16. Therapeutic Administration of KM+ Lectin Protects Mice Against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection via Interleukin-12 Production in a Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Coltri, Kely C.; Oliveira, Leandro L.; Pinzan, Camila F.; Vendruscolo, Patrícia E.; Martinez, Roberto; Goldman, Maria Helena; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2008-01-01

    KM+ is a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces interleukin (IL)-12 production by macrophages and protective T helper 1 immune response against Leishmania major infection. In this study, we performed experiments to evaluate the therapeutic activity of jackfruit KM+ (jfKM+) and its recombinant counterpart (rKM+) in experimental paracoccidioidomycosis. To this end, jfKM+ or rKM+ was administered to BALB/c mice 10 days after infection with Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. Thirty days postinfection, lungs from the KM+-treated mice contained significantly fewer colony-forming units and little to no organized granulomas compared to the controls. In addition, lung homogenates from the KM+-treated mice presented higher levels of nitric oxide, IL-12, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α, whereas higher levels of IL-4 and IL-10 were detected in the control group. With mice deficient in IL-12, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, or TLR adaptor molecule MyD88, we demonstrated that KM+ led to protection against P. brasiliensis infection through IL-12 production, which was dependent on TLR2. These results demonstrated a beneficial effect of KM+ on the severity of P. brasiliensis infection and may expand its potential use as a novel immunotherapeutic molecule. PMID:18599609

  17. Therapeutic administration of KM+ lectin protects mice against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection via interleukin-12 production in a toll-like receptor 2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Coltri, Kely C; Oliveira, Leandro L; Pinzan, Camila F; Vendruscolo, Patrícia E; Martinez, Roberto; Goldman, Maria Helena; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2008-08-01

    KM(+) is a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces interleukin (IL)-12 production by macrophages and protective T helper 1 immune response against Leishmania major infection. In this study, we performed experiments to evaluate the therapeutic activity of jackfruit KM(+) (jfKM(+)) and its recombinant counterpart (rKM(+)) in experimental paracoccidioidomycosis. To this end, jfKM(+) or rKM(+) was administered to BALB/c mice 10 days after infection with Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. Thirty days postinfection, lungs from the KM(+)-treated mice contained significantly fewer colony-forming units and little to no organized granulomas compared to the controls. In addition, lung homogenates from the KM(+)-treated mice presented higher levels of nitric oxide, IL-12, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, whereas higher levels of IL-4 and IL-10 were detected in the control group. With mice deficient in IL-12, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, or TLR adaptor molecule MyD88, we demonstrated that KM(+) led to protection against P. brasiliensis infection through IL-12 production, which was dependent on TLR2. These results demonstrated a beneficial effect of KM(+) on the severity of P. brasiliensis infection and may expand its potential use as a novel immunotherapeutic molecule.

  18. Modulation of Immunoregulatory Properties of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by Toll-Like Receptors: Potential Applications on GVHD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have attracted a lot of attention, due to their potential applicability in the treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a condition frequently associated with opportunistic infections. The present review addresses how Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPS) modulate the immunosuppressive phenotype of human MSCs by signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Overall, we observed that regardless of the source tissue, human MSCs express TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9. Stimulation of distinct TLRs on MSCs elicits distinct inflammatory signaling pathways, differentially influencing the expression of inflammatory factors and the ability of MSCs to suppress the proliferation of immune system cells. The capacity to enhance the immunosuppressive phenotype of MSCs through TLRs stimulation might be properly elucidated in order to improve the MSC-based immunotherapy against GVHD. PMID:27738438

  19. Interleukin-7 and Toll-Like Receptor 7 Induce Synergistic B Cell and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bikker, Angela; Kruize, Aike A.; van der Wurff-Jacobs, Kim M. G.; Peters, Rogier P.; Kleinjan, Marije; Redegeld, Frank; de Jager, Wilco; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van Roon, Joël A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the potential synergy of IL-7-driven T cell-dependent and TLR7-mediated B cell activation and to assess the additive effects of monocyte/macrophages in this respect. Methods Isolated CD19 B cells and CD4 T cells from healthy donors were co-cultured with TLR7 agonist (TLR7A, Gardiquimod), IL-7, or their combination with or without CD14 monocytes/macrophages (T/B/mono; 1 : 1 : 0,1). Proliferation was measured using 3H-thymidine incorporation and Ki67 expression. Activation marker (CD19, HLA-DR, CD25) expression was measured by FACS analysis. Immunoglobulins were measured by ELISA and release of cytokines was measured by Luminex assay. Results TLR7-induced B cell activation was not associated with T cell activation. IL-7-induced T cell activation alone and together with TLR7A synergistically increased numbers of both proliferating (Ki67+) B cells and T cells, which was further increased in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. This was associated by up regulation of activation markers on B cells and T cells. Additive or synergistic induction of production of immunoglobulins by TLR7 and IL-7 was associated by synergistic induction of T cell cytokines (IFNγ, IL-17A, IL-22), which was only evident in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions IL-7-induced CD4 T cell activation and TLR7-induced B cell activation synergistically induce T helper cell cytokine and B cell immunoglobulin production, which is critically dependent on monocytes/macrophages. Our results indicate that previously described increased expression of IL-7 and TLR7 together with increased numbers of macrophages at sites of inflammation in autoimmune diseases like RA and pSS significantly contributes to enhanced lymphocyte activation. PMID:24740301

  20. Polymorphisms in IL-1β, vitamin D receptor Fok1, and Toll-like receptor 2 are associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human genetic variants may affect tuberculosis susceptibility, but the immunologic correlates of the genetic variants identified are often unclear. Methods We conducted a pilot case-control study to identify genetic variants associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis in patients with previously characterized immune defects: low CD4+ lymphocytes and low unstimulated cytokine production. Two genetic association approaches were used: 1) variants previously associated with tuberculosis risk; 2) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes involved in tuberculosis pathogenesis. Single locus association tests and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) assessed main effects and multi-locus interactions. Results There were 24 extrapulmonary tuberculosis cases (18 black), 24 pulmonary tuberculosis controls (19 black) and 57 PPD+ controls (49 black). In approach 1, 22 SNPs and 3 microsatellites were assessed. In single locus association tests, interleukin (IL)-1β +3953 C/T was associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis compared to PPD+ controls (P = 0.049). Among the sub-set of patients who were black, genotype frequencies of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) Fok1 A/G SNP were significantly different in extrapulmonary vs. pulmonary TB patients (P = 0.018). In MDR analysis, the toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 microsatellite had 76% prediction accuracy for extrapulmonary tuberculosis in blacks (P = 0.002). In approach 2, 613 SNPs in 26 genes were assessed. None were associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Conclusions In this pilot study among extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients with well-characterized immune defects, genetic variants in IL-1β, VDR Fok1, and TLR2 were associated with an increased risk of extrapulmonary disease. Additional studies of the underlying mechanism of these genetic variants are warranted. PMID:20196868

  1. Induction of Experimental Arthritis by Borrelial Lipoprotein and CpG Motifs: Are Toll-Like Receptors 2, 4, 9 or CD-14 Involved?

    SciTech Connect

    Batsford, S.; Dunn, J.; Mihatsch, M.

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins and CpG-DNA are ligands for Toll-Like-Receptors (TLR) 2 and 9 respectively. Both classes of molecules were reported to induce experimental arthritis in rodents following direct intra-articular injection. Here we studied: (1) whether arthritis induction by Outer surface (Lipo)protein A (OspA) (B.burgdorferi) involved the TLR-2 as well as the TLR-4 or the CD-14 receptors in addition, and (2) re-examined the arthritogenic potential of CpG-DNA motifs in mice. Following intra-articular injection of the test substances [20 {micro}g recombinant, lipidated OspA; 1nM(6 {micro}g) to 10nM(60 {micro}g) synthetic CpG-DNA], inflammation was monitored by {sup 99}Tc scintigraphy (ratio left/right knee joint uptake > 1.1 indicates inflammation) and by histology. Lipoprotein OspA induced severe, acute arthritis in TLR-2{sup +/+} w.t. but not in TLR-2{sup -/-} mice (p<0.01). There were no significant differences in the severity of arthritis induced in TLR-4{sup +/+} w.t. and TLR-4{sup -/-} mutant mice, or between CD14{sup +/+} w.t. and CD14{sup -/-} mice. CpG-DNA (1or 10 nM) did not cause notable inflammation in C57BL/6 mice; {sup 99}Tc ratios were < 1.0 and histology showed only minimal changes. Induction of arthritis by the OspA lipoprotein of B.burgdorferi involves the TLR-2 receptor, no evidence for additional participation of TLR-4 or CD14 receptors was found. Intra-articular injection of CpG-DNA did not produce manifest joint injury in mice, at variance with previous reports.

  2. Evaluation of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4 RNA Expression and the Cytokine Profile in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Orsatti, Claudio Lera; Nahas, Eliana Aguiar Petri; Nahas-Neto, Jorge; Orsatti, Fabio Lera; Giorgi, Vanessa Innocenti; Witkin, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the gene expression of Toll-Like (TLR-2 and TLR-4) receptors and cytokine profile in postmenopausal women with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods In this cross-sectional study, 311 Brazilian women (age≥45 years and amenorrhea≥12 months) were included. Women showing three or more of the following diagnostic criteria were diagnosed as positive for MetS: waist circumference>88 cm, triglycerides≥150 mg/dL, HDL cholesterol<50 mg/dL, blood pressure≥130/85 mmHg, and fasting glucose≥100 mg/dL. The expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in peripheral blood was evaluated by RNA extraction and subsequent real time PCR analysis. The cytokine profile, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukins 1β, 6, and 10, were measured by ELISA. Results The expression of TLR-2 RNA was demonstrated in 32.5% and TLR-4 in 20.6% of the subjects. There was no association between the expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 and the presence or absence of MetS (P>0.05). A greater production of IL-6 was associated with TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions and greater production of TNF-α was associated only with TLR-2 expression (P>0.05). Only the lower quartile of IL-10 was associated with the presence of the MetS (P>0.05). Conclusions TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressions were associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, with no association with biomarkers of MetS. The low concentrations of IL-10 may suggest an anti-inflammatory modulation in postmenopausal women with MetS. PMID:25329057

  3. Toll-like receptor-induced innate immune responses in non-parenchymal liver cells are cell type-specific

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Meng, Zhongji; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Ejuan; Trippler, Martin; Broering, Ruth; Bucchi, Agnes; Krux, Frank; Dittmer, Ulf; Yang, Dongliang; Roggendorf, Michael; Gerken, Guido; Lu, Mengji; Schlaak, Joerg F

    2010-01-01

    Little is known of how the Toll-like receptor (TLR) system can modulate the function of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPC) as a major component of the innate and adaptive immune system of the liver. To investigate the diversification of TLR signalling pathways in NPC, we isolated Kupffer cells (KC) and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) from wild-type C57BL/6 mice and examined their responses to TLR1 to TLR9 agonists. The data show that KC respond to all TLR ligands by producing tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-6 (IL-6), to TLR3 and TLR4 ligands only by producing interferon-β (IFN-β), to TLR1 and TLR8 ligands by significantly up-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules, and to TLR1, -2, -4 and -6 ligands by inducing high levels of T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production in the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Similarly, LSEC respond to TLR1 to -4, -6, -8 and -9 ligands by producing TNF-α, to TLR3 and -4 ligands by producing IL-6, and to TLR3 ligands by producing IFN-β. Interestingly, despite significant up-regulation of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules in response to TLR8 ligands, LSEC stimulated by TLR1, -2 or -6 could stimulate allogeneic T cells as assessed by MLR. By contrast, myeloid dendritic cells, used as positive control for classical antigen-presenting cells, respond to TLR1, -2, -4 and -9 ligands by both up-regulation of CD40 and activation of allogeneic T cells. In conclusion, NPC display a restricted TLR-mediated activation profile when compared with ‘classical’ antigen-presenting cells which may, at least in part, explain their tolerogenic function in the liver. PMID:19922426

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 2-Mediated Innate Immune Responses against Junín Virus in Mice Lead to Antiviral Adaptive Immune Responses during Systemic Infection and Do Not Affect Viral Replication in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Christian D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful adaptive immunity to virus infection often depends on the initial innate response. Previously, we demonstrated that Junín virus, the etiological agent responsible for Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), activates an early innate immune response via an interaction between the viral glycoprotein and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Here we show that TLR2/6 but not TLR1/2 heterodimers sense Junín virus glycoprotein and induce a cytokine response, which in turn upregulates the expression of the RNA helicases RIG-I and MDA5. NF-κB and Erk1/2 were important in the cytokine response, since both proteins were phosphorylated as a result of the interaction of virus with TLR2, and treatment with an Erk1/2-specific inhibitor blocked cytokine production. We show that the Junín virus glycoprotein activates cytokine production in a human macrophage cell line as well. Moreover, we show that TLR2-mediated immune response plays a role in viral clearance because wild-type mice cleared Candid 1 (JUNV C1), the vaccine strain of Junín virus, more rapidly than did TLR2 knockout mice. This clearance correlated with the generation of Junín virus-specific CD8+ T cells. However, infected wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice developed TLR2-independent blocking antibody responses with similar kinetics. We also show that microglia and astrocytes but not neurons are susceptible to infection with JUNV C1. Although JUNV C1 infection of the brain also triggered a TLR2-dependent cytokine response, virus levels were equivalent in wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice. IMPORTANCE Junín virus is transmitted by rodents native to Argentina and is associated with both systemic disease and, in some patients, neurological symptoms. Humans become infected when they inhale aerosolized Junín virus. AHF has a 15 to 30% mortality rate, and patients who clear the infection develop a strong antibody response to Junín virus. Here we investigated what factors determine the immune response to Jun

  5. Toll-like receptor 3 regulates cord blood-derived endothelial cell function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grelier, Aurore; Cras, Audrey; Balitrand, Nicole; Delmau, Catherine; Lecourt, Séverine; Lepelletier, Yves; Riesterer, Hélène; Freida, Delphine; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Lebousse-Kerdiles, Marie-Caroline; Cuccini, Wendy; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Uzan, Georges; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie

    2013-10-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (cEPC) are capable of homing to neovascularisation sites, in which they proliferate and differentiate into endothelial cells. Transplantation of cEPC-derived cells, in particular those isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB), has emerged as a promising approach in the treatment of cardio-vascular diseases. After in vivo transplantation, these cells may be exposed to local or systemic inflammation or pathogens, of which they are a common target. Because Toll-like receptors (TLR) are critical in detecting pathogens and in initiating inflammatory responses, we hypothesized that TLR may govern UCB cEPC-derived cells function. While these cells expressed almost all TLR, we found that only TLR3 dramatically impaired cell properties. TLR3 activation inhibited cell proliferation, modified cell cycle entry, impaired the in vitro angiogenic properties and induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The anti-angiogenic effect of TLR3 activation was confirmed in vivo in a hind-limb ischemic mice model. Moreover, TLR3 activation consistently leads to an upregulation of miR-29b, -146a and -155 and to a deregulation of cytoskeleton and cell cycle regulator. Hence, TLR3 activation is likely to be a key regulator of cEPC-derived cells properties.

  6. Subgingival Plaque in Periodontal Health Antagonizes at Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Inhibits E-Selectin Expression on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gümüş, Pinar; Nizam, Nejat; Buduneli, Nurcan

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the subgingival microbial community to induce an inappropriate inflammatory response ultimately results in the destruction of bone and gingival tissue. In this study, subgingival plaque samples from both healthy and diseased sites in the same individual were obtained from adults with chronic periodontitis and screened for their ability to either activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or TLR4 and to antagonize TLR4-specific activation by agonist, Fusobacterium nucleatum LPS. Subgingival plaque from diseased sites strongly activated TLR4, whereas matched plaque samples obtained from healthy sites were significantly more variable, with some samples displaying strong TLR4 antagonism, while others were strong TLR4 agonists when combined with F. nucleatum LPS. Similar results were observed when TLR4 dependent E-selectin expression by endothelial cells was determined. These results are the first to demonstrate TLR4 antagonism from human plaque samples and demonstrate that healthy but not diseased sites display a wide variation in TLR4 agonist and antagonist behavior. The results have identified a novel characteristic of clinically healthy sites and warrant further study on the contribution of TLR4 antagonism in the progression of a healthy periodontal site to a diseased one. PMID:26483407

  7. From The Cover: Induction of antiviral immunity requires Toll-like receptor signaling in both stromal and dendritic cell compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ayuko; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2004-11-01

    Pattern recognition by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is known to be important for the induction of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. DCs, in turn, are critically important in the initiation of T cell responses. However, most viruses do not infect DCs. This recognition system poses a biological problem in ensuring that most viral infections be detected by pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, it is unknown what, if any, is the contribution of TLRs expressed by cells that are infected by a virus, versus TLRs expressed by DCs, in the initiation of antiviral adaptive immunity. Here we address these issues using a physiologically relevant model of mucosal infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. We demonstrate that innate immune recognition of viral infection occurs in two distinct stages, one at the level of the infected epithelial cells and the other at the level of the noninfected DCs. Importantly, both TLR-mediated recognition events are required for the induction of effector T cells. Our results demonstrate that virally infected tissues instruct DCs to initiate the appropriate class of effector T cell responses and reveal the critical importance of the stromal cells in detecting infectious agents through their own pattern recognition receptors. mucosal immunity | pattern recognition | viral infection

  8. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces increased expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and downstream TLR signaling molecules in bovine mammary epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine mammary epithelial cells contribute to the innate immune response to intramammary infections by recognizing pathogens through specialized pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one such receptor that binds and is activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of the...

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 in bone marrow-derived cells contributes to the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Haojun; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoliang; Zhang, Jinxiang; Jiang, Fagang; Xiao, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major microvascular complication in diabetics, and its mechanism is not fully understood. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the inflammatory state during DR, and the deletion of TLR4 eventually alleviates the diabetic inflammatory state. To further elucidate the mechanism of DR, we used bone marrow transplantation to establish reciprocal chimeric animals of TLR4 mutant mice and TLR4 WT mice combined with diabetes mellitus (DM) induction by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment to identify the role of TLR4 in different cell types in the development of the proinflammatory state during DR. TLR4 mutation did not block the occurrence of high blood glucose after STZ injection compared with WT mice but did alleviate the progression of DR and alter the expression of the small vessel proliferation-related genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Grafting bone marrow-derived cells from TLR4 WT mice into TLR4 mutant mice increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MIP-2 and increased the damage to the retina. Similarly, VEGF and HIF-1α expression were restored by the bone marrow transplantation. These findings identify an essential role for TLR4 in bone marrow-derived cells contributing to the progression of DR. PMID:25214718

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 is not targeted to the lysosome in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catriona; Canning, Paul; Buchanan, Paul J; Williams, Mark T; Brown, Vanessa; Gruenert, Dieter C; Elborn, J Stuart; Ennis, Madeleine; Schock, Bettina C

    2013-03-01

    The innate immune response to bacterial infection is mediated through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which trigger tightly regulated signaling cascades through transcription factors including NF-κB. LPS activation of TLR4 triggers internalization of the receptor-ligand complex which is directed toward lysosomal degradation or endocytic recycling. Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients display a robust and uncontrolled inflammatory response to bacterial infection, suggesting a defect in regulation. This study examined the intracellular trafficking of TLR4 in CF and non-CF airway epithelial cells following stimulation with LPS. We employed cells lines [16hBE14o-, CFBE41o- (CF), and CFTR-complemented CFBE41o-] and confirmed selected experiments in primary nasal epithelial cells from non-CF controls and CF patients (F508del homozygous). In control cells, TLR4 expression (surface and cytoplasmic) was reduced after LPS stimulation but remained unchanged in CF cells and was accompanied by a heightened inflammatory response 24 h after stimulation. All cells expressed markers of the early (EEA1) and late (Rab7b) endosomes at basal levels. However, only CF cells displayed persistent expression of Rab7b following LPS stimulation. Rab7 variants may directly internalize bacteria to the Golgi for recycling or to the lysosome for degradation. TLR4 colocalized with the lysosomal marker LAMP1 in 16 hBE14o- cells, suggesting that TLR4 is targeted for lysosomal degradation in these cells. However, this colocalization was not observed in CFBE41o- cells, where persistent expression of Rab7 and release of proinflammatory cytokines was detected. Consistent with the apparent inability of CF cells to target TLR4 toward the lysosome for degradation, we observed persistent surface and cytoplasmic expression of this pathogen recognition receptor. This defect may account for the prolonged cycle of chronic inflammation associated with CF. PMID:23316065

  11. Aminobisphosphonates and Toll-like receptor ligands: recruiting Vγ9Vδ2 T cells for the treatment of hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, S; Wesch, D; Kabelitz, D

    2011-01-01

    Gamma delta (γδ) T cells are intrinsically important for preventing the development and progression of hematologic cancers. These innate T cells are particularly suited for the application of cancer therapy due to the fact they: 1) recognize transformed cells independent of antigen processing or presentation by classical MHC molecules, and 2) embody the anti-tumour effector functions of both NK cells and cytotoxic T cells. It was serendipitously discovered that aminobisphosphonates (ABP), a class of drugs used as adjuvant cancer therapy for the treatment of malignant osteolytic bone disease, have the unexpected side-effect of potently activating the antitumour effector functions of human peripheral γδ T cells. Such beneficial therapeutic synergisms are rare, and no time has been wasted to determine how to best harness the anti-cancer potential of γδ T cells and ABP. Despite promising experimental results, the full clinical potential of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been hampered by the subversive strategies employed by cancer cells to obstruct activation of anti-tumour immune responses. These include the promotion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that maintain tumour tolerance and the corruption of dendritic cell (DC) function and maturation. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists have a long history of breaking free of tumour-induced immune-suppression by resetting DC function and abrogating Treg induced tolerance. This review presents data to support the notion that TLR signalling may perfectly complement the anti-tumour synergy of ABP and activated γδ T cells, and this combined innate artillery could provide the necessary ammunition to topple malignancy's stronghold on the immune system.

  12. Shockwave therapy differentially stimulates endothelial cells: implications on the control of inflammation via toll-Like receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Urbschat, Anja; Zacharowski, Kai; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) reportedly improves ventricular function in ischemic heart failure. Angiogenesis and inflammation modulatory effects were described. However, the mechanism remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that SWT modulates inflammation via toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) through the release of cytosolic RNA. SWT was applied to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 250 impulses, 0.08 mJ/mm(2) and 3 Hz. Gene expression of TLR3, inflammatory genes and signalling molecules was analysed at different time points by real-time polymerase chain reaction. SWT showed activation of HUVECs: enhanced expression of TLR3 and of the transporter protein for nucleic acids cyclophilin B, of pro-inflammatory cytokines cyclophilin A and interleukin-6 and of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. No changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial cell adhesion molecule. SWT modulates inflammation via the TLR3 pathway. The interaction between interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in TLR3 stimulation can be schematically seen as a three-phase regulation over time.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Cardiac Inflammation: Immunomodulatory Properties and the Influence of Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    van den Akker, F.; de Jager, S. C. A.; Sluijter, J. P. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background. After myocardial infarction (MI), the inflammatory response is indispensable for initiating reparatory processes. However, the intensity and duration of the inflammation cause additional damage to the already injured myocardium. Treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) upon MI positively affects cardiac function. This happens likely via a paracrine mechanism. As MSC are potent modulators of the immune system, this could influence this postinfarct immune response. Since MSC express toll-like receptors (TLR), danger signal (DAMP) produced after MI could influence their immunomodulatory properties. Scope of Review. Not much is known about the direct immunomodulatory efficiency of MSC when injected in a strong inflammatory environment. This review focuses first on the interactions between MSC and the immune system. Subsequently, an overview is provided of the effects of DAMP-associated TLR activation on MSC and their immunomodulative properties after myocardial infarction. Major Conclusions. MSC can strongly influence most cell types of the immune system. TLR signaling can increase and decrease this immunomodulatory potential, depending on the available ligands. Although reports are inconsistent, TLR3 activation may boost immunomodulation by MSC, while TLR4 activation suppresses it. General Significance. Elucidating the effects of TLR activation on MSC could identify new preconditioning strategies which might improve their immunomodulative properties. PMID:24391353

  14. Human decidual macrophages and NK cells differentially express Toll-like receptors and display distinct cytokine profiles upon TLR stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Duriez, Marion; Quillay, Héloïse; Madec, Yoann; El Costa, Hicham; Cannou, Claude; Marlin, Romain; de Truchis, Claire; Rahmati, Mona; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Nugeyre, Marie-Thérèse; Menu, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Maternofetal pathogen transmission is partially controlled at the level of the maternal uterine mucosa at the fetal implantation site (the decidua basalis), where maternal and fetal cells are in close contact. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may play an important role in initiating rapid immune responses against pathogens in the decidua basalis, however the tolerant microenvironment should be preserved in order to allow fetal development. Here we investigated the expression and functionality of TLRs expressed by decidual macrophages (dMs) and NK cells (dNKs), the major decidual immune cell populations. We report for the first time that both human dMs and dNK cells express mRNAs encoding TLRs 1-9, albeit with a higher expression level in dMs. TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4 protein expression checked by flow cytometry was positive for both dMs and dNK cells. In vitro treatment of primary dMs and dNK cells with specific TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7/8, and TLR9 agonists enhanced their secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, as well as cytokines and chemokines involved in immune cell crosstalk. Only dNK cells released IFN-γ, whereas only dMs released IL-1β, IL-10, and IL-12. TLR9 activation of dMs resulted in a distinct pattern of cytokine expression compared to the other TLRs. The cytokine profiles expressed by dMs and dNK cells upon TLR activation are compatible with maintenance of the fetotolerant immune environment during initiation of immune responses to pathogens at the maternofetal interface. PMID:25071732

  15. Oleic acid stimulates system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblast cells mediated by toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Gaccioli, Francesca; Ramirez, Vanessa I; Jones, Helen N; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-03-01

    Obese women have an increased risk to deliver large babies. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal overgrowth in these pregnancies are not well understood. Obese pregnant women typically have elevated circulating lipid levels. We tested the hypothesis that fatty acids stimulate placental amino acid transport, mediated via toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Circulating NEFA levels and placental TLR4 expression were assessed in women with varying prepregnancy body mass index (BMI). The effects of oleic acid on system A and system L amino acid transport, and on the activation of the mTOR (4EBP1, S6K1, rpS6), TLR4 (IĸB, JNK, p38 MAPK), and STAT3 signaling pathways were determined in cultured primary human trophoblast cells. Maternal circulating NEFAs (n = 33), but not placental TLR4 mRNA expression (n = 16), correlated positively with BMI (P < 0.05). Oleic acid increased trophoblast JNK and STAT3 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), whereas mTOR activity was unaffected. Furthermore, oleic acid doubled trophoblast system A activity (P < 0.05), without affecting system L activity. siRNA-mediated silencing of TLR4 expression prevented the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on system A activity. Our data suggest that maternal fatty acids can increase placental nutrient transport via TLR4, thereby potentially affecting fetal growth.

  16. Antiviral Responses of Human Fallopian Tube Epithelial Cells to Toll-like Receptor 3 Agonist Poly(I:C)

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mimi; Schaefer, Todd M.; Fahey, John V.; Wright, Jacqueline A.; Wira, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the expression of toll-like receptors (TLR) by primary human Fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTEC) and to determine whether exposure to the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) would induce an antiviral response. Design Tissue culture study. Setting University Medical Center. Patient(s) Pre-menopausal women undergoing hysterectomy. Intervention(s) Primary human FTEC were grown to confluence and high transepithelial resistance and treated with TLR agonists. Conditioned media was collected and RNA was extracted and analyzed for the expression of cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial genes. Main Outcome Measure(s) RNA was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and protein levels were assessed by ELISA. Result(s) The FTEC were demonstrated to express TLR1-9 but not 10. Treatment of FTEC with TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) resulted in increased expression of IL-8, TNF-α, human β-defensin 2, interferon beta, and interferon stimulated genes myxovirus resistance gene 1, 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase, and protein kinase R. Additionally, FTEC exposed to poly(I:C) also resulted in the induction of TLR 2, 3, and 7. Conclusion(s) Our results suggest that FTEC are sensitive to viral infection and/or exposure to viral dsRNA and can respond by secreting proinflammatory cytokines that mediate the initiation of an inflammatory response as well as expressing genes that can directly inhibit viral replication. PMID:17669408

  17. Acute phase serum amyloid A induces proinflammatory cytokines and mineralization via toll-like receptor 4 in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Regina; Benisch, Peggy; Krug, Melanie; Zeck, Sabine; Meißner-Weigl, Jutta; Steinert, Andre; Rauner, Martina; Hofbauer, Lorenz; Jakob, Franz

    2015-07-01

    The role of serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins, which are ligands for toll-like receptors, was analyzed in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and their osteogenic offspring with a focus on senescence, differentiation and mineralization. In vitro aged hMSC developed a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), resulting in enhanced SAA1/2, TLR2/4 and proinflammatory cytokine (IL6, IL8, IL1β, CXCL1, CXCL2) expression before entering replicative senescence. Recombinant human SAA1 (rhSAA1) induced SASP-related genes and proteins in MSC, which could be abolished by cotreatment with the TLR4-inhibitor CLI-095. The same pattern of SASP-resembling genes was stimulated upon induction of osteogenic differentiation, which is accompanied by autocrine SAA1/2 expression. In this context additional rhSAA1 enhanced the SASP-like phenotype, accelerated the proinflammatory phase of osteogenic differentiation and enhanced mineralization. Autocrine/paracrine and rhSAA1 via TLR4 stimulate a proinflammatory phenotype that is both part of the early phase of osteogenic differentiation and the development of senescence. This signaling cascade is tightly involved in bone formation and mineralization, but may also propagate pathological extraosseous calcification conditions such as calcifying inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  18. Toll-like receptor 11-initiated innate immune response in male mouse germ cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Weiwei; Liu, Zhenghui; Yan, Keqin; Zhao, Shutao; Han, Daishu

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) may infect the testis and impair testicular function. Mechanisms underlying testicular innate immune response to these two pathogens remain to be clarified. The present study examined the function of TLR11, which can be recognized by T. gondii-derived profilin and UPEC, in initiating innate immune response in male mouse germ cells. TLR11 is predominantly expressed in spermatids. Profilin and UPEC induced the expressions of different inflammatory cytokine profiles in the germ cells. In particular, profilin induced the expressions of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1), interleukin 12 (IL12), and interferon gamma (IFNG) through nuclear factor KB (NFKB) activation. UPEC induced the expressions of MCP1, IL12, and IFNG, as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA), IL6, and IFNB, through the activation of NFKB, IFN regulatory factor 3, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Evidence showed that profilin induced the innate response in male germ cells through TLR11 signaling, and UPEC triggered the response through TLR11 and other TLR-signaling pathways. We also provided evidence that local injection of profilin or UPEC induces the innate immune response in the germ cells. Data describe TLR11-mediated innate immune function of male germ cells in response to T. gondii profilin and UPEC stimulations. This system may play a role in testicular defense against T. gondii and UPEC infections in mice.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mediates the Response of Epithelial and Stromal Cells to Lipopolysaccharide in the Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Iain Martin; Roberts, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ascending infections of the female genital tract with bacteria causes pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), preterm labour and infertility. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria. Innate immunity relies on the detection of LPS by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on host cells. Binding of LPS to TLR4 on immune cells stimulates secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, chemokines such as CXCL1 and CCL20, and prostaglandin E2. The present study tested the hypothesis that TLR4 on endometrial epithelial and stromal cells is essential for the innate immune response to LPS in the female genital tract. Methodology/Principal Findings Wild type (WT) mice expressed TLR4 in the endometrium. Intrauterine infusion of purified LPS caused pelvic inflammatory disease, with accumulation of granulocytes throughout the endometrium of WT but not Tlr4−/− mice. Intra-peritoneal infusion of LPS did not cause PID in WT or Tlr4−/− mice, indicating the importance of TLR4 in the endometrium for the detection of LPS in the female genital tract. Stromal and epithelial cells isolated from the endometrium of WT but not Tlr4−/− mice, secreted IL-6, CXCL1, CCL20 and prostaglandin E2 in response to LPS, in a concentration and time dependent manner. Co-culture of combinations of stromal and epithelial cells from WT and Tlr4−/− mice provided little evidence of stromal-epithelial interactions in the response to LPS. Conclusions/Significance The innate immune response to LPS in the female genital tract is dependent on TLR4 on the epithelial and stromal cells of the endometrium. PMID:20877575

  20. The role of MAPK in CD4{sup +} T cells toll-like receptor 9-mediated signaling following HHV-6 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Jing; Wang, Fang; Li, Lingyun; Feng, Dongju; Qin, Jian; Xie, Fangyi; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Yun; Wang, Jinfeng; Yao, Kun

    2012-01-05

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) is an important immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory virus that primarily infects immune cells (mainly CD4{sup +} T cells) and strongly suppresses the proliferation of infected cells. Toll-like receptors are pattern-recognition receptors essential for the development of an appropriate innate immune defense against infection. To understand the role of CD4{sup +} T cells in the innate response to HHV-6 infection and the involvement of TLRs, we used an in vitro infection model and observed that the infection of CD4{sup +} T cells resulted in the activation of JNK/SAPK via up-regulation of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Associated with JNK activation, annexin V-PI staining indicated that HHV-6A was a strong inducer of apoptosis. Apoptotic response associated cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} also induced by HHV-6A infection.

  1. Increased Expression of Toll-Like Receptors by Monocytes and Natural Killer Cells in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tadema, Henko; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of receptors that sense pathogen associated patterns such as bacterial cell wall proteins. Bacterial infections are associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Here, we assessed the expression of TLRs 2, 4, and 9 by peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with AAV, and investigated TLR mediated responses ex vivo. Methods Expression of TLRs was determined in 38 AAV patients (32 remission, 6 active disease), and 20 healthy controls (HC). Membrane expression of TLRs 2, 4, and 9, and intracellular expression of TLR9 by B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes was assessed using 9-color flowcytometry. Whole blood from 13 patients and 7 HC was stimulated ex vivo with TLR 2, 4 and 9 ligands and production of cytokines was analyzed. Results In patients, we observed increased proportions of TLR expressing NK cells. Furthermore, patient monocytes expressed higher levels of TLR2 compared to HC, and in a subset of patients an increased proportion of TLR4+ monocytes was observed. Monocytes from nasal carriers of Staphylococcus aureus expressed increased levels of intracellular TLR9. Membrane expression of TLRs by B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, and granulocytes was comparable between AAV patients and HC. Patients with active disease did not show differential TLR expression compared to patients in remission. Ex vivo responses to TLR ligands did not differ significantly between patients and HC. Conclusions In AAV, monocytes and NK cells display increased TLR expression. Increased TLR expression by these leukocytes, probably resulting from increased activation, could play a role in disease (re)activation. PMID:21915309

  2. Natural Killer Cell-Dependent Anti-Fibrotic Pathway in Liver Injury via Toll-Like Receptor-9

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Tair, Lina; Axelrod, Jonathan H.; Doron, Sarit; Ovadya, Yossi; Krizhanovsky, Valery; Galun, Eithan

    2013-01-01

    The toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) agonist cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG), activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and mediates fibrosis. We investigated the TLR9 effects on lymphocyte/HSCs interactions. Liver fibrosis was induced in wild-type (WT) mice by intra-peritoneal carbon-tetrachloride (CCl4) induction for 6 weeks. Fibrotic groups were intravenously treated by a vehicle versus CpG along last 2 weeks. Compared to vehicle-treated fibrotic WT, the in-vivo CpG-treatment significantly attenuated hepatic fibrosis and inflammation, associated with decreased CD8 and increased NK liver cells. In-vitro, co-cultures with vehicle-treated fibrotic NK cells increased HSCs proliferation (P<0.001) while their CpG-treated counterparts achieved a significant decrease. To investigate the role of lymphocytes, TLR9-/- mice induced-hepatic fibrosis were used. Although TLR9-/- mice manifested lower fibrotic profile as compared to their wild-type (WT) counterparts, senescence (SA-β-Gal activity) in the liver and ALT serum levels were significantly greater. In an adoptive transfer model; irradiated WT and TLR9-/- recipients were reconstituted with naïve WT or TLR9-/- lymphocytes. The adoptive transfer of TLR9-/- versus WT lymphocytes led to increased fibrosis of WT recipients. TLR9-/- fibrotic recipients reconstituted with TLR9-/- or WT lymphocytes showed no changes in hepatic fibrosis severity or ALT serum levels. TLR9 activation had inconsistent effects on lymphocytes and HSCs. The net balance of TLR9 activation in WT, displayed significant anti-fibrotic activity, accompanied by CD8 suppression and increased NK-cells, activity and adherence to HSCs. The pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory properties of TLR9-/- lymphocytes fail to activate HSCs with an early senescence in TLR9-/- mice.  PMID:24340043

  3. Brazilin plays an anti-inflammatory role with regulating Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR 2 downstream pathways in Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-jiao; Wang, Tian-cheng; Zhang, Ze-cai; Cao, Yong-guo; Zhang, Nai-sheng; Guo, Meng-yao

    2015-07-01

    Mastitis, which commonly occurs during the postpartum period, is caused by the infection of the mammary glands. The most common infectious bacterial pathogen of mastitis is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in both human and animals. Brazilin, a compound isolated from the traditional herbal medicine Caesalpinia sappan L., has been shown to exhibit multiple biological properties. The present study was performed to determine the effect of brazilin on the inflammatory response in the mouse model of S. aureus mastitis and to confirm the mechanism of action involved. Brazilin treatment was applied in both a mouse model and cells. After brazilin treatment of cells, Western blotting and qPCR were performed to detect the protein levels and mRNA levels, respectively. Brazilin treatment significantly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration and inhibited the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of brazilin in mice suppressed S. aureus-induced inflammatory injury and the production of proinflammatory mediators. This suppression was achieved by reducing the increased expression of TLR2 and regulating the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in the mammary gland tissues and cells with S. aureus-induced mastitis. These results suggest that brazilin appears to be an effective drug for the treatment of mastitis and may be applied as a clinical therapy.

  4. CCL-34, a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 activator, modulates differentiation and maturation of myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Liu, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    CCL-34, a synthetic α-galactosylceramide analog, has been reported as an activator of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. TLR4 is highly expressed in dendritic cell (DC) and several TLR4 agonists are known to trigger DC maturation. We herein evaluated the effect of CCL-34 on DC maturation. Human CD14+ monocyte-derived immature DC were treated with CCL-34, its inactive structural analog CCL-44, or LPS to assess the DC maturation. CCL-34 induced DC maturation according to their characteristically dendrite-forming morphology, CD83 expression and IL-12p70 production. The allostimulatory activity of DC on proliferation of naive CD4+CD45+RA+ T cells and their secretion of interferon-γ was increased by CCL-34. Phagocytosis, an important function of immature DC, was reduced after CCL-34 treatment. All these effects related to DC maturation were evidently induced by positive control LPS but not by CCL-44 treatment. TLR4 neutralization impaired human DC maturation triggered by CCL-34. The induction of IL-12, a hallmark of DC maturation, by CCL-34 and LPS was only evident in TLR4-competent C3H/HeN, but not in TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. CCL-34 could further elicit the antigen presentation capability in mice inoculated with doxorubicin-treated colorectal cancer cells. In summary, CCL-34 triggers DC maturation via a TLR4-dependent manner, which supports its potential application as an immunostimulator. PMID:26883191

  5. Diet-induced obesity mediates a proinflammatory response in pancreatic β cell via toll-like receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Chen, Shufen; Qiang, Juan; Wang, Xin; Chen, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 has an important role in inflammation and immunity. Whether TLR4 signaling contributes to the link between insulin resistance and islet β cell dysfunction is an unanswered question. Here, we show that in the face of the same high-fat continuous stimulation for 24 weeks, in TLR4–/– HF mice, the weight, fraction of the liver, epididymal fat pad fraction, as well as blood glucose and insulin levels were lower than in the WT HF group. In TLR4–/– HF mice, the O2 consumption, CO2 production and activities were higher than in the WT HF group. Glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test and insulin release test suggest that the impaired insulin secretion was significantly improved in TLR4–/– HF mice, compared with the WT HF group. In TLR4–/– HF mice, islet β cell ultrastructure was not damaged in the face of the same high-fat continuous stimulation, compared to that in the WT HF group. By detecting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the primary islet, insulin secretion of TLR4–/– HF mice was better than that of the WT HF group, and in the TLR4–/– HF group, at the mRNA level, islet interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were significantly lower than in the WT HF group. There was the islet macrophage infiltration in the WT HF group, but no significant macrophage infiltration in the TLR4–/– HF group. These data suggest that the damaged islet functions of the high fat diet-induced obesity mice may be linked to the TLR4 expression level, and the recruitment of macrophages into the islets. PMID:26155140

  6. Dual Role of the Tyrosine Kinase Syk in Regulation of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aouar, Besma; Kovarova, Denisa; Letard, Sebastien; Font-Haro, Albert; Florentin, Jonathan; Weber, Jan; Durantel, David; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Trejbalova, Katerina; Hejnar, Jiri; Nunès, Jacques A.; Olive, Daniel; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Crosslinking of regulatory immunoreceptors (RR), such as BDCA-2 (CD303) or ILT7 (CD85g), of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) efficiently suppresses production of type-I interferon (IFN)-α/β and other cytokines in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/9 ligands. This cytokine-inhibitory pathway is mediated by spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) associated with the ITAM-containing adapter of RR. Here we demonstrate by pharmacological targeting of Syk that in addition to the negative regulation of TLR7/9 signaling via RR, Syk also positively regulates the TLR7/9 pathway in human pDCs. Novel highly specific Syk inhibitor AB8779 suppressed IFN-α, TNF-α and IL-6 production induced by TLR7/9 agonists in primary pDCs and in the pDC cell line GEN2.2. Triggering of TLR9 or RR signaling induced a differential kinetics of phosphorylation at Y352 and Y525/526 of Syk and a differential sensitivity to AB8779. Consistent with the different roles of Syk in TLR7/9 and RR signaling, a concentration of AB8779 insufficient to block TLR7/9 signaling still released the block of IFN-α production triggered via the RR pathway, including that induced by hepatitis B and C viruses. Thus, pharmacological targeting of Syk partially restored the main pDC function—IFN-α production. Opposing roles of Syk in TLR7/9 and RR pathways may regulate the innate immune response to weaken inflammation reaction. PMID:27258042

  7. Lipid IVa incompletely activates MyD88-independent Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in mouse macrophage cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Norihiko; Muroi, Masashi; Sugiura, Yuka; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the difference in the effect of synthetic lipid A compounds on MyD88-dependent and -independent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in mouse macrophage cells. At higher concentrations, Escherichia coli-type hexa-acylated lipid A 506, Salmonella-type hepta-acylated lipid A 516, the lipid A precursor lipid IVa and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similar levels of production of the MyD88-dependent cytokine IL-1β although their potencies varied, whereas the maximum production of the MyD88-independent cytokine RANTES induced by lipid IVa was less than 50% that of other lipid A compounds. A maximum level of NF-κB activation, which is involved in IL-1β gene transcription, was also induced to a similar level by these four lipid A compounds, while the maximum level of IFN-β promoter activity induced during MyD88-independent signaling was also less than 50% for lipid IVa stimulation compared with other lipid A compounds. Early IκBα phosphorylation activated by MyD88-dependent signaling was similarly induced by 506 and lipid IVa, whereas lipid IVa barely stimulated the phosphorylation of IRF3, a MyD88-independent transcription factor, although efficient phosphorylation was observed with 506 stimulation. These results indicate that lipid IVa has limited activity toward MyD88-independent signaling of TLR4, in macrophage cell lines, despite having efficient activity in the MyD88-dependent pathway.

  8. Antitumor NK activation induced by the Toll-like receptor 3-TICAM-1 (TRIF) pathway in myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Takashi; Ebihara, Takashi; Okuno, Manabu; Okuda, Yu; Shingai, Masashi; Tsujimura, Kunio; Takahashi, Toshitada; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Inoue, Norimitsu; Okamoto-Tanaka, Miki; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Miyoshi, Jun; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2007-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) recognize and respond to polyI:C, an analog of dsRNA, by endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and cytoplasmic receptors. Natural killer (NK) cells are activated in vivo by the administration of polyI:C to mice and in vivo are reciprocally activated by mDCs, although the molecular mechanisms are as yet undetermined. Here, we show that the TLR adaptor TICAM-1 (TRIF) participates in mDC-derived antitumor NK activation. In a syngeneic mouse tumor implant model (C57BL/6 vs. B16 melanoma with low H-2 expresser), i.p. administration of polyI:C led to the retardation of tumor growth, an effect relied on by NK activation. This NK-dependent tumor regression did not occur in TICAM-1−/− or IFNAR−/− mice, whereas a normal NK antitumor response was induced in PKR−/−, MyD88−/−, IFN-β−/−, and wild-type mice. IFNAR was a prerequisite for the induction of IFN-α/β and TLR3. The lack of TICAM-1 did not affect IFN production but resulted in unresponsiveness to IL-12 production, mDC maturation, and polyI:C-mediated NK-antitumor activity. This NK activation required NK-mDC contact but not IL-12 function in in vivo transwell analysis. Implanted tumor growth in IFNAR−/− mice was retarded by adoptively transferring polyI:C-treated TICACM-1-positive mDCs but not TICAM-1−/− mDCs. Thus, TICAM-1 in mDCs critically facilitated mDC-NK contact and activation of antitumor NK, resulting in the regression of low MHC-expressing tumors. PMID:17190817

  9. Association between Toll-like receptor 7 Gln11Leu single-nucleotide polymorphism and basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    RUSSO, IRENE; CONA, CAMILLA; SAPONERI, ANDREA; BASSETTO, FRANCO; BALDO, VINCENZO; ALAIBAC, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common form of human skin cancer. The majority of NMSC are basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with a BCC:SCC incidence ratio of 4:1 in immunocompetent patients. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane glycoproteins that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and damage-associated molecular patterns, against which they activate the innate immune response and initiate the adaptive immune response. Genetic variations of these receptors can alter the immune system and are involved in evolution and susceptibility of various diseases, including cancer. Imiquimod, an agonist of TLR7, is applied topically in the treatment of premalignant and malignant skin disorders, in particular BCC. The high efficacy of this TLR7 agonist toward BCC supports a possible role of this receptor in the induction of BCC and, consequently, polymorphisms of this receptor could be responsible for a greater or lesser susceptibility to BCC. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the presence of the functional TLR7 rs179008/Gln11Leu promoter polymorphism conferred an increased susceptibility to BCC. A case-control study with 177 BCC cases and 158 controls was performed to highlight the possible association between this polymorphism and the susceptibility to BCC. As the TLR7 gene is localized on chromosome X, the allelic frequency of this polymorphism was analyzed separately in males and females. The analysis of the distribution of frequencies of wild-type TLR7 and variant TLR7 carrying the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs179008 in patients with BCC and healthy subjects did not reveal any statistically significant difference between cases and controls. This study does not suggest the involvement of the SNP rs179008 of TLR7 in the susceptibility to BCC, but cannot exclude a role for TLR7 in BCC carcinogenesis considering the high efficacy of the TLR7 agonist, imiquimod, in the treatment of this

  10. Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Inflammatory Response and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Downregulation in Brucella abortus-Infected Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Mariana C.; Hielpos, M. Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  11. Key role of Toll-like receptor 2 in the inflammatory response and major histocompatibility complex class ii downregulation in Brucella abortus-infected alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Hielpos, M Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Oliveira, Sergio C; Baldi, Pablo C

    2014-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis Stimulates Bone Resorption by Enhancing RANKL (Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand) through Activation of Toll-like Receptor 2 in Osteoblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Ali; Henning, Petra; Lundberg, Pernilla; Souza, Pedro P. C.; Lindholm, Catharina; Lerner, Ulf H.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. In experimental arthritis, concomitant periodontitis caused by oral infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis enhances articular bone loss. The aim of this study was to investigate how lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from P. gingivalis stimulates bone resorption. The effects by LPS P. gingivalis and four other TLR2 ligands on bone resorption, osteoclast formation, and gene expression in wild type and Tlr2-deficient mice were assessed in ex vivo cultures of mouse parietal bones and in an in vivo model in which TLR2 agonists were injected subcutaneously over the skull bones. LPS P. gingivalis stimulated mineral release and matrix degradation in the parietal bone organ cultures by increasing differentiation and formation of mature osteoclasts, a response dependent on increased RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand). LPS P. gingivalis stimulated RANKL in parietal osteoblasts dependent on the presence of TLR2 and through a MyD88 and NF-κB-mediated mechanism. Similarly, the TLR2 agonists HKLM, FSL1, Pam2, and Pam3 stimulated RANKL in osteoblasts and parietal bone resorption. LPS P. gingivalis and Pam2 robustly enhanced osteoclast formation in periosteal/endosteal cell cultures by increasing RANKL. LPS P. gingivalis and Pam2 also up-regulated RANKL and osteoclastic genes in vivo, resulting in an increased number of periosteal osteoclasts and immense bone loss in wild type mice but not in Tlr2-deficient mice. These data demonstrate that LPS P. gingivalis stimulates periosteal osteoclast formation and bone resorption by stimulating RANKL in osteoblasts via TLR2. This effect might be important for periodontal bone loss and for the enhanced bone loss seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients with concomitant periodontal disease. PMID:26085099

  13. Plasma cell toll-like receptor (TLR) expression differs from that of B cells, and plasma cell TLR triggering enhances immunoglobulin production

    PubMed Central

    Dorner, Marcus; Brandt, Simone; Tinguely, Marianne; Zucol, Franziska; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Zauner, Ludwig; Berger, Christoph; Bernasconi, Michele; Speck, Roberto F; Nadal, David

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key receptors of the innate immune system and show cell subset-specific expression. We investigated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of TLR genes in human haematopoietic stem cells (HSC), in naïve B cells, in memory B cells, in plasma cells from palatine tonsils and in plasma cells from peripheral blood. HSC and plasma cells showed unrestricted expression of TLR1–TLR9, in contrast to B cells which lacked TLR3, TLR4 and TLR8 but expressed mRNA of all other TLRs. We demonstrated, for the first time, that TLR triggering of terminally differentiated plasma cells augments immunoglobulin production. Thus, boosting the immediate antibody response by plasma cells upon pathogen recognition may point to a novel role of TLRs. PMID:19950420

  14. Stable Toll-Like Receptor 10 Knockdown in THP-1 Cells Reduces TLR-Ligand-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai Van; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10) is the only orphan receptor whose natural ligand and function are unknown among the 10 human TLRs. In this study, to test whether TLR10 recognizes some known TLR ligands, we established a stable TLR10 knockdown human monocytic cell line THP-1 using TLR10 short hairpin RNA lentiviral particle and puromycin selection. Among 60 TLR10 knockdown clones that were derived from each single transduced cell, six clones were randomly selected, and then one of those clones, named E7, was chosen for the functional study. E7 exhibited approximately 50% inhibition of TLR10 mRNA and protein expression. Of all the TLRs, only the expression of TLR10 changed significantly in this cell line. Additionally, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced macrophage differentiation of TLR10 knockdown cells was not affected in the knockdown cells. When exposed to TLR ligands, such as synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL-1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and flagellin, significant induction of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression including Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Chemokine (C–C Motif) Ligand 20 (CCL20) expression, was found in the control THP-1 cells, whereas the TLR10 knockdown cells exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and CCL20. TNF-α was the only cytokine for which the expression did not decrease in the TLR10 knockdown cells from that measured in the control cells. Analysis of putative binding sites for transcription factors using a binding-site-prediction program revealed that the TNF-α promoter does not have putative binding sites for AP-1 or c-Jun, comprising a major transcription factor along with NF-κB for TLR signaling. Our results suggest that TLR10 is involved in the recognition of FSL-1, LPS, and flagellin and TLR-ligand-induced expression of TNF-α does not depend on TLR10. PMID:27258267

  15. Crucial role of Toll-like receptors in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Chao, How-Ran

    2013-12-15

    Our previous studies indicated that zinc induced inflammatory response in both vascular endothelial cells and promonocytes. Here, we asked if other metals could cause the similar effect on vascular endothelial cells and tried to determine its underlying mechanism. Following screening of fifteen metals, zinc and nickel were identified with a marked proinflammatory effect, as determined by ICAM-1 and IL-8 induction, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Inhibiting protein expression of myeloid differentiation primary response protein-88 (MyD88), a Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor acting as a TLR-signaling transducer, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, suggesting the critical roles of TLRs in the inflammatory response. Blockage of TLR-4 signaling by CLI-095, a TLR-4 inhibitor, completely inhibited the nickel-induced ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression and NFκB activation. The same CLI-095 treatment significantly blocked the zinc-induced IL-8 expression, however with no significant effect on the ICAM-1 expression and a minor inhibitory effect on the NFκB activation. The finding demonstrated the differential role of TLR-4 in regulation of the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, where TLR-4 played a dominant role in NFκB activation by nickel, but not by zinc. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB by adenovirus-mediated IκBα expression and Bay 11-7025, an inhibitor of cytokine-induced IκB-α phosphorylation, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory responses, indicating the critical of NFκB in the process. The study demonstrates the crucial role of TLRs in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells and herein deciphers a potential important difference in NFκB activation via TLRs. The study provides a molecular basis for linkage between zinc/nickel exposure and pathogenesis of the metal-related inflammatory vascular disease. - Highlights: • Both zinc and nickel cause

  16. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hong; Wu, Xinyi

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  17. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation by Chlamydia trachomatis Is Plasmid Dependent, and Plasmid-Responsive Chromosomal Loci Are Coordinately Regulated in Response to Glucose Limitation by C. trachomatis but Not by C. muridarum▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Catherine M.; AbdelRahman, Yasser M.; Green, Erin; Darville, Hillary K.; Saira, Kazima; Smith, Bennett; Darville, Toni; Scurlock, Amy M.; Meyer, Christopher R.; Belland, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that plasmid-deficient Chlamydia muridarum retains the ability to infect the murine genital tract but does not elicit oviduct pathology because it fails to activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). We derived a plasmid-cured derivative of the human genital isolate Chlamydia trachomatis D/UW-3/Cx, strain CTD153, which also fails to activate TLR2, indicating this virulence phenotype is associated with plasmid loss in both C. trachomatis and C. muridarum. As observed with plasmid-deficient C. muridarum, CTD153 displayed impaired accumulation of glycogen within inclusions. Transcriptional profiling of the plasmid-deficient strains by using custom microarrays identified a conserved group of chromosomal loci, the expression of which was similarly controlled in plasmid-deficient C. muridarum strains CM972 and CM3.1 and plasmid-deficient C. trachomatis CTD153. However, although expression of glycogen synthase, encoded by glgA, was greatly reduced in CTD153, it was unaltered in plasmid-deficient C. muridarum strains. Thus, additional plasmid-associated factors are required for glycogen accumulation by this chlamydial species. Furthermore, in C. trachomatis, glgA and other plasmid-responsive chromosomal loci (PRCLs) were transcriptionally responsive to glucose limitation, indicating that additional regulatory elements may be involved in the coordinated expression of these candidate virulence effectors. Glucose-limited C. trachomatis displayed reduced TLR2 stimulation in an in vitro assay. During human chlamydial infection, glucose limitation may decrease chlamydial virulence through its effects on plasmid-responsive chromosomal genes. PMID:21199910

  18. Toll-like receptor 2 activation by Chlamydia trachomatis is plasmid dependent, and plasmid-responsive chromosomal loci are coordinately regulated in response to glucose limitation by C. trachomatis but not by C. muridarum.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Catherine M; AbdelRahman, Yasser M; Green, Erin; Darville, Hillary K; Saira, Kazima; Smith, Bennett; Darville, Toni; Scurlock, Amy M; Meyer, Christopher R; Belland, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that plasmid-deficient Chlamydia muridarum retains the ability to infect the murine genital tract but does not elicit oviduct pathology because it fails to activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). We derived a plasmid-cured derivative of the human genital isolate Chlamydia trachomatis D/UW-3/Cx, strain CTD153, which also fails to activate TLR2, indicating this virulence phenotype is associated with plasmid loss in both C. trachomatis and C. muridarum. As observed with plasmid-deficient C. muridarum, CTD153 displayed impaired accumulation of glycogen within inclusions. Transcriptional profiling of the plasmid-deficient strains by using custom microarrays identified a conserved group of chromosomal loci, the expression of which was similarly controlled in plasmid-deficient C. muridarum strains CM972 and CM3.1 and plasmid-deficient C. trachomatis CTD153. However, although expression of glycogen synthase, encoded by glgA, was greatly reduced in CTD153, it was unaltered in plasmid-deficient C. muridarum strains. Thus, additional plasmid-associated factors are required for glycogen accumulation by this chlamydial species. Furthermore, in C. trachomatis, glgA and other plasmid-responsive chromosomal loci (PRCLs) were transcriptionally responsive to glucose limitation, indicating that additional regulatory elements may be involved in the coordinated expression of these candidate virulence effectors. Glucose-limited C. trachomatis displayed reduced TLR2 stimulation in an in vitro assay. During human chlamydial infection, glucose limitation may decrease chlamydial virulence through its effects on plasmid-responsive chromosomal genes. PMID:21199910

  19. [TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS IN COSMONAUT'S PERIPHERAL BLOOD CELLS AFTER LONG-DURATION MISSIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION].

    PubMed

    Berendeeva, T A; Ponomarev, S A; Antropova, E N; Rykova, M P

    2015-01-01

    Studies of Toll-like receptors (TLR) in 20 cosmonauts-members of long-duration (124-199-day) missions to the International space station evidenced changes in relative and absolute counts of peripheral blood monocytes with TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 on the surface, expression of TLR2 and TLR6 genes, and genes of molecules involved in the TLR signaling pathway and TLR-related NF-KB-, JNK/p38- and IRF pathways on the day of return to Earth. The observed changes displayed individual variability.

  20. Mycoplasma bovis-derived lipid-associated membrane proteins activate IL-1β production through the NF-κB pathway via toll-like receptor 2 and MyD88.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Suli; Li, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Shao, Jiari; Chen, Ying; Xin, Jiuqing

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma bovis causes pneumonia, otitis media, and arthritis in young calves, resulting in economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. M. bovis pathogenesis results in part from excessive immune responses. Lipid-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) can potently induce host innate immunity. However, interactions between M. bovis-derived LAMPs and Toll-like receptors (TLRs), or signaling pathways eliciting active inflammation and NF-κB activation, are incompletely understood. Here, we found that IL-1β expression was induced in embryonic bovine lung (EBL) cells stimulated with M. bovis-derived LAMPs. Subcellular-localization analysis revealed nuclear p65 translocation following EBL cell stimulation with M. bovis-derived LAMPs. An NF-κB inhibitor reversed M. bovis-derived LAMP-induced IL-1β expression. TLR2 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) overexpression increased LAMP-dependent IL-1β induction. TLR2-neutralizing antibodies reduced IL-1β expression during LAMP stimulation. LAMPs also inhibited IL-1β expression following overexpression of a dominant-negative MyD88 protein. These results suggested that M. bovis-derived LAMPs activate IL-1β production through the NF-κB pathway via TLR2 and MyD88. PMID:26499291

  1. Mycoplasma bovis-derived lipid-associated membrane proteins activate IL-1β production through the NF-κB pathway via toll-like receptor 2 and MyD88.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Suli; Li, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Shao, Jiari; Chen, Ying; Xin, Jiuqing

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma bovis causes pneumonia, otitis media, and arthritis in young calves, resulting in economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. M. bovis pathogenesis results in part from excessive immune responses. Lipid-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) can potently induce host innate immunity. However, interactions between M. bovis-derived LAMPs and Toll-like receptors (TLRs), or signaling pathways eliciting active inflammation and NF-κB activation, are incompletely understood. Here, we found that IL-1β expression was induced in embryonic bovine lung (EBL) cells stimulated with M. bovis-derived LAMPs. Subcellular-localization analysis revealed nuclear p65 translocation following EBL cell stimulation with M. bovis-derived LAMPs. An NF-κB inhibitor reversed M. bovis-derived LAMP-induced IL-1β expression. TLR2 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) overexpression increased LAMP-dependent IL-1β induction. TLR2-neutralizing antibodies reduced IL-1β expression during LAMP stimulation. LAMPs also inhibited IL-1β expression following overexpression of a dominant-negative MyD88 protein. These results suggested that M. bovis-derived LAMPs activate IL-1β production through the NF-κB pathway via TLR2 and MyD88.

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella; Mirandola, Prisco; De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  3. Heme-Mediated Induction of CXCL10 and Depletion of CD34+ Progenitor Cells Is Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dependent.

    PubMed

    Dickinson-Copeland, Carmen M; Wilson, Nana O; Liu, Mingli; Driss, Adel; Salifu, Hassana; Adjei, Andrew A; Wilson, Michael; Gyan, Ben; Oduro, Daniel; Badu, Kingsley; Botchway, Felix; Anderson, Winston; Bond, Vincent; Bacanamwo, Methode; Singh, Shailesh; Stiles, Jonathan K

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection can cause microvascular dysfunction, cerebral encephalopathy and death if untreated. We have previously shown that high concentrations of free heme, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10) in sera of malaria patients induce apoptosis in microvascular endothelial and neuronal cells contributing to vascular dysfunction, blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage and mortality. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are microvascular endothelial cell precursors partly responsible for repair and regeneration of damaged BBB endothelium. Studies have shown that EPC's are depleted in severe malaria patients, but the mechanisms mediating this phenomenon are unknown. Toll-like receptors recognize a wide variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns generated by pathogens such as bacteria and parasites. We tested the hypothesis that EPC depletion during malaria pathogenesis is a function of heme-induced apoptosis mediated by CXCL10 induction and toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. Heme and CXCL10 concentrations in plasma obtained from malaria patients were elevated compared with non-malaria subjects. EPC numbers were significantly decreased in malaria patients (P < 0.02) and TLR4 expression was significantly elevated in vivo. These findings were confirmed in EPC precursors in vitro; where it was determined that heme-induced apoptosis and CXCL10 expression was TLR4-mediated. We conclude that increased serum heme mediates depletion of EPC during malaria pathogenesis.

  4. Selective utilization of Toll-like receptor and MyD88 signaling in B cells for enhancement of the anti-viral germinal center response

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Baidong; Saudan, Philippe; Ott, Gary; Wheeler, Matthew L.; Ji, Ming; Kuzmich, Lili; Lee, Linda M.; Coffman, Robert L.; Bachmann, Martin F.; DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The contribution of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling to T cell-dependent (TD) antibody responses was assessed by using mice lacking the TLR signaling adaptor MyD88 in individual cell types. When a soluble TLR9 ligand was used as adjuvant for a protein antigen, MyD88 was required in dendritic cells but not in B cells to enhance the TD antibody response, regardless of the inherent immunogenicity of the antigen. In contrast, a TLR9 ligand contained within a virus-like particle substantially augmented the TD germinal center IgG antibody response, and this augmentation required B cell MyD88. The ability of B cells to discriminate between antigens based the physical form of a TLR ligand likely reflects an adaptation to facilitate strong anti-viral antibody responses. PMID:21353603

  5. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context. PMID:27030742

  6. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context.

  7. FcγRIIIa-Syk Co-signal Modulates CD4+ T-cell Response and Up-regulates Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Expression.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anil K; Moore, Terry L; Bi, Ye; Chen, Chen

    2016-01-15

    CD4(+) T-cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients show altered T-cell receptor signaling, which utilizes Fc-receptor γ-chain FcRγ-Syk. A role for FcγRIIIa activation from immune complex (IC) ligation and sublytic terminal complement complex (C5b-9) in CD4(+) T-cell responses is not investigated. In this study, we show that the ICs present in SLE patients by ligating to FcγRIIIa on CD4(+) T-cells phosphorylate Syk and provide a co-stimulatory signal to CD4(+) T-cells in the absence of CD28 signal. This led to the development of pathogenic IL-17A(+) and IFN-γ(high) CD4(+) T-cells in vitro. Cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β1, and IL-23 were the only requirement for the development of both populations. SLE patients CD4(+) T-cells that expressed CD25, CD69, and CD98 bound to ICs showed pSyk and produced IFN-γ and IL-17A. This FcγRIIIa-mediated co-signal differentially up-regulated the expression of IFN pathway genes compared with CD28 co-signal. FcγRIIIa-pSyk up-regulated several toll-like receptor genes as well as the HMGB1 and MyD88 gene transcripts. ICs co-localized with these toll-like receptor pathway proteins. These results suggest a role for the FcγRIIIa-pSyk signal in modulating adaptive immune responses.

  8. Recognition of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum by Toll-like receptors and up-regulation of antimicrobial peptides in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sanhita; Marla, Sushma; Praneetha, DC

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a major cause of corneal ulcers in developing and industrialized nations. In this study, we examined the host innate immune responses to Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum, often overlooked as commensal, in human corneal epithelial cells. The expressions of innate immune mediators were determined by quantitative PCR from corneal ulcers of patients and immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). We have found an elevated expression of Toll like receptors (TLRs) along with IL-6 and IL-1β from both ulcers and epithelial cells infected with C. pseudodiphtheriticum. Activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways were also observed in HCEC in response to C. pseudodiphtheriticum. In addition, we found a significant increase in the expression of antimicrobial peptides S100A8, S100A9 and human β-defensin 1 from both corneal ulcers and HCEC. PMID:26125127

  9. Preferential involvement of mitochondria in Toll-like receptor 3 agonist-induced neuroblastoma cell apoptosis, but not in inhibition of cell growth.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Tai, Ming-Hong; Liou, Chia-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Hung-Yi; Wang, Pei-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can mediate its therapeutic effect through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expressed on tumor cells including neuroblastoma. We used synthetic dsRNA polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)] as a TLR3 agonist to treat TLR3-expressing SK-N-AS neuroblatoma (NB) cells. We found up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins glucose-regulated protein 78 and inositol-requiring enzyme 1. Bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of ER function, effectively blocked poly(I:C)-induced activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3, MnSOD and glutathione peroxidase 1 and reduced poly(I:C)-induced SK-N-AS apoptosis. Pan caspase inhibitor and inhibitor of caspase-9, but not of caspase-8, inhibited poly(I:C)-induced activated caspase-3 expression. Rho zero (ρ(0))-SK-N-AS cells were resistant to poly(I:C)-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis, but not to inhibition of cell growth, as compared to parent SK-N-AS cells. Taking together, these findings suggest that mitochondria are preferentially involved in poly(I:C)-induced NB cell apoptosis, but not in inhibition of cell growth. A crosstalk between mitochondria and ER is implicated.

  10. Quercetin Suppresses the Migration and Invasion in Human Colon Cancer Caco-2 Cells Through Regulating Toll-like Receptor 4/Nuclear Factor-kappa B Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingyang; Song, Yucheng; Zhang, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The migration and invasion features, which were associated with inflammatory response, acted as vital roles in the development of colon cancer. Quercetin, a bioflavonoid compound, was widely spread in vegetables and fruits. Although quercetin exerts antioxidant and anticancer activities, the molecular signaling pathways in human colon cancer cells remain unclear. Hence, the present study was conducted to investigate the suppression of quercetin on migratory and invasive activity of colon cancer and the underlying mechanism. Materials and Methods: The effect of quercetin on cell viability, migration, and invasion of Caco-2 cells was analyzed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, wound-healing assay, and transwell chambers assay, respectively. The protein expressions of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, mitochondrial membrane potential-2 (MMP-2), and MMP-9 were detected by Western blot assay. The inflammatory factors, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), in cell supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The concentration of quercetin <20 μM was chosen for further experiments. Quercetin (5 μM) could remarkably suppress the migratory and invasive capacity of Caco-2 cells. The expressions of metastasis-related proteins of MMP-2, MMP-9 were decreased, whereas the expression of E-cadherin protein was increased by quercetin in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the anti-TLR4 (2 μg) antibody or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; 1 μM) could affect the inhibition of quercetin on cell migration and invasion, as well as the protein expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9, E-cadherin, TLR4, and NF-κB p65. In addition, quercetin could reduce the inflammation factors production of TNF-α, Cox-2, and IL-6. Conclusion: The findings suggested for the 1st time that quercetin might exert its anticolon cancer activity via

  11. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    PubMed

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses.

  12. Bovine beta-casein (1-28), a casein phosphopeptide, enhances proliferation and IL-6 expression of mouse CD19+ cells via Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Keisuke; Kawahara, Takeshi; Otani, Hajime

    2006-10-18

    This study was conducted to elucidate the target cells and receptors which participate in the mitogenic and interleukin (IL)-6-enhancing effect of bovine beta-casein (1-28), a casein phosphopeptide. When the spleen lymphocyte subset (CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells) from C3H/HeN mice was cultured with the beta-casein (1-28), it exerted a dose-dependent mitogenic effect on CD19+ cells. The effect of beta-casein (1-28) was not apparent in the case of CD19+ cells from C3H/HeJ mouse. In addition, the effect was significantly inhibited by treating the C3H/HeN mouse-derived CD19+ cells with neutralizing antibody for toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the beta-casein (1-28) exerted an IL-6-enhancing effect on the CD19+ cells. The effect was also abrogated in either C3H/HeJ mouse-derived CD19+ cell culture or the anti-TLR4 antibody-added culture. These results suggest that the beta-casein (1-28) stimulates both proliferation and IL-6 expression of CD19+ cells via TLR4.

  13. Sertoli cell-initiated testicular innate immune response through toll-like receptor-3 activation is negatively regulated by Tyro3, Axl, and mer receptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Qi, Nan; Shang, Tao; Wu, Hui; Deng, Tingting; Han, Daishu

    2010-06-01

    Several Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in Sertoli cells and can trigger testicular innate responses after activation by ligands. TLR signaling pathway must be tightly controlled because unrestrained TLR activation generates a chronic inflammatory milieu that often leads to pathogenesis of the host. However, the regulation of TLR signaling in Sertoli cells remains to be clarified. Here we demonstrate that Tyro3 subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases, Tyro3, Axl, and Mer (TAM), negatively regulate TLR3 signaling in Sertoli cells. Sertoli cells from TAM triple mutant (TAM(-/-)) mice exhibit an excessive activation of TLR3 in response to its ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, resulting in the up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha, and type I interferons (alpha and beta). Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a common ligand of TAM receptors, inhibits the TLR3-driven expression of cytokines in Sertoli cells. This TAM-mediated inhibition of TLR3 signaling in Sertoli cells is transduced through the up-regulation of TLR signaling suppressors suppressor of cytokine signaling-1/3 by Gas6. Moreover, we provide evidence that TAM inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production by Sertoli cells may have physiological significance in vivo. These results illuminate a negative regulatory mechanism of TLR3 signaling in Sertoli cells, which may participate in controlling the testicular innate immune responses to pathogens.

  14. Toll-like receptor-5 agonist, entolimod, suppresses metastasis and induces immunity by stimulating an NK-dendritic-CD8+ T-cell axis

    PubMed Central

    Brackett, Craig M.; Kojouharov, Bojidar; Veith, Jean; Greene, Kellee F.; Burdelya, Lyudmila G.; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Abrams, Scott I.; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of an anticancer innate immune response is highly desirable because of its inherent ability to generate an adaptive antitumor T-cell response. However, insufficient safety of innate immune modulators limits clinical use to topical applications. Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonists are favorably positioned as potential systemic immunotherapeutic agents because of unusual tissue specificity of expression, uniquely safe profile of induced cytokines, and antitumor efficacy demonstrated in a number of animal models. Here, we decipher the molecular and cellular events underlying the metastasis suppressive activity of entolimod, a clinical stage TLR5 agonist that activates NF-κB–, AP-1–, and STAT3–driven immunomodulatory signaling pathways specifically within the liver. Used as a single agent in murine colon and mammary metastatic cancer models, entolimod rapidly induces CXCL9 and -10 that support homing of blood-borne CXCR3-expressing NK cells to the liver predominantly through an IFN-γ signaling independent mechanism. NK cell-dependent activation of dendritic cells is followed by stimulation of a CD8+ T-cell response, which exert both antimetastatic effect of entolimod and establishment of tumor-specific and durable immune memory. These results define systemically administered TLR5 agonists as organ-specific immunoadjuvants, enabling efficient antitumor vaccination that does not depend on identification of tumor-specific antigens. PMID:26831100

  15. Direct Toll-Like Receptor 8 signaling increases the functional avidity of human CD8+ T lymphocytes generated for adoptive T cell therapy strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chatillon, Jean-François; Hamieh, Mohamad; Bayeux, Florence; Abasq, Claire; Fauquembergue, Emilie; Drouet, Aurélie; Guisier, Florian; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Musette, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of in vitro activated and expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases and cancers. Obtaining in vitro a sufficient amount of highly specific cytotoxic cells and capable of retaining cytotoxic activity in vivo remains problematic. We studied the role of Toll-Like Receptor-8 (TLR8) engagement on peripheral CTLs activated with melanoma antigen MART-1-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs). After a 3-week co-culture, 3–27% of specific CTLs were consistently obtained. CTLs expressed TLR8 in the intracellular compartment and at the cell surface. Specific CTLs activated with a TLR8 agonist (CL075) 24 h before the end of the culture displayed neither any change in their production levels of molecules involved in cytotoxicity (IFN-γ, Granzyme B, and TNF-α) nor major significant change in their cell surface phenotype. However, these TLR8-stimulated lymphocytes displayed increased cytotoxic activity against specific peptide-pulsed target cells related to an increase in specific anti-melanoma CTL functional avidity. TLR8 engagement on CTLs could, therefore, be useful in different immunotherapy strategies. PMID:25866635

  16. Direct Toll-Like Receptor 8 signaling increases the functional avidity of human CD8+ T lymphocytes generated for adoptive T cell therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Chatillon, Jean-François; Hamieh, Mohamad; Bayeux, Florence; Abasq, Claire; Fauquembergue, Emilie; Drouet, Aurélie; Guisier, Florian; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Musette, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Adoptive transfer of in vitro activated and expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases and cancers. Obtaining in vitro a sufficient amount of highly specific cytotoxic cells and capable of retaining cytotoxic activity in vivo remains problematic. We studied the role of Toll-Like Receptor-8 (TLR8) engagement on peripheral CTLs activated with melanoma antigen MART-1-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs). After a 3-week co-culture, 3-27% of specific CTLs were consistently obtained. CTLs expressed TLR8 in the intracellular compartment and at the cell surface. Specific CTLs activated with a TLR8 agonist (CL075) 24 h before the end of the culture displayed neither any change in their production levels of molecules involved in cytotoxicity (IFN-γ, Granzyme B, and TNF-α) nor major significant change in their cell surface phenotype. However, these TLR8-stimulated lymphocytes displayed increased cytotoxic activity against specific peptide-pulsed target cells related to an increase in specific anti-melanoma CTL functional avidity. TLR8 engagement on CTLs could, therefore, be useful in different immunotherapy strategies. PMID:25866635

  17. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist IMO cooperates with everolimus in renal cell carcinoma by interfering with tumour growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, V; Rosa, R; Formisano, L; Nappi, L; Gelardi, T; Marciano, R; Cozzolino, I; Troncone, G; Agrawal, S; Veneziani, B M; De Placido, S; Bianco, R; Tortora, G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin by everolimus is a successful approach for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) therapy. The Toll-like receptor 9 agonist immune modulatory oligonucleotide (IMO) exhibits direct antitumour and antiangiogenic activity and cooperates with both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. Methods: We tested the combination of IMO and everolimus on models of human RCC with different Von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene status, both in vitro and in nude mice. We studied their direct antiangiogenic effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Results: Both IMO and everolimus inhibited in vitro growth and survival of RCC cell lines, and their combination produced a synergistic inhibitory effect. Moreover, everolimus plus IMO interfered with EGFR-dependent signaling and reduced VEGF secretion in both VHL wild-type and mutant cells. In RCC tumour xenografts, IMO plus everolimus caused a potent and long-lasting cooperative antitumour activity, with reduction of tumour growth, prolongation of mice survival and inhibition of signal transduction. Furthermore, IMO and everolimus impaired the main endothelial cell functions. Conclusion: A combined treatment with everolimus and IMO is effective in VHL wild-type and mutant models of RCC by interfering with tumour growth and angiogenesis, thus representing a potentially effective, rationale-based combination to be translated in the clinical setting. PMID:23571736

  18. Modulation of toll-like receptor 7 and LL-37 expression in colon and breast epithelial cells by human beta-defensin-2.

    PubMed

    Stroinigg, Nora; Srivastava, Maya D

    2005-01-01

    Breast-feeding decreases maternal breast cancer risk. Breast-fed infants have fewer infections and inflammatory-allergic diseases. We recently found inducible antimicrobial and immunomodulatory protein human beta3-defensin 2 (HBD-2) in significant amounts in human milk. We investigated if HBD-2 could contribute to benefits of breast-feeding for the mother and the child by immunomodulating effects on breast and gut epithelial cells. Human CaCo-2 colon and MCF-7 breast cell lines were cultured for 16-48 hours in RPMI 1640 5% fetal calf serum with and without HBD-2 at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 microg/mL. RNA was extracted and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and gel electrophoresis for toll-like receptor pathway members, antimicrobial peptides, and cytokines/receptors was performed. Primers were designed with www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and www.broad. mit.edu/cgibin/primer/primer3 www.cgi. Based on RT-PCR results, cells were stained by immunohistochemistry using anti-toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and anti-LL37 antibodies and DAKO EnVision Plus kits. Supernatants were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-8 and liver and activation-regulated chemokine (LARC) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In CaCo-2, messenger RNA (mRNA) for TLR-7, IL-1R-associated kinase, alpha-defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3), and IL-8 were down-regulated; cathelicidin/LL37 and NFkappaBp65 were up-regulated. LARC mRNA and protein were detected after 48 hours. TLR-7 protein, LARC, and IL-8 decreased with HBD-2; LL-37 protein greatly increased. In MCF-7, mRNA for LL37, inhibitor of kappaBalpha, NFkappaBp65, Tollip, MyD88, IL-1R-associated kinase, and TLR-7 were up-regulated. LARC mRNA was turned off. TLR-7 protein was induced. LARC was not detected. IL-8 was barely detectable with or without HBD-2. beta-Defensins 1 and 2; alpha-defensins 5 and 6; TLRs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10; nucleotide binding oligomerization domain protein-2, and CCR6 mRNA were unaffected. HBD-2 profoundly

  19. Interleukin 1/Toll-like Receptor-induced Autophosphorylation Activates Interleukin 1 Receptor-associated Kinase 4 and Controls Cytokine Induction in a Cell Type-specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, Leah; Stochaj, Wayne; Siegel, Marshall; Czerwinski, Robert; Dower, Ken; Wright, Quentin; Hirschfield, Margaret; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Lin, Lih-Ling; Rao, Vikram R.

    2014-01-01

    IRAK4 is a central kinase in innate immunity, but the role of its kinase activity is controversial. The mechanism of activation for IRAK4 is currently unknown, and little is known about the role of IRAK4 kinase in cytokine production, particularly in different human cell types. We show IRAK4 autophosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular reaction and that autophosphorylation is required for full catalytic activity of the kinase. Phosphorylation of any two of the residues Thr-342, Thr-345, and Ser-346 is required for full activity, and the death domain regulates the activation of IRAK4. Using antibodies against activated IRAK4, we demonstrate that IRAK4 becomes phosphorylated in human cells following stimulation by IL-1R and Toll-like receptor agonists, which can be blocked pharmacologically by a dual inhibitor of IRAK4 and IRAK1. Interestingly, in dermal fibroblasts, although complete inhibition of IRAK4 kinase activity does not inhibit IL-1-induced IL-6 production, NF-κB, or MAPK activation, there is complete ablation of these processes in IRAK4-deficient cells. In contrast, the inhibition of IRAK kinase activity in primary human monocytes reduces R848-induced IL-6 production with minimal effect on NF-κB or MAPK activation. Taken together, these studies define the mechanism of IRAK4 activation and highlight the differential role of IRAK4 kinase activity in different human cell types as well as the distinct roles IRAK4 scaffolding and kinase functions play. PMID:24567333

  20. Differential activation of dendritic cells by toll-like receptors causes diverse differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells from allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    Deifl, S.; Kitzmüller, C.; Steinberger, P.; Himly, M.; Jahn-Schmid, B.; Fischer, G. F.; Zlabinger, G. J.; Bohle, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background To avert the differentiation of allergen-specific Th2 cells in atopic individuals is a major goal in the prevention and therapy of IgE-mediated allergy. We aimed to compare different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists regarding their effects on antigen-presenting cells and the differentiation of naïve T cells from allergic patients. Methods Monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDC) from allergic patients were stimulated with Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2 ligand), FSL-1 (TLR2/6 ligand), monophosphoryl lipid (MPL)-A, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, both TLR4 ligands), and flagellin (TLR5 ligand). Allergen uptake and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD58, CCR7 and PD-L1 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Functional maturation of mdDC was tested in mixed leukocyte reactions, and the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and members of the IL-12 family was assessed. TLR-ligand-activated mdDC were used to stimulate naïve CD4+ T cells, and cytokine responses were assessed in supernatants and intracellularly. Results All TLR ligands except flagellin enhanced allergen uptake. All TLR ligands induced functional maturation of mdDC with differential expression of surface molecules and cytokines and promoted the differentiation of IFN-γ-producing T cells. LPS-matured mdDC exclusively induced Th1-like responses, whereas mdDC stimulated with the other TLR ligands induced both Th1- and Th0-like cells. Pam3CSK4 and flagellin additionally induced Th2-like cells. Th1-like responses were associated with higher expression levels of co-stimulatory molecules, PD-L1, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12p70. None of the TLR-ligand-stimulated mdDC induced IL-10- or IL-17-producing T cells. Conclusion Different TLR ligands differently influence T-cell responses due to varying activation of the three signals relevant for T-cell activation, that is, antigen presentation, co-stimulation and cytokine milieu. PMID:25093709

  1. αv Integrins combine with LC3 and atg5 to regulate Toll-like receptor signalling in B cells.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Mridu; Sokolovska, Anna; Tam, Jenny M; Conway, Kara L; Stefani, Caroline; Raso, Fiona; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Feliu, Marianela; Paul, Elahna; Savill, John; Hynes, Richard O; Xavier, Ramnik J; Vyas, Jatin M; Stuart, Lynda M; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Integrin signalling triggers cytoskeletal rearrangements, including endocytosis and exocytosis of integrins and other membrane proteins. In addition to recycling integrins, this trafficking can also regulate intracellular signalling pathways. Here we describe a role for αv integrins in regulating Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling by modulating intracellular trafficking. We show that deletion of αv or β3 causes increased B-cell responses to TLR stimulation in vitro, and αv-conditional knockout mice have elevated antibody responses to TLR-ligand-associated antigens. αv regulates TLR signalling by promoting recruitment of the autophagy component LC3 (microtubule-associated proteins 1 light chain 3) to TLR-containing endosomes, which is essential for progression from NF-κB to IRF signalling, and ultimately for traffic to lysosomes where signalling is terminated. Disruption of LC3 recruitment leads to prolonged NF-κB signalling and increased B-cell proliferation and antibody production. This work identifies a previously unrecognized role for αv and the autophagy components LC3 and atg5 in regulating TLR signalling and B-cell immunity. PMID:26965188

  2. αv Integrins combine with LC3 and atg5 to regulate Toll-like receptor signalling in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Mridu; Sokolovska, Anna; Tam, Jenny M.; Conway, Kara L.; Stefani, Caroline; Raso, Fiona; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Feliu, Marianela; Paul, Elahna; Savill, John; Hynes, Richard O.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Vyas, Jatin M.; Stuart, Lynda M.; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Integrin signalling triggers cytoskeletal rearrangements, including endocytosis and exocytosis of integrins and other membrane proteins. In addition to recycling integrins, this trafficking can also regulate intracellular signalling pathways. Here we describe a role for αv integrins in regulating Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling by modulating intracellular trafficking. We show that deletion of αv or β3 causes increased B-cell responses to TLR stimulation in vitro, and αv-conditional knockout mice have elevated antibody responses to TLR-ligand-associated antigens. αv regulates TLR signalling by promoting recruitment of the autophagy component LC3 (microtubule-associated proteins 1 light chain 3) to TLR-containing endosomes, which is essential for progression from NF-κB to IRF signalling, and ultimately for traffic to lysosomes where signalling is terminated. Disruption of LC3 recruitment leads to prolonged NF-κB signalling and increased B-cell proliferation and antibody production. This work identifies a previously unrecognized role for αv and the autophagy components LC3 and atg5 in regulating TLR signalling and B-cell immunity. PMID:26965188

  3. Toll-like Receptors in Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Kaiser, Andrew; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Cassard, Lydie; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Palmer, Douglas C.; Yu, Zhiya; Antony, Paul A.; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with chemotherapeutic agents or total body irradiation (TBI) before adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells is a critical advancement in the treatment of patients with melanoma. More than 50% of patients that are refractory to other treatments experience an objective or curative response with this approach. Emerging data indicate that the key mechanisms underlying how TBI augments the functions of adoptively transferred T cells include (a) the depletion of regulatory Tcells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells that limit the function and proliferation of adoptively transferred cells; (b) the removal of immune cells that act as “sinks” for homeostatic cytokines, whose levels increase after lymphodepletion; and (c) the activation of the innate immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling, which is engaged by microbial lipopolysaccharide that translocated across the radiation-injured gut. Here, we review these mechanisms and focus on the effect of Toll-like receptor agonists in adoptive immunotherapy. We also discuss alternate regimens to chemotherapy or TBI, which might be used to safely treat patients with advanced disease and promote tumor regression. PMID:17875756

  4. Tim-3 protects decidual stromal cells from toll-like receptor-mediated apoptosis and inflammatory reactions and promotes Th2 bias at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, SongCun; Cao, ChunMei; Piao, HaiLan; Li, YanHong; Tao, Yu; Zhang, XiaoMing; Zhang, Di; Sun, Chan; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Yan; Yuan, MinMin; Li, DaJin; Du, MeiRong

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important in mediating immune responses against various pathogens during pregnancy. However, uncontrolled TLR-triggered inflammation will endanger normal pregnancy, resulting in pregnancy loss. Therefore, maintenance of a moderate inflammatory response is crucial for successful pregnancy under conditions of infection. Here, we demonstrated significantly lowered expression of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) in miscarried decidual stromal cells (DSCs), indicating that Tim-3 might play important roles in maintaining successful pregnancies. Activation of TLR signaling induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis of DSCs, which was accompanied by up-regulated Tim-3 expression. Tim-3, in turn, protected DSCs from TLR-mediated apoptosis in an ERK1/2 pathway-dependent manner. In addition, Tim-3 inhibited TLR signaling-induced inflammatory cytokine production by DSCs through suppressing NF-κB activation. Tim-3 increased production of T helper 2 (Th2)-type cytokines by DSCs and reversed the inhibitory effect of LPS on Th2 cytokine generation by up-regulation of interferon regulatory factor 4 expression. Tim-3 blockade abolished the effect of Tim-3 on the inflammatory response to LPS stimulation. Thus, Tim-3 signaling could represent a "self-control" mechanism in TLR-triggered inflammation during pregnancy. These findings identify Tim-3 as a key regulator of DSCs and suggest its potential as a target for the treatment of spontaneous abortion.

  5. p53 amplifies Toll-like receptor 5 response in human primary and cancer cells through interaction with multiple signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shatz, Maria; Shats, Igor; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor regulates transcription of genes associated with diverse cellular functions including apoptosis, growth arrest, DNA repair and differentiation. Recently, we established that p53 can modulate expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) innate immunity genes but the degree of cross-talk between p53 and TLR pathways remained unclear. Here, using gene expression profiling we characterize the global effect of p53 on the TLR5-mediated transcription in MCF7 cells. We found that combined activation of p53 and TLR5 pathways synergistically increases expression of over 200 genes, mostly associated with immunity and inflammation. The synergy was observed in several human cancer cells and primary lymphocytes. The p53-dependent amplification of transcriptional response to TLR5 activation required expression of NFκB subunit p65 and was mediated by several molecular mechanisms including increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, PI3K and STAT3 signaling. Additionally, p53 induction increased cytokine expression in response to TNFα, another activator of NFκB and MAP kinase pathways, suggesting a broad interaction between p53 and these signaling pathways. The expression of many synergistically induced genes is elevated in breast cancer patients responsive to chemotherapy. We suggest that p53's capacity to enhance immune response could be exploited to increase antitumor immunity and to improve cancer treatment. PMID:26220208

  6. Essential requirement of toll-like receptor 4 expression on CD11c+ cells for locoregional immunotherapy of malignant ascites using a streptococcal preparation OK-432.

    PubMed

    Hironaka, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Okita, Riki; Okawaki, Makoto; Nagamine, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important molecules that stimulate the innate immunity in order to eradicate microbial pathogens, after which the adaptive immunity emerges. The involvement of TLRs in the action mechanism of OK-432, a bacterial preparation, was investigated in the locoregional treatment of malignant ascites from gastric cancer. The expression of TLRs in ascites cells was analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction specific for TLRs and by flow cytometry using anti-TLR2, -TLR4, -CD4, -CD8, and -CD11c antibodies. These measurements were compared with the locoregional response of OK-432 immunotherapy for malignant ascites, as well as TNF-alpha producing potential, which was measured by ELISA, of ascites cells stimulated in vitro with OK-432. It was observed that OK-432 immunotherapy for malignant ascites showed 8 positive (67%) and 4 negative responses with the tolerable adverse effects of fever elevation and abdominal pain. The TNF-alpha production of ascites cells by in vitro OK-432 stimulation was significantly higher in responder patients than in non-responders. The clinical responses were correlated with the expression of the TLR4 gene of ascites cells. The TNF-alpha-producing potential of ascites cells by in vitro OK-432 stimulation was dependent on the existence of a CD11c + TLR-4+ cell population in ascites cells. OK-432 was highly stimulatory for TNF-alpha production of ascites cells compared with other biological response modifiers of PSK and LEM. These results suggest that TLR-4 expression on ascites cells of a macrophage lineage is essential for ascites cells to produce TNF-alpha in relation to OK-432 stimulation and for subsequent positive clinical responses in locoregional immunotherapy using OK-432 for malignant ascites from gastric cancer.

  7. Growth inhibition and apoptosis by an active component of OK-432, a streptococcal agent, via Toll-like receptor 4 in human head and neck cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tano, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Masato; Kan, Shin; Nakashiro, Koh-ichi; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Yamashita, Naomi; Kawakami, Yutaka; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a significant role in cancer therapy as receptors of bacteria-derived immunotherapeutic agents such as OK-432, a streptococcal immunotherapeutic agent. In addition, recent reports demonstrated that TLRs, including TLR4, are also expressed in cancer cells as well as in immunocompetent cells. It is a problem in cancer therapy that the immunoadjuvant may activate survival signals such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB or mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in cancer cells via TLRs. In the current study, we investigated responsiveness of human head and neck cancer cell lines against TLR4 ligands, OK-PSA, an active component of OK-432, and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Stimulation with LPS or OK-PSA resulted in the activation of NF-κB in these cell lines expressing TLR4 and MD-2 that is a significant coreceptor for TLR4 signaling. Interestingly, OK-PSA induced cell-growth inhibition, while LPS enhanced the proliferation of the cancer cells. OK-PSA induced NF-κB activation more slowly than that induced by LPS. In addition, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by OK-PSA was only slight compared with that by LPS. OK-PSA also induced apoptosis of the cancer cells mediated by the activation of caspase 1, 3 and 8 in a p53-independent manner. These findings strongly suggest that active components of OK-432 may elicit anti-cancer effects via enhancing host immunity as well as via directly inducing the growth inhibition and apoptosis of head and neck cancer cells through TLR4 signal.

  8. Direct Toll-like receptor-mediated stimulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells occurs in vivo and promotes differentiation toward macrophages.

    PubMed

    Megías, Javier; Yáñez, Alberto; Moriano, Silvia; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, María-Luisa

    2012-07-01

    As Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), they may play a role in hematopoiesis in response to pathogens during infection. We show here that TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 agonists (tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-L-Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 [Pam3CSK4], lipopolysaccharide [LPS], and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide [ODN]) induce the in vitro differentiation of purified murine lineage negative cells (Lin(-) ) as well as HSPCs (identified as Lin(-) c-Kit(+) Sca-1(+) IL-7Rα(-) [LKS] cells) toward macrophages (Mph), through a myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent pathway. In order to investigate the possible direct interaction of soluble microorganism-associated molecular patterns and TLRs on HSPCs in vivo, we designed a new experimental approach: purified Lin(-) and LKS cells from bone marrow of B6Ly5.1 mice (CD45.1 alloantigen) were transplanted into TLR2(-/-) , TLR4(-/-) , or MyD88(-/-) mice (CD45.2 alloantigen), which were then injected with soluble TLR ligands (Pam3CSK4, LPS, or ODN, respectively). As recipient mouse cells do not recognize the TLR ligands injected, interference by soluble mediators secreted by recipient cells is negligible. Transplanted cells were detected in the spleen and bone marrow of recipient mice, and in response to soluble TLR ligands, cells differentiated preferentially to Mph. These results show, for the first time, that HSPCs may be directly stimulated by TLR agonists in vivo, and that the engagement of these receptors induces differentiation toward Mph. Therefore, HSPCs may sense pathogen or pathogen-derived products directly during infection, inducing a rapid generation of cells of the innate immune system.

  9. Toll-like receptor 4 prompts human breast cancer cells invasiveness via lipopolysaccharide stimulation and is overexpressed in patients with lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Xu, Longjiang; He, Chunyan; Wen, Huiyan; Yan, Jie; Su, Honghong; Zhu, Xueming

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated signaling has been implicated in tumor cell invasion, survival, and metastasis in a variety of cancers. This study investigated the expression and biological role of TLR4 in human breast cancer metastasis. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 are human breast cancer cell lines with low and high metastatic potential, respectively. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to stimulate MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, expression of TLR4 mRNA and protein increased compared with that in control cells. TLR4 activation notably up-regulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) mRNA and their secretion in the supernatants of both cell lines. LPS enhanced invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells by transwell assay and MCF-7 cells by wound healing assay. LPS triggered increased expression of TLR4 downstream signaling pathway protein myeloid differentiation factor 88(MyD88) and resulted in interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 higher production by human breast cancer cells. Stimulation of TLR4 with LPS promoted tumorigenesis and formed metastatic lesions in liver of nude mice. Moreover, expression of TLR4 and MyD88 as well as invasiveness and migration of the cells could be blocked by TLR4 antagonist. Combined with clinicopathological parameters, TLR4 was overexpressed in human breast cancer tissue and correlated with lymph node metastasis. These findings indicated that TLR4 may participate in the progression and metastasis of human breast cancer and provide a new therapeutic target.

  10. Hyaluronan Is Not a Ligand but a Regulator of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in Mesangial Cells: Role of Extracellular Matrix in Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ebid, Rainer; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells (MC), like most cell types secrete hyaluronan (HA), which attached to the cell surface via CD44, is the backbone of a hydrophilic gel matrix around these cells. Reduced extracellular matrix thickness and viscosity result from HA cleavage during inflammation. HA fragments were reported to trigger innate immunity via Toll-like receptor-(TLR-) 2 and/or TLR4 in immune cells. We questioned whether HA fragments also regulate the immunostimulatory capacity of smooth muscle cell-like MC. LPS (TLR4-ligand) and PAM3CysSK4 (TLR2-ligand) induced IL-6 secretion in MC; highly purified endotoxin-free HA < 3000 Da up to 50 μg/mL did not. Bovine-testis-hyaluronidase from was used to digest MC-HA into HA fragments of different size directly in the cell culture. Resultant HA fragments did not activate TLR4-deficient MC, while TLR2-deficient MC responded to LPS-contamination of hyaluronidase, not to produced HA fragments. Hyaluronidase increased the stimulatory effect of TLR2-/-3/-5 ligands on their TLR-receptors in TLR4-deficient MC, excluding any effect by LPS-contamination. Supplemented heparin suppressed every stimulatory effect in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the glycosaminoglycan HA creates a pericellular jelly barrier, which covers surface receptors like the TLRs. Barrier-thickness and viscosity balanced by HA-synthesis and degradation and the amount of HA-receptors on the cell surface regulate innate immunity via the accessibility of the receptors. PMID:24967246

  11. Differential innate immune cell signatures and effects regulated by toll-like receptor 4 during murine lung tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Carla-Maria; Xiong, Ka-Na; Velmurugan, Kalpana; Xiong, Julie; Osgood, Ross S; Bauer, Alison K

    2016-04-01

    Tumor promotion is an early and critical stage during lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). We previously demonstrated that Tlr4 mutant mice were more susceptible to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-induced pulmonary inflammation and tumor promotion in comparison to Tlr4-sufficient mice. Our study objective was to elucidate the underlying differences in Tlr4 mutant mice in innate immune cell populations, their functional responses, and the influence of these cellular differences on ADC progenitor (type II) cells following BHT-treatment. BALB (Tlr4-sufficient) and C.C3-Tlr4(Lps-d)/J (BALB(Lpsd); Tlr4 mutant) mice were treated with BHT (promoter) followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and flow cytometry processing on the lungs. ELISAs, Club cell enrichment, macrophage function, and RNA isolation were also performed. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) co-cultured with a type II cell line were used for wound healing assays. Innate immune cells significantly increased in whole lung in BHT-treated BALB(Lpsd) mice compared to BALB mice. BHT-treated BALB(Lpsd) mice demonstrated enhanced macrophage functionality, increased epithelial wound closure via BMDMs, and increased Club cell number in BALB(Lpsd) mice, all compared to BALB BHT-treated mice. Cytokine/chemokine (Kc, Mcp1) and growth factor (Igf1) levels also significantly differed among the strains and within macrophages, gene expression, and cell surface markers collectively demonstrated a more plastic phenotype in BALB(Lpsd) mice. Therefore, these correlative studies suggest that distinct innate immune cell populations are associated with the differences observed in the Tlr4-mutant model. Future studies will investigate the macrophage origins and the utility of the pathways identified herein as indicators of immune system deficiencies and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27093379

  12. A novel polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. induces dendritic cells maturation through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danfei; Nie, Shaoping; Jiang, Leming; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a polysaccharide purified from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. (PLP-2) on the phenotypic and functional maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and relevant mechanisms. The results showed that PLP-2 increased the expression of maturation markers major histocompatibility complex II, CD86, CD80, and CD40 on DCs. Consistent with the changes in the phenotypic markers, functional assay for DCs maturation showed that PLP-2 decreased DCs endocytosis and increased intracellular interleukin (IL)-12 levels and allostimulatory activity. Furthermore, using a syngeneic T cell activation model, we found that PLP-2 treated DCs presented ovalbumin antigen to T cells more efficiently as demonstrated by increased T cell proliferation. In addition, the effects of PLP-2 on DCs were significantly impaired by treating the cells with anti-TLR4 antibody prior to PLP-2 treatment, implying direct interaction between PLP-2 and TLR4 on cell surface. These results suggested that PLP-2 may induce DCs maturation through TLR4. Our results may have important implications for our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of immunopotentiating action of the polysaccharides from plants. PMID:24316254

  13. A novel polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. induces dendritic cells maturation through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danfei; Nie, Shaoping; Jiang, Leming; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a polysaccharide purified from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. (PLP-2) on the phenotypic and functional maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and relevant mechanisms. The results showed that PLP-2 increased the expression of maturation markers major histocompatibility complex II, CD86, CD80, and CD40 on DCs. Consistent with the changes in the phenotypic markers, functional assay for DCs maturation showed that PLP-2 decreased DCs endocytosis and increased intracellular interleukin (IL)-12 levels and allostimulatory activity. Furthermore, using a syngeneic T cell activation model, we found that PLP-2 treated DCs presented ovalbumin antigen to T cells more efficiently as demonstrated by increased T cell proliferation. In addition, the effects of PLP-2 on DCs were significantly impaired by treating the cells with anti-TLR4 antibody prior to PLP-2 treatment, implying direct interaction between PLP-2 and TLR4 on cell surface. These results suggested that PLP-2 may induce DCs maturation through TLR4. Our results may have important implications for our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of immunopotentiating action of the polysaccharides from plants.

  14. An inhibitory alternative splice isoform of Toll-like receptor 3 is induced by type I interferons in human astrocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jin-Won; Yang, Eun-Jeon; Kim, Se Hoon; Choi, In-Hong

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) recognizes viral double-stranded RNA. It stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine and interferon production. Here we reported the expression of a novel isoform of TLR3 in human astrocyte cell lines whose message is generated by alternative splicing. The isoform represents the N-terminus of the protein. It lacks many of the leucine-rich repeat domains, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular Toll/interferon-1 receptor domain of TLR3. Type I interferons (interferon-α and interferon-β) induced the expression of this isoform. Exogenous overexpression of this isoform inhibited interferon regulatory factor 3, signal transducers and activators of transcription 1, and Inhibitor of kappa Bα signaling following stimulation. This isoform of TLR3 also inhibited the production of chemokine interferon-γ-inducible protein 10. Our study clearly demonstrated that the expression of this isoform of TLR3 was a negative regulator of signaling pathways and that it was inducible by type I interferons. We also found that this isoform could modulate inflammation in the brain.

  15. Toll-like Receptors 4 and 5 Cooperatively Initiate the Innate Immune Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lijing; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Weiwei; Wu, Han; Wang, Qing; Shi, Lili; Zhao, Xiang; Han, Daishu

    2016-03-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) may cause epididymitis and impair male fertility. The mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to UPEC infection in the epididymis are not fully understood. This study showed that UPEC induced innate immune responses in mouse epididymal epithelial cells (EECs) through the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR5. Infection with UPEC significantly induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, in EECs through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Moreover, UPEC induced the production of type 1 interferons by EECs through the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3. The UPEC-induced innate immune responses were significantly reduced in the EECs of Tlr4 or Tlr5 knockout mice. The innate immune responses were further reduced in Tlr4 and Tlr5 double-knockout EECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TLR4 and TLR5 cooperatively initiated the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection in vivo. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection.

  16. Regulatory effects of Spirulina complex polysaccharides on growth of murine RSV-M glioma cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Yu; Tominaga, Akira; Okuyama, Hiromi; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Yutaka; Yawata, Toshio; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Ono, Shiro; Shimizu, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    This study is the first to report that Spirulina complex polysaccharides (CPS) suppress glioma growth by down-regulating angiogenesis via a Toll-like receptor 4 signal. Murine RSV-M glioma cells were implanted s.c. into C3H/HeN mice and TLR4 mutant C3H/HeJ mice. Treatment with either Spirulina CPS or Escherichia coli (E. coli) lipopolysaccharides (LPS) strongly suppressed RSV-M glioma cell growth in C3H/HeN, but not C3H/HeJ, mice. Glioma cells stimulated production of interleukin (IL)-17 in both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ tumor-bearing mice. Treatment with E. coli LPS induced much greater IL-17 production in tumor-bearing C3H/HeN mice than in tumor-bearing C3H/HeJ mice. In C3H/HeN mice, treatment with Spirulina CPS suppressed growth of re-transplanted glioma; however, treatment with E. coli LPS did not, suggesting that Spirulina CPS enhance the immune response. Administration of anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)8, anti-CD4, anti-CD8 antibodies, and anti-asialo GM1 antibodies enhanced tumor growth, suggesting that T cells and natural killer cells or macrophages are involved in suppression of tumor growth by Spirulina CPS. Although anti-interferon-γ antibodies had no effect on glioma cell growth, anti-IL-17 antibodies administered four days after tumor transplantation suppressed growth similarly to treatment with Spirulina CPS. Less angiogenesis was observed in gliomas from Spirulina CPS-treated mice than in those from saline- or E. coli LPS-treated mice. These findings suggest that, in C3H/HeN mice, Spirulina CPS antagonize glioma cell growth by down-regulating angiogenesis, and that this down-regulation is mediated in part by regulating IL-17 production. PMID:23134155

  17. INVOLVEMENT OF TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 AND MAPK PATHWAYS IN LPS-INDUCED CD40 EXPRESSION IN MONOCYTIC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CD40 is a co-stimulatory surface molecule actively expressed on mature dendritic cells (DC). Recent studies suggest that endotoxin (LPS) inhalation induces DC maturation in the airways of healthy volunteers. To characterize the effect of LPS on CD40 expression and underlying mech...

  18. Activation of myeloid dendritic cells by deoxynucleic acids from Cordyceps sinensis via a Toll-like receptor 9-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gang; Miyazato, Akiko; Abe, Yuzuru; Zhang, Tiantuo; Nakamura, Kiwamu; Inden, Ken; Tanaka, Misuzu; Tanno, Daiki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito; Yamamoto, Natsuo; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Hirakata, Yoichi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism by which host cells recognize Cordyceps sinensis, a Chinese herbal medicine that is known to exhibit immunomodulating activity, remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether the DNA of this fungus could activate mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs). Upon stimulation with C. sinensis DNA, BM-DCs released IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha and expressed CD40. Cytokine production and CD40 expression were attenuated by chloroquin and bafilomycin A. Activation of BM-DCs by C. sinensis DNA was almost completely abrogated in TLR9KO mice. According to a luciferase reporter assay, C. sinensis DNA activated NF-kappaB in HEK293T cells transfected with the TLR9 gene. Finally, a confocal microscopic analysis showed that C. sinensis DNA was co-localized with CpG-ODN and partly with TLR9 and LAMP-1, a late endosomal marker, in BM-DCs. Our results demonstrated that C. sinensis DNA caused activation of BM-DCs in a TLR9-dependent manner. PMID:20451901

  19. Activation of human B cells by the agonist CD40 antibody CP-870,893 and augmentation with simultaneous toll-like receptor 9 stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L; Mick, Rosemarie; Rüter, Jens; Vonderheide, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Background CD40 activation of antigen presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) and B cells plays an important role in immunological licensing of T cell immunity. Agonist CD40 antibodies have been previously shown in murine models to activate APC and enhance tumor immunity; in humans, CD40-activated DC and B cells induce tumor-specific T cells in vitro. Although clinical translation of these findings for patients with cancer has been previously limited due to the lack of a suitable and available drug, promising clinical results are now emerging from phase I studies of the agonist CD40 monoclonal antibody CP-870,893. The most prominent pharmacodynamic effect of CP-870,893 infusion is peripheral B cell modulation, but direct evidence of CP-870,893-mediated B cell activation and the potential impact on T cell reactivity has not been reported, despite increasing evidence that B cells, like DC, regulate cellular immunity. Methods Purified total CD19+ B cells, CD19+ CD27+ memory, or CD19+ CD27neg subsets from peripheral blood were stimulated in vitro with CP-870,893, in the presence or absence of the toll like receptor 9 (TLR9) ligand CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). B cell surface molecule expression and cytokine secretion were evaluated using flow cytometry. Activated B cells were used as stimulators in mixed lymphocyte reactions to evaluate their ability to induce allogeneic T cell responses. Results Incubation with CP-870,893 activated B cells, including both memory and naïve B cells, as demonstrated by upregulation of CD86, CD70, CD40, and MHC class I and II. CP-870,893-activated B cells induced T cell proliferation and T cell secretion of effector cytokines including IFN-gamma and IL-2. These effects were increased by TLR9 co-stimulation via a CpG ODN identical in sequence to a well-studied clinical grade reagent. Conclusion The CD40 mAb CP-870,893 activates both memory and naïve B cells and triggers their T cell stimulatory capacity. Simultaneous TLR9

  20. Carbon monoxide down-modulates Toll-like receptor 4/MD2 expression on innate immune cells and reduces endotoxic shock susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been recently reported as the main anti-inflammatory mediator of the haem-degrading enzyme haem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). It has been shown that either HO-1 induction or CO treatment reduces the ability of monocytes to respond to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), due to an inhibition of the signalling pathways leading to nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases and interferon regulatory factor 3 activation. Hence, it has been suggested that CO impairs the stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD2) complex located on the surface of immune cells. However, whether CO can negatively modulate the surface expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex in immune cells remains unknown. Here we report that either HO-1 induction or treatment with CO decreases the surface expression of TLR4/MD2 in dendritic cells (DC) and neutrophils. In addition, in a septic shock model of mice intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), prophylactic treatment with CO protected animals from hypothermia, weight loss, mobility loss and death. Further, mice pre-treated with CO and challenged with LPS showed reduced recruitment of DC and neutrophils to peripheral blood, suggesting that this gas causes a systemic tolerance to endotoxin challenge. No differences in the amount of innate cells in lymphoid tissues were observed in CO-treated mice. Our results suggest that CO treatment reduces the expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex on the surface of myeloid cells, which renders them resistant to LPS priming in vitro, as well as in vivo in a model of endotoxic shock. PMID:25179131

  1. Lipopolysaccharide differentially modulates expression of cytokines and cyclooxygenases in dorsal root ganglion cells via Toll-like receptor-4 dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Tse, K-H; Chow, K B S; Leung, W K; Wong, Y H; Wise, H

    2014-05-16

    We have examined the functional expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in adult male rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in culture by studying changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent prostanoid production. In the mixed population of DRG neurons and glial cells, only DRG neurons expressed cell surface TLR4 along with MD-2 and CD14. This classical TLR4 signaling complex on DRG neurons responded to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a TLR4-dependent and time-dependent increase in interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression which was entirely dependent on NF-κB activity. In contrast, after 2-h incubation with DRG cells, LPS-stimulated COX-2 was regulated by both NF-κB and transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with potential downstream activation of ERK1/2 and p38 kinase. In contrast to this evidence for myeloid differentiation primary response gene-88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling, no evidence was obtained for TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-ß (TRIF)-dependent signaling from TLR4 in DRG neurons. LPS surprisingly produced a time-dependent decrease in COX-1 protein which likely facilitates the COX-2-dependent production of prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin. Our study is the first to demonstrate the activation of TLR4-dependent production of prostaglandin E2 and prostacyclin in DRG cell cultures. Our findings support the concept that the activation of TLR4 on primary sensory neurons by endogenous ligands may underlie neuropathic and inflammatory pain states.

  2. Carbon monoxide down-modulates Toll-like receptor 4/MD2 expression on innate immune cells and reduces endotoxic shock susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been recently reported as the main anti-inflammatory mediator of the haem-degrading enzyme haem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). It has been shown that either HO-1 induction or CO treatment reduces the ability of monocytes to respond to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), due to an inhibition of the signalling pathways leading to nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases and interferon regulatory factor 3 activation. Hence, it has been suggested that CO impairs the stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD2) complex located on the surface of immune cells. However, whether CO can negatively modulate the surface expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex in immune cells remains unknown. Here we report that either HO-1 induction or treatment with CO decreases the surface expression of TLR4/MD2 in dendritic cells (DC) and neutrophils. In addition, in a septic shock model of mice intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), prophylactic treatment with CO protected animals from hypothermia, weight loss, mobility loss and death. Further, mice pre-treated with CO and challenged with LPS showed reduced recruitment of DC and neutrophils to peripheral blood, suggesting that this gas causes a systemic tolerance to endotoxin challenge. No differences in the amount of innate cells in lymphoid tissues were observed in CO-treated mice. Our results suggest that CO treatment reduces the expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex on the surface of myeloid cells, which renders them resistant to LPS priming in vitro, as well as in vivo in a model of endotoxic shock.

  3. RIPK1 and RIPK3 Kinases Promote Cell-Death-Independent Inflammation by Toll-like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Malek; Saleh, Danish; Zelic, Matija; Nogusa, Shoko; Shah, Saumil; Tai, Albert; Finger, Joshua N; Polykratis, Apostolos; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Whalen, Michael J; Pasparakis, Manolis; Balachandran, Siddharth; Kelliher, Michelle; Poltorak, Alexander; Degterev, Alexei

    2016-07-19

    Macrophages are a crucial component of the innate immune system in sensing pathogens and promoting local and systemic inflammation. RIPK1 and RIPK3 are homologous kinases, previously linked to activation of necroptotic death. In this study, we have described roles for these kinases as master regulators of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by lipopolysaccharide, independent of their well-documented cell death functions. In primary macrophages, this regulation was elicited in the absence of caspase-8 activity, required the adaptor molecule TRIF, and proceeded in a cell autonomous manner. RIPK1 and RIPK3 kinases promoted sustained activation of Erk, cFos, and NF-κB, which were required for inflammatory changes. Utilizing genetic and pharmacologic tools, we showed that RIPK1 and RIPK3 account for acute inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide in vivo; notably, this regulation did not require exogenous manipulation of caspases. These findings identified a new pharmacologically accessible pathway that may be relevant to inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27396959

  4. Penicillin Binding Proteins as Danger Signals: Meningococcal Penicillin Binding Protein 2 Activates Dendritic Cells through Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Marcelo; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Segovia, Mercedes; Zarantonelli, Maria Leticia; Tilly, Gaëlle; Blancou, Philippe; Bériou, Gaëlle; Josien, Régis; Anegon, Ignacio; Hong, Eva; Ruckly, Corinne; Antignac, Aude; Ghachi, Meriem El; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen responsible for life-threatening inflammatory diseases. Meningococcal penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and particularly PBP2 are involved in bacterial resistance to β-lactams. Here we describe a novel function for PBP2 that activates human and mouse dendritic cells (DC) in a time and dose-dependent manner. PBP2 induces MHC II (LOGEC50 = 4.7 µg/ml±0.1), CD80 (LOGEC50 = 4.88 µg/ml±0.15) and CD86 (LOGEC50 = 5.36 µg/ml±0.1). This effect was abolished when DCs were co-treated with anti-PBP2 antibodies. PBP2-treated DCs displayed enhanced immunogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, proteins co-purified with PBP2 showed no effect on DC maturation. We show through different in vivo and in vitro approaches that this effect is not due to endotoxin contamination. At the mechanistic level, PBP2 induces nuclear localization of p65 NF-kB of 70.7±5.1% cells versus 12±2.6% in untreated DCs and needs TLR4 expression to mature DCs. Immunoprecipitation and blocking experiments showed that PBP2 binds TLR4. In conclusion, we describe a novel function of meningococcal PBP2 as a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) at the host-pathogen interface that could be recognized by the immune system as a danger signal, promoting the development of immune responses. PMID:22046231

  5. Hypoxia preconditioning increases survival and decreases expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ali, Irshad; Nanchal, Rahul; Husnain, Fouad; Audi, Said; Konduri, G Ganesh; Densmore, John C; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth R

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Pulmonary or systemic infections and hypoxemic respiratory failure are among the leading causes of admission to intensive care units, and these conditions frequently exist in sequence or in tandem. Inflammatory responses to infections are reproduced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) engaging Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Apoptosis is a hallmark of lung injury in sepsis. This study was conducted to determine whether preexposure to LPS or hypoxia modulated the survival of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs). We also investigated the role TLR4 receptor expression plays in apoptosis due to these conditions. Bovine PAECs were cultured in hypoxic or normoxic environments and treated with LPS. TLR4 antagonist TAK-242 was used to probe the role played by TLR4 receptors in cell survival. Cell apoptosis and survival were measured by caspase 3 activity and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) incorporation. TLR4 expression and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production were also determined. LPS increased caspase 3 activity in a TAK-242-sensitive manner and decreased MTT incorporation. Apoptosis was decreased in PAECs preconditioned with hypoxia prior to LPS exposure. LPS increased TNF-α production, and hypoxic preconditioning blunted it. Hypoxic preconditioning reduced LPS-induced TLR4 messenger RNA and TLR4 protein. TAK-242 decreased to baseline the LPS-stimulated expression of TLR4 messenger RNA regardless of environmental conditions. In contrast, LPS followed by hypoxia substantially increased apoptosis and cell death. In conclusion, protection from LPS-stimulated PAEC apoptosis by hypoxic preconditioning is attributable in part to reduction in TLR4 expression. If these signaling pathways apply to septic patients, they may account for differing sensitivities of individuals to acute lung injury depending on oxygen tensions in PAECs in vivo.

  6. Hypoxia preconditioning increases survival and decreases expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Nanchal, Rahul; Audi, Said; Konduri, G. Ganesh; Medhora, Meetha

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary or systemic infections and hypoxemic respiratory failure are among the leading causes of admission to intensive care units, and these conditions frequently exist in sequence or in tandem. Inflammatory responses to infections are reproduced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) engaging Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Apoptosis is a hallmark of lung injury in sepsis. This study was conducted to determine whether preexposure to LPS or hypoxia modulated the survival of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs). We also investigated the role TLR4 receptor expression plays in apoptosis due to these conditions. Bovine PAECs were cultured in hypoxic or normoxic environments and treated with LPS. TLR4 antagonist TAK-242 was used to probe the role played by TLR4 receptors in cell survival. Cell apoptosis and survival were measured by caspase 3 activity and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) incorporation. TLR4 expression and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production were also determined. LPS increased caspase 3 activity in a TAK-242-sensitive manner and decreased MTT incorporation. Apoptosis was decreased in PAECs preconditioned with hypoxia prior to LPS exposure. LPS increased TNF-α production, and hypoxic preconditioning blunted it. Hypoxic preconditioning reduced LPS-induced TLR4 messenger RNA and TLR4 protein. TAK-242 decreased to baseline the LPS-stimulated expression of TLR4 messenger RNA regardless of environmental conditions. In contrast, LPS followed by hypoxia substantially increased apoptosis and cell death. In conclusion, protection from LPS-stimulated PAEC apoptosis by hypoxic preconditioning is attributable in part to reduction in TLR4 expression. If these signaling pathways apply to septic patients, they may account for differing sensitivities of individuals to acute lung injury depending on oxygen tensions in PAECs in vivo. PMID:24618542

  7. Differential production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen by bovine macrophages and dendritic cells stimulated with Toll-like receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Werling, Dirk; Hope, Jayne C; Howard, Chris J; Jungi, Thomas W

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) have been described as partially sharing signalling pathways but showing unique ligand specificity and tissue distribution. Here, the response of bovine macrophages (Mφ) and dendritic cells (DC), both derived from monocytes, was compared by exposing them to the TLR-specific ligands lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C)-double-stranded RNA, and CpG-DNA, as well as inactivated Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, shown to bind to TLR. The production of NO, superoxide anion, interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) was determined. Compared to monocytes, Mφ expressed more TLR2 and similar levels of TLR4 mRNA transcripts, as analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, whereas DC expressed reduced amounts. Although both DC and Mφ recognized the TLR ligands, dramatic differences were seen in their reaction pattern to them. Both cell types responded with the production of TNF, but DC produced more IL-12, whereas Mφ produced more IL-10, regardless of the TLR agonist used. Co-stimulation with interferon-γ influenced the amount of cytokine production, but did not alter the cell type-specific response pattern. Compared to Mφ, DC produced >10 times less NO upon triggering with TLR ligands. In addition, DC produced superoxide anion to opsonized and non-opsonized zymosan, but not to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a response pattern confirmed for human Mφ and DC, respectively. Different protein kinase C isoforms and extracellular signal-regulated kinase patterns were detected in cell lysates of resting and stimulated Mφ and DC. Collectively, our results point to profound differences in pathogen-derived signal–response coupling occurring commensurate with distinct functions carried out by Mφ or DC. PMID:14678198

  8. CNL, a ricin B-like lectin from mushroom Clitocybe nebularis, induces maturation and activation of dendritic cells via the toll-like receptor 4 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Švajger, Urban; Pohleven, Jure; Kos, Janko; Štrukelj, Borut; Jeras, Matjaž

    2011-01-01

    A novel lectin, isolated from the basidiomycete mushroom Clitocybe nebularis and termed C. nebularis lectin (CNL), exhibits an immunostimulatory effect on the most potent antigen-presenting cells, the dendritic cells (DCs). Treatment of human monocyte-derived DCs with CNL in doses from 1 to 10 μg/ml resulted in a dose-dependent induction of overall DC maturation characteristics. Exposure of DCs to CNL for 48 hr resulted in extensive up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, as well as of the maturation marker CD83 and HLA-DR molecules. Such CNL-matured DCs (CNL-DCs) were capable of inducing a T helper type 1-polarized response in naive CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells in 5-day allogeneic co-cultures. The allostimulatory potential of CNL-DCs was significantly increased relative to untreated controls, as was their capacity to produce several pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and tumour necrosis factor-α. By using a specific Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling inhibitor, CLI-095, as well as Myd88 inhibitory peptide, we have shown that DC activation by CNL is completely dependent on the TLR4 activation pathway. Furthermore, activation of TLR4 by CNL was confirmed via TLR4 reporter assay. Measurement of p65 nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation levels following CNL stimulation of DCs revealed primarily an increase in nuclear factor-κB activity, with less effect on the induction of p38 MAPK signalling than of lipopolysaccharide-matured DCs. The CNL had the ability to activate human DCs in such a way as to subsequently direct T helper type 1 T-cell responses. Our results encourage the use of mushroom-derived lectins for use in therapeutic strategies with aims such as to strengthen anti-tumour immune responses. PMID:22044067

  9. Activation of Toll-like receptor 7 regulates the expression of IFN-λ1, p53, PTEN, VEGF, TIMP-1 and MMP-9 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Jin, Rui; Zou, Bing-Bing; Li, Lei; Cheng, Feng-Wei; Luo, Xin; Geng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Sheng-Quan

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical in the induction of the immune response in tumor development. TLR7 has previously been demonstrated to be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer, and the release of cytokines and chemokines from other types of cancer cell; however, the specific expression induced by TLR7 agonists in pancreatic cancer cells remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the TLR7 agonist, gardiquimod, on ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and on the expression of genes involved in the pathogenesis of cancer, including phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), p53, type Ⅲ interferon (IFN-λ1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1). The results demonstrated that activation of TLR7 upregulated the expression levels of certain genes to varying degrees; the expression levels of IFN-λ1 and MMP-9 were increased by ~3 fold, whereas other genes (p53, PTEN, TIMP-1) were upregulated by ~2 fold, and VEGF was marginally upregulated after 10 min. Furthermore, gardiquimod increased the expression levels of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. In addition, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation, inhibited the ability of gardiquimod to activate ERK1/2; consequently weakening the effect of gardiquimod on gene regulation. These findings indicated that the effect of TLR7 agonists, including gardiquimod, on gene expression in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells was partly associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase-ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 3 and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Proteins Regulate CXCR4 and CXCR7 Expression in Bone Marrow-Derived Human Multipotent Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Coffelt, Seth B.; Betancourt, Aline M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of bone marrow-derived human multipotent stromal cells (hMSC) in cell-based therapies has dramatically increased in recent years, as researchers have exploited the ability of these cells to migrate to sites of tissue injury, inflammation, and tumors. Our group established that hMSC respond to “danger” signals – by-products of damaged, infected or inflamed tissues – via activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, little is known regarding downstream signaling mediated by TLRs in hMSC. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that TLR3 stimulation activates a Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 pathway, and increases expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 in hMSC. Our studies suggest that each of these SOCS plays a distinct role in negatively regulating TLR3 and JAK/STAT signaling. TLR3-mediated interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) expression was inhibited by SOCS3 overexpression in hMSC while SOCS1 overexpression reduced STAT1 activation. Furthermore, our study is the first to demonstrate that when TLR3 is activated in hMSC, expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 is downregulated. SOCS3 overexpression inhibited internalization of both CXCR4 and CXCR7 following TLR3 stimulation. In contrast, SOCS1 overexpression only inhibited CXCR7 internalization. Conclusion/Significance These results demonstrate that SOCS1 and SOCS3 each play a functionally distinct role in modulating TLR3, JAK/STAT, and CXCR4/CXCR7 signaling in hMSC and shed further light on the way hMSC respond to danger signals. PMID:22745793

  11. [Inhibitory effect of polydatin on expression of toll-like receptor 4 in ischemia-reperfusion injured NRK-52E cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Xiong, Wei-Jian; Yang, Jing; Zhong, Jin; Zheng, Jin; Zhang, Ling; Ouyang, Xiao-Qin

    2014-08-01

    Polydatin is a monocrystaline compound isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc. (Polygonaceae) with biological properties, such as anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative and nephroprotective effects. Increasing number of studies have demonstrated the protective effect of polydatin on renal ischemia reperfusion injury. However, the possible mechanisms of this protection are not fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of polydatin on ischemia-reperfusion induced expression of toll-like receptor4 (TLR4) in rat renal tubular epithelia cells (NRK-52E), and analyze the mechanism of polydatin on TLR4 signal pathway. The cultured NRK-52E cells were incubated in three gas incubators for a period of 6 h at hypoxia and 24h at reoxygenation to simulate the ischemia-reperfusion injury in vitro. TLR4 mRNA level was analyzed by real-time-PCR, and the protein expression of TLR4 and NF-κB by Western blotting, while TNF-α and IL-1β proteins expressions were detected by ELISA. Polydatin downregulated I/R induced mRNA and protein expressions of TLR4, and decreased the protein expression of NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β. The TLR4 blocker partially antagonized the effect of I/R on NF-κB signaling, and such inhibitory effect was markedly enhanced by polydatin. In the present study, polydatin protects NRK-52E cells from I/R injury possibly by relieving the inflammatory response through regulation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25509306

  12. Kinetics of the West Nile virus induced transcripts of selected cytokines and Toll-like receptors in equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Suen, Willy W; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Hartwig, Airn-Elizabeth; Hall, Roy A; Bowen, Richard A; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is one of the most common causes of epidemic viral encephalitis in horses worldwide. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are amongst the first to encounter the virus following a mosquito bite. This study aimed to elucidate the transcription kinetics of cytokine, Toll-like receptor (TLRs) and TLRs-associated genes following WNV challenge of equine PBMCs. PBMCs were challenged with an Australian strain of WNV (WNVNSW2011) and transcriptomes were quantified at 2, 6, 12 and 24 h post-infection (pi) using qRT-PCR. Type I and II interferons (IFNα, β and γ) mRNA transcription increased following WNV exposure, as did the transcripts for IL1α, IL1β, IL6, IL8, and IL22, but with slightly varying kinetics. TLR1, 3, 5, 7-9 transcripts were also upregulated in equine PBMCsin response to WNV challenge, as were those for MyD88, NF-κB, TRAF3, STAT1 and 2, IRF3 and 7, ISG15, as well as SOCS1 and 3 compared to the control cells. Expression of selected genes in the draining lymph node, spleen and brain (medulla oblongata) of experimentally infected horses was also assessed and transcription of most of these genes was also upregulated here. Although qRT-PCR detected higher viral RNA at 24 h pi compared to 6 h pi, the virus did not replicate productively in equine PBMCs. The up-regulation of gene-transcription for selected cytokines, IFNs, TLRs and TLRs-associated molecules suggests their involvement in virus recognition and control of WNV infection in the horse. PMID:27267361

  13. Transcription of Toll-Like Receptors 2, 3, 4 and 9, FoxP3 and Th17 Cytokines in a Susceptible Experimental Model of Canine Leishmania infantum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hosein, Shazia; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Blake, Damer P.; Allenspach, Karin; Alberola, Jordi; Solano-Gallego, Laia

    2015-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) due to Leishmania infantum is a chronic zoonotic systemic disease resulting from complex interactions between protozoa and the canine immune system. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are essential components of the innate immune system and facilitate the early detection of many infections. However, the role of TLRs in CanL remains unknown and information describing TLR transcription during infection is extremely scarce. The aim of this research project was to investigate the impact of L. infantum infection on canine TLR transcription using a susceptible model. The objectives of this study were to evaluate transcription of TLRs 2, 3, 4 and 9 by means of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in skin, spleen, lymph node and liver in the presence or absence of experimental L. infantum infection in Beagle dogs. These findings were compared with clinical and serological data, parasite densities in infected tissues and transcription of IL-17, IL-22 and FoxP3 in different tissues in non-infected dogs (n = 10), and at six months (n = 24) and 15 months (n = 7) post infection. Results revealed significant down regulation of transcription with disease progression in lymph node samples for TLR3, TLR4, TLR9, IL-17, IL-22 and FoxP3. In spleen samples, significant down regulation of transcription was seen in TLR4 and IL-22 when both infected groups were compared with controls. In liver samples, down regulation of transcription was evident with disease progression for IL-22. In the skin, upregulation was seen only for TLR9 and FoxP3 in the early stages of infection. Subtle changes or down regulation in TLR transcription, Th17 cytokines and FoxP3 are indicative of the silent establishment of infection that Leishmania is renowned for. These observations provide new insights about TLR transcription, Th17 cytokines and Foxp3 in the liver, spleen, lymph node and skin in CanL and highlight possible markers of disease susceptibility in

  14. Molecular characterization of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), analysis of its inductive expression and associated down-stream signaling molecules following ligands exposure and bacterial infection in the Indian major carp, rohu (Labeo rohita).

    PubMed

    Samanta, Mrinal; Swain, Banikalyan; Basu, Madhubanti; Panda, Padmaja; Mohapatra, Girish B; Sahoo, Bikash R; Maiti, Nikhil K

    2012-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are one of the key components of innate immunity. Among various TLR types, TLR2 is involved in recognizing specific microbial structures such as peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), zymosan etc., and after binding them it triggers myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling pathway to induce various cytokines. In this report, TLR2 gene was cloned and characterized in rohu (Labeo rohita), which is highly commercially important fish species in the farming-industry of Indian subcontinent. Full-length rohu TLR2 (rTLR2) cDNA comprised of 2691 bp with a single open reading frame (ORF) of 2379 bp encoding a polypeptide of 792 amino acids (aa) with an estimated molecular mass of 90.74 kDa. Structurally, it comprised of one leucine-rich repeat region (LRR) each at N-terminal (LRR-NT; 44-55 aa) and C-terminal (LRR-CT; 574-590 aa), 21 LRRs in between C and N-terminal, one trans-membrane (TM) domain (595-612 aa), and one TIR domain (645-790 aa). Phylogenetically, rohu TLR2 was closely related to common carp and exhibited significant similarity (93.1%) and identity (88.1%) in their amino acids. During embryogenesis, rTLR2 expression was detected as early as ∼7 h post fertilization indicating its importance in embryonic innate immune defense system in fish. Basal expression analysis of rTLR2 showed its constitutive expression in all the tissues examined, highest was in the spleen and the lowest was in the eye. Inductive expression of TLR2 was observed following zymosan, PGN and LTA exposure and Streptococcus uberis and Edwardsiella tarda infections. Expression of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-8, in various organs was significantly enhanced by ligands exposure and bacterial infections, and was correlated with inductive expression of TLR2. In vitro studies showed that PGN treatment induced TLR2, MyD88 and TRAF6 (TNF receptor associated factor 6) expression, NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B

  15. A systemic defect in Toll-like receptor 4 signaling increases lipopolysaccharide-induced suppression of IL-2-dependent T-cell proliferation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Chikosi, Sarah-Jane; Yanik, Sarah; Rupp, Jan; Jungck, David; Koch, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility to bacterial infections is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This promotes exacerbations. IL-2 triggers CD4(+)/Th1-cell proliferation, which is important for infection defense. Bacterial endotoxin (LPS) activates MyD88/IRAK and TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 pathways via Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) in Th1 cells. Systemic defects in TLR pathways in CD4(+)/Th1 cells cause an impairment of IL-2-dependent immune responses to bacterial infections in COPD. Peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells of never smokers, smokers without COPD, and smokers with COPD (each n = 10) were ex vivo activated towards Th1 and stimulated with LPS. IL-2, MyD88, and TRIF expression, and cell proliferation was analyzed by ELISA, quantitative RT-PCR, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and trypan blue staining comparative among the cohorts. IL-2 release from activated T cells was increased in COPD vs. smokers and never smokers. LPS reduced IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation. These effects were increased in COPD vs. never smokers and inversely correlated with FEV1 (%predicted). The MyD88/TRIF ratio was decreased in Th1 cells of COPD. The suppression of IL-2 by LPS was abolished by MyD88/IRAK blockade in never smokers but by TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 blockade in COPD. Moxifloxacin restored IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation in the presence of LPS by blocking p38 MAPK. The increased IL-2 release from Th1 cells in COPD might contribute to airway inflammation in disease exacerbations. A switch from MyD88/IRAK to TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 signaling amplifies the suppression of IL-2-dependent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by LPS in COPD. This molecular pathology is of systemic origin, might impair adaptive immune responses, and could explain the increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in COPD. Targeting TLR4-downstream signaling, for example, with moxifloxacin, might reduce exacerbation rates. PMID:26498252

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 1/2 and 5 Ligands Enhance the Expression of Cyclin D1 and D3 and Induce Proliferation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mastorci, Katy; Muraro, Elena; Pasini, Elisa; Furlan, Chiara; Sigalotti, Luca; Cinco, Marina; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Fratta, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with a still undefined etiology. Several lines of evidence are consistent with the possible involvement of peculiar microenvironmental stimuli sustaining tumor cell growth and survival, as the activation of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 4 and 9. However, little is known about the contribution of other TLRs of pathogenic relevance in the development of MCL. This study reports evidence that MCL cell lines and primary MCL cells express different levels of TLR2 and TLR5, and that their triggering is able to further activate the Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling cascades, known to be altered in MCL cells. This leads to the enhancement of cyclin D1 and D3 over-expression, occurring at post-translational level through a mechanism that likely involves the Akt/GSK-3α/β pathway. Interestingly, in primary B cells, TLR1/2 or TLR5 ligands increase protein level of cyclin D1, which is not usually expressed in normal B cells, and cyclin D3 when associated with CD40 ligand (CD40L), IL-4, and anti-human-IgM co-stimulus. Finally, the activation of TLR1/2 and TLR5 results in an increased proliferation of MCL cell lines and, in the presence of co-stimulation with CD40L, IL-4, and anti-human-IgM also of primary MCL cells and normal B lymphocytes. These effects befall together with an enhanced IL-6 production in primary cultures. Overall, our findings suggest that ligands for TLR1/2 or TLR5 may provide critical stimuli able to sustain the growth and the malignant phenotype of MCL cells. Further studies aimed at identifying the natural source of these TLR ligands and their possible pathogenic association with MCL are warranted in order to better understand MCL development, but also to define new therapeutic targets for counteracting the tumor promoting effects of lymphoma microenvironment. PMID:27123851

  17. A species-specific activation of Toll-like receptor signaling in bovine and sheep bronchial epithelial cells triggered by Mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Han, Fei; Liang, Jinping; Yang, Jiali; Shi, Juan; Xue, Jing; Yang, Li; Li, Yong; Luo, Meihui; Wang, Yujiong; Wei, Jun; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis caused by a Mycobacterium infection remains a major public health problem in most part of the world, in part owing to the transmission of its pathogens between hosts including human, domestic and wild animals. To date, molecular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of TB are still incompletely understood. In addition to alveolar macrophages, airway epithelial cells have also been recently recognized as main targets for Mycobacteria infections. In an effort to understand the pathogen-host interaction between Mycobacteria and airway epithelial cells in domestic animals, in present study, we investigated the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in bovine and sheep airway epithelial cells in response to an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis avirulent H37Ra stain or Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain, using primary air-liquid interface (ALI) bronchial epithelial culture models. Our results revealed a host and pathogen species-specific TLR-mediated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), induction and activation of TLR signaling pathways, and substantial induction of inflammatory response in bronchial epithelial cells in response to Mycobacteria infections between these two species. Interestingly, the activation TLR signaling in bovine bronchial epithelial cells induced by Mycobacteria infection was mainly through a myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-independent TLR signaling pathway, while both MyD88-dependent and independent TLR signaling cascades could be induced in sheep epithelial cells. Equally noteworthy, a BCG infection was able to induce both MyD88-dependent and independent signaling in sheep and bovine airway epithelial cells, but more robust inflammatory responses were induced in sheep epithelial cells relative to the bovines; whereas an H37Ra infection displayed an ability to mainly trigger a MyD88-independent TLR signaling cascade in these two host species, and induce a more extent expression of

  18. Expression of nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors predicts HPV16 clearance associated with an E6-directed cell-mediated response.

    PubMed

    Scott, Mark E; Ma, Yifei; Farhat, Sepideh; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2015-05-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), important in rapid clearance of incident human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, may also be important in shaping the adaptive response to persistent infections. We examined here the association between TLR expression and clearance of HPV16 infections following periods of persistence, using longitudinal TLR measurements and a time-to-clearance analysis, as well as the interaction between TLRs and adaptive, cell-mediated responses involved in clearance. TLR2, TLR3, TLR7, TLR8 and TLR9 mRNA expression were measured in cervical cytobrush samples by quantitative PCR. Responses to the HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins were measured by an interferon-γ immunospot assay. Bivariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the effect of TLRs on HPV16 clearance. Higher expression of TLR3 or TLR7 at an HPV16-positive visit was a significant (p ≤ 0.05) predictor of clearance by the following visit, in both unadjusted and adjusted (for smoking and oral contraceptive use) models. In women with, but not those without, a positive response to E6, higher expression of TLR3 (hazard ratio: 1.2 [95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.39], p = 0.012), TLR7 (1.39 [1.14-1.7], p = 0.001), TLR8 (1.37 [1.11-1.69], p = 0.003), or TLR9 (1.53 [1.13-2.08], p = 0.006) was significantly associated with clearance, revealing an important link between innate and adaptive immunity in the control of HPV infections following periods of persistence.

  19. Differential Expression of Toll-like Receptors in Dendritic Cells of Patients with Dengue during Early and Late Acute Phases of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Silvia; Hernández, Juan Carlos; Giraldo, Diana; Arboleda, Margarita; Rojas, Mauricio; Smit, Jolanda M.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is observed in individuals that have pre-existing heterotypic dengue antibodies and is associated with increased viral load and high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines early in infection. Interestingly, a recent study showed that dengue virus infection in the presence of antibodies resulted in poor stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), thereby facilitating virus particle production, and also suggesting that TLRs may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the expression levels of TLR2, 3, 4 and 9 and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 by flow cytometry. This was evaluated in monocytes, in myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (mDCs and pDCs) from 30 dengue patients with different clinical outcomes and in 20 healthy controls. Increased expression of TLR3 and TLR9 in DCs of patients with dengue fever (DF) early in infection was detected. In DCs from patients with severe manifestations, poor stimulation of TLR3 and TLR9 was observed. In addition, we found a lower expression of TLR2 in patients with DF compared to DHF. Expression levels of TLR4 were not affected. Furthermore, the expression of CD80 and CD86 was altered in mDCs and CD86 in pDCs of severe dengue cases. We show that interferon alpha production decreased in the presence of dengue virus after stimulation of PBMCs with the TLR9 agonist (CpG A). This suggests that the virus can affect the interferon response through this signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significance These results show that during dengue disease progression, the expression profile of TLRs changes depending on the severity of the disease. Changes in TLRs expression could play a central role in DC activation, thereby influencing the innate immune response. PMID:23469297

  20. Amyloid-beta mediates the receptor of advanced glycation end product-induced pro-inflammatory response via toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Jer; Wang, Pei-Wen; Yang, I-Hui; Wu, Chia-Lin; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-07-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β, a product of amyloid precursor protein, is associated with neuro-inflammation in patients with Alzheimer's diseases. The correlation between amyloid-beta and advanced glycation end products, which accumulate in tissue of diabetic patients, is not clear. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of advanced glycation end product on the expression of amyloid precursor protein/amyloid-beta and associated pro-inflammatory responses in retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5. Treatment with advanced glycation end product produced upregulation of amyloid precursor protein and increased secretion of amyloid-β(1-40). Additionally, amyloid-β(1-40) induced toll-like receptor 4-dependent phosphorylation of tyrosine in myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88). We found that N-[N-(3,5-Difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, a γ-secretase inhibitor, reduced the secretion of amyloid-β(1-40) and inhibited the advanced glycation end product-induced activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88). Amyloid-β(1-40) induced the activation of NF-κB and the expression of TNFα mRNA. Knockdown of toll-like receptor 4 inhibited the amyloid-β(1-40)-induced phosphorylation of p65 in NF-κB. Additionally, the nuclear translocation of p65 and transcriptions of TNFα were inhibited by siRNA knockdown of receptor of advanced glycation end product or toll-like receptor 4. The advanced glycation end product-induced secretion of VEGF-A was also reduced by knockdown of toll-like receptor 4. Taken together, our data suggested that amyloid-β(1-40) mediates the interaction between receptor of advanced glycation end product and toll-like receptor 4. Inhibition of the toll-like receptor 4 is an effective method for suppressing the amyloid-β(1-40)-induced pro-inflammatory responses in RGC-5 cells.

  1. Coordinated Activation of Toll-Like Receptor8 (TLR8) and NLRP3 by the TLR8 Agonist, VTX-2337, Ignites Tumoricidal Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Gregory N.; Lu, Hailing; Yang, Yi; Morishima, Chihiro; Chow, Laura Q.; Disis, Mary L.; Hershberg, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    VTX-2337 (USAN: motolimod) is a selective toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8) agonist, which is in clinical development as an immunotherapy for multiple oncology indications, including squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Activation of TLR8 enhances natural killer cell activation, increases antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and induces Th1 polarizing cytokines. Here, we show that VTX-2337 stimulates the release of mature IL-1β and IL-18 from monocytic cells through coordinated actions on both TLR8 and the NOD-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome complex. In vitro, VTX-2337 primed monocytic cells to produce pro-IL-1β, pro-IL-18, and caspase-1, and also activated the NLRP3 inflammasome, thereby mediating the release of mature IL-1β family cytokines. Inhibition of caspase-1 blocked VTX-2337-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation, but had little impact on production of other TLR8-induced mediators such as TNFα. IL-18 activated natural killer cells and complemented other stimulatory pathways, including FcγRIII and NKG2D, resulting in IFNγ production and expression of CD107a. NLRP3 activation in vivo was confirmed by a dose-related increase in plasma IL-1β and IL-18 levels in cynomolgus monkeys administered VTX-2337. These results are highly relevant to clinical studies of combination VTX-2337/cetuximab treatment. Cetuximab, a clinically approved, epidermal growth factor receptor-specific monoclonal antibody, activates NK cells through interactions with FcγRIII and facilitates ADCC of tumor cells. Our preliminary findings from a Phase I open-label, dose-escalation, trial that enrolled 13 patients with recurrent or metastatic SCCHN show that patient NK cells become more responsive to stimulation by NKG2D or FcγRIII following VTX-2337 treatment. Together, these results indicate that TLR8 stimulation and inflammasome activation by VTX-2337 can complement FcγRIII engagement and may augment clinical responses in SCCHN

  2. Dysregulation of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Compromises Innate and Adaptive T Cell Responses and Host Resistance to an Attenuated West Nile Virus Infection in Old Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guorui; Luo, Huanle; Pang, Lan; Peng, Bi-hung; Winkelmann, Evandro; McGruder, Brenna; Hesse, Joseph; Whiteman, Melissa; Campbell, Gerald; Milligan, Gregg N.; Cong, Yingzi; Barrett, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms, mostly in the elderly population. No vaccines are available for human use. Recent work showed that an attenuated WNV, a nonstructural (NS) 4B-P38G mutant, induced no lethality but strong immune responses in young (6- to 10-week-old) mice. While studying protective efficacy, we found unexpectedly that old (21- to 22-month) mice were susceptible to WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection but were protected from subsequent lethal wild-type WNV challenge. Compared to responses in young mice, the NS4B-P38G mutant triggered higher inflammatory cytokine and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, a delayed γδ T cell expansion, and lower antibody and WNV-specific T cell responses in old mice. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is expressed on multiple types of cells. Impaired TLR7 signaling in old mice led to dendritic cell (DC) antigen-presenting function compromise and a reduced γδ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion during NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848, a TLR7 agonist, decreased host vulnerability in NS4B-P38G-infected old mice by enhancing γδ T cell and Treg expansion and the antigen-presenting capacity of DCs, thereby promoting T cell responses. In summary, our results suggest that dysregulation of TLR7 partially contributes to impaired innate and adaptive T cell responses and an enhanced vulnerability in old mice during WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848 increases the safety and efficacy during immunization of old mice with the WNV NS4B-P38G mutant. IMPORTANCE The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms more frequently in the elderly population. No vaccines are available

  3. Toll-like Receptor 4 Variant D299G Induces Features of Neoplastic Progression in Caco-2 Intestinal Cells and Is Associated With Advanced Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eyking, Annette; Ey, Birgit; Rünzi, Michael; Roig, Andres I.; Reis, Henning; Schmid, Kurt W.; Gerken, Guido; Podolsky, Daniel K.; Cario, Elke

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims The Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 mediates homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) barrier. We investigated the effects of TLR4-D299G on IEC functions. Methods We engineered IECs (Caco-2) to stably overexpress hemagglutinin-tagged wild-type TLR4, TLR4-D299G, or TLR4-T399I. We performed gene expression profiling using DNA microarray analysis. Findings were confirmed by real-time, quantitative, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, confocal immunofluorescence, and functional analyses. Tumorigenicity was tested using the CD1 nu/nu mice xenograft model. Human colon cancer specimens (N = 214) were genotyped and assessed for disease stage. Results Caco-2 cells that expressed TLR4-D299G underwent the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and morphologic changes associated with tumor progression, whereas cells that expressed wild-type TLR4 or TLR4-T399I did not. Caco-2 cells that expressed TLR4-D299G had significant increases in expression levels of genes and proteins associated with inflammation and/or tumorigenesis compared with cells that expressed other forms of TLR4. The invasive activity of TLR4-D299G Caco-2 cells required Wnt-dependent activation of STAT3. In mice, intestinal xenograft tumors grew from Caco-2 cells that expressed TLR4-D299G, but not cells that expressed other forms of TLR4; tumor growth was blocked by a specific inhibitor of STAT3. Human colon adenocarcinomas from patients with TLR4-D299G were more frequently of an advanced stage (International Union Against Cancer [UICC] ≥III, 70% vs 46%; P = .0142) with metastasis (UICC IV, 42% vs 19%; P = .0065) than those with wild-type TLR4. Expression of STAT3 messenger RNA was higher among colonic adenocarcinomas with TLR4-D299G than those with wild-type TLR4. Conclusions TLR4-D299G induces features of neoplastic progression in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and associates with aggressive colon cancer in humans, implying a

  4. DNA-PKcs interacts with Aire and regulates the expression of toll-like receptors in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Zhu, W; Fu, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, J; Yang, W; Li, Y

    2012-05-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire) is a key mediator of the central tolerance for peripheral tissue self-antigen (PTAs) and is involved in the transcriptional control of many antigens in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). However, the function of Aire in peripheral lymphoid tissues and haematopoietic cells, particularly in monocytes and macrophages, remains poorly understood. We previously found that the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 1, TLR3 and TLR8 was notably upregulated in pEGFPC1/Aire stably transfected RAW264.7 (GFP-Aire/RAW) cells, while the expressions of other TLRs were not significantly changed. The mechanism by which Aire affects TLR1, TLR3 and TLR8 expression is not clear. Interactions with other proteins, such as DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), are crucial for regulating the transcriptional activity of Aire. In this study, we found that Aire and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were co-located in the nucleus of GFP-Aire/RAW cells, and they interact with each other. Small interfering RNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs in these cells decreased the expression of TLR1, TLR3 and TLR8, but no change was observed in pEGFPC1 stably transfected RAW264.7 (GFP/RAW) cells. We did not observe any change in the expressions of other TLRs after DNA-PKcs knock-down in GFP-Aire/RAW or GFP/RAW cells. A similar observation has been made in pEGFPC1/Aire or pEGFPC1 transiently transfected primary peritoneal macrophages. Using a luciferase activity assay, we found the that the transcriptional activity of TLR1, TLR3 and TLR8 promoters was also decreased after knock-down of DNA-PKcs in GFP-Aire/RAW cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that DNA-PKcs may interact with Aire to promote the expression of TLRs in RAW264.7 cells.

  5. Enhancement of the priming efficacy of DNA vaccines encoding dendritic cell-targeted antigens by synergistic toll-like receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Claudius; Tenbusch, Matthias; Nchinda, Godwin; Temchura, Vladimir; Nabi, Ghulam; Stone, Geoffrey W; Kornbluth, Richard S; Überla, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background Targeting of protein antigens to dendritic cells (DC) via the DEC205 receptor enhances presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC-I and MHC-II molecules and, in the presence of costimulatory signals, antigen-specific immune responses. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single chain antibodies directed against DEC205. To further improve this strategy, we evaluated different toll-like receptor ligands (TLR) and CD40 ligands (CD40L) as adjuvants for DNA vaccines encoding a DEC205-single-chain antibody fused to the ovalbumin model antigen or HIV-1 Gag and assessed the priming efficacy of DNA in a DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunization regimen. Results Mice were primed with the adjuvanted DEC-205 targeted DNA vaccines and boosted with adenoviral vectors encoding the same antigens. CD8+ T cell responses were determined after the adenoviral booster immunization, to determine how well the different DNA immunization regimens prime for the adenoviral boost. In the absence of adjuvants, targeting of DNA-encoded ovalbumin to DCs suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses after the adenoviral booster immunization. CD8+ T-cell responses to the DEC205 targeted DNA vaccines increased only slightly by adding either the TLR-9 ligand CpG, the TLR-3 ligand Poly I:C, or CD40 ligand expression plasmids. However, the combination of both TLR-ligands led to a strong enhancement of CD8+ T-cell responses compared to a non-targeted DNA vaccine. This finding was confirmed using HIV Gag as antigen. Conclusion Although DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunizations belong to the strongest inducers of cytotoxic T cell responses in different animal models and humans, the CD8+ T cell responses can be further improved by targeting the DNA encoded antigen to DEC205 in the presence of synergistic TLR ligands CpG and Poly I:C. PMID:19650904

  6. The GroEL protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis regulates atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells mediated by upregulating toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yao; Shih, Chun-Ming; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shih, Chun-Che; Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chang, Yu-Jia; Hsieh, Chi-Kun; Lin, Feng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is a bacterial species that causes periodontitis. GroEL from P. gingivalis may possess biological activity and may be involved in the destruction of periodontal tissues. However, it is unclear whether P. gingivalis GroEL enhances the appearance of atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells and vessels. Here, we constructed recombinant GroEL from P. gingivalis to investigate its effects in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) in vitro and on aortas of high-cholesterol (HC)-fed B57BL/6 and B57BL/6-Tlr4(lps-del) mice in vivo. The results showed that GroEL impaired tube-formation capacity under non-cytotoxic conditions in HCAECs. GroEL increased THP-1 cell/HCAEC adhesion by increasing the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in endothelial cells. Additionally, GroEL increased DiI-oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake, which may be mediated by elevated lectin-like oxLDL receptor (LOX)-1 but not scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cells (SREC) and scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1) expression. Furthermore, GroEL interacts with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and plays a causal role in atherogenesis in HCAECs. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein with a high affinity for the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TLR4 mRNA, contributes to the up-regulation of TLR4 induced by GroEL in HCAECs. In a GroEL animal administration study, GroEL elevated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, LOX-1 and TLR4 expression in the aortas of HC diet-fed wild C57BL/6 but not C57BL/6-Tlr4(lps-del) mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that P. gingivalis GroEL may contribute to cardiovascular disorders by affecting TLR4 expression. PMID:27158334

  7. The GroEL protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis regulates atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells mediated by upregulating toll-like receptor 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Yao; Shih, Chun-Ming; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shih, Chun-Che; Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chang, Yu-Jia; Hsieh, Chi-Kun; Lin, Feng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is a bacterial species that causes periodontitis. GroEL from P. gingivalis may possess biological activity and may be involved in the destruction of periodontal tissues. However, it is unclear whether P. gingivalis GroEL enhances the appearance of atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells and vessels. Here, we constructed recombinant GroEL from P. gingivalis to investigate its effects in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) in vitro and on aortas of high-cholesterol (HC)-fed B57BL/6 and B57BL/6-Tlr4lps-del mice in vivo. The results showed that GroEL impaired tube-formation capacity under non-cytotoxic conditions in HCAECs. GroEL increased THP-1 cell/HCAEC adhesion by increasing the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in endothelial cells. Additionally, GroEL increased DiI-oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake, which may be mediated by elevated lectin-like oxLDL receptor (LOX)-1 but not scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cells (SREC) and scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1) expression. Furthermore, GroEL interacts with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and plays a causal role in atherogenesis in HCAECs. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein with a high affinity for the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) of TLR4 mRNA, contributes to the up-regulation of TLR4 induced by GroEL in HCAECs. In a GroEL animal administration study, GroEL elevated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, LOX-1 and TLR4 expression in the aortas of HC diet-fed wild C57BL/6 but not C57BL/6-Tlr4lps-del mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that P. gingivalis GroEL may contribute to cardiovascular disorders by affecting TLR4 expression. PMID:27158334

  8. Anti-inflammatory properties of tianeptine on lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in microglial cells involve toll-like receptor-related pathways.

    PubMed

    Slusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Glombik, Katarzyna; Piotrowska, Anna; Budziszewska, Boguslawa; Kubera, Marta; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Lason, Wladyslaw; Mika, Joanna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of microglia plays a key role in the pathogenesis of depression. Activated microglia produce a wide range of factors whose prolonged or excessive release may lead to brain disorders. Thus, the inhibition of microglial cells may be beneficial in the treatment of depressive diseases. Tianeptine is an atypical antidepressant drug with proven clinical efficacy, but its mechanism of action remains still not fully understood. In the present study, using microglial cultures we investigated whether tianeptine modifies microglial activation after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and which intracellular pathways are involved in the activity of this antidepressant. Our study shows that tianeptine attenuated the LPS-evoked inflammatory activation of microglia by decreasing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), the release of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Analyses of signaling pathways demonstrate that tianeptine led to the suppression of LPS-induced TLR4 expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, our study reveals the inhibitory impact of tianeptine on caspase-3-induced PKCδ degradation and consequently on the activation of NF-κB factor in microglial cells. Taken together, present results show anti-inflammatory properties of tianeptine in microglial cultures stimulated by LPS. This study provides evidence that the inhibition of microglial activation may underlie the therapeutic activity of tianeptine. Our findings show the anti-inflammatory effect of tianeptine (TIA) in lipopolisaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cells. The beneficial tianeptine action is mediated through the inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression as well as the TLR4-related pathways: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), caspase-3-dependent protein kinase δ (PKC

  9. Anti-inflammatory properties of tianeptine on lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in microglial cells involve toll-like receptor-related pathways.

    PubMed

    Slusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Glombik, Katarzyna; Piotrowska, Anna; Budziszewska, Boguslawa; Kubera, Marta; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Lason, Wladyslaw; Mika, Joanna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of microglia plays a key role in the pathogenesis of depression. Activated microglia produce a wide range of factors whose prolonged or excessive release may lead to brain disorders. Thus, the inhibition of microglial cells may be beneficial in the treatment of depressive diseases. Tianeptine is an atypical antidepressant drug with proven clinical efficacy, but its mechanism of action remains still not fully understood. In the present study, using microglial cultures we investigated whether tianeptine modifies microglial activation after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and which intracellular pathways are involved in the activity of this antidepressant. Our study shows that tianeptine attenuated the LPS-evoked inflammatory activation of microglia by decreasing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), the release of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Analyses of signaling pathways demonstrate that tianeptine led to the suppression of LPS-induced TLR4 expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, our study reveals the inhibitory impact of tianeptine on caspase-3-induced PKCδ degradation and consequently on the activation of NF-κB factor in microglial cells. Taken together, present results show anti-inflammatory properties of tianeptine in microglial cultures stimulated by LPS. This study provides evidence that the inhibition of microglial activation may underlie the therapeutic activity of tianeptine. Our findings show the anti-inflammatory effect of tianeptine (TIA) in lipopolisaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cells. The beneficial tianeptine action is mediated through the inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression as well as the TLR4-related pathways: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), caspase-3-dependent protein kinase δ (PKC

  10. Toll-like receptor 3 stimulation promotes Ro52/TRIM21 synthesis and nuclear redistribution in salivary gland epithelial cells, partially via type I interferon pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakidis, N C; Kapsogeorgou, E K; Gourzi, V C; Konsta, O D; Baltatzis, G E; Tzioufas, A G

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulated expression of Ro52/tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21), Ro60/TROVE domain family, member 2 (TROVE2) and lupus LA protein/Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (La/SSB) autoantigens has been described in the salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC) of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). SGECs, the key regulators of autoimmune SS responses, express high levels of surface functional Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, whereas Ro52/TRIM21 negatively regulates TLR-3-mediated inflammation. Herein, we investigated the effect of TLR-3-signalling on the expression of Ro52/TRIM21, as well as Ro60/TROVE2 and La/SSB autoantigens, by SGECs. The effect of TLR-3 or TLR-4 stimulation on autoantigen expression was evaluated by polyI:C or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, respectively, of SGEC lines (10 from SS patients, 12 from non-SS controls) or HeLa cells, followed by analysis of mRNA and protein expression. PolyI:C, but not LPS, resulted in a two-step induction of Ro52/TRIM21 mRNA expression by SGECs, a 12-fold increment at 6 h followed by a 2·5-fold increment at 24–48 h, whereas it induced a late two-fold up-regulation of Ro60/TROVE2 and La/SSB mRNAs at 48 h. Although protein expression levels were not affected significantly, the late up-regulation of Ro52/TRIM21 mRNA was accompanied by protein redistribution, from nucleolar-like pattern to multiple coarse dots spanning throughout the nucleus. These late phenomena were mediated significantly by interferon (IFN)-β production, as attested by cognate secretion and specific inhibition experiments and associated with IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 degradation. TLR-3-signalling had similar effects on SGECs obtained from SS patients and controls, whereas it did not affect the expression of these autoantigens in HeLa cells. TLR-3 signalling regulates the expression of autoantigens by SGECs, implicating innate immunity pathways in their over-expression in inflamed tissues and possibly in their exposure to the immune

  11. Expression of Toll-Like Receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and response to cognitive-behavioral therapy in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kéri, Szabolcs; Szabó, Csilla; Kelemen, Oguz

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been paid to the inflammatory mechanisms of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of the present study was to investigate pro-inflammatory pathways related to the "leaky gut" hypothesis of MDD, which is based on the putative intestinal translocation of Gram-negative bacteria and a subsequent abnormal immune response mediated by the Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR-4) pathway. 50 patients with first-episode MDD and 30 healthy control subjects participated in the study. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure TLR-4 and TLR-2 RNA from peripheral mononuclear blood cells, as well as the expression of NF-κβ, a key transcription factor of the pro-inflammatory response. TLR-4 protein expression was determined by using flow cytometry. TLR-2 served as a control molecule. Low-grade inflammation was characterized by the measurement of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Bacterial translocation was investigated by the measurement of the 16S rRNA subunit (16S rDNA) of intestinal microbiota in the blood plasma of the participants. We performed these analyses before (t1) and after (t2) cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in MDD. The healthy control subjects were also assessed two times. We found significantly elevated expressions of all three markers (TLR-4 RNA and protein, NF-κβ RNA) and 16S rDNA in MDD at t1 relative to healthy control subjects. These markers showed a significant decrease during CBT (t1>t2 in MDD). We observed no between-group differences and changes in the case of TLR-2. Greater reduction of pro-inflammatory markers during CBT was associated with more pronounced clinical improvement. IL-6 and CRP displayed a moderately elevated level in MDD and did not change during CBT. In conclusion, TLR-4 signaling is up-regulated in newly diagnosed patients with MDD, which may be related to bacterial translocation or to the presence of various damage-associated molecular patterns. Clinical improvement during

  12. Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Is Essential for Hsp70-like Protein 1 (HSP70L1) to Activate Dendritic Cells and Induce Th1 Response*

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hongliang; Wu, Yanfeng; Huang, Xiaohui; Wang, Wenying; Ang, Bing; Cao, Xuetao; Wan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play important roles in initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Emerging evidence suggests that TLR agonists can serve as potential adjuvant for vaccination. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), functionally serving as TLR4 agonists, have been proposed to act as Th1 adjuvant. We have identified a novel Hsp70 family member, termed Hsp70-like protein 1 (Hsp70L1), shown that Hsp70L1 is a potent T helper cell (Th1) polarizing adjuvant that contributes to antitumor immune responses. However, the underlying mechanism for how Hsp70L1 exerts its Th1 adjuvant activity remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that Hsp70L1 binds directly to TLR4 on the surface of DCs, activates MAPK and NF-κB pathways, up-regulates I-ab, CD40, CD80, and CD86 expression and promotes production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-12p70. Hsp70L1 failed to induce such phenotypic maturation and cytokine production in TLR4-deficient DCs, indicating a role for TLR4 in mediating Hsp70L1-induced DC activation. Furthermore, more efficient induction of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific Th1 immune response was observed in mice immunized by wild-type DCs pulsed with Hsp70L1-CEA576–669 fusion protein as compared with TLR4-deficient DCs pulsed with same fusion protein. In addition, TLR4 antagonist impaired induction of CEA-specific human Th1 immune response in a co-culture system of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from HLA-A2.1+ healthy donors and autologous DCs pulsed with Hsp70L1-CEA576–669 in vitro. Taken together, these results demonstrate that TLR4 is a key receptor mediating the interaction of Hsp70L1 with DCs and subsequently enhancing the induction of Th1 immune response by Hsp70L1/antigen fusion protein. PMID:21730052

  13. [Influence of Opiate Abuse on Expression of Toll-like Receptor 9 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of HIV-1-Infected Individuals].

    PubMed

    Pan, Peijiang; Wei, Fumei; Jiang, Junjun; Liang, Bingyu; Huang, Jiegang; Liao, Yanyan; Su, Jinming; Li, Yu; Yang, Xiaoyi; Chen, Hui; Ye, Li; Liang, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of opiate abuse on the expression of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-1-infected patients and to elucidate possible mechanisms involved in the enhancement of HIV-1 replication by opiate abuse. A total of 200 participants were enrolled in the study by random selection from methadone treatment centers and voluntary HIV counseling and testing centers in the cities of Nanning, Liuzhou, and Qinzhou. These participants included 50 HIV-positive opiate abusers (Opiates HIV(+) group), 50 HIV-negative opiate abusers (Opiates HIV(-) group), 50 HIV-positive subjects who were not opiate abusers (Non-opiates HIV (+) group), and 50 HIV-negative subjects who were not opiate abusers (Control group). PBMCs were isolated from the peripheral blood samples from the subjects and the expression levels of TLR9 mRNA and protein were determined by q-PCR and western blot respectively. There was no significant difference among the four groups in age, gender, nationality, domicile, marital status, educational background or duration of drug abuse (P > 0.05). The median viral loads of the Opiates HIV(+) were significantly higher than those of the Non-Opiates HIV(+) groups (4.450 x 10(3) and 3.977 x 10(3) copies/mL respectively, P < 0.05). The relative expression levels of TLR9 mRNA in the Opiates HIV(+), Non-Opiates HIV(+), Opiates HIV(-) and Control groups were (2.13 +/- 1.59) x 10(-3), (3.66 +/- 2.22) x 10(-3), (1.96 +/- 1.42) x 10(-3) and (7.66 +/- 4.87) x 10(-3), respectively. The expression of TLR9 mRNA was significantly lower in both HIV-1-infected and -uninfected groups of opiate abusers compared with groups of non-abusers (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in TLR9 mRNA expression levels between the Opiates HIV(+) group and the Opiates HIV(-) group (P > 0.05). However, in the non-opiate groups, the expression levels of TLR9 mRNA in the HIV(+) group were significantly

  14. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), transforming growth factor-β, hyaluronan (HA), and receptor for HA-mediated motility (RHAMM) are required for surfactant protein A-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Joseph P; Lam, David; Jiang, Hongmei; Liao, Jie; Cheong, Naeun; McDevitt, Theresa M; Zaman, Aisha; Wright, Jo Rae; Savani, Rashmin C

    2012-10-26

    The innate immune system protects the host from bacterial and viral invasion. Surfactant protein A (SPA), a lung-specific collectin, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis. However, the mechanisms regulating this function are unknown. Hyaluronan (HA) and its receptors RHAMM (receptor for HA-mediated motility, CD168) and CD44 also regulate cell migration and inflammation. We therefore examined the role of HA, RHAMM, and CD44 in SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis. Using antibody blockade and murine macrophages, SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis was dependent on TLR2 but not the other SPA receptors examined. Anti-TLR2 blocked SPA-induced production of TGFβ. In turn, TGFβ1-stimulated chemotaxis was inhibited by HA-binding peptide and anti-RHAMM antibody but not anti-TLR2 antibody. Macrophages from TLR2(-/-) mice failed to migrate in response to SPA but responded normally to TGFβ1 and HA, effects that were blocked by anti-RHAMM antibody. Macrophages from WT and CD44(-/-) mice had similar responses to SPA, whereas those from RHAMM(-/-) mice had decreased chemotaxis to SPA, TGFβ1, and HA. In primary macrophages, SPA-stimulated TGFβ production was dependent on TLR2, JNK, and ERK but not p38. Pam3Cys, a specific TLR2 agonist, stimulated phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, but only JNK and ERK inhibition blocked Pam3Cys-stimulated chemotaxis. We have uncovered a novel pathway for SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis where SPA stimulation via TLR2 drives JNK- and ERK-dependent TGFβ production. TGFβ1, in turn, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis in a RHAMM and HA-dependent manner. These findings are highly relevant to the regulation of innate immune responses by SPA with key roles for specific components of the extracellular matrix.

  15. Toll-like receptor 2 and 6 interdependency in the erosive stage of Staphylococcus aureus induced septic arthritis mediated by IFN-γ and IL-6--A possible involvement of IL-17 in the progression of the disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Chandrayee; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus induced septic arthritis has emerged as a potent disabling and life threatening disease; hence combating this malady has become an imperative need of medical science. Role of TLR-2 in innate recognition of S. aureus and activation of inflammatory cascade by the interplay of some proinflammatory cytokines, resulting in joint inflammation has been established. Variation in the reports suggesting both functional dependency and independency of TLR-2 on its heterodimeric partner TLR-6 in response to ligands exists, thus this study was postulated to observe the expression pattern of TLR-6 in synovial tissue and lymphoid organs after inducing septic arthritis by S. aureus in Swiss albino mouse model and the instigated cytokine profile could affirm its plausible role in SA. The functional relation of TLR-2 and 6 was verified by simulating an in vitro study design on synovial mononuclear cells, blocking TLR-2 and 6, and it was found that they are required to co-express for generating cytokine, NO and H2O2 on infection. IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-17 were identified to play a distinguished role in SA from their secretion pattern in both in vivo and in vitro study. IFN-γ and IL-6 remained high throughout the infection possibly by the shift of response from Th1 to Th2 and Th17 and contribute in various converging pathways of inflammation. IL-17 increased with the onset of the disease but reduced on the late period. Hence IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 along with TLR-6 can be a potent target for therapeutic approach because of their significant contribution in SA.

  16. A systematic review of CD14 and toll-like receptors in relation to asthma in Caucasian children.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Ester Mm; Thönissen, Brenda Ejt; van Eys, Guillaume; Dompeling, Edward; Jöbsis, Quirijn

    2013-03-15

    The aetiology of childhood asthma is complex. An early dysfunction in the immunological development of the innate immune system in combination with environmental factors possibly triggers asthma. CD14 and toll-like receptors are important components of the innate immune system. The aim of this systematic review was to obtain a better insight into the relation between CD14 and toll-like receptors and childhood asthma in Caucasians. We searched PubMed and EMBASE for relevant articles. In total, 44 articles were included. The quality of the selected studies was independently assessed by the first two authors using the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale. Toll-like receptor 2, toll-like receptor 6, toll-like receptor 9, and toll-like receptor 10 appear to have some association with childhood asthma in Caucasians. The evidence for a relation of CD14 with childhood asthma is limited. In conclusion, there is no convincing evidence yet for a role of CD14 and toll-like receptors in relation to childhood asthma. Future studies should include haplotype analysis and take environmental factors into account to further clarify the role of CD14 and toll-like receptors on childhood asthma.

  17. A push-pull vaccine strategy using Toll-like receptor ligands, IL-15, and blockade of negative regulation to improve the quality and quantity of T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Berzofsky, Jay A

    2012-06-19

    We have developed a strategy to optimize the efficacy of vaccines to induce T-cell immunity against chronic viral infections and cancer based on a "push-pull" approach in which we first optimize the antigen structure by increasing the affinity of epitopes for major histocompatibility complex molecules ("epitope enhancement"), then push the response not only in magnitude but also in quality toward the desired response phenotype, using synergistic combinations of cytokines, Toll-like receptor ligands, and costimulatory molecules, and then pull the response by removing the brakes exerted by negative regulatory mechanisms, including regulatory cells, cell surface molecules, and cytokines. Components of this approach show promise in macaque models of AIDS virus infection and in murine models of cancer, and are being developed for human clinical trials.

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist Therapy with Imidazoquinoline Enhances Cancer Cell Death and Increases Lymphocytic Infiltration and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Established Tumors of a Renal Cell Carcinoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Eric C.; Liu, Huixian; Schwartz, Michael J.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Imidazoquinolines are synthetic toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonists and potent dendritic cell activators with established anticancer activity. Here we test the hypothesis that imidazoquinoline has in vivo efficacy within established renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tumors. Immunocompetent mice bearing syngeneic RCC xenografts were treated with imidazoquinoline or placebo at two separate time points. Harvested tumors were assayed by TUNEL/caspase-3/Ki67 immunostains to evaluate cell death/apoptosis/proliferation, and CD3/B220/CD45 immunostains to evaluate T-cell lymphocyte/B-cell lymphocyte/pan-leukocyte tumor infiltration. ELISA measurement of tumor and serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1, was performed. A single imidazoquinoline dose significantly decreased RCC tumor growth by 50% and repeat dosing compounded the effect, without observed weight loss or other toxicity. Tumor immunostaining revealed significant increases in cell death and apoptosis without changes in cell proliferation, supporting induction of apoptosis as the primary mechanism of tumor growth suppression. Imidazoquinoline treatment also significantly enhanced peritumoral aggregation and intratumoral infiltration by T-cell lymphocytes, while increasing intratumoral (but not serum) levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, imidazoquinoline treatment enhances T-cell lymphocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine production within established mouse RCC tumors, while suppressing tumor growth via induction of cancer cell apoptosis. These findings support a therapeutic role for imidazoquinoline in RCC. PMID:22481916

  19. Myeloid cell leukaemia 1 has a vital role in retinoic acid-mediated protection of Toll-like receptor 9-stimulated B cells from spontaneous and DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Kristine L; Indrevaer, Randi L; Myklebust, June Helen; Kolstad, Arne; Moskaug, Jan Øivind; Naderi, Elin H; Blomhoff, Heidi K

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin A is an essential anti-infective agent with pleiotropic effects on cells of the immune system. The goal of the present study was to unravel the impact of the vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) on B-cell survival related both to normal B-cell homeostasis and to the detrimental effects imposed by DNA-damaging agents. By combining RA with Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) ligands, we show that RA prevents spontaneous, irradiation- and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis of human B cells in an RA receptor-dependent manner. RA-mediated survival involved up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL1) at the transcriptional level, and knock down of MCL1 by small interfering RNA partially reversed the effects of RA. To ensure that the combination of TLR9-ligands and RA would not promote the survival of malignant B cells, the combined effects of stimulation with RA and TLR9 ligands was assessed on cells from patients with B-cell malignancies. In contrast to the effects on normal B cells, the combination of TLR9 stimulation and RA neither enhanced the MCL1 levels nor inhibited the death of malignant B cells challenged by DNA-damaging agents. Taken together, the present results reveal a vital role of MCL1 in RA-mediated survival of normal B cells. Moreover, the findings suggest that RA in combination with TLR9 ligands might be useful adjuvants in the treatment of B-cell malignancies by selectively protecting normal and not malignant B cells from DNA-damage-induced cell death.

  20. Nfkb1 activation by the E26 transformation-specific transcription factors PU.1 and Spi-B promotes Toll-like receptor-mediated splenic B cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Stephen K H; Abbas, Ali K; Solomon, Lauren A; Groux, Gaëlle M N; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2015-05-01

    Generation of antibodies against T-independent and T-dependent antigens requires Toll-like receptor (TLR) engagement on B cells for efficient responses. However, the regulation of TLR expression and responses in B cells is not well understood. PU.1 and Spi-B (encoded by Sfpi1 and Spib, respectively) are transcription factors of the E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family and are important for B cell development and function. It was found that B cells from mice knocked out for Spi-B and heterozygous for PU.1 (Sfpi1(+/-) Spib(-/-) [PUB] mice) proliferated poorly in response to TLR ligands compared to wild-type (WT) B cells. The NF-κB family member p50 (encoded by Nfkb1) is required for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness in mice. PUB B cells expressed reduced Nfkb1 mRNA transcripts and p50 protein. The Nfkb1 promoter was regulated directly by PU.1 and Spi-B, as shown by reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Occupancy of the Nfkb1 promoter by PU.1 was reduced in PUB B cells compared to that in WT B cells. Finally, infection of PUB B cells with a retroviral vector encoding p50 substantially restored proliferation in response to LPS. We conclude that Nfkb1 transcriptional activation by PU.1 and Spi-B promotes TLR-mediated B cell proliferation.

  1. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  2. Toll-like Receptor 4 in CNS Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Madison M.; Hutchinson, Mark; Watkins, Linda R.; Yin, Hang

    2010-01-01

    The responses of the brain to infection, ischemia and trauma share remarkable similarities. These and other conditions of the CNS coordinate an innate immune response marked by activation of microglia, the macrophage-like cells of the nervous system. An important contributor to microglial activation is toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor known to initiate an inflammatory cascade in response to various CNS stimuli. The present review traces new efforts to characterize and control the contribution of TLR4 to inflammatory etiologies of the nervous system. PMID:20402965

  3. Therapeutic potential of Toll-like receptor 9 activation.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Arthur M

    2006-06-01

    In the decade since the discovery that mouse B cells respond to certain unmethylated CpG dinucleotides in bacterial DNA, a specific receptor for these 'CpG motifs' has been identified, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), and a new approach to immunotherapy has moved into the clinic based on the use of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) as TLR9 agonists. This review highlights the current understanding of the mechanism of action of these CpG ODN, and provides an overview of the preclinical data and early human clinical trial results using these drugs to improve vaccines and treat cancer, infectious disease and allergy/asthma. PMID:16763660

  4. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling molecules in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ariz; Masir, Noraidah; Elyamany, Ghaleb; Phang, Kean-Chang; Mahe, Etienne; Al-Zahrani, Ali Matar; Shabani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Stewart, Douglas Allan; Mansoor, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS DLBCL) is a distinct and aggressive lymphoma that is confined to CNS. Since, central nervous system is barrier-protected and immunologically silent; role of TLR/BCR signaling in pathogenesis and biology of CNS DLBCL is intriguing. Genomic mutations in key regulators of TLR/BCR signaling pathway (MYD88/CD79B/CARD11) have recently been reported in this disease. These observations raised possible implications in novel targeted therapies; however, expression pattern of molecules related to TLR/BCR pathways in this lymphoma remains unknown. We have analyzed the expression of 19 genes encoding TLR/BCR pathways and targets in CNS DLBCLs (n = 20) by Nanostring nCounter™ analysis and compared it with expression patterns in purified reactive B-lymphocytes and systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 20). Relative expression of TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, CD79B and BLNK was higher in CNS DLBCLs than in control B-lymphocytes; where as TLR7, MALT1, BCL10, CD79A and LYN was lower in CNS DLBCLs (P < 0.0001). When compared with systemic DLBCL samples, higher expression of TLR9, CD79B, CARD11, LYN and BLNK was noted in CNS DLBCL (>1.5 fold change; P < 0.01). The B cell receptor molecules like BLNK and CD79B were also associated with higher expression of MYD88 dependent TLRs (TLR4/5/9). In conclusion, we have shown over expression of TLR/BCR related genes or their targets, where genomic mutations have commonly been identified in CNS DLBCL. We have also demonstrated that TLR over expression closely relate with up regulation of genes associated with BCR pathway like CD79B/BLNK and CARD11, which play an important role in NF-kB pathway activation. Our results provide an important insight into the possibility of TLR and/or B-cell receptor signaling molecules as possible therapeutic targets in CNS DLBCL. PMID:25391967

  5. Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 p30, but not p12/p8, counteracts toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR4 signaling in human monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fenizia, Claudio; Fiocchi, Martina; Jones, Kathryn; Parks, Robyn Washington; Ceribelli, Michele; Chevalier, Sebastien A; Edwards, Dustin; Ruscetti, Francis; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2014-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) p30 protein, essential for virus infectivity in vivo, is required for efficient infection of human dendritic cells (DCs) but not B and T cells in vitro. We used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, and dendritic cells to study the mechanism of p30 and p12/p8 requirements in these cell types. p30 inhibited the expression of interferon (IFN)-responsive genes (ISG) following stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and by poly(I·C) of TLR3 but not of TLR7/8 with imiquimod. Results with THP-1 mirrored those for ex vivo human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-mDC). The effect of p30 on TLR signaling was also demonstrated by ablating its expression within a molecular clone of HTLV-1. HTLV-1 infection of monocytes inhibited TLR3- and TLR4-induced ISG expression by 50 to 90% depending on the genes, whereas the isogenic clone p30 knockout virus was less effective at inhibiting TLR3 and TRL4 signaling and displayed lower infectivity. Viral expression and inhibition of ISG transcription was, however, rescued by restoration of p30 expression. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that p30 inhibits initiation and elongation of PU.1-dependent transcription of IFN-α1, IFN-β, and TLR4 genes upon TLR stimulation. In contrast, experiments conducted with p12/p8 did not demonstrate an effect on ISG expression. These results provide a mechanistic explanation of the requirement of p30 for HTLV-1 infectivity in vivo, suggest that dampening interferon responses in monocytes and DCs is specific for p30, and represent an essential early step for permissive HTLV-1 infection and persistence.

  6. RNA Interference of Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Gene Expression in THP-1 Cell Line Leads to Toll-Like Receptor-4 Overexpression/Activation As Well As Up-modulation of Annexin-II1

    PubMed Central

    Maratheftis, Christos I; Giannouli, Stavroula; Spachidou, Maria P; Panayotou, George; Voulgarelis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a candidate transcription factor for the regulation of the Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) gene. Using a small interfering RNA-based (siRNA) process to silence IRF-1 gene expression in the leukemic monocytic cell line THP-1, we investigated whether such a modulation would alter TLR-4 expression and activation status in these cells. The siIRF-1 cells expressed elevated levels of TLR-4 mRNA and protein compared to controls by 90% and 77%, respectively. ICAM.1 protein expression and apoptosis levels were increased by 8.35- and 4.25-fold, respectively. The siIRF-1 cells overexpressed Bax mRNA compared to controls. Proteomic analysis revealed upmodulation of the Annexin-II protein in siIRF-1 THP-1 cells. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with an absence of full-length IRF-1 mRNA also overexpressed Annexin-II. It is plausible that this overexpression may lead to the activation of TLR-4 contributing to the increased apoptosis characterizing MDS. PMID:18084608

  7. CD14 Mediates Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Endocytosis and Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) and Interferon Regulatory Transcription Factor 3 (IRF3) Activation in Epithelial Cells and Impairs Neutrophil Infiltration and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Killing in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sanhita; Karmakar, Mausita; Pearlman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the role of CD14 in regulating LPS activation of corneal epithelial cells and Pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal infection. Our findings demonstrate that LPS induces Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) internalization in corneal epithelial cells and that blocking with anti-CD14 selectively inhibits TLR4 endocytosis, spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and IRF3 phosphorylation, and production of CCL5/RANTES and IFN-β, but not IL-8. Using a murine model of P. aeruginosa corneal infection, we show that although infected CD14−/− corneas produce less CCL5, they exhibit significantly increased CXC chemokine production, neutrophil recruitment to the corneal stroma, and bacterial clearance than C57BL/6 mice. We conclude that CD14 has a critical role in mediating TLR4 signaling through IRF3 in resident corneal epithelial cells and macrophages and thereby modulates TLR4 cell surface activation of the MyD88/NF-κB/AP-1 pathway and production of CXC chemokines and neutrophil infiltration to infected tissues. PMID:24275652

  8. Expression of toll-like receptors by human muscle cells in vitro and in vivo: TLR3 is highly expressed in inflammatory and HIV myopathies, mediates IL-8 release and up-regulation of NKG2D-ligands.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Bettina; Voss, Joachim; Wischhusen, Jörg; Dombrowski, Yvonne; Steinle, Alexander; Lochmüller, Hanns; Dalakas, Marinos; Melms, Arthur; Wiendl, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    The particular microenvironment of the skeletal muscle can be the site of complex immune reactions. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate inflammatory stimuli from pathogens and endogenous danger signals and link the innate and adaptive immune system. We investigated innate immune responses in human muscle. Analyzing TLR1-9 mRNA in cultured myoblasts and rhabdomyosarcoma cells, we found constitutive expression of TLR3. The TLR3 ligand Poly (I:C), a synthetic analog of dsRNA, and IFN-gamma increased TLR3 levels. TLR3 was mainly localized intracellularly and regulated at the protein level. Poly (I:C) challenge 1) activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), 2) increased IL-8 release, and 3) up-regulated NKG2D ligands and NK-cell-mediated lysis of muscle cells. We examined muscle biopsy specimens of 6 HIV patients with inclusion body myositis/polymyositis (IBM/PM), 7 cases of sporadic IBM and 9 nonmyopathic controls for TLR3 expression. TLR3 mRNA levels were elevated in biopsy specimens from patients with IBM and HIV-myopathies. Muscle fibers in inflammatory myopathies expressed TLR3 in close proximity of infiltrating mononuclear cells. Taken together, our study suggests an important role of TLR3 in the immunobiology of muscle, and has substantial implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies or therapeutic interventions like vaccinations or gene transfer.

  9. Pleiotropic Effects of Blastocystis spp. Subtypes 4 and 7 on Ligand-Specific Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and NF-κB Activation in a Human Monocyte Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Joshua D. W.; MacAry, Paul A.; Tan, Kevin S. W.

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis spp. is a common enteric stramenopile parasite that colonizes the colon of hosts of a diverse array of species, including humans. It has been shown to compromise intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity and mediate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Mucosal epithelial surfaces, including the intestinal epithelium, are increasingly recognized to perform a vital surveillance role in the context of innate immunity, through the expression of pathogen recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). In this study, we use the human TLR reporter monocytic cell line, THP1-Blue, which expresses all human TLRs, to investigate effects of Blastocystis on TLR activation, more specifically the activation of TLR-2, -4 and -5. We have observed that live Blastocystis spp. parasites and whole cell lysate (WCL) alone do not activate TLRs in THP1-Blue. Live ST4-WR1 parasites inhibited LPS-mediated NF-κB activation in THP1-Blue. In contrast, ST7-B WCL and ST4-WR1 WCL induced pleiotropic modulation of ligand-specific TLR-2 and TLR-4 activation, with no significant effects on flagellin-mediated TLR-5 activation. Real time-qPCR analysis on SEAP reporter gene confirmed the augmenting effect of ST7-B on LPS-mediated NF-κB activation in THP1-Blue. Taken together, this is the first study to characterize interactions between Blastocystis spp. and host TLR activation using an in vitro reporter model. PMID:24551212

  10. Toll-like receptors and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kesar, Vivek; Odin, Joseph A

    2014-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that play an important role in host defence by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP). Recent studies indicate that TLR signalling plays an important role in progression of chronic liver diseases. Ongoing clinical trials suggest that therapeutic manipulation of TLR pathways may offer novel means of reversing chronic liver diseases. Upon activation by their respective ligands, TLRs initiate an intracellular pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory signalling cascade via recruitment of various adaptor proteins. TLR associated signalling pathways are tightly regulated to keep a check on inappropriate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferons thereby preventing various autoimmune and inflammatory processes. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge of hepatic distribution, signalling pathways and therapeutic modulation of TLRs in chronic liver diseases. PMID:24118797

  11. High-dose irradiation in combination with toll-like receptor 9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 7909 downregulates PD-L1 expression via the NF-κB signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Zhang, Qi; Luo, Youjun; Gao, Caixia; Zhuang, Xibing; Xu, Guoxiong; Qiao, Tiankui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Irradiation resistance appears as local recurrence and distant metastasis in advanced stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). High-dose irradiation combined with immunotherapy improved overall survival and local control of NSCLC. This study explored the underlying molecular mechanism by which the effect of high-dose irradiation plus toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN) 7909 on NSCLC. Materials and methods NSCLC H460 cells were exposed to constant high-dose irradiation (6.37 Gy) in irradiation (IR) group and the irradiation plus CpG group. Gene expression was assessed using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Knockdown of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 expression was conducted using p65 siRNA. Results Expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) mRNA was significantly decreased in IR combined with CpG ODN 7909 group compared with the control or IR-alone groups (P<0.05). TLR9 expression was also obviously increased in the combination group compared with the control (P<0.05). Moreover, expression of NF-κB p65 was apparently reduced in the combination group compared with the control (P<0.05). However, expression of PD-L1 was significantly decreased after knockdown of p65 in IR group (P<0.05), but increased in the combination group (P<0.05) and slightly increased in CpG ODN-alone group (P<0.05), which was opposite to that without p65 knockdown group. Conclusion This study demonstrated that radiotherapy combined with CpG ODN 7909 was able to downregulate PD-L1 expression through inhibition via the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27799798

  12. MicroRNA-146a-5p Negatively Regulates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and Cell Activation in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhan; Zeng, Zhaochong; Shen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Zhifeng; Dong, Yinying; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is demonstrated to be involved in the hepatic fibrosis. MicroRNA (miR)-146a-5p is a key regulator of the innate immune response. The functional significance of miR-146a-5p during the LPS/TLR4 mediated hepatic fibrosis process remains unclear. In this study, we found that TLR4 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were up-regulated and miR-146a-5p was down-regulated in human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) line LX2 after LPS stimulation. Overexpression of miR-146a-5p inhibited LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion through down-regulating the expression levels of TLR-4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), TNF receptor associated factor-6 (TRAF6) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Knockdown of IRAK1 and TRAF6 also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation. In addition, miR-146a-5p mimic blocked LPS induced TRAF6 dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smad2 activation as well as α-SMA production. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-146a-5p suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and cell activation of HSC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TLR4/TRAF6/JNK pathway. PMID:27399683

  13. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway and production of type I interferon in spleen cells from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueqin; Xie, Zhijun; Liu, Fenfen; Han, Chunwen; Zhang, Dongyu; Wang, Dawei; Bao, Xi; Sun, Jing; Wen, Chengping; Fan, Yongsheng

    2014-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by various immunological abnormalities. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a metabolite of artemisinin, has been recently reported to exhibit immunosuppressive properties. The present study aims to determine the effects of DHA on spleen cell activation triggered by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and investigate the effects of DHA on LPS-induced activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/interferon regulatory factor (IRF) signaling pathway. Spleen cells from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice were isolated, prepared and cultured. Cells were treated with LPS alone or LPS with DHA, and spleen cell proliferation was analyzed using MTS assay. Protein expressions of TLR4, IRF3, and IRF7 were analyzed by Western blot. IRF3 phosphorylation was also determined. Gene expression levels of IFN-α and IFN-β were measured using real-time PCR, and protein levels in cells' supernatants were determined by ELISA. DHA was found to inhibit LPS-induced spleen cell proliferation, decrease LPS-induced protein expression of TLR4, and inhibit IRF3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, LPS significantly induced IRF3 expression and slightly increased IRF7 expression in the nucleus of spleen cells, which was accompanied by enhanced IFN-α and IFN-β production. DHA inhibited the effects of LPS in spleen cells of MRL/lpr mice. Taken together, the data obtained reveal that DHA inhibits LPS-induced cell activation possibly by suppressing the TLR4/IRF/IFN pathway in spleen cells of MRL/lpr mice. These data suggest that DHA has the potential therapeutic utility for the treatment of SLE.

  14. Toll-like Receptor 4 and MyD88 Dependent Signaling Mechanisms of the Innate Immune System are Essential for the Response to Lipopolysaccharide by Epithelial and Stromal Cells of the Bovine Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, James G; Turner, Matthew L; Goetze, Leopold; Bryant, Clare E; Sheldon, I Martin

    2015-01-01

    Infection of the bovine endometrium with Gram-negative bacteria commonly causes uterine disease. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on cells of the immune system bind Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stimulating the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and the chemokine IL-8. As the endometrium is the first barrier to infection of the uterus, the signaling cascade triggered by LPS and the subsequent expression of inflammatory mediators was investigated in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and the key pathways identified using short interfering RNA (siRNA) and biochemical inhibitors. Treatment of endometrial cells with ultrapure LPS stimulated an inflammatory response characterized by increased IL1B, IL6 and IL8 mRNA expression, and IL-6 protein accumulation in epithelial cells; and increased IL1B and IL8 mRNA expression, and IL-6 and IL-8 protein accumulation in stromal cells. Treatment of endometrial cells with LPS also induced the degradation of IκB and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, as well as rapid phosphorylation of MAPK3/1 and MAPK14. Knockdown of TLR4 or its signaling adaptor molecule, MYD88, using siRNA reduced the inflammatory response to LPS in epithelial and stromal cells. Biochemical inhibition of MAPK3/1, but not JNK, or MAPK14, reduced LPS-induced IL1B, IL6 and IL8 expression in endometrial cells. In conclusion, epithelial and stromal cells have an intrinsic role in innate immune surveillance in the endometrium, and in the case of LPS this recognition occurs via TLR4 and MyD88 dependent cell signaling pathways. PMID:22053092

  15. Chloroquine inhibits MGC803 gastric cancer cell migration via the Toll-like receptor 9/nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Li, Yunhong; Li, Yalan; Li, Rui; Ma, Yajun; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yin

    2015-02-01

    Stimulation of Toll‑like receptor 9 (TLR9) has been associated with invasion in various types of cancer cell in vitro. The present study aimed to evaluate the expression of TLR9 in MGC803 gastric cancer cells and investigate the effect of a non‑specific TLR9 inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ), on MGC803 cell migration via the TLR9/nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling pathway. The expression of TLR9 was investigated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR), flow cytometry and western blot analysis. The effects of CQ on MGC803 cell proliferation were measured by MTT colorimetric assay. The mRNA expression levels of cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2, MMP‑7 and NFκB p65 were evaluated by RT‑PCR in MGC803 cells stimulated by various concentrations of CQ. The migration of gastric cancer cells treated with CQ at 12, 24 and 36 h was measured by wound healing assay. The results indicated that MGC803 cells expressed TLR9 and that CQ had anti‑proliferative effects on MGC803 cells and inhibited mRNA expression of COX‑2, MMP‑2, MMP‑7 and NFκB p65 (P<0.05). Furthermore, CQ inhibited the bioactivity of NFκB p65 and prevented the migration of MGC803 cells in a dose‑dependent manner (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results indicated that the TLR9/NFκB signaling pathway was involved in gastric cancer cell migration and that CQ had anti‑tumor activity. PMID:25369757

  16. Activation of adult rat CNS endothelial cells by opioid-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling induces proinflammatory, biochemical, morphological, and behavioral sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Peter M.; Ramos, Khara M.; Rodgers, Krista M.; Wang, Xiaohui; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Lewis, Makenzie T.; Morgan, Kelly N.; Kroll, Juliet L.; Taylor, Frederick R.; Strand, Keith A.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra; Huey, Madeline G.; Greene, Lisa I.; Cochran, Thomas A.; Yin, Hang; Barth, Daniel S.; Johnson, Kirk W.; Rice, Kenner; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    CNS immune signaling contributes to deleterious opioid effects including hyperalgesia, tolerance, reward, and dependence/withdrawal. Such effects are mediated by opioid signaling at TLR4, presumptively of glial origin. Whether CNS endothelial cells express TLR4 is controversial. If so, they would be well positioned for activation by blood-borne opioids, contributing to opioid-induced pro-inflammatory responses. These studies examined adult primary rat CNS endothelial cell responses to (-)-morphine or its mu-opioid receptor (MOR) inactive metabolite morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), both known TLR4 agonists. We demonstrate that adult rat CNS endothelial cells express functional TLR4. M3G activated NFκB, increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) mRNAs, and released prostaglandin E2 from these cells. (-)-Morphine-induced upregulation of TNFα mRNA and prostaglandin E2 release were unmasked by pre-treatment with nalmefene, a MOR antagonist without TLR4 activity (unlike CTAP, shown to have both MOR- and TLR4-activity), suggestive of an interplay between MOR and TLR4 co-activation by (-)-morphine. In support, MOR-dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA) opposed TLR4 signaling, as PKA inhibition (H-89) also unmasked (-)-morphine-induced TNFα and COX2 mRNA upregulation. Intrathecal injection of CNS endothelial cells, stimulated in vitro with M3G, produced TLR4-dependent tactile allodynia. Further, cortical suffusion with M3G in vivo induced TLR4-dependent vasodilation. Finally, endothelial cell TLR4 activation by lipopolysaccharide and/or M3G was blocked by the glial inhibitors AV1013 and propentofylline, demonstrating endothelial cells as a new target of such drugs. These data indicate that (-)-morphine and M3G can activate CNS endothelial cells via TLR4, inducing proinflammatory, biochemical, morphological, and behavioral sequalae. CNS endothelial cells may have previously unanticipated roles in opioid-induced effects, in phenomena blocked by

  17. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Drives Differentiation of Human and Murine Dendritic Cells from a Pro- into an Anti-Inflammatory Mode

    PubMed Central

    Luger, Romana; Valookaran, Sneha; Knapp, Natalie; Vizzardelli, Caterina; Dohnal, Alexander M.; Felzmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The dendritic cell (DC) coordinates innate and adaptive immunity to fight infections and cancer. Our observations reveal that DCs exposed to the microbial danger signal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) acquire a continuously changing activation/maturation phenotype. The DCs’ initial mode of action is pro-inflammatory via up-regulation among others of the signaling molecule interleukin (IL) 12, which polarizes IFN-γ secreting type 1 helper T-cells (Th1). Within 24 hours the same DC switches from the pro- into an anti-inflammatory phenotype. This is mediated by autocrine IL-10 release and secretion of soluble IL-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2RA) molecules. T-cells, when contacted with DCs during their anti-inflammatory phase loose their proliferative capacity and develop regulatory T-cell (Treg) -like anti-inflammatory functions indicated by IL-10 secretion and elevated FoxP3 levels. Studying the kinetics of IL-12 and IL-10 expression from LPS/IFN-γ activated myeloid DCs on a single cell level confirmed these observations. When T-cells are separated from DCs within 24 hours, they are spared from the anti-inflammatory DC activity. We conclude that, in addition to differentiation of DCs into distinct subsets, the observed sequential functional phases of DC differentiation permit the fine-tuning of an immune response. A better understanding of time-kinetic DC features is required for optimally exploiting the therapeutic capacity of DCs in cancer immune therapy. PMID:23408948

  18. HIV Gag protein conjugated to a Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist improves the magnitude and quality of Th1 and CD8+ T cell responses in nonhuman primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille-Reece, Ulrike; Flynn, Barbara J.; Loré, Karin; Koup, Richard A.; Kedl, Ross M.; Mattapallil, Joseph J.; Weiss, Walter R.; Roederer, Mario; Seder, Robert A.

    2005-10-01

    Induction and maintenance of antibody and T cell responses will be critical for developing a successful vaccine against HIV. A rational approach for generating such responses is to design vaccines or adjuvants that have the capacity to activate specific antigen-presenting cells. In this regard, dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells for generating primary T cell responses. Here, we report that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists and ligands that activate DCs in vitro influence the magnitude and quality of the cellular immune response in nonhuman primates (NHPs) when administered with HIV Gag protein. NHPs immunized with HIV Gag protein and a TLR7/8 agonist or a TLR9 ligand [CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN)] had significantly increased Gag-specific T helper 1 and antibody responses, compared with animals immunized with HIV Gag protein alone. Importantly, conjugating the HIV Gag protein to the TLR7/8 agonist (Gag-TLR7/8 conjugate) dramatically enhanced the magnitude and altered the quality of the T helper 1 response, compared with animals immunized with HIV Gag protein and the TLR7/8 agonist or CpG ODN. Furthermore, immunization with the Gag-TLR7/8 conjugate vaccine elicited Gag-specific CD8+ T responses. Collectively, our results show that conjugating HIV Gag protein to a TLR7/8 agonist is an effective way to elicit broad-based adaptive immunity in NHPs. This type of vaccine formulation should have utility in preventive or therapeutic vaccines in which humoral and cellular immunity is required. vaccine | dendritic cell | cross-presentation | cellular immunity

  19. Modulation of Female Genital Tract-Derived Dendritic Cell Migration and Activation in Response to Inflammatory Cytokines and Toll-Like Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Shey, Muki S.; Maharaj, Niren; Archary, Derseree; Ngcapu, Sinaye; Garrett, Nigel; Abdool Karim, Salim; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.

    2016-01-01

    HIV transmission across the genital mucosa is a major mode of new HIV infections in women. The probability of infection may be influenced by several factors including recruitment and activation of HIV target cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs) and cytokine production, associated with genital inflammation. We evaluated the role of inflammatory cytokines and TLR signaling in migration and activation of genital tract DCs in the human cervical explant model. Hysterectomy tissues from 10 HIV-negative and 7 HIV-positive donor women were separated into ecto- and endocervical explants, and incubated with inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, MIP-1β) or agonists for TLR4 (LPS), TLR2/1 (PAM3) and TLR7/8 (R848). Migration (frequency) and activation (HLA-DR expression) of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs and Langerhans cells were measured by flow cytometry. We observed that cytokines, LPS and PAM3 induced activation of migrating myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs. LPS induced a 3.6 fold lower levels of migration of plasmacytoid DCs from HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women (median activation indices of 2.932 vs 0.833). There was however a 4.5 fold increase in migration of Langerhans cells in HIV-infected compared with HIV-uninfected women in response to cytokines (median activation indices of 3.539 vs 0.77). Only TLR agonists induced migration and activation of DCs from endocervical explants. Hormonal contraception use was associated with an increase in activation of DC subsets in the endo and ectocervical explants. We conclude that inflammatory signals in the female genital tract induced DC migration and activation, with possible important implications for HIV susceptibility of cervical tissues. PMID:27171482

  20. Lignin-rich Enzyme Lignin (LREL), a Cellulase-treated Lignin-Carbohydrate Derived from Plants, Activates Myeloid Dendritic Cells via Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Ryohei; Koizumi, Hideki; Aoki, Dan; Watanabe, Yuta; Sugihara, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Lignin-carbohydrates, one of the major cell wall components, are believed to be the structures that form chemical linkage between lignin and cell wall polysaccharides. Due to the molecular complexity of lignin-containing substances, their isolation and the assignment of their biological activities have so far remained a difficult task. Here, we extracted two lignin-containing carbohydrates, lignin-rich enzyme lignin (LREL) and pure enzyme lignin (PEL), from barley husk and demonstrated that they act as immune stimulators of dendritic cells (DCs), which are particularly important in linking innate and adaptive immunity. Thioacidolysis, acid hydrolysis, and mild alkali hydrolysis of both LREL and PEL revealed that their immunostimulatory activities depended on the lignin structure and/or content, neutral sugar content (especially the characteristic distribution of galactose and mannose), and presence of an ester bond. Furthermore, we showed that the immunostimulatory potency of the lignin-carbohydrate depended on its molecular weight and degree of polymerization. We also demonstrated that the LREL-induced activation of DCs was mediated via TLR4. Thus, LREL-induced increases in the expression levels of several cell surface marker proteins, production of inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 and TNF-α, and activation and nuclear translocation of transcription factors, as was observed in the WT DCs, were completely abrogated in DCs derived from the TLR4−/− mice but not in DCs derived from the TLR2−/−, TLR7−/−, and TLR9−/− mice. We further demonstrated that LRELs isolated from other plant tissues also activated DCs. These immunostimulatory activities of lignin-carbohydrates, extracted from edible plant tissues, could have potential relevance in anti-infectious immunity and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25548274

  1. Toll-like receptors are key players in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Daniela S.; Soria, Javier A.; Gaviglio, Emilia A.; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C.; Iribarren, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The activation of innate immune response is initiated by engagement of pattern-recognition receptors (PPRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These receptors are expressed in peripheral leukocytes and in many cell types in the central nervous system (CNS). The expression of TLRs in CNS was mainly studied in astrocytes and microglial cells. However, new evidence indicates that these receptors may play an important role in neuronal homeostasis. The expression of TLRs in the CNS is variable and can be modulated by multiple factors, including pro-inflammatory molecules, which are elevated in neurodegenerative diseases and can increase the expression of TLRs in CNS cells. Moreover, activation of TLRs induces the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, TLRs have been shown to play a role in several aspects of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we will discuss results reported in the recent literature concerning the participation of TLRs in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21616174

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mediates Endothelial Cell Activation Through NF-κB but Is Not Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Menghini, Rossella; Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Marino, Arianna; Rovella, Valentina; Rodia, Giuseppe; Schinzari, Francesca; Tolusso, Barbara; di Daniele, Nicola; Federici, Massimo; Zoli, Angelo; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Cardillo, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of TLR4 antagonism on human endothelial cells activation and cytokine expression, and whether the Asp299Gly TLR4 polymorphism is associated with better endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), OxPAPC, and free fatty acids (FFA) at baseline and after incubation with the TLR4 antagonist eritoran (E5564). Cytokine expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. In vivo endothelial function was assessed as brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in RA patients with the wild type gene (aa) and with the Asp299Gly TLR4 polymorphic variant (ag). Results In HAEC, TLR4 antagonism with eritoran inhibited LPS-induced mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, CCL-2, VCAM and ICAM (P<0.05 for all) and inhibited Ox-PAPC-induced mRNA expression of IL-8 (P<0.05) and IL-6, albeit not to a statistically significant level (p = 0.07). In contrast, eritoran did not affect FFA-induced mRNA expression of IL-6 (P>0.05). In 30 patients with RA (15 with the ag allele) undergoing measurement of FMD, no differences in FMD and plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8, VCAM, and ICAM were found between the aa and the ag phenotype (P>0.05 for all). Conclusions TLR4 signaling in endothelial cells may be triggered by LPS and oxidized phospholipids, leading to endothelial activation and inflammation, which are inhibited by eritoran. Our in vivo investigation, however, does not support an association between the Asp299Gly TLR4 polymorphism and improved endothelium-dependent vasodilator function in patients with RA. Further study is needed to better understand the potential role of TLR4 on endothelial dysfunction in this and other patient populations. PMID:24918924

  3. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 licenses Toll-like receptor 4-dependent interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 production via IL-6 receptor-positive feedback in endometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J G; Kanamarlapudi, V; Thornton, C A; Sheldon, I M

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6), acting via the IL-6 receptor (IL6R) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), limits neutrophil recruitment once bacterial infections are resolved. Bovine endometritis is an exemplar mucosal disease, characterized by sustained neutrophil infiltration and elevated IL-6 and IL-8, a neutrophil chemoattractant, following postpartum Gram-negative bacterial infection. The present study examined the impact of the IL6R/STAT3 signaling pathway on IL-8 production by primary endometrial cells in response to short- or long-term exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. Tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is required for DNA binding and expression of specific targets genes. Immunoblotting indicated constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in endometrial cells was impeded by acute exposure to LPS. After 24 h exposure to LPS, STAT3 returned to a tyrosine phosphorylated state, indicating cross-talk between the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the IL6R/STAT3 signaling pathways. This was confirmed by short interfering RNA targeting the IL6R, which abrogated the accumulation of IL-6 and IL-8, induced by LPS. Furthermore, there was a differential endometrial cell response, as the accumulation of IL-6 and IL-8 was dependent on STAT3, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, and Src kinase signaling in stromal cells, but not epithelial cells. In conclusion, positive feedback through the IL6R amplifies LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production in the endometrium. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into how elevated IL-6 concentrations in the postpartum endometrium during bacterial infection leads to marked and sustained neutrophil infiltration. PMID:26813342

  4. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 licenses Toll-like receptor 4-dependent interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 production via IL-6 receptor-positive feedback in endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, J G; Kanamarlapudi, V; Thornton, C A; Sheldon, I M

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6), acting via the IL-6 receptor (IL6R) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), limits neutrophil recruitment once bacterial infections are resolved. Bovine endometritis is an exemplar mucosal disease, characterized by sustained neutrophil infiltration and elevated IL-6 and IL-8, a neutrophil chemoattractant, following postpartum Gram-negative bacterial infection. The present study examined the impact of the IL6R/STAT3 signaling pathway on IL-8 production by primary endometrial cells in response to short- or long-term exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. Tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is required for DNA binding and expression of specific targets genes. Immunoblotting indicated constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in endometrial cells was impeded by acute exposure to LPS. After 24 h exposure to LPS, STAT3 returned to a tyrosine phosphorylated state, indicating cross-talk between the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the IL6R/STAT3 signaling pathways. This was confirmed by short interfering RNA targeting the IL6R, which abrogated the accumulation of IL-6 and IL-8, induced by LPS. Furthermore, there was a differential endometrial cell response, as the accumulation of IL-6 and IL-8 was dependent on STAT3, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, and Src kinase signaling in stromal cells, but not epithelial cells. In conclusion, positive feedback through the IL6R amplifies LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production in the endometrium. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into how elevated IL-6 concentrations in the postpartum endometrium during bacterial infection leads to marked and sustained neutrophil infiltration. PMID:26813342

  5. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Shows That SAV-3 Infection Upregulates Pattern Recognition Receptors of the Endosomal Toll-Like and RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways in Macrophage/Dendritic Like TO-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng; Evensen, Øystein; Mweemba, Hetron Munang’andu

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental step in cellular defense mechanisms is the recognition of “danger signals” made of conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed by invading pathogens, by host cell germ line coded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this study, we used RNA-seq and the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) to identify PRRs together with the network pathway of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that recognize salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3) infection in macrophage/dendritic like TO-cells derived from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) headkidney leukocytes. Our findings show that recognition of SAV-3 in TO-cells was restricted to endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3 and 8 together with RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and not the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors NOD-like receptor (NLRs) genes. Among the RLRs, upregulated genes included the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I), melanoma differentiation association 5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2). The study points to possible involvement of the tripartite motif containing 25 (TRIM25) and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) in modulating RIG-I signaling being the first report that links these genes to the RLR pathway in SAV-3 infection in TO-cells. Downstream signaling suggests that both the TLR and RLR pathways use interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 to produce IFN-a2. The validity of RNA-seq data generated in this study was confirmed by quantitative real time qRT-PCR showing that genes up- or downregulated by RNA-seq were also up- or downregulated by RT-PCR. Overall, this study shows that de novo transcriptome assembly identify key receptors of the TLR and RLR sensors engaged in host pathogen interaction at cellular level. We envisage that data presented here can open a road map for future intervention strategies in SAV infection of salmon. PMID:27110808

  6. A Novel Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist, MGN1703, Enhances HIV-1 Transcription and NK Cell-Mediated Inhibition of HIV-1-Infected Autologous CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Sara Konstantin; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Østergaard, Lars; Denton, Paul W.; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are potent enhancers of innate antiviral immunity and may also reverse HIV-1 latency. Therefore, TLR agonists have a potential role in the context of a “shock-and-kill” approach to eradicate HIV-1. Our extensive preclinical evaluation suggests that a novel TLR9 agonist, MGN1703, may indeed perform both functions in an HIV-1 eradication trial. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from aviremic HIV-1-infected donors on antiretroviral therapy (ART) that were incubated with MGN1703 ex vivo exhibited increased secretion of interferon alpha (IFN-α) (P = 0.005) and CXCL10 (P = 0.0005) in culture supernatants. Within the incubated PBMC pool, there were higher proportions of CD69-positive CD56dim CD16+ NK cells (P = 0.001) as well as higher proportions of CD107a-positive (P = 0.002) and IFN-γ-producing (P = 0.038) NK cells. Incubation with MGN1703 also increased the proportions of CD69-expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, CD4+ T cells within the pool of MGN1703-incubated PBMCs showed enhanced levels of unspliced HIV-1 RNA (P = 0.036). Importantly, MGN1703 increased the capacity of NK cells to inhibit virus spread within a culture of autologous CD4+ T cells assessed by using an HIV-1 p24 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (P = 0.03). In conclusion, we show that MGN1703 induced strong antiviral innate immune responses, enhanced HIV-1 transcription, and boosted NK cell-mediated suppression of HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4+ T cells. These findings support clinical testing of MGN1703 in HIV-1 eradication trials. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that MGN1703 (a TLR9 agonist currently undergoing phase 3 clinical testing for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer) induces potent antiviral responses in immune effector cells from HIV-1-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The significantly improved safety and tolerability profiles of MGN1703 versus TLR9 agonists of the Cp

  7. Nuclear presence of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c3 and c4 is required for Toll-like receptor-activated innate inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Hiroshi; Shin, Mike J; Celil Aydemir, Ayse B; Kim, Kyung-Ok; Nizami, Saqib A; Chung, Gook-Jin; Lee, Francis Young-In

    2011-11-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATs) are crucial transcription factors that tightly control proinflammatory cytokine expression for adaptive immunity in T and B lymphocytes. However, little is known about the role of NFATs for innate immunity in macrophages. In this study, we report that NFAT is required for Toll-like receptor (TLR)-initiated innate immune responses in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). All TLR ligand stimulation including LPS, a TLR4 ligand, and Pam(3)CSK(4), a TLR1/2 ligand, induced expression of TNF which was inhibited by VIVIT, an NFAT-specific inhibitor peptide. BMMs from NFATc4 knock-out mouse expressed less TNF than wild type. Despite apparent association between NFAT and TNF, LPS did not directly activate NFAT based on NFAT-luciferase reporter assay, whereas NF-κB was inducibly activated by LPS. Instead, macrophage exhibited constitutive NFAT activity which was not increased by LPS and was decreased by VIVIT. Immunocytochemical examination of NFATc1-4 of BMMs exhibited nuclear localization of NFATc3/c4 regardless of LPS stimulation. LPS stimulation did not cause nuclear translocation of NFATc1/c2. Treatment with VIVIT resulted in nuclear export of NFATc3/c4 and inhibited TLR-activated TNF expression, suggesting that nuclear residence of NFATc is required for TLR-related innate immune response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using anti-RNA polymerase II (PolII) antibody suggested that VIVIT decreased PolII binding to TNF gene locus, consistent with VIVIT inhibition of LPS-induced TNF mRNA expression. This study identifies a novel paradigm of innate immune regulation rendered by NFAT which is a well known family of adaptive immune regulatory proteins.

  8. CD200 restrains macrophage attack on oligodendrocyte precursors via toll-like receptor 4 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Pham, Loc-Duyen D; Seo, Ji Hae; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Maki, Takakuni; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David; van Leyen, Klaus; Waeber, Christian; Kim, Kyu-Won; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous barriers to white matter repair after central nervous system injury and the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. In this study, we propose the hypothesis that inflammatory macrophages in damaged white matter attack oligodendrocyte precursor cells via toll-like receptor 4 signaling thus interfering with this endogenous progenitor recovery mechanism. Primary cell culture experiments demonstrate that peritoneal macrophages can attack and digest oligodendrocyte precursor cells via toll-like receptor 4 signaling, and this phagocytosis of oligodendrocyte precursor cells can be inhibited by using CD200-Fc to downregulate toll-like receptor 4. In an in vivo model of white matter ischemia induced by endothelin-1, treatment with CD200-Fc suppressed toll-like receptor 4 expression in peripherally circulating macrophages, thus restraining macrophage phagocytosis of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and leading to improved myelination. Taken together, these findings suggest that deleterious macrophage effects may occur after white matter ischemia, whereby macrophages attack oligodendrocyte precursor cells and interfere with endogenous recovery responses. Targeting this pathway with CD200 may offer a novel therapeutic approach to amplify endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cell-mediated repair of white matter damage in mammalian brain.

  9. The Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Monlish, Darlene A.; Bhatt, Sima T.; Schuettpelz, Laura G.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern recognition receptors that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns and host-derived damage-associated molecular patterns. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed. PMID:27733853

  10. Essential Roles of Toll-Like Receptors in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juntang; Kakkar, Vijay; Lu, Xinjie

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is driven by inflammation with an involvement of innate and adaptive immune responses. Toll-like receptors, the well-defined pattern recognition receptors of the immune system, play a central role in macrophage activation. Toll-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns expressed by a wide range of infectious agents and provide a strong link between local innate and adaptive immunity. Activation of these receptors triggers an intracellular signaling cascade mediated through myeloid differentiation factor 88 or toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β, leading to the secretion of proand anti-inflammatory cytokines. Engagement of Toll-like receptors with their ligands induces leukocyte recruitment and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression within atherosclerotic lesions. Recently certain Toll-like receptors have shown a protective role in atherosclerosis. TLRs, therefore, represent an important link between inflammation and atheroma, making them attractive targets for the treatment of atherosclerosis. This review will briefly describe the general biological structure and potential roles of Toll-like receptors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of atherosclerosis and highlight the potential challenges on Toll-like receptor- based therapy in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26639096

  11. Cathepsins are required for Toll-like receptor 9 responses

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Saitoh, Shin-ichiroh; Fukui, Ryutaroh; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Tanimura, Natsuko; Konno, Kazunori; Kusumoto, Yutaka; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke

    2008-03-14

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize a variety of microbial products and activate defense responses. Pathogen sensing by TLR2/4 requires accessory molecules, whereas little is known about a molecule required for DNA recognition by TLR9. After endocytosis of microbes, microbial DNA is exposed and recognized by TLR9 in lysosomes. We here show that cathepsins, lysosomal cysteine proteases, are required for TLR9 responses. A cell line Ba/F3 was found to be defective in TLR9 responses despite enforced TLR9 expression. Functional cloning with Ba/F3 identified cathepsin B/L as a molecule required for TLR9 responses. The protease activity was essential for the complementing effect. TLR9 responses were also conferred by cathepsin S or F, but not by cathepsin H. TLR9-dependent B cell proliferation and CD86 upregulation were apparently downregulated by cathepsin B/L inhibitors. Cathepsin B inhibitor downregulated interaction of CpG-B with TLR9 in 293T cells. These results suggest roles for cathepsins in DNA recognition by TLR9.

  12. Allergens and Activation of the Toll-Like Receptor Response.

    PubMed

    Monie, Tom P; Bryant, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) provide a crucial function in the detection of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were the first family of PRRs to be discovered and have been extensively studied since. Whilst TLRs remain the best characterized family of PRRs there is still much to be learnt about their mode of activation and the mechanisms of signal transduction they employ. Much of our understanding of these processes has been gathered through the use of cell based signaling assays utilizing specific gene-reporters or cytokine secretion based readouts. More recently it has become apparent that the repertoire of ligands recognized by these receptors may be wider than originally assumed and that their activation may be sensitized, or at least modulated by the presence of common household allergens such as the cat dander protein Fel d 1, or the house dust mite allergen Der p 2. In this chapter we provide an overview of the cell culture and stimulation processes required to study TLR signaling in HEK293 based assays and in bone marrow-derived macrophages. PMID:26803639

  13. A Toll-like receptor in horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Kei-ichiro; Ariki, Shigeru; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2004-04-01

    Non-self-recognition of invading microbes relies on the pattern-recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) derived from microbial cell-wall components. Insects and mammals conserve a signaling pathway of the innate immune system through cell-surface receptors called Tolls and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are an important trigger of the horseshoe crab's innate immunity to infectious microorganisms. Horseshoe crabs' granular hemocytes respond specifically to LPS stimulation, inducing the secretion of various defense molecules from the granular hemocytes. Here, we show a cDNA which we named tToll, coding for a TLR identified from hemocytes of the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. tToll is most closely related to Drosophila Toll in both domain architecture and overall length. Human TLRs have been suggested to contain numerous PAMP-binding insertions located in the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of their ectodomains. However, the LRRs of tToll contained no obvious PAMP-binding insertions. Furthermore, tToll was non-specifically expressed in horseshoe crab tissues. These observations suggest that tToll does not function as an LPS receptor on granular hemocytes.

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Deficiency Impairs Motor Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian-Wei; Li, Yi-Fei; Wang, Zhao-Tao; Jia, Wei-Qiang; Xu, Ru-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum plays an essential role in balance and motor coordination. Purkinje cells (PCs) are the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex and are critical for the execution of its functions, including motor coordination. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is involved in the innate immune response and is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system; however, little is known about its role in cerebellum-related motor functions. To address this question, we evaluated motor behavior in TLR4 deficient mice. We found that TLR4−∕− mice showed impaired motor coordination. Morphological analyses revealed that TLR4 deficiency was associated with a reduction in the thickness of the molecular layer of the cerebellum. TLR4 was highly expressed in PCs but not in Bergmann glia or cerebellar granule cells; however, loss of TLR4 decreased the number of PCs. These findings suggest a novel role for TLR4 in cerebellum-related motor coordination through maintenance of the PC population. PMID:26909014

  15. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway Mediates Inhalant Organic Dust-Induced Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Staab, Elizabeth; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Clarey, Dillon; Wyatt, Todd A; Romberger, Debra J; Wells, Adam D; Dusad, Anand; Wang, Dong; Klassen, Lynell W; Mikuls, Ted R; Duryee, Michael J; Poole, Jill A

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture workers have increased rates of airway and skeletal disease. Inhalant exposure to agricultural organic dust extract (ODE) induces bone deterioration in mice; yet, mechanisms underlying lung-bone crosstalk remain unclear. Because Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 are important in mediating the airway consequences of ODE, this study investigated their role in regulating bone responses. First, swine facility ODE stimulated wild-type (WT) bone marrow macrophages to form osteoclasts, and this finding was inhibited in TLR4 knock-out (KO), but not TLR2 KO cells. Next, using an established intranasal inhalation exposure model, WT, TLR2 KO and TLR4 KO mice were treated daily with ODE or saline for 3 weeks. ODE-induced airway neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine release were similarly reduced in TLR2 and TLR4 KO animals as compared to WT mice. Utilizing micro-computed tomography (CT), analysis of tibia showed loss of bone mineral density, volume and deterioration of bone micro-architecture and mechanical strength induced by ODE in WT mice were significantly reduced in TLR4 but not TLR2 KO animals. Bone marrow osteoclast precursor cell populations were analyzed by flow cytometry from exposed animals. In WT animals, exposure to inhalant ODE increased osteoclast precursor cell populations as compared to saline, an effect that was reduced in TLR4 but not TLR2 KO mice. These results show that TLR2 and TLR4 pathways mediate ODE-induced airway inflammation, but bone deterioration consequences following inhalant ODE treatment is strongly dependent upon TLR4. Thus, the TLR4 signaling pathway appears critical in regulating the lung-bone inflammatory axis to microbial component-enriched organic dust exposures. PMID:27479208

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway Mediates Inhalant Organic Dust-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Staab, Elizabeth; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Clarey, Dillon; Wyatt, Todd A.; Romberger, Debra J.; Wells, Adam D.; Dusad, Anand; Wang, Dong; Klassen, Lynell W.; Mikuls, Ted R.; Duryee, Michael J.; Poole, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture workers have increased rates of airway and skeletal disease. Inhalant exposure to agricultural organic dust extract (ODE) induces bone deterioration in mice; yet, mechanisms underlying lung-bone crosstalk remain unclear. Because Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 are important in mediating the airway consequences of ODE, this study investigated their role in regulating bone responses. First, swine facility ODE stimulated wild-type (WT) bone marrow macrophages to form osteoclasts, and this finding was inhibited in TLR4 knock-out (KO), but not TLR2 KO cells. Next, using an established intranasal inhalation exposure model, WT, TLR2 KO and TLR4 KO mice were treated daily with ODE or saline for 3 weeks. ODE-induced airway neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine release were similarly reduced in TLR2 and TLR4 KO animals as compared to WT mice. Utilizing micro-computed tomography (CT), analysis of tibia showed loss of bone mineral density, volume and deterioration of bone micro-architecture and mechanical strength induced by ODE in WT mice were significantly reduced in TLR4 but not TLR2 KO animals. Bone marrow osteoclast precursor cell populations were analyzed by flow cytometry from exposed animals. In WT animals, exposure to inhalant ODE increased osteoclast precursor cell populations as compared to saline, an effect that was reduced in TLR4 but not TLR2 KO mice. These results show that TLR2 and TLR4 pathways mediate ODE-induced airway inflammation, but bone deterioration consequences following inhalant ODE treatment is strongly dependent upon TLR4. Thus, the TLR4 signaling pathway appears critical in regulating the lung-bone inflammatory axis to microbial component-enriched organic dust exposures. PMID:27479208

  17. Toll-Like Receptor Gene Expression during Trichinella spiralis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sin; Park, Mi Kyung; Yu, Hak Sun

    2015-01-01

    In Trichinella spiralis infection, type 2 helper T (Th2) cell-related and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune responses are the most important immune events. In order to clarify which Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are closely associated with these responses, we analyzed the expression of mouse TLR genes in the small intestine and muscle tissue during T. spiralis infection. In addition, the expression of several chemokine- and cytokine-encoding genes, which are related to Th2 and Treg cell mediated immune responses, were analyzed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-associated proteins (TIRAP) and Toll receptor-associated activator of interferons (TRIF) adapter protein deficient and wild type (WT) mice. The results showed significantly increased TLR4 and TLR9 gene expression in the small intestine after 2 weeks of T. spiralis infection. In the muscle, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 gene expression significantly increased after 4 weeks of infection. Only the expression of the TLR4 and TLR9 genes was significantly elevated in WT MEF cells after treatment with excretory-secretory (ES) proteins. Gene expression for Th2 chemokine genes were highly enhanced by ES proteins in WT MEF cells, while this elevation was slightly reduced in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells, and quite substantially decreased in TRIF-/- MEF cells. In contrast, IL-10 and TGF-β expression levels were not elevated in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells. In conclusion, we suggest that TLR4 and TLR9 might be closely linked to Th2 cell and Treg cell mediated immune responses, although additional data are needed to convincingly prove this observation. PMID:26323841

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Wild Type Homozygozity of Polymorphisms +896 and +1196 Is Associated with High Gastrin Serum Levels and Peptic Ulcer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pohjanen, Vesa-Matti; Koivurova, Olli-Pekka; Huhta, Heikki; Helminen, Olli; Mäkinen, Johanna M.; Karhukorpi, Jari M.; Joensuu, Tapio; Koistinen, Pentti O.; Valtonen, Jarno M.; Niemelä, Seppo E.; Karttunen, Riitta A.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 is a part of the innate immune system and recognizes Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms +896 (rs4986790) and +1196 (rs4986791) in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastroduodenal diseases in relation to gastric secretion and inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms, serum gastrin-17 and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were determined, and gastroscopies with histopathological analyses were performed to 216 dyspeptic patients. As genotype controls, 179 controls and 61 gastric cancer patients were studied. In our study, the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 polymorphisms were in total linkage disequilibrium. The homozygous wild types displayed higher gastrin-17 serum concentrations than the mutants (p = 0.001) and this effect was independent of Helicobacter pylori. The homozygous wild types also displayed an increased risk for peptic ulcers (OR: 4.390). Toll-like receptor 4 genotypes did not show any association with Helicobacter pylori positivity or the features of gastric inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was seen in gastrin and somatostatin expressing cells of antral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 4 in gastric acid regulation and that the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 wild type homozygozity increases peptic ulcer risk via gastrin secretion. PMID:26161647

  19. Comparative studies of Toll-like receptor signalling using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Zakia; Wiegertjes, Geert F; Veneman, Wouter J; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish model systems for infectious disease are increasingly used for the functional analysis of molecular pattern recognition processes. These studies benefit from the high conservation level of all innate immune factors in vertebrates. Zebrafish studies are strategically well positioned for this because of the ease of comparisons with studies in other fish species of which the immune system also has been intensively studied, but that are currently still less amendable to detailed genetic or microscopic studies. In this paper we focus on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling factors, which currently are the best characterized in mammalian systems. We review the knowledge on TLR signalling in the context of recent advances in zebrafish studies and discuss possibilities for future approaches that can complement studies in cell cultures and rodent models. A focus in these comparisons is the role of negative control mechanisms in immune responses that appear very important in a whole organism to keep adverse systemic responses in check. We also pay much attention to comparisons with studies in common carp that is highly related to zebrafish and that because of its large body mass can complement immune studies in zebrafish.

  20. Subverting Toll-Like Receptor Signaling by Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Victoria A.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are detected by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on innate immune cells, which activate intracellular signal transduction pathways to elicit an immune response. Toll-like receptors are, perhaps, the most studied of the PRRs and can activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. These pathways are critical for mounting an effective immune response. In order to evade detection and promote virulence, many pathogens subvert the host immune response by targeting components of these signal transduction pathways. This mini-review highlights the diverse mechanisms that bacterial pathogens have evolved to manipulate the innate immune response, with a particular focus on those that target MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Understanding the elaborate strategies that pathogens employ to subvert the immune response not only highlights the importance of these proteins in mounting effective immune responses, but may also identify novel approaches for treatment or prevention of infection. PMID:26648936

  1. Computational Approaches to Toll-Like Receptor 4 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Billod, Jean-Marc; Lacetera, Alessandra; Guzmán-Caldentey, Joan; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), along with its accessory protein myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2), builds a heterodimeric complex that specifically recognizes lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which are present on the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria, activating the innate immune response. Some TLR4 modulators are undergoing preclinical and clinical evaluation for the treatment of sepsis, inflammatory diseases, cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. Since the relatively recent elucidation of the X-ray crystallographic structure of the extracellular domain of TLR4, research around this fascinating receptor has risen to a new level, and thus, new perspectives have been opened. In particular, diverse computational techniques have been applied to decipher some of the basis at the atomic level regarding the mechanism of functioning and the ligand recognition processes involving the TLR4/MD-2 system at the atomic level. This review summarizes the reported molecular modeling and computational studies that have recently provided insights into the mechanism regulating the activation/inactivation of the TLR4/MD-2 system receptor and the key interactions modulating the molecular recognition process by agonist and antagonist ligands. These studies have contributed to the design and the discovery of novel small molecules with promising activity as TLR4 modulators. PMID:27483231

  2. Chapter 3. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Nilufer; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Brain abscesses arise from a localized parenchymal infection, typically elicited by pyogenic bacteria such as S. aureus. Despite improvements in detection and treatment strategies, brain abscesses continue to occur, with an increased prevalence in developing countries and immune compromised patients. Adding to the seriousness of these infections is the recent emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, which are becoming more commonly associated with brain abscesses. Recent studies using a mouse experimental brain abscess model have revealed a complex role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in disease pathogenesis. Interestingly, TLR2 has limited impact on the innate immune response during the acute stage of brain abscess formation induced by S. aureus but influences adaptive immunity. In contrast, mice deficient in MyD88, a central adaptor molecule for the majority of TLRs in addition to the IL-1R and IL-18R, demonstrate severe defects in innate immunity coupled with exaggerated tissue destruction. It is envisioned that understanding the roles for TLRs in both resident CNS glia as well as infiltrating immune cells will provide insights as to how the immune response to bacterial infection can be tailored to achieve effective pathogen destruction without inducing excessive bystander damage of surrounding non-infected brain parenchyma. A discussion of recent findings in this field is presented along with outstanding questions and the concept of a pathogen-necrosis-autoantigen triad for the amplification for TLR signaling is introduced. PMID:19688327

  3. Deviation from major codons in the Toll-like receptor genes is associated with low Toll-like receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Fei; Cao, Weiping; Chan, Edmund; Tay, Puei Nam; Cahya, Florence Feby; Zhang, Haifeng; Lu, Jinhua

    2005-01-01

    Microbial structures activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-mediated cell signalling elicits and regulates host immunity. Most TLRs are poorly expressed but the underlying expression mechanism is not clear. Examination TLR sequences revealed that most human TLR genes deviated from using major human codons. CD14 resembles TLRs in sequence but its gene preferentially uses major codons. Indeed, CD14 expression on monocytes was higher than expression of TLR1 and TLR2. The TLR9 gene is abundant in major codons and it also showed higher expression than TLR1, TLR2 and TLR7 in transfected 293T cells. Change of the 5′-end 302 base pairs of the TLR2 sequence into major human codons markedly increased TLR2 expression, which led to increased TLR2-mediated constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. Change of the 5′-end 381 base pairs of the CD14 sequence into prevalent TLR codons markedly reduced CD14 expression. These results collectively show that the deviation of TLR sequences from using major codons dictates the low TLR expression and this may protect the host against excessive inflammation and tissue damages. PMID:15606798

  4. The potential for Toll-like receptors to collaborate with other innate immune receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Herre, Jurgen; Brown, Gordon D; Gordon, Siamon

    2004-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system express a large repertoire of germ-line encoded cell-surface glycoprotein receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs recognize conserved motifs on microbes and induce inflammatory signals. Evidence suggests that individual members of the TLR family or other non-TLR surface antigens either physically or functionally interact with each other and cumulative effects of these interactions instruct the nature and outcome of the immune response to a particular pathogen. PMID:15270722

  5. Enhanced antibody responses to a detoxified lipopolysaccharide-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine are due to synergistic engagement of Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wilbur H; Basu, Subhendu; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Cross, Alan S

    2010-10-01

    When given passively or elicited actively, antibodies induced by a detoxified Escherichia coli Rc chemotype (J5) mutant lipopolysaccharide (J5dLPS)-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP) complex vaccine protected animals from lethal sepsis. The protection from sepsis is believed to be dependent on high levels of antibodies against the core glycolipid (CGL), a region of LPS that is rather conserved among Enterobacteriaceae. The addition of unmethylated deoxycytidyl-deoxyguanosine dinucleotide (CpG)-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) was used as an immuno-adjuvant to improve antibody responses. In preparation for a Phase I human trial, we elucidated potential contributions by which the sepsis vaccine (J5dLPS-OMP) and CpG ODN might enhance the antibody response and provide evidence that the generation of immune responses is Toll-like receptor (TLR) dependent. Toll-like receptor 2, TLR4, and TLR9 were each essential for generating robust cytokine and antibody responses. The signature cytokine of dendritic cells, interleukin-12, was one of the cytokines that demonstrated synergy with the optimal TLR ligand/ engagement combination. We conclude that the involvement of multiple TLRs upon immunization was critical for the generation of optimal antibody responses. These observations provide further evidence for the inclusion of innate immune-based adjuvants during the development of next-generation vaccines. PMID:19822632

  6. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them.

  7. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them. PMID:27597805

  8. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kathleen L

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them. PMID:27597805

  9. Systemic cancer immunotherapy with Toll-like receptor 7 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, Christian; Bourquin, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists represent a promising strategy for the immunotherapy of cancer. We have recently investigated the influence of TLR tolerance on the efficacy of systemic tumor treatment with TLR7 ligands. We propose that considering the kinetics of receptor sensitivity highly improves the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22720251

  10. Toll-like Receptors of the Ascidian Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Naoko; Ogasawara, Michio; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Kusumoto, Shoichi; Satake, Honoo

    2009-01-01

    Key transmembrane proteins in the innate immune system, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), have been suggested to occur in the genome of non-mammalian organisms including invertebrates. However, authentic invertebrate TLRs have been neither structurally nor functionally investigated. In this paper, we originally present the structures, localization, ligand recognition, activities, and inflammatory cytokine production of all TLRs of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, designated as Ci-TLR1 and Ci-TLR2. The amino acid sequence of Ci-TLR1 and Ci-TLR2 were found to possess unique structural organization with moderate sequence similarity to functionally characterized vertebrate TLRs. ci-tlr1 and ci-tlr2 genes were expressed predominantly in the stomach and intestine as well as in hemocytes. Ci-TLR1 and Ci-TLR2 expressed in HEK293 cells, unlike vertebrate TLRs, were localized to both the plasma membrane and endosomes. Intriguingly, both Ci-TLR1 and Ci-TLR2 stimulate NF-κB induction in response to multiple pathogenic ligands such as double-stranded RNA, and bacterial cell wall components that are differentially recognized by respective vertebrate TLRs, revealing that Ci-TLRs recognize broader pathogen-associated molecular patterns than vertebrate TLRs. The Ci-TLR-stimulating pathogenic ligands also induced the expression of Ci-TNFα in the intestine and stomach where Ci-TLRs are expressed. These results provide evidence that the TLR-triggered innate immune systems are essentially conserved in ascidians, and that Ci-TLRs possess “hybrid” biological and immunological functions, compared with vertebrate TLRs. Moreover, it is presumed that chordate TLR ancestors also acquired the Ci-TLR-like multiple cellular localization and pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition. PMID:19651780

  11. Dynamics of the avian inflammatory response to Salmonella following administration of the toll-like receptor 5 agonist flagellin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flagellin is a highly evolutionarily conserved bacterial component that is recognized by the innate immune system through toll-like receptor (TLR) 5. Previous work has shown that flagellin is a potent stimulator in vitro of phagocytic cell functions of chickens. The purpose of the present study wa...

  12. Toll-like receptor-4 mediates cigarette smoke-induced cytokine production by human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Khalil; Sarir, Hadi; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Smit, Joost J; Hosseini, Hossein; De Kimpe, Sjef J; Nijkamp, Frans P; Folkerts, Gert

    2006-01-01

    Background The major risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking. Smoking causes activation of resident cells and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the lungs, which leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotactic factors, oxygen radicals and proteases. In the present study evidence is found for a new cellular mechanism that refers to a link between smoking and inflammation in lungs. Methods Employing human monocyte-derived macrophages, different techniques including FACS analysis, Cytometric Bead Array Assay and ELISA were achieved to evaluate the effects of CS on pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion including IL-8. Then, Toll-like receptor neutralization was performed to study the involvement of Toll-like receptor-4 in IL-8 production. Finally, signaling pathways in macrophages after exposure to CS medium were investigated performing ELISA and Western analysis. Results We demonstrate that especially human monocytes are sensitive to produce IL-8 upon cigarette smoke stimulation compared to lymphocytes or neutrophils. Moreover, monocyte-derived macrophages produce high amounts of the cytokine. The IL-8 production is dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 stimulation and LPS is not involved. Further research resolved the cellular mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces cytokine production in monocyte-derived macrophages. Cigarette smoke causes subsequently a concentration-dependent phosphorylation of IRAK and degradation of TRAF6. Moreover, IκBα was phosphorylated which suggests involvement of NF-κB. In addition, NFκB -inhibitor blocked cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 production. Conclusion These findings link cigarette smoke to inflammation and lead to new insights/therapeutic strategies in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema. PMID:16620395

  13. Use of lipolanthionine peptide, a toll-like receptor 2 inhibitor, enhances transdermal delivery efficiency

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, BIN; LIU, DA-LIE; PAN, WEN-YAN; YANG, XIAO-HUI; SHOU, JIA-BAO; WU, JU-HUA; MAO, QING-LONG; WANG, JIA

    2014-01-01

    The transdermal delivery system (TDS) is able to obtain a systemic therapeutic effect by administration through the skin, which has low side effects and is able to maintain a sustained blood concentration. However, due to the barrier presented by the stratum corneum, numerous drugs have poor percutaneous permeability. Therefore, the improvement of skin permeability is key to TDS. The main method of promoting transdermal absorption is through the usage of penetration enhancers. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a commonly used penetration enhancer, which has anti-inflammatory analgesic effects and is able to penetrate the skin. Retinoic acid (RA) and lipolanthionine peptide (LP) may also benefit the permeation efficiency of TDS. Therefore, the present study examined the function of DMSO, RA and LP as penetration enhancers in TDS. Firstly, the optimum concentration of DMSO was confirmed by detecting the expression of the LacZ gene in vitro. Secondly, different combinations of LP, RA and DMSO were applied to mouse skin to analyze the penetration enhancer combination with the greatest efficacy. All the animals were divided into five groups: The RA + LP + DMSO + pORF-LacZ group, the RA + DMSO + pORF-LacZ group, the LP + DMSO + pORF-LacZ group, the DMSO + pORF-LacZ group and the control group. Skin was soaked in combinations of LP, RA and DMSO for seven days and then the pORF-LacZ plasmids were daubed onto the skin once daily three days. On the 11th day, all the animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and the skin and blood samples were collected. The blood samples were used to detect the expression of the LacZ gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the skin samples were used to detect the expression of claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) proteins by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the combination of LP, RA and DMSO exhibited the greatest transdermal delivery efficiency, which verified that RA and LP were able to increase the penetration effects. Following treatment with LP, the symptoms of dermal edema were relieved and the capillaries contracted, which suggested that LP was a safe and effective penetration enhancer able to reduce the side-effects caused by DMSO. The present study provides a guideline for the synthesis of novel penetration enhancers. PMID:24858729

  14. Glycyrrhizin Attenuates Toll Like Receptor-2, -4 and Experimental Vasospasm in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2014-01-01

    Upregulated TLRs are observed in the serum of animals following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage. This study was to examine glycyrrhizin's effect on proinflammatory cytokines and TLRs in SAH rats. Administration with glycyrrhizin was initiated 24 hr before and 1 hr later using osmotic minipump. Basilar arteries were harvested to examine TLRs mRNA and protein (rt-PCR and western blot) and CSF cytokines (rt-PCR). Morphologically, deformed endothelium, tortuous elastic lamina, and smooth muscle necrosis were observed in the SAH rats, but were absent in the glycyrrhizin pretreatment group. The TLR-3 protein level was not increased in SAH animals, compared with the controls, while that of TLR-2 and -4 in the SAH only and SAH plus vehicle groups was significantly elevated (P < 0.01). Pretreatment and treatment with glycyrrhizin reduced TLR-2 and -4 by 28 ± 8% and 33.4 ± 9.2%, respectively. Likewise, glycyrrhizin was able to reduce the IL-1β and MCP-1 mRNA levels. This study shows glycyrrhizin exerts anti-inflammatory effects on SAH induced vasospasm and attenuates the ultrashort time expression of TLRs, like TLR-2 and -4. It corresponds to SAH induced early brain injury. These findings offer credit to the antivasospastic effect of glycyrrhizin and its effect on SAH induced early brain injury. PMID:25152897

  15. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also

  16. Effect of pulse high-volume hemofiltration on Toll-like receptor in patients with severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Jian; Cao, Zhuo; Deng, Liancheng; Wu, Yifen; Liu, Hong; Qiu, Zeliang

    2016-01-01

    The expression level and prognosis of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with severe sepsis after applying pulse high-volume hemofiltration (PHVHF) were investigated. Sustained PHVHF treatment was carried out on 40 patients on the basis of conventional treatment for up to 72 h. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II scores of patients were compared before and after the treatment. CD4+, CD8+ lymphocyte counts and ratios in the peripheral blood were detected using FASort before and 24 and 48 h of PHVHF treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was adopted to detect tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) concentrations in plasma at different time points before and after 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment, while semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technology was used to test TLR2 mRNA expression. After PHVHF treatment, APACHE II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores were decreased (P<0.05). After 72 h of PHVHF treat-ment, TNF-α, IL-10, TLR2 mRNA expression levels in the plasma of patients were significantly decreased compared to before treatment (P<0.05), and the IL-10 / TNF-α ratio was much higher than before treatment (p<0.05). In conclusion, PHVHF can restore the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory balance of the body, thereby improving the overall condition of the patients by removing inflammatory mediators and lowering TLR2 expression of mononuclear cell surface in peripheral blood. PMID:27588059

  17. Systemic toll-like receptor ligation and selective killing of dendritic cell subsets fail to dissect priming pathways for anti-vaccinia virus CD8⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yik Chun; Smith, Stewart A; Tscharke, David C

    2013-11-01

    CD8⁺ T cell responses can be generated by direct or cross-priming mechanisms, and several mouse models have been used to reveal which of these is the most important pathway for various viruses. Among these models is systemic treatment of mice with a CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG) to mature all dendritic cells (DCs), rendering them incapable of cross-presentation. A second is the use of cytochrome c (cytc) as a selective poison of the subsets of DCs able to cross-present antigen. In this study, using two vaccinia virus (VACV) strains, namely, WR and MVA, we found that the CpG and cytc methods gave conflicting data. Moreover, we show for both strains of VACV that treatment of mice with CpG and cytc inhibited CD8⁺ T cell responses to antigens designed to prime exclusively by direct presentation. Further investigation of the CpG method found that the extent to which priming is inhibited depends on the antigen examined, immunization route, replication ability of the virus, and, crucially, immunization dose. We suggest that greater caution is required when interpreting data using these methods and that priming pathways for antiviral CD8⁺ T cells are not simply separated according to DC subsets or their maturation state.

  18. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  19. Antiinfective applications of toll-like receptor 9 agonists.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Arthur M

    2007-07-01

    The innate immune system detects pathogens by the presence of highly conserved pathogen-expressed molecules, which trigger host immune defenses. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 detects unmethylated CpG dinucleotides in bacterial or viral DNA, and can be stimulated for therapeutic applications with synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing immune stimulatory "CpG motifs." TLR9 activation induces both innate and adaptive immunity. The TLR9-induced innate immune activation can be applied in the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases, and the adaptive immune-enhancing effects can be harnessed for improving vaccines. This article highlights the current understanding of the mechanism of action of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, and provides an overview of the preclinical data and early human clinical trial results, applying these TLR9 agonists in the field of infectious diseases. PMID:17607015

  20. Unique features of chicken Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; de Zoete, Marcel R; Bouwman, Lieneke I; Vaezirad, Mahdi M; van Putten, Jos P M

    2013-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a major class of innate immune pattern recognition receptors that have a key role in immune homeostasis and the defense against infections. The research explosion that followed the discovery of TLRs more than a decade ago has boosted fundamental knowledge on the function of the immune system and the resistance against disease, providing a rational for clinical modulation of the immune response. In addition, the conserved nature of the ancient TLR system throughout the animal kingdom has enabled a comparative biology approach to understand the evolution, structural architecture, and function of TLRs. In the present review we focus on TLR biology in the avian species, and, especially, on the unique functional properties of the chicken TLR repertoire. PMID:23628643

  1. Induction of latency-associated peptide (transforming growth factor-β1) expression on CD4+ T cells reduces Toll-like receptor 4 ligand-induced tumour necrosis factor-α production in a transforming growth factor-β-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Sandra; Sharif, Shayan; Alisa, Akeel; Pereira, Stephen P; Williams, Roger; Behboudi, Shahriar

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T cells expressing the latent form of transforming growth factor-β [latency-associated peptide (LAP) (TGF-β1)] play an important role in the modulation of immune responses. Here, we identified a novel peptide ligand (GPC81–95) with an intrinsic ability to induce membrane-bound LAP (TGF-β1) expression on a subpopulation of human CD4+ T cells (using flow cytometry; ranging from 0·8% to 2·6%) and stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells to release LAP (TGF-β1) (using ELISPOT assay; ranging from 0·03% to 0·16%). In spite of this low percentage of responding cells, GPC81–95 significantly reduced Toll-like receptor 4 ligand-induced tumour necrosis factor-α production in a TGF-β1- and CD4+ T-cell-dependent manner. The results demonstrate that GPC81–95 is a useful tool to study the functional properties of a subpopulation of LAP (TGF-β1)+ CD4+ T cells and suggest a pathway that can be exploited to suppress inflammatory response. PMID:21426338

  2. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions.

  3. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions. PMID:27672603

  4. Macroscopic law of conservation revealed in the population dynamics of Toll-like receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Selvarajoo, Kumar

    2011-04-20

    Stimulating the receptors of a single cell generates stochastic intracellular signaling. The fluctuating response has been attributed to the low abundance of signaling molecules and the spatio-temporal effects of diffusion and crowding. At population level, however, cells are able to execute well-defined deterministic biological processes such as growth, division, differentiation and immune response. These data reflect biology as a system possessing microscopic and macroscopic dynamics. This commentary discusses the average population response of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and 4 signaling. Without requiring detailed experimental data, linear response equations together with the fundamental law of information conservation have been used to decipher novel network features such as unknown intermediates, processes and cross-talk mechanisms. For single cell response, however, such simplicity seems far from reality. Thus, as observed in any other complex systems, biology can be considered to possess order and disorder, inheriting a mixture of predictable population level and unpredictable single cell outcomes.

  5. The role of Toll-like receptors in retinal ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Qin; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are commonly referred to a series of evolutionary conserved receptors which recognize and respond to various microbes and endogenous ligands. Growing evidence has demonstrated that the expression of TLRs in the retina is regulated during retinal ischemic diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). TLRs can be expressed in multiple cells in the retina, such as glial cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as photoreceptor cells and endothelium cells. Activation of TLRs in retina could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade, induce the production of inflammatory cytokines and regulate the level of co-stimulatory molecules, which play prominent roles in the pathogenesis of retinal ischemic diseases. In this review, we summarized current studies about the relationship between TLRs and ischemic retinopathy. A greater understanding of the effect of TLRs on ischemic injuries may contribute to the development of specific TLR targeted therapeutic strategies in these conditions. PMID:27672603

  6. Toll-like receptors in alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Yoon Seok; Seki, Ekihiro

    2013-08-01

    Activation of innate immune systems including Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a key in chronic liver disease. Recent studies suggest that gut microflora-derived bacterial products (i.e. lipopolysaccharide [LPS], bacterial DNA) and endogenous substances (i.e. high-mobility group protein B1 [HMGB1], free fatty acids) released from damaged cells activate hepatic TLRs that contribute to the development of alcoholic (ASH) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and liver fibrosis. The crucial role of TLR4, a receptor for LPS, has been implicated in the development of ASH, NASH, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the role of other TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR9 in chronic liver disease remains less clear. In this review, we will discuss the role of TLR2, 4, and 9 in Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells in the development of ASH, NASH, and hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:23855294

  7. CPG-7909 (PF-3512676, ProMune): toll-like receptor-9 agonist in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Murad, Yanal M; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A

    2007-08-01

    Stimulation of toll-like receptor (TLR)9 activates human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells, and induces potent innate immune responses in preclinical tumor models and in patients. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) are TLR9 agonists that show promising results as vaccine adjuvants and in the treatment of cancers, infections, asthma and allergy. PF-3512676 (ProMune) was developed as a TLR9 agonist for the treatment of cancer as monotherapy and as an adjuvant in combination with chemo- and immunotherapy. Phase I and II trials have tested this drug in several hematopoietic and solid tumors. Pfizer has initiated Phase III trials to test PF-3512676 in combination with standard chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:17696823

  8. High basal levels of functional toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and noncanonical Wnt5a are expressed in papillary thyroid cancer and are coordinately decreased by phenylmethimazole together with cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    McCall, Kelly D; Harii, Norikazu; Lewis, Christopher J; Malgor, Ramiro; Kim, Won Bae; Saji, Motoyasu; Kohn, Aimee D; Moon, Randall T; Kohn, Leonard D

    2007-09-01

    High basal levels of TLR3 and Wnt5a RNA are present in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cell lines consistent with their overexpression and colocalization in PTC cells in vivo. This is not the case in thyrocytes from normal tissue and in follicular carcinoma (FC) or anaplastic carcinoma (AC) cells or tissues. The basally expressed TLR3 are functional in PTC cells as evidenced by the ability of double-strand RNA (polyinosine-polycytidylic acid) to significantly increase the activity of transfected NF-kappaB and IFN-beta luciferase reporter genes and the levels of two end products of TLR3 signaling, IFN-beta and CXCL10. Phenylmethimazole (C10), a drug that decreases TLR3 expression and signaling in FRTL-5 thyrocytes, decreases TLR3 levels and signaling in PTC cells in a concentration-dependent manner. C10 also decreased Wnt5a RNA levels coordinate with decreases in TLR3. E-cadherin RNA levels, whose suppression may be associated with high Wnt5a, increased with C10 treatment. C10 simultaneously decreased PTC proliferation and cell migration but had no effect on the growth and migration of FC, AC, or FRTL-5 cells. C10 decreases high basal phosphorylation of Tyr705 and Ser727 on Stat3 in PTC cells and inhibits IL-6-induced Stat3 phosphorylation. IL-6-induced Stat3 phosphorylation is important both in up-regulating Wnt5a levels and in cell growth. In sum, high Wnt5a levels in PTC cells may be related to high TLR3 levels and signaling; and the ability of phenylmethimazole (C10) to decrease growth and migration of PTC cells may be related to its suppressive effect on TLR3 and Wnt5a signaling, particularly Stat3 activation. PMID:17525119

  9. Constraint and Adaptation in newt Toll-Like Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Babik, Wiesław; Dudek, Katarzyna; Fijarczyk, Anna; Pabijan, Maciej; Stuglik, Michał; Szkotak, Rafał; Zieliński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Acute die-offs of amphibian populations worldwide have been linked to the emergence of viral and fungal diseases. Inter and intraspecific immunogenetic differences may influence the outcome of infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an essential component of innate immunity and also prime acquired defenses. We report the first comprehensive assessment of TLR gene variation for urodele amphibians. The Lissotriton newt TLR repertoire includes representatives of 13 families and is compositionally most similar to that of the anuran Xenopus. Both ancient and recent gene duplications have occurred in urodeles, bringing the total number of TLR genes to at least 21. Purifying selection has predominated the evolution of newt TLRs in both long (∼70 Ma) and medium (∼18 Ma) timescales. However, we find evidence for both purifying and positive selection acting on TLRs in two recently diverged (2–5 Ma) allopatric evolutionary lineages (Lissotriton montandoni and L. vulgaris graecus). Overall, both forms of selection have been stronger in L. v. graecus, while constraint on most TLR genes in L. montandoni appears relaxed. The differences in selection regimes are unlikely to be biased by demographic effects because these were controlled by means of a historical demographic model derived from an independent data set of 62 loci. We infer that TLR genes undergo distinct trajectories of adaptive evolution in closely related amphibian lineages, highlight the potential of TLRs to capture the signatures of different assemblages of pathogenic microorganisms, and suggest differences between lineages in the relative roles of innate and acquired immunity. PMID:25480684

  10. Toll-like receptors: potential targets for lupus treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-wei; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-ping

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of tolerance to self-nuclear antigens. Accumulating evidence shows that Toll-like receptors (TLRs), previously proven to be critical for host defense, are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by recognition of self-molecules. Genome-wide association studies, experimental mouse models and clinical sample studies have provided evidence for the involvement of TLRs, including TLR2/4, TLR5, TLR3 and TLR7/8/9, in SLE pathogenesis. A number of downstream proteins in the TLR signaling cascade (such as MyD88, IRAKs and IFN-α) are identified as potential therapeutic targets for SLE treatment. Numerous antagonists targeting TLR signaling, including oligonucleotides, small molecular inhibitors and antibodies, are currently under preclinical studies or clinical trials for SLE treatment. Moreover, the emerging new manipulation of TLR signaling by microRNA (miRNA) regulation shows promise for the future treatment of SLE.

  11. The evolution of vertebrate Toll-like receptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roach, J.C.; Glusman, G.; Rowen, L.; Kaur, A.; Purcell, M.K.; Smith, K.D.; Hood, L.E.; Aderem, A.

    2005-01-01

    The complete sequences of Takifugu Toll-like receptor (TLR) loci and gene predictions from many draft genomes enable comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis. Strong selective pressure for recognition of and response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns has maintained a largely unchanging TLR recognition in all vertebrates. There are six major families of vertebrate TLRs. This repertoire is distinct from that of invertebrates. TLRs within a family recognize a general class of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Most vertebrates have exactly one gene ortholog for each TLR family. The family including TLR1 has more species-specific adaptations than other families. A major family including TLR11 is represented in humans only by a pseudogene. Coincidental evolution plays a minor role in TLR evolution. The sequencing phase of this study produced finished genomic sequences for the 12 Takifugu rubripes TLRs. In addition, we have produced > 70 gene models, including sequences from the opossum, chicken, frog, dog, sea urchin, and sea squirt. ?? 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  12. Toll-like receptors: potential targets for lupus treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan-wei; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of tolerance to self-nuclear antigens. Accumulating evidence shows that Toll-like receptors (TLRs), previously proven to be critical for host defense, are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by recognition of self-molecules. Genome-wide association studies, experimental mouse models and clinical sample studies have provided evidence for the involvement of TLRs, including TLR2/4, TLR5, TLR3 and TLR7/8/9, in SLE pathogenesis. A number of downstream proteins in the TLR signaling cascade (such as MyD88, IRAKs and IFN-α) are identified as potential therapeutic targets for SLE treatment. Numerous antagonists targeting TLR signaling, including oligonucleotides, small molecular inhibitors and antibodies, are currently under preclinical studies or clinical trials for SLE treatment. Moreover, the emerging new manipulation of TLR signaling by microRNA (miRNA) regulation shows promise for the future treatment of SLE. PMID:26592511

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 limits transmission of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Rolin, Olivier; Smallridge, Will; Henry, Michael; Goodfield, Laura; Place, David; Harvill, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Transmission of pathogens has been notoriously difficult to study under laboratory conditions leaving knowledge gaps regarding how bacterial factors and host immune components affect the spread of infections between hosts. We describe the development of a mouse model of transmission of a natural pathogen, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and its use to assess the impact of host immune functions. Although B. bronchiseptica transmits poorly between wild-type mice and mice lacking other immune components, it transmits efficiently between mice deficient in Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4). TLR4-mutant mice were more susceptible to initial colonization, and poorly controlled pathogen growth and shedding. Heavy neutrophil infiltration distinguished TLR4-deficient responses, and neutrophil depletion did not affect respiratory CFU load, but decreased bacterial shedding. The effect of TLR4 response on transmission may explain the extensive variation in TLR4 agonist potency observed among closely related subspecies of Bordetella. This transmission model will enable mechanistic studies of how pathogens spread from one host to another, the defining feature of infectious disease.

  14. Role of toll-like receptors and inflammation in adrenal gland insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Zacharowski, Kai; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal gland insufficiency - the clinical manifestation of deficient production or action of adrenal steroids - is a life-threatening disorder. Among many factors which can predispose to primary adrenal failure, an autoimmune adrenalitis and infectious agents play a major role. The initial host defense against bacterial infections is executed primarily by the pattern recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), expressed in cells from the innate immune system. Upon activation, TLRs have been found to regulate various levels of innate and adaptive immunity as well as control tissue inflammation. TLRs are implicated in adrenal cell turnover and steroidogenesis during inflammation. Therefore, TLRs play a crucial role in the activation of adrenal inflammation mediating adrenal gland dysfunction during septicemia.

  15. Expression of antimicrobial peptides and toll-like receptors is increased in tinea and pityriasis versicolor.

    PubMed

    Brasch, J; Mörig, A; Neumann, B; Proksch, E

    2014-03-01

    In superficial tinea and pityriasis versicolor, the causative fungi are for the most part confined to the stratum corneum which is barely reached by leukocytes. Therefore, a role of non-cellular components in the epidermal antifungal defence was suggested. To investigate the presence of such factors in these infections, the expression of human beta defensins 2 and 3 (hBD-2, hBD-3), RNase 7, psoriasin, toll-like receptors 2, 4 and 9 (TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9) and dectin 2 was analysed by use of immunostainings in skin biopsies. We found that hBD2, hBD3, psoriasin, RNase7, TLR2 and TLR4 were significantly more often expressed in distinct layers of lesional epidermis as compared with uninfected epidermis. In both infections but not in normal skin, hBD2 and hBD3 were commonly expressed within the stratum corneum and in the stratum granulosum. Similarly, psoriasin was seen more often in the upper skin layers of both infections as compared with normal skin. No significant differences between normal and infected skin were found for the expression of TLR9 and dectin 2. Our findings clearly show the expression of specific antimicrobial proteins and defence-related ligands in superficial tinea as well as in pityriasis versicolor, suggesting that these factors contribute to fungal containment.

  16. Toll-like receptor 7 cooperates with IL-4 in activated B cells through antigen receptor or CD38 and induces class switch recombination and IgG1 production.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Nagai, Yoshinori; Kariyone, Ai; Shibata, Takuma; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Akira, Shizuo; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2009-04-01

    IL-4 and 8-mercaptoguanosine (8-SGuo) stimulation of CD38-activated B cells induces mu to gamma1 class switch recombination (CSR) at the DNA level leading to a high level of IgG1 production. Although some of signaling events initiated by IL-4 in activated B cells have been characterized, the involvement of TLR/MyD88 and Btk pathway in IL-4-dependent mu to gamma1 CSR has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, we characterized receptors for 8-SGuo and differential roles of 8-SGuo and IL-4 in the induction and mu to gamma1 CSR and IgG1 production. The role of TLR7 and MyD88 in 8-SGuo-induced AID expression and mu to gamma1 CSR was documented, as 8-SGuo did not act on CD38-stimulated splenic B cells from Tlr7(-/-) and Myd88(-/-) mice. CD38-activated B cells from Btk-deficient mice failed to respond to TLR7 ligands for the AID expression and CSR, indicating that Btk is also indispensable for the system. Stimulation of CD38-activated B cells with 8-SGuo induced significant AID expression and DNA double strand breaks, but IL-4 stimulation by itself did not trigger mu to gamma1 CSR. Intriguingly, the mu to gamma1 CSR in the B cells stimulated with CD38 and 8-SGuo totally depends on IL-4 stimulation. Similar results were obtained in the activated B cells through BCR and loxoribine, a well-known TLR7 ligand, in place of 8-SGuo. In vivo administration of TLR7 ligand and anti-CD38 antibody induced the generation of CD138(+) IgG1(+) cells. These results indicate that TLR7 is a receptor for 8-SGuo and plays an essential role in the AID and Blimp-1 expression; however it is not enough to complete mu to gamma1 CSR in CD38-activated B cells. IL-4 may be required for the induction of DNA repair system together with AID for the completion of CSR.

  17. Toll-like Receptor Signaling Activation by Entamoeba histolytica Induces Beta Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Epithelial Cells: Its Possible Role as an Element of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Téllez-López, Victor M.; Domínguez-Robles, M. del Carmen; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; Meza, Isaura

    2013-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite of humans, produces dysenteric diarrhea, intestinal mucosa damage and extraintestinal infection. It has been proposed that the intestinal microbiota composition could be an important regulatory factor of amebic virulence and tissue invasion, particularly if pathogenic bacteria are present. Recent in vitro studies have shown that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induced human colonic CaCo2 cells to synthesize TLR-2 and TLR-4 and proinflammatory cytokines after binding to the amebic Gal/GalNac lectin carbohydrate recognition domain. The magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by trophozoites and the subsequent cell damage were synergized when cells had previously been exposed to pathogenic bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings We show here that E. histolytica activation of the classic TLR pathway in CaCo2 cells is required to induce β defensin-2 (HBD2) mRNA expression and production of a 5-kDa cationic peptide with similar properties to the antimicrobial HBD2 expressed by CaCo2 cells exposed to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The induced peptide showed capacity to permeabilize membranes of bacteria and live trophozoites. This activity was abrogated by inhibition of TLR2/4-NFκB pathway or by neutralization with an anti-HBD2 antibody. Conclusions/Significance Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites bind to human intestinal cells and induce expression of HBD2; an antimicrobial molecule with capacity to destroy pathogenic bacteria and trophozoites. HDB2's possible role as a modulator of the course of intestinal infections, particularly in mixed ameba/bacteria infections, is discussed. PMID:23469306

  18. Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 agonists enhance interferon (IFN) beta-1a's immunoregulatory effects on B cells in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yazhong; Zhang, Xin; Markovic-Plese, Silva

    2016-09-15

    We report that B cells from patients with RRMS have decreased endogenous IFN-β secretion and deficient IFN receptor (IFNAR)1/2 and TLR7 gene expression in comparison to healthy controls (HCs), which may contribute to disregulation of cytokine secretion by B cells. We propose that TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation with loxorubin (LOX) and CpG, in combination with exogenous IFN-β may effectively reconstitute endogenous IFN-β production deficit and induce the secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines by B cells. Both LOX/IFN-β and CpG/IFN-β in-vitro treatments of B cells from RRMS patients induced higher endogenous IFN-β gene expression in comparison to the exogenous IFN-β alone. CpG/IFN-β combination induced higher secretion of IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-27 in comparison to stimulation with IFN-β. Our study provides a basis for future clinical studies employing IFN-β and TLR7/9 agonists, which may enhance the resolution of the inflammatory response in RRMS. PMID:27609294

  19. MicroRNA Expression Profiles of Human Blood Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells and Macrophages Reveal miR-511 as Putative Positive Regulator of Toll-like Receptor 4*

    PubMed Central

    Tserel, Liina; Runnel, Toomas; Kisand, Kai; Pihlap, Maire; Bakhoff, Lairi; Kolde, Raivo; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak; Peterson, Pärt; Rebane, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MFs) are important multifunctional immune cells. Like other cell types, they express hundreds of different microRNAs (miRNAs) that are recently discovered post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Here we present updated miRNA expression profiles of monocytes, DCs and MFs. Compared with monocytes, ∼50 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in immature and mature DCs or MFs, with major expression changes occurring during the differentiation. Knockdown of DICER1, a protein needed for miRNA biosynthesis, led to lower DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and enhanced CD14 protein levels, confirming the importance of miRNAs in DC differentiation in general. Inhibition of the two most highly up-regulated miRNAs, miR-511 and miR-99b, also resulted in reduced DC-SIGN level. Prediction of miRNA-511 targets revealed a number of genes with known immune functions, of which TLR4 and CD80 were validated using inhibition of miR-511 in DCs and luciferase assays in HEK293 cells. Interestingly, under the cell cycle arrest conditions, miR-511 seems to function as a positive regulator of TLR4. In conclusion, we have identified miR-511 as a novel potent modulator of human immune response. In addition, our data highlight that miRNA influence on gene expression is dependent on the cellular environment. PMID:21646346

  20. Regulation of migration and invasion by Toll-like receptor-9 signaling network in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Mei, Xiao-Long; Shi, Zhi; Di, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in tumorigenesis and progress of prostate cancer. However, the function and mechanism of Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) in prostate cancer is not totally understood. Here, we found that high expression of TLR9 was associated with a higher probability of lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. Further in vitro functional study verified that silence of TLR9 inhibited migration and invasion of PC-3 cells, indicating expression of TLR9 involving in the migration and invasion of cancer cells. The data of microarray exhibited silence of TLR9 induced 205 genes with larger than 2-fold changes in expression levels, including 164 genes down-regulated and 41 genes up-regulated. Functional Gene Ontology (GO) processes annotation demonstrated that the top three scores of molecular and cellular functions were regulation of programmed cell death, regulation of locomotion and response to calcium ion. TLR9 signaling network analysis of the migration and invasion related genes identified several genes, like matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP2), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and interleukin 8 (IL8), formed the core interaction network based on their known biological relationships. A few genes, such as odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM), claudin 2 (CLDN2), gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) and Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 pseudogene 1 (ROCK1P1), so far have not been found to interact with the other genes. This study provided the foundation to discover the new molecular mechanism in signaling networks of invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer. PMID:26087186

  1. [Progress on the role of Toll-like receptors in Candida albicans infections].

    PubMed

    Yun, Zhou; Jianping, Pan

    2016-05-25

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are expressed mainly on innate immunocytes such as dendritic cells and macrophages, and may have the potential to recognize and bind to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from Candida albicans, thereby triggering the downstream signals. The genetic polymorphism of TLRs is associated with susceptibility to Candida albicans. The activation of TLRs by PAMPs from Candida albicans can induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines that play key roles in the anti-infection of Candida albicans. However, in order to evade the immune response of host,Candida albicans can also change its bacterial phase. Understanding of the interaction between TLRs and Candida albicans will provide novel evidence to further clarify the mechanisms of anti-fungal immune response. PMID:27651197

  2. DAT isn’t all that: cocaine reward and reinforcement requires Toll Like Receptor 4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Northcutt, A.L.; Hutchinson, M.R.; Wang, X.; Baratta, M.V.; Hiranita, T.; Cochran, T.A.; Pomrenze, M.B.; Galer, E.L.; Kopajtic, T.A.; Li, C.M.; Amat, J.; Larson, G.; Cooper, D.C.; Huang, Y.; O’Neill, C.E.; Yin, H.; Zahniser, N.R.; Katz, J.L.; Rice, K.C.; Maier, S.F.; Bachtell, R.K.; Watkins, L.R.

    2014-01-01

    The initial reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, are largely attributed to their ability to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. Resulting increases in extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) are traditionally thought to result from cocaine’s ability to block dopamine transporters (DATs). Here we demonstrate that cocaine also interacts with the immunosurveillance receptor complex, Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4), on microglial cells to initiate central innate immune signaling. Disruption of cocaine signaling at TLR4 suppresses cocaine-induced extracellular dopamine in the NAc, as well as cocaine conditioned place preference and cocaine self-administration. These results provide a novel understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying cocaine reward/reinforcement that includes a critical role for central immune signaling, and offer a new target for medication development for cocaine abuse treatment. PMID:25644383

  3. IFN-alpha/beta-dependent cross-priming induced by specific toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2006-04-12

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that have been identified as crucial in the initiation of innate immune responses against pathogens. They are thought to be involved in shaping appropriate adaptive immune responses, although their precise contribution has not yet been fully characterised. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on cellular immune responses. We examined the ability of a range of TLR stimuli to induce CD8+ T cell responses against a model soluble protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA). We found that TLR 3, TLR 4, and TLR 9 agonists induced functional cross-priming, and that this process was dependent on IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:16823911

  4. Human Toll like receptor 4 gene expression of PBMCs in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Z; Kiani, Z; Nasiri, A A; Mashhadi, M A; Javadian, F; Haghighi, A; Kohan, F; Bahari, A; Sargazi, A

    2015-07-31

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the most pivotal pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immune systems. In this study, we evaluate the expression of the TLR4 in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) in comparison to healthy controls. Expression of TLR4 in 32 human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with DM2 and 20 control samples was assessed using Real—Time PCR technique. For each patient, body mass index (BMI) and blood glucose levels were measured. The results of Real—Time PCR showed a 5—folds increase in expression of TLR4 on the PBMCs of DM2 patients in comparison to controls. No correlation was observed between the TLR4 expression and sex or BMI. Our results confirmed that DM2 can increase TLR4 expression independent from sex, blood glucose concentrations and BMI.

  5. Orphan receptor IL-17RD regulates Toll-like receptor signalling via SEFIR/TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Mellett, Mark; Atzei, Paola; Bergin, Ronan; Horgan, Alan; Floss, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Callanan, John J; Moynagh, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    Receptor families of the innate immune response engage in 'cross-talk' to tailor optimal immune responses against invading pathogens. However, these responses are subject to multiple levels of regulation to keep in check aberrant inflammatory signals. Here, we describe a role for the orphan receptor interleukin-17 receptor D (IL-17RD) in negatively regulating Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced responses. Deficiency of IL-17RD expression in cells leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory signalling and gene expression in response to TLR stimulation, and Il17rd(-/-) mice are more susceptible to TLR-induced septic shock. We demonstrate that the intracellular Sef/IL-17R (SEFIR) domain of IL-17RD targets TIR adaptor proteins to inhibit TLR downstream signalling thus revealing a paradigm involving cross-regulation of members of the IL-17R and TLR families.

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms in dengue virus-infected children.

    PubMed

    Djamiatun, Kis; Ferwerda, Bart; Netea, Mihai G; van der Ven, André J A M; Dolmans, Wil M V; Faradz, Sultana M H

    2011-08-01

    Differential viral recognition by cells bearing Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile may influence susceptibility and severity of dengue virus infection. In central Java, Indonesia, we investigated 201 children with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and 179 healthy controls. Patients and controls were mostly ethnic Javanese. A nearly complete cosegregation of the two mutations was observed. The TLR4 299/399 genotype was found in five patients and four controls. Prevalence of the TLR4 299/399 genotype did not differ significantly between controls and DHF patients or between patients with different severities of DHF. Also, vascular leakage in patients with different TLR4 genotypes did not differ. Thus, the 299/399 TLR4 haplotype has only minor influence on susceptibility and severity of complicated dengue virus infection.

  7. Lipopolysaccharides Belonging to Different Salmonella Serovars Are Differentially Capable of Activating Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Spiga, Luisella; De Riu, Nicola; Delaconi, Paola; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Ganau, Giulia; Rubino, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar (serotype) Abortusovis is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae. This serotype is naturally restricted to ovine species and does not infect humans. Limited information is available about the immune response of sheep to S. Abortusovis. S. Abortusovis, like Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi, causes a systemic infection in which, under natural conditions, animals are not able to raise a rapid immune response. Failure to induce the appropriate response allows pathogens to reach the placenta and results in an abortion. Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are specific to bacteria and are not synthesized by the host. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of receptors that specifically recognize PAMPs. As a first step, we were able to identify the presence of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the ovine placenta by using an immunohistochemistry technique. To our knowledge, this is the first work describing the interaction between S. Abortusovis LPS and TLR4. Experiments using an embryonic cell line (HEK293) transfected with human and ovine TLR4s showed a reduction of interleukin 8 (IL-8) production by S. Abortusovis and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi upon LPS stimulation compared to Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Identical results were observed using heat-killed bacteria instead of LPS. Based on data obtained with TLR4 in vitro stimulation, we demonstrated that the serotype S. Abortusovis is able to successfully evade the immune system whereas S. Typhimurium and other serovars fail to do so. PMID:25135686

  8. [Congenital components of immunity: Toll-like receptors in the normal state and in immunopathology].

    PubMed

    Koval'chuk, L V; Khoreva, M V; Varivoda, A S

    2005-01-01

    This review deals with rapidly accumulating information on a highly important components of the congenital immune system: Toll-like receptors playing a leading role in the recognition of microbial patterns. The data on the main structural and functional features of Toll-like receptors and their distribution in the body are summarized. The main signal paths are characterized and the key molecules which take part in the transduction are pointed out. Special attention is paid to the activating action of lipopolysaccharides through TLR4. Pathological processes developing as the result of damages in the structure and function of Toll-like receptors in humans and experimental animals are determined.

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Is a Regulator of Monocyte and Electroencephalographic Responses to Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Clegern, William C.; Schmidt, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep loss triggers changes in inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain and periphery. The mechanisms that underlie these changes are ill-defined. The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activates inflammatory signaling cascades in response to endogenous and pathogen-associated ligands known to be elevated in association with sleep loss. TLR4 is therefore a possible mediator of some of the inflammation-related effects of sleep loss. Here we describe the baseline electroencephalographic sleep phenotype and the biochemical and electroencephalographic responses to sleep loss in TLR4-deficient mice. Design, Measurements and Results: TLR4-deficient mice and wild type controls were subjected to electroencephalographic and electromyographic recordings during spontaneous sleep/wake cycles and during and after sleep restriction sessions of 3, 6, and 24-h duration, during which sleep was disrupted by an automated sleep restriction system. Relative to wild type control mice, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited an increase in the duration of the primary daily waking bout occurring at dark onset in a light/dark cycle. The amount of time spent in non-rapid eye movement sleep by TLR4-deficient mice was reduced in proportion to increased wakefulness in the hours immediately after dark onset. Subsequent to sleep restriction, EEG measures of increased sleep drive were attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. TLR4 was enriched 10-fold in brain cells positive for the cell surface marker CD11b (cells of the monocyte lineage) relative to CD11b-negative cells in wild type mouse brains. To assess whether this population was affected selectively by TLR4 knockout, flow cytometry was used to count F4/80- and CD45-positive cells in the brains of sleep deprived and time of day control mice. While wild-type mice exhibited a significant reduction in the number of CD11b-positive cells in the brain after 24-h sleep restriction, TLR4-deficient mice did not. Conclusion

  10. Full-Length Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Administered with Long-Chain Poly(I·C) or the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion Elicits Potent Antibody and CD4+ T Cell Immunity and Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kastenmüller, Kathrin; Espinosa, Diego A.; Trager, Lauren; Stoyanov, Cristina; Salazar, Andres M.; Pokalwar, Santosh; Singh, Sanjay; Dutta, Sheetij; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) protein (CSP) is a major vaccine target for preventing malaria infection. Thus, developing strong and durable antibody and T cell responses against CSP with novel immunogens and potent adjuvants may improve upon the success of current approaches. Here, we compare four distinct full-length P. falciparum CS proteins expressed in Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris for their ability to induce immunity and protection in mice when administered with long-chain poly(I·C) [poly(I·C)LC] as an adjuvant. CS proteins expressed in E. coli induced high-titer antibody responses against the NANP repeat region and potent CSP-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Moreover, E. coli-derived CS proteins in combination with poly(I·C)LC induced potent multifunctional (interleukin 2-positive [IL-2+], tumor necrosis factor alpha-positive [TNF-α+], gamma interferon-positive [IFN-γ+]) CD4+ effector T cell responses in blood, in spleen, and particularly in liver. Using transgenic Plasmodium berghei expressing the repeat region of P. falciparum CSP [Pb-CS(Pf)], we showed that there was a 1- to 4-log decrease in malaria rRNA in the liver following a high-dose challenge and ∼50% sterilizing protection with a low-dose challenge compared to control levels. Protection was directly correlated with high-level antibody titers but not CD4+ T cell responses. Finally, protective immunity was also induced using the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion (GLA-SE) as the adjuvant, which also correlated with high antibody titers yet CD4+ T cell immunity that was significantly less potent than that with poly(I·C)LC. Overall, these data suggest that full-length CS proteins and poly(I·C)LC or GLA-SE offer a simple vaccine formulation to be used alone or in combination with other vaccines for preventing malaria infection. PMID:23275094

  11. Site differences of Toll-like receptor expression in the mucous epithelium of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Mantani, Y; Kamezaki, A; Udayanga, K G S; Takahara, E-i; Qi, W M; Kawano, J; Yokoyama, T; Hoshi, N; Kitagawa, H

    2011-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and might function as receptors to detect microbes. In this study, the distribution of TLR-2, -4 and -9 were immunohistochemically investigated in the rat small intestine. As a result, TLR-2 was detected in the striated borders of villous columnar epithelial cells throughout the small intestine, except for the apices of a small number of intestinal villi. TLR-4 and -9 were detected in the striated borders of the villous columnar epithelial cells only in the duodenum. TLR-4-immunopositive minute granules were found in the apical cytoplasms of epithelial cells, subepithelial spaces and blood capillary lumina. TLR-2 and -4 were detected in the striated borders of undifferentiated epithelial cells and in the luminal substances of the intestinal crypts throughout the small intestine, but TLR-9 was not detected in the crypts throughout the small intestine. Only TLR-4 was detected in the secretory granules of Paneth cells in both the jejunal and ileal intestinal crypts. These findings suggest that duodenal TLRs might monitor indigenous bacteria proliferation in the upper alimentary tract, that TLR-2 might also monitor the proliferation of colonized indigenous bacteria throughout the small intestine, that the lack of TLR-2 at the villous apices might contribute to the settlement of indigenous bacteria, and that TLR-2 and -4 are secreted from intestinal crypts.

  12. Role of Toll-like receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sinéad M

    2014-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. Although infection induces an immune response that contributes to chronic gastric inflammation, the response is not sufficient to eliminate the bacterium. H. pylori infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is linked to the severity of the host inflammatory response. Gastric epithelial cells represent the first line of innate immune defence against H. pylori, and respond to infection by initiating numerous cell signalling cascades, resulting in cytokine induction and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the gastric mucosa. Pathogen recognition receptors of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family mediate many of these cell signalling events. This review discusses recent findings on the role of various TLRs in the recognition of H. pylori in distinct cell types, describes the TLRs responsible for the recognition of individual H. pylori components and outlines the influence of innate immune activation on the subsequent development of the adaptive immune response. The mechanistic identification of host mediators of H. pylori-induced pathogenesis has the potential to reveal drug targets and opportunities for therapeutic intervention or prevention of H. pylori-associated disease by means of vaccines or immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25133016

  13. Molecular Regulation of Toll-like Receptors in Asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Lucas, Kurt; Fortuna, Christopher A.; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Best, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have both been historically associated with significant morbidity and financial burden. These diseases can be induced by several exogenous factors, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) (e.g., allergens and microbes). Endogenous factors, including reactive oxygen species, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) recognized by toll-like receptors (TLRs), can also result in airway inflammation. Asthma is characterized by the dominant presence of eosinophils, mast cells, and clusters of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells in the airways, while COPD typically results in the excessive formation of neutrophils, macrophages, and CD8+ T cells in the airways. In both asthma and COPD, in the respiratory tract, TLRs are the primary proteins of interest associated with the innate and adaptive immune responses; hence, multiple treatment options targeting TLRs are being explored in an effort to reduce the severity of the symptoms of these disorders. TLR-mediated pathways for both COPD and asthma have their similarities and differences with regards to cell types and the pro-inflammatory cytotoxins present in the airway. Because of the complex TLR cascade, a variety of treatments have been used to minimize airway hypersensitivity and promote bronchodilation. Although unsuccessful at completely alleviating COPD and severe asthmatic symptoms, new studies are focused on possible targets within the TLR cascade to ameliorate airway inflammation. PMID:26617525

  14. Toll-Like Receptors: Insights into Their Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Bernardino, Andrea L. F.; Myers, Tereance A.; Alvarez, Xavier; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis is likely caused by inflammatory effects of the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi on the nervous system. Microglia, the resident macrophage cells within the central nervous system (CNS), are important in initiating an immune response to microbial products. In addition, astrocytes, the major CNS glial cell type, also can contribute to brain inflammation. TLRs (Toll-like receptors) are used by glial cells to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), mediate innate responses, and initiate an acquired immune response. Here we hypothesize that because of their PAMP specificities, TLR1, -2, -5, and -9 may be involved in the pathogenesis of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Previous reports have shown that the rhesus monkey is the only animal model to exhibit signs of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Therefore, we used primary cultures of rhesus astrocytes and microglia to determine the role of TLRs in mediating proinflammatory responses to B. burgdorferi. The results indicate that microglia and astrocytes respond to B. burgdorferi through TLR1/2 and TLR5. In addition, we observed that phagocytosis of B. burgdorferi by microglia enhances not only the expression of TLR1, -2, and -5, but also that of TLR4. Taken together, our data provide proof of the concept that astrocyte and microglial TLR1, -2, and -5 are involved in the in vivo response of primate glial cells to B. burgdorferi. The proinflammatory molecules elicited by these TLR-mediated responses could be a significant factor in the pathogenesis of Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:18694963

  15. Toll-like receptors: the swiss army knife of immunity and vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Jennifer K; Mansell, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune cells have a critical role in defense against infection and disease. Central to this is the broad specificity with which they can detect pathogen-associated patterns and danger-associated patterns via the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) they express. Several families of PRRs have been identified including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), C-type lectin-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptors. TLRs are one of the most largely studied families of PRRs. The binding of ligands to TLRs on antigen presenting cells (APCs), mainly dendritic cells, leads to APC maturation, induction of inflammatory cytokines and the priming of naive T cells to drive acquired immunity. Therefore, activation of TLRs promotes both innate inflammatory responses and the induction of adaptive immunity. Consequently, in the last two decades mounting evidence has inextricably linked TLR activation with the pathogenesis of immune diseases and cancer. It has become advantageous to harness these aspects of TLR signaling therapeutically to accelerate and enhance the induction of vaccine-specific responses and also target TLRs with the use of biologics and small molecule inhibitors for the treatment of disease. In these respects, TLRs may be considered a ‘Swiss Army' knife of the immune system, ready to respond in a multitude of infectious and disease states. Here we describe the latest advances in TLR-targeted therapeutics and the use of TLR ligands as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27350884

  16. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Type 2 Impairs Macrophage Responsiveness to Toll-Like Receptor Ligation with the Exception of Toll-Like Receptor 7

    PubMed Central

    Schaut, Robert G.; Ridpath, Julia F.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family. BVDV isolates are classified into two biotypes based on the development of cytopathic (cp) or non-cytopathic (ncp) effects in epithelial cell culture. BVDV isolates are further separated into species, BVDV1 and 2, based on genetic differences. Symptoms of BVDV infection range from subclinical to severe, depending on strain virulence, and may involve multiple organ systems and induction of a generalized immunosuppression. During BVDV-induced immune suppression, macrophages, critical to innate immunity, may have altered pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) signaling, including signaling through toll-like receptors (TLRs). Comparison of BVDV 2 strains with different biotypes and virulence levels is valuable to determining if there are differences in host macrophage cellular responses between viral phenotypes. The current study demonstrates that cytopathic (cp), noncytopathic (ncp), high (hv) or low virulence (lv) BVDV2 infection of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMΦ) result in differential expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to uninfected MDMΦ. A hallmark of cp BVDV2 infection is IL-6 production. In response to TLR2 or 4 ligation, as might be observed during secondary bacterial infection, cytokine secretion was markedly decreased in BVDV2-infected MDMΦ, compared to non-infected MDMΦ. Macrophages were hyporesponsive to viral TLR3 or TLR8 ligation. However, TLR7 stimulation of BVDV2-infected MDMΦ induced cytokine secretion, unlike results observed for other TLRs. Together, these data suggest that BVDV2 infection modulated mRNA responses and induced a suppression of proinflammatory cytokine protein responses to TLR ligation in MDMΦ with the exception of TLR7 ligation. It is likely that there are distinct differences in TLR pathways modulated following BVDV2 infection, which have implications for macrophage responses to secondary infections. PMID:27420479

  17. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-10-13

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent.

  18. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  19. Berberine reduces Toll-like receptor-mediated macrophage migration by suppression of Src enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Erh; Ying Chang, Miao; Wei, Jyun-Yan; Chen, Yen-Jen; Maa, Ming-Chei; Leu, Tzeng-Horng

    2015-06-15

    Berberine is an isoquinoline with anti-inflammatory activity. We previously demonstrated that there was a loop of signal amplification between nuclear factor kappa B and Src for macrophage mobility triggered by the engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The simultaneous suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and cell mobility in berberine-treated macrophages suggested Src might be a target of berberine. Indeed, th reduced migration, greatly suppressed Src induction in both protein and RNA transcript by berberine were observed in macrophages exposed to LPS, peptidoglycan, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides. In addition to Src induction, berberine also inhibited LPS-mediated Src activation in Src overexpressing macrophages and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (a nitric oxide donor) could partly restore it. Moreover, berberine suppressed Src activity in fibronectin-stimulated macrophages and in v-Src transformed cells. These results implied that by effectively reducing Src expression and activity, berberine inhibited TLR-mediated cell motility in macrophages.

  20. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  1. Podocyte apoptosis is prevented by blocking the Toll-like receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saurus, P; Kuusela, S; Lehtonen, E; Hyvönen, M E; Ristola, M; Fogarty, C L; Tienari, J; Lassenius, M I; Forsblom, C; Lehto, M; Saleem, M A; Groop, P-H; Holthöfer, H; Lehtonen, S

    2015-01-01

    High serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity in normoalbuminuric patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) predicts the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. We observed that treatment of cultured human podocytes with sera from normoalbuminuric T1D patients with high LPS activity downregulated 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1), an activator of the Akt cell survival pathway, and induced apoptosis. Knockdown of PDK1 in cultured human podocytes inhibited antiapoptotic Akt pathway, stimulated proapoptotic p38 MAPK pathway, and increased apoptosis demonstrating an antiapoptotic role for PDK1 in podocytes. Interestingly, PDK1 was downregulated in the glomeruli of diabetic rats and patients with type 2 diabetes before the onset of proteinuria, further suggesting that reduced expression of PDK1 associates with podocyte injury and development of DN. Treatment of podocytes in vitro and mice in vivo with LPS reduced PDK1 expression and induced apoptosis, which were prevented by inhibiting the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway with the immunomodulatory agent GIT27. Our data show that LPS downregulates the cell survival factor PDK1 and induces podocyte apoptosis, and that blocking the TLR pathway with GIT27 may provide a non-nephrotoxic means to prevent the progression of DN. PMID:25950482

  2. Immune Adjuvant Effect of Molecularly-defined Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Toussi, Deana N.; Massari, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy is optimized by addition of immune adjuvants. However, although adjuvants have been used for over a century, to date, only few adjuvants are approved for human use, mostly aimed at improving vaccine efficacy and antigen-specific protective antibody production. The mechanism of action of immune adjuvants is diverse, depending on their chemical and molecular nature, ranging from non-specific effects (i.e., antigen depot at the immunization site) to specific activation of immune cells leading to improved host innate and adaptive responses. Although the detailed molecular mechanism of action of many adjuvants is still elusive, the discovery of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has provided new critical information on immunostimulatory effect of numerous bacterial components that engage TLRs. These ligands have been shown to improve both the quality and the quantity of host adaptive immune responses when used in vaccine formulations targeted to infectious diseases and cancer that require both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The potential of such TLR adjuvants in improving the design and the outcomes of several vaccines is continuously evolving, as new agonists are discovered and tested in experimental and clinical models of vaccination. In this review, a summary of the recent progress in development of TLR adjuvants is presented. PMID:26344622

  3. Toll-Like Receptor Polymorphisms, Inflammatory and Infectious Diseases, Allergies, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line-encoded innate immune sensors that recognize conserved microbial structures and host alarmins and signal expression of MHC proteins, costimulatory molecules, and inflammatory mediators by macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and other cell types. These processes activate immediate and early mechanisms of innate host defense, as well as initiate and orchestrate adaptive immune responses. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR genes have been associated with altered susceptibility to infectious, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, and have been found to play a role in tumorigenesis. Critical advances in our understanding of innate immune functions and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered complex interactions of genetic polymorphisms within TLRs and environmental factors. However, conclusions obtained in the course of such analyses are restricted by limited power of many studies that is likely to explain controversial findings. Further, linkages to certain ethnic backgrounds, gender, and the presence of multigenic effects further complicate the interpretations of how the TLR SNPs affect immune responses. For many TLRs, the molecular mechanisms by which SNPs impact receptor functions remain unknown. In this review, I have summarized current knowledge about the TLR polymorphisms, their impact on TLR signaling, and associations with various inflammatory, infectious, allergic diseases and cancers, and discussed the directions of future scientific research. PMID:23675778

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 in experimental kidney transplantation: early mediator of endogenous danger signals.

    PubMed

    Bergler, Tobias; Hoffmann, Ute; Bergler, Elisabeth; Jung, Bettina; Banas, Miriam C; Reinhold, Stephan W; Krämer, Bernhard K; Banas, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been described in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury, but data on the expression and function of TLR4 during renal allograft damage are still scarce. We analyzed the expression of TLR4 in an experimental rat model 6 and 28 days after allogeneic kidney transplantation in comparison to control rats and rats after syngeneic transplantation. On day 6, a significant induction in TLR4 expression--restricted to the glomerular compartment--was found in acute rejecting allografts only. TLR4 expression strongly correlated with renal function, and TLR4 induction was accompanied by a significant increase in CC chemokine expression within the graft as well as in urinary CC chemokine excretion. TLR4 induction may be caused by an influx of macrophages as well as TLR4-expressing intrinsic renal cells. Fibrinogen deposition in renal allografts correlated with renal TLR4 expression and may act as a potent stimulator of chemokine release via TLR4 activation. This study provides, for the first time, data about the precise intrarenal localization and TLR4 induction after experimental kidney transplantation. It supports the hypothesis that local TLR4 activation by endogenous ligands may be one pathological link from unspecific primary allograft damage to subsequent chemokine release, infiltration and activation of immune cells leading to deterioration of renal function and induction of renal fibrosis. PMID:23171961

  5. Pivotal role for neuronal Toll-like receptors in ischemic brain injury and functional deficits

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sung-Chun; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Xu, Xiangru; Cheng, Aiwu; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Jo, Dong Gyu; Lathia, Justin D.; Siler, Dominic A.; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Ouyang, Xin; Magnus, Tim; Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    The innate immune system senses the invasion of pathogenic microorganisms and tissue injury through Toll-like receptors (TLR), a mechanism thought to be limited to immune cells. We now report that neurons express several TLRs, and that the levels of TLR2 and -4 are increased in neurons in response to IFN-γ stimulation and energy deprivation. Neurons from both TLR2 knockout and -4 mutant mice were protected against energy deprivation-induced cell death, which was associated with decreased activation of a proapoptotic signaling cascade involving jun N-terminal kinase and the transcription factor AP-1. TLR2 and -4 expression was increased in cerebral cortical neurons in response to ischemia/reperfusion injury, and the amount of brain damage and neurological deficits caused by a stroke were significantly less in mice deficient in TLR2 or -4 compared with WT control mice. Our findings establish a proapoptotic signaling pathway for TLR2 and -4 in neurons that may render them vulnerable to ischemic death. PMID:17693552

  6. γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase is an endogenous activator of Toll-like receptor 4-mediated osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Sawako; Into, Takeshi; Suzuki, Keiko; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Takata, Takashi; Shibayama, Keigo; Niida, Shumpei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation-associated bone destruction, which is observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis, is mediated by excessive osteoclastogenesis. We showed previously that γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), an enzyme involved in glutathione metabolism, acts as an endogenous activator of such pathological osteoclastogenesis, independent of its enzymatic activity. GGT accumulation is clinically observed in the joints of RA patients, and, in animals, the administration of recombinant GGT to the gingival sulcus as an in vivo periodontitis model induces an increase in the number of osteoclasts. However, the underlying mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Here, we report that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes GGT to activate inflammation-associated osteoclastogenesis. Unlike lipopolysaccharide, GGT is sensitive to proteinase K treatment and insensitive to polymyxin B treatment. TLR4 deficiency abrogates GGT-induced osteoclastogenesis and activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling in precursor cells. Additionally, GGT does not induce osteoclastogenesis in cells lacking the signaling adaptor MyD88. The administration of GGT to the gingival sulcus induces increased osteoclastogenesis in wild-type mice, but does not induce it in TLR4-deficient mice. Our findings elucidate a novel mechanism of inflammation-associated osteoclastogenesis, which involves TLR4 recognition of GGT and subsequent activation of MyD88-dependent signaling. PMID:27775020

  7. Endosomal Toll-like receptors in clinically overt and silent autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Buyon, Jill P

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), first identified as pattern recognition receptors, are now recognized to serve as a key interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by both continuous and cyclic stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune system by endogenous nucleic acids released from apoptotic or necrotic cells. TLR7 and TLR9 function as innate sensors of viral infection as their ligands are ssRNA and dsDNA, respectively. Recognition of self nucleic acids by endosomal TLRs in B cells and pDCs is thought to be an important step in the pathogenesis of SLE, generating anti-nuclear antibodies and producing type I IFN. In this review, we take a specific look at how TLR7, non-coding RNA, and SSA/Ro60 can contribute to clinical autoimmunity and organ damage in the context of neonatal lupus (NL). Although 15 times less common than SLE, NL provides a unique opportunity to study two different aspects of autoimmunity: passively acquired tissue injury in a developing fetus and clinical progression of disease in an asymptomatic mother found to have anti-Ro60 autoantibodies only after identification of heart block/rash in a child. Finally, we discuss hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) use by asymptomatic subjects which may forestall the clinical expression of autoimmunity.

  8. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms, inflammatory and infectious diseases, allergies, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Andrei E

    2013-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line-encoded innate immune sensors that recognize conserved microbial structures and host alarmins and signal expression of MHC proteins, costimulatory molecules, and inflammatory mediators by macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and other cell types. These processes activate immediate and early mechanisms of innate host defense, as well as initiate and orchestrate adaptive immune responses. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR genes have been associated with altered susceptibility to infectious, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, and have been found to play a role in tumorigenesis. Critical advances in our understanding of innate immune functions and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered complex interactions of genetic polymorphisms within TLRs and environmental factors. However, conclusions obtained in the course of such analyses are restricted by limited power of many studies that is likely to explain controversial findings. Further, linkages to certain ethnic backgrounds, gender, and the presence of multigenic effects further complicate the interpretations of how the TLR SNPs affect immune responses. For many TLRs, the molecular mechanisms by which SNPs impact receptor functions remain unknown. In this review, I have summarized current knowledge about the TLR polymorphisms, their impact on TLR signaling, and associations with various inflammatory, infectious, allergic diseases and cancers, and discussed the directions of future scientific research.

  9. Flagellin A Toll-Like Receptor 5 Agonist as an Adjuvant in Chicken Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Preety; Deb, Rajib; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Dey, Sohini

    2014-01-01

    Chicken raised under commercial conditions are vulnerable to environmental exposure to a number of pathogens. Therefore, regular vaccination of the flock is an absolute requirement to prevent the occurrence of infectious diseases. To combat infectious diseases, vaccines require inclusion of effective adjuvants that promote enhanced protection and do not cause any undesired adverse reaction when administered to birds along with the vaccine. With this perspective in mind, there is an increased need for effective better vaccine adjuvants. Efforts are being made to enhance vaccine efficacy by the use of suitable adjuvants, particularly Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based adjuvants. TLRs are among the types of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize conserved pathogen molecules. A number of studies have documented the effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant as well as its ability to promote cytokine production by a range of innate immune cells. This minireview summarizes our current understanding of flagellin action, its role in inducing cytokine response in chicken cells, and the potential use of flagellin as well as its combination with other TLR ligands as an adjuvant in chicken vaccines. PMID:24451328

  10. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Dependent Small Intestinal Immune Responses Following Murine Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Karadas, Gül; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic cases of gastroenteritis have been attributed to Arcobacter butzleri infection, but information about the underlying immunopathological mechanisms is scarce. We have recently shown that experimental A. butzleri infection induces intestinal, extraintestinal and systemic immune responses in gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunopathological role of Toll-like Receptor-4, the receptor for lipopolysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria, during murine A. butzleri infection. To address this, gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice lacking TLR-4 were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with two different A. butzleri strains isolated from a patient (CCUG 30485) or fresh chicken meat (C1), respectively. Bacteria of either strain stably colonized the ilea of mice irrespective of their genotype at days 6 and 16 postinfection. As compared to IL-10–/– control animals, TLR-4–/– IL-10–/– mice were protected from A. butzleri-induced ileal apoptosis, from ileal influx of adaptive immune cells including T lymphocytes, regulatory T-cells and B lymphocytes, and from increased ileal IFN-γ secretion. Given that TLR-4-signaling is essential for A. butzleri-induced intestinal inflammation, we conclude that bacterial lipooligosaccharide or lipopolysaccharide compounds aggravate intestinal inflammation and may thus represent major virulence factors of Arcobacter. Future studies need to further unravel the molecular mechanisms of TLR-4-mediated A. butzleri-host interactions. PMID:26716022

  11. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates the antitumor host response induced by Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Nie, Shao-Ping; Wang, Jun-Qiao; Huang, Dan-Fei; Li, Wen-Juan; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2015-01-21

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 in Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1)-induced antitumor activity. In vitro, the apoptosis rate of S-180 cells was increased in PSG-1-induced peritoneal macrophage derived from C3H/HeN (wild-type) mice, but not from C3H/HeJ (TLR4-deficient) mice. In the S-180 tumor model, phagocytosis, NO and ROS release, phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, and expression of NF-κB were increased by PSG-1 in peritoneal macrophage derived from C3H/HeN mice. Furthermore, PSG-1 elevated Th1 cytokine production and enhanced the cytotoxic activity of CTL and NK cells in C3H/HeN mice. In addition, PSG-1 decreased the tumor weight and increased the apoptosis rate and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities of tumor derived from the C3H/HeN mice. However, none of these activities were observed in C3H/HeJ mice. In summary, these findings demonstrated that the antitumor activity of PSG-1 is mediated by TLR4.

  12. Differential Toll-Like Receptor-Signalling of Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide in Murine and Human Models

    PubMed Central

    Weehuizen, Tassili A. F.; Prior, Joann L.; van der Vaart, Thomas W.; Ngugi, Sarah A.; Nepogodiev, Sergey A.; Field, Robert A.; Kager, Liesbeth M.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis and is a CDC category B bioterrorism agent. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 impairs host defense during pulmonary B.pseudomallei infection while TLR4 only has limited impact. We investigated the role of TLRs in B.pseudomallei-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation. Purified B.pseudomallei-LPS activated only TLR2-transfected-HEK-cells during short stimulation but both HEK-TLR2 and HEK-TLR4-cells after 24 h. In human blood, an additive effect of TLR2 on TLR4-mediated signalling induced by B.pseudomallei-LPS was observed. In contrast, murine peritoneal macrophages recognized B.pseudomallei-LPS solely through TLR4. Intranasal inoculation of B.pseudomallei-LPS showed that both TLR4-knockout(-/-) and TLR2x4-/-, but not TLR2-/- mice, displayed diminished cytokine responses and neutrophil influx compared to wild-type controls. These data suggest that B.pseudomallei-LPS signalling occurs solely through murine TLR4, while in human models TLR2 plays an additional role, highlighting important differences between specificity of human and murine models that may have important consequences for B.pseudomallei-LPS sensing by TLRs and subsequent susceptibility to melioidosis. PMID:26689559

  13. Regulation of cell surface transferrin receptor-2 by iron-dependent cleavage and release of a soluble form.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Alessia; Vieillevoye, Maud; Nai, Antonella; Rausa, Marco; Ladli, Meriem; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Verdier, Frédérique; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 is a transmembrane protein whose expression is restricted to hepatocytes and erythroid cells. Transferrin receptor-2 has a regulatory function in iron homeostasis, since its inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Hepatic transferrin receptor-2 participates in iron sensing and is involved in hepcidin activation, although the mechanism remains unclear. Erythroid transferrin receptor-2 associates with and stabilizes erythropoietin receptors on the erythroblast surface and is essential to control erythrocyte production in iron deficiency. We identified a soluble form of transferrin receptor-2 in the media of transfected cells and showed that cultured human erythroid cells release an endogenous soluble form. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 originates from a cleavage of the cell surface protein, which is inhibited by diferric transferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, the shedding of the transferrin receptor-2 variant G679A, mutated in the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid motif and unable to bind diferric transferrin, is not modulated by the ligand. This observation links the process of transferrin receptor-2 removal from the plasma membrane to iron homeostasis. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 does not affect the binding of erythropoietin to erythropoietin receptor or the consequent signaling and partially inhibits hepcidin promoter activation only in vitro. Whether it is a component of the signals released by erythropoiesis in iron deficiency remains to be investigated. Our results indicate that membrane transferrin receptor-2, a sensor of circulating iron, is released from the cell membrane in iron deficiency. PMID:25637053

  14. Toll-like receptor and tumour necrosis factor dependent endotoxin-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Togbe, Dieudonnée; Schnyder-Candrian, Silvia; Schnyder, Bruno; Doz, Emilie; Noulin, Nicolas; Janot, Laure; Secher, Thomas; Gasse, Pamela; Lima, Carla; Coelho, Fernando Rodrigues; Vasseur, Virginie; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernhard; Couillin, Isabelle; Moser, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies on endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute inflammatory response in the lung are reviewed. The acute airway inflammatory response to inhaled endotoxin is mediated through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD14 signalling as mice deficient for TLR4 or CD14 are unresponsive to endotoxin. Acute bronchoconstriction, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-12 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) production, protein leak and neutrophil recruitment in the lung are abrogated in mice deficient for the adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP), but independent of TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-beta (TRIF). In particular, LPS-induced TNF is required for bronchoconstriction, but dispensable for inflammatory cell recruitment. Lipopolysaccharide induces activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of pulmonary MAPK activity abrogates LPS-induced TNF production, bronchoconstriction, neutrophil recruitment into the lungs and broncho-alveolar space. In conclusion, TLR4-mediated, bronchoconstriction and acute inflammatory lung pathology to inhaled endotoxin are dependent on TLR4/CD14/MD2 expression using the adapter proteins TIRAP and MyD88, while TRIF, IL-1R1 or IL-18R signalling pathways are dispensable. Further downstream in this axis of signalling, TNF blockade reduces only acute bronchoconstriction, while MAPK inhibition abrogates completely endotoxin-induced inflammation. PMID:18039275

  15. Toll-like receptors gene polymorphisms may confer increased susceptibility to breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, George E; Saridakis, Vasilios; Karantanos, Theodoros; Michalopoulos, Nikolaos V; Zagouri, Flora; Kontogianni, Panagiota; Lymperi, Maria; Gazouli, Maria; Zografos, George C

    2012-08-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation may be an important event in tumor cell immune evasion. TLR2 and TLR4 gene polymorphisms have been related to increased susceptibility to cancer development in various organs. 261 patients and 480 health individuals were investigated for genotype and allelic frequencies of a 22-bp nucleotide deletion (-196 to -174del) in the promoter of TLR2 gene as well as two polymorphisms causing amino acid substitutions (Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile) in TLR4 gene. As far as (-196 to -174del) in TLR2 gene is concerned ins/del and del/del genotypes and del allele were significantly more frequent in breast cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Considering Asp299Gly replacement of TLR4 gene, Gly carriers (Asp/Gly & Gly/Gly genotype) and Gly allele were overrepresented among the breast cancer cases. The -174 to -196del of TLR2 gene and Asp299Gly of TLR4 gene polymorphisms may confer an increased susceptibility to breast cancer development.

  16. Starring role of toll-like receptor-4 activation in the gut-liver axis

    PubMed Central

    Carotti, Simone; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Morini, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of the term “gut-liver axis”, many studies have focused on the functional links of intestinal microbiota, barrier function and immune responses to liver physiology. Intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases alter microbiota composition and lead to dysbiosis, which aggravates impaired intestinal barrier function via increased lipopolysaccharide translocation. The subsequent increased passage of gut-derived product from the intestinal lumen to the organ wall and bloodstream affects gut motility and liver biology. The activation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) likely plays a key role in both cases. This review analyzed the most recent literature on the gut-liver axis, with a particular focus on the role of TLR-4 activation. Findings that linked liver disease with dysbiosis are evaluated, and links between dysbiosis and alterations of intestinal permeability and motility are discussed. We also examine the mechanisms of translocated gut bacteria and/or the bacterial product activation of liver inflammation and fibrogenesis via activity on different hepatic cell types. PMID:26600967

  17. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in aquatic animals: signaling pathways, expressions and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Rauta, Pradipta R; Samanta, Mrinal; Dash, Hirak R; Nayak, Bismita; Das, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    The innate system's recognition of non-self and danger signals is mediated by a limited number of germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are single, non-catalytic, membrane-spanning PRRs present in invertebrates and vertebrates. They act by specifically recognizing PAMPs of a variety of microbes and activate signaling cascades to induce innate immunity. A large number of TLRs have been identified in various aquatic animals of phyla Cnidaria, Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Chordata. TLRs of aquatic and warm-blooded higher animals exhibit some distinctive features due to their diverse evolutionary lineages. However, majority of them share conserve signaling pathways in pathogen recognition and innate immunity. Functional analysis of novel TLRs in aquatic animals is very important in understanding the comparative immunology between warm-blooded and aquatic animals. In additions to innate immunity, recent reports have highlighted the additional roles of TLRs in adaptive immunity. Therefore, vaccines against many critical diseases of aquatic animals may be made more effective by supplementing TLR activators which will stimulate dendritic cells. This article describes updated information of TLRs in aquatic animals and their structural and functional relationship with warm-blooded animals.

  18. Regulation of Wound Healing and Organ Fibrosis by Toll-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Huebener, Peter; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic injury often triggers maladaptive wound healing responses leading to the development of tissue fibrosis and subsequent organ malfunction. Inflammation is a key component of the wound healing process and promotes the development of organ fibrosis. Here, we review the contribution of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to wound healing with a particular focus on their role in liver, lung, kidney, skin and myocardial fibrosis. We discuss the role of TLRs on distinct cell populations that participate in the repair process following tissue injury, and the contribution of exogenous and endogenous TLR ligands to the wound healing response. Systemic review of the literature shows that TLRs promote tissue repair and fibrosis in many settings, albeit with profound differences between organs. In particular, TLRs exert a pronounced effect on fibrosis in organs with higher exposure to bacterial TLR ligands, such as the liver. Targeting TLR signaling at the ligand or receptor level may represent a novel strategy for the prevention of maladaptive wound healing and fibrosis in chronically injured organs. PMID:23220258

  19. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition.

    PubMed

    Voogdt, Carlos G P; Bouwman, Lieneke I; Kik, Marja J L; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions.

  20. Upregulation of HMGB1, toll-like receptor and RAGE in human Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Luan, Guoming; Gao, Qing; Zhai, Feng; Chen, Yin; Li, Tianfu

    2016-07-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare neurological disorder of childhood characterized by uni-hemispheric inflammation, progressive neurological deficits and intractable focal epilepsy. The pathogenesis of RE is still enigmatic. Activation of endogenous high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) has been proved to be with pro-inflammatory as well as pro-convulsant effects. We hypothesized that the epileptogenic mechanisms underlying RE are related to activation of HMGB1/TLR signaling. Immunnohistochemistry approach was used to examine the expression of HMGB1, TLR2, TLR4, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in surgically resected human epileptic cortical specimens from RE (n=12), and compared that with control cortical issue (n=6). HMGB1 was ubiquitously detected in nuclei of astrocytes while its receptors were not detected in control cortex specimens. Marked expression of the receptors were observed in the lesions of RE. In particular, HMGB1 was in stead detected in cytoplasm of reactive astrocytes in RE cortex, predictive its release from glial cells. Significant greater HMGB1 and its receptors expression in RE vs. control was demonstrated by western blot. These results provide the novel evidence of intrinsic activation of these pro-inflammation pathways in RE, which suggest the specific targets in the treatment of epilepsy associated with RE. PMID:27108105

  1. Intracellular Toll-like receptor recruitment and cleavage in endosomal/lysosomal organelles.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are recognized through multiple, distinct receptors such as intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs 3, 7, 8, 9, and 13) which reside in the endosomes and lysosomes. TLRs are sensitive to chloroquine, a lysomotropic agent that neutralizes acidic compartments indicating a role for endo/lysosomal proteases for their signaling. Indeed, upon stimulation, full-length TLR7 and 9 are cleaved into a C-terminal fragment and this processing is highly dependent on a cysteine protease named asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) in dendritic cells. A recruitment and a boost in AEP activity, which was induced shortly after TLR7 and 9 stimulation, are shown to promote TLR7 and 9 cleavage and correlate with an increased acidification in endosomes and lysosomes. Moreover, mutating a putative AEP cleavage site in TLR7 or 9 strongly decreases their signaling in DCs, suggesting perhaps a direct cleavage of TLR7 and 9 by AEP. These results demonstrate that TLR7 and 9 require a proteolytic cleavage for their signaling and identified a key endocytic protease playing a critical role in this process. PMID:24377922

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mediates the Regenerative Effects of Bone Grafts for Calvarial Bone Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gilbert, James R.; Shaw, Melissa A.; Shakir, Sameer; Losee, Joseph E.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial trauma is difficult to repair and presents a significant burden to the healthcare system. The inflammatory response following bone trauma is critical to initiate healing, serving to recruit inflammatory and progenitor cells and to promote angiogenesis. A role for inflammation in graft-induced bone regeneration has been suggested, but is still not well understood. The current study assessed the impact of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) signaling on calvarial repair in the presence of morselized bone components. Calvarial defects in wild-type and global TLR4−/− knockout mouse strains were treated with fractionated bone components in the presence or absence of a TLR4 neutralizing peptide. Defect healing was subsequently evaluated over 28 days by microcomputed tomography and histology. The matrix-enriched fraction of morselized bone stimulated calvarial bone repair comparably with intact bone graft, although the capacity for grafts to induce calvarial bone repair was significantly diminished by inhibition or genetic ablation of TLR4. Overall, our findings suggest that the matrix component of bone graft stimulates calvarial bone repair in a TLR4-dependent manner. These results support the need to better understand the role of inflammation in the design and implementation of strategies to improve bone healing. PMID:25603990

  3. Toll-Like Receptors in Liver Fibrosis: Cellular Crosstalk and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Seki, Ekihiro

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that distinguish conserved microbial products, also known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), from host molecules. Liver is the first filter organ between the gastrointestinal tracts and the rest of the body through portal circulation. Thus, the liver is a major organ that must deal with PAMPs and microorganisms translocated from the intestine and to respond to the damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from injured organs. These PAMPs and DAMPs preferentially activate TLR signaling on various cell types in the liver inducing the production of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines that initiate and prolong liver inflammation, thereby leading to fibrosis. We summarize recent findings on the role of TLRs, ligands, and intracellular signaling in the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis due to different etiology, as well as to highlight the potential role of TLR signaling in liver fibrosis associated with hepatitis C infection, non-alcoholic and alcoholic steatoheoatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22661952

  4. The use of Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonists as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Vasilakos, John P; Tomai, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    Small molecule Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists have demonstrated potential as vaccine adjuvants, since they directly activate APCs and can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses, especially Th1 responses. Although the natural ligands for TLR7 and TLR8 are ssRNA, the vast majority of vaccine studies performed thus far have been performed with synthetic small molecule imidazoquinolines, such as imiquimod and resiquimod. Despite the approved clinical use of the topical TLR7 agonist, imiquimod (Aldara(®) Imiquimod 5% cream; 3M, MN, USA), for external genital warts, superficial basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis, no vaccines using TLR7, TLR8 or TLR7/8 agonists have progressed beyond early-phase clinical studies thus far. This review will highlight the nonclinical and clinical studies that indicate promise for TLR7/8 ligands as vaccine adjuvants, reasons for inconsistent results thus far, problems with current technology and potential paths forward for TLR7/8 agonists as vaccine adjuvants.

  5. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in healthy and infected canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Chotimanukul, S; Sirivaidyapong, S

    2011-10-01

    This study provides the first report into immunohistochemical localization of Toll-like receptor (TLR) in the canine reproductive tract. TLR4 was investigated in endometrium during the estrous cycle and in pyometra. Pyometra is the most important pathological condition of the uterus due to bacterial infection in dogs. To protect against invading pathogens, the female reproductive tract has evolved immune mechanisms. TLRs are the cellular components of the afferent arm of the innate immune system. The expression of TLR4 was significantly higher in the endometrial stroma compared to the endometrial surface epithelium and glandular epithelium in proestrus. The glandular epithelium and stroma at the diestrous stage expressed TLR4 significantly higher than surface epithelium. Furthermore, when compared to other healthy groups, the glandular epithelium at diestrus also higher expressed TLR4 than other stages. The expression of TLR4 in the surface epithelium was higher in dogs with pyometra compared with all other groups. And, the surface epithelium of dogs suffering from pyometra also expressed TLR4 more intensely than the glandular epithelium. The innate immunity of infected canine endometrium response to bacterial infection is intensely extremely increased by the expression of TLR4. Furthermore, the different levels of TLR4 expression seems related to physiological changes in distinct cell types of endometrium, leukocytes populations, cytokines and sex hormones. PMID:21752456

  6. Molecular cloning and characterisation of the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) toll-like receptor 1.

    PubMed

    de la Lastra, José Manuel Pérez; de la Fuente, José

    2007-01-01

    The toll-like receptor (TLR) family is an ancient pattern recognition receptor family, conserved from insects to mammals. Members of the TLR family are vital to immune function through the sensing of pathogenic agents and initiation of an appropriate immune response. In this study, we cloned a cDNA encoding for a griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) orthologue of mammalian TLR1 (CD281). The predicted 650 amino acid sequence comprised an extracellular domain with five leucine-rich repeats (LRR) and an LRR-C-terminal (LRR-CT) motif, followed by a 23 amino acid transmembrane segment, and a 190 amino acid intracytoplasmic region containing the Toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain. Vulture TLR1 and TIR domain showed 64% and 86% amino acid sequence similarity with chicken sequences. The tissue and cell expression pattern of vulture TLR1 were analysed by real time-PCR (RT-PCR) and correlated with the ability to respond to various pathogenic challenges. Despite the similarities in the overall structure and expression pattern of vulture TLR1 with other vertebrate TLRs, the length of the vulture TLR ectodomain, number and position of LRRs and N-glycosylation sites suggest structural differences that may have functional implications.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates the regenerative effects of bone grafts for calvarial bone repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gilbert, James R; Shaw, Melissa A; Shakir, Sameer; Losee, Joseph E; Billiar, Timothy R; Cooper, Gregory M

    2015-04-01

    Craniofacial trauma is difficult to repair and presents a significant burden to the healthcare system. The inflammatory response following bone trauma is critical to initiate healing, serving to recruit inflammatory and progenitor cells and to promote angiogenesis. A role for inflammation in graft-induced bone regeneration has been suggested, but is still not well understood. The current study assessed the impact of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) signaling on calvarial repair in the presence of morselized bone components. Calvarial defects in wild-type and global TLR4(-/-) knockout mouse strains were treated with fractionated bone components in the presence or absence of a TLR4 neutralizing peptide. Defect healing was subsequently evaluated over 28 days by microcomputed tomography and histology. The matrix-enriched fraction of morselized bone stimulated calvarial bone repair comparably with intact bone graft, although the capacity for grafts to induce calvarial bone repair was significantly diminished by inhibition or genetic ablation of TLR4. Overall, our findings suggest that the matrix component of bone graft stimulates calvarial bone repair in a TLR4-dependent manner. These results support the need to better understand the role of inflammation in the design and implementation of strategies to improve bone healing.

  8. Role of Toll-like receptors in photodynamic-therapy-elicited host response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen

    2004-07-01

    Treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) induces a host reaction, coordinated through a network of inflammatory and immune responses, that plays an important role in the therapy outcome. It is suggested that this host response is initiated by altered self-associated endogenous danger signals massively released from PDT-treated tumors. Toll-like receptors, localized predominantly in the membrane of immune cells, are the major sensors of the recognition arm of the innate immune system. The engagement of these receptors by PDT-generated danger signals prompts the activation of the networks of innate immunity signaling pathways leading to the downstream activation of nuclear transcription factors responsible for the transcription of inflammatory/immune response-associated genes. The contribution of PDT-induced host response to the therapeutic outcome depends on the balance between the tissue-destructive action of inflammatory/immune effectors and the impact of concomitantly mobilized negative regulatory mechanisms evolved for controlling the intensity and duration of inflammatory and immune responses.

  9. Age-associated inflammation and Toll-like receptor dysfunction prime the lungs for pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa, Ernesto; Boyd, Angela R.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with increased inflammation and risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Streptococcus pneumoniae co-opts the NFkB-regulated proteins Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) to attach and invade cells. We sought to determine if aging and chronic inflammation was associated with increased pIgR & PAFr in the lungs and increased susceptibility to S. pneumoniae. Methods Lung protein and mRNA levels were quantitated using Western blot and quantitative PCR. NFkB activation was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cytokine levels were measured by cytometric bead analysis. To model chronic inflammation mice were implanted with osmotic pumps that delivered tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. Results Aged mice and those infused with TNFα had increased levels of pIgR & PAFr in their lungs and were more susceptible to S. pneumoniae. During pneumonia, aged mice had reduced levels of pIgR & PAFr and less NFkB activation despite greater bacterial burden. We determined that aged mice had decreased amounts of lung Toll-like receptors (TLR)-1, 2, and 4 and reduced capacity to respond to S. pneumoniae with pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Conclusions Aged mice, and potentially elderly humans, are more susceptible to pneumonia because of a priming effect of chronic inflammation and TLR dysfunction. PMID:19586419

  10. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling.

  11. Toll-like receptors in prostate infection and cancer between bench and bedside

    PubMed Central

    Gambara, Guido; Cesaris, Paola; Nunzio, Cosimo; Ziparo, Elio; Tubaro, Andrea; Filippini, Antonio; Riccioli, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Toll-Like receptors (TLRs) are a family of evolutionary conserved transmembrane proteins that recognize highly conserved molecules in pathogens. TLR-expressing cells represent the first line of defence sensing pathogen invasion, triggering innate immune responses and subsequently priming antigen-specific adaptive immunity. In vitro and in vivo studies on experimental cancer models have shown both anti- and pro-tumoural activity of different TLRs in prostate cancer, indicating these receptors as potential targets for cancer therapy. In this review, we highlight the intriguing duplicity of TLR stimulation by pathogens: their protective role in cases of acute infections, and conversely their negative role in favouring hyperplasia and/or cancer onset, in cases of chronic infections. This review focuses on the role of TLRs in the pathophysiology of prostate infection and cancer by exploring the biological bases of the strict relation between TLRs and prostate cancer. In particular, we highlight the debated question of how reliable mutations or deregulated expression of TLRs are as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools for prostate cancer. So far, the anticancer activity of numerous TLR ligands has been evaluated in clinical trials only in organs other than the prostate. Here we review recent clinical trials based on the most promising TLR agonists in oncology, envisaging a potential application also in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:23551576

  12. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Mediates Prolyl Endopeptidase Release from Airway Epithelia via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Szul, Tomasz; Bratcher, Preston E; Fraser, Kyle B; Kong, Michele; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Ingersoll, Sarah; Sztul, Elizabeth; Rangarajan, Sunil; Blalock, J Edwin; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are important regulators of pulmonary remodeling and airway inflammation. Recently, we have characterized the enzyme prolyl endopeptidase (PE), a serine peptidase, as a critical protease in the generation of the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) from collagen. However, PE has been characterized as a cytosolic enzyme, and the mechanism mediating PE release extracellularly remains unknown. We examined the role of exosomes derived from airway epithelia as a mechanism for PE release and the potential extracellular signals that regulate the release of these exosomes. We demonstrate a specific regulatory pathway of exosome release from airway epithelia and identify PE as novel exosome cargo. LPS stimulation of airway epithelial cells induces release of PE-containing exosomes, which is significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA depletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These differences were recapitulated upon intratracheal LPS administration in mice competent versus deficient for TLR4 signaling. Finally, sputum samples from subjects with cystic fibrosis colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrate elevated exosome content and increased PE levels. This TLR4-based mechanism highlights the first report of nonstochastic release of exosomes in the lung and couples TLR4 activation with matrikine generation. The increased quantity of these proteolytic exosomes in the airways of subjects with chronic lung disease highlights a new mechanism of injury and inflammation in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders.

  13. Reconstitution of a Functional Toll-like Receptor 5 Binding Site in Campylobacter jejuni Flagellin*

    PubMed Central

    de Zoete, Marcel R.; Keestra, A. Marijke; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin is important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Flagellins from most species activate Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). The principal bacterial food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni escapes TLR5 recognition, probably due to an alternate flagellin subunit structure. We investigated the molecular basis of TLR5 evasion by aiming to reconstitute TLR5 stimulating activity in live C. jejuni. Both native glycosylated C. jejuni flagellins (FlaA and FlaB) and recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli failed to activate NF-κB in HEK293 cells expressing TLR5. Introduction of multiple defined regions from Salmonella flagellin into C. jejuni FlaA via a recombinatorial approach revealed three regions critical for the activation of human and mouse TLR5, including a β-hairpin structure not previously implicated in TLR5 recognition. Surprisingly, this domain was not required for the activation of chicken TLR5, indicating a selective requirement for the β-hairpin in the recognition of mammalian TLR5. Expression of the active chimeric protein in C. jejuni resulted in secreted glycosylated flagellin that induced a potent TLR5 response. Overall, our results reveal a novel structural requirement for TLR5 recognition of bacterial flagellin and exclude flagellin glycosylation as an additional mechanism of bacterial evasion of the TLR5 response. PMID:20164175

  14. Reconstitution of a functional Toll-like receptor 5 binding site in Campylobacter jejuni flagellin.

    PubMed

    de Zoete, Marcel R; Keestra, A Marijke; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2010-04-16

    Bacterial flagellin is important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Flagellins from most species activate Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). The principal bacterial food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni escapes TLR5 recognition, probably due to an alternate flagellin subunit structure. We investigated the molecular basis of TLR5 evasion by aiming to reconstitute TLR5 stimulating activity in live C. jejuni. Both native glycosylated C. jejuni flagellins (FlaA and FlaB) and recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli failed to activate NF-kappaB in HEK293 cells expressing TLR5. Introduction of multiple defined regions from Salmonella flagellin into C. jejuni FlaA via a recombinatorial approach revealed three regions critical for the activation of human and mouse TLR5, including a beta-hairpin structure not previously implicated in TLR5 recognition. Surprisingly, this domain was not required for the activation of chicken TLR5, indicating a selective requirement for the beta-hairpin in the recognition of mammalian TLR5. Expression of the active chimeric protein in C. jejuni resulted in secreted glycosylated flagellin that induced a potent TLR5 response. Overall, our results reveal a novel structural requirement for TLR5 recognition of bacterial flagellin and exclude flagellin glycosylation as an additional mechanism of bacterial evasion of the TLR5 response. PMID:20164175

  15. Response of Toll-like receptors in experimental Guillain-Barré syndrome: a kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gries, Manuela; Davies, Laura; Liu, Yang; Bachhuber, Armin; Spiegel, Jörg; Dillmann, Ulrich; Hartmann, Tobias; Fassbender, Klaus; Walter, Silke

    2012-06-19

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune disorder caused by the interaction between cellular and humoral immune responses in the peripheral nervous system. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key players in innate and have regulatory functions in adaptive immunity. In this study, we systematically examined expression patterns of TLRs in sciatic nerve and lymphoid organs during the disease course of murine experimental autoimmune neuritis and in blood from Guillain-Barré patients. A kinetic response pattern was identified, characterized by a pronounced up-regulation of TLR2, 6 and 11 on T cells and TLR4 and 6 on APCs, while TLR1 expression was decreased. Moreover, an enhanced expression of the disease promoting cytokine Interleukin-(IL)17A was detected. Additional analysis of GBS patients revealed an up-regulation of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 mRNA, negatively correlated with disease severity. This first systematic analysis of TLR expression pattern may contribute to elucidating the role of TLRs in GBS pathophysiology.

  16. Expression profile of toll like receptors in a range of water buffalo tissues (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Vahanan, B Mayil; Raj, G Dhinakar; Pawar, Rahul Mohan Chandra; Gopinath, V P; Raja, A; Thangavelu, A

    2008-11-15

    The present study was carried out to determine the expression profile of toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1-10 in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC), neutrophils, spleen, liver, lung, heart, kidney, ovary and uterus using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with bovine TLR-specific primers The buffalo TLR partial nucleotide sequences had 95-98% nucleotide homology with bovine TLR sequences available in the GenBank. PBMNC expressed all TLRs except TLR1 and neutrophils expressed all TLRs except TLR3. Expression of all TLRs was observed in spleen, lung and liver tissues. Wide range of TLR mRNA expression was observed in heart, which lacked the expression of only TLR10. Among the tissues analyzed kidneys had the least repertoire of TLR expression. The kidney tissue revealed mRNA expression of only TLR2, TLR5, TLR7 and TLR9. Among the reproductive tissues analyzed, uterus expressed a wide range of TLRs such as 2, 5, 7, 8, 9 and 10 while ovary expressed all TLRs except TLR1 indicating their immuno competence.

  17. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition

    PubMed Central

    Voogdt, Carlos G. P.; Bouwman, Lieneke I.; Kik, Marja J. L.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions. PMID:26738735

  18. The Architecture of the TIR Domain Signalosome in the Toll-like Receptor-4 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; VanWaes, Carter; Chen, Zhong; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Activated Toll-like receptors (TLRs) cluster in lipid rafts and induce pro- and anti-tumor responses. The organization of the assembly is critical to the understanding of how these key receptors control major signaling pathways in the cell. Although several models for individual interactions were proposed, the entire TIR-domain signalosome architecture has not been worked out, possibly due to its complexity. We employ a powerful algorithm, crystal structures and experimental data to model the TLR4 and its cluster. The architecture that we obtain with 8 MyD88 molecules provides the structural basis for the MyD88-templated myddosome helical assembly and receptor clustering; it also provides clues to pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways branching at the signalosome level to Mal/MyD88 and TRAM/TRIF pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. The assembly of MyD88 death domain (DD) with TRAF3 (anti-viral/anti-inflammatory) and TRAF6 (pro-inflammatory) suggest that TRAF3/TRAF6 binding sites on MyD88 DD partially overlap, as do IRAK4 and FADD. Significantly, the organization illuminates mechanisms of oncogenic mutations, demonstrates that almost all TLR4 parallel pathways are competitive and clarifies decisions at pathway branching points. The architectures are compatible with the currently-available experimental data and provide compelling insights into signaling in cancer and inflammation pathways. PMID:26293885

  19. Dynamic Arginine Methylation of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 6 Regulates Toll-like Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tikhanovich, Irina; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Artigues, Antonio; Villar, Maria T.; Dorko, Kenneth; Nawabi, Atta; Roberts, Benjamin; Weinman, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification, but its role in regulating protein function is poorly understood. This study demonstrates that, TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in innate immune signaling, is regulated by reversible arginine methylation in a range of primary and cultured cells. Under basal conditions, TRAF6 is methylated by the methyltransferase PRMT1, and this inhibits its ubiquitin ligase activity, reducing activation of toll-like receptor signaling. In response to toll-like receptor ligands, TRAF6 is demethylated by the Jumonji domain protein JMJD6. Demethylation is required for maximal activation of NF-κB. Loss of JMJD6 leads to reduced response, and loss of PRMT1 leads to basal pathway activation with subsequent desensitization to ligands. In human primary cells, variations in the PRMT1/JMJD6 ratio significantly correlate with TRAF6 methylation, basal activation of NF-κB, and magnitude of response to LPS. Reversible arginine methylation of TRAF6 by the opposing effects of PRMT1 and JMJD6 is, therefore, a novel mechanism for regulation of innate immune pathways. PMID:26221041

  20. First identification of Toll-like receptor-4 in avian brain: evolution of lipopolysaccharide recognition and inflammation-dependent responses.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Concetta; Cianciulli, Antonia; Calvello, Rosa; Cavallo, Pasqua; Mitolo, Vincenzo; Panaro, Maria Antonietta

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we examine the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment on nerve cells of chick embryo used as a universal avian model. We demonstrate that LPS leads to a dramatic cell loss in primary cultures of both glia and neurons, isolated from chick embryos. Toxic effects appear to be mediated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 complex, expressed in both glial and neuronal cells, since after TLR-4 silencing by RNA interference experiments LPS-induced cytotoxicity was prevented. The role of nitric oxide in LPS-induced cell damage has also been investigated. These results demonstrate, for the first time in avian nerve cells, the surface expression of TLR-4 and its role as a pattern recognition receptor involved in LPS-induced cell responses in a similar manner to that observed in mammals.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in the Epithelium of Inflammatory Periapical Lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, R.; Perrotta, R.E.; Musumeci, G.; Crimi, S.; dos Santos, J.N.; Rusu, M.C.; Bufo, P.; Barbato, E.; Pannone, G.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are essential for the innate immune response against invading pathogens and have been described in immunocompetent cells of areas affected by periapical disease. Besides initiating the inflammatory response, they also directly regulate epithelial cell proliferation and survival in a variety of settings. This study evaluates the in situ expression of TLR4 in periapical granulomas (PG) and radicular cysts, focusing on the epithelial compartment. Twenty-one periapical cysts (PC) and 10 PG were analyzed; 7 dentigerous non-inflamed follicular cyst (DC) served as control. TLR4 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 immunoreaction products were detected in the epithelium of all specimens, with a higher percentage of immunostained cells in PG. Although TLR4 overexpression was detected in both PG and PC, there were differences that seemed to be related to the nature of the lesion, since in PG all epithelial cells of strands, islands and trabeculae were strongly immunoreactive for TLR4, whereas in PC only some areas of the basal and suprabasal epithelial layers were immunostained. This staining pattern is consistent with the action of TLR4: in PG it could promote formation of epithelial cell rests of Malassez and in epithelial strands and islands the enhancement of cell survival, proliferation and migration, whereas in PC TLR4 could protect the lining epithelium from extensive apoptosis. These findings go some way towards answering the intriguing question of why many epithelial strands or islands in PG and the lining epithelium of apical cysts regress after non-surgical endodontic therapy, and suggest that TLR4 plays a key role in the pathobiology of the inflammatory process related to periapical disease. PMID:26708181

  2. AP1S3 mutations are associated with pustular psoriasis and impaired Toll-like receptor 3 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Setta-Kaffetzi, Niovi; Simpson, Michael A; Navarini, Alexander A; Patel, Varsha M; Lu, Hui-Chun; Allen, Michael H; Duckworth, Michael; Bachelez, Hervé; Burden, A David; Choon, Siew-Eng; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Kirby, Brian; Kolios, Antonios; Seyger, Marieke M B; Prins, Christa; Smahi, Asma; Trembath, Richard C; Fraternali, Franca; Smith, Catherine H; Barker, Jonathan N; Capon, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) is an evolutionary conserved heterotetramer that promotes vesicular trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the endosomes. The knockout of most murine AP-1 complex subunits is embryonically lethal, so the identification of human disease-associated alleles has the unique potential to deliver insights into gene function. Here, we report two founder mutations (c.11T>G [p.Phe4Cys] and c.97C>T [p.Arg33Trp]) in AP1S3, the gene encoding AP-1 complex subunit σ1C, in 15 unrelated individuals with a severe autoinflammatory skin disorder known as pustular psoriasis. Because the variants are predicted to destabilize the 3D structure of the AP-1 complex, we generated AP1S3-knockdown cell lines to investigate the consequences of AP-1 deficiency in skin keratinocytes. We found that AP1S3 silencing disrupted the endosomal translocation of the innate pattern-recognition receptor TLR-3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and resulted in a marked inhibition of downstream signaling. These findings identify pustular psoriasis as an autoinflammatory phenotype caused by defects in vesicular trafficking and demonstrate a requirement of AP-1 for Toll-like receptor homeostasis. PMID:24791904

  3. Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Graft-versus-Host Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Sanfang; Zhong, Danli; Xie, Weixin; Huang, Wenfa; Jiang, Yangyang; Li, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and infection are major complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in HSCT patients. Recent work has demonstrated that the two complications are interdependent. GVHD occurs when allo-reactive donor T lymphocytes are activated by major histocompatibility antigens or minor histocompatibility antigens on host antigen-presenting cells (APCs), with the eventual attack of recipient tissues or organs. Activation of APCs is important for the priming of GVHD and is mediated by innate immune signaling pathways. Current evidence indicates that intestinal microbes and innate pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) on host APCs, including both Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), are involved in the pathogenesis of GVHD. Patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or total body irradiation before allo-HSCT are susceptible to aggravated gastrointestinal epithelial cell damage and the subsequent translocation of bacterial components, followed by the release of endogenous dangerous molecules, termed pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which then activate the PRRs on host APCs to trigger local or systemic inflammatory responses that modulate T cell allo-reactivity against host tissues, which is equivalent to GVHD. In other words, infection can, to some extent, accelerate the progression of GVHD. Therefore, the intestinal flora’s PAMPs can interact with TLRs to activate and mature APCs, subsequently activate donor T cells with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and eventually, induce GVHD. In the present article, we summarize the current perspectives on the understanding of different TLR signaling pathways and their involvement in the occurrence of GVHD. PMID:27529218

  4. Central role of liver in anticancer and radioprotective activities of Toll-like receptor 5 agonist.

    PubMed

    Burdelya, Lyudmila G; Brackett, Craig M; Kojouharov, Bojidar; Gitlin, Ilya I; Leonova, Katerina I; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Veith, Jean; Johnson, Christopher; Haderski, Gary J; Stanhope-Baker, Patricia; Allamaneni, Shyam; Skitzki, Joseph; Zeng, Ming; Martsen, Elena; Medvedev, Alexander; Scheblyakov, Dmitry; Artemicheva, Nataliya M; Logunov, Denis Y; Gintsburg, Alexander L; Naroditsky, Boris S; Makarov, Sergei S; Gudkov, Andrei V

    2013-05-14

    Vertebrate Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) recognizes bacterial flagellin proteins and activates innate immune responses to motile bacteria. In addition, activation of TLR5 signaling can inhibit growth of TLR5-expressing tumors and protect normal tissues from radiation and ischemia-reperfusion injuries. To understand the mechanisms behind these phenomena at the organismal level, we assessed nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation (indicative of TLR5 signaling) in tissues and cells of mice treated with CBLB502, a pharmacologically optimized flagellin derivative. This identified the liver and gastrointestinal tract as primary CBLB502 target organs. In particular, liver hepatocytes were the main cell type directly and specifically responding to systemic administration of CBLB502 but not to that of the TLR4 agonist LPS. To assess CBLB502 impact on other pathways, we created multireporter mice with hepatocytes transduced in vivo with reporters for 46 inducible transcription factor families and found that along with NF-κB, CBLB502 strongly activated STAT3-, phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PREM), and activator protein 1 (AP-1-) -driven pathways. Livers of CBLB502-treated mice displayed induction of numerous immunomodulatory factors and massive recruitment of various types of immune cells. This led to inhibition of growth of liver metastases of multiple tumors regardless of their TLR5 status. The changed liver microenvironment was not, however, hepatotoxic, because CBLB502 induced resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in normal liver cells. Temporary occlusion of liver blood circulation prevented CBLB502 from protecting hematopoietic progenitors in lethally irradiated mice, indicating involvement of a factor secreted by responding liver cells. These results define the liver as the key mediator of TLR5-dependent effects in vivo and suggest clinical applications for TLR5 agonists as hepatoprotective and antimetastatic agents.

  5. Expression of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the lungs and lymphoid tissue of pigs.

    PubMed

    Kuzemtseva, Liudmila; Pérez, Mónica; Mateu, Enric; Segalés, Joaquim; Darwich, Laila

    2015-02-01

    The pattern of distribution of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in different tissues varies between species. The aim of the present study was to describe the distribution of TLR9 expression in selected tissues and organs of healthy pigs at 3 weeks and 3 months of age. Representative formalin-fixed samples of lung, thymus and secondary lymphoid tissues were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. TLR9 positive staining was observed in epithelial cells, vascular endothelium and myoepithelial-like cells, as well as in cells of the alveolar septa of the lung. Antigen presenting cells of perifollicular zones (interdigitating, macrophage and dendritic-like cells) of the Peyer's patches, lymph nodes, spleen and thymus were also immunoreactive for TLR9. No differences were seen in TLR9 protein expression in tissues from the two age groups.

  6. Expression of toll-like receptors in hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Dai, J J; Hu, W F; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can specifically identify pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by recognizing structural patterns in diverse microbial molecules, and can provide an effective defense against multiple microbial infectious. A variety of TLRs can be expressed on the surface of liver parenchymal as well as nonparenchymal cells. Kupffer cells are a type of hepatic nonparenchymal macrophage, and are positively associated with the severity of liver fibrosis. They play an important role in the synthesis and deposition of the extracellular matrix by upregulating the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases and downregulating the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Cirrhosis, a chronic diffuse lesion usually accompanying extensive liver fibrosis and nodular regeneration, is caused by liver parenchymal cells repeating injury-repair following reconstruction of organizational structure in the hepatic lobules. Hepatocellular carcinoma is caused by repeated and persistent chronic severe liver injury, and partial hepatocytes can eventually transform into hepatoma cells. Multiple TLRs such as TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9, as well as other receptors, can be expressed in cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. About 53 and 85% of hepatocellular carcinoma patients frequently express TLR3 and TLR9, respectively. The chronic and repeated liver injury caused by alcohol, and HBV, HCV, or other pathogens can be recognized by TLRs through the PAMP pathway, which directly increases the risk for hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, we briefly present evidence that the novel cellular molecular mechanisms of TLRs may provide more information about new therapeutics targets of the anti-inflammatory immune response.

  7. Toll-like receptor-4 pathway is required for the pathogenesis of human chronic endometritis

    PubMed Central

    JU, JINFEN; LI, LIANGPENG; XIE, JINGYAN; WU, YAN; WU, XI; LI, WEIHON

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signal transduction is a central component of the primary innate immune response to pathogenic challenge. TLR4, a member of the TLR family, is highly expressed in the endometrial cells of the uterus and could thus be a key link between human chronic endometritis (CE) and the immune system. However, the exact biological function of TLR4 in human CE remains largely unexplored. The present study aimed to examine the role of TLR4 in human CE. A comprehensive expression and activation analysis of TLR4 in the endometrial cells of the uterus from patients with human CE (n=25) and normal endometrial (NE) tissue (n=15) was performed. Western blot analyses demonstrated that compared with NE, the protein expression TLR4 markedly increased in human CE. Endometrial tissue scrapings were also used for total RNA extraction and were transcribed and amplified by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that significant upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and downregulation of IL-10 mRNA was observed in CE compared with the NE group. Furthermore, the protein of the signaling adapter myeloid differentiation factor-88 and the accessory molecules (TNF receptor associated factor 6 and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1) were also detected in all the assayed tissues. Of note, differential expression (CE versus NE) was observed by immunoblotting at each level of the nuclear factor-κB signaling cascade, including inhibitor κBα and P65 (all P<0.05). The altered TLR4 and its corresponding downstream signaling molecules in CE cells may be of relevance for the progression of the human CE. These findings indicate that the evaluation of expression patterns of TLR4 holds promise for the treatment of human CE. PMID:25371751

  8. Toll-like receptor-4 pathway is required for the pathogenesis of human chronic endometritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jinfen; Li, Liangpeng; Xie, Jingyan; Wu, Yan; Wu, Xi; Li, Weihon

    2014-12-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signal transduction is a central component of the primary innate immune response to pathogenic challenge. TLR4, a member of the TLR family, is highly expressed in the endometrial cells of the uterus and could thus be a key link between human chronic endometritis (CE) and the immune system. However, the exact biological function of TLR4 in human CE remains largely unexplored. The present study aimed to examine the role of TLR4 in human CE. A comprehensive expression and activation analysis of TLR4 in the endometrial cells of the uterus from patients with human CE (n=25) and normal endometrial (NE) tissue (n=15) was performed. Western blot analyses demonstrated that compared with NE, the protein expression TLR4 markedly increased in human CE. Endometrial tissue scrapings were also used for total RNA extraction and were transcribed and amplified by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that significant upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and downregulation of IL-10 mRNA was observed in CE compared with the NE group. Furthermore, the protein of the signaling adapter myeloid differentiation factor-88 and the accessory molecules (TNF receptor associated factor 6 and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1) were also detected in all the assayed tissues. Of note, differential expression (CE versus NE) was observed by immunoblotting at each level of the nuclear factor-κB signaling cascade, including inhibitor κBα and P65 (all P<0.05). The altered TLR4 and its corresponding downstream signaling molecules in CE cells may be of relevance for the progression of the human CE. These findings indicate that the evaluation of expression patterns of TLR4 holds promise for the treatment of human CE. PMID:25371751

  9. Toll-like receptor-4-dependence of the lipopolysaccharide-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Huang, D; Li, Z J; Li, X H; Wang, X; Yang, H P; Tian, S P; Mao, Y; Liu, M F; Wang, Y F; Wu6, Y; Han7, X F

    2016-01-01

    Bone fractures or bones subjected to open conduction and internal fixation are easily infected by bacteria; bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been recognized as an important pathogenic factor affecting bone fracture healing. Therefore, the effect of LPS on bone metabolism is relevant for bone healing. In this study, we investigated the effect of LPS on the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 (an LPS receptor) by using real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting. We also examined the regulatory role of LPS in osteoblast differentiation by measuring the ALP activity, matrix mineralization, and ALP, OCN, and Runx2 mRNA (essential factors affecting osteoblast differentiation) expression in LPS-treated mouse osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells. We also evaluated the effect of TLR-4 on LPS-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation using RNA interference. LPS promotes TLR-4 mRNA and protein expression in MC3T3-E1 cells (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001), and inhibits osteoblast differentiation by downregulating matrix mineralization and ALP activity (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001), and suppressing the expression ALP, OCN, and Runx2 mRNA in MC3T3-E1 cells (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Conversely, RNAi-mediated TLR-4 knockdown abrogates the LPS-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). In summary, LPS was shown to inhibit osteoblast differentiation by suppressing the expression of ALP, OCN, and Runx2 in a TLR-4-dependent manner. The results of this study may provide insights into the signal pathway of LPS-induced bone loss or delayed bone fracture healing. PMID:27173231

  10. Toll-like receptor 4-positive macrophages protect mice from Pasteurella pneumotropica-induced pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Marcia L.; Mosier, Derek A.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-positive macrophages in early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacteria. TLR4 is a trans-membrane receptor that is the primary recognition molecule for lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria. The TLR4(Lps-del) mouse strains C57BL10/ScN (B10) and STOCK Abb(tm1) TLR4(Lps-del) Slc11a1(s)(B10 x C2D) are susceptible to pulmonary infections and develop pneumonia when naturally or experimentally infected by the opportunistic bacterium Pasteurella pneumotropica. Since these mice have the TLR4(Lps-del) genotype, we hypothesized that reconstitution of mice with TLR4-positive macrophages would provide resistance to this bacterium. A cultured macrophage cell line (C2D macrophages) and bone marrow cells from C2D mice were adoptively transferred to B10 and B10 x C2D mice by intraperitoneal injection. C2D macrophages increased B10 and B10 x C2D mouse resistance to P. pneumotropica. In C2D-recipient mice there was earlier transcription of tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemokines JE and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) in the lungs of B10 and B10 x C2D mice, and there was earlier transcription of KC and MIP-1alpha in B10 x C2D mice. In addition, the course of inflammation following experimental Pasteurella challenge was altered in C2D recipients. C2D macrophages also protected B10 x C2D mice, which lack CD4(+) T cells. These data indicate that macrophages are critical for pulmonary immunity and can provide host resistance to P. pneumotropica. This study indicates that TLR4-positive macrophages are important for early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacterial infections.

  11. HIGH GLUCOSE INDUCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN MONOCYTES: MECHANISM OF ACTIVATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced inflammation is central in diabetes complications and monocytes are important in orchestrating these effects. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune responses as well as inflammation. However, there is a paucity of data examining the expression a...

  12. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  13. Toll Like Receptor-4 Mediates Vascular Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Diet-Induced Obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular dysfunction is a major complication of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. The current studies were undertaken to determine if inflammatory responses are activated in the vasculature of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), and if so, whether Toll Like Receptor-4 (TLR4), a ke...

  14. Systemic cancer immunotherapy with Toll-like receptor 7 agonists: Timing is everything.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Christian; Bourquin, Carole

    2012-03-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists represent a promising strategy for the immunotherapy of cancer. We have recently investigated the influence of TLR tolerance on the efficacy of systemic tumor treatment with TLR7 ligands. We propose that considering the kinetics of receptor sensitivity highly improves the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22720251

  15. Toll-like Receptors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Prospects for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Uk; Sreih, Antoine; Bucala, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental and clinical studies have placed new emphasis on the role of the innate immune system in SLE. Nucleic acid-containing immune complexes activate the innate response by engaging specific Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and promote the generation of autoantibodies. Pharmacologic modulation of TLR-directed pathways may offer new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of SLE. PMID:18722558

  16. Toll-like Receptors as a Target of Food-derived Anti-inflammatory Compounds*

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Takahiro; Nakashima, Fumie; Honda, Kazuya; Lu, Yu-Jhang; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Ushida, Yusuke; Aizawa, Koichi; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Oe, Sho; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takashi; Uchida, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in linking pathogen recognition with the induction of innate immunity. They have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, representing potential targets for prevention/treatment. Vegetable-rich diets are associated with the reduced risk of several inflammatory disorders. In the present study, based on an extensive screening of vegetable extracts for TLR-inhibiting activity in HEK293 cells co-expressing TLR with the NF-κB reporter gene, we found cabbage and onion extracts to be the richest sources of a TLR signaling inhibitor. To identify the active substances, we performed activity-guiding separation of the principal inhibitors and identified 3-methylsulfinylpropyl isothiocyanate (iberin) from the cabbage and quercetin and quercetin 4′-O-β-glucoside from the onion, among which iberin showed the most potent inhibitory effect. It was revealed that iberin specifically acted on the dimerization step of TLRs in the TLR signaling pathway. To gain insight into the inhibitory mechanism of TLR dimerization, we developed a novel probe combining an isothiocyanate-reactive group and an alkyne functionality for click chemistry and detected the probe bound to the TLRs in living cells, suggesting that iberin disrupts dimerization of the TLRs via covalent binding. Furthermore, we designed a variety of iberin analogues and found that the inhibition potency was influenced by the oxidation state of the sulfur. Modeling studies of the iberin analogues showed that the oxidation state of sulfur might influence the global shape of the isothiocyanates. These findings establish the TLR dimerization step as a target of food-derived anti-inflammatory compounds. PMID:25294874

  17. Agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 containing synthetic dinucleotide motifs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Putta, Mallikarjuna R; Bhagat, Lakshmi; Li, Yukui; Zhu, Fugang; Wang, Daqing; Tang, Jimmy X; Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Agrawal, Sudhir

    2007-12-13

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG motifs activate Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Our previous studies have shown that ODNs containing two 5'-ends are more immunostimulatory than those with one 5'-end. In the present study, to understand the role of functional groups in TLR9 recognition and subsequent immune response, we substituted C or G of a CpG dinucleotide with 5-OH-dC, 5-propyne-dC, furano-dT, 1-(2'-deoxy-beta- d-ribofuranosyl)-2-oxo-7-deaza-8-methyl-purine, dF, 4-thio-dU, N(3)-Me-dC, N (4)-Et-dC, Psi-iso-dC, and arabinoC or 7-deaza-dG, 7-deaza-8-aza-dG, 9-deaza-dG, N(1)-Me-dG, N(2)-Me-dG, 6-Thio-dG, dI, 8-OMe-dG, 8-O-allyl-dG, and arabinoG in ODN containing two 5'-ends. Agonists of TLR9 containing cytosine or guanine modification showed activity in HEK293 cells expressing TLR9, mouse spleen, and human cell-based assays and in vivo in mice. The results presented here provide insight into which specific chemical modifications at C or G of the CpG motif are recognized by TLR9 and the ability to modulate immune responses substituting natural C or G in immune modulatory oligonucleotides. PMID:17988082

  18. Practical techniques for detection of Toll-like receptor-4 in the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Ryan; Abreu, Maria T; Fukata, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    The human intestine has evolved in the presence of a diverse array of luminal microorganisms. In order to maintain intestinal homeostasis, mucosal immune responses to theses microorganisms must be tightly regulated. The intestine needs to be able to respond to pathogenic organisms while at the same time maintain tolerance to normal commensal flora. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in this delicate balance. TLRs are transmembrane noncatalytic receptor proteins that induce activation of innate and adaptive immune responses to microorganisms by recognizing structurally conserved molecular patterns of microbes. Expression of TLRs by intestinal epithelial cell is normally down-regulated to maintain immune tolerance to the luminal microorganisms.One of the challenges of TLR research in the human intestine is that it is difficult for many experimental methods to detect very low expression of TLRs within the intestinal mucosa. Quantitative methods such as PCR are limited in their ability to detect TLR