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  1. Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  2. Exploring cell-based tolerance strategies for hand and face transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Madeline; Grahammer, Johanna; Khalifian, Saami; Furtmüller, Georg J; Lee, W P Andrew; Raimondi, Giorgio; Brandacher, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Broader clinical application of reconstructive hand and face transplantation is hindered by the need for lifelong immunosuppression for allograft maintenance. In this review, we summarize various cell-based approaches to tolerance induction currently under investigation in both clinical and pre-clinical models to alleviate the need for chronic immunosuppression. These include strategies to induce mixed hematopoietic chimerism, therapy with T and B regulatory cells, regulatory macrophages, tolerogenic dendritic cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. The vascularized, intragraft bone components inherent to reconstructive transplants serve as a continuous source of donor-derived hematopoietic cells, and make hand and face transplants uniquely well suited for cell-based approaches to tolerance that may ultimately tilt the risk-benefit balance for these life-changing, but not life-saving, procedures.

  3. Hepatic tissue engineering: from transplantation to customized cell-based liver directed therapies from the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, Henning C; Kaufmann, Peter M; Bruns, Helge; Kluth, Dietrich; Horch, Raymund E; Vacanti, Joseph P; Kneser, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Today, liver transplantation is still the only curative treatment for liver failure due to end-stages liver diseases. Donor organ shortage, high cost and the need of immunosuppressive medications are still the major limitations in the field of liver transplantation. Thus, alternative innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, are under investigation with the aim, that in future an artificial liver tissue could be created and be used for the replacement of the liver function in patients. Using cells instead of organs in this setting should permit (i) expansion of cells in an in vitro phase, (ii) genetic or immunological manipulation of cells for transplantation, (iii) tissue typing and cryopreservation in a cell bank, and (iv) the ex vivo genetic modification of patient's own cells prior re-implantation. Function and differentiation of liver cells are influenced by the three-dimensional organ architecture. The use of polymeric matrices permits the three dimensional formation of a neo-tissue and specific stimulation by adequate modification of the matrix-surface which might be essential for appropriate differentiation of transplanted cells. Additionally, culturing hepatocytes on three dimensional matrices permits culture in a flow bioreactor system with increased function and survival of the cultured cells. Based on bioreactor technology, bioartificial liver devices (BAL) are developed for extracorporeal liver support. Although BALs improved clinical and metabolic conditions, increased patient survival rates have not been proven yet. For intra-corporeal liver replacement, a concept which combines Tissue Engineering using three-dimensional, highly porous matrices with cell transplantation could be useful. In such a concept, whole liver mass transplantation, long term engraftment and function as well as correction of a metabolic defect in animal models could be achieved with a principally reversible procedure. Future studies have to

  4. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live. Transplanted islet cells, however, can take over the work of the destroyed cells. The beta cells in these islets will begin to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with ...

  5. Stem cell-based approaches to improve nerve regeneration: potential implications for reconstructive transplantation?

    PubMed

    Khalifian, Saami; Sarhane, Karim A; Tammia, Markus; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Mao, Hai-Quan; Cooney, Damon S; Shores, Jaimie T; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2015-02-01

    Reconstructive transplantation has become a viable option to restore form and function after devastating tissue loss. Functional recovery is a key determinant of overall success and critically depends on the quality and pace of nerve regeneration. Several molecular and cell-based therapies have been postulated and tested in pre-clinical animal models to enhance nerve regeneration. Schwann cells remain the mainstay of research focus providing neurotrophic support and signaling cues for regenerating axons. Alternative cell sources such as mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived stromal cells have also been tested in pre-clinical animal models and in clinical trials due to their relative ease of harvest, rapid expansion in vitro, minimal immunogenicity, and capacity to integrate and survive within host tissues, thereby overcoming many of the challenges faced by culturing of human Schwann cells and nerve allografting. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived Schwann cells are of particular interest since they can provide abundant, patient-specific autologous Schwann cells. The majority of experimental evidence on cell-based therapies, however, has been generated using stem cell-seeded nerve guides that were developed to enhance nerve regeneration across "gaps" in neural repair. Although primary end-to-end repair is the preferred method of neurorrhaphy in reconstructive transplantation, mechanistic studies elucidating the principles of cell-based therapies from nerve guidance conduits will form the foundation of further research employing stem cells in end-to-end repair of donor and recipient nerves. This review presents key components of nerve regeneration in reconstructive transplantation and highlights the pre-clinical studies that utilize stem cells to enhance nerve regeneration.

  6. Post-transplantation Cyclophosphamide and Sirolimus after Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Using a Treosulfan-based Myeloablative Conditioning and Peripheral Blood Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Cieri, Nicoletta; Greco, Raffaella; Crucitti, Lara; Morelli, Mara; Giglio, Fabio; Levati, Giorgia; Assanelli, Andrea; Carrabba, Matteo G; Bellio, Laura; Milani, Raffaella; Lorentino, Francesca; Stanghellini, Maria Teresa Lupo; De Freitas, Tiago; Marktel, Sarah; Bernardi, Massimo; Corti, Consuelo; Vago, Luca; Bonini, Chiara; Ciceri, Fabio; Peccatori, Jacopo

    2015-08-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) performed using bone marrow (BM) grafts and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) has gained much interest for the excellent toxicity profile after both reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning. We investigated, in a cohort of 40 high-risk hematological patients, the feasibility of peripheral blood stem cells grafts after a treosulfan-melphalan myeloablative conditioning, followed by a PTCy and sirolimus-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis (Sir-PTCy). Donor engraftment occurred in all patients, with full donor chimerism achieved by day 30. Post-HSCT recovery of lymphocyte subsets was broad and fast, with a median time to CD4 > 200/μL of 41 days. Cumulative incidences of grade II to IV and III-IV acute GVHD were 15% and 7.5%, respectively, and were associated with a significant early increase in circulating regulatory T cells at day 15 after HSCT, with values < 5% being predictive of subsequent GVHD occurrence. The 1-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 20%. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 100 days and 1 year were 12% and 17%, respectively. With a median follow-up for living patients of 15 months, the estimated 1-year overall and disease-free survival (DFS) was 56% and 48%, respectively. Outcomes were more favorable in patients who underwent transplantation in complete remission (1-year DFS 71%) versus patients who underwent transplantation with active disease (DFS, 34%; P = .01). Overall, myeloablative haploidentical HSCT with peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and Sir-PTCy is a feasible treatment option: the low rates of GVHD and NRM as well as the favorable immune reconstitution profile pave the way for a prospective comparative trial comparing BM and PBSC in this specific transplantation setting.

  7. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  8. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants A ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  9. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doney, Kristine C; Mielcarek, Marco; Stewart, F Marc; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2015-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used to treat a single disease with multiorgan involvement or 2 separate diseases, the first requiring SOT and the second often a possible complication of SOT. Results of such serial transplants have been reported sporadically in the literature, usually as single case studies. Thirteen autologous and 27 allogeneic HCTs after SOT published previously are summarized. A more detailed review is provided for an additional 16 patients transplanted at a single institution, 8 of whom had autologous and 8 of whom had allogeneic HCT after SOT. Five of 8 autologous transplant recipients are alive a median of 4.6 years after HCT. Four of 8 allogeneic HCT recipients are alive a median of 8.7 years after HCT. In carefully selected patients, HCT after SOT is feasible and associated with a low incidence of either solid organ or hematopoietic cell rejection.

  10. Mesothelial cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Witkowicz, Joanna

    2008-05-01

    Mesothelial cells are an integral part of the peritoneum and play an important role in maintaining its structural and functional properties. In the recent years a number of studies on mesothelial cells have been performed to evaluate the localization, secretional properties and the ability of regeneration and transdifferentiation of these cells. They are also involved in the repair of the peritoneum damage following surgery or peritonitis. Mesothelial cells produce several cytokines, growth factors and extracellular matrix components, possessing anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Because of their plasticity, these cells are able to form a new cell type like fibroblast, endothelial and smooth muscle cell, chondrocyte, osteoblast, adipocyte or neuron. The first step involves mesothelial cell transdifferentiation into progenitor cells with the capacity of further differentiation. In this paper the current knowledge concerning the mesothelial cell differentiation and transplantation has been reviewed. Own mesothelial cells of a patient are used in transplantation. They are sampled, cultured in vitro and then they can be used in the prevention and treatment of post-operative abdominal adhesions, incisional hernias, repair of peritoneal membrane of patients on long-term peritoneal dialysis, the prevention of ischemic myocardial damage, nerve regeneration and genetically modified recombinant protein secretion. Inevitably, more potential applications of transplanted mesothelial cell will be available over the next few years.

  11. Magnetic Cell Labeling of Primary and Stem Cell-Derived Pig Hepatocytes for MRI-Based Cell Tracking of Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R.; Garrett, Wesley M.; Welch, Glenn; Caperna, Thomas J.; Talbot, Neil C.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP) and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF). The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO) that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility. PMID:25856627

  12. Enhanced infarct myocardium repair mediated by thermosensitive copolymer hydrogel-based stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Lang, Meidong; Xiao, Yan; Lian, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation by intramyocardial injection has been proposed as a promising therapy strategy for cardiac repair after myocardium infarction. However, low retention and survival of grafted MSCs hinder its further application. In this study, copolymer with N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylic acid/2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) ratio of 88:9.6:2.4 was bioconjugated with type I collagen to construct a novel injectable thermosensitive hydrogel. The injectable and biocompatible hydrogel-mediated MSC transplantation could enhance the grafted cell survival in the myocardium, which contributed to the increased neovascularization, decreased interstitial fibrosis, and ultimately improved heart function to a significantly greater degree than regular MSC transplantation. We suggest that this novel hydrogel has the potential for future stem cell transplantation. PMID:25432986

  13. Enhanced infarct myocardium repair mediated by thermosensitive copolymer hydrogel-based stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yu; Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Lang, Meidong; Xiao, Yan; Lian, Sheng; Guo, Changfa; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation by intramyocardial injection has been proposed as a promising therapy strategy for cardiac repair after myocardium infarction. However, low retention and survival of grafted MSCs hinder its further application. In this study, copolymer with N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylic acid/2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) ratio of 88:9.6:2.4 was bioconjugated with type I collagen to construct a novel injectable thermosensitive hydrogel. The injectable and biocompatible hydrogel-mediated MSC transplantation could enhance the grafted cell survival in the myocardium, which contributed to the increased neovascularization, decreased interstitial fibrosis, and ultimately improved heart function to a significantly greater degree than regular MSC transplantation. We suggest that this novel hydrogel has the potential for future stem cell transplantation.

  14. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Parents > Stem Cell Transplants A A A What's in this article? ... Recovery Coping en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in the body that have the ...

  15. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Congenital Hemoglobinopathies Using a Tailored Busulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen: Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Zaidman, Irina; Rowe, Jacob M; Khalil, Abdalla; Ben-Arush, Myriam; Elhasid, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only proven curative option for patients with hemoglobinopathies, both thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA). A busulfan-based myeloablative conditioning regimen is the standard of care for HSCT in these patients, although increased treatment-related morbidity, including veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been demonstrated. Thirty-eight pediatric patients, median age 8 years (range, 6 months to 22 years), suffering from hemoglobinopathy were treated at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, between 1998 and 2011. Thirty-four patients had thalassemia major and 4 had SCA. The 38 patients underwent 40 HSCTs, 34 of which were first transplants and 6 second transplants. Most transplants (32/40) were from matched sibling donors. Sources of stem cells were peripheral blood in 30 transplants, bone marrow in 7 transplants, and cord blood in 3 transplants. All received different customized busulfan-based conditioning regimens tailored by pharmacokinetic analysis of busulfan levels. Primary engraftment occurred in 37 of 40 transplants. Neutrophil engraftment (>.5 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 15.3 days post-transplantation (range, 10 to 45). Platelet transfusion independence (>20 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 22.3 days (range, 11 to 60). The rate of 5-year overall survival for thalassemia patients after first transplantation was 90.5% ± 5.3%. The rate of 5-year thalassemia-free survival was 81.7% ± 6.8%. Cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 17.6%. Rate of grades III to IV GVHD was 8.8%. Cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 23.5%, with 11.8% incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. One patient developed VOD. Full donor chimerism occurred in 36.4% of patients with class 1 + 2 thalassemia, compared with 78.6% in class 3 thalassemia (P = .049). Overall survival above 90% in patients undergoing their first transplant was demonstrated using busulfan-based

  16. Reduced intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantion for MDS using tacrolimus/sirolimus-based GVHD prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ryotaro; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Stiller, Tracey; Thomas, Sandra H.; Chao, Joseph; Alvarnas, Joseph; Parker, Pablo M.; Pullarkat, Vinod; Maegawa, Rodrigo; Stein, Anthony S.; Snyder, David S.; Bhatia, Ravi; Chang, Karen; Wang, Shirong; Cai, Ji-Lian; Senitzer, David; Forman, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a consecutive series of 59 patients with MDS who underwent reduced-intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RI-HSCT) with fludarabine/melphalan conditioning and tacrolimus/sirolimus-based GVHD prophylaxis. Two-year OS, EFS, and relapse incidences were 75.1%, 65.2%, and 20.9%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality at 100 days, 1 year, and 2 years was 3.4%, 8.5%, and 10.5%, respectively. The incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD was 35.4%; grade III-IV was 18.6%. Forty of 55 evaluable patients developed chronic GVHD, 35 extensive grade. This RI-HSCT protocol produces encouraging outcomes in MDS patients, and tacrolimus/sirolimus-based GVHD prophylaxis may contribute to that promising result. PMID:22677229

  17. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-09

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-05-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class-based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  19. Cell sheet transplantation for heart tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2013-08-10

    Cell transplantation is attracting considerable attention as the next-generation therapy for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We have developed cell sheet engineering as a type of scaffold-less tissue engineering for application in myocardial tissue engineering and the repair of injured heart tissue by cell transplantation. Various types of cell sheet transplantation have improved cardiac function in animal models and clinical settings. Furthermore, cell-based tissue engineering with human induced pluripotent stem cell technology is about to create thick vascularized cardiac tissue for cardiac grafts and heart tissue models. In this review, we summarize the current cardiac cell therapies for treating heart failure with cell sheet technology and cell sheet-based tissue engineering.

  20. What Is a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as hematopoietic stem cell transplant, hematopoietic cell transplant, autologous transplant, or allogeneic ... or bone marrow transplant replaces abnormal blood-forming stem cells with healthy cells. When the healthy stem cells ...

  1. Flow Cytometry and Transplantation-Based Quantitative Assays for Satellite Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arpke, Robert W; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In response to muscle damage, satellite cells proliferate and undertake both differentiation and self-renewal, generating new functional muscle tissue and repopulating this new muscle with stem cells for future injury responses. For many questions relating to the physiological regulation of satellite cells, quantitative readouts of self-renewal and differentiation can be very useful. There is a particular need for a quantitative assay for satellite cell self-renewal that does not rely solely upon sectioning, staining and counting cells in sections. In this chapter, we provide detailed methods for quantifying the self-renewal and differentiation potential of a given population of satellite cells using an assay involving transplantation into injured, regenerating muscle together with specific markers for donor cell identity and state of differentiation. In particular, using the Pax7-ZsGreen transgene as a marker of satellite cell state, self-renewal can be quantified by FACS on transplanted muscle to actually count the total number of resident satellite cells at time points following transplantation.

  2. Treosulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen in Sibling and Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marzollo, Antonio; Calore, Elisabetta; Tumino, Manuela; Pillon, Marta; Gazzola, Maria Vittoria; Destro, Roberta; Colombatti, Raffaella; Marson, Piero; Tison, Tiziana; Colpo, Anna; Mainardi, Chiara; Gabelli, Maria; Boaro, Maria Paola; Rossin, Sara; Strano, Aurora; Quaglia, Nadia; Menzato, Federica; Basso, Giuseppe; Sainati, Laura; Messina, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Lack of suitable donors and regimen related toxicity are major barriers for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The aim of the study is the assessment of efficacy and toxicity of Treosulfan-based conditioning regimen for SCD also when alternative donors such as mismatched unrelated donor and haploidentical donor are employed. Methods We report our single-center experience: 11 patients with SCD received HSCT with a Treosulfan/Thiotepa/Fludarabine/Anti-thymoglobulin conditioning regimen between 2010 and 2015. The donor was a matched sibling donor (n= 7), a haploidentical parent (n= 2), a matched unrelated donor (n= 1) or a mismatched unrelated donor (n=1). The haploidentical and mismatched unrelated donor grafts were manipulated by removing TCRαβ and CD19 positive cells. Results All patients survived the procedure and achieved stable engraftment. Stable mixed chimerism was observed in 5/11 patients. Grade III–IV regimen related toxicity was limited to mucositis and no grade III–IV graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) occurred. No SCD manifestation was observed post transplant and cerebral vasculopathy improved in 3/5 evaluable patients. Organ function evaluation showed no pulmonary, cardiac or renal toxicity but gonadal failure occurred in 1/4 evaluable patients. Conclusion Our data suggest that Treosulfan is associated with low toxicity and may be employed also for unrelated and haploidentical donor HSCT. PMID:28293402

  3. Total Body Irradiation-Based Myeloablative Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation Is a Safe and Effective Alternative to Unrelated Donor Transplantation in Patients Without Matched Sibling Donors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Scott R; Sizemore, Connie A; Sanacore, Melissa; Zhang, Xu; Brown, Stacey; Holland, H Kent; Morris, Lawrence E; Bashey, Asad

    2015-07-01

    We enrolled 30 patients on a prospective phase II trial utilizing a total body irradiation (TBI)-based myeloablative preparative regimen (fludarabine 30 mg/m2/day × 3 days and TBI 150 cGy twice per day on day -4 to -1 [total dose 1200 cGy]) followed by infusion of unmanipulated peripheral blood stem cells from a haploidentical family donor (haplo). Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg/day on days 3 and 4, mycophenolate mofetil through day 35, and tacrolimus through day 180. Median patient age was 46.5 years (range, 24 to 60). Transplantation diagnosis included acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 16), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), chronic myelogenous leukemia (n = 5), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 2). Using the Dana Farber/Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research/Disease Risk Index (DRI), patients were classified as low (n = 4), intermediate (n = 12), high (n = 11), and very high (n = 3) risk. All patients engrafted with a median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery of 16 and 25 days, respectively. All evaluable patients achieved sustained complete donor T cell and myeloid chimerism by day +30. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades II to IV and III and IV was seen in 43% and 23%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 56% (severe in 10%). After a median follow-up of 24 months, the estimated 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), nonrelapse mortality, and relapse rate were 78%, 73%, 3%, and 24%, respectively. Two-year DFS and relapse rate in patients with low/intermediate risk disease was 100% and 0%, respectively, compared with 39% and 53% for patients with high/very high risk disease. When compared with a contemporaneously treated cohort of patients at our institution receiving myeloablative HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation (acute myelogenous leukemia [n = 17], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [n = 15

  4. Magentic Cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of heptocytes transplantation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this wo...

  5. Difficult Decisions: Fetal Cell Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.; Parakh, Jal S.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, techniques used, and details of the issues involved in the controversial issue of fetal cell transplantation are discussed. Questions for use in class discussion are provided. Suggestions for beginning a discussion are provided with accompanying questions. (CW)

  6. Nanovector-based prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 silencing system enhances the efficiency of stem cell transplantation for infarcted myocardium repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Guo, Changfa; Li, Jun; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has attracted much attention in myocardial infarction therapy. One of the limitations is the poor survival of grafted cells in the ischemic microenvironment. Small interfering RNA-mediated prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) silencing in MSCs holds tremendous potential to enhance their survival and paracrine effect after transplantation. However, an efficient and biocompatible PHD2 silencing system for clinical application is lacking. Herein, we developed a novel PHD2 silencing system based on arginine-terminated generation 4 poly(amidoamine) (Arg-G4) nanoparticles. The system exhibited effective and biocompatible small interfering RNA delivery and PHD2 silencing in MSCs in vitro. After genetically modified MSC transplantation in myocardial infarction models, MSC survival and paracrine function of IGF-1 were enhanced significantly in vivo. As a result, we observed decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis, scar size, and interstitial fibrosis, and increased angiogenesis in the diseased myocardium, which ultimately attenuated ventricular remodeling and improved heart function. This work demonstrated that an Arg-G4 nanovector-based PHD2 silencing system could enhance the efficiency of MSC transplantation for infarcted myocardium repair. PMID:25429216

  7. Two complementary strategies to improve cell engraftment in mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy: Increasing transplanted cell resistance and increasing tissue receptivity.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Fernando E; Ezquer, Marcelo E; Vicencio, Jose M; Calligaris, Sebastián D

    2017-01-02

    Over the past 2 decades, therapies based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been tested to treat several types of diseases in clinical studies, due to their potential for tissue repair and regeneration. Currently, MSC-based therapy is considered a biologically safe procedure, with the therapeutic results being very promising. However, the benefits of these therapies are not stable in the long term, and the final outcomes manifest with high inter-patient variability. The major cause of these therapeutic limitations results from the poor engraftment of the transplanted cells. Researchers have developed separate strategies to improve MSC engraftment. One strategy aims at increasing the survival of the transplanted MSCs in the recipient tissue, rendering them more resistant to the hostile microenvironment (cell-preconditioning). Another strategy aims at making the damaged tissue more receptive to the transplanted cells, favoring their interactions (tissue-preconditioning). In this review, we summarize several approaches using these strategies, providing an integral and updated view of the recent developments in MSC-based therapies. In addition, we propose that the combined use of these different conditioning strategies could accelerate the process to translate experimental evidences from pre-clinic studies to the daily clinical practice.

  8. Two complementary strategies to improve cell engraftment in mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy: Increasing transplanted cell resistance and increasing tissue receptivity

    PubMed Central

    Ezquer, Fernando E.; Ezquer, Marcelo E.; Vicencio, Jose M.; Calligaris, Sebastián D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the past 2 decades, therapies based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been tested to treat several types of diseases in clinical studies, due to their potential for tissue repair and regeneration. Currently, MSC-based therapy is considered a biologically safe procedure, with the therapeutic results being very promising. However, the benefits of these therapies are not stable in the long term, and the final outcomes manifest with high inter-patient variability. The major cause of these therapeutic limitations results from the poor engraftment of the transplanted cells. Researchers have developed separate strategies to improve MSC engraftment. One strategy aims at increasing the survival of the transplanted MSCs in the recipient tissue, rendering them more resistant to the hostile microenvironment (cell-preconditioning). Another strategy aims at making the damaged tissue more receptive to the transplanted cells, favoring their interactions (tissue-preconditioning). In this review, we summarize several approaches using these strategies, providing an integral and updated view of the recent developments in MSC-based therapies. In addition, we propose that the combined use of these different conditioning strategies could accelerate the process to translate experimental evidences from pre-clinic studies to the daily clinical practice. PMID:27294313

  9. [Hepatic cell transplantation. Technical and methodological aspects].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Martínez, Amparo; Cortés, Miriam; Bonora, Ana; Moya, Angel; Sanjuán, Fernando; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Mir, José

    2010-03-01

    Hepatic cell transplantation consists of grafting already differentiated cells such as hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes are viable and functionally active. Liver cell transplantation is carried out by means of a 3-step method: isolation of hepatocytes from donor liver rejected for orthotopic transplantation, preparing a cell suspension for infusion and, finally, hepatocytes are implanted into the recipient. There are established protocols for the isolation of human hepatocytes from unused segments of donor livers, based on collagenase digestion of cannulated liver tissue at 37 degrees C. The hepatocytes can be used fresh or cryopreserved. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes would then be available for planned use. In cell transplant, the important aspects are: infusion route, number of cells, number of infusions and viability of the cells. The cells are infused into the patient through a catheter inserted via portal vein or splenic artery. Liver cell transplantation allows liver tissue to be used that would, otherwise, be discarded, enabling multiple patients to be treated with hepatocytes from a single tissue donor.

  10. Concise Review: Mechanisms Behind Apoptotic Cell-Based Therapies Against Transplant Rejection and Graft versus Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Adrian E; Larregina, Adriana T

    2016-05-01

    The main limitations to the success of transplantation are the antigraft response developed by the recipient immune system, and the adverse side effects of chronic immunosuppression. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) triggered by donor-derived T lymphocytes against the recipient tissues is another serious obstacle in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Several laboratories have tested the possibility of promoting antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance for therapy of graft rejection, GVHD, and autoimmune disorders, by developing methodologies that mimic the mechanisms by which the immune system maintains peripheral tolerance in the steady state. It has been long recognized that the silent clearance of cells undergoing apoptosis exerts potent immune-regulatory effects and provides apoptotic cell-derived Ags to those Ag-presenting cells (APCs) that internalize them, in particular macrophages and dendritic cells. Therefore, in situ-targeting of recipient APCs by systemic administration of leukocytes in early apoptosis and bearing donor Ags represents a relatively simple approach to control the antidonor response against allografts. Here, we review the mechanisms by which apoptotic cells are silently cleared by phagocytes, and how such phenomenon leads to down-regulation of the innate and adaptive immunity. We discuss the evolution of apoptotic cell-based therapies from murine models of organ/tissue transplantation and GVHD, to clinical trials. We make emphasis on potential limitations and areas of concern of apoptotic cell-based therapies, and on how other immune-suppressive therapies used in the clinics or tested experimentally likely also function through the silent clearance of apoptotic cells by the immune system. Stem Cells 2016;34:1142-1150.

  11. L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation improve outcomes in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki Sun; Cho, Su-Hee; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Kang, Eun-Suk; Kim, Won Seog

    2016-04-18

    Aggressive nature killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a mature NK-T cell lymphoma with worse prognosis, but optimal treatment is unclear. Therefore, we analyzed the efficacy of L-asparaginase-based regimens for ANKL patients. Twenty-one patients who received dexamethasone, methotrexate, ifosfamide, L-asparaginase, and etoposide (SMILE) or etoposide, ifosfamide, dexamethasone, and L-asparaginase (VIDL) chemotherapy at Samsung Medical Center were selected. The overall response rate for all patients was 33% (7/21); 38% (5/13) in SMILE and 40% (2/5) in VIDL, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 3.9 months (95% CI 0.0-8.1 months) and median overall survival was 7.0 months (95% CI 2.3-11.7 months). Treatment response (P = 0.001), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) (P = 0.007) and negative conversion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA titer after treatment (P = 0.004) were significantly associated with survival. Thus, L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic HSCT seem to improve the outcome for ANKL patients.

  12. Accessory cells for β-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Staels, W; De Groef, S; Heremans, Y; Coppens, V; Van Gassen, N; Leuckx, G; Van de Casteele, M; Van Riet, I; Luttun, A; Heimberg, H; De Leu, N

    2016-02-01

    Despite recent advances, insulin therapy remains a treatment, not a cure, for diabetes mellitus with persistent risk of glycaemic alterations and life-threatening complications. Restoration of the endogenous β-cell mass through regeneration or transplantation offers an attractive alternative. Unfortunately, signals that drive β-cell regeneration remain enigmatic and β-cell replacement therapy still faces major hurdles that prevent its widespread application. Co-transplantation of accessory non-islet cells with islet cells has been shown to improve the outcome of experimental islet transplantation. This review will highlight current travails in β-cell therapy and focuses on the potential benefits of accessory cells for islet transplantation in diabetes.

  13. Allogeneic transplantation strategies including haploidentical transplantation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy. Despite antenatal counseling and neonatal screening programs implemented in higher income countries, SCD is still associated with multiple morbidities and early mortality. To date, the only curative approach to SCD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but this therapy is not yet established worldwide. The registries of the European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) and the Centre for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) account, respectively, for 611 and 627 patients receiving transplantations for SCD. Most of these patients were transplanted with grafts from an HLA-identical sibling donor. The main obstacles to increasing the number of transplantations are a lack of awareness on the part of physicians and families, the absence of reliable prognostic factors for severity, and the perceived risk that transplantation complications may outweigh the benefits of early transplantation. Results show that more than 90% of patients having undergone an HLA-identical sibling transplantation after myeloablative conditioning are cured, with very limited complications. Major improvement is expected from the use of new reduced-toxicity conditioning regimens and the use of alternative donors, including unrelated cord blood transplantations and related haploidentical bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantations.

  14. Treosulfan-based conditioning regimen for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Strocchio, Luisa; Zecca, Marco; Comoli, Patrizia; Mina, Tommaso; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Giraldi, Eugenia; Vinti, Luciana; Merli, Pietro; Regazzi, Mario; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-06-01

    Although allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) still represents the only consolidated possibility of cure for sickle cell disease (SCD) patients, its use has been limited by the risk of morbidity and mortality associated with conventional myeloablative therapy. The introduction of treosulfan to replace busulfan in conditioning regimens has recently been explored by virtue of its lower toxicity profile. We report our experience with a treosulfan/thiotepa/fludarabine conditioning for human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling or unrelated donor-HSCT in 15 children with SCD, and compare patient outcomes with those of a historical cohort (15 patients) given a busulfan-based regimen. Engraftment was achieved in 28 out of 30 patients (93%), with one case of graft failure in either group. The conditioning regimen was well tolerated in both groups, with no cases of grade III-IV regimen-related toxicity. The 7-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for the whole cohort were 100% and 93%, respectively, with a 93% DFS in both busulfan and treosulfan groups. No SCD-related adverse events occurred after engraftment in patients with complete or mixed donor chimerism. This retrospective analysis suggests that a treosulfan-based conditioning regimen is able to ensure engraftment with excellent OS/DFS and low regimen-related toxicity in patients with SCD.

  15. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  16. Reduction of Relapse after Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplantation by KIR-Based Graft Selection

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, Silke; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2017-01-01

    Besides donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are considered to have a major role in preventing relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). After T-cell-depleted haploidentical HSCT, a strong NK alloreactivity has been described. These effects have been attributed to killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Abundant reports suggest a major role of KIR not only on outcome after haploidentical HSCT but also in the unrelated donor setting. In this review, we give a brief overview of the mechanism of NK cell activation, nomenclature of KIR haplotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) groups, and distinct models for prediction of NK cell alloreactivity. It can be concluded that KIR-ligand mismatch seems to provoke adverse effects in unrelated donor HSCT with reduced overall survival and increased risk for high-grade acute graft-versus-host disease. The presence of activating KIR, as seen in KIR haplotype B, as well as the patient’s HLA C1/x haplotype might reduce relapse in myeloid malignancies. PMID:28228753

  17. [Post-hematopietic stem cell transplant complications].

    PubMed

    de Berranger, Eva; Jubert, Charlotte; Michel, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Under the long-term monitoring of patients treated in childhood or adolescence for cancer, we present in this article the long-term monitoring and therefore possible effects of patients who underwent allergenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This article is based on a collaborative effort organized by the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC), which took place during the 4th day of allograft harmonization practices. Patients affected are children and young adults (0-25 years). We defined the monitoring effects beyond 1 year post-transplant. Our recommendations are based on a literature review, in line with the Leucémie Enfant Adulte (LEA) study cohort of long-term monitoring of patients treated for hematological malignancies in childhood, grafted or not. It became important to determine the nature of problems, their risk factors, frequency and monitoring necessary to implement for their detection. We will not address the therapeutic management of sequelae.

  18. High incidence of post-transplant cytomegalovirus reactivations in myeloma patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation after treatment with bortezomib-based regimens: a survey from the Rome transplant network.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, F; Mengarelli, A; Giannotti, F; Tendas, A; Anaclerico, B; Porrini, R; Picardi, A; Cerchiara, E; Dentamaro, T; Chierichini, A; Romeo, A; Cudillo, L; Montefusco, E; Tirindelli, M C; De Fabritiis, P; Annino, L; Petti, M C; Monarca, B; Arcese, W; Avvisati, G

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivations in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) receiving autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is relatively low. However, the recent increased use of novel agents, such as bortezomib and/or immunomodulators, before transplant, has led to an increasing incidence of Herpesviridae family virus infections. The aim of the study was to establish the incidence of post-engraftment symptomatic CMV reactivations in MM patients receiving ASCT, and to compare this incidence with that of patients treated with novel agents or with conventional chemotherapy before transplant. The study was a survey of 80 consecutive patients who underwent ASCT after treatment with novel agents (Group A). These patients were compared with a cohort of 89 patients treated with VAD regimen (vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone) before ASCT (Group B). Overall, 7 patients (4.1%) received an antiviral treatment for a symptomatic CMV reactivation and 1 died. The incidence of CMV reactivations was significantly higher in Group A than in Group B (7.5% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.048). When compared with Group B, the CMV reactivations observed in Group A were significantly more frequent in patients who received bortezomib, whether or not associated with immunomodulators (9.4% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.019), but not in those treated with immunomodulators only (3.7% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.396). These results suggest that MM patients treated with bortezomib-based regimens are at higher risk of developing a symptomatic CMV reactivation after ASCT.

  19. Memory B cells in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Anita S.; Sciammas, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research on the humoral response to allografts has focused on circulating serum antibodies and the long-lived plasma cells that produce these antibodies. In contrast, the interrogation of the quiescent memory B cell compartment is technically more challenging and thus has not been incorporated into the clinical diagnostic or prognostic toolkit. In this review, we discuss new technologies that have allowed this heretofore enigmatic subset of B cells to be identified at quiescence and during a recall response. These technologies in experimental models are providing new insights into memory B cell heterogeneity with respect to their phenotype, cellular function and the antibodies they produce. Similar technologies are also allowing for the identification of comparable memory alloreactive B cells in transplant recipients. While much of the focus in transplant immunology has been on controlling the alloreactive B cell population, long-term transplant patient survival is critically dependent on protection by pathogen-specific memory B cells. Techniques are also available that allow the interrogation of memory B cell response to pathogen re-encounter. Thus we are poised in our ability toinvestigate how immunosuppression affects allo- as well as pathogen-specific memory B cells, and reason that these investigation can yield new insights that will be beneficial for graft as well as patient survival. PMID:25525921

  20. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  1. Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewska, Anna; Nowakowski, Adam; Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff WM; Gilad, Assaf A; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification. PMID:26366076

  2. Stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gratwohl, A; Passweg, J; Gerber, I; Tyndall, A

    2001-12-01

    Much progress has been made in the field of haemopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) for severe autoimmune disorders. Theoretical considerations, animal data and anecdotal evidence suggested some time ago that intensive immunoablation followed by autologous HSCT could restore normal immune reactivity in patients with severe autoimmune disorders. Based on a concept statement issued in 1995, two European societies, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) began collecting phase I/II trial data in an international collaborative network. Sufficient information from more than 350 patients allows a preliminary assessment with level three evidence. Autologous HSCTs can induce remissions in all disease categories tested so far. Remissions can be transient or durable. HSCTs are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) is near 10% at 1 year and is associated with the intensity of the conditioning and the stage of the disease at the time of transplant. Marked interdisease differences exist. There are few data available in haematological autoimmune diseases, more in systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Patient selection has been recognized as a crucial element from the phase I-II trials. Patients with advanced disease, severely compromised organ function or irreversible organ damage should not be considered as candidates for HSCT. Prospective randomized studies should now determine the value of HSCT compared to standard therapy. Such trials are ongoing for patients with systemic sclerosis (ASTIS trial--Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Scleroderma Trial) or are planned for patients with multiple sclerosis (ASTIMS trial--Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Multiple Sclerosis Trial) and rheumatoid arthritis (ASTIRA trial--Autologous Stem

  3. Personalized Home-based Interval Exercise Training May Improve Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Cancer Patients Preparing to Undergo Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A; Phillips, Brett; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Wilson, Doug; Deal, Allison M; Bailey, Charlotte; Meeneghan, Mathew; Reeve, Bryce B; Basch, Ethan M; Bennett, Antonia V; Shea, Thomas C; Battaglini, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Impaired cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with inferior survival in patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Exercise training based on short, higher-intensity intervals has the potential to efficiently improve cardiorespiratory fitness. We studied home-based interval exercise training (IET) in 40 patients prior to autologous (N=20) or allogeneic (N=20) HCT. Each session consisted of 5, three-minute intervals of walking, jogging, or cycling at 65-95% maximal heart rate (MHR) with 3 minutes of low intensity exercise (<65% MHR) between intervals. Participants were asked to perform sessions at least 3 times weekly. The duration of the intervention was at least 6 weeks, depending on each patient’s scheduled transplantation date. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed from a peak oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) and a 6 minute walk (6MWD) before and after the intervention period. For the autologous HCT cohort, improvements in VO2peak (p=0.12) and 6MWD (p=0.19) were not statistically significant. For the allogeneic cohort, the median VO2peak improvement was 3.7ml/kg*min (p=0.005) and the median 6MWD improvement was 34 meters (p=0.006). Home-based, interval exercise training can be performed prior to HCT and has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26999467

  4. Periodontal tissue regeneration by transplantation of rat adipose-derived stromal cells in combination with PLGA-based solid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Akita, Daisuke; Morokuma, Masakazu; Saito, Yoko; Yamanaka, Katsuyuki; Akiyama, Yuko; Sato, Momoko; Mashimo, Takayuki; Toriumi, Taku; Arai, Yoshinori; Kaneko, Tadashi; Tsukimura, Naoki; Isokawa, Keitaro; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Honda, Masaki J

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of damaged periodontium is challenging due to its multi-tissue composition. Mesenchymalstem cell-based approaches using adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) may contribute to periodontal reconstruction, particularly when combined with the use of scaffolds to maintain a space for new tissue growth. The aim of this study was to assess the regenerative potential of ASCs derived from inbred or outbred rats in combination with novel solid scaffolds composed of PLGA (Poly D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA-scaffolds). Cultured ASCs seeded onto PLGA scaffolds (ASCs/PLGA) or PLGA-scaffolds (PLGA) alone were transplanted into periodontal fenestration defects created in F344 or Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Micro-CT analysis showed a significantly higher percentage of bone growth in the ASCs/PLGA groups compared with the PLGA-alone groups at five weeks after surgery. Similarly, histomorphometric analysis demonstrated thicker growth of periodontal ligament and cementum layers in the ASCs/PLGA-groups compared with the PLGA-alone groups. In addition, transplanted DiI-labeled ASCs were observed in the periodontal regenerative sites. The present investigation demonstrated the marked ability of ASCs in combination with PLGA scaffolds to repair periodontal defects.

  5. [Transplantation of corneal endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Amano, Shiro

    2002-12-01

    Though conventional corneal transplantation has achieved great success, it still has several drawbacks including limited availability of donor corneas, recurrent allograft rejection, and subsequent graft failure in certain cases. Reconstructing clinically usable corneas by applying the technology of regenerative medicine can offer a solution to these problems, as well as making corneal transplantation a non-emergency surgery and enabling the usage of banked corneal cells. In the present study, we focused on corneal endothelium that is critical for corneal transparency and investigated the reconstruction of cornea utilizing cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). We succeeded in steadily culturing HCECs by using culture dishes pre-coated with extracellular matrix produced by calf corneal endothelial cells and culture media that contained basic fibroblast growth factor and fetal bovine serum. We performed the following analysis utilizing these cultured HCECs. The older the donor was, the more frequently large senescent cells appeared in the passaged HCECs. The telomeres of HCECs were measured as terminal restriction fragments (TRF) by Southern blotting. HCECs, in vivo from donors in their seventies had a long TRFs of over 12 kilobases. Passaging shortened the TRFs but there was no difference in TRFs among donors of various ages. These results indicated that shortening of telomere length is not related to senescence of HCECs. We investigated the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the senescence of in vivo HCECs. The results indicated that AGE-protein in the aqueous humor is endocytosed into HCECs via AGE receptors expressed on the surface of HCECs and damages HCECs by producing reactive oxygen species and inducing apoptosis, suggesting that AGEs, at least partly, cause the senescence of HECEs. HCECs were cultured using adult human serum instead of bovine serum to get rid of bovine material that can be infected with prions. Primary and passage

  6. T Regulatory Cells and Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gorantla, Vijay S.; Schneeberger, Stefan; Brandacher, Gerald; Sucher, Robert; Zhang, Dong; Lee, Andrew; Zheng, Xin Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Despite the development of successful immunosuppression protocols and tremendous improvement in short-term graft survival rates, the problem of chronic graft loss remains the bane of clinical transplantation. The induction and maintenance of transplantation tolerance is the “Holy grail” of transplantation. The recent identification and characterization of regulatory T cells (T regs) has opened up exciting opportunities for tolerance induction, immunotherapy and immunomodulation in transplantation. This review focuses on current understanding of regulatory T cells and their role in transplantation tolerance. PMID:20541385

  7. Mantle cell lymphoma: observation to transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma as a rare non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma can present in different clinical presentations such as an aggressive form or a more indolent picture. Treatment modality is based on multiple factors including age, presence or absence of symptoms, and comorbidities. Watchful waiting is a reasonable approach for asymptomatic patients especially in elderly. In symptomatic patients, treatment is chemo-immunotherapy followed by maintenance immunotherapy or autologous bone marrow transplant. Allogeneic bone marrow transplant has a potential benefit of cure for relapsed/refractory cases, but it has a high mortality rate. Novel treatment with agents such as ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown promising results in relapse/refractory cases. We extensively review the most recent data on diagnostic and therapeutic management of mantle cell lymphoma through presenting two extreme clinical scenarios. PMID:25642314

  8. Cryptococcosis in solid-organ, hematopoietic stem cell, and tissue transplant recipients: evidence-based evolving trends.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Wagener, Marilyn M; Singh, Nina

    2009-06-01

    The impact of current transplantation practices on the characteristics of cryptococcosis in solid-organ transplant recipients is not well defined. The incidence of cryptococcal disease among solid-organ transplant recipients has remained unchanged; however, patients are less likely to present with central nervous system or disseminated disease and are more likely to have cryptococcosis limited to the lungs. Additionally, lipid formulations of amphotericin B are now used more frequently, whereas their use in combination with flucytosine has decreased. The overall mortality of cryptococcosis has significantly improved in the current era. Renal failure remains associated with poor outcome, whereas use of lipid formulations of amphotericin B is associated with a higher survival rate. Despite rare infectious complication, certain peculiar attributes of cryptococcal disease in hematopoietic stem cell recipients and tissue transplant recipients warrant recognition.

  9. Cost of Stem Cell-Based Tissue-Engineered Airway Transplants in the United Kingdom: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Culme-Seymour, Emily J.; Mason, Katrina; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Carvalho, Carla; Partington, Leanne; Crowley, Claire; Hamilton, Nick J.; Toll, Ed C.; Butler, Colin R.; Elliott, Martin J.; Birchall, Martin A.; Lowdell, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based tissue-engineered tracheas are at an early stage in their product development cycle. Tens of patients have been treated worldwide in predominantly compassionate use settings, demonstrating significant promise. This potentially life-saving treatment is complex, and the cost and its implications for such treatments are yet to be fully understood. The costs are compounded by varying strategies for graft preparation and transplant, resulting in differing clinical and laboratory costs from different research groups. In this study, we present a detailed breakdown of the clinical and manufacturing costs for three of the United Kingdom (UK) patients treated with such transplants. All three patients were treated under Compassionate Use legislation, within the UK National Health Service (NHS) hospital setting. The total costs for the three UK patients treated ranged from $174,420 to $740,500. All three patients were in a state of poor health at time of treatment and had a number of complexities in addition to the restricted airway. This is the first time a cost analysis has been made for a tissue-engineered organ and provides a benchmark for future studies, as well as comparative data for use in reimbursement considerations. PMID:26559535

  10. Treosulfan-Based Conditioning and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Nonmalignant Diseases: A Prospective Multi-Center Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Lauri M.; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Storer, Barry E.; Talano, Julie-An; Domm, Jennifer; Giller, Roger H.; Shimamura, Akiko; Delaney, Colleen; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Thakar, Monica S.; Baker, K. Scott; Rawlings, David J.; Englund, Janet A.; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Storb, Rainer; Woolfrey, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is effective in the treatment of patients with nonmalignant diseases and for many is the only known cure. Conventional myeloablative regimens have been associated with unacceptably high early transplant-related mortality (TRM) particularly in patients with co-morbid conditions. This prospective multicenter trial was designed to determine the safety and engraftment efficacy of treosulfan-based conditioning in patients with nonmalignant diseases. Thirty-one patients received HLA-matched related (n=4) or unrelated (n=27) grafts following conditioning with treosulfan (total dose: 42 g/m2), fludarabine (total dose: 150 mg/m2), ± thymoglobulin (6 mg/kg; n=22). Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus and methotrexate. All patients engrafted. Day-100 TRM was 0%. With a median follow-up of 2 years, the 2-year survival was 90%. Three patients died of GVHD, recurrent hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and a surgical complication, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grades II–IV and III–IV acute GVHD at day 100 and chronic GVHD at 2 years were 62%, 10% and 21%, respectively. Patients who received thymoglobulin had a significantly lower incidence of grade III-IV acute GVHD (0% versus 33%; P = 0.005). These results indicate that the combination of treosulfan, fludarabine, and thymoglobulin is effective at establishing donor engraftment with low toxicity and improved survival in patients with nonmalignant diseases, and support the need for future disease-specific clinical trials. PMID:25196857

  11. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  12. Regulatory myeloid cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, Brian R; Raïch-Regué, Dàlia; Turnquist, Heth R; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-02-27

    Regulatory myeloid cells (RMC) are emerging as novel targets for immunosuppressive (IS) agents and hold considerable promise as cellular therapeutic agents. Herein, we discuss the ability of regulatory macrophages, regulatory dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to regulate alloimmunity, their potential as cellular therapeutic agents, and the IS agents that target their function. We consider protocols for the generation of RMC and the selection of donor- or recipient-derived cells for adoptive cell therapy. Additionally, the issues of cell trafficking and antigen (Ag) specificity after RMC transfer are discussed. Improved understanding of the immunobiology of these cells has increased the possibility of moving RMC into the clinic to reduce the burden of current IS agents and to promote Ag-specific tolerance. In the second half of this review, we discuss the influence of established and experimental IS agents on myeloid cell populations. IS agents believed historically to act primarily on T cell activation and proliferation are emerging as important regulators of RMC function. Better insights into the influence of IS agents on RMC will enhance our ability to develop cell therapy protocols to promote the function of these cells. Moreover, novel IS agents may be designed to target RMC in situ to promote Ag-specific immune regulation in transplantation and to usher in a new era of immune modulation exploiting cells of myeloid origin.

  13. The effect of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel on bone marrow stromal cell transplant survival and spinal cord repair.

    PubMed

    Ritfeld, Gaby J; Rauck, Britta M; Novosat, Tabitha L; Park, Daewon; Patel, Pavan; Roos, Raymund A C; Wang, Yadong; Oudega, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Cell therapy for nervous tissue repair is limited by low transplant survival. We investigated the effects of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(serinol hexamethylene urethane) (ESHU) on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplant survival and repair using a rat model of spinal cord contusion. Transplantation of BMSCs in ESHU at three days post-contusion resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in BMSC survival at one week post-injury and a 66% increase in spared nervous tissue volume at four weeks post-injury. These improvements were accompanied by enhanced hindlimb motor and sensorimotor recovery. In vitro, we found that ESHU protected BMSCs from hydrogen peroxide-mediated death, resulting in a four-fold increase in BMSC survival with two-fold fewer BMSCs expressing the apoptosis marker, caspase 3 and the DNA oxidation marker, 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. We argue that ESHU protected BMSCs transplanted is a spinal cord contusion from death thereby augmenting their effects on neuroprotection leading to improved behavioral restoration. The data show that the repair effects of intraneural BMSC transplants depend on the degree of their survival and may have a widespread impact on cell-based regenerative medicine.

  14. T cell depleted haploidentical transplantation: positive selection.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco

    2011-06-22

    Interest in mismatched transplantation arises from the fact that a suitable one-haplotype mismatched donor is immediately available for virtually all patients, particularly for those who urgently need an allogenic transplant. Work on one haplotype-mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years all over the world and novel transplant techniques have been developed. Some centres have focused on the conditioning regimens and post transplant immune suppression; others have concentrated on manipulating the graft which may be a megadose of extensively T celldepleted or unmanipulated progenitor cells. Excellent engraftment rates are associated with a very low incidence of acute and chronic GVHD and regimen-related mortality even in patients who are over 50 years old. Overall, event-free survival and transplant-related mortality compare favourably with reports on transplants from sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling.

  15. Hepatocyte transplantation in children with liver cell failure

    PubMed Central

    Hamooda, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatic failure and liver-based metabolic disorders require management which is both costly and complex. Hepatocyte transplantation has been very encouraging as an alternative to organ transplantation for liver disease treatment, and studies in rodents, show that transplants involving isolated liver cells can reverse hepatic failure, and correct various metabolic deficiencies of the liver. This 2016 review is based on a literature search using PubMed including original articles, reviews, cases and clinical guidelines. The search terms were “hepatocyte transplantation”, “liver transplantation”, “liver cell failure”, “metabolic liver disorders”, “orthotropic liver transplantation”, “hepatocytes” and “stem cell transplantation”. The goal of this review is to summarize the significance of hepatocyte transplantation, the sources of hepatocytes and the barriers of hepatocyte transplantation using a detailed review of literature. Our review shows that treatment of patients with liver disease by hepatocyte transplantation has expanded exponentially, especially for patients suffering from liver-based metabolic disorders. Once hepatocyte transplantation has been shown to effectively replace organ transplantation for a portion of patients with life-threatening liver metabolic diseases and those with liver failure it will make cell therapy effective and available for a broad population of patients with liver disorders. PMID:27957309

  16. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups.

  17. Biosimilar G-CSF based mobilization of peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells for autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Michael; Publicover, Amy; Orchard, Kim H; Görlach, Matthias; Wang, Lei; Schmitt, Anita; Mani, Jiju; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Kuriakose, Reeba; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    The use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) biosimilars for peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSC) mobilization has stimulated an ongoing debate regarding their efficacy and safety. However, the use of biosimilar G-CSF was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for all the registered indications of the originator G-CSF (Neupogen (®) ) including mobilization of stem cells. Here, we performed a comprehensive review of published reports on the use of biosimilar G-CSF covering patients with hematological malignancies as well as healthy donors that underwent stem cell mobilization at multiple centers using site-specific non-randomized regimens with a biosimilar G-CSF in the autologous and allogeneic setting. A total of 904 patients mostly with hematological malignancies as well as healthy donors underwent successful autologous or allogeneic stem cell mobilization, respectively, using a biosimilar G-CSF (520 with Ratiograstim®/Tevagrastim, 384 with Zarzio®). The indication for stem cell mobilization in hematology patients included 326 patients with multiple myeloma, 273 with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 79 with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), and other disease. 156 sibling or volunteer unrelated donors were mobilized using biosimilar G-CSF. Mobilization resulted in good mobilization of CD34+ stem cells with side effects similar to originator G-CSF. Post transplantation engraftment did not significantly differ from results previously documented with the originator G-CSF. The side effects experienced by the patients or donors mobilized by biosimilar G-CSF were minimal and were comparable to those of originator G-CSF. In summary, the efficacy of biosimilar G-CSFs in terms of PBSC yield as well as their toxicity profile are equivalent to historical data with the reference G-CSF.

  18. Haematopoietic cell transplants in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Gale, R P; Seber, A; Bonfim, C; Pasquini, M

    2016-07-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done predominately in Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplant activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of >600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. These data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America.

  19. Haematopoietic Cell Transplants in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Robert Peter; Seber, Adriana; Bonfim, Carmem; Pasquini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly-distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done in predominately Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplants activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of more than 600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. The data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America. PMID:26999468

  20. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  1. Antifungal Treatment in Stem Cell Transplantation Centers in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Akan, Hamdi; Atilla, Erden

    2016-03-05

    Despite the development of various guidelines, the approach to antifungal treatment in stem cell transplantation centers differs according to country or even between centers. This led to the development of another survey that aims to understand the antifungal treatment policies of Turkish stem cell transplantation centers. Although there has been an increasing trend towards the use of diagnostic-based treatments in Turkey in the last few years, empirical treatment is still the main approach. The practices of the stem cell transplantation centers reflect the general trends and controversies in this area, while there is a considerable use of antifungal combination therapy.

  2. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  3. Neural stem cell transplantation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean-Pyo; McKercher, Scott; Muller, Franz-Josef; Snyder, Evan Y

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are the most primordial, least committed cells of the nervous system, and transplantation of these multipotent cells holds the promise of regenerative therapy for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This unit describes methods for NSC transplantation into neonatal mouse pups, embryonic mouse brain, and adult mouse brain. A description of options for detection of labeled donor cells in engrafted mouse brain is provided along with an example protocol for detecting lacZ-expressing cells in situ. Also included is a protocol for preparing NSCs for transplantation.

  4. Cyclophosphamide-based hematopoietic stem cell mobilization before autologous stem cell transplantation in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Sascha A; Bacon, Wendi A; Huang, Li-Wen; Long, Gwynn; Rizzieri, David; Horwitz, Mitchell; Chute, John P; Sullivan, Keith; Morris Engemann, Ashley; Yopp, Amanda; Li, Zhiguo; Corbet, Kelly; Chao, Nelson; Gasparetto, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) is frequently employed for peripheral blood mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells before high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in multiple myeloma (MM). The benefit of mobilization with Cy over filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; G-CSF) alone is unclear. Between 2000 and 2008, 167 patients with newly diagnosed MM underwent single ASCT after melphalan conditioning at our institution. Seventy-three patients were mobilized with G-CSF alone, and 94 patients with Cy plus G-CSF (Cy+G-CSF). We retrospectively analyzed Cy's impact on both toxicity and efficacy. Mobilization efficiency was augmented by Cy; a mean total of 12 versus 5.8 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were collected from patients mobilized with Cy+G-CSF versus G-CSF, respectively, (P < 0.01), over a mean of 1.6 versus 2.2 days of peripheral blood apheresis (p = 0.001). Mobilization-related toxicity was also, however, augmented by Cy; 14% of Cy+G-CSF patients were hospitalized because of complications versus none receiving G-CSF (P < 0.0001). Toxicity, including death, related to ASCT was similar between cohorts. Regarding long-term outcomes, multivariate analysis revealed no difference for Cy+G-CSF versus G-CSF (hazard ratio 0.8 for event-free survival [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.57-1.25] and 0.96 for overall survival [95% CI 0.61-1.54]). In summary, we show that mobilization with Cy increases toxicity without positively impacting long-term outcomes in MM. Our findings place into question Cy's benefit as a routine component of stem cell mobilization regimens in MM. Randomized trials are needed to elucidate the risks and benefits of Cy more definitively.

  5. Transplantation of three-dimensional artificial human vascular tissues fabricated using an extracellular matrix nanofilm-based cell-accumulation technique.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshiya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Okano, Daisuke; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    We have established a novel three-dimensional (3D) tissue-constructing technique, referred to as the 'cell-accumulation method', which is based on the self-assembly of cultured human cells. In this technique, cells are coated with fibronectin and gelatin to construct extracellular matrix (ECM) nanofilms and cultured to form multi-layers in vitro. By using this method, we have successfully fabricated artificial tissues with vascular networks constructed by co-cultivation of human umbilical vein-derived vascular endothelial cells between multi-layers of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, to assess these engineered vascular tissues as therapeutic implants, we transplanted the 3D human tissues with microvascular networks, fabricated based on the cell-accumulation method, onto the back skin of nude mice. After the transplantation, we found vascular networks with perfusion of blood in the transplanted graft. At the boundary between host and implanted tissue, connectivity between murine and human vessels was found. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted artificial vascular tubules demonstrated the ultrastructural features of blood capillaries. Moreover, maturation of the vascular tissues after transplantation was shown by the presence of pericyte-like cells and abundant collagen fibrils in the ECM surrounding the vasculature. These results demonstrated that artificial human vascular tissues constructed by our method were engrafted and matured in animal skin. In addition, the implanted artificial human vascular networks were connected with the host circulatory system by anastomosis. This method is an attractive technique for engineering prevascularized artificial tissues for transplantation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... Considering becoming a bone marrow or a blood stem cell donor? View this video on YouTube. Follow a ...

  7. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth KEY POINTS n Have a dental checkup before your transplant procedure. n See your ... problems . SEE YOUR DENTIST Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth BEFORE ...

  8. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  9. Fibrin patch-based insulin-like growth factor-1 gene-modified stem cell transplantation repairs ischemic myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhu, Kai; Yang, Shan; Wang, Yulin; Guo, Changfa; Yin, Kanhua; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), tissue-engineered cardiac patch, and therapeutic gene have all been proposed as promising therapy strategies for cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. In our study, BMSCs were modified with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene, loaded into a fibrin patch, and then transplanted into a porcine model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) myocardium injury. The results demonstrated that IGF-1 gene overexpression could promote proliferation of endothelial cells and cardiomyocyte-like differentiation of BMSCs in vitro. Four weeks after transplantation of fibrin patch loaded with gene-modified BMSCs, IGF-1 overexpression could successfully promote angiogenesis, inhibit remodeling, increase grafted cell survival and reduce apoptosis. In conclusion, the integrated strategy, which combined fibrin patch with IGF-1 gene modified BMSCs, could promote the histological cardiac repair for a clinically relevant porcine model of I/R myocardium injury. PMID:25767192

  10. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  11. Hematopoetic stem cell transplantation in children

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilipek, Mehmet Akif

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is called hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), since peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood can also be used as sources of stem cell currently. In children, bone marrow transplantation is used as a definite treatment method in many diseases including hemoglobinopaties, immune deficiencies, bone marrow failure and congenital metabolic diseases in addition to hematological malignancies. In addition to the underlying disease, the most important factors which have an impact on prognosis include infections which develop during the process of transplantation and graft-versus-host disease. In this article, it was aimed to give brief information on stem cell sources, preparation therapies, HSCT indications and post-transplantation complications in children. PMID:26078642

  12. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and Their Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Scalea, Joseph R.; Tomita, Yusuke; Lindholm, Christopher R.; Burlingham, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor-derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the induction regimen capable of achieving consistent tolerance, while avoiding unwanted sided effects, and which is scalable to the human patient, has yet to be identified. Here, we present the status of investigations of various tolerogenic cell types and the mechanistic rationale for their use in tolerance induction protocols. PMID:27014267

  13. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and Their Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scalea, Joseph R; Tomita, Yusuke; Lindholm, Christopher R; Burlingham, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor-derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the induction regimen capable of achieving consistent tolerance, while avoiding unwanted sided effects, and which is scalable to the human patient, has yet to be identified. Here, we present the status of investigations of various tolerogenic cell types and the mechanistic rationale for their use in tolerance induction protocols.

  14. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Akio; Nagai, Takayuki; Mandai, Michiko Takahashi, Masayo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2007-11-16

    The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy.

  15. Hematopoietic Stem cell transplantation and lentiviral vector‐based gene therapy for Krabbe's disease: Present convictions and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Nikolaishvili‐Feinberg, Nana; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bi, Yanmin; Pan, Dao; Moore, Dominic; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Sands, Mark S.; Miller, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, presymtomatic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation (HSPCT) is the only therapeutic modality that alleviates Krabbe's disease (KD)‐induced central nervous system damage. However, all HSPCT‐treated patients exhibit severe deterioration in peripheral nervous system function characterized by major motor and expressive language pathologies. We hypothesize that a combination of several mechanisms contribute to this phenomenon, including 1) nonoptimal conditioning protocols with consequent inefficient engraftment and biodistribution of donor‐derived cells and 2) insufficient uptake of donor cell‐secreted galactocerebrosidease (GALC) secondary to a naturally low expression level of the cation‐independent mannose 6‐phosphate‐receptor (CI‐MPR). We have characterized the effects of a busulfan (Bu) based conditioning regimen on the efficacy of HSPCT in prolonging twi mouse average life span. There was no correlation between the efficiency of bone marrow engraftment of donor cells and twi mouse average life span. HSPCT prolonged the average life span of twi mice, which directly correlated with the aggressiveness of the Bu‐mediated conditioning protocols. HSPC transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying the GALC cDNA under control of cell‐specific promoters were efficiently engrafted in twi mouse bone marrow. To facilitate HSPCT‐mediated correction of GALC deficiency in target cells expressing low levels of CI‐MPR, a novel GALC fusion protein including the ApoE1 receptor was developed. Efficient cellular uptake of the novel fusion protein was mediated by a mannose‐6‐phosphate‐independent mechanism. The novel findings described here elucidate some of the cellular mechanisms that impede the cure of KD patients by HSPCT and concomitantly open new directions to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of HSPCT protocols for KD. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638600

  16. Micron-sized iron oxide-containing particles for microRNA-targeted manipulation and MRI-based tracking of transplanted cells.

    PubMed

    Leder, Annekatrin; Raschzok, Nathanael; Schmidt, Christian; Arabacioglu, Duygu; Butter, Antje; Kolano, Susanne; de Sousa Lisboa, Luisa S; Werner, Wiebke; Polenz, Dietrich; Reutzel-Selke, Anja; Pratschke, Johann; Sauer, Igor M

    2015-05-01

    Particle-based delivery systems for therapeutic manipulation and tracking of transplanted cells by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly based on nanometer-sized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs). Here, we present a proof of concept for multifunctional, silica based micron-sized iron oxide-containing particles (sMPIO) that combine fluorescence imaging, MRI tracking, and on-the-spot targeting of specific microRNAs on a particle surface for therapeutic manipulation by RNA interference. Antisense locked nucleic acids (α-LNA) were covalently bound to the surface of silica-based, DAPI-integrated, micron-sized iron oxide particles (sMPIO-α-LNA). In vitro studies using primary human hepatocytes showed rapid particle uptake (4 h) that was accompanied by significant depletion of the targeted microRNA Let7g (80%), up-regulation of the target proteins Cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and specific proteome changes. sMPIO-α-LNA-labeled cells were successfully detected by fluorescence imaging and could be visualized by MRI after intrasplenic transplantation in rats. This new theranostic particle provides a promising tool for cell transplantation where cellular imaging and microRNA-based manipulation is needed. [165].

  17. Results of a phase I/II British Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation study on PCR-based pre-emptive therapy with valganciclovir or ganciclovir for active CMV infection following alemtuzumab-based reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Z Y; Cook, G; Johnson, P R; Parker, Anne; Zuckerman, M; Marks, D; Wiltshire, H; Mufti, G J; Pagliuca, A

    2009-02-01

    This multi-centre randomized study assessed the bioavailability of ganciclovir in patients undergoing alemtuzumab-based reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after oral administration of valganciclovir. Patients were randomized to 2 groups receiving either oral valganciclovir (900 mg twice daily) or intravenous ganciclovir (5mg/kg twice daily) for 14 days. Twenty-seven patients were recruited and 18 patients (67%) completed allocated treatment resulting in clearance of cytomegolovirus (CMV) DNA load at a median of 14 days. The bioavailability of ganciclovir from valganciclovir was 73% (95% CI: 34-112%). The average exposure in the valganciclovir group (36.9+/-14.9 microg h/ml) was higher than the ganciclovir cohort (27.9+/-7.5 microg h/ml). When compared with intravenous ganciclovir, oral valganciclovir had high bioavailability in patients undergoing alemtuzumab-based RIC HSCT.

  18. Evolving approaches of hematopoietic stem cell-based therapies to induce tolerance to organ transplants: the long road to tolerance.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, J; Miller, J; Abecassis, M; Tollerud, D J; Ildstad, S T

    2013-01-01

    The immunoregulatory properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been recognized for more than 60 years, beginning in 1945, when Owen reported that genetically disparate freemartin cattle sharing a common placenta were red blood cell chimeras. In 1953, Billingham, Brent, and Medawar demonstrated that murine neonatal chimeras prepared by infusion of donor-derived hematopoietic cells exhibited donor-specific tolerance to skin allografts. Various approaches using HSCs in organ transplantation have gradually brought closer to reality the dream of inducing donor-specific tolerance in organ transplant recipients. Several hurdles needed to be overcome, especially the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the toxicity of ablative conditioning, and the need for close donor-recipient matching. For wide acceptance, HSC therapy must be safe and reproducible in mismatched donor-recipient combinations. Discoveries in other disciplines have often unexpectedly and synergistically contributed to progress in this area. This review presents a historic perspective of the quest for tolerance in organ transplantation, highlighting current clinical approaches.

  19. A mindfulness-based program for improving quality of life among hematopoietic stem cell transplantation survivors: feasibility and preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Paul; Zwahlen, Diana; Halter, Jorg P; Passweg, Jakob R; Steiner, Claudia; Kiss, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is often substantially reduced among individuals who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and incidences of depression, fatigue, and anxiety are elevated. We examined effects of a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) compared to psycho-oncological telephone consultation upon HRQoL, depression, anxiety, and fatigue among HSCT survivors. Sixty-two medically stable patients participated in the study; they had completed HSCT ≥6 months previously. Thirty-two were randomly assigned to intervention arms, and 30 were offered their treatment preference. MBI consisted of a structured 8-week program of mindfulness training. Assessments were made at baseline, post-intervention and 3 months follow-up. Primary outcome was HRQoL. Depression, fatigue, anxiety, and personal goal attainment were secondary measures. Non-completion of interventions was low in both groups (9 %, MBI; 7 % control). Employing intention-to-treat analysis, MBI, compared with comparison procedure, improved HRQoL and reduced depression and anxiety at post-intervention (p's < 0.05); Cohen's d effect sizes, 0.6-0.7; 3-month follow-up benefits were modest. These findings demonstrate broad feasibility and acceptance of, as well as satisfaction and adherence with, a program of mindfulness training for HSCT survivors; findings also suggest improved HRQoL and well-being as a consequence of MBI. Nevertheless, this is a preliminary study; a larger trial with more prolonged intervention phase is warranted.

  20. Next-generation sequencing-based detection of circulating tumour DNA After allogeneic stem cell transplantation for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alex F; Kim, Haesook T; Kong, Katherine A; Faham, Malek; Sun, Heather; Sohani, Aliyah R; Alyea, Edwin P; Carlton, Victoria E; Chen, Yi-Bin; Cutler, Corey S; Ho, Vincent T; Koreth, John; Kotwaliwale, Chitra; Nikiforow, Sarah; Ritz, Jerome; Rodig, Scott J; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Armand, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) detection is a promising monitoring tool for lymphoid malignancies. We evaluated whether the presence of ctDNA was associated with outcome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in lymphoma patients. We studied 88 patients drawn from a phase 3 clinical trial of reduced-intensity conditioning HSCT in lymphoma. Conventional restaging and collection of peripheral blood samples occurred at pre-specified time points before and after HSCT and were assayed for ctDNA by sequencing of the immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor genes. Tumour clonotypes were identified in 87% of patients with adequate tumour samples. Sixteen of 19 (84%) patients with disease progression after HSCT had detectable ctDNA prior to progression at a median of 3·7 months prior to relapse/progression. Patients with detectable ctDNA 3 months after HSCT had inferior progression-free survival (PFS) (2-year PFS 58% vs. 84% in ctDNA-negative patients, P = 0·033). In multivariate models, detectable ctDNA was associated with increased risk of progression/death (Hazard ratio 3·9, P = 0·003) and increased risk of relapse/progression (Hazard ratio 10·8, P = 0·0006). Detectable ctDNA is associated with an increased risk of relapse/progression, but further validation studies are necessary to confirm these findings and determine the clinical utility of NGS-based minimal residual disease monitoring in lymphoma patients after HSCT.

  1. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  2. Transfusion Support for ABO-Incompatible Progenitor Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kopko, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary ABO-incompatible transplants comprise up to 50% of allogeneic progenitor cell transplants. Major, minor and bidirectional ABO-incompatible transplants each have unique complications that can occur, including hemolysis at the time of progenitor cell infusion, hemolysis during donor engraftment, passenger lymphocyte syndrome, delayed red blood cell engraftment, and pure red cell aplasia. Appropriate transfusion support during the different phases of the allogeneic progenitor cell transplant process is an important part of ABO-incompatible transplantation. PMID:27022318

  3. [Altered gut bacterial flora and organic acids in feces of patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based antibacterial prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Shotaro; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Morotomi, Masami; Ishizuka, Naoki; Miwa, Akiyoshi; O Yoshida, Takato

    2010-06-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity and various infections are serious problems associated with high-dose chemotherapy. Antibacterial chemoprophylaxis reduces the incidence of gram-negative bacterial infection; however, it may affect the normal intestinal flora and induce drug resistance in organisms. We evaluated the chronological changes in fecal bacteria and organic acids in 6 patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based chemoprophylaxis. All patients developed grade 2-3 diarrhea. Four patients developed grade 3 febrile neutropenia. The total count of obligatory anaerobic bacteria was significantly decreased on Day 7, but total facultative anaerobic bacterial count did not change throughout transplantation. However, Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacillus were decreased on Day 7 and Staphylococcus was increased after transplantation. Total organic acid concentration and short-chain fatty acids were decreased on Day 7. The bacterial flora and organic acids in the gut were significantly altered in patients who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolonebased chemoprophylaxis. These changes may contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity and infections.

  4. Immunological aspects of liver cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oldhafer, Felix; Bock, Michael; Falk, Christine S; Vondran, Florian W R

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, the liver is of major interest for adoption of regenerative strategies due to its well-known and unique regenerative capacity. Whereas therapeutic strategies such as liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can be considered standards of care for the treatment of a variety of liver diseases, the concept of liver cell transplantation (LCTx) still awaits clinical breakthrough. Success of LCTx is hampered by insufficient engraftment/long-term acceptance of cellular allografts mainly due to rejection of transplanted cells. This is in contrast to the results achieved for OLT where long-term graft survival is observed on a regular basis and, hence, the liver has been deemed an immune-privileged organ. Immune responses induced by isolated hepatocytes apparently differ considerably from those observed following transplantation of solid organs and, thus, LCTx requires refined immunological strategies to improve its clinical outcome. In addition, clinical usage of LCTx but also related basic research efforts are hindered by the limited availability of high quality liver cells, strongly emphasizing the need for alternative cell sources. This review focuses on the various immunological aspects of LCTx summarizing data available not only for hepatocyte transplantation but also for transplantation of non-parenchymal liver cells and liver stem cells. PMID:27011904

  5. Clinical-scale laser-based scanning and processing of live cells: selective photothermal killing of fluorescent tumor targets for autologous stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Manfred R.; Hanania, Elie G.; Eisfeld, Timothy; O'Neal, Robert A.; Khovananth, Kevin M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2001-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, is widely used for the treatment of cancer. However, contaminating tumor cells within HSC harvests continue to be of major concern since re-infused tumor cells have proven to contribute to disease relapse. Many tumor purging methods have been evaluated, but all leave detectable tumor cells in the transplant and result in significant loss of HSCs. These shortcomings cause engraftment delays and compromise the therapeutic value of purging. A novel approach integrating automated scanning cytometry, image analysis, and selective laser-induced killing of labeled cells within a cell mixture is described here. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cells were spiked into cell mixtures, and fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were used to label tumor cells within the mixture. Cells were then allowed to settle on a surface, and as the surface was scanned with a fluorescence excitation source, a laser pulse was fired at every detected tumor cell using high-speed beam steering mirrors. Tumor cells were selectively killed with little effect on adjacent non-target cells, demonstrating the feasibility of this automated cell processing approach. This technology has many potential research and clinical applications, one example of which is tumor cell purging for autologous HSC transplantation.

  6. Genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells for improved islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ye, Zhaoyang; Mahato, Ram I

    2011-10-03

    The use of adult stem cells for therapeutic purposes has met with great success in recent years. Among several types of adult stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM) and other sources have gained popularity for basic research and clinical applications because of their therapeutic potential in treating a variety of diseases. Because of their tissue regeneration potential and immune modulation effect, MSCs were recently used as cell-based therapy to promote revascularization, increase pancreatic β-cell proliferation, and avoid allograft rejection in islet transplantation. Taking advantage of the recent progress in gene therapy, genetically modified MSCs can further enhance and expand the therapeutic benefit of primary MSCs while retaining their stem-cell-like properties. This review aims to gain a thorough understanding of the current obstacles to successful islet transplantation and discusses the potential role of primary MSCs before or after genetic modification in islet transplantation.

  7. In-Hospital Mortality and Post-Transplant Complications in Elderly Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: a Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Larysa; Sylvester, Michael; Parrondo, Ricardo; Mariotti, Veronica; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Chang, Victor T

    2017-03-09

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) has improved survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and is increasingly used in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare in-hospital complications and mortality after auto-HSCT in younger (< age 65) vs. elderly (≥ age 65) MM patients utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Over a three-year period (2008-2010), 2209 patients with MM were admitted to U.S. Hospitals for auto-HSCT. The median age was 59 years, with 1650 patients (74.7%) younger than age 65 and 559 patients (25.3%) age 65 or older. Overall, in-hospital mortality in MM patients following auto-HSCT was rare (1.5%) and there was no significant difference in mortality between elderly and younger patients. Elderly patients did have a significantly increased mean length of stay (18.6 days + 10.8 days (standard deviation) vs. 16.8 days + 7.2 days, p<0.001) and mean total hospital charges ($161,117 + $105,008 vs. $151,192 + $78,342, p=0.018) compared to younger pts. Elderly patients were significantly more likely than younger patients to develop major in-hospital post-transplant complications such as severe sepsis (OR 2.70, 95% CI: 1.40-5.21, p=0.003), septic shock, (OR 3.10, 95% CI: 1.43-6.71, p=0.004), pneumonia (OR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.06-2.46, p=0.024), acute respiratory failure (OR 3.44, 95% CI: 1.70-6.96, p=0.001), endotracheal intubation requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation (OR 2.19, 95% CI: 1.06-4.55, p=0.035), acute renal failure (OR 2.14, 95% CI: 1.38-3.33, p=0.001), and cardiac arrhythmias (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.52-2.79, <0.001). This data may help guide informed consent discussions and provide a focus for future studies to reduce treatment-related morbidity in elderly MM patients undergoing auto-HSCT.

  8. Catheter–Based Transendocardial Delivery of Autologous Bone-Marrow-Derived Mononuclear Cells in Patients Listed for Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Guilherme V.; Perin, Emerson C.; Dohmann, Hans F.R.; Borojevic, Radovan; Silva, Suzana A.; Sousa, Andre L.S.; Assad, Joao A.R.; Vaughn, William K.; Mesquita, Claudio T.; Belém, Luciano; Carvalho, Antonio C.; Dohmann, Hans J.F.; do Amaral, Ellen Barroso; Coutinho, Joaquim; Branco, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Edie; Willerson, James T.

    2004-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that transplantation of autologous bone-marrow mononuclear cells (ABMMNCs) can improve the perfusion and contractile function of ischemic myocardium. This procedure could potentially benefit transplant candidates awaiting a donor heart. To study the safety and feasibility of ABMMNC injection, we performed a prospective, nonrandomized, open-label study in 5 heart transplant candidates with severe ischemic heart failure. Each patient underwent baseline single-photon emission computed tomography, a ramp treadmill protocol, 2-dimensional echocardiography, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and signal-averaged electrocardiography, which were repeated at 2 and 6 months. Transendocardial delivery of ABMMNCs was done with the aid of electromechanical mapping to identify viable myocardium. Each patient received 15 ABMMNC injections of 0.2 cc each. There were no deaths, significant arrhythmias, or other major complications. The ABMMNC injection reduced the amount of ischemic myocardium (not statistically significant). More important, exercise test results improved significantly. Myocardial volume oxygen consumption increased from 10.6 ± 3 mL/kg/min (baseline) to 16.3 ± 7 mL/kg/min (2 months) and 23 ± 7 mL/kg/min (6 months) (P = 0.0091). In 4 of the 5 cases, this was such an improvement that the patients were no longer eligible for cardiac transplantation. In addition, metabolic equivalents improved from 3.03 ± 0.66 (baseline) to 4.65 ± 1.99 (2 months) and 6.5 ± 2.0 (6 months) (P = 0.0092). In conclusion, ABMMNC injections were performed safely and resulted in improved exercise capacity. This technique may hold promise as an alternative to medical management in patients with severe ischemic heart failure who are ineligible for conventional revascularization. PMID:15562839

  9. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Flavio; López Meiller, María José; Naswetter, Gustavo; Longoni, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, which are capable of self renewal and reconstitution of all types of blood cells, can be a treatment for numerous potential lethal diseases, including leukemias and lymphomas. It may now be applicable for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases, such as therapy-resistant multiple sclerosis, lupus and systemic sclerosis. Studies in animal models show that the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells can reverse autoimmunity. The outcome of ongoing clinical trials, as well as of studies in patients and animal models, will help to determine the role that stem-cell transplantation can play in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  10. National Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplant Registry in Poland: Nationwide Internet Reporting System and Results.

    PubMed

    Łęczycka, A; Dudkiewicz, M; Czerwiński, J; Malanowski, P; Żalikowska-Hołoweńko, J; Danielewicz, R

    2016-06-01

    History of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Poland begins in early 1980s; the 1st bone marrow allotransplantation was performed in 1983 in the Central Clinical Hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Warsaw. Following years brought the 1st autologous stem cell transplantations. Ten years later, unrelated bone marrow transplantation was performed for the 1st time by the team of the Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit in Katowice. Since then, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation developed to be standard procedure and one of the most important therapies applied in leukemia treatment. The number of allotransplantations in Poland has grown significantly in the past 2 decades, which generated new needs and problems. In 2005, based on a new Transplant Law, a National Transplants Registry was created. Its main role is to collect data (registration of procedures and follow-up data) related to every transplantation case for stem cells and tissues as well as for organs. We present statistics concerning stem cell transplantations performed in Poland, as collected in the National Transplants Registry in the years 2006-2014. There are 18 centers transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in Poland. The total number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations performed in 2006-2014 was 3,537, with allotransplantations from relatives accounted for 1,491 and from unrelated donors for 2,046. The main indication for allotransplantation in past years was acute leukemia.

  11. Combined transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells and human retinal progenitor cells into the subretinal space of RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, Linghui; Gao, Lixiong; Xu, Haiwei; Duan, Ping; Zeng, Yuxiao; Liu, Yong; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-03-15

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of hereditary retinal diseases characterized by the loss of photoreceptors. Cell transplantation has been clinically applied to treat RP patients. Human retinal progenitor cells (HRPCs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs) are the two commonly and practically used stem cells for transplantation. Since combined transplantation could be a promising way to integrate the advantages of both stem cell types, we transplanted HRPCs and HBMSCs into the subretinal space (SRS) of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. We report that HRPCs/HBMSCs combined transplantation maintains the electroretinogram results much better than HRPCs or HBMSCs single transplantations. The thickness of outer nuclear layer also presented a better outcome in the combined transplantation. Importantly, grafted cells in the combination migrated better, both longitudinally and latitudinally, than single transplantation. The photoreceptor differentiation of grafted cells in the retina of RCS rats receiving combined transplantation also showed a higher ratio than single transplantation. Finally, activation of microglia and the gliosis of Müller cells were more effectively suppressed in combined transplantation, indicating better immunomodulatory and anti-gliosis effects. Taken together, combining the transplantation of HRPCs and HBMSCs is a more effective strategy in stem cell-based therapy for retinal degenerative diseases.

  12. Consideration of strategies for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Isaac; Ash, Shifra; Farkas, Daniel L; Askenasy, Nadir; Stein, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has been adoptively transferred from oncology to the treatment of autoimmune disorders. Along with extension of prevalent transplant-related concepts, the assumed mechanism that arrests autoimmunity involves elimination of pathogenic cells and resetting of immune homeostasis. Similar to graft versus tumor (GVT) reactivity, allogeneic transplants are considered to provide a better platform of immunomodulation to induce a graft versus autoimmunity reaction (GVA). It is yet unclear whether recurrence of autoimmunity in both autologous and allogeneic settings reflects relapse of the disease, transplant-associated immune dysfunction or insufficient immune modulation. Possible causes of disease recurrence include reactivation of residual host pathogenic cells and persistence of memory cells, genetic predisposition to autoimmunity and pro-inflammatory characteristics of the target tissues. Most important, there is little evidence that autoimmune disorders are indeed abrogated by current transplant procedures, despite reinstitution of both peripheral and thymic immune homeostasis. It is postulated that non-specific immunosuppressive therapy that precedes and accompanies current bone marrow transplant strategies is detrimental to the active immune process that restores self-tolerance. This proposition refocuses the need to develop strategies of immunomodulation without immunosuppression.

  13. Immunosuppressive Total Lymphoid Irradiation-Based Reconditioning Regimens Enable Engraftment After Graft Rejection or Graft Failure in Patients Treated With Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzelmann, Frank; Lang, Peter J.; Ottinger, Hellmut; Faul, Christoph; Bethge, Wolfgang; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bamberg, Michael; Belka, Claus

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI)-based reconditioning regimens in patients with graft failure or graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: The results of 14 patients (7 adults and 7 children) with a variety of hematologic malignant diseases treated with a TLI-based reconditioning regimen with 7-Gy single-dose application plus anti-T-lymphocyte antibody OKT3 (n = 11) and/or antithymocyte globulin (n = 7)/fludarabine (n = 9), followed by an infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (n = 13) or bone marrow stem cells (n = 1) from related or unrelated donors, were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of the 14 recipients, the data from 11 were evaluable for engraftment after TLI-based reconditioning because 3 adults died early (at Day 2, 5, and 15) after the second transplantation of infectious complications. Engraftment in 4 adults was seen after a median of 12 days (range, 10-18) and occurred after a median of 10 days (range, 9-32) in the 7 children. TLI-based reconditioning was well-tolerated with no severe toxicity. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for the whole cohort was 140 days (range, 5-1,268). After a median follow-up of 681 days, the disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 85.7% and 85.7%, respectively, in the children. Despite engraftment in the 4 remaining adults, 1 died of fatal graft-vs.-host disease, 1 of infectious complications, 1 of disease relapse, and 1 of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Conclusions: In patients with graft failure or graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, TLI-based reconditioning regimens allow sustained engraftment, paralleled by a favorable toxicity profile, potentially leading to long-term survival.

  14. In Utero Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (IUHSCT)

    PubMed Central

    Renda, Maria Concetta; Maggio, Aurelio

    2009-01-01

    In utero haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHSCT) is a non-myeloablative approach for the prenatal treatment of genetic disorders. However, in target disorders, where there is not a selective advantage for donor cells, a useful donor-cell chimerism has not been achieved. There are three possible barriers to engraftment following IUHSCT: limited space in the fetus due to host-cell competition; the large number of donor cells needed, and the immunological asset of recipient. PMID:21415998

  15. In Utero Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (IUHSCT).

    PubMed

    Renda, Maria Concetta; Maggio, Aurelio

    2009-12-29

    In utero haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHSCT) is a non-myeloablative approach for the prenatal treatment of genetic disorders. However, in target disorders, where there is not a selective advantage for donor cells, a useful donor-cell chimerism has not been achieved. There are three possible barriers to engraftment following IUHSCT: limited space in the fetus due to host-cell competition; the large number of donor cells needed, and the immunological asset of recipient.

  16. Stem cell transplantation reverses chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Hanna, Nevine; Tran, Katherine K.; Liao, Alicia C.; Christie, Lori-Ann; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    The frequent use of chemotherapy to combat a range of malignancies can elicit severe cognitive dysfunction often referred to as “chemobrain”, a condition that can persist long after the cessation of treatment in as many as 75% of survivors. While cognitive health is a critical determinant of therapeutic outcome, chemobrain remains an unmet medical need that adversely impacts quality of life in pediatric and adult cancer survivors. Using a rodent model of chemobrain, we showed that chronic cyclophosphamide treatment induced significant performance based decrements on behavioral tasks designed to interrogate hippocampal and cortical function. Intrahippocampal transplantation of human neural stem cells resolved all cognitive impairments when animals were tested one month after the cessation of chemotherapy. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived (8%) and differentiated along neuronal and astroglial lineages, where improved cognition was associated with reduced neuroinflammation and enhanced host dendritic arborization. Stem cell transplantation significantly reduced the number of activated microglia after cyclophosphamide treatment in the brain. Granule and pyramidal cell neurons within the dentate gyrus and CA1 subfields of the hippocampus exhibited significant reductions in dendritic complexity, spine density, immature and mature spine types following chemotherapy, adverse effects that were eradicated by stem cell transplantation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cranial transplantation of stem cells can reverse the deleterious effects of chemobrain, through a trophic support mechanism involving the attenuation of neuroinflammation and the preservation host neuronal architecture. PMID:25687405

  17. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  18. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  19. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia.

  20. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-10-27

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3-6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2-5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2-5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted.

  1. Stem Cell Transplants May Help Some with Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163677.html Stem Cell Transplants May Help Some With Multiple Sclerosis Review ... 20, 2017 MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cell transplants may halt the progression of aggressive multiple ...

  2. Emergent Complications in the Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Munchel, Ashley; Chen, Allen; Symons, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only potentially curative option for a variety of pediatric malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Despite advances in transplantation biology and immunology as well as in posttransplant management that have contributed to improved survival and decreased transplant-related mortality, hematopoietic cell transplantation does not come without significant risk of complications. When patients who have undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation present to the emergency department, it is important to consider a variety of therapy-related complications to optimize management and outcome. In this article, we use clinical cases to highlight some of the more common emergent complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:25411564

  3. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  4. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with a megadose T-cell-depleted graft: harnessing natural and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Velardi, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    For patients with high-risk acute leukemia who do not have a matched donor or who urgently need a transplant, transplantation from a full human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype mismatched family donor should be considered a viable option. Clinical trials have shown that a strategy for haploidentical transplantation based on the infusion of high numbers of T-cell-depleted hematopoietic progenitor cells and no post-transplant immunosuppression controls bi-directional T-cell alloreactivity, ie, graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in patients with leukemia. Overall, event-free survival compares favorably with reports of transplants using sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling. This transplant modality has highlighted the crucial role of donor-versus-recipient natural killer cell (NK) alloreactivity in the control of leukemia relapse. Current studies are focusing on rebuilding post-transplant immunity to improve clinical outcomes.

  5. Role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ima N

    2015-02-01

    High-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been the standard frontline consolidative therapy for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) for > 2 decades. This approach has resulted in higher complete response (CR) rates and increased event-free survival and overall survival (OS) compared with conventional chemotherapy. The emergence of novel agent-based therapy combined with ASCT has revolutionized MM therapy by improving the CR rates and OS, raising questions concerning the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this setting.

  6. Bacterial foodborne infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Nicole M; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A

    2014-11-01

    Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence after transplantation within a single-center population of HCT recipients. All HCT recipients who underwent transplantation from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington were followed for 1 year after transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplantation, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species, or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within 1 year after transplantation. Nonfoodborne infections with these agents and patients with pre-existing bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplantation) were excluded from analyses. A total of 12 of 4069 (.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within 1 year after transplantation. Patients with infections had a median age at transplantation of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 35 to 57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9 of 12 [75%]), male gender (8 of 12 [67%]) and had allogeneic transplantation (8 of 12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval, .5 to 1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplantation (IQR, 26 to 58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was C. jejuni/coli (5 of 12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3 of 12 [25%]), although Salmonella (2 of 12 [17%]) and Listeria (2 of 12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Vermylen, C; Cornu, G

    1997-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only therapy able to cure sickle cell anemia at the present time. So far, transplantations have been undertaken in approximatively 140 sickle cell patients all over the world, with good results. The selection of patients for transplantation remains a subject of dilemma because of the unpredictable course of the disease and the lack of valuable prognostic markers. The selection criteria accepted so far concern young patients under the age of 16, with a morbid course of the disease and having a HLA-compatible sibling. In Belgium, patients going back to their country of origin were also considered for transplantation. For 100 patients who underwent transplantation in Europe, the current Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival, event-free survival, and disease-free survival rates are 90%, 79%, and 81%, respectively. Benefits and side effects are analyzed.

  8. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program.

  9. Progress in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as allogeneic cellular gene therapy in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Isgrò, Antonella; Gaziev, Javid; Sodani, Pietro; Lucarelli, Guido

    2010-08-01

    Allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents one of the best cures for thalassemia. Currently, HSCT for thalassemia consists of allogeneic stem cell gene therapy and still awaits autologous genetically modified stem cell transplantation. HSCT for thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, due in large part to improvements in preventive strategies, the effective control of transplant-related complications, and the development of new preparative regimens. A risk classes-based approach to transplantation in thalassemia has led to disease-free survival probability of 87, 85, and 80% in classes 1, 2, and 3 patients, respectively. Adult thalassemia patients, who are higher risk patients for transplant-related toxicity due to an advanced phase of the disease, have a cure rate of 65% with current treatment protocol. Patients who do not have matched family or unrelated donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. Overall, the results of this type of transplantation appear encouraging.

  10. Solid organ transplants following hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children.

    PubMed

    Bunin, Nancy; Guzikowski, Virginia; Rand, Elizabeth R; Goldfarb, Samuel; Baluarte, Jorge; Meyers, Kevin; Olthoff, Kim M

    2010-12-01

    SOT may be indicated for a select group of pediatric patients who experience permanent organ failure following HSCT. However, there is limited information available about outcomes. We identified eight children at our center who received an SOT following an HSCT. Patients were six months to 18 yr at HSCT. Diseases for which children underwent HSCT included thalassemia, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Shwachman-Diamond/bone marrow failure, sickle cell disease (SCD), erythropoietic porphyria (EP), ALL, chronic granulomatous disease, and neuroblastoma. Time from HSCT to SOT was 13 days to seven yr (median, 27 months. Lung SOT was performed for two patients with BO, kidney transplants for three patients, and liver transplants for three patients (VOD, chronic GVHD). Seven patients are alive with functioning allografts 6-180 months from SOT. Advances in organ procurement, operative technique, immunosuppressant therapy, and infection control may allow SOT for a select group of patients post-HSCT. However, scarcity of donor organs available in a timely fashion continues to be a limiting factor. Children who have undergone HSCT and develop single organ failure should be considered for an SOT if there is a high likelihood of cure of the primary disease.

  11. Autologous stem cell transplantation for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Farge, Dominique; Nash, Richard; Laar, Jacob M

    2008-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a generalised autoimmune disease, of yet unknown origin, with two major clinical subsets: the limited (lcSSc) and the diffuse cutaneous (dcSSc) forms, which can be distinguished by the extent of skin involvement, the autoantibody profile and the pattern of organ involvement. With an incidence of 1/10(5), SSc affects around 250,000 people in Europe and is responsible for significant morbidity with a 5-year mortality rate of at least 30% of all patients. In patients with rapidly progressive dcSSc, the 5-year mortality is estimated to be 40-50%. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), mostly autologous but also allogeneic in some specific cases, has been employed worldwide since 1996 as a new therapeutic strategy in patients with a poor prognosis. In 2007, 150 HSCT procedures have been reported in the EBMT data base. We review herein both the short and the long-term reports from the various European and North American phase I-II studies, which have shown that autologous HSCT in selected patients with severe dcSSc results in sustained improvement of skin thickening and stabilisation of organ function up to seven years after transplantation. Based on these promising results, ongoing phase III trials have been designed in parallel, both in Europe (ASTIS) and in North America (SCOTT) aiming to analyse the respective benefits from autologous HSCT respectively without or with high dose irradiation. This review reports the current data concerning the effects of HSCT on survival, skin, and major organ function in patients with severe dcSSc.

  12. Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ochando, Jordi; Conde, Patricia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

  13. Limbal stem cell transplantation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Atallah, Marwan Raymond; Palioura, Sotiria; Perez, Victor L; Amescua, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the corneal surface after an epithelial insult involves division, migration, and maturation of a specialized group of stem cells located in the limbus. Several insults, both intrinsic and extrinsic, can precipitate destruction of the delicate microenvironment of these cells, resulting in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). In such cases, reepithelialization fails and conjunctival epithelium extends across the limbus, leading to vascularization, persistent epithelial defects, and chronic inflammation. In partial LSCD, conjunctival epitheliectomy, coupled with amniotic membrane transplantation, could be sufficient to restore a healthy surface. In more severe cases and in total LSCD, stem cell transplantation is currently the best curative option. Before any attempts are considered to perform a limbal stem cell transplantation procedure, the ocular surface must be optimized by controlling causative factors and comorbid conditions. These factors include adequate eyelid function or exposure, control of the ocular surface inflammatory status, and a well-lubricated ocular surface. In cases of unilateral LSCD, stem cells can be obtained from the contralateral eye. Newer techniques aim at expanding cells in vitro or in vivo in order to decrease the need for large limbal resection that may jeopardize the “healthy” eye. Patients with bilateral disease can be treated using allogeneic tissue in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Another emerging option for this subset of patients is the use of noncorneal cells such as mucosal grafts. Finally, the use of keratoprosthesis is reserved for patients who are not candidates for any of the aforementioned options, wherein the choice of the type of keratoprosthesis depends on the severity of the disease. In summary, limbal stem cell transplantation improves both vision and quality-of-life in patients with ocular surface disorders associated with LSCD, and overall, the use of autologous tissue offers

  14. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chien, Ke-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone) and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells). The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  15. Detection of Herpesviridae in whole blood by multiplex PCR DNA-based microarray analysis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Debaugnies, France; Busson, Laurent; Ferster, Alina; Lewalle, Philippe; Azzi, Nadira; Aoun, Mickael; Verhaegen, Godelieve; Mahadeb, Bhavna; de Marchin, Jérôme; Vandenberg, Olivier; Hallin, Marie

    2014-07-01

    Viral infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The monitoring by PCR of Herpesviridae loads in blood samples has become a critical part of posttransplant follow-up, representing mounting costs for the laboratory. In this study, we assessed the clinical performance of the multiplex PCR DNA microarray Clart Entherpex kit for detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) as a screening test for virological follow-up. Two hundred fifty-five blood samples from 16 transplanted patients, prospectively tested by routine PCR assays, were analyzed by microarray. Routine PCR detected single or multiple viruses in 42% and 10% of the samples, respectively. Microarray detected single or multiple viruses in 34% and 18% of the samples, respectively. Microarray results correlated well with CMV and EBV detections by routine PCR (kappa tests = 0.79 and 0.78, respectively), whereas a weak correlation was observed with HHV-6 (0.43). HHV-7 was also detected in 48 samples by microarray. In conclusion, the microarray is a reliable screening assay for a posttransplant virological follow-up to detect CMV and EBV infections in blood. However, positive samples must be subsequently confirmed and viral loads must be quantified by PCR assays. Limitations were identified regarding HHV-6 detection. Although it is promising, is easy to use as a first-line test, and allows a reduction in the cost of analysis without undue delay in the reporting of the final quantitative result to the clinician, some characteristics of this microarray should be improved, particularly regarding quality control and the targeted virus panel, such that it could then be used as a routine test.

  16. B Cell Immunity in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Gonca E.; Claas, Frans H. J.; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of B cells to alloimmune responses is gradually being understood in more detail. We now know that B cells can perpetuate alloimmune responses in multiple ways: (i) differentiation into antibody-producing plasma cells; (ii) sustaining long-term humoral immune memory; (iii) serving as antigen-presenting cells; (iv) organizing the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs; and (v) secreting pro- as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines. The cross-talk between B cells and T cells in the course of immune responses forms the basis of these diverse functions. In the setting of organ transplantation, focus has gradually shifted from T cells to B cells, with an increased notion that B cells are more than mere precursors of antibody-producing plasma cells. In this review, we discuss the various roles of B cells in the generation of alloimmune responses beyond antibody production, as well as possibilities to specifically interfere with B cell activation. PMID:28119695

  17. Hematopoietic cell transplantation: a curative option for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. Reduced intensity conditioning regimen have the potential to further reduce regimen related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments, such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimen may enable the safe use of alternate source of stem cells such as unrelated matched donors and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment.

  18. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jason R; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2011-10-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of hematopoietic derived cell precursors that can suppress immune responses in a variety of inflammatory settings. Here we review recent studies detailing expansion of phenotypically and functionally disparate MDSC. Findings related to MDSC accumulation, activation, and mechanisms utilized in immune suppression are presented. Further, we discuss recent reports that suggest MDSC are expanded during transplantation and that modulation of MDSC can participate in preventing graft rejection.

  19. B-Cell-Based and Soluble Biomarkers in Body Liquids for Predicting Acute/Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Juric, Mateja Kralj; Shevtsov, Maxim; Mozes, Petra; Ogonek, Justyna; Crossland, Rachel E.; Dickinson, Anne M.; Greinix, Hildegard T.; Holler, Ernst; Weissinger, Eva M.; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the main curative therapy for hematological malignancy such as leukemias, lymphomas, or multiple myelomas and some other hematological disorders. In this therapy, cure of hematological diseases relies on graft-versus-malignancy effects by allogenic immune cells. However, severe posttransplant treatment-associated complications such as acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) limit this approach. Most research into GvHD has concentrated on the aGvHD, while the more complex and multifaceted chronic form has been largely poorly investigated. cGvHD is a multi-organ autoimmune disorder and is the major cause of non-relapse morbidity and mortality following allo-HSCT, occurring in about 50% of patients, or 13,000–15,000 patients per year worldwide. Therefore, there is a high medical need for an early prediction of these therapy-associated toxicities. Biomarkers have gained importance over the last decade in diagnosis, in prognosis, and in prediction of pending diseases or side effects. Biomarkers can be cells, factors isolated from target tissues, or soluble factors that can be detected in body fluids. In this review, we aim to summarize some of the recent developments of biomarkers in the field of allo-HSCT. We will focus on cell-based biomarkers (B-cell subsets) for cGvHD and soluble factors including microRNA (miRNA), which are excreted into serum/plasma and urine. We also discuss the potential role of cytosolic and extracellular 70 kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70) as potential biomarkers for aGvHD and their role in preclinical models. Proteomic biomarkers in the blood have been used as predictors of treatment responses in patients with aGvHD for many years. More recently, miRNAs have been found to serve as a biomarker to diagnose aGvHD in the plasma. Another development relates to urine-based biomarkers that are usually detected by capillary

  20. Multiscale patterned transplantable stem cell patches for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangho; Bae, Won-Gyu; Choung, Han-Wool; Lim, Ki Taek; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Suh, Khap-Yang; Jeon, Noo Li; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Stem cell-based therapy has been proposed as an enabling alternative not only for the treatment of diseases but also for the regeneration of tissues beyond complex surgical treatments or tissue transplantation. In this study, we approached a conceptual platform that can integrate stem cells into a multiscale patterned substrate for bone regeneration. Inspired by human bone tissue, we developed hierarchically micro- and nanopatterned transplantable patches as synthetic extracellular matrices by employing capillary force lithography in combination with a surface micro-wrinkling method using a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer. The multiscale patterned PLGA patches were highly flexible and showed higher tissue adhesion to the underlying tissue than did the single nanopatterned patches. In response to the anisotropically multiscale patterned topography, the adhesion and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were sensitively controlled. Furthermore, the stem cell patch composed of hMSCs and transplantable PLGA substrate promoted bone regeneration in vivo when both the micro- and nanotopography of the substrate surfaces were synergistically combined. Thus, our study concludes that multiscale patterned transplantable stem cell patches may have a great potential for bone regeneration as well as for various regenerative medicine approaches.

  1. Systemically transplanted human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells contributing to bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan-Chen; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Ji, Qiu-Xia; Yu, Xin-Bo; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Deng, Jing; Yang, Pi-Shan

    2014-01-01

    As novel postnatal stem cells, gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) have been considered as an ideal candidate cell resource for tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. GMSCs implanted into sites of injury have been confirmed to promote the injury repair. However, no studies have demonstrated whether systemically transplanted GMSCs can home to the bone injuries and contribute to the new bone formation in vivo. In this study, we transplanted human GMSCs into C57BL/6J mice with defects in mandibular bone via the tail vein to explore the capacity of transplanted GMSCs to promote bone regeneration. Results showed that the transplanted GMSCs were detected in the bone defects and employed in new bone formation. And the newly formed bone area in mice with GMSCs transplantation was significantly higher than that in control mice. Our findings indicate that systemically transplanted GMSCs can not only home to the mandibular defect but also promote bone regeneration.

  2. iPS cell transplantation for traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Goulão, Miguel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of work has been published on transplantation of a wide range of neural stem and progenitor cell types derived from the developing and adult CNS, as well as from pluripotent embryonic stem cells, in models of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, many of these cell-based approaches present practical issues for clinical translation such as ethical cell derivation, generation of potentially large numbers of homogenously prepared cells, and immune rejection. With the advent of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell technology, many of these issues may potentially be overcome. To date, a number of studies have demonstrated integration, differentiation into mature CNS lineages, migration and long-term safety of iPS cell transplants in a variety of SCI models, as well as therapeutic benefits in some cases. Given the clinical potential of this advance in stem cell biology, we present a concise review of studies published to date involving iPS cell transplantation in animal models of SCI. PMID:26201863

  3. Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation as Platform for Post-transplant Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kongtim, Piyanuch; Lee, Dean A.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Haploidentical transplantation can extend the opportunity for transplantation to almost all patients who lack an HLA-matched donor. Advances in the field of haploidentical transplantation have led to a marked decrease in treatment-related mortality, allowing investigators to focus on developing rationale pre- and peri-remission therapies aimed at preventing disease relapse post-transplant. Due to widespread availability, low treatment-related mortality and cost, haploidentical donors may become the preferred “alternative” donors for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. One of the major advantages of using a related donor is the possibility to collect or generate additional cellular products from the same immediate available donor, which will not be rejected. Infusion of these cells in the peri-transplant period, derived from the same immune system, is opening the possibility to markedly enhance the anti-tumor effects of the graft and hasten immunologic reconstitution post-transplant. PMID:26172479

  4. Group-Based Trajectory Modeling of Distress and Well-Being Among Caregivers of Children Undergoing Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Sands, Stephen A; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Manne, Sharon; Devine, Katie A; Savone, Mirko; Kashy, Deborah A

    2016-08-20

    OBJECTIVE : To examine the trajectories of caregiver psychological responses in the year following their child's hematopoetic stem cell transplant (HSCT), and whether cognitive and social processing strategies differentiated between trajectories.  METHOD : One hundred and eight caregivers randomized to the control condition of a cognitive-behavioral intervention study completed measures of distress, coping, and social support at baseline, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year post HSCT of their child.  RESULTS : The majority reported moderate or low anxiety, depression, or distress that decreased over time, but a small group demonstrated high anxiety, depression, or distress that persisted or increased over time. Maladaptive coping was highest among caregivers in the high-persistent distress subgroup compared with the moderate-decreasing and low-stable groups. Adaptive coping was minimally associated with trajectory subgroups.  CONCLUSIONS : Screening HSCT caregivers for distress and maladaptive coping may be useful in identifying caregivers likely to experience persistently high distress who may benefit from psychological intervention.

  5. Antibacterial Resistance in Patients with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Sehnaz; Akova, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at substantial risk of bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic infections depending on the time elapsed since transplantation, presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and the degree of immunosuppression. Infectious complications in HSCT recipients are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Bacterial infections constitute the major cause of infectious complications, especially in the early post-transplant period. The emergence of antibacterial resistance complicates the management of bacterial infections in this patient group. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in this group of patients have attracted considerable interest and may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Empirical antibacterial therapy in patients with HSCT and febrile neutropenia has a critical role for survival and should be based on local epidemiology. This review attempts to provide an overview of risk factors and epidemiology of emerging resistant bacterial infections and their management in HSCT recipients. PMID:28101308

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed. PMID:26731468

  7. T-cell post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after cardiac transplantation: a single institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Draoua, H Y; Tsao, Lawrence; Mancini, Donna M; Addonizio, Linda J; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2004-11-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a well-recognized and potentially life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation. While the vast majority of PTLDs are B-cell lymphoproliferations, T-cell PTLDs are rarely seen. Among 898 patients receiving cardiac transplants between 1990 and 2003, 34 patients (3.8%) developed PTLDs with two (0.2%) T-cell PTLDs, 31 (3.5%) B-cell PTLDs and one (0.1%) natural killer cell PTLD. An additional three cases of T-cell PTLD were identified among all cardiac transplant patients followed at our institution. These T-cell PTLDs comprised a heterogeneous group of Epstein-Barr virus negative lymphoproliferations that developed late after transplantation and followed an aggressive course.

  8. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation: Update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is categorized as a β-cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients who lack the ability to secrete insulin. Allogeneic islet cell transplantation is for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, and autologous islet cell transplantation is for the prevention of surgical diabetes after a total pancreatectomy. The issues of allogeneic islet cell transplantation include poor efficacy of islet isolation, the need for multiple donor pancreata, difficulty maintaining insulin independence and undesirable side effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Those issues have been solved step by step and allogeneic islet cell transplantation is almost ready to be the standard therapy. The donor shortage will be the next issue and marginal and/or living donor islet cell transplantation might alleviate the issue. Xeno-islet cell transplantation, β-cell regeneration from human stem cells and gene induction of the naïve pancreas represent the next generation of β-cell replacement therapy. Autologous islet cell transplantation after total pancreatectomy for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain is the standard therapy, even though only limited centers are able to perform this treatment. Remote center autologous islet cell transplantation is an attractive option for hospitals performing total pancreatectomies without the proper islet isolation facilities. PMID:21785738

  9. Cord blood transplants for SCID: better B-cell engraftment?

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan-Yin; Roberts, Robert Lloyd; Moore, Theodore B; Stiehm, E Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Despite successful T-cell engraftment in transplanted patients, B-cell function is not always achieved; up to 58% of patients require immunoglobulin therapy after receiving haploidentical transplants. We report 2 half-sibling males with X-linked γ-chain SCID treated with different sources of stem cells. Sibling 1 was transplanted with T-cell-depleted haploidentical maternal bone marrow and sibling 2 was transplanted with 7/8 human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated umbilical cord blood. Both patients received pretransplant conditioning and posttransplant graft-versus-host-disease prophylaxis. B-cell engraftment and function was achieved in sibling 1 but not in sibling 2. This disparate result is consistent with a review of 19 other SCID children who received cord blood transplants. B-cell function, as indicated by no need for immunoglobulin therapy, was restored in 42% of patients given haploidentical transplants and in 68% of patients given matched unrelated donor transplants compared with 80% of patients given cord blood transplants. Cord blood is an alternative source of stem cells for transplantation in children with SCID and has a higher likelihood of B-cell reconstitution.

  10. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving.

  11. Arrhythmias in the setting of hematopoietic cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Tonorezos, E S; Stillwell, E E; Calloway, J J; Glew, T; Wessler, J D; Rebolledo, B J; Pham, A; Steingart, R M; Lazarus, H; Gale, R P; Jakubowski, A A; Schaffer, W L

    2015-09-01

    Prior studies report that 9-27% of persons receiving a hematopoietic cell transplant develop arrhythmias, but the effect on outcomes is largely unknown. We reviewed data from 1177 consecutive patients ⩾40 years old receiving a hematopoietic cell transplant at one center during 1999-2009. Transplant indication was predominately leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Overall, 104 patients were found to have clinically significant arrhythmia: 43 before and 61 after transplant. Post-transplant arrhythmias were most frequently atrial fibrillation (N=30), atrial flutter (N=7) and supraventricular tachycardia (N=11). Subjects with an arrhythmia post transplant were more likely to have longer median hospital stays (32 days vs 23, P=<0.001), a greater probability of an intensive care unit admission (52% vs 7%; P<0.001), greater probability of in-hospital deaths (28% vs 3%, P<0.001), and greater probability of death within 1 year of transplant (41% vs 15%; P<0.001) compared with patients without arrhythmia at any time. In a multivariate model including age at transplant, diagnosis, history of pretransplant arrhythmia, and transplant-related variables, post-transplant arrhythmia was associated with a greater risk for death within a year of transplant (odds ratio 3.5, 95% confidence interval: 2.1, 5.9; P<0.001). Our data suggest that arrhythmias after transplants are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A prospective study of arrhythmia in the transplant setting is warranted.

  12. Intranigral transplantation of epigenetically induced BDNF-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cell-based therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Somoza, Rodrigo; Juri, Carlos; Baes, Mauricio; Wyneken, Ursula; Rubio, Francisco Javier

    2010-11-01

    It is thought that the ability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to deliver neurotrophic factors might be potentially useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of the present study was to characterize signals and/or molecules that regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression/delivery in hMSC cultures and evaluate the effect of epigenetically generated BDNF-secreting hMSC on the intact and lesioned substantia nigra (SN). We tested 4 different culture media and found that the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) decreased the expression of BDNF, whereas exogenous addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to serum-free medium was required to induce BDNF release (125 ± 12 pg/day/10⁶ cells). These cells were called hM(N)SC. Although the induction medium inhibited the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA), an hMSC marker, and increased the nestin-positive subpopulation of hMSC cultures, the ability to express BDNF was restricted to the nestin-negative subpopulation. One week after transplantation into the SN, the human cells integrated into the surrounding tissue, and some showed a dopaminergic phenotype. We also observed the activation of Trk receptors for neurotrophic factors around the implant site, including the BDNF receptor TrkB. When we transplanted these cells into the unilateral lesioned SN induced by striatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a significant hypertrophy of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)(+) cells, an increase of striatal TH-staining and stabilization of amphetamine-induced motor symptoms were observed. Therefore, hMSC cultures exposed to the described induction medium might be highly useful as a vehicle for neurotrophic delivery to the brain and specifically are strong candidates for future therapeutic application in Parkinson's disease.

  13. CMV in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de la Cámara, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Due to its negative impact on the outcome of stem cell transplant (SCT) and solid organ transplant patients (SOT) CMV has been called “the troll of transplantation”. One of the greatest advances in the management of SCT has been the introduction of the preemptive strategy. Since its introduction, the incidence of the viremia, as expected, remains unchanged but there has been a marked decline in the incidence of early CMV disease. However, in spite of the advances in prevention of CMV disease, CMV is still today an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Late CMV disease is still occurring in a significant proportion of patients and the so-called indirect effects of CMV are causing significant morbidity and mortality. Fortunately there have been several advances in the development of new antivirals, adoptive immunotherapy and DNA-CMV vaccines that might transform the management of CMV in the near future. PMID:27413524

  14. Stem cell transplantation for rheumatic autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hügle, Thomas; van Laar, Jacob M

    2008-01-01

    Immunoablative therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an intensive treatment modality aimed at 'resetting' the dysregulated immune system of a patient with immunoablative therapy and allow outgrowth of a nonautogressive immune system from reinfused hematopoietic stem cells, either from the patient (autologous HSCT) or a healthy donor (allogeneic HSCT). HSCT has been shown to induce profound alterations of the immune system affecting B and T cells, monocytes, and natural killer and dendritic cells, resulting in elimination of autoantibody-producing plasma cells and in induction of regulatory T cells. Most of the available data have been collected through retrospective cohort analyses of autologous HSCT, case series, and translational studies in patients with refractory autoimmune diseases. Long-term and marked improvements of disease activity have been observed, notably in systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and treatment-related morbidity and mortality have improved due to better patient selection and modifications of transplant regimens. Treatment-related mortality has decreased to approximately 7%. Prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trials are ongoing or planned in systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and several nonrheumatological conditions. PMID:18947373

  15. Transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells into contusion-injured spinal cord of rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Kenji; Nakano, Norihiko; Noda, Toru; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Masayoshi; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukushima, Masanori; Ide, Chizuka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of the transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs) on locomotor improvement and tissue repair including axonal extension in spinal cord lesions was examined in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: CPECs were cultured from the choroid plexus of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats, and transplanted directly into the contusion-injured spinal cord lesions of rats of the same strain. Locomotor behaviors were evaluated based on BBB scores every week after transplantation until 4 weeks after transplantation. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed at 2 days, and every week until 5 weeks after transplantation. Results: Locomotor behaviors evaluated by the BBB score were significantly improved in cell-transplanted rats. Numerous axons grew, with occasional interactions with CPECs, through the astrocyte-devoid areas. These axons exhibited structural characteristics of peripheral nerves. GAP-43-positive axons were found at the border of the lesion 2 days after transplantation. Cavity formation was more reduced in cell-transplanted than control spinal cords. CPECs were found within the spinal cord lesion, and sometimes in association with astrocytes at the border of the lesion until 2 weeks after transplantation. Conclusion: The transplantation of CPECs enhanced locomotor improvement and tissue recovery, including axonal regeneration, in rats with SCI. PMID:26923614

  16. Megakaryocytopoiesis in Stem Cell Transplantation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    test this hypothesis, nonadherent mononuclear PIXY321 promotes more rapid platelet recovery in rhesus cells (MNCs) from apheresis specimens of patients...with growth factors usually results in delayed platelet engraftment as compared to neutrophil recovery (1-4), requiring patients to be submitted to...repeated platelet transfusions. The overall objective of this research proposal is to investigate several laboratory protocols to improve megakaryocyte

  17. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  18. Use of hematopoietic cell transplants to achieve tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Strober, Samuel

    2016-03-24

    The goals of tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants are to eliminate the lifelong need for immunosuppressive (IS) drugs and to prevent graft loss due to rejection or drug toxicity. Tolerance with complete withdrawal of IS drugs has been achieved in recipients of HLA-matched and mismatched living donor kidney transplants in 3 medical centers using hematopoietic cell transplants to establish mixed or complete chimerism.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in thalassemia major and sickle cell disease: indications and management recommendations from an international expert panel.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Baronciani, Donatella; Bernaudin, Françoise; Bonanomi, Sonia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Di Bartolomeo, Paolo; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Dickerhoff, Roswitha; Giardini, Claudio; Gluckman, Eliane; Hussein, Ayad Achmed; Kamani, Naynesh; Minkov, Milen; Locatelli, Franco; Rocha, Vanderson; Sedlacek, Petr; Smiers, Frans; Thuret, Isabelle; Yaniv, Isaac; Cavazzana, Marina; Peters, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Thalassemia major and sickle cell disease are the two most widely disseminated hereditary hemoglobinopathies in the world. The outlook for affected individuals has improved in recent years due to advances in medical management in the prevention and treatment of complications. However, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is still the only available curative option. The use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been increasing, and outcomes today have substantially improved compared with the past three decades. Current experience world-wide is that more than 90% of patients now survive hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and disease-free survival is around 80%. However, only a few controlled trials have been reported, and decisions on patient selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and transplant management remain principally dependent on data from retrospective analyses and on the clinical experience of the transplant centers. This consensus document from the European Blood and Marrow Transplantation Inborn Error Working Party and the Paediatric Diseases Working Party aims to report new data and provide consensus-based recommendations on indications for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and transplant management.

  20. Major complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Afessa, Bekele; Peters, Steve G

    2006-06-01

    Tens of thousands of patients undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually, 15 to 40% of whom are admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary complications are the most life threatening conditions that develop in HSCT recipients. Both infectious and noninfectious complications occur more frequently in allogeneic HSCT. The management of HSCT recipients requires knowledge of their immune status, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, and early treatment. During the pre-engraftment phase (0 to 30 days after transplant), the most prevalent pathogens causing infection are bacteria and Candida species and, if the neutropenia persists, Aspergillus species. The early post-engraftment phase (30 to 100 days) is characterized by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Pneumocystis jiroveci, and Aspergillus infections. During the late posttransplant phase (> 100 days), allogeneic HSCT recipients are at risk for CMV, community-acquired respiratory virus, and encapsulated bacterial infections. Antigen and polymerase chain reaction assays are important for the diagnosis of CMV and Aspergillus infections. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and peri-engraftment respiratory distress syndrome occur in both allogeneic and autologous HSCT recipients, usually during the first 30 days. Bronchiolitis obliterans occurs exclusively in allogeneic HSCT recipients with graft versus host disease. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome occurs at any time following transplant. Bronchoscopy is usually helpful for the diagnosis of the infectious pulmonary complications and DAH.

  1. Luminex® and Its Applications for Solid Organ Transplantation, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, and Transfusion†

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Nils; Todorova, Kremena; Schulze, Harald; Schönemann, Constanze

    2013-01-01

    Summary The detection of antibodies against the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has become indispensable in every clinical practice. The development of solid-phase assays like the Luminex allows the standardized measurement of anti-HLA antibodies (HLAab) with high sensitivity, albeit the relevance for some clinical settings remains a matter of debate. In this review we aim to describe the principle of Luminex-based antibody detection, including two modifications that allow identifying solely complement-activating antibodies. We then describe three applications for Luminex: i) detection of HLAab preceding solid-organ transplantation and monitoring of donor-specific antibodies posttransplant as a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection; ii) presence of HLAab in recipients as a risk for graft failure in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, especially in haploidentical or mismatched transplantations; iii) role of HLAab in blood transfusion including refractory thrombocytopenia and selection of suitable platelet donors, transfusion-related lung injury after plasma transfusion, and immunization against HLA after red blood cell transfusion despite leukodepletion. Although the Luminex platform constitutes a potent technology for HLA antibody detection, some drawbacks require the well-educated analysis and interpretation of data in critical cases. In addition, Luminex has become an important tool to identify clinically relevant antibodies. PMID:23922543

  2. Salvage Second Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Laura C.; Saad, Ayman; Zhong, Xiaobo; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Freytes, Cesar O.; Marks, David I.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bird, Jennifer M.; Holmberg, Leona; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kumar, Shaji; Lill, Michael; Meehan, Kenneth R.; Saber, Wael; Schriber, Jeffrey; Tay, Jason; Vogl, Dan T.; Wirk, Baldeep; Savani, Bipin N.; Gale, Robert P.; Vesole, David H.; Schiller, Gary J.; Abidi, Muneer; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Nishihori, Taiga; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Vose, Julie M.; Moreb, Jan S.; Drobyski, William; Munker, Reinhold; Roy, Vivek; Ghobadi, Armin; Holland, H. Kent; Nath, Rajneesh; To, L. Bik; Maiolino, Angelo; Kassim, Adetola A.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Landau, Heather; Schouten, Harry C.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mikhael, Joseph; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Stiff, Patrick J.; Gibson, John; Lonial, Sagar; Krishnan, Amrita; Dispenzieri, Angela; Hari, Parameswaran

    2013-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) as initial therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) improves survival. However, data to support this approach for relapsed/progressive disease after initial AHCT (AHCT1) are limited. Using Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data, we report the outcomes of 187 patients who underwent a second AHCT (AHCT2) for the treatment of relapsed/progressive MM. Planned tandem AHCT was excluded. Median age at AHCT2 was 59 years (range, 28 to 72), and median patient follow-up was 47 months (range, 3 to 97). Nonrelapse mortality after AHCT2 was 2% at 1 year and 4% at 3 years. Median interval from AHCT1 to relapse/progression was 18 months, and median interval between transplantations was 32 months. After AHCT2, the incidence of relapse/progression at 1 and 3 years was 51% and 82%, respectively. At 3 years after AHCT2, progression-free survival was 13%, and overall survival was 46%. In multivariate analyses, those relapsing ≥36 months after AHCT1 had superior progression-free (P = .045) and overall survival (P = .019). Patients who underwent AHCT2 after 2004 had superior survival (P = .026). AHCT2 is safe and feasible for disease progression after AHCT1. In this retrospective study, individuals relapsing ≥36 months from AHCT1 derived greater benefit from AHCT2 compared with those with a shorter disease-free interval. Storage of an adequate graft before AHCT1 will ensure that the option of a second autologous transplantation is retained for patients with relapsed/progressive MM. PMID:23298856

  3. Angiogenesis after transplantation of auto- and allogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Fatkhudinov, T Kh; Bol'shakova, G B; Komissarova, S V; Arutyunyan, I V; Rzhaninova, A A; Goldstein, D V

    2010-10-01

    Neoangiogenesis after transplantation of auto- and allogenic mononuclears and multipotent stromal cells from the bone marrow was studied on the model of inflammatory angiogenesis. Transplanted auto- and allogenic cells stimulate the formation of new blood vessels in the granulation tissue, this manifesting in an increase in the quantity and volume density of blood vessels. The most pronounced angiogenesis was observed after transplantation of allogenic mononuclears and multipotent stromal cells. It was associated with intense inflammatory infiltration, with less numerous and mature collagen fibers in the granulation tissue. Injection of allogenic cells led to stimulation and chronization of inflammation, infiltration with inflammatory and poorly differentiated cells, and more pronounced and lasting angiogenesis. However, neither auto-, nor allogenic transplanted labeled cells were detected in the walls of new blood vessels. Hence, it seems that bone marrow mononuclears and multipotent stromal cells stimulated angiogenesis mainly at the expense of production of angiogenic factors, and after transplantation of allogenic cells also by stimulating the inflammation.

  4. Immune Tolerance for Autoimmune Disease and Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xunrong; Miller, Stephen D.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2016-01-01

    The undesired destruction of healthy cells, either endogenous or transplanted, by the immune system results in the loss of tissue function or limits strategies to restore tissue function. Current therapies typically involve non-specific immunosuppression that may prevent the appropriate response to an antigen, thereby decreasing humoral immunity and increasing the risks of patient susceptibility to opportunistic infections, viral reactivation, and neoplasia. The induction of antigen-specific immunological tolerance to block undesired immune responses to self- or allogeneic antigens, while maintaining the integrity of the remaining immune system, has the potential to transform the current treatment of autoimmune disease and serve as a key enabling technology for therapies based on cell transplantation. PMID:26928211

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Geisler, William M; Corey, Lawrence

    2002-03-27

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in immunocompetent patients; however, its role as a respiratory pathogen in immunocompromised hosts has been infrequently recognized. We describe C. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection in a 19-year-old male after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient developed fever on day +14, and a subsequent computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a right lateral pleural-based opacity, which was then resected during thoracoscopy. Diagnosis was made by culture and staining of the resected tissue with C. pneumoniae-specific monoclonal antibodies, and azithromycin was administered. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. pneumoniae respiratory infection after stem cell or marrow transplantation. C. pneumoniae often coexists with other etiologic agents of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Considering the infrequency of infections from this organism in this clinical setting, one must still rule out other more likely respiratory pathogens.

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Steward, Colin G

    2010-02-01

    Osteopetrosis is the generic name for a group of diseases caused by deficient formation or function of osteoclasts, inherited in either autosomal recessive or dominant fashion. Osteopetrosis varies in severity from a disease that may kill infants to an incidental radiological finding in adults. It is increasingly clear that prognosis is governed by which gene is affected, making detailed elucidation of the cause of the disease a critical component of optimal care, including the decision on whether hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is appropriate. This article reviews the characteristics and management of osteopetrosis.

  7. The Evolving Roles of Memory Immune Cells in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhao; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C

    2015-10-01

    Memory cells are the products of immune responses but also exert significant impact on subsequent immunity and immune tolerance, thus placing them in a unique position in transplant research. Memory cells are heterogeneous, including not only memory T cells but also memory B cells and innate memory cells. Memory cells are a critical component of protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially in immunosuppressed patients, but they also mediate graft loss and tolerance resistance. Recent studies suggest that some memory cells unexpectedly act as regulatory cells, promoting rather than hindering transplant survival. This functional diversity makes therapeutic targeting of memory cells a challenging task in transplantation. In this article, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of memory cells, focusing on diversity of memory cells and mechanisms involved in their induction and functions. We also provide a broad overview on the challenges and opportunities in targeting memory cells in the induction of transplant tolerance.

  8. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric multiple sclerosis: a registry-based study of the Autoimmune Diseases Working Party (ADWP) and Pediatric Diseases Working Party (PDWP) of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    PubMed

    Burman, J; Kirgizov, K; Carlson, K; Badoglio, M; Mancardi, G L; De Luca, G; Casanova, B; Ouyang, J; Bembeeva, R; Haas, J; Bader, P; Snowden, J; Farge, D

    2017-03-20

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) is a promising therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), which has mainly been used in adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate efficacy and adverse events of aHSCT in the treatment of children with MS using data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry. Twenty-one patients with a median follow-up time of 2.8 years could be identified. PFS at 3 years was 100%, 16 patients improved in expanded disability status scale score and only 2 patients experienced a clinical relapse. The procedure was generally well tolerated and only two instances of severe transplant-related toxicity were recorded. There was no treatment-related mortality, although one patient needed intensive care. aHSCT may be a therapeutic option for children with disease that does not respond to standard care.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 20 March 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.40.

  9. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  10. Haematopoietic cell transplantation in the treatment of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Robert C; Walters, Mark C

    2003-12-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is presently the only treatment which offers the possibility of a cure for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). While approximately 84% of patients survive disease-free after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor HCT, this therapy has traditionally been reserved for patients who have suffered serious complications due to the risk of transplant-related morbidity and mortality. Typically, these sickle-related complications have included recurrent episodes of acute chest syndrome, recurrent vaso-occlusive episodes and stroke. The future of HCT for haemoglobinopathies undoubtedly will evolve as transplant-related complications are reduced and as the process of selecting patients for HCT is refined.

  11. Immunity to Infections after Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aversa, Franco; Prezioso, Lucia; Manfra, Ilenia; Galaverna, Federica; Spolzino, Angelica; Monti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The advantage of using a Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donor is that almost every patient who does not have an HLA-identical donor or who urgently needs hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has at least one family member with whom shares one haplotype (haploidentical) and who is promptly available as a donor. The major challenge of haplo-HSCT is intense bi-directional alloreactivity leading to high incidences of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Advances in graft processing and pharmacologic prophylaxis of GVHD have reduced these risks and have made haplo-HSCT a viable alternative for patients lacking a matched donor. Indeed, the haplo-HSCT has spread to centers worldwide even though some centers have preferred an approach based on T cell depletion of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs), others have focused on new strategies for GvHD prevention, such as G-CSF priming of bone marrow and robust post-transplant immune suppression or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCY). Today, the graft can be a megadose of T-cell depleted PBPCs or a standard dose of unmanipulated bone marrow and/or PBPCs. Although haplo-HSCT modalities are based mainly on high intensity conditioning regimens, recently introduced reduced intensity regimens (RIC) showed promise in decreasing early transplant-related mortality (TRM), and extending the opportunity of HSCT to an elderly population with more comorbidities. Infections are still mostly responsible for toxicity and non-relapse mortality due to prolonged immunosuppression related, or not, to GVHD. Future challenges lie in determining the safest preparative conditioning regimen, minimizing GvHD and promoting rapid and more robust immune reconstitution. PMID:27872737

  12. Promising treatment results with blood brain barrier disruption (BBBD) based immunochemotherapy combined with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL).

    PubMed

    Kuitunen, Hanne; Tokola, Susanna; Siniluoto, Topi; Isokangas, Matti; Sonkajärvi, Eila; Alahuhta, Seppo; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Jantunen, Esa; Nousiainen, Tapio; Vasala, Kaija; Kuittinen, Outi

    2017-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare brain tumour with a dismal prognosis. Several phase II studies with high-dose methotrexate-based regimens have shown promising early results, but in all hospital-based data published so far, the disease outcome has been poor. Patients with relapsed or refractory disease have a dismal prognosis. We performed retrospective analysis to evaluate results and tolerabilities of BBBD therapy in combination with high-dose therapy supported by autologous stem cell transplantation. We analysed 25 patients (age range: 40-71 years) who were treated in first or second line with BBBD therapy. When we started BBBD treatment, patients had relapsed or refractory PCNSL or they did not tolerate Bonn-like therapy. In recent years, some of the patients were treated in first line. We found promising response rates. Altogether 19 (76 %) of the patients achieved a complete response (CR). Two-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 61 and 57 % respectively and the five-year OS was 47 %. Patients who were treated with a five-drug therapy had a very promising prognosis. The CR rate was 100 % in first-line therapy and 60 % in relapsed cases. These findings suggest that BBBD is a promising therapy for PCNSL, especially for patients in first line, but also for patients with relapsed or refractory disease after conventional chemotherapy, who commonly have a very poor prognosis. Treatment-related toxicity was generally manageable. Thus, BBBD followed by ASCT could be a treatment of choice in transplant-eligible patients with PCNSL.

  13. Impact of Pretransplantation Indices in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Knowledge of Center-Specific Outcome Data Is Pivotal before Making Index-Based Decisions.

    PubMed

    Törlén, Johan; Remberger, Mats; Le Blanc, Katarina; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    Outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is influenced by patient comorbidity, disease type, and status before treatment. We performed a retrospective study involving 521 consecutive adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients who underwent transplantation for hematological malignancy at our center from 2000 to 2012 to compare the predictive value of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) and the disease risk index (DRI) for overall survival and transplantation-related mortality. Patients in the highest HCT-CI risk group (HCT-CI score ≥3) had a lower 5-year overall survival rate (50%) than the low-risk group (63%; P < .01). Subset analysis of donor origin showed greater 5-year overall survival in siblings than in matched unrelated donors, regardless of HCT-CI score (eg, 67% 5-year overall survival in siblings despite an HCT-CI score of >6 [n = 9]). Five-year overall survival in the highest DRI risk group was significantly poorer (44%) than in the low-risk group (63%; P < .01). Both indices failed to predict differences in transplantation-related mortality (HCT-CI, P = .54; DRI, P = .17). We conclude that HCT-CI and DRI were predictive of overall survival in our patient population. Even so, our data show that different patient groups may have different outcomes despite sharing the same index risk group and that indices should, therefore, be evaluated according to local data before clinical implementation at the single-center level.

  14. Stem cell biology and cell transplantation therapy in the retina.

    PubMed

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Masayo

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are derived from the inner cell mass of mammalian blastocyst stage embryos, have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body and to grow indefinitely while maintaining pluripotency. During development, cells undergo progressive and irreversible differentiation into specialized adult cell types. Remarkably, in spite of this restriction in potential, adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed and returned to the naive state of pluripotency found in the early embryo simply by forcing expression of a defined set of transcription factors. These induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are molecularly and functionally equivalent to ES cells and provide powerful in vitro models for development, disease, and drug screening, as well as material for cell replacement therapy. Since functional impairment results from cell loss in most central nervous system (CNS) diseases, recovery of lost cells is an important treatment strategy. Although adult neurogenesis occurs in restricted regions, the CNS has poor potential for regeneration to compensate for cell loss. Thus, cell transplantation into damaged or diseased CNS tissues is a promising approach to treating various neurodegenerative disorders. Transplantation of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from human ES cells can restore some visual function. Patient-specific iPS cells may lead to customized cell therapy. However, regeneration of retinal function will require a detailed understanding of eye development, visual system circuitry, and retinal degeneration pathology. Here, we review the current progress in retinal regeneration, focusing on the therapeutic potential of pluripotent stem cells.

  15. Blood and marrow transplant clinical trials network toxicity committee consensus summary: thrombotic microangiopathy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vincent T; Cutler, Corey; Carter, Shelly; Martin, Paul; Adams, Roberta; Horowitz, Mary; Ferrara, James; Soiffer, Robert; Giralt, Sergio

    2005-08-01

    The syndrome of microangiopathic hemolysis associated with renal failure, neurologic impairment, or both is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This entity is often called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), yet it is clear that the pathophysiology of transplant-associated HUS/TTP is different from that of classic HUS or TTP. Furthermore, the incidence of this syndrome varies from 0.5% to 76% in different transplant series, primarily because of the lack of a uniform definition. The toxicity committee of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network has reviewed the current literature on transplant-related HUS/TTP and recommends that it be henceforth renamed posttransplantation thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). An operational definition for TMA based on the presence of microangiopathic hemolysis and renal and/or neurologic dysfunction is proposed. The primary intervention after diagnosis of TMA should be withdrawal of calcineurin inhibitors. Plasma exchange, although frequently used in this condition, has not been proven to be effective. In the absence of definitive trials, plasma exchange cannot be considered a standard of care for TMA. It is hoped that these positions will improve the identification and reporting of this devastating complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and facilitate future clinical studies for its prevention and treatment.

  16. Stem cell research in cell transplantation: sources, geopolitical influence, and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eve, David J; Fillmore, Randolph W; Borlongan, Cesar V; Sanberg, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    If the rapidly progressing field of stem cell research reaches its full potential, successful treatments and enhanced understanding of many diseases are the likely results. However, the full potential of stem cell science will only be reached if all possible avenues can be explored and on a worldwide scale. Until 2009, the US had a highly restrictive policy on obtaining cells from human embryos and fetal tissue, a policy that pushed research toward the use of adult-derived cells. Currently, US policy is still in flux, and retrospective analysis does show the US lagging behind the rest of the world in the proportional increase in embryonic/fetal stem cell research. The majority of US studies being on either a limited number of cell lines, or on cells derived elsewhere (or funded by other sources than Federal) rather than on freshly isolated embryonic or fetal material. Neural, mesenchymal, and the mixed stem cell mononuclear fraction are the most commonly investigated types, which can generally be classified as adult-derived stem cells, although roughly half of the neural stem cells are fetal derived. Other types, such as embryonic and fat-derived stem cells, are increasing in their prominence, suggesting that new types of stem cells are still being pursued. Sixty percent of the reported stem cell studies involved transplantation, of which over three quarters were allogeneic transplants. A high proportion of the cardiovascular systems articles were on allogeneic transplants in a number of different species, including several autologous studies. A number of pharmaceutical grade stem cell products have also recently been tested and reported on. Stem cell research shows considerable promise for the treatment of a number of disorders, some of which have entered clinical trials; over the next few years it will be interesting to see how these treatments progress in the clinic.

  17. Stem cell transplantation therapy for multifaceted therapeutic benefits after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Wei, Zheng Z; Jiang, Michael Qize; Mohamad, Osama; Yu, Shan Ping

    2017-03-18

    One of the exciting advances in modern medicine and life science is cell-based neurovascular regeneration of damaged brain tissues and repair of neuronal structures. The progress in stem cell biology and creation of adult induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has significantly improved basic and pre-clinical research in disease mechanisms and generated enthusiasm for potential applications in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including stroke. Endogenous neural stem cells and cultured stem cells are capable of self-renewal and give rise to virtually all types of cells essential for the makeup of neuronal structures. Meanwhile, stem cells and neural progenitor cells are well-known for their potential for trophic support after transplantation into the ischemic brain. Thus, stem cell-based therapies provide an attractive future for protecting and repairing damaged brain tissues after injury and in various disease states. Moreover, basic research on naïve and differentiated stem cells including iPS cells has markedly improved our understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurological disorders, and provides a platform for the discovery of novel drug targets. The latest advances indicate that combinatorial approaches using cell based therapy with additional treatments such as protective reagents, preconditioning strategies and rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve therapeutic benefits. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of cell therapy in different ischemic models and the application of stem cells and progenitor cells as regenerative medicine for the treatment of stroke.

  18. Twenty-five years of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Körbling, Martin; Freireich, Emil J

    2011-06-16

    Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) is the most common transplantation procedure performed in medicine. Its clinical introduction in 1986 replaced BM as a stem-cell source to approximately 100% in the autologous and to approximately 75% in the allogeneic transplantation setting. This historical overview provides a brief insight into the discovery of circulating hematopoietic stem cells in the early 1960s, the development of apheresis technology, the discovery of hematopoietic growth factors and small molecule CXCR4 antagonist for stem- cell mobilization, and in vivo experimental transplantation studies that eventually led to clinical PBSCT. Also mentioned are the controversies surrounding the engraftment potential of circulating stem cells before acceptance as a clinical modality. Clinical trials comparing the outcome of PBSCT with BM transplantation, registry data analyses, and the role of the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) in promoting unrelated blood stem-cell donation are addressed.

  19. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Hande H; Rana, Naveed; Milani, Cannon; Darko, Angela; Al-Homsi, Samer A

    2012-01-01

    Recognition and management of gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has gained increasing importance as indications and techniques of transplantation have expanded in the last few years. The transplant recipient is at risk for several complications including conditioning chemotherapy related toxicities, infections, bleeding, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) as well as other long-term problems. The severity and the incidence of many complications have improved in the past several years as the intensity of conditioning regimens has diminished and better supportive care and GVHD prevention strategies have been implemented. Transplant clinicians, however, continue to be challenged with problems arising from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched and unrelated donor transplants, expanding transplant indications and age-limit. This review describes the most commonly seen transplant related complications, focusing on their pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and management. PMID:22563164

  20. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation and CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Hamblin, Milton H; Lee, Jean-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    In neurological disorders, pathological lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) may be globally dispersed throughout the brain or localized to specific regions. Although native neural stem cells (NSCs) are present in the adult mammalian brain, intrinsic self-repair of injured adult CNS tissue is inadequate or ineffective. The brain's poor regenerative ability may be due to the fact that NSCs are restricted to discrete locations, are few in number, or are surrounded by a microenvironment that does not support neuronal differentiation. Therapeutic potential of NSC transplantation in CNS diseases characterized by global degeneration requires that gene products and/or replaced cells be widely distributed. Global degenerative CNS diseases include inherited pediatric neurodegenerative diseases (inborn errors of metabolism, including lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), such as Tay-Sachs-related Sandhoff disease), hypoxic or ischemic encephalopathy, and some adult CNS diseases (such as multiple sclerosis). Both mouse and human NSCs express many chemokines and chemokine receptors (including CXCR4 and adhesion molecules, such as integrins, selectins, and immunoglobulins) that mediate homing to sources of inflammatory chemokines, such as SDF-1α. In mammalian brains of all ages, NSCs may be attracted even at a great distance to regions of neurodegeneration. Consequently, NSC transplantation presents a promising strategy for treating many CNS diseases.

  1. [Aspergillus galactomannan detection in allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Rovira Tarrats, Montserrat; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge

    2003-09-01

    Invasive aspergillosis has become the leading cause of death after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is partially due to the lack of a prompt diagnosis. Recently the detection of Aspergillus galactomannan antigen by means an ELISA technique in serum has been described. The objective of this study was to validate its usefulness in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation setting.

  2. Sustained telomere erosion due to increased stem cell turnover during triple autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Thomas; Kneer, Harald; König, Jochem; Herrmann, Markus; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres cap chromosomal ends and are shortened throughout a lifetime. Additional telomere erosion has been documented during conventional chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Previous studies of stem cell transplantation reported variable amounts of telomere shortening with inconsistent results regarding the persistence of telomere shortening. Here we have prospectively studied telomere length and proliferation kinetics of hematopoietic cells in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients who underwent a four-course high-dose chemotherapy protocol combined with triple autologous stem cell transplantation. We observed sustained telomere shortening in hematopoietic cells after triple stem cell transplantation with prolonged stem cell replication during the first year after stem cell transplantation.

  3. Stem cell transplantation: a treatment option for severe systemic sclerosis?

    PubMed

    van Laar, J M; Farge, D; Tyndall, A

    2008-12-01

    High-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (commonly referred to as "stem cell transplantation") is an established treatment for a variety of haemato-oncological conditions. Recent studies have confirmed its potent clinical and immunological effects in rheumatic autoimmune diseases, including severe diffuse systemic sclerosis (SSc). With modifications of treatment protocols and more stringent selection of patients, the safety profile of stem cell transplantation has improved as expressed in lower treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Prospective, randomised trials are in progress in Europe and North America to compare the safety and efficacy of stem cell transplantation with conventional chemotherapy in patients with early diffuse SSc, on the premise that induction of remission in early disease can be achieved by stem cell transplantation as a means to interrupt fibrogenesis.

  4. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-09-26

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements.

  5. Composite vascularized skin/bone transplantation models for bone marrow-based tolerance studies.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Selahattin; Ulusal, Betul G; Ulusal, Ali E; Izycki, Dariusz; Siemionow, Maria

    2006-03-01

    There is an ongoing need to understand the mechanisms of bone marrow-based allograft tolerance. This is important in clarifying the diverse variables influencing the ultimate outcome of the solid organ and composite tissue transplants. To establish bone marrow transplantation as a routine clinical application, further experimental studies should be conducted to overcome the obstacles related to the bone marrow transplantation. These obstacles include graft versus host disease, immunocompetence, and toxicity of the conditioning regimens. For these purposes, novel experimental models are needed. In an attempt to provide a reliable research tool for bone marrow-based tolerance induction studies, we introduced different experimental models of modified vascularized skin/bone marrow (VSBM) transplantation technique for tolerance induction, monitoring, and maintenance studies. In this skin/bone transplantation model, the technical feasibility of concurrent or consecutive transplantation of the combination of bilateral vascularized skin, vascularized bone marrow, or vascularized skin/bone marrow transplants was investigated. Isograft transplantations were performed between genetically identical Lewis (LEW, RT1) rats. Five different experimental designs in 5 groups of 5 animals each were studied. Group I: Bilateral vascularized skin (VS) transplantation; group II: bilateral vascularized skin/bone transplantation; group III: vascularized skin transplantation on one side and vascularized skin/bone transplantation on the contralateral side; group IV: vascularized bone transplantation on one side and vascularized skin/bone transplantation on the contralateral side; group V: vascularized bone transplantation on one side and vascularized skin transplantation on the contralateral side. Successful transplantations were performed in all groups. The survival of the isograft transplants was evaluated clinically and histologically. All skin flaps remained pink and pliable and grew new

  6. Pediatric Hematology Providers on Referral for Transplant Evaluation for Sickle Cell Disease: A Regional Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mikles, Bethany; Bhatia, Monica; Oyeku, Suzette O.; Jin, Zhezhen; Green, Nancy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematology referral for evaluation is a key step for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease (SCD). Pediatric SCD providers in the US Northeast (New York-Mid-Atlantic and New England regions) were surveyed anony-mously for perspectives and practices regarding transplant referral and compared by whether they practiced at SCD transplant centers. Data were analyzed using the Fisher exact test, χ2 test, and logistic regression. Half of the respondents practiced primarily at transplant sites. Most (79%) were enthusiastic about transplant for SCD and 78% had recently referred ≥1 child for evaluation. Overall, 77% limited referral to certain sickle hemoglobinopathies and 44% preferred referral for β-thalassemia to SCD. Indications selected for referral resembled current transplant criteria, plus family request or poor response to therapy. Referral for children on chronic transfusions predicted enthusiasm and prior referral. Many (66%) referred children with multiple SCD complications, even without matched sibling donors, 37% with sibling donors despite limited disease. Practitioners at transplant centers more commonly accepted event-free survival rates of ≤90% (P = 0.002). North-eastern providers expressed varying enthusiasm for referral for evaluation based on eligibility, donor availability, and acceptable risk, with modestly more interest from practitioners at transplant centers. Differing provider perspectives may affect patient referral for transplant consideration. PMID:24633300

  7. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Franco; Pagliara, Daria

    2012-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) represents the only curative treatment for sickle cell disease (SCD), being successful in around 85-90% of patients. Mortality and long-term morbidity (including infertility, gonadal failure, and chronic graft-vs.-host disease) associated with conventional approaches curtail the number of patients who undergo allo-HSCT. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cord blood is as effective as and possibly safer than bone marrow in pediatric patients with SCD. Likewise, transplant strategies based on the use of reduced-intensity regimens and the induction of mixed chimerism have been explored to decrease allo-HSCT short- and long-term complications.

  8. Transplantation of Heterospheroids of Islet Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Effective Angiogenesis and Antiapoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Youn; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Han, Jin; Bhang, Suk Ho; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Haque, Muhammad R.; Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Noh, Myungkyung

    2015-01-01

    Although islet transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for type 1 diabetes, there are efficiency concerns that are attributed to poor engraftment of transplanted islets. Hypoxic condition and delayed vasculogenesis induce necrosis and apoptosis of the transplanted islets. To overcome these limitations in islet transplantation, heterospheroids (HSs), which consist of rat islet cells (ICs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), were transplanted to the kidney and liver. The HSs cultured under the hypoxic condition system exhibited a significant increase in antiapoptotic gene expression in ICs. hMSCs in the HSs secreted angiogenic and antiapoptotic proteins. With the HS system, ICs and hMSCs were successfully located in the same area of the liver after transplantation of HSs through the portal vein, whereas the transplantation of islets and the dissociated hMSCs did not result in localization of transplanted ICs and hMSCs in the same area. HS transplantation resulted in an increase in angiogenesis at the transplantation area and a decrease in the apoptosis of transplanted ICs after transplantation into the kidney subcapsule compared with transplantation of islet cell clusters (ICCs). Insulin production levels of ICs were higher in the HS transplantation group compared with the ICC transplantation group. The HS system may be a more efficient transplantation method than the conventional methods for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25344077

  9. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families After Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families after Stem Cell Transplant What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)? Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ... weakened by medicines that you must take after stem cell transplant and by the transplant itself. Your body ...

  10. Curative treatment for severe sickle cell disease: allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oshrine, Benjamin; Talano, Julie-An

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited hematologic disorder that in its severe form can result in substantial morbidity and early mortality. Patients with this disorder can suffer from severe pain, lung disease, and strokes, resulting in chronic debilitating conditions, end organ dysfunction, and organ failure. The health care costs of caring for these chronically ill patients are substantial. Allogeneic transplantation is a modality that has the potential to cure these patients. To date, matched sibling donor transplantation is widely accepted as a standard of care for pediatric patients. Utilizing alternative donors for transplant is still under investigation, as is transplant for adult patients with sickle cell disease. This review focuses on the most recent data for hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease.

  11. Cells transplanted onto the surface of the glial scar reveal hidden potential for functional neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Holley, Matthew C.; Hashido, Kento; Ono, Kazuya; Shimomura, Koichiro; Horie, Rie T.; Hamaguchi, Kiyomi; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-01-01

    Cell transplantation therapy has long been investigated as a therapeutic intervention for neurodegenerative disorders, including spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indeed, patients have high hopes for a cell-based therapy. However, there are numerous practical challenges for clinical translation. One major problem is that only very low numbers of donor cells survive and achieve functional integration into the host. Glial scar tissue in chronic neurodegenerative disorders strongly inhibits regeneration, and this inhibition must be overcome to accomplish successful cell transplantation. Intraneural cell transplantation is considered to be the best way to deliver cells to the host. We questioned this view with experiments in vivo on a rat glial scar model of the auditory system. Our results show that intraneural transplantation to the auditory nerve, preceded by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC)-treatment, is ineffective. There is no functional recovery, and almost all transplanted cells die within a few weeks. However, when donor cells are placed on the surface of a ChABC-treated gliotic auditory nerve, they autonomously migrate into it and recapitulate glia- and neuron-guided cell migration modes to repair the auditory pathway and recover auditory function. Surface transplantation may thus pave the way for improved functional integration of donor cells into host tissue, providing a less invasive approach to rescue clinically important neural tracts. PMID:26080415

  12. Comparison of Subcutaneous versus Intravenous Alemtuzumab for Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis with Fludarabine/Melphalan-Based Conditioning in Matched Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Khilna; Parmar, Sapna; Shah, Shreya; Shore, Tsiporah; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; van Besien, Koen

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare infusion-related reactions and outcomes of using subcutaneous (subQ) alemtuzumab versus intravenous (i.v.) alemtuzumab as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis for matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations. Outcomes include incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV)/Epstein-Barr (EBV) viremia, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, time to engraftment, relapse rate, and survival. We conducted a retrospective study of all adult matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations patients who received fludarabine/melphalan with subQ or i.v. alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus as part of their conditioning for unrelated donor transplantation at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 21, 2014. Alemtuzumab was administered at a total cumulative dose of 100 mg (divided over days -7 to -3). Forty-six patients received an unrelated donor stem cell transplantation with fludarabine/melphalan and either subQ (n = 26) or i.v. (n = 20) alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus. Within the evaluable population, 130 subQ and 100 i.v. alemtuzumab doses were administered. For the primary outcome, ≥grade 2 infusion-related reactions occurred in 11 (8%) versus 25 (25%) infusions in the subQ and i.v. cohorts, respectively (P = .001). Overall, 12 injections (9%) in the subQ arm versus 26 infusions (26%) in the i.v. arm experienced an infusion-related reaction of any grade (P = .001). There were no significant differences between the subQ and i.v. arms in rates of reactivation of CMV/EBV, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, or survival. Subcutaneous administration of alemtuzumab for GVHD prophylaxis was associated with fewer infusion-related reactions compared with i.v. administration in the SCT setting

  13. Bioluminescence tracking of alginate micro-encapsulated cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Tiernan, Aubrey R; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based therapies to treat loss-of-function hormonal disorders such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease are routinely coupled with encapsulation strategies, but an understanding of when and why grafts fail in vivo is lacking. Consequently, investigators cannot clearly define the key factors that influence graft success. Although bioluminescence is a popular method to track the survival of free cells transplanted in preclinical models, little is known of the ability to use bioluminescence for real-time tracking of microencapsulated cells. Furthermore, the impact that dynamic imaging distances may have, due to freely-floating microcapsules in vivo, on cell survival monitoring is unknown. This work addresses these questions by applying bioluminescence to a pancreatic substitute based on microencapsulated cells. Recombinant insulin-secreting cells were transduced with a luciferase lentivirus and microencapsulated in Ba(2+) crosslinked alginate for in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro quantitative bioluminescence monitoring was possible and viable microencapsulated cells were followed in real time under both normoxic and anoxic conditions. Although in vivo dispersion of freely-floating microcapsules in the peritoneal cavity limited the analysis to a qualitative bioluminescence evaluation, signals consistently four orders of magnitude above background were clear indicators of temporal cell survival. Strong agreement between in vivo and in vitro cell proliferation over time was discovered by making direct bioluminescence comparisons between explanted microcapsules and parallel in vitro cultures. Broader application of this bioluminescence approach to retrievable transplants, in supplement to currently used end-point physiological tests, could improve understanding and accelerate development of cell-based therapies for critical clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Allogeneic and autologous mode of stem cell transplantation in regenerative medicine: which way to go?

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Dutta, Susmita; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar; Pal, Rajarshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a generic term covering different techniques. However there is argument over the pros and cons of autologous and allogeneic transplants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative therapy. Given that the MSCs have already been proven to be safe in patients, we hypothesize that allogeneic transplantation could be more effective and cost-effective as compared to autologous transplantation specifically in older subjects who are the likely victims of degenerative diseases. This analysis is based on the scientific logic that allogeneic stem cells extracted in large numbers from young and healthy donors could be physiologically, metabolically and genetically more stable. Therefore stem cells from young donors may be expected to exhibit higher vigor in secreting trophic factors leading to activation of host tissue-specific stem cells and also be more efficient in remodeling the micro-environmental niche of damaged tissue.

  15. Gene Expression Changes in the Injured Spinal Cord Following Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Espín, Abel; Hernández, Joaquim; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) or olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC) have demonstrated beneficial effects after spinal cord injury (SCI), providing tissue protection and improving the functional recovery. However, the changes induced by these cells after their transplantation into the injured spinal cord remain largely unknown. We analyzed the changes in the spinal cord transcriptome after a contusion injury and MSC or OEC transplantation. The cells were injected immediately or 7 days after the injury. The mRNA of the spinal cord injured segment was extracted and analyzed by microarray at 2 and 7 days after cell grafting. The gene profiles were analyzed by clustering and functional enrichment analysis based on the Gene Ontology database. We found that both MSC and OEC transplanted acutely after injury induce an early up-regulation of genes related to tissue protection and regeneration. In contrast, cells transplanted at 7 days after injury down-regulate genes related to tissue regeneration. The most important change after MSC or OEC transplant was a marked increase in expression of genes associated with foreign body response and adaptive immune response. These data suggest a regulatory effect of MSC and OEC transplantation after SCI regarding tissue repair processes, but a fast rejection response to the grafted cells. Our results provide an initial step to determine the mechanisms of action and to optimize cell therapy for SCI. PMID:24146830

  16. [Cell transplant and regenerative stem cell therapy].

    PubMed

    Prosper, F

    2008-01-01

    The derivation of the first human embryonic stem cell lines as well as the notion of the unexpected plasticity and potential of the adult stem cells has significantly impacted the biomedical research. Many of the tissues long believe to lack any regenerative capacity has demonstrated otherwise. Patients alike physicians expectations for treatment of incurable diseases have also fuelled this field and in occasions have led to unrealistic expectations. In the next pages I review some of the tissue specific stem cells that have been used either in preclinical models or even in clinical research. Despite the effort of numerous investigators, more questions that answers remain in the field of cell therapy and only careful and independent -not biased- research will allow us to translate some of this findings into clinical application.

  17. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  18. Cell transplantation to the auditory nerve and cochlear duct.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Kojima, Ken; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Kim, Tae-Soo; Tamura, Tetsuya; Ito, Juichi

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a technique to deliver cells to the inner ear without injuring the membranes that seal the endolymphatic and perilymphatic chambers. The integrity of these membranes is essential for normal hearing, and the technique should significantly reduce surgical trauma during cell transplantation. Embryonic stem cells transplanted at the internal auditory meatal portion of an atrophic auditory nerve migrated extensively along it. Four-five weeks after transplantation, the cells were found not only throughout the auditory nerve, but also in Rosenthal's canal and the scala media, the most distal portion of the auditory nervous system where the hair cells reside. Migration of the transplanted cells was more extensive following damage to the auditory nerve. In the undamaged nerve, migration was more limited, but the cells showed more signs of neuronal differentiation. This highlights an important balance between tissue damage and the potential for repair.

  19. Repopulation dynamics of single haematopoietic stem cells in mouse transplantation experiments: Importance of stem cell composition in competitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ema, Hideo; Uchinomiya, Kouki; Morita, Yohei; Suda, Toshio; Iwasa, Yoh

    2016-04-07

    The transplantation of blood tissues from bone marrow into a lethally irradiated animal is an experimental procedure that is used to study how the blood system is reconstituted by haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In a competitive repopulation experiment, a lethally irradiated mouse was transplanted with a single HSC as a test cell together with a number of bone marrow cells as competitor cells, and the fraction of the test cell progeny (percentage of chimerism) was traced over time. In this paper, we studied the stem cell kinetics in this experimental procedure. The balance between symmetric self-renewal and differentiation divisions in HSC determined the number of cells which HSC produce and the length of time for which HSC live after transplantation. The percentage of chimerism depended on the type of test cell (long-, intermediate-, or short-term HSC), as well as the type and number of HSC included in competitor cells. We next examined two alternative HSC differentiation models, one-step and multi-step differentiation models. Although these models differed in blood cell production, the percentage of chimerism appeared very similar. We also estimated the numbers of different types of HSC in competitor cells. Based on these results, we concluded that the experimental results inevitably include stochasticity with regard to the number and the type of HSC in competitor cells, and that, in order to detect different types of HSC, an appropriate number of competitor cells needs to be used in transplantation experiments.

  20. Tuberculosis in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Batista, Marjorie Vieira; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    Literature on tuberculosis (TB) occurring in recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is scanty even in countries where TB is common. Most reports of TB in HSCT patients were from ASIA, in fact the TB incidence ranging from 0.0014 (USA) to 16% (Pakistan). There are few reports of TB diagnosis during the first two weeks after HSCT; most of cases described in the literature occurred after 90 days of HSCT, and the lung was the organ most involved. The mortality ranged from 0 to 50% and is higher in allogeneic HSCT than in autologous. There is no consensus regarding the screening with tuberculin skin test or QuantiFERON-TB gold, primary prophylaxis for latent TB, and whether the epidemiologic query should be emphasized in developing countries with high prevalence of TB. PMID:24363876

  1. Hematopoietic cell transplantation for mucopolysaccharidosis IIB (Hunter syndrome).

    PubMed

    Peters, C; Krivit, W

    2000-05-01

    Hunter syndrome is an X-linked metabolic storage disorder arising from deficiency of iduronate sulfatase enzyme activity. Despite the successful use of hematopoietic cell transplantation for a variety of lysosomal and peroxisomal storage diseases, limited benefit occurs following transplantation in either the severe or mild forms of Hunter syndrome. A brief ethical commentary is provided on the case of a boy with mucopolysaccharidosis IIB (ie the mild form) who received an unrelated umbilical cord blood transplant to improve his future quality of life. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000).

  2. Patients with mantle-cell lymphoma relapsing after autologous stem cell transplantation may be rescued by allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Carreras, E; Rovira, M; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Esteve, J; Perales, M; Fernández, F; Montserrat, E

    2000-09-01

    Two patients with disseminated mantle-cell lymphoma relapsed 24 and 13 months, respectively, after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT). Both patients had an HLA-identical sibling and received an allogeneic stem cell transplant (alloSCT) 32 and 18 months after autologous transplant, after conditioning with fractionated 12 Gy total body irradiation plus cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg. They are both alive and in complete remission 24 months after transplant. Both patients have developed chronic graft-versus-host disease and their Karnofsky performance status is 90%. AlloSCT may offer a useful approach in a subgroup of patients with mantle-cell lymphoma who have relapsed after autologous transplantation.

  3. Chromaffin cell transplants: from the lab to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Ambriz-Tututi, Mónica; Monjaraz-Fuentes, Fernanda; Drucker-Colín, René

    2012-12-17

    Chromaffin cell transplants have been explored since the early 1980s as a promising alternative in different pathological states, mainly Parkinson's disease and chronic pain. Advances are significant since transplants have been performed in humans. The general mechanism of these transplants relies in the capacity of chromaffin cells to act as mini-pumps that release amines and peptides. Different strategies are being used to improve the efficacy of transplants. However, a remaining hurdle is to determine the viability across time and the interaction with the microenvironment of the graft. We analyzed previous and current results finding that although there is a lot of positive evidence, there is also a lack of molecular studies that support behavioral results. The present review gives an update on recent advances of chromaffin cell transplants and their future in the clinic.

  4. Verification of cell viability in bioengineered tissues and organs before clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jungebluth, Philipp; Haag, Johannes C; Lim, Mei L; Lemon, Greg; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Ylva; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Gilevich, Irina; Simonson, Oscar E; Grinnemo, Karl H; Corbascio, Matthias; Baiguera, Silvia; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Strömblad, Staffan; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    The clinical outcome of transplantations of bioartificial tissues and organs depends on the presence of living cells. There are still no standard operative protocols that are simple, fast and reliable for confirming the presence of viable cells on bioartificial scaffolds prior to transplantation. By using mathematical modeling, we have developed a colorimetric-based system (colorimetric scale bar) to predict the cell viability and density for sufficient surface coverage. First, we refined a method which can provide information about cell viability and numbers in an in vitro setting: i) immunohistological staining by Phalloidin/DAPI and ii) a modified colorimetric cell viability assay. These laboratory-based methods and the developed colorimetric-based system were then validated in rat transplantation studies of unseeded and seeded tracheal grafts. This was done to provide critical information on whether the graft would be suitable for transplantation or if additional cell seeding was necessary. The potential clinical impact of the colorimetric scale bar was confirmed using patient samples. In conclusion, we have developed a robust, fast and reproducible colorimetric tool that can verify and warrant viability and integrity of an engineered tissue/organ prior to transplantation. This should facilitate a successful transplantation outcome and ensure patient safety.

  5. Imaging of complications from hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Tarun; Maximin, Suresh; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplant has been the focus of clinical research for a long time given its potential to treat several incurable diseases like hematological malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-degenerative disorders like Parkinson disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the oldest and most widely used technique of stem cell transplant. HSCT has not only been used to treat hematological disorders including hematological malignancies, but has also been found useful in treamtent of genetic, immunological, and solid tumors like neuroblastoma, lymphoma, and germ cell tumors. In spite of the rapid advances in stem cell technology, success rate with this technique has not been universal and many complications have also been seen with this form of therapy. The key to a successful HSCT therapy lies in early diagnosis and effective management of complications associated with this treatment. Our article aims to review the role of imaging in diagnosis and management of stem cell transplant complications associated with HSCT. PMID:25489126

  6. Essential role for B cells in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, Robert R; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Parsons, Ronald; Vivek, Kumar; Mustafa, Moiz M; Noorchashm, Hooman; Naji, Ali

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes are the primary targets of immunotherapy in clinical transplantation. However, B lymphocytes are detrimental to graft survival by virtue of their capacity to present antigen to T cells via the indirect pathway of allorecognition and the generation of donor specific alloantibody. Furthermore, the long-term survival of organ allografts remains challenged by chronic rejection, a process in which activated B cells have been found to play a significant role. Therefore, the achievement of transplantation tolerance will likely require induction of both T and B cell tolerance to alloantigens. Moreover, human and animal investigations have shown that subsets of B cells, Transitional and Regulatory, are inherently tolerogenic. Developing therapeutic strategies that exploit these populations may be key to achieving transplantation tolerance. In this review we describe the current evidence for the essential role of B cells in transplant tolerance and discuss emerging B cell directed strategies to achieve allograft tolerance. PMID:21982511

  7. Treatment of patients with secondary central nervous system lymphoma with high-dose busulfan/thiotepa-based conditioning and autologous stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Oh, Danielle H; Chua, Neil; Street, Lesley; Stewart, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Although the survival rates are extremely low for patients with secondary central nervous system lymphoma (SCNSL) treated with conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, more encouraging outcomes have recently been reported in small series with high-dose (HD) therapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). The optimal HD regimen for SCNSL is unknown. Despite reports of thiotepa/busulfan-based conditioning for primary CNS lymphoma, very little data exist regarding the use of this regimen for SCNSL. We analyzed 23 patients with SCNSL (median age 62 years) who underwent ASCT at two Alberta centers using thiotepa, busulfan, cyclophosphamide (TBC) in six patients prior to 2011 and rituximab-busulfan, melphalan, thiotepa (R-BuMelTt) in 17 patients after 2011. At a median follow-up of 27.8 months (4.2-113.6), the 2-year actuarial rate of progression-free survival was 76.1%. In conclusion, our results demonstrate encouraging survival outcomes for patients with SCNSL treated with R-BuMelTt and ASCT.

  8. First Successful Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Romania.

    PubMed

    Tănase, Alina; Tomuleasa, C; Mărculescu, Alexandra; Bardaş, A; Coliţă, Anca; Ciurea, Ş O

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an established treatment for many malignant and non-malignant haematological disorders. In the current case report, we describe the first haploidentical stem cell transplantation, used for the first time in Romania, the case of a 33 year-old young woman diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma that has underwent a haploSCT after she relapsed from several chemotherapy regimens, as well as after an autologous stem cell transplantation. This success represents a prèmiere in Romanian clinical hematology, being the first case of a haploSCT in Romania, as well as in South-Eastern Europe.

  9. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, NN; Savani, BN; Shaw, BE; Abraham, AA; Ahmed, IA; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, KS; Basak, GW; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, TK; Greinix, HT; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, BK; Hayashi, RJ; Jacobsohn, DA; Kamble, RT; Kasow, KA; Khera, N; Lazarus, HM; Malone, AK; Lupo-Stanghellini, MT; Margossian, SP; Muffly, LS; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, JR; Wirk, B; Wood, WA; Yong, A; Duncan, CN; Flowers, MED; Majhail, NS

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients. PMID:25822223

  10. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, N N; Savani, B N; Shaw, B E; Abraham, A A; Ahmed, I A; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, K S; Basak, G W; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, T K; Greinix, H T; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, B K; Hayashi, R J; Jacobsohn, D A; Kamble, R T; Kasow, K A; Khera, N; Lazarus, H M; Malone, A K; Lupo-Stanghellini, M T; Margossian, S P; Muffly, L S; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, J R; Wirk, B; Wood, W A; Yong, A; Duncan, C N; Flowers, M E D; Majhail, N S

    2015-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients.

  11. Human adipose-derived stem cells promote vascularization of collagen-based scaffolds transplanted into nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Mario; Valdatta, Luigi; Balzaretti, Riccardo; Pellegatta, Igor; Rossi, Federica; Protasoni, Marina; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Accolla, Roberto S; Bernardini, Giovanni; Gornati, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Aim: After in vivo implantation of cell-loaded devices, only the cells close to the capillaries can obtain nutrients to maintain their functions. It is known that factors secreted by stem cells, rather than stem cells themselves, are fundamental to guarantee new vascularization in the area of implant. Materials & methods: To investigate this possibility, we have grafted mice with Bilayer and Flowable Integra® scaffolds, loaded or not with human adipose-derived stem cells. Results: Our results support the therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells to induce new vascular networks of engineered organs and tissues. Conclusion: This finding suggests that our approach can help to form new vascular networks that allow sufficient vascularization of engineered organs and tissues in cases of difficult wound healing due to ischemic conditions. PMID:26965659

  12. Prenatal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Götherström, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) can be a severe disorder that can be diagnosed before birth. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has the potential to improve the bone structure, growth, and fracture healing. In this review, we give an introduction to OI and MSC, and the basis for pre- and postnatal transplantation in OI. We also summarize the two patients with OI who have received pre- and postnatal transplantation of MSC. The findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic MSC in OI is safe. The cell therapy is of likely clinical benefit with improved linear growth, mobility, and reduced fracture incidence. Unfortunately, the effect is transient. For this reason, postnatal booster infusions using same-donor MSC have been performed with clinical benefit, and without any adverse events. So far there is limited experience in this specific field and proper studies are required to accurately conclude on clinical benefits of MSC transplantation to treat OI. PMID:25346689

  13. Electrochemical manipulation of cell populations supported by biodegradable polymeric nanosheets for cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jin; Nagai, Nobuhiro; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Abe, Toshiaki; Kaji, Hirokazu

    2017-01-31

    We describe an electrochemical method of harvesting cells cultured on a biodegradable polymeric nanosheet (cell/nanosheet construct), which is stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiol molecules. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanosheet was attached by hydrophobic interactions onto the surface of a SAM of l-cysteine coated onto a gold electrode. Retinal pigment epithelial cell lines (RPE-J cells) were cultured on the nanosheet to form a monolayer. An AA-size dry battery was used to apply a negative electrical potential, causing reductive desorption of the SAM from the gold surface. Within one minute of application of the voltage, the cell/nanosheet of several mm in diameter was successfully detached without the loss of cell viability in a gentle stream of the electrolyte solution. The use of a porous electrode shortened the detachment time due to the more efficient permeation of the electrolyte solution to the electrode surface. Cell transplantation following the harvesting process was demonstrated by the local delivery of RPE-J cell/nanosheet constructs into the subretinal space of rat eyes through a capillary needle. This nanosheet-based approach that allows the on-demand harvesting of cell/nanosheet constructs and their subsequent transplantation in a minimally-invasive manner could play an important role in cell transplantation therapy.

  14. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  15. A Calpain Inhibitor Enhances the Survival of Schwann Cells In Vitro and after Transplantation into the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Guller, Yelena; Raffa, Scott J.; Hurtado, Andres; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite the diversity of cells available for transplantation into sites of spinal cord injury (SCI), and the known ability of transplanted cells to integrate into host tissue, functional improvement associated with cellular transplantation has been limited. One factor potentially limiting the efficacy of transplanted cells is poor cell survival. Recently we demonstrated rapid and early death of Schwann cells (SCs) within the first 24 h after transplantation, by both necrosis and apoptosis, which results in fewer than 20% of the cells surviving beyond 1 week. To enhance SC transplant survival, in vitro and in vivo models to rapidly screen compounds for their ability to promote SC survival are needed. The current study utilized in vitro models of apoptosis and necrosis, and based on withdrawal of serum and mitogens and the application of hydrogen peroxide, we screened several inhibitors of apoptosis and necrosis. Of the compounds tested, the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 enhanced SC survival both in vitro in response to oxidative stress induced by application of H2O2, and in vivo following delayed transplantation into the moderately contused spinal cord. The results support the use of calpain inhibitors as a promising new treatment for promoting the survival of transplanted cells. They also suggest that in vitro assays for cell survival may be useful for establishing new compounds that can then be tested in vivo for their ability to promote transplanted SC survival. PMID:20568964

  16. Tailored strategy for AML patients receiving allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2006-10-01

    Considering the heterogeneity of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), along with the pros and cons of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), a tailored strategy is needed to minimize the transplant-related mortality and maximize the transplant outcomes in AML patients exhibiting certain factors that have an impact on the post-transplant quality of life and outcomes. The factors that need to be considered when tailoring a strategy in an allogeneic PBSCT setting include the recipient's performance status and co-morbid disease include AML risk stratification, disease status, expected severity of graft-versus-host disease, and the necessity of a graft-versus-leukemia effect. Accordingly, this review article describes a possible tailoring strategy for AML patients receiving allogeneic PBSCT based on certain factors influencing the transplant outcome.

  17. Factors associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) among patients in a population-based study of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela R; Warlick, Erica D; Roesler, Michelle A; Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Hirsch, Betsy; Ross, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by dysplastic changes in the bone marrow, ineffective erythropoiesis, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment planning for patients with MDS is a complex process, and we sought to better characterize hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes and the factors that play into decision-making regarding referral of adults with MDS for definitive therapy with HCT. Patients enrolled in a population-based study of MDS between April 2010 and January 2013 who underwent HCT within the first year after enrollment were included in this analysis. Age- and risk-matched MDS patient controls also enrolled during that time period were used as a comparison. Survival was significantly better in the HCT group (48 vs. 21 %, log-rank p value 0.009). Non-HCT patients were more likely to have comorbidities, and HCT patients were more likely to have a college degree and an income >$80,000. All three of these variables were independently associated with HCT, but none impacted survival. Patients with MDS in our study who underwent HCT had better survival than a comparable group of patients who did not undergo HCT. With refined treatment techniques, more patients may be able to be considered for this therapy. More work needs to be done to determine why education and income appear to impact the decision to pursue HCT, but these factors may impact referral to an academic center where aggressive therapy like HCT is more likely to be considered.

  18. National Survey of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Center Personnel, Infrastructure, and Models of Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Majhail, Navneet S; Mau, Lih-Wen; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Payton, Tammy; Eckrich, Michael; Joffe, Steven; Lee, Stephanie J; LeMaistre, Charles F; LeRademacher, Jennifer; Loberiza, Fausto; Logan, Brent; Parsons, Susan K; Repaczki-Jones, Ramona; Robinett, Pam; Rizzo, J Douglas; Murphy, Elizabeth; Denzen, Ellen M

    2015-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a complex procedure that requires availability of adequate infrastructure, personnel, and resources at transplantation centers. We conducted a national survey of transplantation centers in the United States to obtain data on their personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery models. A 42-item web-based survey was administered to medical directors of transplantation centers in the United States that reported any allogeneic HCT to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research in 2011. The response rate for the survey was 79% for adult programs (85 of 108 centers) and 82% for pediatric programs (54 of 66 centers). For describing results, we categorized centers into groups with similar volumes based on 2010 total HCT activity (adult centers, 9 categories; pediatric centers, 6 categories). We observed considerable variation in available resources, infrastructure, personnel, and care delivery models among adult and pediatric transplantation centers. Characteristics varied substantially among centers with comparable transplantation volumes. Transplantation centers may find these data helpful in assessing their present capacity and use them to evaluate potential resource needs for personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery and in planning for growth.

  19. [Pegfilgrastim in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fernández Alvarez, R

    2010-12-01

    Pegylation implies progress in filgrastim therapy. The addition of one molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the drug's half-life by reducing renal excretion. A single dose of pegfilgrastim is equivalent to a daily administration of G-CSF for recovering from neutropenia after cancer chemotherapy. Pegfilgrastim is also useful to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells. Several studies have researched its efficacy in this context, in patients with myeloma or lymphoma. Outcomes suggest that it has an efficacy similar to daily G-CSF. In allogeneic donors, a single 12-mg dose of pegfilgrastim produces sufficient increase of CD34+ in peripheral blood, with acceptable toxicity. There is interest on the data about the various functional and biologic properties of hematopoietic stem cells mobilized with pegfilgrastim compared to G-CSF, and on the effect that these differences may have on the graft composition. The administration of a single dose of pegfilgrastim after autologous transplantation has been shown to shorten the time for leukocyte recovery in a manner similar to G-CSF

  20. Stem Cell Transplantation for Pulpal Regeneration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jakusz, Kimberley; Jochens, Arne; Dörfer, Christof; Schwendicke, Falk

    2015-01-01

    For treating pulpal pathological conditions, pulpal regeneration through transplanted stem/progenitor cells might be an alternative to conventional root canal treatment. A number of animal studies demonstrated beneficial effects of stem/progenitor cell transplantation for pulp–dentin complex regeneration, that is, pulpal tissue, neural, vascular, and dentinal regeneration. We systematically reviewed animal studies investigating stem/progenitor cell-mediated pulp–dentin complex regeneration. Studies quantitatively comparing pulp–dentin complex regeneration after transplantation of stem/progenitor cells versus no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls in intraoral in vivo teeth animal models were analyzed. The following outcomes were investigated: regenerated pulp area per root canal total area, capillaries per total surface, regenerated dentinal area per total defect area, and nerves per total surface. PubMed and EMBASE were screened for studies published until July 2014. Cross-referencing and hand searching were used to identify further articles. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. To assess possible bias, SYRCLE's risk of bias tool for animal studies was used. From 1364 screened articles, five studies (representing 64 animals) were included in the quantitative analysis. Risk of bias of all studies was high. Stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps showed significantly larger regenerated pulp area per root canal total area (SMD [95% CI]: 2.28 [0.35–4.21]) and regenerated dentin area per root canal total area (SMD: 6.91 [5.39–8.43]) compared with no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls. Only one study reported on capillaries per or nerves per total surface and found both significantly increased in stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps compared with controls. Stem/progenitor cell transplantation seems to enhance pulp–dentin complex regeneration in

  1. Hematopoietic cell transplantation in fetal lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Westlake, V J; Jolly, R D; Jones, B R; Mellor, D J; Machon, R; Zanjani, E D; Krivit, W

    1995-06-05

    Hematopoietic cells from the liver of normal 45-48-day-old fetal lambs (Hb type AA) were transplanted intraperitoneally into 58-60-day-old recipient fetuses (Hb type BB). The recipient fetuses resulted from mating homozygous ceroid-lipofuscinosis affected males with heterozygous, phenotypically normal, females. The sex of the donor fetus was also recorded. At age 2 1/2 months the recipient lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis were diagnosed by histopathology of brain biopsies. Monitoring of blood and bone marrow cells showed that an average of 9% of blood cells in ceroid-lipofuscinosis affected recipients were of donor origin. No differences were evident in the clinical course of disease, brain weight, or histopathology of organs between transplanted and non-transplanted lambs with ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Under the conditions of this experiment, transplantation of fetal hematopoietic cells was not beneficial.

  2. Immunological considerations in in utero hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT)

    PubMed Central

    Loewendorf, Andrea I.; Csete, Marie; Flake, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT) is an attractive approach and a potentially curative surgery for several congenital hematopoietic diseases. In practice, this application has succeeded only in the context of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders. Here, we review potential immunological hurdles for the long-term establishment of chimerism and discuss relevant models and findings from both postnatal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and IUHCT. PMID:25610396

  3. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Michael, W.; Schüpbach, M.; Mandel, Hanna; Casali, Carlo; Orchard, Kim; Collin, Matthew; Valcarcel, David; Rovelli, Attilio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Dotti, Maria T.; Marotta, Giuseppe; Pintos, Guillem; Barba, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Ferra, Christelle; Illa, Isabel; Beguin, Yves; Bakker, Jaap A.; Boelens, Jaap J.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Fay, Keith; Sue, Carolyn M.; Nachbaur, David; Zoller, Heinz; Sobreira, Claudia; Pinto Simoes, Belinda; Hammans, Simon R.; Savage, David; Martí, Ramon; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Elhasid, Ronit; Gratwohl, Alois; Hirano, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all known patients suffering from mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy who underwent allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2011. Twenty-four patients, 11 males and 13 females, median age 25 years (range 10–41 years) treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from related (n = 9) or unrelated donors (n = 15) in 15 institutions worldwide were analysed for outcome and its associated factors. Overall, 9 of 24 patients (37.5%) were alive at last follow-up with a median follow-up of these surviving patients of 1430 days. Deaths were attributed to transplant in nine (including two after a second transplant due to graft failure), and to mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in six patients. Thymidine phosphorylase activity rose from undetectable to normal levels (median 697 nmol/h/mg protein, range 262–1285) in all survivors. Seven patients (29%) who were engrafted and living more than 2 years after transplantation, showed improvement of body mass index, gastrointestinal manifestations, and peripheral neuropathy. Univariate statistical analysis demonstrated that survival was associated with two defined pre-transplant characteristics: human leukocyte antigen match (10/10 versus <10/10) and disease characteristics (liver disease, history of gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction or both). Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can restore thymidine phosphorylase enzyme function in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy and improve clinical manifestations of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in the long term. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  4. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Halter, Joerg P; Michael, W; Schüpbach, M; Mandel, Hanna; Casali, Carlo; Orchard, Kim; Collin, Matthew; Valcarcel, David; Rovelli, Attilio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Dotti, Maria T; Marotta, Giuseppe; Pintos, Guillem; Barba, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Ferra, Christelle; Illa, Isabel; Beguin, Yves; Bakker, Jaap A; Boelens, Jaap J; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Fay, Keith; Sue, Carolyn M; Nachbaur, David; Zoller, Heinz; Sobreira, Claudia; Pinto Simoes, Belinda; Hammans, Simon R; Savage, David; Martí, Ramon; Chinnery, Patrick F; Elhasid, Ronit; Gratwohl, Alois; Hirano, Michio

    2015-10-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all known patients suffering from mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy who underwent allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2011. Twenty-four patients, 11 males and 13 females, median age 25 years (range 10-41 years) treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from related (n = 9) or unrelated donors (n = 15) in 15 institutions worldwide were analysed for outcome and its associated factors. Overall, 9 of 24 patients (37.5%) were alive at last follow-up with a median follow-up of these surviving patients of 1430 days. Deaths were attributed to transplant in nine (including two after a second transplant due to graft failure), and to mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in six patients. Thymidine phosphorylase activity rose from undetectable to normal levels (median 697 nmol/h/mg protein, range 262-1285) in all survivors. Seven patients (29%) who were engrafted and living more than 2 years after transplantation, showed improvement of body mass index, gastrointestinal manifestations, and peripheral neuropathy. Univariate statistical analysis demonstrated that survival was associated with two defined pre-transplant characteristics: human leukocyte antigen match (10/10 versus <10/10) and disease characteristics (liver disease, history of gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction or both). Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can restore thymidine phosphorylase enzyme function in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy and improve clinical manifestations of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in the long term. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  5. Liver cell therapy and tissue engineering for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vacanti, Joseph P; Kulig, Katherine M

    2014-06-01

    Liver transplantation remains the only definitive treatment for liver failure and is available to only a tiny fraction of patients with end-stage liver diseases. Major limitations for the procedure include donor organ shortage, high cost, high level of required expertise, and long-term consequences of immune suppression. Alternative cell-based liver therapies could potentially greatly expand the number of patients provided with effective treatment. Investigative research into augmenting or replacing liver function extends into three general strategies. Bioartificial livers (BALs) are extracorporeal devices that utilize cartridges of primary hepatocytes or cell lines to process patient plasma. Injection of liver cell suspensions aims to foster organ regeneration or provide a missing metabolic function arising from a genetic defect. Tissue engineering recreates the organ in vitro for subsequent implantation to augment or replace patient liver function. Translational models and clinical trials have highlighted both the immense challenges involved and some striking examples of success.

  6. MHC Universal Cells Survive in an Allogeneic Environment after Incompatible Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Constança; Wedekind, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Vahlsing, Stefanie; Horn, Peter A.; Seltsam, Axel; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Cell, tissue, and organ transplants are commonly performed for the treatment of different diseases. However, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity often prevents complete donor-recipient matching, resulting in graft rejection. This study evaluates in a preclinical model the capacity of MHC class I-silenced cells to engraft and grow upon allogeneic transplantation. Short hairpin RNA targeting β2-microglobulin (RN_shβ2m) was delivered into fibroblasts derived from LEW/Ztm (RT1l) (RT1-Al) rats using a lentiviral-based vector. MHC class I (RT1-A-) expressing and -silenced cells were injected subcutaneously in LEW rats (RT1l) and MHC-congenic LEW.1W rats (RT1u), respectively. Cell engraftment and the status of the immune response were monitored for eight weeks after transplantation. In contrast to RT1-A-expressing cells, RT1-A-silenced fibroblasts became engrafted and were still detectable eight weeks after allogeneic transplantation. Plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were significantly higher in animals transplanted with RT1-A-expressing cells than in those receiving RT1-A-silenced cells. Furthermore, alloantigen-specific T-cell proliferation rates derived from rats receiving RT1-A-expressing cells were higher than those in rats transplanted with RT1-A-silenced cells. These data suggest that silencing MHC class I expression might overcome the histocompatibility barrier, potentially opening up new avenues in the field of cell transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:24350288

  7. MHC universal cells survive in an allogeneic environment after incompatible transplantation.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Wedekind, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Vahlsing, Stefanie; Horn, Peter A; Seltsam, Axel; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Cell, tissue, and organ transplants are commonly performed for the treatment of different diseases. However, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity often prevents complete donor-recipient matching, resulting in graft rejection. This study evaluates in a preclinical model the capacity of MHC class I-silenced cells to engraft and grow upon allogeneic transplantation. Short hairpin RNA targeting β2-microglobulin (RN_shβ2m) was delivered into fibroblasts derived from LEW/Ztm (RT1(l)) (RT1-A(l)) rats using a lentiviral-based vector. MHC class I (RT1-A-) expressing and -silenced cells were injected subcutaneously in LEW rats (RT1(l)) and MHC-congenic LEW.1W rats (RT1(u)), respectively. Cell engraftment and the status of the immune response were monitored for eight weeks after transplantation. In contrast to RT1-A-expressing cells, RT1-A-silenced fibroblasts became engrafted and were still detectable eight weeks after allogeneic transplantation. Plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 α , IL-1 β , IL-6, TNF- α , and IFN- γ were significantly higher in animals transplanted with RT1-A-expressing cells than in those receiving RT1-A-silenced cells. Furthermore, alloantigen-specific T-cell proliferation rates derived from rats receiving RT1-A-expressing cells were higher than those in rats transplanted with RT1-A-silenced cells. These data suggest that silencing MHC class I expression might overcome the histocompatibility barrier, potentially opening up new avenues in the field of cell transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  9. Children's lived experiences of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Manookian, Arpi; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Asadi, Monireh

    2014-09-01

    Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a valuable treatment in many life-threatening pediatric disorders, a large number of children who receive hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are faced with a variety of physical and psychological problems throughout this process. In this study, we explored the lived experiences of these children during their treatment to provide a better understanding of their main concerns, emotions, and expectations. The participants were six children, aged between 6 and 17 years, who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Data were collected through individual, in-depth, and semistructured interviews. Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, the findings revealed that the children experienced "transplantation rejoicing" in this "difficult passage", which was associated with "deepening of family ties". Awareness of these experiences, feelings, and concerns can help in the development of more professional interventions to provide children with holistic care during their hospitalization.

  10. Combinatorial human progenitor cell transplantation optimizes islet regeneration through secretion of paracrine factors.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Meschino, Michael T; Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Broughton, Heather C; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Hess, David A

    2012-07-20

    Transplanted human bone marrow (BM) and umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitor cells activate islet-regenerative or revascularization programs depending on the progenitor subtypes administered. Using purification of multiple progenitor subtypes based on a conserved stem cell function, high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity (ALDH(hi)), we have recently shown that transplantation of BM-derived ALDH(hi) progenitors improved systemic hyperglycemia and augmented insulin secretion by increasing islet-associated proliferation and vascularization, without increasing islet number. Conversely, transplantation of culture-expanded multipotent-stromal cells (MSCs) derived from BM ALDH(hi) cells augmented total beta cell mass via formation of beta cell clusters associated with the ductal epithelium, without sustained islet vascularization. To identify paracrine effectors produced by islet-regenerative MSCs, culture-expanded BM ALDH(hi) MSCs were transplanted into streptozotocin-treated nonobese diabetic/severe combine immune deficient (SCID) mice and segregated into islet-regenerative versus nonregenerative cohorts based on hyperglycemia reduction, and subsequently compared for differential production of mRNA and secreted proteins. Regenerative MSCs showed increased expression of matrix metalloproteases, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-activating ligands, and downstream effectors of Wnt signaling. Regenerative MSC supernatant also contained increased levels of pro-angiogenic versus pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented the expansion of ductal epithelial but not beta cells in vitro. Conversely, co-culture with UCB ALDH(hi) cells induced beta cell but not ductal epithelial cell proliferation. Sequential transplantation of MSCs followed by UCB ALDH(hi) cells improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance by increasing beta cell mass associated with the ductal epithelium and by augmenting intra-islet capillary densities. Thus, combinatorial human progenitor cell

  11. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Ramya; Downing, Christopher; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers represent a major cause of morbidity after organ transplantation. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are the most common cutaneous malignancies seen in this population, with a 65–100 fold greater incidence in organ transplant recipients compared to the general population. In recent years, human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the beta genus have been implicated in the pathogenesis of post-transplant SCCs. The underlying mechanism of carcinogenesis has been attributed to the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV. Specific immunosuppressive medications, such as the calcineurin inhibitors and azathioprine, are associated with a higher incidence of post-transplant SCCs compared to other immunosuppressive agents. Compared to other immunosuppressives, mTOR inhibitors and mycophenolate mofetil have been associated with a decreased risk of developing post-transplant non-melanoma skin cancers. As a result, they may represent ideal immunosuppressive medications in organ transplant recipients. Treatment options for post-transplant SCCs include surgical excision, Mohs micrographic surgery, systemic retinoid therapy, adjunct topical therapy, electrodessication and curettage, and radiation therapy. This review will discuss the epidemiology, risk factors, and management options of post-transplant SCCs. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of beta-HPV mediated carcinogenesis will be discussed. PMID:26239556

  12. DNA Methylation Dynamics in Blood after Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ramon M.; Suarez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Salvanés, Rubén; Muro, Manuel; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Colado, Enrique; Sánchez, Miguel Alcoceba; Díaz, Marcos González; Fernandez, Agustin F.; Fraga, Mario F.; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic deregulation is considered a common hallmark of cancer. Nevertheless, recent publications have demonstrated its association with a large array of human diseases. Here, we explore the DNA methylation dynamics in blood samples during hematopoietic cell transplant and how they are affected by pathophysiological events during transplant evolution. We analyzed global DNA methylation in a cohort of 47 patients with allogenic transplant up to 12 months post-transplant. Recipients stably maintained the donor’s global methylation levels after transplant. Nonetheless, global methylation is affected by chimerism status. Methylation analysis of promoters revealed that methylation in more than 200 genes is altered 1 month post-transplant when compared with non-pathological methylation levels in the donor. This number decreased by 6 months post-transplant. Finally, we analyzed methylation in IFN-γ, FASL, IL-10, and PRF1 and found association with the severity of the acute graft-versus-host disease. Our results provide strong evidence that methylation changes in blood are linked to underlying physiological events and demonstrate that DNA methylation analysis is a viable strategy for the study of transplantation and for development of biomarkers. PMID:23451113

  13. Measurement and illustration of immune interaction after stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    A variety of stem cells, including embryonic, mesenchymal, and hematopoietic stem cells, have been isolated to date, resulting in the current investigation of many therapeutic applications. These stem cells offer a high potential in cell replacement therapies or in the regeneration of organ damage. One current obstacle in using these stem cells in clinical applications are the unknown or unexplained mechanisms regarding the activation of immune responses as well as their given potential of immune activity, which can attack the host tissue. Similarly, the unknown immunological environment, which can benefit tumor growth, also restrains the rapid clinical implementation of stem cells. We have shown that several techniques for measurement or illustration of immune responses in a hematopoietic murine CD4(k/o) mice transplantation model might be beneficial to get new insight into in vivo behavior of transplanted stem cells. Subjected to the transplantation setups (allogeneic, syngeneic, or xenogenic transplantation) different immune responses (enhancement of CD4(+) T cells, cytokine activity) as well as different effects of the transplanted cells on the host organs (organ destruction, toxicity) are detectable. The methods used to describe such immune responses will be presented here.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Europe 2014: more than 40 000 transplants annually

    PubMed Central

    Passweg, J R; Baldomero, H; Bader, P; Bonini, C; Cesaro, S; Dreger, P; Duarte, R F; Dufour, C; Kuball, J; Farge-Bancel, D; Gennery, A; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Nagler, A; Sureda, A; Mohty, M

    2016-01-01

    A record number of 40 829 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 36 469 patients (15 765 allogeneic (43%), 20 704 autologous (57%)) were reported by 656 centers in 47 countries to the 2014 survey. Trends include: continued growth in transplant activity, more so in Eastern European countries than in the west; a continued increase in the use of haploidentical family donors (by 25%) and slower growth for unrelated donor HSCT. The use of cord blood as a stem cell source has decreased again in 2014. Main indications for HSCT were leukemias: 11 853 (33% 96% allogeneic); lymphoid neoplasias; 20 802 (57% 11% allogeneic); solid tumors; 1458 (4% 3% allogeneic) and non-malignant disorders; 2203 (6% 88% allogeneic). Changes in transplant activity include more allogeneic HSCT for AML in CR1, myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) and aplastic anemia and decreasing use in CLL; and more autologous HSCT for plasma cell disorders and in particular for amyloidosis. In addition, data on numbers of teams doing alternative donor transplants, allogeneic after autologous HSCT, autologous cord blood transplants are presented. PMID:26901709

  15. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  16. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Afonso José Pereira; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Saboya, Rosaura; Mendrone Júnior, Alfredo; Amigo Filho, Ulisses; Coracin, Fabio Luiz; Buccheri, Valéria; Linardi, Camila da Cruz Gouveia; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Background Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. Objectives To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. Methods A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. Results The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. Conclusion Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not been previously reported

  17. Post-transplant adoptive T-cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aqui, Nicole A.; June, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    Immune reconstitution following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an often slow and incomplete process that leads to increased risk of infection and malignant disease. Immunization in SCT is frequently unsuccessful due to the prolonged lymphopenia, especially of CD4 T cells, seen following transplant. The transfusion of T cells, also called ‘adoptive T-cell therapy’, has the potential to enhance anti-tumour and overall immunity, and augment vaccine efficacy in the post-transplant setting. Recent advances in tissue culture, cellular immunology and tumour biology are guiding new approaches to adoptive T-cell therapy. This chapter will discuss the challenges that face the field before adoptive T-cell therapy can be translated into routine clinical practice. PMID:18790452

  18. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  19. The risk of transmitting cutaneous malignancy through skin transplantation: a literature-based risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Sarah; Van Wijk, Marja J; Richters, Cornelia D; Beele, Hilde

    2015-12-01

    According to the European Union Tissues and Cells Directives donation of tissue is contraindicated in the presence of or a previous history of malignant disease, with the exception of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma. Skin cancer is the most common cancer. Due to ultraviolet light exposure and increasing life expectancy an increasing prevalence of malignant or premalignant skin lesions is observed, which may result in a decline of the availability of skin for transplantation. A risk assessment based on published studies and expert opinion was performed in order to investigate the risk of transmitting malignant or premalignant skin lesions through tissue transplantation, and more particular through skin transplantation. The scarcity of data concerning cancer transmission in tissue transplantation was challenging. Circumstantial evidence, available for organ transplantation, was used to develop the following policy proposal for skin transplantation and cutaneous tumours. Malignant melanoma is an absolute contraindication for the donation of skin and also of other tissues, whereas, non-lesional skin and other tissues of a donor with non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) or with a premalignant skin lesion can be considered for transplantation. The above mentioned protocol proposal might serve as a prototype for analogous protocols for non-cutaneous malignancies.

  20. Immunomodulation by Transplanted Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendroglial Progenitors in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heechul; Walczak, Piotr; Kerr, Candace; Galpoththawela, Chulani; Gilad, Assaf A.; Muja, Naser; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cells and their neural derivatives can lead to amelioration of the disease symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Oligodendroglial progenitors (OPs), derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, HES-1), were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide and transduced with luciferase. At 7 days following induction of EAE in C57/BL6 mice, 1 × 106 cells were transplanted in the ventricles of C57/BL6 mice and noninvasively monitored by magnetic resonance and bioluminescence imaging. Cells were found to remain within the cerebroventricular system and did not survive for more than 10 days. However, EAE mice that received hESC-OPs showed a significant improvement in neurological disability scores (0.9 ± 0.2; n = 12) compared to that of control animals (3.3 ± 0.4; n = 12) at day 15 post-transplantation. Histopathologically, transplanted hESC-OPs generated TREM2-positive CD45 cells, increased TIMP-1 expression, confined inflammatory cells within the subarachnoid space, and gave rise to higher numbers of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells in the spinal cord and spleen. Our results suggest that transplantation of hESC-OPs can alter the pathogenesis of EAE through immunomodulation, potentially providing new avenues for stem cell-based treatment of MS. PMID:22949039

  1. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cell Transplantation for Liver Diseases: Monitoring, Clinical Translation, and Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Francesco; Nicosia, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been investigated to rescue experimental liver failure and is promising to offer an alternative therapy to liver transplantation for liver diseases treatment. Several clinical studies in this field have been carried out, but the therapeutic benefit of this treatment is still controversial. A major obstacle to developing stem cell therapies in clinic is being able to visualize the cells in vivo. Imaging modalities allow optimization of delivery, detecting cell survival and functionality by in vivo monitoring these transplanted graft cells. Moreover, theranostic imaging is a brand new field that utilizes nanometer-scale materials to glean diagnostic insight for simultaneous treatment, which is very promising to improve stem cell-based therapy for treatment of liver diseases. The aim of this review was to summarize the various imaging tools that have been explored with advanced molecular imaging probes. We also outline some recent progress of preclinical and clinical studies of liver stem cells transplantation. Finally, we discuss theranostic imaging for stem cells transplantation for liver dysfunction and future opportunities afforded by theranostic imaging. PMID:28070195

  2. Tracking T-cell immune reconstitution after TCRαβ/CD19-depleted hematopoietic cells transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Zvyagin, I V; Mamedov, I Z; Tatarinova, O V; Komech, E A; Kurnikova, E E; Boyakova, E V; Brilliantova, V; Shelikhova, L N; Balashov, D N; Shugay, M; Sycheva, A L; Kasatskaya, S A; Lebedev, Y B; Maschan, A A; Maschan, M A; Chudakov, D M

    2016-12-09

    αβT-cell-depleted allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation holds promise for the safe and accessible therapy of both malignant and non-malignant blood disorders. Here we employed molecular barcoding normalized T-cell receptor (TCR) profiling to quantitatively track T-cell immune reconstitution after TCRαβ-/CD19-depleted transplantation in children. We demonstrate that seemingly early reconstitution of αβT-cell counts 2 months after transplantation is based on only several hundred rapidly expanded clones originating from non-depleted graft cells. In further months, frequency of these hyperexpanded clones declines, and after 1 year the observed T-cell counts and TCRβ diversity are mostly provided by the newly produced T cells. We also demonstrate that high TCRβ diversity at day 60 observed for some of the patients is determined by recipient T cells and intrathymic progenitors that survived conditioning regimen. Our results indicate that further efforts on optimization of TCRαβ-/CD19-depleted transplantation protocols should be directed toward providing more efficient T-cell defense in the first months after transplantation.Leukemia advance online publication, 9 December 2016; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.321.

  3. 3-D Imaging Reveals Participation of Donor Islet Schwann Cells and Pericytes in Islet Transplantation and Graft Neurovascular Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    The primary cells that participate in islet transplantation are the endocrine cells. However, in the islet microenvironment, the endocrine cells are closely associated with the neurovascular tissues consisting of the Schwann cells and pericytes, which form sheaths/barriers at the islet exterior and interior borders. The two cell types have shown their plasticity in islet injury, but their roles in transplantation remain unclear. In this research, we applied 3-dimensional neurovascular histology with cell tracing to reveal the participation of Schwann cells and pericytes in mouse islet transplantation. Longitudinal studies of the grafts under the kidney capsule identify that the donor Schwann cells and pericytes re-associate with the engrafted islets at the peri-graft and perivascular domains, respectively, indicating their adaptability in transplantation. Based on the morphological proximity and cellular reactivity, we propose that the new islet microenvironment should include the peri-graft Schwann cell sheath and perivascular pericytes as an integral part of the new tissue.

  4. New directions for rabbit antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin(®)) in solid organ transplants, stem cell transplants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mohty, Mohamad; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Saliba, Faouzi; Zuckermann, Andreas; Morelon, Emmanuel; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2014-09-01

    In the 30 years since the rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) Thymoglobulin(®) was first licensed, its use in solid organ transplantation and hematology has expanded progressively. Although the evidence base is incomplete, specific roles for rATG in organ transplant recipients using contemporary dosing strategies are now relatively well-identified. The addition of rATG induction to a standard triple or dual regimen reduces acute cellular rejection, and possibly humoral rejection. It is an appropriate first choice in patients with moderate or high immunological risk, and may be used in low-risk patients receiving a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-sparing regimen from time of transplant, or if early steroid withdrawal is planned. Kidney transplant patients at risk of delayed graft function may also benefit from the use of rATG to facilitate delayed CNI introduction. In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, rATG has become an important component of conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, following demonstration of reduced acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. More recently, a role for rATG has also been established in reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. In autoimmunity, rATG contributes to the treatment of severe aplastic anemia, and has been incorporated in autograft projects for the management of conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and systemic sclerosis. Finally, research is underway for the induction of tolerance exploiting the ability of rATG to induce immunosuppresive cells such as regulatory T-cells. Despite its long history, rATG remains a key component of the immunosuppressive armamentarium, and its complex immunological properties indicate that its use will expand to a wider range of disease conditions in the future.

  5. Cell transplantation in lumbar spine disc degeneration disease.

    PubMed

    Hohaus, C; Ganey, T M; Minkus, Y; Meisel, H J

    2008-12-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common symptom, affecting nearly three-quarters of the population sometime in their life. Given that disc herniation is thought to be an extension of progressive disc degeneration that attends the normal aging process, seeking an effective therapy that staves off disc degeneration has been considered a logical attempt to reduce back pain. The most apparent cellular and biochemical changes attributable to degeneration include a decrease in cell density in the disc that is accompanied by a reduction in synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. With this in mind, one therapeutic strategy would be to replace, regenerate, or augment the intervertebral disc cell population, with a goal of correcting matrix insufficiencies and restoring normal segment biomechanics. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. We designed an animal study using the dog as our model to investigate this hypothesis by transplantation of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes into degenerated intervertebral discs. As a result we demonstrated that disc cells remained viable after transplantation; transplanted disc cells produced an extracellular matrix that contained components similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue; a statistically significant correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height could displayed. Following these results the Euro Disc Randomized Trial was initiated to embrace a representative patient group with persistent symptoms that had not responded to conservative treatment where an indication for surgical treatment was given. In the interim analyses we evaluated that patients who received autologous disc cell transplantation had greater pain reduction at 2 years compared with patients who did not receive cells following their discectomy surgery and discs in patients that

  6. Neural stem cell transplantation promotes behavioral recovery in a photothrombosis stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junning; Gao, Junwei; Hou, Boru; Liu, Jixing; Chen, Sihua; Yan, Guizhong; Ren, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy provides a promising approach for treat stroke. Neural stem cells isolated from mice hippocampus possessing the capacity of differentiate into neurons and astrocytes both in vitro and vivo. Here, we investigated the capability of neural stem cell transplantation in photothrombosis stroke model. Nissl staining revealed that the cortical infarct significantly decreased by 16.32% (Vehicle: 27.93le: an mm3, n=6, NSC: 23.37le: ai mm3, n=6, P<0.05) in the NSC group compared with the vehicle. More over transplantation of neural stem cells significantly (P<0.01) improved neurological performance compared with vehicle. These results indicate that transplantation of neural stem cell is an effective therapy in ischemic stroke. PMID:26339348

  7. Corneal regeneration by transplantation of corneal epithelial cell sheets fabricated with automated cell culture system in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Kan, Kazutoshi; Nishida, Kohji; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2013-12-01

    We have performed clinical applications of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine with human patients in several fields. In order to achieve the mass production of transplantable cell sheets, we have developed automated cell culture systems. Here, we report an automated robotic system utilizing a cell culture vessel, cell cartridge. The cell cartridge had two rooms for epithelial cells and feeder layer cells separating by porous membrane on which a temperature-responsive polymer was covalently immobilized. After pouring cells into this robotic system, cell seeding, medium change, and microscopic examination during culture were automatically performed according to the computer program. Transplantable corneal epithelial cell sheets were successfully fabricated in cell cartridges with this robotic system. Then, fabricated cell sheets were transplanted onto ocular surfaces of rabbit limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency model after 6-h transportation using a portable homothermal container to keep inner temperature at 36 °C. Within one week after transplantation, normal corneal epithelium was successfully regenerated. This automatic cell culture system would be useful for industrialization of tissue-engineered products for regenerative medicine.

  8. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  9. 78 FR 23571 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises the Secretary of the... Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies. The Council will also hear presentations...

  10. Predictors for severe cardiac complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Kanda, Y; Nakagawa, M; Asano-Mori, Y; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Imai, Y; Hangaishi, A; Kurokawa, M; Tsujino, S; Ogawa, S; Chiba, S; Motokura, T; Hirai, H

    2004-05-01

    The value of pre-transplant factors for predicting the development of cardiac complications after transplantation has been inconsistent among studies. We analyzed the impact of pre-transplant factors on the incidence of severe cardiac complications in 164 hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. We identified eight patients (4.8%) who experienced grade III or IV cardiac complications according to the Bearman criteria. Seven died of cardiac causes a median of 3 days after the onset of cardiac complications. On univariate analysis, both the cumulative dose of anthracyclines and the use of anthracyclines within 60 days before transplantation affected the incidence of severe cardiac complications (P=0.0091 and 0.011). The dissociation of heart rate and body temperature, which reflects "relative tachycardia", was also associated with a higher incidence of cardiac complications (P=0.024). None of the variables obtained by electrocardiography or echocardiography were useful for predicting cardiac complications after transplantation, although the statistical power might not be sufficient to detect the usefulness of ejection fraction. On a multivariate analysis, the cumulative dose of anthracyclines was the only independent significant risk factor for severe cardiac complications. We conclude that the cumulative dose of anthracyclines is the most potent predictor of cardiac complications and the administration of anthracyclines should be avoided within two months before transplantation.

  11. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found.

  12. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method

    PubMed Central

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies. PMID:26330231

  13. Therapeutically targeting astrocytes with stem and progenitor cell transplantation following traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Falnikar, Aditi; Li, Ke; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2014-01-01

    Replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes via multipotent neural stem cell (NSC) and lineage-restricted neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Cell transplantation in general offers the potential to replace central nervous system (CNS) cell types, achieve remyelination, deliver missing gene products, promote and guide axonal growth, modulate the host immune response, deliver neuroprotective factors, and provide a cellular substrate for bridging the lesion site, amongst other possible benefits. A host of cell types that differ in their developmental stage, CNS region and species of derivation, as well as in their phenotypic potential, have been tested in a variety of SCI animal models. Historically in the SCI field, most pre-clinical NSC and NPC transplantation studies have focused on neuronal and oligodendrocyte replacement. However, much less attention has been geared towards targeting astroglial dysfunction in the inured spinal cord, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in both normal CNS function and in the diseased nervous system. Despite the relative lack of studies, cell transplantation-based targeting of astrocytes dates back to some of the earliest transplant studies in SCI animal models. In this review, we will describe the history of work involving cell transplantation for targeting astrocytes in models of SCI. We will also touch on the current state of affairs in the field, as well as on important future directions as we move forward in trying to develop this approach into a viable strategy for SCI patients. Practical issues such as timing of delivery, route of transplantation and immunesuppression needs are beyond the scope of this review. PMID:25251595

  14. Islet and stem cell encapsulation for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster, Clarence E; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues.

  15. Islet and Stem Cell Encapsulation for Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster 3rd, Clarence E.; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  16. Neuroprotective effects of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplantation in premature rat brain following hypoxic-ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long-Xia; Ma, Si-Min; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Zi-Chuan; Xiong, Man; Cheng, Guo-Qiang; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Zi-Long; Zhou, Wen-Hao; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a common ischemic brain injury in premature infants for which there is no effective treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether transplanted mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) have neuroprotective effects in a rat model of PVL. Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) was induced in 3-day-old rat pups by left carotid artery ligation, followed by exposure to 6% oxygen for 2.5 h. Animals were assigned to OPC transplantation or sham control groups and injected with OPCs or PBS, respectively, and sacrificed up to 6 weeks later for immunohistochemical analysis to investigate the survival and differentiation of transplanted OPCs. Apoptosis was evaluated by double immunolabeling of brain sections for caspase-3 and neuronal nuclei (NeuN), while proliferation was assessed using a combination of anti-Nestin and -bromodeoxyuridine antibodies. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Bcl-2 was examined 7 days after OPC transplantation. The Morris water maze was used to test spatial learning and memory. The results showed that transplanted OPCs survived and formed a myelin sheath, and stimulated BDNF and Bcl-2 expression and the proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC), while inhibiting HI-induced neuronal apoptosis relative to control animals. Moreover, deficits in spatial learning and memory resulting from HI were improved by OPC transplantation. These results demonstrate an important neuroprotective role for OPCs that can potentially be exploited in cell-based therapeutic approaches to minimize HI-induced brain injury.

  17. ABO blood group mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Sibel Akpınar; Özbek, Namık

    2016-02-01

    Apart from solid organ transplantations, use of ABO-blood group mismatched (ABO-mismatched) donors is acceptable in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. About 20-40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients will receive grafts from ABO-mismatched donors. ABO incompatible HSCT procedures are associated with immediate and late consequences, including but not restricted to acute or delayed hemolytic reactions, delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and graft-versus-host disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge about consequences of ABO-mismatched HSCT in terms of associated complications and will evaluate its impact on important outcome parameters of HSCT.

  18. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: natural regulators for transplant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Boros, Peter; Ochando, Jordi C; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2010-11-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to the negative regulation of immune response in cancer patients. This review summarizes results on important issues related to MDSC biology, including expansion and activation of MDSC, phenotype, and subsets as well pathways and different mechanisms by which these cells exert their suppressive effect. Recent observations suggesting that MDSC may have roles in transplant tolerance are presented. Although therapeutic targeting and destruction of MDCS is of primary interest in cancer patients, in transplantation it will instead be necessary to induce, expand, and activate these cells; thus current possibilities for in vitro generation of MDSC are also discussed.

  19. Allogeneic stem cell transplant for adults with myelodysplastic syndromes: relevance of pre-transplant disease status.

    PubMed

    Busca, Alessandro; Pecoraro, Clara; Giaccone, Luisa; Bruno, Benedetto; Allione, Bernardino; Corsetti, Maria Teresa; Pini, Massimo; Marmont, Filippo; Audisio, Ernesta; D'Ardia, Stefano; Frairia, Chiara; Castiglione, Anna; Ciccone, Giovannino; Levis, Alessandro; Vitolo, Umberto; Falda, Michele

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcome of 94 adult patients with myelodysplasia (MDS) who received an allogeneic stem cell transplant between January 1995 and September 2010 in two Italian hematology centers. At the time of transplant, 53 patients (56%) had relapsed/refractory disease. The cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI] 21-45%) and 78% (95% CI 66-90%), respectively. The cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality (TRM) at 100 days was 13% (95% CI 6-21%). The 2-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 41% (95% CI 31-51%) and 49% (95% CI 38-59%), respectively. On multivariate analysis, advanced disease stage at transplant was the major independent variable associated with an inferior 2-year PFS (HR 3.66, 95% CI 1.98-6.76) and OS (HR 3.68, 95% CI 1.95-6.93). Use of an alternative donor was an independent variable associated with TRM (HR 3.18, 95% CI 1.31-7.72). In conclusion, our data suggest that disease status at the time of transplant is the major predictor for improved PFS and OS, and treatments required to reach this goal may have value in leading to an improved outcome.

  20. [Human herpesvirus-6 associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-10-01

    Reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6B is a relatively common occurrence after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and it is associated with the development of various post-transplant complications. HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be a significant, life-threatening complication caused by HHV-6B reactivation. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops 2-6 weeks after SCT, and the symptoms are characterized by memory loss, seizures, and consciousness loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Recent large-scale studies and a prospective study showed a similar incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis development, with 7.9-9.9% in cord blood transplant recipients and 0.5-1.2% in bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients. Epidemiological studies suggest that post-transplant immune reactions such as GVHD, pre-engraftment immune reaction, or engraftment syndrome play important roles in the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. The mortality rate remains high, and even among survivors, many patients are left with serious neurological impairments, such as memory disturbance and seizures. Elucidation of the pathophysiology and establishment of appropriate prophylactic measures are necessary to overcome this serious complication. Besides encephalitis, associations between HHV-6 and various post-transplant complications have been reported, including pneumonitis, gastroenterocolitis, hepatitis, bone marrow suppression, and GVHD. Further investigations are needed to determine the role of HHV-6 in these complications.

  1. Noninvasive Assessment of Cell Fate and Biology in Transplanted Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Federico; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, molecular imaging has become a conditio sine qua non for cell-based regenerative medicine. Developments in molecular imaging techniques, such as reporter gene technology, have increasingly enabled the noninvasive assessment of the fate and biology of cells after cardiovascular applications. In this context, bioluminescence imaging is the most commonly used imaging modality in small animal models of preclinical studies. Here, we present a detailed protocol of a reporter gene imaging approach for monitoring the viability and biology of Mesenchymal Stem Cells transplanted in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

  2. How I assess comorbidities before hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic cell transplantation-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is a comorbidity tool suited for recipients of HCT. The index has been shown to sensitively capture the prevalence and magnitude of severity of various organ impairments before HCT and to provide valuable prognostic information after HCT. Many investigators have validated the discriminative power of the HCT-CI, but others have not. One concern is the consistency in comorbidity coding across different evaluators, particularly in view of the relatively recent addition of the HCT-CI to the transplant evaluation process. In this article, comorbidity scoring was tested across different evaluators, and only a fair interobserver agreement rate could be detected. To address these issues, a brief training program is proposed here, consisting of systematic methodology for data acquisition and consistent guidelines for comorbidity coding that were summarized in a Web-based calculator. In a validation patient cohort, this training program was shown to improve the interevaluator agreement on HCT-CI scores to an excellent rate with weighted κ values in the range of 0.89 to 0.97. This proposed training program will facilitate reliable assessment of comorbidities in the clinic and for research studies leading to standardization of the use of comorbidities in prediction of HCT outcomes. PMID:23355537

  3. A new immunodeficient pigmented retinal degenerate rat strain to study transplantation of human cells without immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.; Jones, Melissa K.; Ferguson, Dave L.; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to develop an immunodeficient rat model of retinal degeneration (RD nude rats) that will not reject transplanted human cells. Methods SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav females homozygous for a mutated mouse rhodopsin transgene were mated with NTac:NIH-Whn (NIH nude) males homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele. Through selective breeding, a new stock, SD-Foxn1 Tg(S334ter)3Lav (RD nude) was generated such that all animals were homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele and either homo- or hemizygous for the S334ter transgene. PCR-based assays for both the Foxn1rnu mutation and the S334ter transgene were developed for accurate genotyping. Immunodeficiency was tested by transplanting sheets of hESC-derived neural progenitor cells to the subretinal space of RD nude rats, and, as a control, NIH nude rats. Rats were killed between 8 and 184 days after surgery, and eye sections were analyzed for human, neuronal, and glial markers. Results After transplantation to RD nude and to NIH nude rats, hESC-derived neural progenitor cells differentiated to neuronal and glial cells, and migrated extensively from the transplant sheets throughout the host retina. Migration was more extensive in RD nude than in NIH nude rats. Already 8 days after transplantation, donor neuronal processes were found in the host inner plexiform layer. In addition, host glial cells extended processes into the transplants. The host retina showed the same photoreceptor degeneration pattern as in the immunocompetent SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav rats. Recipients survived well after surgery. Conclusions This new rat model is useful for testing the effect of human cell transplantation on the restoration of vision without interference of immunosuppression. PMID:24817311

  4. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: is it an immunologic therapy?].

    PubMed

    Olaya Vargas, Alberto; Pérez Gonzáles, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    The graft-versus-tumor effect occurring after allogeneic (genetically different) haematopoietic cell transplantation for treating human malignancies, represents the clearest example of the power of the human immune system to eradicate cancer. Recent advances in our understanding of the immunobiology of stem-cell engraftment, tolerance and tumor eradication are allowing clinicians to better harness this powerful effect.

  5. Related cord blood banking for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Screnci, M; Murgi, E; Carmini, D; Piro, L; Cinelli, N; Laurenti, L; Iori, A P; Simone, F; Massari, S; Girelli, G

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this single centre study were to assess the feasibility of related cord blood collecting, the appropriateness of storage and the final suitability for transplantation. Since September 1994, 63 families were enrolled in this study. Families were eligible if they were caring for a patient with a disorder treatable by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and were experiencing a pregnancy. A total of 72 cord blood units were collected and stored for 64 patients (both siblings and parents). We focussed on human leucocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility and cell content as critical requirements to unit's suitability for transplantation. HLA-typing was carried out for 34 donor-recipient couples and most units (72%) mismatched with the related patients. About 60% of collections had a minimum cell dose considered acceptable for transplantation. Only 21% of units had both compatibility degree and cell content suitable for transplantation. When applicable, information on the compatibility degree between the foetus and the patient should be obtained during pregnancy. Appropriateness of related cord blood banking for parents should be further investigated and cost-effective guidelines policies should be provided. Finally, as banking of related cord blood units is an important resource then, this public service should be supported and enhanced.

  6. Stem cell transplantation for treating stroke: status, trends and development.

    PubMed

    Huo, Wenxin; Liu, Xiaoyang; Tan, Cheng; Han, Yingying; Kang, Chunyang; Quan, Wei; Chen, Jiajun

    2014-09-01

    The developing approaches of thrombolytic therapy, endovascular treatment, neuroprotective therapy, and stem cell therapy have enabled breakthroughs in stroke treatment. In this study, we summarize and analyze trends and progress in stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment by retrieval of literature from Thomson Reuters Web of Science database, the NIH Clinical Trial Planning Grant Program, and Clinical Trials Registration Center in North America. In the last 10 years, there has been an increasing number of published articles on stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment. In particular, research from the USA and China has focused on stem cell transplantation. A total of 2,167 articles addressing stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment from 2004 to 2013 were retrieved from the Thomson Reuters Web of Science database. The majority of these articles were from the USA (854, 39.4%), with the journal Stroke publishing the most articles (145, 6.7%). Of the published articles, 143 were funded by the National Institutes of Health (accounting for 6.6% of total publications), and 91 by the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Between 2013 and 2014, the National Institutes of Health provided financial support ($130 million subsidy) for 329 research projects on stroke therapy using stem cell transplantation. In 2014, 215 new projects were approved, receiving grants of up to $70,440,000. Ninety clinical trials focusing on stem cell transplantation for stroke were registered in the Clinical Trial Registration Center in North America, with 40 trials registered in the USA (ranked first place). China had the maximum number of registered research or clinical trials (10 projects).

  7. First example of hepatocyte transplantation to alleviate ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, monitored by NMR-based metabonomics.

    PubMed

    Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Cloarec, Olivier; Parker, David A; Murphy, Gerard M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Mitry, Ragai R; Vilca-Melendez, Hector; Rela, Mohamed; Dhawan, Anil; Heaton, Nigel

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate the effective use of NMR spectroscopic profiles of urine and plasma from the first successful use of hepatocyte transplantation as a bridge to auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation in a child antenatally diagnosed with severe ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency. In this single-patient study, NMR profiles indicated that the disrupted urea cycle could be normalized by hepatocyte cell infusion and this was confirmed using orthogonal partial least-squares-based chemometrics. However, despite dietary manipulations and adminstration of ammonia scavengers, the desired reduction in plasma ammonia was not consistently achieved between sessions of hepatocyte transplantation due to episodes of sepsis. A subsequent liver transplant corrected the metabolic abnormalities. The use of metabolic profiling has been shown to be a promising method for evaluating the efficacy of cell infusions and has demonstrated the capability for the early detection of response to therapy in real time, an approach that may be of use in wider clinical settings.

  8. Stem cell transplantation in strategies for curing HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hütter, Gero

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 can persist in a latent form in resting memory CD4+ cells and macrophages carrying an integrated copy of the HIV genome. Because of the presence of these stable reservoir cells, eradication by antiretroviral therapy is unlikely and in order to achieve eradication, alternative treatment options are required. Stem cell transplantation has been considered previously to effect the clinical course of HIV-infection but in practice eradication or virus control was not achievable. However, modifications of stem cell transplantation using natural or artificial resistant cell sources, combination with new techniques of gene editing or generating cytotoxic anti HIV effector cells have stimulated this field of HIV cell therapy substantially. Here, we look back on 30 years of stem cell therapy in HIV patients and discuss most recent developments in this direction.

  9. Facial Reconstruction by Biosurgery: Cell Transplantation Versus Cell Homing

    PubMed Central

    Stosich, Michael S.; Moioli, Eduardo K.; Lee, Chang Hun; Fu, Susan Y.; Bastian, Barbara; Eisig, Sidney B.; Zemnick, Candice; Ascherman, Jeffrey; Wu, June; Rohde, Christine; Ahn, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The face distinguishes one human being from another. When the face is disfigured because of trauma, tumor removal, congenital anomalies, or chronic diseases, the patient has a strong desire for functional and esthetic restoration. Current practice of facial reconstruction using autologous grafts, synthetic fillers, and prostheses is frequently below the surgeon's and patient's expectations. Facial reconstruction is yet to take advantage of recent advances in seemingly unrelated fields of stem cell biology, chemical engineering, biomaterials, and tissue engineering. “Biosurgery,” a new concept that we propose, will incorporate novel principles and strategies of bioactive cues, biopolymers, and/or cells to restore facial defects. Small facial defects can likely be reconstructed by cell homing and without cell transplantation. A critical advantage of cell homing is that agilely recruited endogenous cells have the potential to harness the host's innate capacity for regeneration, thus accelerating the rate of regulatory and commercialization processes for product development. Large facial defects, however, may not be restorable without cell delivery per our understanding at this time. New breakthrough in biosurgery will likely originate from integrated strategies of cell biology, cytokine biology, chemical engineering, biomaterials, and tissue engineering. Regardless of cell homing or cell delivery approaches, biosurgery not only will minimize surgical trauma and repetitive procedures, but also produce long-lasting results. At the same time, caution must be exercised against the development of products that lack scientific basis or dogmatic combination of cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules. Together, scientifically derived biosurgery will undoubtedly develop into new technologies that offer increasingly natural reconstruction and/or augmentation of the face. PMID:19891541

  10. Children's Oncology Group's 2013 blueprint for research: stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Stephan A; Dvorak, Christopher C; Nieder, Michael L; Levine, John E; Wall, Donna A; Langholz, Bryan; Pulsipher, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    The role of SCT in pediatric oncology has continued to evolve with the introduction of new therapeutic agents and immunological insights into cancer. COG has focused its efforts on the study of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment of pediatric malignancies in several major multi-institutional Phase II and Phase III studies. These studies include addressing the impact of allogenicity in ALL (ASCT0431), and establishing autologous stem cell transplant as the standard of care in neuroblastoma. Reducing transplant-associated toxicity was addressed in the ASCT0521 study, where the TNFα inhibitor etanercept was tested for the treatment of idiopathic pneumonia syndrome. Impact of cell dose was explored in the single versus tandem umbilical cord blood study CTN-0501, in close collaboration with the BMT-CTN.

  11. The Past, Present, and Future of NK Cells in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Frank; Verneris, Michael R; Cooley, Sarah; Bachanova, Veronika; Brunstein, Claudio G; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John; Schlums, Heinrich; Bryceson, Yenan T; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used as a part of cancer therapy for over half a decade. Beyond the necessity for donor-derived cells to reconstitute hematopoiesis after radiation and chemotherapy, immunologic reconstitution from allogeneic cells is important for the elimination of residual tumor cells. Natural killer (NK) cells are first among lymphocytes to reconstitute post-transplant and protect against cancer relapse. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the role of NK cells in cancer control in the transplant setting and focus on current research aimed at improving NK cell responses for therapeutic benefit.

  12. Analysis of graft survival in a trial of stem cell transplant in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Tezeta; Gearing, Marla; Senitzer, David; Saxe, Debra; Brat, Daniel J; Bray, Robert; Gebel, Howard; Hill, Charles; Boulis, Nicholas; Riley, Jonathan; Feldman, Eva; Johe, Karl; Hazel, Thomas; Polak, Meraida; Bordeau, Jane; Federici, Thais; Glass, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The first US Food and Drug Administration–approved clinical trial to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with neural stem cell–based therapy is in progress. The goal of the current study was to identify and assess the survival of human spinal cord–derived neural stem cells (HSSCs) transplanted into the spinal cord in patients with ALS. Methods Spinal cords transplanted with HSSCs were examined from six autopsy cases. Homogenized tissues were interrogated for the presence of donor versus recipient DNA using real-time PCR methods (qPCR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using DNA probes for XY chromosomes to identify male donor HSSCs in one female case, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to characterize the identified donor cells. Results Genomic DNA from donor HSSCs was identified in all cases, comprising 0.67–5.4% of total tissue DNA in patients surviving 196 to 921 days after transplantation. In the one female patient a “nest” of cells identified on H&E staining were XY-positive by FISH, confirming donor origin. A subset of XY-positive cells labeled for the neuronal marker NeuN and stem cell marker SOX2. Interpretation This is the first study to identify human neural stem cells transplanted into a human spinal cord. Transplanted HSSCs survived up to 2.5 years posttransplant. Some cells differentiated into neurons, while others maintained their stem cell phenotype. This work is a proof of concept of the survival and differentiation of human stems cell transplanted into the spinal cord of ALS patients. PMID:25540804

  13. Veno-occlusive disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Elisabeth C

    2012-10-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that affects the liver, as well as other organs. Although mild cases resolve on their own, severe cases of VOD carry a high mortality rate. The diagnosis usually is clinically based, with nonspecific signs such as weight gain, ascites, hepatomegaly, right upper quadrant abdominal pain, and elevated serum bilirubin. Although studies are ongoing, no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for VOD exist to date. Therefore, supportive care is a critical part of the treatment plan. Oncology nurses should be familiar with the risk factors and clinical signs of VOD so that patients can be monitored closely for its occurrence. Accurate and timely recognition of VOD is crucial for appropriate treatment.

  14. Indications and Results of HLA-Identical Sibling Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Walters, Mark C; De Castro, Laura M; Sullivan, Keith M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Kamani, Naynesh; Bredeson, Christopher; Neuberg, Donna; Hassell, Kathryn L; Farnia, Stephanie; Campbell, Andrew; Petersdorf, Effie

    2016-02-01

    Although a number of published trials exist of HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for sickle cell disease (SCD) that span 2 decades, when and for whom this therapy should be pursued is a subject of debate. Assessments of the risks of transplant-related complications that include infertility and debilitating graft-versus-host disease and long-term quality of life after successful HCT are difficult to perform without prospective trials in transplant and nontransplant cohorts. However, it is possible to assess the risk of mortality and to compare published rates of survival in individuals with SCD treated and not treated by HCT. In this brief review, projections about mortality risk based on recent published reports are reviewed and summarized. The published data show overall survival and event-free survival rates of 95% and 92%, respectively, in children treated by HLA-identical sibling HCT. The overall survival rates in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (N = 412) and European Blood and Marrow Transplant (N = 487) registries were 91% and 95%, respectively. These results provide broad support for the therapeutic value of HLA-identical sibling HCT for children with SCD and serve as the basis for a strong recommendation in favor of the option of HCT when a suitable donor is available. The experience of HLA-identical sibling HCT in adults with SCD is limited but appears to be similar to results in children. These preliminary observations, however, warrant further investigation.

  15. Mycophenolate-based graft versus host disease prophylaxis is not inferior to methotrexate in myeloablative-related donor stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Nada; Shanavas, Mohamed; Michelis, Fotios V; Uhm, Jieun; Gupta, Vikas; Seftel, Matthew; Kuruvilla, John; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Messner, Hans A; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2015-05-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 242 patients who received related donor myeloablative peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplantation. We compared patients who received mycophenolate (MMF)/cyclosporine (CSA) (n = 71), to historical controls who received methotrexate (MTX)/CSA (n = 172). There were no differences in overall survival, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse. The MMF/CSA group had significantly faster neutrophil and platelet engraftment: medians of 13 versus 18 days and 10 versus 14 days, respectively (P = 0.001). The cumulative incidence of acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) (Grades, 2-4) was significantly lower in the MMF/CSA group (45.1 vs. 74.4%, P < 0.001). The MMF/CSA group showed a lower incidence of skin (51.5 vs. 72.1%, P < 0.001) and liver acute GVHD (11.3 vs. 54.2%, P < 0.001) and a higher incidence of lung (42.2 vs. 19.0%, P = 0.045), eye (59.7 vs. 30.1%, P < 0.001), and mouth (72.8 vs. 56.4%, P = 0.001) chronic GVHD but only eye chronic GVHD was confirmed in propensity score matching (PSM) analysis. The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia was higher in the MMF/CSA group (55.8 vs. 39.6%, P < 0.001) but this was not confirmed in PSM analysis. MMF/CSA was identified as an independent favorable factor for acute GVHD (P < 0.001, hazard ratio, 0.41) but as a possible adverse risk factor for CMV viremia as this was not found to be statistically significant in PSM analysis. MMF/CSA in myeloablative matched related donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant is not inferior as GVHD prophylaxis in comparison with MTX/CSA and is associated with faster engraftment but a potentially higher risk of CMV viremia.

  16. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma successfully treated with autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goede, Jeroen S; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Taverna, Christian; Schanz, Urs; Dispenzieri, Angela; Hummel, Yvonne; Trüeb, Ralph M; Fehr, Jörg

    2007-04-01

    Paraproteinemia can be complicated by necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. Therapeutic options for this progressive disease are limited, and there is no agreement on a single best strategy. We report the case of a patient with a massive periorbital infiltration narrowing the palpebral fissure and blinding the patient. Conventional myeloma therapy had only limited benefit in our patient. However, he was successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, rendering the patient free of symptoms. This is the first report of autologous stem cell transplantation in a patient with necrobiotic xanthogranuloma.

  17. Regulatory T cells in kidney disease and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Wang, Yuan Min; Wang, Yiping; Zhang, Geoff Y; Zheng, Guoping; Yi, Shounan; O'Connell, Philip J; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be important in maintaining immune homeostasis and preventing autoimmune disease, including autoimmune kidney disease. It is also likely that they play a role in limiting kidney transplant rejection and potentially in promoting transplant tolerance. Although other subsets of Tregs exist, the most potent and well-defined Tregs are the Foxp3 expressing CD4(+) Tregs derived from the thymus or generated peripherally. These CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs limit autoimmune renal disease in animal models, especially chronic kidney disease, and kidney transplantation. Furthermore, other subsets of Tregs, including CD8 Tregs, may play a role in immunosuppression in kidney disease. The development and protective mechanisms of Tregs in kidney disease and kidney transplantation involve multiple mechanisms of suppression. Here we review the development and function of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs. We discuss the specific application of Tregs as a therapeutic strategy to prevent kidney disease and to limit kidney transplant rejection and detail clinical trials in this area of transplantation.

  18. Kidney Transplantation From a Donor With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Rossidis, A; Lim, M A; Palmer, M; Levine, M H; Naji, A; Bloom, R D; Abt, P L

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, >100 000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant. Given the paucity of organs available for transplant, expansion of eligibility criteria for deceased donation is of substantial interest. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is viewed as a contraindication to kidney donation, perhaps because SCD substantially alters renal structure and function and thus has the potential to adversely affect multiple physiological processes of the kidney. To our knowledge, transplantation from a donor with SCD has never been described in the literature. In this paper, we report the successful transplantation of two kidneys from a 37-year-old woman with SCD who died from an intracranial hemorrhage. Nearly 4 mo after transplant, both recipients are doing well and are off dialysis. The extent to which kidneys from donors with SCD can be safely transplanted with acceptable outcomes is unknown; however, this report should provide support for the careful expansion of kidneys from donors with SCD without evidence of renal dysfunction and with normal tissue architecture on preimplantation biopsies.

  19. 77 FR 22791 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Health Service Act, as amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises... Thawing and Washing, (4) Access to Transplantation, and (5) Advancing Hematopoietic Stem...

  20. Insights and hopes in umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantations.

    PubMed

    Shahrokhi, Somayeh; Menaa, Farid; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; McGuckin, Colin; Ebtekar, Massoumeh

    2012-01-01

    Over 20.000 umblical cord blood transplantations (UCBT) have been carried out around the world. Indeed, UCBT represents an attractive source of donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and, offer interesting features (e.g., lower graft-versus-host disease) compared to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Thereby, UCBT often represents the unique curative option against several blood diseases. Recent advances in the field of UCBT, consisted to develop strategies to expand umbilical stem cells and shorter the timing of their engraftment, subsequently enhancing their availability for enhanced efficacy of transplantation into indicated patients with malignant diseases (e.g., leukemia) or non-malignant diseases (e.g., thalassemia major). Several studies showed that the expansion and homing of UCBSCs depends on specific biological factors and cell types (e.g., cytokines, neuropeptides, co-culture with stromal cells). In this review, we extensively present the advantages and disadvantages of current hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs), compared to UBCT. We further describe the importance of cord blood content and obstetric factors on cord blood selection, and report the recent approaches that can be undertook to improve cord blood stem cell expansion as well as engraftment. Eventually, we provide two majors examples underlining the importance of UCBT as a potential cure for blood diseases.

  1. Insights and Hopes in Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantations

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Somayeh; Menaa, Farid; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; McGuckin, Colin; Ebtekar, Massoumeh

    2012-01-01

    Over 20.000 umblical cord blood transplantations (UCBT) have been carried out around the world. Indeed, UCBT represents an attractive source of donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and, offer interesting features (e.g., lower graft-versus-host disease) compared to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Thereby, UCBT often represents the unique curative option against several blood diseases. Recent advances in the field of UCBT, consisted to develop strategies to expand umbilical stem cells and shorter the timing of their engraftment, subsequently enhancing their availability for enhanced efficacy of transplantation into indicated patients with malignant diseases (e.g., leukemia) or non-malignant diseases (e.g., thalassemia major). Several studies showed that the expansion and homing of UCBSCs depends on specific biological factors and cell types (e.g., cytokines, neuropeptides, co-culture with stromal cells). In this review, we extensively present the advantages and disadvantages of current hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs), compared to UBCT. We further describe the importance of cord blood content and obstetric factors on cord blood selection, and report the recent approaches that can be undertook to improve cord blood stem cell expansion as well as engraftment. Eventually, we provide two majors examples underlining the importance of UCBT as a potential cure for blood diseases. PMID:23258957

  2. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  3. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Dogs With Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Maura K. W.; Barros, Michele A.; Martins, João Flávio P.; Vasconcellos, Jose Paulo C.; Morais, Bruna P.; Pompeia, Celine; Bittencourt, Matheus Domingues; Evangelho, Karine dos Santos; Kerkis, Irina; Wenceslau, Cristiane V.

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is a dysfunction in tear production associated with clinical signs, which include conjunctival hyperemia, ocular discharge, discomfort, pain, and, eventually, corneal vascularization and pigmentation. Immunosuppressive drugs are routinely administrated for long periods to treat KCS but with side effects and limited results. Evaluation of the clinical benefits of intralacrimal transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in dogs with mild–moderate and severe KCS was done. A total of 24 eyes with KCS from 15 dogs of different breeds were enrolled in the present study. A single transplantation of MSCs (1 × 106) directly into lacrimal glands (dorsal and third eyelid) was performed. The Schirmer tear tests (STTs) and ocular surface improvements were used to assess short- and long-term effects of these cells. The STTs were carried out on day 0 (before MSCs transplantation) and on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, as well as 6 and 12 months after MSC transplantation. Our data demonstrate that allogeneic MSC transplantation in KCS dogs is safe since no adverse effects were observed immediately after transplantation and in short- and long-term follow-ups. A statistically significant increase in the STT and ocular surface improvements was found in all eyes studied. In all the eyes with mild–moderate KCS, STT values reverted to those of healthy eyes, while in eyes with severe KCS, although complete reversion was not found, there was improvement in tear production and in other clinical signs. Our study shows that a single dose of a low number of MSCs can be used to treat KCS in dogs. In contrast to immunosuppressive drug use, MSC transplantation has an effect over a long period (up to 12 months), even after a single administration, and does not require daily drug administration. PMID:28003932

  4. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration.

  5. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Shwachman-Diamond disease: a study from the European Group for blood and marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Oneto, Rosi; Messina, Chiara; Gibson, Brenda E; Buzyn, Agnes; Steward, Colin; Gluckman, Eliane; Bredius, Robbert; Breddius, Robbert; Boogaerts, Marc; Vermylen, Christiane; Veys, Paul; Marsh, Judith; Badell, Isabel; Michel, Gerard; Güngör, Tayfun; Niethammer, Dietrich; Bordigoni, Pierre; Oswald, Cecilia; Favre, Claudio; Passweg, Jakob; Dini, Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    This report assessed the results of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in 26 patients with Shwachman-Diamond disease (SDS) and severe bone marrow abnormalities. The conditioning regimen was based on busulphan (54%), total body irradiation (23%), fludarabine (15%) or other chemotherapy combinations (8%). Standard prevention of graft versus host disease (GVHD) with cyclosporin +/- methotrexate was adopted in 54% of the patients whilst in vivo or in vitro T-cell depletion was used in 17 and four patients respectively. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment were achieved in 21 (81%) and 17 (65%) of 26 patients after a median time of 18 days and 29 days respectively. The incidence of grade III and IV acute GVHD was 24% and of chronic GVHD 29%. Nine patients died after a median time of 70 d, post-SCT. After a median follow-up of 1.1 years, the transplant-related mortality was 35.5% (95% CI 17-54) whilst the overall survival was 64.5% (95% CI 45.7-83.2). Allo-SCT was found to be successful in more than half of SDS patients with severe bone marrow dysfunction. Further improvements would be anticipated by a better definition of the optimum time in the course of disease to transplant and by the adoption of less toxic conditioning regimens.

  6. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milanetti, Francesca; Bucha, Jurate; Testori, Alessandro; Burt, Richard K

    2011-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare disorder manifesting as skin and internal organ fibrosis, a diffuse vasculopathy, inflammation, and features of autoimmunity. Patients with diffuse cutaneous disease or internal organ involvement have a poor prognosis with high mortality. To date no therapy has been shown to reverse the natural course of the disease. Immune suppressive drugs are commonly utilized to treat patients, but randomized trials have generally failed to demonstrate any long-term benefit. In phase I/II trials, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has demonstrated impressive reversal of skin fibrosis, improved functionality and quality of life, and stabilization of internal organ function, but initial studies were complicated by significant treatment-related mortality. Treatment-related mortality was reduced by better pre-transplant evaluation to exclude patients with compromised cardiac function and by treating patients earlier in disease, allowing selected patients the option of autologous HSCT treatment. There are currently three ongoing randomized trials of autologous HSCT for systemic sclerosis: ASSIST (American Systemic Sclerosis Immune Suppression versus Transplant), SCOT (scleroderma cyclophosphamide versus Transplant), and ASTIS (Autologous Stem cell Transplantation International Scleroderma). The results from these trials should clarify the role of autologous HSCT in the currently limited therapeutic arsenal of severe systemic sclerosis.

  7. Key factors in experimental mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Opolski, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The first mouse model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was developed more than 50 years ago. HSCT is currently being widely used in a broad range of research areas, which include studies of the engraftment process, the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease and possible ways of its treatment and prophylaxis, attempts to use the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect in treating hematological and oncological malignancies, cancer vaccine development, induction of transplanted organ tolerance, and gene therapy. However, although this model is widely distributed, many laboratories use different protocols for the procedure. There are a number of papers discussing different HSCT protocols in clinical work, but no articles summarizing mouse laboratory models are available. This review attempts to bring together different details about HSCT in the mouse model, such as the types of transplantation, possible pretreatment regimens and their combinations, methods and sources of graft harvesting and preparation for the transplantation procedure, the influence of graft cell dose and content on the engraftment process, the transplantation method itself, possible complications, symptoms and techniques of their prophylaxis or treatment, as well as follow-up and engraftment assessment. We have also tried to reflect current knowledge of the biology of the engraftment.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease: progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Abraham, Allistair A; Tisdale, John F; Hsieh, Matthew M

    2014-12-01

    Research has solidified matched sibling marrow, cord blood, or mobilized peripheral blood as the best source for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease, with low graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and high disease-free survival rates. Fully allelic matched unrelated donor is an option for transplant-eligible patients without HLA-matched sibling donors. Unrelated cord transplant studies reported high GVHD and low engraftment rates. Haploidentical transplants have less GVHD, but improvements are needed to increase the low engraftment rate. The decision to use unrelated cord blood units or haploidentical donors depends on institutional expertise.

  9. Proceedings: Immune Tolerance and Stem Cell Transplantation: A CIRM Mini-Symposium and Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Talib, Sohel; Millan, Maria T; Jorgenson, Rebecca L; Shepard, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) is to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs. Immune rejection is one hurdle that stem cell therapies must overcome to achieve a durable and effective therapeutic benefit. In July 2014, CIRM convened a group of clinical investigators developing stem cell therapeutics, immunologists, and transplantation biologists to consider strategies to address this challenge. Workshop participants discussed current approaches for countering immune rejection in the context of organ transplant and cellular therapy and defined the risks, challenges, and opportunities for adapting them to the development of stem cell-based therapeutics. This effort led to the development of a Roadmap to Tolerance for allogeneic stem cell therapy, with four fundamental steps: (a) the need to identify "tolerance-permissive" immune-suppressive regimens to enable the eventual transition from current, drug-based approaches to a newer generation of technologies for inducing tolerance; (b) testing new biologics and small molecules for inducing tolerance in stem cell-based preclinical and clinical studies; (c) stimulation of efforts to develop novel therapeutic approaches to induce central and peripheral tolerance, including manipulation of the thymus, transplantation of purified stem cells, and cell therapy with T-regulatory cells; and (d) development of robust and sensitive immune monitoring technologies for identifying biomarkers of tolerance and rejection after allogeneic stem cell treatments in the clinical setting.

  10. Optimized cell transplantation using adult rag2 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Moore, John C.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Moore, Finola E.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Tenente, Inês M.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Berman, Jason N.; Liwski, Robert S.; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation into adult zebrafish has lagged behind mouse due to the lack of immune compromised models. Here, we have created homozygous rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish that have reduced numbers of functional T and B cells but are viable and fecund. Mutant fish engraft zebrafish muscle, blood stem cells, and cancers. rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish are the first immune compromised zebrafish model that permits robust, long-term engraftment of multiple tissues and cancer. PMID:25042784

  11. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    improves renal function and structure in other models of renal failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol...cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal. 305:F1804- F1812 6. Mason SB...successful long-term kidney cell engraftment and renal regeneration in diabetic nephropathy and also cell auto-transplants (9). We used adult

  12. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide for nonmalignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Orly R.; Chen, Allen R.; Gamper, Christopher; Loeb, David; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas; Huo, Jeffrey; Dezern, Amy E.; Steppan, Diana; Robey, Nancy; Holuba, Mary Jo; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Symons, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic (allo-) hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is curative for many nonmalignant pediatric disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and immunodeficiencies. There is great success using HLA-matched related donors for these patients; however, the use of alternative donors has been associated with increased graft failure, graft versus host disease (GVHD), and transplant-related mortality (TRM). HSCT using alternative donors with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) for GVHD prophylaxis has been performed for hematologic malignancies with engraftment, GVHD, and TRM comparable to that seen with HLA-matched related donors. There are limited reports of HSCT in nonmalignant pediatric disorders other than hemoglobinopathies using alternative donors and PT/Cy. We transplanted eleven pediatric patients with life-threatening nonmalignant conditions using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC), alternative donors, and PT/Cy alone or in combination with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We observed limited GVHD, no TRM, and successful engraftment sufficient to eliminate manifestations of disease in all patients. Allo-HSCT using alternative donors and PT/Cy shows promise for curing nonmalignant disorders; development of prospective clinical trials to confirm these observations is warranted. PMID:26860634

  13. Biomimetic synthetic self-assembled hydrogels for cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barros, Daniela; Amaral, Isabel Freitas; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    The development of three-dimensional matrices capable of recapitulating the main features of native extracellular matrix and contribute for the establishment of a favorable microenvironment for cell behavior and fate is expected to circumvent some of the main limitations of cell-based therapies. In this context, self-assembly has emerged as a promising strategy to engineer cell-compatible hydrogels. A wide number of synthetically-derived biopolymers, such as proteins, peptides and DNA/RNA, with intrinsic ability to self-assemble into well-defined nanofibrous structures, are being explored. The resulting hydrogels, in addition to closely resembling the architecture of native cellular microenvironments, present a versatile and dynamic behavior that allows them to be designed to undergo sol-to-gel transition in response to exogenous stimulus. This review presents an overview on the state-of-the-art of the different strategies being explored for the development of injectable synthetic self-assembled hydrogels for cell transplantation and/or recruitment of endogenous cells, with an emphasis on their biological performance, both in vitro and in vivo. Systems based on peptides are the most widely explored and have already generated promising results in pre-clinical in vivo studies involving different repair/regenerative scenarios, including cartilage, bone, nerve and heart. On the other hand, systems based on DNA and hybrid hydrogels are now emerging for application in the biomedical field with high potential. Finally, the main challenges hampering the translation of these systems to the clinic and the issues that need to be addressed for these to progress from bench-to-bedside are discussed.

  14. Immunotherapeutic strategies against mucormycosis in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Tramsen, Lars; Schneider, Andreas; Balan, Ada; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycoses remain a serious complication in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In these patients, mortality rates of mucormycosis reach up to 90%, which is due, at least in part, to the severe and prolonged immunosuppression after transplantation. Although prolonged neutropaenia is one of the most important risk factors for mucormycosis, other cell populations, such as CD4(+) T cells may also provide critical defence mechanisms against this infection. The management of mucormycosis includes antifungal therapy, surgery and, most importantly, the control of the underlying predisposing conditions, such as the correction of an impaired immune system. Here, we review the current data of granulocytes, antifungal T cells and natural killer cells regarding their activity against mucormycetes and regarding a potential immunotherapeutic approach. It is hoped that further animal studies and clinical trials assessing immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately improve the poor prognosis of allogeneic HSCT recipients suffering from mucormycosis.

  15. [Therapeutic intensification and autologous stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Z; Gerber, I; Toledano, C; Hen-Solal, J; Damade, R; de Saint-Cyr, I; Sarrot-Reynauld, F; Ilié, D; Daneshpouy, M; Mounier, N; Ruivard, M; Tyndall, C; Vidal, E; Quere, I; Durand, J-M; Constans, J; Farge, D

    2005-02-26

    THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY of most autoimmune diseases is often poorly understood. EXPERIMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS and clinical experience suggest that high doses immunoablation followed by stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic option to consider for certain severe autoimmune disorders. THE CONCEPT OF RESTORING NORMAL IMMUNE REACTIVITY must in part br true since current results of 466 transplants (445 autologous, 21 allogeneic) patients suffering from various autoimmune diseases show a beneficial outcome in approximately 2/3 of the patients. TO IMPROVE THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF SUCH AN AGGRESSIVE PROCEDURE in patients with potentially affected vital organs by the underlying autoimmune disease, it is especially important to follow international consensus guidelines and to centrally collect clinical data for in depth analysis in the EBMT International Stem Cell Project for Autoimmune Disease in Basel, Switzerland. PHASE III STUDIES ARE RUNNING FOR SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS (Astis, Autologous Stem cell Transplantation International Rheumatoid Arthritis Trial) started in 2003. A STUDY PROJECT IS PLANNED FOR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (Astims, Autologous Stem cell Transplantation International Multiple Sclerosis).

  16. Liver transplant for giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, H. V.; Rela, M.; Baker, A.; Ball, C.; Portmann, B.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Heaton, N.

    1997-01-01

    

 Giant cell hepatitis (CGH) with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AHA) is a distinct entity with an aggressive course. Immunosuppression may help early disease. A case is reported of a child with GCH and AHA with early disease recurrence after liver transplantation for end stage liver disease. 

 PMID:9370907

  17. Management of infections complicating allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, John W

    2009-07-01

    The use of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of hematologic malignancies, as well as some benign hematologic disorders, has continued to grow over the last 10 years. The availability of this procedure to an increasing number of patients has been facilitated by the use of newer techniques, including reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens, peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) and cord blood as donor sources, graft manipulation such as selective T-cell depletion, and other in vitro and in vivo attempts to reduce the risk and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after transplantation without losing the potential benefits of a graft-versus-tumor effect for patients with hematologic malignancies. The underlying theme of many of these newer techniques has been to minimize the severity and duration of transplant-related immune suppression, thus reducing the risk of morbidity and mortality from infectious complications. This article reviews immune suppression and recovery that occur after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, with changes in the epidemiology, and some of the recent advances that have been made in management of infectious complications.

  18. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for CD3δ deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Nufar; Takada, Hidetoshi; Law, Jason; Cowan, Morton J; Gil, Juana; Regueiro, Jose; Lopez de Sabando, Diego Plaza; Lopez-Granados, Eduardo; Dalal, Jignesh; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Manfred, Hoenig; Hanson, I. Celine; Grunebaum, Eyal; Shearer, William T; Roifman, Chaim M.

    2012-01-01

    Background CD3δ deficiency is a fatal form of severe combined immunodeficiency which can be cured by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The presence of a thymus loaded with T cell progenitors in these patients may require special considerations in choosing the regimen of conditioning and the type of HSCT. Objectives To study the outcome of CD3δ deficiency using various modalities of stem cell transplantation. Methods We analyzed data on 13 patients with CD3δ deficiency who underwent HSCT in 7 centers. HSCT was performed using different sources of donor stem cells as well as various conditioning regimens. Results Two patients who received stem cells from matched related donors and survived, both needed substantial conditioning in order to engraft. Only one of six other patients who received a related mismatched donor (MMRD) transplant survived, two of them had no conditioning while the others received various combinations of conditioning regimens. Three other patients received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor (MUD), survived and enjoyed full immune reconstitution. Two other patients received unrelated cord blood without conditioning. One of them has had a partial but stable engraftment, while the other engrafted well but is only 12 months after HSCT. We also report here for the first time that patients with CD3δ deficiency can present with typical features of Omenn syndrome. Conclusions HSCT is a successful treatment for patients with CD3δ deficiency. The small number of patients in this report prevent definitive statements on the importance of survival factors, but several are suggested: 1) HLA matched donor transplants are associated with superior reconstitution and survival than mismatched donor transplants; 2) substantial conditioning appears necessary; 3) early diagnosis and absence of opportunistic infections. PMID:21757226

  19. High-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to promote graft-host tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Luznik, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease, or GVHD, is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Here, we describe a novel method for preventing GVHD after alloHSCT using high-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (Cy). Post-transplantation Cy promotes tolerance in alloreactive host and donor T cells, leading to suppression of both graft rejection and GVHD after alloHSCT. High-dose, post-transplantation Cy facilitates partially HLA-mismatched HSCT without severe GVHD and is effective as sole prophylaxis of GVHD after HLA-matched alloHSCT. By reducing the morbidity and mortality of alloHSCT, post-transplantation Cy may expand the applications of this therapy to the treatment of autoimmune diseases and non-malignant hematologic disorders such as sickle cell disease. PMID:20066512

  20. What Unrelated Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia Taught us about Transplant Immunogenetics

    PubMed Central

    La Nasa, Giorgio; Vacca, Adriana; Littera, Roberto; Piras, Eugenia; Orru, Sandro; Greco, Marianna; Carcassi, Carlo; Caocci, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Although the past few decades have shown an improvement in the survival and complication-free survival rates in patients with beta-thalassemia major and gene therapy is already at an advanced stage of experimentation, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) continues to be the only effective and realistic approach to the cure of this chronic non-malignant disease. Historically, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings have been the preferred source of donor cells owing to superior outcomes compared with HSCT from other sources. Nowadays, the availability of an international network of voluntary stem cell donor registries and cord blood banks has significantly increased the odds of finding a suitable HLA matched donor. Stringent immunogenetic criteria for donor selection have made it possible to achieve overall survival (OS) and thalassemia-free survival (TFS) rates comparable to those of sibling transplants. However, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains the most important complication in unrelated HSCT in thalassemia, leading to significant rates of morbidity and mortality for a chronic non-malignant disease. A careful immunogenetic assessment of donors and recipients makes it possible to individualize appropriate strategies for its prevention and management. This review provides an overview of recent insights about immunogenetic factors involved in GVHD, which seem to have a potential role in the outcome of transplantation for thalassemia. PMID:27872728

  1. Quantitative evaluation of the transplanted lin(-) hematopoietic cell migration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kašėta, Vytautas; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Liubavičiūtė, Aušra; Maciulevičienė, Rūta; Stirkė, Arūnas; Biziulevičienė, Genė

    2016-02-01

    Stem cells take part in organogenesis, cell maturation and injury repair. The migration is necessary for each of these functions to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of transplanted hematopoietic lin(-) cell population (which consists mainly of the stem and progenitor cells) in BALB/c mouse contact hypersensitivity model and quantify the migration to the site of inflammation in the affected foot and other healthy organs. Quantitative analysis was carried out with the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lung, liver, damaged and healthy foot tissue samples at different time points were collected for analysis. The quantitative data normalization was performed according to the comparative quantification method. The analysis of foot samples shows the significant migration of transplanted cells to the recipient mice affected foot. The quantity was more than 1000 times higher, as compared with that of the untreated foot. Due to the inflammation, the number of donor origin cells migrating to the lungs, liver, spleen and bone marrow was found to be decreased. Our data shows that transplanted cells selectively migrated into the inflammation areas of the foot edema. Also, the inflammation caused a secondary migration in ectopic spleen of hematopoietic stem cell niches and re-homing from the spleen to the bone marrow took place.

  2. Heterogeneity within T Cell Memory: Implications for Transplant Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Krummey, Scott M.; Ford, Mandy L.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in both mouse and man results in the generation of immunological memory. Memory T cells are both friend and foe to transplant recipients, as they are intimately involved and in many cases absolutely required for the maintenance of protective immunity in the face immunosuppression, yet from the evidence presented herein they clearly constitute a formidable barrier for the successful implementation of tolerance induction strategies in transplantation. This review describes the experimental evidence demonstrating the increased resistance of memory T cells to many distinct tolerance induction strategies, and outlines recent advances in our knowledge of the ways in which alloreactive memory T cells arise in previously untransplanted individuals. Understanding the impact of alloreactive memory T cell specificity, frequency, and quality might allow for better donor selection in order to minimize the donor-reactive memory T cell barrier in an individual transplant recipient, thus allowing stratification of relative risk of alloreactive memory T cell mediated rejection, and conversely increase the likelihood of successful establishment of tolerance. However, further research into the molecular and cellular pathways involved in alloreactive memory T cell-mediated rejection is required in order to design new strategies to overcome the memory T cell barrier, without critically impairing protective immunity. PMID:22566919

  3. Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Lepski, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    Cell transplantation, as a therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury (SCI), has been extensively studied by researchers in recent years. A number of different kinds of stem cells, neural progenitors, and glial cells have been tested in basic research, and most have been excluded from clinical studies because of a variety of reasons, including safety and efficacy. The signaling pathways, protein interactions, cellular behavior, and the differentiated fates of experimental cells have been studied in vitro in detail. Furthermore, the survival, proliferation, differentiation, and effects on promoting functional recovery of transplanted cells have also been examined in different animal SCI models. However, despite significant progress, a “bench to bedside” gap still exists. In this paper, we comprehensively cover publications in the field from the last years. The most commonly utilized cell lineages were covered in this paper and specific areas covered include survival of grafted cells, axonal regeneration and remyelination, sensory and motor functional recovery, and electrophysiological improvements. Finally we also review the literature on the in vivo tracking techniques for transplanted cells. PMID:23484157

  4. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wahlstrom, Justin T.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective approach for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, SCID is not a homogeneous disease, and the treatment required for successful transplantation varies significantly between SCID subtypes and the degree of HLA mismatch between the best available donor and the patient. Recent studies are beginning to more clearly define this heterogeneity and how outcomes may vary. With a more detailed understanding of SCID, new approaches can be developed to maximize immune reconstitution, while minimizing acute and long-term toxicities associated with chemotherapy conditioning. PMID:25821657

  5. Giardiasis in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Ajumobi, A B; Daniels, J A; Sostre, C F; Trevino, H H

    2014-12-01

    Giardiasis can mimic diarrhea secondary to mucosal injury from the conditioning therapy prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), as well as from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Herein, we describe the endoscopic diagnosis of giardiasis in a patient 2 months after HSCT for myelodysplastic syndrome. The patient was referred to gastroenterology service for suspected GVHD, but duodenal biopsy results showed Giardia lamblia. He was successfully treated with metronidazole with prompt resolution of all of his gastrointestinal symptoms. This case highlights the need to consider giardiasis in the differential diagnosis of diarrhea in the peri-transplant period.

  6. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Aggressive NK Cell Leukemia. A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamadani, Mehdi; Kanate, Abraham S; DiGilio, Alyssa; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Smith, Sonali M; Lee, Jong Wook; Ayala, Ernesto; Chao, Nelson; Hari, Parameswaran; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Gress, Ronald; Smedegaard Anderson, Niels; Chen, Yi-Bin; Farooq, Umar; Schiller, Gary; Yared, Jean; Sureda, Anna; Fenske, Timothy S; Olteanu, Horatiu

    2017-02-01

    Aggressive NK cell leukemia (ANKL) is an exceedingly rare form of leukemia and carries a poor prognosis, with a median survival of only 2 months. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database, we evaluated outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) in patients with ANKL. Twenty-one patients with a centrally confirmed diagnosis of ANKL were included. Median patient age was 42 years and 15 patients (71%) were Caucasian. Fourteen patients (67%) were in complete remission (CR) at the time of alloHCT, and 5 patients had active disease. Median follow-up of survivors was 25 months (range, 12 to 116). The 2-year estimates of nonrelapse mortality, relapse/progression, progression-free (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were 21%, 59%, 20%, and 24%, respectively. The 2-year PFS of patients in CR at the time of alloHCT was significantly better than that of patients with active disease at transplantation (30% versus 0%; P = .001). The 2-year OS in similar order was 38% versus 0% (P < .001). In conclusion, this registry analysis that included majority non-Asian patient population shows that alloHCT can provide durable disease control in a subset of ANKL patients. Achieving CR before transplantation appears to be a prerequisite for successful transplantation outcomes.

  7. Ex vivo T-cell depletion in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Saad, A; Lamb, L S

    2017-03-20

    The most common cause of post-transplant mortality in patients with hematological malignancy is relapse, followed by GvHD, infections, organ toxicity and second malignancy. Immune-mediated complications such as GvHD continue to be challenging, yet amenable to control through manipulation of the T-cell compartment of the donor graft with subsequent immunomodulation after transplant. However, risk of both relapse and infection increase concomitantly with T-cell depletion (TCD) strategies that impair immune recovery. In this review, we discuss the clinical outcome of current and emerging strategies of TCD in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant that have developed during the modern transplantation era, focusing specifically on ex vivo strategies that target selected T-cell subsets.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 20 March 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.22.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of a Preemptive Antiviral Therapy Strategy Based on Combined Virological and Immunological Monitoring for Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, David; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; López, Javier; Vázquez, Lourdes; Serrano, David; Nieto, José; Rovira, Monserrat; Piñana, José Luis; Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preemptive antiviral therapy for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT) results in overtreatment and a high rate of recurrences. Monitoring of CMV-specific T-cell immunity may help to individualize treatments and minimize these problems. Methods. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, matched comparison-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel strategy that consisted of interrupting anti-CMV therapy upon CMV DNAemia clearance and concurrent detection of phosphoprotein 65/immediate-early-1-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells at levels of >1 cell/µL (within 30 days after the initiation of therapy). Immunological monitoring was performed on days +7, +14, +21, and +28 after treatment initiation. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of recurrent DNAemia within 2 months after treatment cessation. Secondary endpoints were the length of antiviral treatment courses and the incidence of hematological toxicity. Results. Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study group. Fifty-six patients were included in the matched-control group. Eleven patients (18%) fulfilled the criteria for antiviral treatment interruption. The cumulative incidence of recurrent CMV DNAemia was significantly lower (P = .02) in these patients than in patients in the comparative groups. Likewise, the length of antiviral treatment courses was significantly shorter in these patients than that in patients in the matched-control group (P = .003). No significant differences in the incidence of hematological toxicity was observed between the comparative groups. Conclusions. Our data support the clinical utility of combining immunological and virological monitoring for the management of CMV infection in a subset of Allo-SCT recipients. PMID:27419179

  9. Current Status of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for MDS

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers potentially curative therapy for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, as most patients with MDS are in the 7th or 8th decade of life, only few of these were transplanted in the past, using high-dose conditioning regimens. The development of reduced-intensity conditioning has allowed to offer HCT also to older patients and those with clinically relevant comorbid conditions. Dependent upon disease status and the type of clonal chromosomal abnormalities present at the time of HCT, some 25%–75% of patients will be cured of their disease and survive long-term. Recent results with HLA matched unrelated donors are comparable to those with HLA genotypically identical siblings. The increasing use of cord blood and HLA haploidentical donors is expected to make HCT available to a growing number of patients. However, post-transplant relapse and graft-versus-host disease remain problems requiring further investigation. PMID:22571701

  10. Consolidative therapy with stem cell transplantation improves survival of patients with mantle cell lymphoma after any induction regimen.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Nishitha; Greer, John P; Goodman, Stacey; Kassim, Adetola; Morgan, David S; Chinratanalab, Wichai; Brandt, Stephen; Englehardt, Brian; Oluwole, Olalekan; Jagasia, Madan H; Savani, Bipin N

    2012-05-01

    Intensive induction regimen followed by high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) is frequently used to improve outcomes in patients with mantle-cell lymphoma. The comparative impact of conventional vs intensive induction regimen before transplantation is unknown. Forty-eight patients with mantle-cell lymphoma receiving SCT at our institution between January 2000 and December 2010 were included in this study. At the time of initial presentation, 43 (89.5%) had stage IV disease and 18 (37.5%) received more than one chemotherapy regimen before transplantation. Forty patients underwent auto-SCT and 7 had allogeneic SCT (allo-SCT); 1 patient had an allo-SCT for relapsed disease after auto-SCT. At the time of this analysis (median follow-up of 6 years from diagnosis and 4 years from transplantation), 40 patients (88%) were alive with a 5-year disease-free survival of 74.8%. Age, disease stage, number of regimens pre-SCT, pre-SCT disease status, and type of SCT had no impact on long-term outcomes. Importantly, there were no differences among the types of induction regimen on outcomes in this cohort receiving SCT. Based on our data, we believe that future studies should focus on strategies to prevent disease relapse rather than comparing induction regimens before stem cell transplantation.

  11. Regulatory immune cells and functions in autoimmunity and transplantation immunology.

    PubMed

    Papp, Gabor; Boros, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2017-03-07

    In physiological circumstances, various tolerogenic mechanisms support the protection of self-structures during immune responses. However, quantitative and/or qualitative changes in regulatory immune cells and mediators can evoke auto-reactive immune responses, and upon susceptible genetic background, along with the presence of other concomitant etiological factors, autoimmune disease may develop. In transplant immunology, tolerogenic mechanisms are also critical, since the balance between of alloantigen-reactive effector cells and the regulatory immune cells will ultimately determine whether a graft is accepted or rejected. Better understanding of the immunological tolerance and the potential modulations of immune regulatory processes are crucial for developing effective therapies in autoimmune diseases as well as in organ transplantation. In this review, we focus on the novel insights regarding the impaired immune regulation and other relevant factors contributing to the development of auto-reactive and graft-reactive immune responses in autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection, respectively. We also address some promising approaches for modification of immune-regulatory processes and tolerogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity and solid organ transplantation, which may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  12. [Prenatal stem cell transplantation: from bench to bedside].

    PubMed

    Surbek, D V; Holzgreve, W

    2002-11-01

    Prenatal stem cell transplantation is a novel, promising therapeutic option for genetic disorders, which is now at the edge of moving from preclinical research into clinical application. The first clinical experience shows that inborn diseases, which lead to a severe immunodeficiency, can be treated successfully inutero. No therapeutic success has been achieved in genetic disorders which do not severely affect the immune system. Therefore, new strategies to improve the success are being developed, including e.g., graft modification, prenatal conditioning of the fetus, postnatal re-transplantation after prenatal induction of immune tolerance, and fetal gene therapy using autologous fetal stem cells. The use of non-hematopoietic (e.g. mesenchymal) or pluripotent stem cells will most probably lead to an expansion of the spectrum of indications in genetic diseases for this novel treatment. At the same time, however, ethical implications, in particular regarding fetal gene therapy and the use of pluripotent stem cells must be evaluated.

  13. Accelerating immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pharmacologic agents are effective against some pathogens, but they are costly and can be associated with significant toxicities. Thus, many groups have investigated adoptive T-cell transfer as a means of hastening immune reconstitution and preventing and treating viral infections. This review discusses the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been explored. PMID:25505959

  14. Exercise and stress management training prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation: Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) 0902.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Paul B; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Jim, Heather; Syrjala, Karen; Wingard, John R; Logan, Brent; Wu, Juan; Majhail, Navneet S; Wood, William; Rizzo, J Douglas; Geller, Nancy L; Kitko, Carrie; Faber, Edward; Abidi, Muneer H; Slater, Susan; Horowitz, Mary M; Lee, Stephanie J

    2014-10-01

    Studies show that engaging patients in exercise and/or stress management techniques during hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) improves quality of life. The Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network tested the efficacy of training patients to engage in self-directed exercise and stress management during HCT. The study randomized 711 patients at 21 centers to receive 1 of 4 training interventions before HCT: a self-directed exercise program, a self-administered stress management program, both, or neither. Participants completed self-reported assessments at enrollment and up to 180 days after HCT. Randomization was stratified by center and transplant type. There were no differences in the primary endpoints of the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary scales of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 at day +100 among the groups, based on an intention-to-treat analysis. There also were no differences in overall survival, days of hospitalization through day +100 post-HCT, or in other patient-reported outcomes, including treatment-related distress, sleep quality, pain, and nausea. Patients randomized to training in stress management reported more use of those techniques, but patients randomized to training in exercise did not report more physical activity. Although other studies have reported efficacy of more intensive interventions, brief training in an easy-to-disseminate format for either self-directed exercise or stress management was not effective in our trial.

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for auto immune rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Subramanian; Jain, Sandeep; Ravindran, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have their origins in the embryo and during the process of organogenesis, these differentiate into specialized cells which mature to form tissues. In addition, stem cell are characterized by an ability to indefinitely self renew. Stem cells are broadly classified into embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Adult stem cells can be genetically reprogrammed to form pluripotent stem cells and exist in an embroyonic like state. In the early phase of embryogenesis, human embryonic stem cells only exist transiently. Adult stem cells are omnipresent in the body and function to regenerate during the process of apoptosis or tissue repair. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are adult stem cells that form blood and immune cells. Autoimmune responses are sustained due to the perennial persistence of tissue self autoantigens and/or auto reactive lymphocytes. Immune reset is a process leading to generation of fresh self-tolerant lymphocytes after chemotherapy induced elimination of self or autoreactive lymphocytes. This forms the basis for autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT). In the beginning HSCT had been limited to refractory autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRD) due to concern about transplant related mortality and morbidity. However HSCT for AIRD has come a long way with better understanding of patient selection, conditioning regime and supportive care. In this narrative review we have examined the available literature regarding the HSCT use in AIRD. PMID:27011918

  16. Development of interspecies testicular germ-cell transplantation in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarini, Tiziana; Sarasquete, Carmen; Cabrita, Elsa

    2014-06-01

    Interspecific testicular germ cell (TGC) transplantation was investigated in two commercial flatfish species. Testes from donor species (Senegalese sole) were evaluated using classical histological techniques (haematoxylin-eosin staining and haematoxylin-light green-orange G-acid fuchsine staining), in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical analysis. Both Ssvasa1-2 mRNAs and SsVasa protein allowed the characterisation of TGCs, confirming the usefulness of the vasa gene in the detection of Senegalese sole TGCs. Xenogenic transplants were carried out using TGCs from one-year-old Senegalese sole into turbot larvae. Propidium iodide-SYBR-14 and 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining showed that 87.98% of the extracted testicular cells were viable for microinjection and that 15.63% of the total recovered cells were spermatogonia. The vasa gene was characterised in turbot recipients using cDNA cloning. Smvasa mRNA was confirmed as a germ cell-specific molecular marker in this species. Smvasa expression analysis during turbot ontogeny was carried out before Senegalese sole TGC transplants into turbot larvae. Turbot larvae at 18 days after hatching (DAH) proved to be susceptible to manipulation procedures. High survival rates (83.75±15.90-100%) were obtained for turbot larvae at 27, 34 and 42 DAH. These data highlight the huge potential of this species for transplantation studies. Quantitative PCR was employed to detect Senegalese sole vasa mRNAs (Ssvasa1-2) in the recipient turbot larvae. The Ssvasa mRNAs showed a significant increase in relative expression in 42-DAH microinjected larvae three weeks after treatment, showing the proliferation of Senegalese sole spermatogonia in transplanted turbot larvae.

  17. Myocardial regeneration by embryonic stem cell transplantation: present and future trends.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wangde; Kloner, Robert A

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells are a promising source for myocardial regeneration due to their pluripotency and plasticity. In theory, embryonic stem cells are capable of self-renewal in an unlimited fashion, and can differentiate into any cell type required for cell-based therapy, including cardiac myocytes. In recent years, embryonic stem cells have been transplanted for cardiac regeneration in animal models, and the results are encouraging. However, there are still many hurdles to be overcome for the clinical application of embryonic stem cells.

  18. Economic 3D-printing approach for transplantation of human stem cell-derived β-like cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiwon; Millman, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    Transplantation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) differentiated into insulin-producing β cells is a regenerative medicine approach being investigated for diabetes cell replacement therapy. This report presents a multifaceted transplantation strategy that combines differentiation into stem cell-derived β (SC-β) cells with 3D printing. By modulating the parameters of a low-cost 3D printer, we created a macroporous device composed of polylactic acid (PLA) that houses SC-β cell clusters within a degradable fibrin gel. Using finite element modeling of cellular oxygen diffusion-consumption and an in vitro culture system that allows for culture of devices at physiological oxygen levels, we identified cluster sizes that avoid severe hypoxia within 3D-printed devices and developed a microwell-based technique for resizing clusters within this range. Upon transplantation into mice, SC-β cell-embedded 3D-printed devices function for 12 weeks, are retrievable, and maintain structural integrity. Here, we demonstrate a novel 3D-printing approach that advances the use of differentiated hPSC for regenerative medicine applications and serves as a platform for future transplantation strategies.

  19. NKT cells, Treg, and their interactions in bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Pillai, Asha B.; Lowsky, Robert; Strober, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Tumor eradication is promoted by the anti-tumor activity of donor T cells contained in the transplant; however, donor T cells also mediate the serious side effect of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Separation of GVHD from graft anti-tumor activity is an important goal of research in improving transplant outcome. One approach is to take advantage of the immunomodulatory activity of regulatory NKT cells and CD4+ CD25+ Treg of host and/or donor origin. Both host and donor NKT cells and donor Treg are able to prevent GVHD in murine models. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of NKT cell- and Treg-mediated protection against GVHD in mice while maintaining graft anti-tumor activity. In addition, we also examine the interactions between NKT cells and Treg in the context of BMT, and integrate the data from murine experimental models with the observations made in humans. PMID:20583031

  20. Transplantation models to characterize the mechanisms of stem cell-induced islet regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Nasri, Grace N; Hess, David A

    2013-09-20

    This unit describes our current knowledge regarding the isolation human bone marrow-derived progenitor cells for the paracrine stimulation of islet regeneration after transplantation into immunodeficient mouse models of diabetes. By using high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH(hi) ) activity, a conserved function in multiple stem cell lineages, a mixed population of hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal progenitor cells can be efficiently purified using flow cytometry. We describe in vitro approaches to characterize and expand these distinct cell types. Importantly, these cell types can be transplanted into immunodeficient mice rendered beta-cell deficient by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, in order monitor functional recovery from hyperglycemia and to characterize endogenous islet regeneration via paracrine mechanisms. Herein, we provide detailed protocols for: (1) isolation and characterization of ALDH(hi) cells for the establishment of hematopoietic and multipotent-stromal progenitor lineages; (2) intravenous and intrapancreatic transplantation of human stem cell subtypes for the quantification of glycemic recovery in STZ-treated immunodeficient mice; and (3) immunohistochemical characterization of islet recovery via the stimulation of islet neogenic, beta-cell proliferative, and islet revascularization programs. Collectively, these systems can be used to support the pre-clinical development of human progenitor cell-based therapies to treat diabetes via islet regeneration.

  1. Normal and Malignant Muscle Cell Transplantation into Immune Compromised Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John C.; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish have become a powerful tool for assessing development, regeneration, and cancer. More recently, allograft cell transplantation protocols have been developed that permit engraftment of normal and malignant cells into irradiated, syngeneic, and immune compromised adult zebrafish. These models when coupled with optimized cell transplantation protocols allow for the rapid assessment of stem cell function, regeneration following injury, and cancer. Here, we present a method for cell transplantation of zebrafish adult skeletal muscle and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a pediatric sarcoma that shares features with embryonic muscle, into immune compromised adult rag2E450fs homozygous mutant zebrafish. Importantly, these animals lack T cells and have reduced B cell function, facilitating engraftment of a wide range of tissues from unrelated donor animals. Our optimized protocols show that fluorescently labeled muscle cell preparations from α-actin-RFP transgenic zebrafish engraft robustly when implanted into the dorsal musculature of rag2 homozygous mutant fish. We also demonstrate engraftment of fluorescent-transgenic ERMS where fluorescence is confined to cells based on differentiation status. Specifically, ERMS were created in AB-strain myf5-GFP; mylpfa-mCherry double transgenic animals and tumors injected into the peritoneum of adult immune compromised fish. The utility of these protocols extends to engraftment of a wide range of normal and malignant donor cells that can be implanted into dorsal musculature or peritoneum of adult zebrafish. PMID:25591079

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C; Osborne, Andrew; Martin, Keith R

    2015-10-01

    A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long-term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft-induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM-MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis-mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft-induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM-MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM-MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell-induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation-based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve.

  3. Hematopoietic cell transplantation activity of Turkey in 2014: Ongoing increase in HCT rates.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Emre; Şencan, İrfan; Kapuağası, Arif; Ünal, Doğan; Öztürk, Murat; Gümüş, Eyüp; Göker, Hakan; Tavil, Emine Betül; Ertem, Mehmet; Çetin, Mustafa; Arat, Mutlu; Soysal, Teoman; Karakaşlı, Osman; Sur, Halil Yılmaz; Yeşilipek, Akif; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan; Uçkan, Duygu; İlhan, Osman; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is an established treatment option with curative potential for a variety of clinical conditions. The last decade especially witnessed a remarkable increase in HCT activity in Turkey. In 2014, 696 pediatric and 2631 adult (total 3327) HCT were performed in Turkey. Corresponding transplant rates per 10 million inhabitants for autologous-HCT and allogeneic-HCT were 226 and 202, respectively. Total HCT procedures in Turkey increased 177% in the last 5 years and 791% in the last 14 years. This report focuses mainly on HCT activity of Turkey in 2014 based on the national HCT registry and presents a general picture of national HCT activity.

  4. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with miss-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  5. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Strong, D Michael; Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with mis-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  6. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage.

    PubMed

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section.

  7. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    first utilized oriP/EBNA1 ( Epstein - Barr nuclear antigen-1)-based reprogramming vectors that utilize episomal expression of the 6 pluripotency factors...phenotype observed in during transplantation. Non-integrating methods, such as plasmid-based and Sendai single-stranded RNA viruses , avoid random...reprogramming factors is required in Yucatan minipig cells. Recently, Sendai virus (SeV)-based reprogramming technology has been reported as an

  8. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  9. Treating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease with transplantation of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pantcheva, Paolina; Reyes, Stephanny; Hoover, Jaclyn; Kaelber, Sussannah; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Parkinson’s disease (PD) treatment-based research has focused on developing therapies for the management of motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms do not respond to treatments targeting motor deficits, thus necessitating an urgent need to develop new modalities that cater to both motor and non-motor deficits. Stem cell transplantation is potentially therapeutic for PD, but the disease non-motor symptoms have been primarily neglected in such cell therapy regimens. Many types of stem cells are currently available for transplantation therapy, including adult tissue (e.g., bone marrow, placenta)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The fact that MSCs can replace and rescue degenerated dopaminergic, and non-dopaminergic cells suggest their potential for the treatment of motor, as well as non-motor symptoms of PD, which is we discuss here. PMID:26394528

  10. Lack of evidence for recipient precursor cells replenishing β-cells in transplanted islets.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Inada, Akari; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow and tissue precursor cells have been postulated to replenish grafts of transplanted islets. Several investigators have reported that bone marrow cells can promote the regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we investigated the potential of recipient-derived precursor cells to form new pancreatic endocrine cells in islet grafts transplanted under the kidney capsule. Mouse insulin promoter (MIP)-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice, which express GFP only in β-cells, or β-actin GFP mice, which express GFP ubiquitously, were used to determine if the recipient-derived cells differentiate into β-cells or other types of endocrine cells. We transplanted MIP-GFP islets into wild-type mice, wild-type islets into MIP-GFP mice, β-actin GFP islets into wild-type mice, and wild-type islets into β-actin GFP mice. β-Actin GFP bone marrow cells were then injected into wild-type mice to evaluate the potential role of bone marrow stem cells to provide new islet cells to the graft. No β-cells with green fluorescence were seen in the graft when wild-type islets were transplanted into MIP-GFP mice. When wild-type islets were transplanted into β-actin GFP mice, no β-cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts. Similarly, no endocrine cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts after injection of β-actin GFP bone marrow cells into wild-type islet-transplanted wild-type mice. This study provides further support for the concept that recipient precursor cells do not produce new β-cells in grafts of transplanted islets.

  11. Therapeutic Efficacy of Stem Cells Transplantation in Diabetes: Role of Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Marco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio A.; Vanella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The growing data obtained from in vivo studies and clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of adult stem cells transplantation in diabetes; although an important limit is represented by their survival after the transplant. To this regard, recent reports suggest that genetic manipulation of stem cells prior to transplantation can lead to enhanced survival and better engraftment. The following review proposes to stimulate interest in the role of heme oxygenase-1 over-expression on transplantation of stem cells in diabetes, focusing on the clinical potential of heme oxygenase protein and activity to restore tissue damage and/or to improve the immunomodulatory properties of transplanted stem cells. PMID:27547752

  12. Competitive Transplants to Evaluate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Fitness.

    PubMed

    Kwarteng, Edward O; Heinonen, Krista M

    2016-08-31

    The gold standard definition of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a cell that when transferred into an irradiated recipient will have the ability to reestablish blood cell production for the lifespan of the recipient. This protocol explains how to set up a functional assay to compare the HSC capacities of two different populations of cells, such as bone marrow from mice of two different genotypes, and how to analyze the recipient mice by flow cytometry. The protocol uses HSC equivalents rather than cell sorting for standardization and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches. We further discuss different variations to the basic protocol, including serial transplants, limiting dilution assays, homing assays and non-competitive transplants, including the advantages and preferred uses of these varied approaches. These assays are central for the study of HSC function and could be used not only for the investigation of fundamental HSC intrinsic aspects of biology but also for the development of preclinical assays for bone marrow transplant and HSC expansion in culture.

  13. Induction of pluripotent stem cells transplantation therapy for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Lv, Lei; Ji, Haifeng; Yang, Xuelian; Zhu, Wei; Cai, Liying; Gu, Xiaju; Chai, Changfeng; Huang, Shu; Sun, Jian; Dong, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    Stroke can cause permanent neurological damage, complications, and even death. However, there is no treatment exists to restore its lost function. Human embryonic stems transplantation therapy was a novel and potential therapeutic approach for stroke. However, as we have seen, the ethical controversy pertains to embryonic stem cell research. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are the latest generation of stem cells that may be a solution to the controversy of using embryonic cells. In our study, we generated iPSCs from adult human fibroblasts by introduction of four defined transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and Lin-28). And then, we investigated the efficacy of iPSCs transplantation therapy for stroke on the animal models of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Surprisingly, we found that transplanted iPSCs migrated to injured brain areas, and differentiated into neuron-like cells successfully. After 4-16 days iPSCs grafting, sensorimotor function of rats has been improved significantly. In one word, we may prove that iPSCs therapy in stroke to be an effective form of treatment.

  14. Effects of amniotic epithelial cell transplantation in endothelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Vácz, Gabriella; Cselenyák, Attila; Cserép, Zsuzsanna; Benkő, Rita; Kovács, Endre; Pankotai, Eszter; Lindenmair, Andrea; Wolbank, Susanne; Schwarz, Charlotte M.; Horváthy, Dénes B.; Kiss, Levente; Hornyák, István; Lacza, Zsombor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) are promising tools for endothelial repair in vascular regenerative medicine. We hypothesized that these epithelial cells are capable of repairing the damaged endothelial layer following balloon injury of the carotid artery in adult male rats. Results Two days after injury, the transplanted hAECs were observed at the luminal side of the arterial wall. Then, 4 weeks after the injury, significant intimal thickening was observed in both untreated and cell implanted vessels. Constriction was decreased in both implanted and control animals. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a few surviving cells in the intact arterial wall, but no cells were observed at the site of injury. Interestingly, acetylcholine-induced dilation was preserved in the intact side and the sham-transplanted injured arteries, but it was a trend toward decreased vasodilation in the hAECs’ transplanted vessels. Conclusion We conclude that hAECs were able to incorporate into the arterial wall without immunosuppression, but failed to improve vascular function, highlighting that morphological implantation does not necessarily result in functional benefits and underscoring the need to understand other mechanisms of endothelial regeneration. PMID:28180006

  15. Pros and cons of stem cell transplantation for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E D

    1997-05-01

    The data and discussion at this symposium have provided a most useful analysis of the autoimmune diseases and their potential for therapy by stem cell transplantation. These diseases are characterized by threat to life and particularly by chronic, painful and debilitating courses that warrant aggressive therapy. Selection of patients will be difficult because of the variable disease course and the necessity to choose patients who still have reversible disease. The safety of both autologous and allogeneic stem cell grafting has progressed to the point where, in many cases, the risks of the disease far outweigh those of transplantation. In my opinion the data presented at this symposium show that we should proceed cautiously with both autologous and allogeneic stem cell grafts. Purified stem cells, which have the advantage of being free of lymphocytes, should be used for the first series of autologous studies. These studies are attractive because of the low risk of transplant related complications but are less likely to be curative. Allogeneic grafts from perfectly matched donors have the advantage of providing a completely new immunological environment. For this reason, I believe that curative results are most probable after allogeneic stem cell engraftment. Emphasis should be on the identification of patients with HLA matched siblings. Initially, these studies will be carried out in patients with advanced disease, as was the case in the early days of transplantation for leukemia. In considering more aggressive treatment for autoimmune diseases it appears there are 3 possible approaches. First, and most conservative, is to store peripheral blood stem cells for possible future marrow rescue and then to give higher doses of immunosuppressive agents, especially in combination, to see whether there is an improvement over conventional doses. Second, for those who prefer a conservative approach to stem cell transplantation, is to give myeloablative and lymphoablative

  16. Haploidentical Related Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for DOCK8 Deficiency Using Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirali N; Freeman, Alexandra F; Su, Helen; Cole, Kristen; Parta, Mark; Moutsopoulos, Niki M; Baris, Safa; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif; Hughes, Thomas E; Kong, Heidi H; Holland, Steve M; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2017-03-10

    Dedicator-of-Cytokinesis-8 (DOCK8) deficiency, a primary immunodeficiency disease, can be reversed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); however, there are few reports describing the use of alternative donor sources for HSCT in DOCK8 deficiency. We describe HSCT for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor using bone marrow from haploidentical related donors and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) for GVHD prophylaxis. Seven patients with DOCK8 deficiency (median age 20 years, range 7-25 years) received a haploidentical related donor HSCT. The conditioning regimen included 2 days of low-dose cyclophosphamide, 5 days of fludarabine, three days of busulfan, and 200 cGy TBI. Graft-versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) 50 mg/kg/day on days +3 and +4, and tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil starting at day +5. The median times to neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 15 and 19 days, respectively. All patients attained >90% donor engraftment by day +30. Four subjects developed acute GVHD (one with maximum grade 3). No patient developed chronic GVHD. With a median follow-up time of 20.6 months (range 9.5 - 31.7 months), 6 of 7 patients are alive and disease-free. Haploidentical related donor HSCT with PT/CY represents an effective therapeutic approach for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor.

  17. Stem cell transplantation in genetically linked regulatory T-cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Shalini

    2008-01-01

    T-regulatory disorders are a heterogenous group characterized by autoimmune and allergic manifestations of varying onset, severity, and progression. The advent of sophisticated molecular and immunologic diagnostic techniques has resulted in accurate elucidation of etiopathogenesis of many immunoregulatory disorders previously clubbed under the autoimmune umbrella. The severity of presentation and progression, early morbidity and mortality, poor quality of life, and frequent refractoriness to immunosuppressive therapy has prompted studies of stem cell transplantation in many immunoregulatory disorders. The benefits of autologous or allogeneic transplantation are related to either suppression and reprogramming of the immune system (autologous transplant) or replacement of missing elements of immune regulation (allogeneic transplants). Transplant methods have steadily improved through a series of studies and trials to have the benefits of this approach outweigh the risks of procedure-related toxicities. This article summarizes the current status and the future goals of stem cell transplantation for T-cell immunoregulatory disorders and reviews advances in disease detection, targeted transplant strategies and novel approaches, and the pros and cons of transplant in this field.

  18. National Institutes of Health Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Late Effects Initiative: Consensus Recommendations for Research Methodology and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Bronwen E.; Hahn, Theresa; Martin, Paul J.; Mitchell, Sandy; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Armstrong, Greg T.; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Storer, Barry; Bhatia, Smita

    2016-01-01

    The increasing numbers of hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) performed each year, the changing demographics of HCT recipients, the introduction of new transplantation strategies, incremental improvement in survival, and the growing population of HCT survivors demand a comprehensive approach to examining the health and well-being of patients throughout life after HCT. This report summarizes strategies for the conduct of research on late effects after transplantation, including consideration of the study design and analytic approaches; methodologic challenges in handling complex phenotype data; an appreciation of the changing trends in the practice of transplantation; and the availability of biospecimens to support laboratory-based research. It is hoped that these concepts will promote continued research and facilitate the development of new approaches to address fundamental questions in transplantation outcomes. PMID:27590102

  19. Use of Sertoli cell transplants to provide local immunoprotection for tissue grafts.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, Craig; Emerich, Dwaine F; Gores, Paul

    2004-06-01

    The recent success of allogeneic islet transplantation for the treatment of type I diabetes has renewed interest in cell therapy for diseases of secretory cell dysfunction. Unfortunately, widespread clinical use of cell transplantation is limited by tissue availability and the need for long-term immunosuppresion. Testicular Sertoli cells can confer local immunoprotection for co-transplanted cells and may provide a means of overcoming the obstacles associated with cell transplantation. Sertoli cell grafts protect islets in animal models of diabetes and can be transplanted into the brain to enhance regeneration and promote the survival of co-grafted tissues. This review describes the role that Sertoli cells normally play in testicular immunology, details the preclinical data using transplanted Sertoli cells in models of diabetes and Parkinson's disease and discusses some of the possible mechanisms involved in this phenomena, as well as the future of this technology.

  20. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola; Gilbert, Ethel S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M; Sobocinski, Kathleen A; Horowitz, Mary M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Kingma, Douglas W; Travis, Lois B; Flowers, Mary E; Martin, Paul J; Deeg, H Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E

    2009-05-14

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial.

  1. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT. PMID:27022317

  2. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  3. Hypomethylating agents after allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rautenberg, Christina; Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with myeloid malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure. So far, therapeutic options for patients with AML or MDS who relapse after allo-SCT generally consisted of palliative care, low-dose or intensive chemotherapy as well as cellular therapies such as donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) and second transplantation in selected cases. Nevertheless, the prognosis of patients with myeloid malignancies relapsing after allo-SCT remains dismal therefore asking for novel treatment strategies. Considering their well-balanced profile of good efficacy and moderate toxicity in the non-transplant setting, the hypomethylating agents (HMA) azacitidine (Aza) and decitabine (DAC) have also been tested either alone or in combination with DLI in the post-transplant period. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the use of these two HMA as pre-emptive, salvage or consolidation therapy mostly retrieved from retrospective studies but also from a few prospective trials. Within this review, we also comment on some practical issues such as optimal dose and schedule, the choice of HMA candidates and the role of additional cellular interventions. Finally, we also give an overview on the assumed mode of actions, ongoing research, clinical studies and potential combination partners aiming to improve this treatment approach. PMID:28066786

  4. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells improves type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Lisha; Li, Furong; Gao, Feng; Yang, Yali; Liu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Pingping; Li, Yulin

    2016-05-01

    Bone-marrow-derived stem cells can regenerate pancreatic tissue in a model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) form the main part of bone marrow. We show that the intrapancreatic transplantation of MSCs elevates serum insulin and C-peptide, while decreasing blood glucose. MSCs engrafted into the damaged rat pancreas become distributed into the blood vessels, acini, ducts, and islets. Renascent islets, islet-like clusters, and a small number of MSCs expressing insulin protein have been observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. Intrapancreatic transplantation of MSCs triggers a series of molecular and cellular events, including differentiation towards the pancreas directly and the provision of a niche to start endogenous pancreatic regeneration, which ameliorates hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia caused by streptozotocin. These data establish the many roles of MSCs in the restoration of the function of an injured organ.

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  6. Reprint of: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  7. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ogonek, Justyna; Kralj Juric, Mateja; Ghimire, Sakhila; Varanasi, Pavankumar Reddy; Holler, Ernst; Greinix, Hildegard; Weissinger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The timely reconstitution and regain of function of a donor-derived immune system is of utmost importance for the recovery and long-term survival of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of note, new developments such as umbilical cord blood or haploidentical grafts were associated with prolonged immunodeficiency due to delayed immune reconstitution, raising the need for better understanding and enhancing the process of immune reconstitution and finding strategies to further optimize these transplant procedures. Immune reconstitution post-HSCT occurs in several phases, innate immunity being the first to regain function. The slow T cell reconstitution is regarded as primarily responsible for deleterious infections with latent viruses or fungi, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and relapse. Here we aim to summarize the major steps of the adaptive immune reconstitution and will discuss the importance of immune balance in patients after HSCT. PMID:27909435

  8. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of refractory scleromyxedema.

    PubMed

    Shayegi, Nona; Alakel, Nael; Middeke, Jan Moritz; Schetelig, J; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Scleromyxedema is a rare disorder of connective tissue with unknown etiology. Its manifestation includes a generalized mucin deposition, which is frequently associated with paraproteinemia. The course of scleromyxedema is progressive and often lethal. As a result of its poorly understood pathogenesis, there is no causative treatment option. The efficacy of cytoreductive agents and autologous stem cell transplantation has been reported, but so far allografting as a treatment option has not yet been documented. Herein, we report on a patient with severe neurologic involvement and refractory course attaining durable remission after receiving an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant from an human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling. This case not only illustrates a potential new treatment option for selected patients, but also provides insights into the pathogenesis of this rare disease.

  9. Fecal microbiota transplantation for fulminant Clostridium difficile infection in an allogeneic stem cell transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Neemann, K; Eichele, D D; Smith, P W; Bociek, R; Akhtari, M; Freifeld, A

    2012-12-01

    We present a case of severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in a non-neutropenic allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient who was treated successfully with fecal microbiota therapy after standard pharmacologic therapy had failed. Following naso-jejunal instillation of donor stool, the patient's symptoms resolved within 48 h. Bowel resection was averted. This is the first case in the literature, to our knowledge, to describe fecal microbiota therapy in a profoundly immunocompromised host with severe CDI. We propose that fecal microbiota therapy be considered as a therapeutic option in immunosuppressed patients with refractory severe CDI.

  10. Analyzing In Vivo Cell Migration using Cell Transplantations and Time-lapse Imaging in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Giger, Florence A; Dumortier, Julien G; David, Nicolas B

    2016-04-29

    Cell migration is key to many physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis. The cellular and molecular bases of cell migration have been thoroughly analyzed in vitro. However, in vivo cell migration somehow differs from in vitro migration, and has proven more difficult to analyze, being less accessible to direct observation and manipulation. This protocol uses the migration of the prospective prechordal plate in the early zebrafish embryo as a model system to study the function of candidate genes in cell migration. Prechordal plate progenitors form a group of cells which, during gastrulation, undergoes a directed migration from the embryonic organizer to the animal pole of the embryo. The proposed protocol uses cell transplantation to create mosaic embryos. This offers the combined advantages of labeling isolated cells, which is key to good imaging, and of limiting gain/loss of function effects to the observed cells, hence ensuring cell-autonomous effects. We describe here how we assessed the function of the TORC2 component Sin1 in cell migration, but the protocol can be used to analyze the function of any candidate gene in controlling cell migration in vivo.

  11. Hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. A reduced-intensity conditioning regimen has the potential to further reduce regimen-related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications, such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage, are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimens may enable the safe use of an alternative source of stem cells, such as unrelated matched donors, and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment.

  12. Transplanting Retinal Cells using Bucky Paper for Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J.; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, Meyya; Fishman, Harvey; Leng, Ted; Huie, Philip; Bilbao, Kalayaan

    2004-01-01

    A novel treatment for retinal degenerative disorders involving transplantation of cells into the eye is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University School of Medicine. The technique uses bucky paper as a support material for retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells, and/or stem cells. This technology is envisioned as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in persons over age 65 in Western nations. Additionally, patients with other retinal degenerative disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, may be treated by this strategy. Bucky paper is a mesh of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as shown in Figure 1, that can be made from any of the commercial sources of CNTs. Bucky paper is biocompatible and capable of supporting the growth of biological cells. Because bucky paper is highly porous, nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and waste can readily diffuse through it. The thickness, density, and porosity of bucky paper can be tailored in manufacturing. For transplantation of cells into the retina, bucky paper serves simultaneously as a substrate for cell growth and as a barrier for new blood vessel formation, which can be a problem in the exudative type of macular degeneration. Bucky paper is easily handled during surgical implantation into the eye. Through appropriate choice of manufacturing processes, bucky paper can be made relatively rigid yet able to conform to the retina when the bucky paper is implanted. Bucky paper offers a distinct advantage over other materials that have been investigated for retinal cell transplantation - lens capsule and Descemet's membrane - which are difficult to handle during surgery because they are flimsy and do not stay flat.

  13. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in transplantation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochando, Jordi C; Chen, Shu Hsia

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are myeloid cells that suppress the immune response, a definition that reflects both their origin and their function. As negative regulators of the immune response, MDSC represent a novel therapeutic approach for manipulating the immune system toward tolerance or immunity. MDSC are present in cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice and are in part responsible for the inhibition of the cell-mediated immune response against the tumor. Our laboratories investigate the immunologic mechanisms of tumor acceptance mediated by MDSC, which can be exploited to prevent allograft rejection in transplantation. A better understanding of MDSC biology will open new avenues for therapeutic intervention, either by inhibiting their function (i.e. in cancer patients), or by enhancing their suppressive effects and promoting their expansion (i.e. in organ transplantation and alloimmune responses). In this review, we summarize some of the critical aspects of the immunoregulatory function of MDSC in cancer and transplantation and discuss their potential clinical applications.

  14. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  15. Indications and Results of Human Leukocyte Antigen-identical Sibling Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Mark C.; De Castro, Laura M.; Sullivan, Keith M.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Kamani, Naynesh; Bredeson, Christopher; Neuberg, Donna; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Farnia, Stephanie; Campbell, Andrew; Petersdorf, Effie

    2016-01-01

    Although there are a number of published trials of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) – identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for sickle cell disease (SCD) that span 2 decades, when and for whom this therapy should be pursued is a subject of debate. Assessments of the risks of transplant-related complications that include infertility and debilitating graft-versus-host disease and long-term quality of life after successful HCT are difficult to perform without prospective trials in transplant and non-transplant cohorts. However, it is possible to assess the risk of mortality and to compare published rates of survival in individuals with sickle cell disease treated and not treated by HCT. In this brief review, projections about mortality risk based upon recent published reports are reviewed and summarized. The published data show overall survival and event-survival rates of 95% and 92%, respectively, in children treated by HLA-identical sibling HCT. The overall survival in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) (N=412) and European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) (N=487) registries was 91% and 95%, respectively. These results provide broad support for the therapeutic value of HLA-identical sibling HCT for children with sickle cell disease and serve as the basis for a strong recommendation in favor of the option of HCT when a suitable donor is available. The experience of HLA-identical sibling HCT in adults with SCD is limited but appears similar to results in children, and these preliminary observations warrant further investigation. PMID:26500093

  16. Subretinal transplantation of MACS purified photoreceptor precursor cells into the adult mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Dominic; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Grahl, Sandra; Ader, Marius

    2014-02-22

    Vision impairment and blindness due to the loss of the light-sensing cells of the retina, i.e. photoreceptors, represents the main reason for disability in industrialized countries. Replacement of degenerated photoreceptors by cell transplantation represents a possible treatment option in future clinical applications. Indeed, recent preclinical studies demonstrated that immature photoreceptors, isolated from the neonatal mouse retina at postnatal day 4, have the potential to integrate into the adult mouse retina following subretinal transplantation. Donor cells generated a mature photoreceptor morphology including inner and outer segments, a round cell body located at the outer nuclear layer, and synaptic terminals in close proximity to endogenous bipolar cells. Indeed, recent reports demonstrated that donor photoreceptors functionally integrate into the neural circuitry of host mice. For a future clinical application of such cell replacement approach, purified suspensions of the cells of choice have to be generated and placed at the correct position for proper integration into the eye. For the enrichment of photoreceptor precursors, sorting should be based on specific cell surface antigens to avoid genetic reporter modification of donor cells. Here we show magnetic-associated cell sorting (MACS) - enrichment of transplantable rod photoreceptor precursors isolated from the neonatal retina of photoreceptor-specific reporter mice based on the cell surface marker CD73. Incubation with anti-CD73 antibodies followed by micro-bead conjugated secondary antibodies allowed the enrichment of rod photoreceptor precursors by MACS to approximately 90%. In comparison to flow cytometry, MACS has the advantage that it can be easier applied to GMP standards and that high amounts of cells can be sorted in relative short time periods. Injection of enriched cell suspensions into the subretinal space of adult wild-type mice resulted in a 3-fold higher integration rate compared to

  17. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J.; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Wright, Megan C.; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  18. Preclinical Studies of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Astrocyte Transplantation in ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Pluripotent Stem Cell -Derived Astrocyte Transplantation in ALS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas J. Maragakis, M.D...Pluripotent Stem Cell -Derived Astrocyte Transplantation in ALS 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0520 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...into astrocytes following transplantation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stem Cells , iPS cells , astrocytes, familial ALS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  19. Renal transplant recipient with advanced HIV infection: graft and peripheral cell population analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, Ian C; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Gómez-Martín, Diana; Lima, Guadalupe; Martin-Onraët, Alexandra; Sierra, Juan; Uribe-Uribe, Norma O; Vilatobá, Mario; Contreras, Alan G; Gabilondo, Bernardo; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Alberú, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The scenario of a renal transplant recipient who is diagnosed with HIV infection in the late post transplant period is very uncommon. The viral infection effect on immunologic stability, regulatory cells, and allogeneic response during immune quiescence and graft acceptance provides a fertile ground in organ transplantation research and translational immunology. PMID:25356218

  20. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  1. Donor exosomes rather than passenger leukocytes initiate alloreactive T cell responses after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Jose; Babiker-Mohamed, Mohamed H.; Crosby-Bertorini, Patrick; Paster, Joshua T.; LeGuern, Christian; Germana, Sharon; Abdi, Reza; Uehara, Mayuko; Kim, James I.; Markmann, James F.; Tocco, Georges; Benichou, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of allogeneic organs and tissues represents a lifesaving procedure for a variety of patients affected with end-stage diseases. Although current immunosuppressive therapy prevents early acute rejection, it is associated with nephrotoxicity and increased risks for infection and neoplasia. This stresses the need for selective immune-based therapies relying on manipulation of lymphocyte recognition of donor antigens. The passenger leukocyte theory states that allograft rejection is initiated by recipient T cells recognizing donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules displayed on graft leukocytes migrating to the host’s lymphoid organs. We revisited this concept in mice transplanted with allogeneic skin, heart, or islet grafts using imaging flow cytometry. We observed no donor cells in the lymph nodes and spleen of skin-grafted mice, but we found high numbers of recipient cells displaying allogeneic MHC molecules (cross-dressed) acquired from donor microvesicles (exosomes). After heart or islet transplantation, we observed few donor leukocytes (100 per million) but large numbers of recipient cells cross-dressed with donor MHC (>90,000 per million). Last, we showed that purified allogeneic exosomes induced proinflammatory alloimmune responses by T cells in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that recipient antigen-presenting cells cross-dressed with donor MHC rather than passenger leukocytes trigger T cell responses after allotransplantation. PMID:27942611

  2. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplantation – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Salvino, Marco Aurélio; Ruiz, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous support of hematopoietic progenitor cells is an effective strategy to treat various hematologic neoplasms, such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells are the main source of support for autologous transplants, and collection of an adequate number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is a critical step in the autologous transplant procedure. Traditional strategies, based on the use of growth factors with or without chemotherapy, have limitations even when remobilizations are performed. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is the most widely used agent for progenitor cell mobilization. The association of plerixafor, a C-X-C Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) inhibitor, to granulocyte colony stimulating factor generates rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A literature review was performed of randomized studies comparing different mobilization schemes in the treatment of multiple myeloma and lymphomas to analyze their limitations and effectiveness in hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplant. This analysis showed that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte colony stimulating factor is well tolerated and results in a greater proportion of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or multiple myeloma reaching optimal CD34+ cell collections with a smaller number of apheresis compared the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor alone. PMID:26969772

  3. Correction of metachromatic leukodystrophy in the mouse model by transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Alessandra; De Palma, Michele; Quattrini, Angelo; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Amadio, Stefano; Visigalli, Ilaria; Sessa, Maria; Fasano, Stefania; Brambilla, Riccardo; Marchesini, Sergio; Bordignon, Claudio; Naldini, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    Gene-based delivery can establish a sustained supply of therapeutic proteins within the nervous system. For diseases characterized by extensive CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement, widespread distribution of the exogenous gene may be required, a challenge to in vivo gene transfer strategies. Here, using lentiviral vectors (LVs), we efficiently transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) ex vivo and evaluated the potential of their progeny to target therapeutic genes to the CNS and PNS of transplanted mice and correct a neurodegenerative disorder, metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD). We proved extensive repopulation of CNS microglia and PNS endoneurial macrophages by transgene-expressing cells. Intriguingly, recruitment of these HSC-derived cells was faster and more robust in MLD mice. By transplanting HSCs transduced with the arylsulfatase A gene, we fully reconstituted enzyme activity in the hematopoietic system of MLD mice and prevented the development of motor conduction impairment, learning and coordination deficits, and neuropathological abnormalities typical of the disease. Remarkably, ex vivo gene therapy had a significantly higher therapeutic impact than WT HSC transplantation, indicating a critical role for enzyme overexpression in the HSC progeny. These results indicate that transplantation of LV-transduced autologous HSCs represents a potentially efficacious therapeutic strategy for MLD and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:15085191

  4. Genome-wide transcription profile of endothelial cells after cardiac transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mikalsen, B; Fosby, B; Wang, J; Hammarström, C; Bjaerke, H; Lundström, M; Kasprzycka, M; Scott, H; Line, P-D; Haraldsen, G

    2010-07-01

    Transcriptome analyses of organ transplants have until now usually focused on whole tissue samples containing activation profiles from different cell populations. Here, we enriched endothelial cells from rat cardiac allografts and isografts, establishing their activation profile at baseline and on days 2, 3 and 4 after transplantation. Modulated transcripts were assigned to three categories based on their regulation profile in allografts and isografts. Categories A and B contained the majority of transcripts and showed similar regulation in both graft types, appearing to represent responses to surgical trauma. By contrast, category C contained transcripts that were partly allograft-specific and to a large extent associated with interferon-gamma-responsiveness. Several transcripts were verified by immunohistochemical analysis of graft lesions, among them the matricellular protein periostin, which was one of the most highly upregulated transcripts but has not been associated with transplantation previously. In conclusion, the majority of the differentially expressed genes in graft endothelial cells are affected by the transplantation procedure whereas relatively few are associated with allograft rejection.

  5. Alefacept and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic-granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Fanconi Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia

  6. Accelerated Bone Mass Senescence After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Serio, B; Pezzullo, L; Fontana, R; Annunziata, S; Rosamilio, R; Sessa, M; Giudice, V; Ferrara, I; Rocco, M; De Rosa, G; Ricci, P; Tauchmanovà, L; Montuori, N; Selleri, C.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis and avascular necrosis (AVN) are long-lasting and debilitating complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the magnitude of bone loss, AVN and impairment in osteogenic cell compartment following autologous (auto) and allogeneic (allo) HSCT, through the retrospective bone damage revaluation of 100 (50 auto- and 50 allo-HSCT) long-term survivors up to 15 years after transplant. Current treatment options for the management of these complications are also outlined. We found that auto- and allo-HSCT recipients show accelerated bone mineral loss and micro-architectural deterioration during the first years after transplant. Bone mass density (BMD) at the lumbar spine, but not at the femur neck, may improve in some patients after HSCT, suggesting more prolonged bone damage in cortical bone. Phalangeal BMD values remained low for even more years, suggesting persistent bone micro-architectural alterations after transplant. The incidence of AVN was higher in allo-HSCT recipients compared to auto-HSCT recipients. Steroid treatment length, but not its cumulative dose was associated with a higher incidence of bone loss. Allo-HSCT recipients affected by chronic graft versus host disease seem to be at greater risk of continuous bone loss and AVN development. Reduced BMD and higher incidence of AVN was partly related to a reduced regenerating capacity of the normal marrow osteogenic cell compartment. Our results suggest that all patients after auto-HSCT and allo-HSCT should be evaluated for their bone status and treated with anti-resorptive therapy as soon as abnormalities are detected. PMID:23905076

  7. Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Increase p16(INK4a) Expression, a Biomarker of T-cell Aging.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Krishnamurthy, Janakiraman; Mitin, Natalia; Torrice, Chad; Parker, Joel S; Snavely, Anna C; Shea, Thomas C; Serody, Jonathan S; Sharpless, Norman E

    2016-09-01

    The expression of markers of cellular senescence increases exponentially in multiple tissues with aging. Age-related physiological changes may contribute to adverse outcomes in cancer survivors. To investigate the impact of high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation on senescence markers in vivo, we collected blood and clinical data from a cohort of 63 patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. The expression of p16(INK4a), a well-established senescence marker, was determined in T-cells before and 6months after transplant. RNA sequencing was performed on paired samples from 8 patients pre- and post-cancer therapy. In patients undergoing allogeneic transplant, higher pre-transplant p16(INK4a) expression was associated with a greater number of prior cycles of chemotherapy received (p=0.003), prior autologous transplantation (p=0.01) and prior exposure to alkylating agents (p=0.01). Transplantation was associated with a marked increase in p16(INK4a) expression 6months following transplantation. Patients receiving autologous transplant experienced a larger increase in p16(INK4a) expression (3.1-fold increase, p=0.002) than allogeneic transplant recipients (1.9-fold increase, p=0.0004). RNA sequencing of T-cells pre- and post- autologous transplant or cytotoxic chemotherapy demonstrated increased expression of transcripts associated with cellular senescence and physiological aging. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially alkylating agents, and stem cell transplantation strongly accelerate expression of a biomarker of molecular aging in T-cells.

  8. Immune tolerance of mice allogenic tooth transplantation induced by immature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenying; Deng, Feng; Wang, Yu; Ma, Ce; Wang, Yurong

    2015-01-01

    As a common procedure in dentistry for replacing a missing tooth, allogenic tooth transplantation has encountered many difficulties in the clinical application because of immunological rejection. It is hypothesized that immature dendritic cell injection might be a potential alternative method to avoid or alleviate immunological rejection in allogenic tooth transplantation. To test this hypothesis, a mouse model of allogenic and autogeneic tooth transplantation was to established test the immunosuppressive effect of immature dendritic cells (imDCs) derived from donor bone marrows on transplant rejection in allogenic tooth transplantation. 2 × 106 imDCs generated with 50 U/ml GM-CSF were injected to each recipient mouse by two ways: tail vein injection 7 days before transplantation or regional dermal injection at day 0 and day 3 after transplantation. Groups of autogeneic tooth transplantation and allogenic tooth transplantation without any treatment were set as control groups. The effects were evaluated with histopathology and immunohistochemistry. We found there was no obvious rejection in autogeneic tooth transplantation group; tail intravenous injection group showed obviously alleviated rejection while local injection group and none-treatment allogenic tooth transplantation group both showed severe rejection. Our results suggested that the rejection of allogenic tooth transplantation could be alleviated by tail vein injection of donor bone marrow-derived imDCs though it could not be completely eliminated. The clinical application of imDCs in allogenic tooth transplantation still needs further deep research. PMID:26131099

  9. Great promise of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells in transplantation and cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great promise in replacing non-functioning or lost cells and regenerating diseased and damaged tissues. The presence of a small subpopulation of adult stem/progenitor cells in most tissues and organs provides the possibility of stimulating their in vivo differentiation, or of using their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell-replacement and gene therapies with multiple applications in humans without a high-risk of graft rejection and major side effects. Among the diseases that could be treated by adult stem cell-based therapies are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus as well as skin, eye, liver, lung, tooth and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, a combination of the current cancer treatments with an adjuvant treatment consisting of an autologous or allogeneic adult stem/progenitor cell transplantation also represents a promising strategy for treating and even curing diverse aggressive, metastatic, recurrent and lethal cancers. In this chapter, we reviewed the most recent advancements on the characterization of phenotypic and functional properties of adult stem/progenitor cell types found in bone marrow, heart, brain and other tissues and discussed their therapeutic implications in the stem cell-based transplantation therapy.

  10. Transplantation of multipotent Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells preserves infarcted heart function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunpeng; Tian, Shuo; Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Ma, Peter; Wang, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy to restore heart function after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the cell type selection and ensuing effects remain controversial. Here, we intramyocardially injected Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from EGFP/luciferase double-tagged mouse embryonic stem (dt-mES) cells with vehicle (fibrin gel) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the infarcted area in nude mice to assess the contribution of CPCs to the recovery of cardiac function post-MI. Our results showed that Isl1+ CPCs differentiated normally into three cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells) both on cell culture plates and in fibrin gel. Cell retention was significantly increased when the transplanted cells were injected with vehicle. Importantly, 28 days after injection, CPCs were observed to differentiate into CMs within the infarcted area. Moreover, numerous CD31+ endothelial cells derived from endogenous revascularization and differentiation of the injected CPCs were detected. SMMHC-, Ki67- and CX-43-positive cells were identified in the injected CPC population, further demonstrating the proliferation, differentiation and integration of the transplanted CPCs in host cells. Furthermore, animal hearts injected with CPCs showed increased angiogenesis, decreased infarct size, and improved heart function. In conclusion, our studies showed that Isl1+ CPCs, when combined with a suitable vehicle, can produce notable therapeutic effects in the infarcted heart, suggesting that CPCs might be an ideal cell source for cardiac therapy. PMID:28386378

  11. Transplantation of multipotent Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells preserves infarcted heart function in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunpeng; Tian, Shuo; Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Ma, Peter; Wang, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy to restore heart function after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the cell type selection and ensuing effects remain controversial. Here, we intramyocardially injected Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from EGFP/luciferase double-tagged mouse embryonic stem (dt-mES) cells with vehicle (fibrin gel) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the infarcted area in nude mice to assess the contribution of CPCs to the recovery of cardiac function post-MI. Our results showed that Isl1+ CPCs differentiated normally into three cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells) both on cell culture plates and in fibrin gel. Cell retention was significantly increased when the transplanted cells were injected with vehicle. Importantly, 28 days after injection, CPCs were observed to differentiate into CMs within the infarcted area. Moreover, numerous CD31+ endothelial cells derived from endogenous revascularization and differentiation of the injected CPCs were detected. SMMHC-, Ki67- and CX-43-positive cells were identified in the injected CPC population, further demonstrating the proliferation, differentiation and integration of the transplanted CPCs in host cells. Furthermore, animal hearts injected with CPCs showed increased angiogenesis, decreased infarct size, and improved heart function. In conclusion, our studies showed that Isl1+ CPCs, when combined with a suitable vehicle, can produce notable therapeutic effects in the infarcted heart, suggesting that CPCs might be an ideal cell source for cardiac therapy.

  12. Dopamine release from transplanted neural stem cells in Parkinsonian rat striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xinjiang; Xu, Huadong; Teng, Sasa; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Deng, Zijun; Zhou, Li; Zuo, Panli; Liu, Bing; Liu, Bin; Wu, Qihui; Wang, Li; Hu, Meiqin; Dou, Haiqiang; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Feipeng; Li, Qing; Guo, Shu; Gu, Jingli; Lei, Qian; Lü, Jing; Mu, Yu; Jin, Mu; Wang, Shirong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Kun; Wang, Changhe; Li, Wenlin; Zhang, Kang; Zhou, Zhuan

    2014-11-04

    Embryonic stem cell-based therapies exhibit great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) because they can significantly rescue PD-like behaviors. However, whether the transplanted cells themselves release dopamine in vivo remains elusive. We and others have recently induced human embryonic stem cells into primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) that are self-renewable for massive/transplantable production and can efficiently differentiate into dopamine-like neurons (pNSC-DAn) in culture. Here, we showed that after the striatal transplantation of pNSC-DAn, (i) pNSC-DAn retained tyrosine hydroxylase expression and reduced PD-like asymmetric rotation; (ii) depolarization-evoked dopamine release and reuptake were significantly rescued in the striatum both in vitro (brain slices) and in vivo, as determined jointly by microdialysis-based HPLC and electrochemical carbon fiber electrodes; and (iii) the rescued dopamine was released directly from the grafted pNSC-DAn (and not from injured original cells). Thus, pNSC-DAn grafts release and reuptake dopamine in the striatum in vivo and alleviate PD symptoms in rats, providing proof-of-concept for human clinical translation.

  13. Imparting regenerative capacity to limbs by progenitor cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gufa; Chen, Ying; Slack, Jonathan M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The frog Xenopus can normally regenerate its limbs at early developmental stages but loses the ability during metamorphosis. This behavior provides a potential gain-of-function model for measures that can enhance limb regeneration. Here we show that frog limbs can be caused to form multidigit regenerates after receiving transplants of larval limb progenitor cells. It is necessary to activate Wnt/β -catenin signaling in the cells, and to add Sonic hedgehog, FGF10 and thymosin β4. These factors promote survival and growth of the grafted cells and also provide pattern information. The eventual regenerates are not composed solely of donor tissue; the host cells also make a substantial contribution despite their lack of regeneration-competence. Cells from adult frog legs or from regenerating tadpole tails do not promote limb regeneration, demonstrating the necessity for limb progenitor cells. These findings have obvious implications for the development of a technology to promote limb regeneration in mammals. PMID:23273877

  14. Alternative donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Alfraih, Feras; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a curative therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies, mainly severe sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia (TM). However, the applicability of HSCT has been limited mainly by donor availability, with a less than 25%-30% of eligible patients having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donors. Previous outcomes using alternate donor options have been markedly inferior due to increased regimen-related toxicity, transplant-related mortality, graft failure, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Advances in transplant technology, including high-resolution HLA typing, improved GVHD prophylactic approaches with tolerance induction, and better supportive care over the last decade, are addressing these historical challenges, resulting in increasing donor options. Herein, we review alternate donor HSCT approaches for severe SCD and TM using unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, or related haploidentical donors. Though this is an emerging field, early results are promising and in selected patients, this may be the preferred option to mitigate against the age-related morbidity and early mortality associated with these disorders.

  15. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease.

  16. Secondary Malignant Neoplasms Following Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Bomken, Simon; Skinner, Roderick

    2015-01-01

    Improving survival rates in children with malignancy have been achieved at the cost of a high frequency of late adverse effects of treatment, especially in intensively treated patients such as those undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many of whom suffer the high burden of chronic toxicity. Secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are one of the most devastating late effects, cause much morbidity and are the most frequent cause of late (yet still premature) treatment-related mortality. They occur in up to 7% of HSCT recipients by 20 years post-HSCT, and with no evidence yet of a plateau in incidence with longer follow-up. This review describes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and risk factors of the three main categories of post-HSCT SMNs. A wide range of solid SMNs has been described, usually occurring 10 years or more post-HSCT, related most often to previous or conditioning radiotherapy. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplasia occurs earlier, typically three to seven years post-HSCT, mainly in recipients of autologous transplant and is related to previous alkylating agent or topoisomerase II inhibitor chemotherapy. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders occur early (usually within two years) post-HSCT, usually presenting as Epstein-Barr virus-related B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27417356

  17. Folate antagonist, methotrexate induces neuronal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells transplanted into nude mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akira; Taguchi, Ayako; Aoki, Hitomi; Hatano, Yuichiro; Niwa, Masayuki; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2010-06-25

    Transplanted embryonic stem (ES) cells can be integrated into the retinas of adult mice as well-differentiated neuroretinal cells. However, the transplanted ES cells also have a tumorigenic activity as they have the ability for multipotent differentiation to various types of tissues. In the present study, human ES (hES) cells were transplanted into adult nude mouse retinas by intravitreal injections 20 h after intravitreal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) administration. After the transplantation of hES cells, the folate antagonist, methotrexate (MTX) was administrated in order to control the differentiation of the transplanted hES cells. Neuronal differentiation and teratogenic potential of hES cells were examined immunohistochemically 5 weeks after transplantation. The proliferative activity of transplanted cells was determined by both the mitotic index and the Ki-67 proliferative index. Disappearance of Oct-4-positive hES cells showing undifferentiated morphology was observed after intraperitoneal MTX treatment daily, for 15 days. Decreased mitotic and Ki-67 proliferative indices, and increased neuronal differentiation were detected in the surviving hES cells after the MTX treatment. These results suggest two important effects of intraperitoneal MTX treatment for hES cells transplanted into nude mouse retina: (1) MTX treatment following transplantation induces neuronal differentiation, and (2) MTX decreases proliferative activity and tumorigenic potential.

  18. Post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantion immune-mediated cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Panagiotis D; Resnick, Igor B; Or, Reuven; Elad, Sharon; Zilberman, Irina; Yoffe, Luba; Levovic, Alexander; Miron, Svetlana; Gesundheit, Benjamin; Slavin, Shimon; Shapira, Michael-Yechiel

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated cytopenias after allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be categorized as either alloimmune when host or donor immunity reacts against donor or host elements, respectively, or autoimmune when donor immunity reacts against donor hematopoietic tissue, owing to poorly understood mechanisms that result in severe impairment of central and peripheral tolerance. Immune cytopenias are manifested as monolineage or more rarely as bilineage cytopenias, and are usually mediated through humoral immune mechanisms. On the contrary, immune-mediated pancytopenia is a rare event with only few cases reported in the literature. The exact pathogenesis of immune pancytopenia is not well known although it is possible that cellular immunity may play a significant role. The importance of these syndromes lies in the fact that they can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Differential diagnosis from other causes of post-transplant pancytopenia is of extreme value because these disorders can respond to various treatment modalities.

  19. Antifungal prophylaxis following reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kami, M; Murashige, N; Tanaka, Y; Narimatsu, H

    2006-12-01

    Reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) has been developed to be a novel curative option for advanced hematologic diseases. Its minimal toxicity allows for transplantation in patients with advanced age or with organ dysfunction. Young patients without comorbidity can undergo RIST as outpatients. However, fungal infection remains an important complication in RIST. Given the poor prognosis of fungal infection, prophylaxis is critical in its management. The prophylactic strategy is recently changing with the development of RIST. Hospital equipment is important for fungal prophylaxis; however, the median day for the development of fungal infection is day 100, when most RIST patients are followed as outpatients. The focus of fungal management after RIST needs to shift from in-hospital equipment to oral antifungals. Various antifungals have recently been developed and introduced for clinical use. A major change in antifungal management will probably occur within several years.

  20. [Eight years using the "Mexican method" for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Gómez-Almaguer, David; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; del Carmen Tarin-Arzaga, Luz

    2007-01-01

    In the past eight years, in Mexico and in other developing countries, over 350 patients have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants using a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen developed in Mexico and based on international standards. The so called "Mexican method" to conduct allogeneic stem cell transplants is endowed with certain advantages which make it affordable and in turn, available to individuals living in resource-poor countries. The best results using this method have been observed among patients with stage 1 chronic myelogenous leukemia and aplastic anemia. The less favourable results have been observed among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia; mild to moderate results have been reported among patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. The "Mexican method" to conduct hematopoietic cells allografting has resulted not only in turning this method accessible to patients in developing countries, but also it has witnessed an increase in the academic activities of physicians from these countries involved in the field.

  1. Treating Parkinson’s disease in the 21st century: Can stem cell transplantation compete?

    PubMed Central

    Buttery, Philip C; Barker, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    The characteristic and selective degeneration of a unique population of cells—the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons—that occurs in Parkinson’s disease (PD) has made the condition an iconic target for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic cells into the DA-deficient striatum was first trialled nearly 30 years ago, at a time when other treatments for the disease were less well developed. Over recent decades standard treatments for PD have advanced, and newer biological therapies are now emerging. In the 21st century, stem cell technology will have to compete alongside other sophisticated treatments, including deep brain stimulation and gene therapies. In this review we examine how stem cell–based transplantation therapies compare with these novel and emerging treatments in the management of this common condition. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2802–2816, 2014. PMID:24610597

  2. Treatment of systemic sclerosis: potential role for stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wen; Derk, Chris T

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may “reset” the immune reconstitution and induce self tolerance of autoreactive lymphocytes, and has been explored in the treatments for systemic sclerosis. Phase I/II trials have shown a satisfactory risk benefit ratio. The true benefit will be identified by two ongoing prospective, randomized phase III trials. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and immunosuppressive properties. The use of MSCs has showed successful responses in patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft versus host disease in phase II trials, and may be a potentially promising option for patients with systemic sclerosis. PMID:24198505

  3. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  4. Reflections on HLA Epitope-Based Matching for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Duquesnoy, Rene J.

    2016-01-01

    HLA antibodies are primary causes of transplant rejection; they recognize epitopes that can be structurally defined by eplets. There are many reviews about HLA epitope-based matching in transplantation. This article describes some personal reflections about epitopes including a historical perspective of HLA typing at the antigen and allele levels, the repertoires of antibody-verified HLA epitopes, the use of HLAMatchmaker in determining the specificities of antibodies tested in different assays, and, finally, possible strategies to control HLA antibody responses. PMID:27965660

  5. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  6. Scripts for TRUMP data analyses. Part II (HLA-related data): statistical analyses specific for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The Transplant Registry Unified Management Program (TRUMP) made it possible for members of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (JSHCT) to analyze large sets of national registry data on autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, as the processes used to collect transplantation information are complex and differed over time, the background of these processes should be understood when using TRUMP data. Previously, information on the HLA locus of patients and donors had been collected using a questionnaire-based free-description method, resulting in some input errors. To correct minor but significant errors and provide accurate HLA matching data, the use of a Stata or EZR/R script offered by the JSHCT is strongly recommended when analyzing HLA data in the TRUMP dataset. The HLA mismatch direction, mismatch counting method, and different impacts of HLA mismatches by stem cell source are other important factors in the analysis of HLA data. Additionally, researchers should understand the statistical analyses specific for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, such as competing risk, landmark analysis, and time-dependent analysis, to correctly analyze transplant data. The data center of the JSHCT can be contacted if statistical assistance is required.

  7. [Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Guidelines from the Francophone society of marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Stéphanie; Chalandon, Yves; Lemarie, Claude; Simon, Sophie; Masson, Dominique; Dhedin, Nathalie; Suarez, Felipe; Renaud, Barbara; Charbonnier, Amandine; Yafour, Nabil; François, Sylvie; Duléry, Rémy; Blaise, Didier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Rubio, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-11-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is being increasingly used due to improvement of the transplantation procedures allowing a reduction of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) and of transplant-related mortality (TRM). Such improvements have been particularly observed after administration of T-replete HSCT graft associated to an in vivo T cell depletion by the administration of high-doses of cyclophosphamide (HD-Cy) after transplantation. Here, we have analyzed the results of haplo-identical T replete HSC transplants, in particular, when performed with post-transplant HD-Cy in order to provide recommendations for the clinical practice. Criteria of choice for a haploidentical donor by priority order are absence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and to prioritize: CMV seronegative recipient/donor couples, ABO matching in case of deserythrocytation, male donor for a male recipient, the youngest donor. There is no clear argument in favor of the use of bone marrow versus peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after non myeloablative conditioning regimen, while after ablative conditioning PBSC seem to be associated with higher risks of GVHD without obvious impact on survival. Results of haploidentical HSCT, confirmed by several groups, are interesting in lymphomas (in particular Hodgkin disease) and for acute leukemia. Outcomes of patients rely on age, disease status at transplant and conditioning intensity. At equivalent disease risk, results of haploidentical HSCT seem comparable to those of HLA matched HSCT, raising the question of the classification of such transplants as alternatives. In all cases, we recommend to include patients in prospective clinical trials.

  8. Treating congenital megacolon by transplanting GDNF and GFRα-1 double genetically modified rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C B; Peng, C H; Pang, W B; Zhang, D; Chen, Y J

    2015-08-14

    We studied the survival and gene expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and GDNF receptor α-1 (GFRα-1) double-genetically modified rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplanted into the intestinal walls of the rat models with congenital megacolon and determine the feasibility of treatment by transplantation of double-genetically modified rat BMSCs. The rat colorectal intestinal wall nerve plexus was treated with the cationic surface active agent benzalkonium chloride to establish an experimental megacolon model. The rat target genes GDNF and GFRα-1 were extracted and ligated into pEGFP-N1. Eukaryotic fluorescent expression vectors carrying the GDNF and GFRα-1 genes were transfected into BMSCs by in vitro culture. We treated congenital megacolon by transplanting double-genetically modified rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The pEGFP-EGFP-GDNF-GFRα-1 double-gene co-expressing the eukaryotic expression plasmid vector was successfully established. Protein gene protein 9.5 and vasoactive intestinal peptide-positive ganglion cells showed no positive expression in the phosphate-buffered saline transplantation group based on an immunofluorescence test at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after transplantation of BMSCs. Additionally, compared with the phosphate-buffered saline transplantation group, the expression of rearranged during transfection, GDNF, and GFRα-1 mRNA in the stem cell transplantation group increased gradually. The double-genetically modified BMSCs colonized and survived in the intestinal wall of the experimental megacolon rat model and expressed related genes, partially recovering the colonic neuromuscular regulatory functions and thus providing an experimental basis for treating congenital megacolon by cellular transplantation.

  9. Pyrintegrin Induces Soft Tissue Formation by Transplanted or Endogenous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bhranti S.; Chen, Mo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Embree, Mildred; Kong, Kimi; Lee, Chang H.; He, Ling; Xiang, Lusai; Ahn, Jeffrey A.; Ding, Sheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2017-01-01

    Focal adipose deficiency, such as lipoatrophy, lumpectomy or facial trauma, is a formidable challenge in reconstructive medicine, and yet scarcely investigated in experimental studies. Here, we report that Pyrintegrin (Ptn), a 2,4-disubstituted pyrimidine known to promote embryonic stem cells survival, is robustly adipogenic and induces postnatal adipose tissue formation in vivo of transplanted adipose stem/progenitor cells (ASCs) and recruited endogenous cells. In vitro, Ptn stimulated human adipose tissue derived ASCs to differentiate into lipid-laden adipocytes by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα), with differentiated cells increasingly secreting adiponectin, leptin, glycerol and total triglycerides. Ptn-primed human ASCs seeded in 3D-bioprinted biomaterial scaffolds yielded newly formed adipose tissue that expressed human PPARγ, when transplanted into the dorsum of athymic mice. Remarkably, Ptn-adsorbed 3D scaffolds implanted in the inguinal fat pad had enhanced adipose tissue formation, suggesting Ptn’s ability to induce in situ adipogenesis of endogenous cells. Ptn promoted adipogenesis by upregulating PPARγ and C/EBPα not only in adipogenesis induction medium, but also in chemically defined medium specifically for osteogenesis, and concurrently attenuated Runx2 and Osx via BMP-mediated SMAD1/5 phosphorylation. These findings suggest Ptn’s novel role as an adipogenesis inducer with a therapeutic potential in soft tissue reconstruction and augmentation. PMID:28128224

  10. MRI tracking stem cells transplantation for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Xia, Rui; Zhang, Bing; Gao, Fabao

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Stem cell transplantation has become a new treatment option for cardiovascular disease because the stem cells are able to migrate to damaged cardiac tissue, repair the myocardial infarction area and ultimately reduce the role of the infarct-related mortality. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new robust non-invasive imaging technique that can detect anatomical information and myocardial dysfunction, study the mechanism of stem cells therapy with superb spatial/temporal resolution, relatively safe contrast material and lack of radiation. This review describes the advantages and disadvantages of cardiac MRI applied in stem cells transplantation and discusses how to translate this technique into clinical therapy. Sources of Data/Study Selection: Data from cross-sectional and prospective studies published between the years 2001-2013 on the topic were included. Data searches included both human and animal studies. Data Extraction: The data was extracted from online resources of statistic reports, Pub med, THE MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Medical and Radiological journals. Conclusion: MRI is an appealing technique for cell trafficking depicting engraftment, differentiation and survival. PMID:25097541

  11. Role of Memory T Cells and Perspectives for Intervention in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kailin; Chen, Song; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are necessary for protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially under conditions of immunosuppression. However, their presence also threatens transplant survival, making transplantation a great challenge. Significant progress has been achieved in recent years in advancing our understanding of the role that memory T cells play in transplantation. This review focuses on the latest advances in our understanding of the involvement of memory T cells in graft rejection and transplant tolerance and discusses potential strategies for targeting memory T cells in order to minimize allograft rejection and optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:26441978

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C.; Osborne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    abstract A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long‐term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft‐induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM‐MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis‐mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin‐2 (Lcn‐2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft‐induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM‐MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM‐MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell‐induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation‐based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve. Stem Cells 2015;33:3006–3016 PMID:26175331

  13. NK Cells and Other Innate Lymphoid Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Paola; Montaldo, Elisa; Croxatto, Daniele; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Vitale, Chiara; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3) are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILCs provide host defenses against viruses, bacteria, and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodeling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defenses that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILCs may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodeling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILCs. Of note, CD34(+) cells isolated from different sources of HSC may differentiate in vitro toward various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g., IL-1β) may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT.

  14. Granulomatous amebic encephalitis following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Rozansky, Gregory; Nguyen, Ha Son; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Mueller, Wade; Johnson, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) is rare, but often fatal. The infection has been documented predominantly among the immunocompromised population or among those with chronic disease. To date, however, there have only been eight cases regarding the infection following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Case Description: A 62-year-old female with a history of relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, recently underwent peripheral blood autologous stem cell transplant after BEAM conditioning (day 0). On day +15, she began to exhibit worsening fatigue, generalized weakness, and fever. Symptoms progressed to nausea, emesis, somnolence, confusion, and frontal headaches over the next few days. Imaging demonstrated multifocal ill-defined vasogenic edema with patchy enhancement. The patient was started on broad antibiotics, antifungals, and seizure prophylaxis. Evaluation for bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial, and viral etiologies was fruitless. Her mental status progressively deteriorated. On day +22, she exhibited severe lethargy and went into pulseless electrical activity arrest, requiring chest compressions. The episode lasted <2 min and her pulse was restored. She was taken to the operating room for a brain biopsy. Postoperatively, her right pupil began to dilate compared to the left; she demonstrated extensor posturing in her upper extremities and withdrawal in her lower extremities. Repeat computed tomography demonstrated progressive edema. Given poor prognosis and poor neurological examination, the family opted for withdrawal of care. Final pathology was consistent with Acanthamoeba GAE. Conclusion: The authors report the third case of GAE after autologous stem cell transplant, and the ninth case overall after HSCT. This case is unusual due to its rapid clinical presentation after HSCT compared to prior literature. The case highlights the need for high suspicion of Acanthamoeba infection in this patient population. PMID:26539322

  15. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  16. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged.

  17. Determining Toxoplasma high-risk autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients by systematic pre-transplant PCR screening of stem cell originated buffy coat.

    PubMed

    Caner, Ayşe; Dönmez, Ayhan; Döşkaya, Mert; Değirmenci, Aysu; Tombuloğlu, Murat; Cağirgan, Seçkin; Guy, Edward; Francis, Janet; Soyer, Nur Akad; Gürüz, Yüksel

    2012-12-01

    The diagnosis of Toxoplasma infection or disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients is achieved mainly by PCR screening; however screening did not find wide field of use in practice due to costly expenditures of PCR. This study aimed to determine patients at high risk of Toxoplasma infection or disease before transplantation by stem cell originated buffy coat PCR and subsequently to screen them. Buffy coats collected from 12 autologous and 18 allogeneic HSCT patients' donors were investigated by PCR before transplantation. After transplantation, blood and sera collected at fixed time intervals were screened by two PCR methods and serological assays. Screening results first time assessed a toxoplasmosis incidence level as 25% in autologous HSCT patients and increased incidence level in allogeneic HSCT patients to 22%. Importantly, buffy coat PCR was first time performed before transplantation, to determine the risk of toxoplasmosis. Buffy coat PCR results showed that four patients were at high risk of toxoplasmosis before transplantation. After transplantation, these patients experienced toxoplasmosis. In conclusion, for the determination of patients at risk of toxoplasmosis, clinicians should consider buffy coat PCR in combination with serology before transplantation. After transplantation, PCR screening can be initiated in high risk patients upon clinical suspicion.

  18. Adjustment in Parents of Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lindwall, Jennifer J.; Russell, Kathy; Huang, Qinlei; Zhang, Hui; Vannatta, Kathryn; Barrera, Maru; Alderfer, Melissa; Phipps, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric stem cell transplant (SCT) is a demanding procedure for children and parents. Interventions to promote positive adjustment of parents in this setting are needed. Method 171 patient/parent dyads from 4 sites received one of 3 interventions to reduce SCT-related distress: a child intervention with massage and humor therapy, an identical child intervention plus a parent intervention with massage and relaxation/imagery, or standard care. Parents completed weekly self-report measures of distress and positive affect during the acute phase of treatment (weeks −1 through +6), and measures of depression, posttraumatic stress (PTSD), and benefit-finding at baseline and week +24. Results No significant differences across treatment arms were observed on repeated measures of parental distress. There was a marginally significant effect of the child intervention on parental positive affect. Over time, parental distress decreased significantly and positive affect increased significantly in all groups. Similarly, there were no significant intervention effects on the global adjustment outcomes of depression, PTSD, and benefit finding. However, reports of depression and PTSD decreased significantly and reports of benefit-finding increased significantly from baseline to week +24 for all groups. Conclusion Across all study arms, parent adjustment improved over time, suggesting that parents demonstrate a transient period of moderately elevated distress at the time of their child’s admission for transplant, followed by rapid improved to normative levels of adjustment. Similar to results previously reported for their children, these parents appear resilient to the challenges of transplant. PMID:24434783

  19. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed.

  20. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A.; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Luger, Selina M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Litzow, Mark R.; Marks, David I.; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F.; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A.; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Wood, William A.; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S.; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, N=240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MK+MDS, N=221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes compared to other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, N=3,360; MDS, N=1,373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1998 to 2011. MK+AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98, p<0.01), similar transplant related mortality (TRM, HR 1.01, p=0.9) and worse survival (HR 1.67, p<0.01) compared to other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (HR 2.39, p<0.01), higher TRM (HR 1.80, p<0.01) and worse survival (HR 2.02, p<0.01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (HR 1.72, p<0.01) and MDS (HR1.79, p<0.01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  1. Vaccination of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients: Perspective in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Antibody titers to vaccine-preventable diseases such as tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella decline within 1-10 years after allogeneic or autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) if the recipient is not vaccinated. Vaccine-preventable diseases such as pneumococcal diseases, Haemophilus influenzae type b infections, influenza, measles, and varicella can pose an increased risk for SCT recipients. Therefore, after SCT, the recipients should be routinely revaccinated. Vaccination recommendations have previously been developed and published by the European Group of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and the Centers for Disease Control, by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and by the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation in 2009. Different epidemiologies and strategies have existed in Korea. In 2012, the Korean Society of Infectious Diseases published "Vaccination for Adult" describing the guidelines for vaccination, one of the chapters assigned for vaccination of SCT recipients. The present article reviews the current available vaccination strategies for SCT recipients, their family members, and healthcare workers, with the focus on recent Korean perspectives. PMID:24396628

  2. Permanent diffuse alopecia after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bresters, D; Wanders, D C M; Louwerens, M; Ball, L M; Fiocco, M; van Doorn, R

    2017-03-20

    Permanent alopecia after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is distressing and few studies have investigated this late effect. The aim of the study was to assess the percentage of patients with alopecia and investigate risk factors for alopecia. Patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT before age 19 years, from January 1990 to January 2013, who were at least 2 years after transplant and in follow-up in our clinic were included. Alopecia was defined as clinically apparent decreased hair density. Possible risk factors considered for alopecia after HSCT included: gender, age, diagnosis, donor type, conditioning regimen: cranial irradiation (TBI/cranial radiotherapy) and/or chemotherapy, which chemotherapeutic agents were used and acute/chronic GvHD. The percentage of permanent alopecia in our cohort was 15.6% (41/263 patients). All patients had diffuse alopecia except for one with alopecia totalis. In multivariate analysis, a conditioning regimen with busulphan and busulphan plus fludarabine (odds ratio (OR) 5.7 (confidence interval (CI): 2.5-12.7) and OR 7.4 (CI: 3.3-16.2), respectively, was the main risk factor and associated with alopecia independent of acute/chronic GvHD. Neither TBI nor other alkylating chemotherapy, including treosulfan, was associated with alopecia. In conclusion, permanent alopecia after HSCT is associated with busulphan and GvHD and occurs in 16% of patients.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 20 March 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.15.

  3. Infused total nucleated cell dose is a better predictor of transplant outcomes than CD34+ cell number in reduced-intensity mobilized peripheral blood allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul S; Li, Shuli; Nikiforow, Sarah; Alyea, Edwin P; Antin, Joseph H; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey S; Ho, Vincent T; Kekre, Natasha; Koreth, John; Luckey, C John; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood is the most common graft source for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following reduced-intensity conditioning. In assessing the effect of donor cell dose and graft composition on major transplant outcomes in the reduced-intensity setting, prior studies focused primarily on CD34(+)cell dose and reported conflicting results, especially in relation to survival end-points. While the impact of total nucleated cell dose has been less frequently evaluated, available studies suggest higher total nucleated cell dose is associated with improved survival outcomes in the reduced-intensity setting. In order to further explore the relationship between CD34(+)cell dose and total nucleated cell dose on reduced-intensity transplant outcomes, we analyzed the effect of donor graft dose and composition on outcomes of 705 patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent reduced-intensity peripheral blood stem cell transplantation at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute from 2000 to 2010. By multivariable analysis we found that higher total nucleated cell dose (top quartile; ≥10.8 × 10(10)cells) was associated with improved overall survival [HR 0.69 (0.54-0.88),P=0.0028] and progression-free survival [HR 0.68 (0.54-0.85),P=0.0006]. Higher total nucleated cell dose was independently associated with decreased relapse [HR 0.66 (0.51-0.85),P=0.0012] and increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease [HR 1.4 (1.12-1.77),P=0.0032]. In contrast, higher doses of CD34(+)cells (top quartile; ≥10.9 × 10(6)/kg) had no significant effect on graft-versus-host disease or survival outcomes. These data suggest total nucleated cell dose is a more relevant prognostic variable for reduced-intensity transplant outcomes than the more commonly studied CD34(+)cell dose.

  4. Safety of Autologous Human Schwann Cell Transplantation in Subacute Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kim D; Guest, James D; Dietrich, W Dalton; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Curiel, Rosie; Dididze, Marine; Green, Barth A; Khan, Aisha; Pearse, Damien D; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Widerström-Noga, Eva; Wood, Patrick; Levi, Allan D

    2017-03-21

    The rationale for implantation of autologous human Schwann cells (SCs) in persons with subacute spinal cord injury (SCI) is based on evidence that transplanted SCs are neuroprotective, support local axonal plasticity, and are capable of myelinating axons. A Phase I clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the safety of autologous human SC transplantation into the injury epicenter of six subjects with subacute SCI. The trial was an open-label, unblinded, non-randomized, non-placebo controlled study with a dose escalation design and standard medical rehabilitation. Participants were paraplegics with neurologically complete, trauma-induced spinal lesions. Autologous SCs were cultured in vitro from a sural nerve harvested from each participant and injected into the epicenter of the spinal lesion. Outcome measures for safety were protocol compliance, feasibility, adverse events, stability of neurological level, absence of detectable mass lesion, and the emergence of clinically significant neuropathic pain or muscle spasticity no greater than expected for a natural course cohort. One year post-transplantation, there were no surgical, medical, or neurological complications to indicate that the timing or procedure for the cell transplantation was unsafe. There were no adverse events or serious adverse events related to the cell therapy. There was no evidence of additional spinal cord damage, mass lesion, or syrinx formation. We conclude that it is feasible to identify eligible candidates, appropriately obtain informed consent, perform a peripheral nerve harvest to obtain SCs within 5-30 days of injury, and perform an intra-spinal transplantation of highly purified autologous SCs within 4-7 weeks of injury.

  5. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Babarit, Candice; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Leroux, Isabelle; Zuber, Céline; Ledevin, Mireille; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Fromes, Yves; Cherel, Yan; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Several adult stem cell populations exhibit myogenic regenerative potential, thus representing attractive candidates for therapeutic approaches of neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking clinical benefits in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog. This global effect, which is observed in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, leads us to question here the molecular pathways that are impacted by MuStem cell transplantation. To address this issue, we compare the global gene expression profile between healthy, GRMD and MuStem cell treated GRMD dog muscle, four months after allogenic MuStem cell transplantation. Results In the dystrophic context of the GRMD dog, disease-related deregulation is observed in the case of 282 genes related to various processes such as inflammatory response, regeneration, calcium ion binding, extracellular matrix organization, metabolism and apoptosis regulation. Importantly, we reveal the impact of MuStem cell transplantation on several molecular and cellular pathways based on a selection of 31 genes displaying signals specifically modulated by the treatment. Concomitant with a diffuse dystrophin expression, a histological remodelling and a stabilization of GRMD dog clinical status, we show that cell delivery is associated with an up-regulation of genes reflecting a sustained enhancement of muscle regeneration. We also identify a decreased mRNA expression of a set of genes having metabolic functions associated with lipid homeostasis and energy. Interestingly, ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is highly enhanced in GRMD dog muscle after systemic delivery of MuStem cells. Conclusions Overall, our results provide the first high-throughput characterization of GRMD dog muscle and throw new light on the

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Morton J; Neven, Benedicte; Cavazanna-Calvo, M; Fischer, A; Puck, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for most children with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Survival for SCID following HSCT has significantly improved over the past several decades, and ranges from 70% to 95% depending on the clinical condition of the child at the time of transplant, the availability of an HLA-matched sibling donor, and the SCID genotype/phenotype. In this article we will review the types of SCID and discuss the critical HSCT issues that confront us today, including the optimal source of donor cells when an HLA-matched sibling is not available, as well as the pros and cons of using conditioning therapy pretransplant. As SCID children have been followed for several decades, it is becoming apparent that long-term outcome and durable T and B cell immune reconstitution are quite variable depending on the initial treatment and source of donor cells. Finally, the development of methods to improve the early diagnosis of SCID along with designing prospective trials to evaluate the best approaches to curing these diseases with minimal toxicity are critical to improving outcomes for children with SCID.

  7. Allogenic stem cell transplantation as salvage therapy for patients relapsing after autologous transplantation: experience from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Carreras, E; Rovira, M; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Esteve, J; Fernández-Avilés, F; Perales, M; Rives, S; Gómez, M; Montserrat, E

    2001-05-01

    The prognosis of patients relapsing after an autologous transplant (autoSCT) is very poor. Allogenic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) offers the possibility of curing some of these patients, at the cost, however, of a high transplant related mortality (TRM). The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of 14 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies, from a single institution, who underwent alloSCT for progressive disease after autoSCT. Patients had relapsed at a median of 11.5 months (range 2-72) after autoSCT and they underwent alloSCT at a median of 25.5 months (range 7-73) from the first transplant. Ten patients received HLA-identical related peripheral blood progenitor cells, three patients underwent matched-unrelated donor marrow transplants, and one patient received a mismatched related transplant. Conditioning regimens consisted of total body irradiation plus cyclophosphamide (n=5) or melphalan (n=1), or high-dose combination chemotherapy (n=8). Cyclosporin A and methotrexate were administered as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Eight patients (57%) developed grade II-IV acute GVHD. All evaluable patients (n=6) presented extensive chronic GVHD. Overall survival at 1 year was 16% (median 3.5 months, 95% CI 0.7-10.3). Ten patients (71%) died from transplant related complications at a median of 3.5 months (range 0.7-11). Only one patient died of recurrent disease. Three patients remain alive and in complete remission at the time of this report (4, 20 and 20 months, respectively). In conclusion, alloSCT offers the possibility of a sustained control of the disease in some patients who relapse after an autoSCT. However, the procedure is associated with a high transplant-related mortality. Better results might be obtained by carefully selecting patients and by reducing the intensity of the preparative regimen.

  8. Origin of enriched regulatory t cells in patients receiving combined kidney/bone marrow transplantation to induce transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; DeWolf, Susan; Savage, Thomas M; Morokata, Tatsuaki; Obradovic, Aleksandar; LoCascio, Samuel A; Shonts, Brittany; Zuber, Julien; Lau, Sai Ping; Shah, Ravi; Morris, Heather; Steshenko, Valeria; Zorn, Emmanuel; Preffer, Frederic I; Olek, Sven; Dombkowski, David M; Turka, Laurence A; Colvin, Robert; Winchester, Robert; Kawai, Tatsuo; Sykes, Megan

    2017-03-01

    We examined tolerance mechanisms in patients receiving HLA-mismatched combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation (CKBMT) that led to transient chimerism under a previously-published non-myeloablative conditioning regimen (Immune Tolerance Network study ITN036). Polychromatic flow cytometry (FCM) and high throughput sequencing of TCRβ hypervariable regions of DNA from peripheral blood T regulatory cells (Tregs) and CD4 non-Tregs revealed marked early enrichment of regulatory T cells (CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low) Foxp3(+) ) in blood that resulted from peripheral proliferation (Ki67(+) ), possibly new thymic emigration (CD31(+) ) and, in one tolerant subject, conversion from non-Tregs. Among recovering conventional T cells, central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells predominated. A large fraction of the T cell clones detected in post-transplant biopsy specimens by TCR sequencing were detected in the peripheral blood and were not donor-reactive. Our results suggest that enrichment of Tregs by new thymic emigration and lymphopenia-driven peripheral proliferation in the early post-transplant period may contribute to tolerance following CKBMT. Furthermore, most conventional T cell clones detected in immunologically quiescent post-transplant biopsies appear to be circulating cells in the microvasculature rather than infiltrating T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Transplanting mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mouse otocysts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroki; Minoda, Ryosei; Miwa, Toru; Yamada, Takao; Ise, Momoko

    2017-03-27

    The otocyst is an attractive target for studying treatment strategies for genetic hearing loss and for understanding inner ear development. We have previously reported that trans-uterine supplemental gene therapy in vivo into the otocysts of mice, which had a loss of function mutation in a causative gene of deafness, was able to prevent putative hearing loss. We herein set out to clarify the feasibility of allogenic cell transplantation into the mouse otocysts in vivo. We transplanted naive mouse-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) into the otocysts of wild type mice or connexin (Cx) 30 deficient mice, at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5). The transplanted m-iPSCs survived in the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and E15.5 in wild type mice. In the Cx30 deficient mouse, the transplanted cells survived similarly, with some of the transplanted cells migrating into the lining cells of the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and showing tumorigenic cell proliferation at E15.5. In addition, engrafted cells appear to be able to differentiate after the cell transplantation. Our results suggest that otocyst transplanted cells survived and differentiated. A Cx30 deficiency may facilitate cell migration. These findings may offer some hope for cell transplantation therapy for profound genetic hearing loss caused by a Cxs deficiency.

  10. Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in a Parkinsonian Model Exerts Neuroprotection via Regulation of the Host Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Fu-Xing; Bao, Xin-Jie; Sun, Xi-Cai; Wu, Jun; Bai, Qing-Ran; Chen, Guo; Li, Xue-Yuan; Zhou, Qiang-Yi; Yang, Yuan-Fan; Shen, Qin; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and consequent dopamine (DA) deficit, and current treatment still remains a challenge. Although neural stem cells (NSCs) have been evaluated as appealing graft sources, mechanisms underlying the beneficial phenomena are not well understood. Here, we investigate whether human NSCs (hNSCs) transplantation could provide neuroprotection against DA depletion by recruiting endogenous cells to establish a favorable niche. Adult mice subjected to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were transplanted with hNSCs or vehicle into the striatum. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrated significant neurorescue response observed in hNSCs-treated animals compared with the control mice. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived, proliferated, and migrated within the astrocytic scaffold. Notably, more local astrocytes underwent de-differentiation, acquiring the properties of NSCs or neural precursor cells (NPCs) in mice given hNSCs. Additionally, we also detected significantly higher expression of host-derived growth factors in hNSCs-transplanted mice compared with the control animals, together with inhibition of local microglia and proinflammatory cytokines. Overall, our results indicate that hNSCs transplantation exerts neuroprotection in MPTP-insulted mice via regulating the host niche. Harnessing synergistic interaction between the grafts and host cells may help optimize cell-based therapies for PD. PMID:26556344

  11. Thiotepa-based versus total body irradiation-based myeloablative conditioning prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eder, Sandra; Labopin, Myriam; Arcese, William; Or, Reuven; Majolino, Ignazio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; de Rosa, Gennaro; Volin, Liisa; Beelen, Dietrich; Veelken, Hendrik; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kuball, Jurgen; Cornelissen, Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Thiotepa is an alkylating compound with an antineoplastic and myeloablative activity and can mimic the effect of radiation. However, it is unknown whether this new regimen could safely replace the long-established ones. This retrospective matched-pair analysis evaluated the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission who received myeloablative conditioning either with a thiotepa-based (n = 121) or a cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation-based (TBI; n = 358) regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling or an unrelated donor. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the outcome was similar in both groups. Acute graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was observed in 25% after thiotepa-containing regimen versus 35% after TBI (P = 0.06). The 2-yr cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 40.5% for thiotepa and 41% for TBI (P = 0.98). At 2 yrs, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 23.9% (thiotepa) vs. 22.4% (TBI; P = 0.66) and 17.2% (thiotepa) vs. 23.3% (TBI; P = 0.77), respectively. The probabilities of leukaemia-free and overall survival at 2 yrs were not significantly different between the thiotepa and TBI groups, at 58.9% vs. 54.2% (P = 0.95) and 61.4% vs. 58% (P = 0.72), respectively. Myeloablative regimens using combinations including thiotepa can provide satisfactory outcomes, but the optimal conditioning remains unclear for the individual patient in this setting.

  12. Liver cell transplantation for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I: Update and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lysy, Philippe A; Najimi, Mustapha; Stéphenne, Xavier; Bourgois, Annick; Smets, Françoise; Sokal, Etienne M

    2008-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation is an attractive technique to treat liver-based inborn errors of metabolism. The feasibility and efficacy of the procedure has been demonstrated, leading to medium term partial metabolic control of various diseases. Crigler-Najjar is the paradigm of such diseases in that the host liver is lacking one function with an otherwise normal parenchyma. The patient is at permanent risk for irreversible brain damage. The goal of liver cell transplantation is to reduce serum bilirubin levels within safe limits and to alleviate phototherapy requirements to improve quality of life. Preliminary data on Gunn rats, the rodent model of the disease, were encouraging and have led to successful clinical trials. Herein we report on two additional patients and describe the current limits of the technique in terms of durability of the response as compared to alternative therapeutic procedures. We discuss the future developments of the technique and new emerging perspectives. PMID:18567072

  13. Follicular T helper cells and humoral reactivity in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    de Graav, G N; Dieterich, M; Hesselink, D A; Boer, K; Clahsen-van Groningen, M C; Kraaijeveld, R; Litjens, N H R; Bouamar, R; Vanderlocht, J; Tilanus, M; Houba, I; Boonstra, A; Roelen, D L; Claas, F H J; Betjes, M G H; Weimar, W; Baan, C C

    2015-01-01

    Memory B cells play a pivotal role in alloreactivity in kidney transplantation. Follicular T helper (Tfh) cells play an important role in the differentiation of B cells into immunoglobulin-producing plasmablasts [through interleukin (IL)-21]. It is unclear to what extent this T cell subset regulates humoral alloreactivity in kidney transplant patients, therefore we investigated the absolute numbers and function of peripheral Tfh cells (CD4POSCXCR5POS T cells) in patients before and after transplantation. In addition, we studied their relationship with the presence of donor-specific anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSA), and the presence of Tfh cells in rejection biopsies. After transplantation peripheral Tfh cell numbers remained stable, while their IL-21-producing capacity decreased under immunosuppression. When isolated after transplantation, peripheral Tfh cells still had the capacity to induce B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which could be inhibited by an IL-21-receptor-antagonist. After transplantation the quantity of Tfh cells was the highest in patients with pre-existent DSA. In kidney biopsies taken during rejection, Tfh cells co-localized with B cells and immunoglobulins in follicular-like structures. Our data on Tfh cells in kidney transplantation demonstrate that Tfh cells may mediate humoral alloreactivity, which is also seen in the immunosuppressed milieu. PMID:25557528

  14. Has stem cell transplantation come of age in the treatment of sickle cell disease?

    PubMed

    Shenoy, S

    2007-11-01

    Currently, hematopoietic SCT (HCT) is the only intervention that can restore normal hematopoiesis to provide a 'cure' in sickle cell disease. Yet, this treatment modality is used sparsely-a total of less than 400 transplants are reported in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database despite 70,000 afflicted in the United States; 88% of transplants are from HLA-matched sibling donors and 84% are <16 years of age at transplant. Overall survival at 3 years is over 90% after HCT in the young but 62% in adult HCT recipients due to increased disease and transplant-related morbidity. The decision and timing of HCT is a dilemma for physicians and families due to the need to consider HCT before severe organ damage in a disease that is generally not fatal in children with adequate supportive care. From the transplant physician's perspective, however, advances in the ability to identify well-matched donors, supportive care and promising conditioning regimens with low toxicity and transplant complications support the development of new HCT trials for sickle cell disease as the risk/benefit ratio can be balanced better. With the recognition of new predictors of early mortality, the anticipation of extensive and expensive life-long medical support, and the poor quality of life despite medical care, the scales tip in favor of HCT. This is prime time for the development of careful unrelated donor HCT trials for sickle cell disease. Research efforts targeting HCT will need to be directed at seeking safe and effective transplant methods applicable to all patients who might derive benefit.

  15. The future for treatment by bone marrow transplantation for adrenoleukodystrophy, metachromatic leukodystrophy, globoid cell leukodystrophy and Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krivit, W; Lockman, L A; Watkins, P A; Hirsch, J; Shapiro, E G

    1995-01-01

    Within the past decade, bone marrow transplantation has been applied to over 200 patients worldwide with the intention of treating storage diseases. Bone marrow transplantation has provided a method for treatment of adrenoleukodystrophy, metachromatic leukodystrophy, globoid cell leukodystrophy and Hurler syndrome. After engraftment, significant improvement in the clinical course of each of these diseases occurs. Survival data of engrafted patients are superior to those of non-transplanted. Engraftment and the resulting enzymatic reconstitution are concordant. Outcomes based on neuropsychological tests indicate continued maintenance and in some cases increase in cognitive function. Magnetic resonance imaging as well as spectroscopic examinations of the brain provide further evidence that positive changes occur in the central nervous system following long-term engraftment. A better quality of life follows engraftment. Greater gains from use of bone marrow transplantation for these particular storage diseases will occur in the future. Earlier diagnosis will allow bone marrow transplantation in the presymptomatic stage at a younger age, providing an enhancement of positive effects noted from such treatment. At the same time, advances in bone marrow technology will serve to reduce the risk factors involved with the bone marrow transplantation process itself. These two factors taken together will be more than additive in providing benefits from use of bone marrow transplantation.

  16. Donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Luca; Sarina, Barbara; Bramanti, Stefania; Perseghin, Paolo; Mariotti, Jacopo; Morabito, Lucio

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is considered the cornerstone in the treatment of several malignant and not malignant hematological diseases. However, relapse of hematological disease after allo-SCT is considered the most challenging point in the field. The risk can be reduced through optimal patients, donor and disease selection before allo-SCT, but harnessing donor immune system is an appealing way to treat or avoid disease relapse. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a simple and effective therapy after allo-SCT. In this paper, the efficacy of DLI will be analyzed in different hematological diseases, focusing also on their therapeutic or pre-emptive use.

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Greco, Raffaella; Bondanza, Attilio; Vago, Luca; Moiola, Lucia; Rossi, Paolo; Furlan, Roberto; Martino, Gianvito; Radaelli, Marta; Martinelli, Vittorio; Carbone, Maria Rosaria; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Assanelli, Andrea; Bernardi, Massimo; Corti, Consuelo; Peccatori, Jacopo; Bonini, Chiara; Vezzulli, Paolo; Falini, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Comi, Giancarlo

    2014-03-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is a rare neurological autoimmune disorder characterized by a poor prognosis. Immunosuppression can halt disease progression, but some patients are refractory to multiple treatments, experiencing frequent relapses with accumulating disability. Here we report on durable clinical remissions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in 2 patients suffering from severe forms of the disease. Immunological data evidenced disappearance of the pathogenic antibodies and regeneration of a naive immune system of donor origin. These findings correlated with evident clinical and radiological improvement in both patients, warranting extended clinical trials to investigate this promising therapeutic option.

  18. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P. Daniel; Hoffman, William Y.; Pomerantz, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2–4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50–70 fiber-associated, or 1,000–5,000 FACS-enriched CD56+/CD29+ human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications. PMID:26352798

  19. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P Daniel; Hoffman, William Y; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-09-08

    Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2-4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50-70 fiber-associated, or 1,000-5,000 FACS-enriched CD56(+)/CD29(+) human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  20. A Study of Noncultured Extracted Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath Cell Suspension for Transplantation in Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aarti N; Marfatia, Ritu K; Saikia, Siddhartha S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vitiligo surgeries have come a long way from tissue grafts to cultured and non cultured cell transplantation. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell transplantation (EHF ORS) suspension is more enriched with melanocyte. In a hair bulb, there is one melanocyte for every five keratinocytes which is much higher than the epidermal melanin unit. Aims: To analyse the effectiveness of cultured EHF ORS and to perform objective evaluation based on clinical improvement & photographic evidence. To observe any untoward events or side effects. Settings and Design: The study was open and uncontrolled. All the patients were screened at preliminary visit. Reviews were done every two weeks. The endpoint selected was six months post procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients of stable Vitiligo were included in the study and follicular unit were harvested by Follicular Unit Extraction method. Outer root sheath cells were extracted by trypsinization. The solution was transplanted over dermabraded recipient site. Pressure dressing was given. Patients were followed up regularly. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive Statistics, Chi-Square. Results: Mean ± SD repigmentation was 80.15% ± 22.9% with excellent repigmentation (90-100%) in 60% of patients. Conclusions: This method is safe, effective, and simpler than the other methods involving cell culturing and requiring a laboratory set-up but selection of patients is crucial for the success of the outcome. PMID:27601859

  1. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; P<0.001). A 4-fold increase of PGF was observed in myeloproliferative disorders compared to acute leukemia (P<0.001). Other risk factors for PGF included recipient age below 30, HLA-mismatch, male recipients of female donor grafts, ABO-incompatibility, busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning, and cryopreservation. In bone marrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; P<0.001). The use of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were associated with decreased PGF risk. These data, allow clinicians to do more informed choices with respect to graft source, donor selection, conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens to reduce the risk of PGF. Moreover, a novel risk score determined on day 21 post-transplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  2. Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem Cell Transplantation and PD-1 Blockade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0296 TITLE: Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem Cell Transplantation and PD-1...Addendum 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1May2014 - 30Apr2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem...anti-PD1 antibody (CT-011) alone (Cohort 1) and in conjunction with a dendritic cell/myeloma fusion cell vaccine (Cohort 2) following autologous

  3. Donor selection in T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: knowns, unknowns, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Stefan O; Champlin, Richard E

    2013-02-01

    Multiple donors are generally available for haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we discuss the factors that should be considered when selecting donors for this type of transplantation according to the currently available evidence. Donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) increase the risk of graft failure and should be avoided whenever possible. Strategies to manage recipients with DSAs are discussed. One should choose a full haplotype mismatch rather than a better-matched donor and maximize the dose of infused hematopoietic cells. Donor age and sex are other important factors. Other factors, including predicted natural killer cell alloreactivity and consideration of noninherited maternal alleles, are more controversial. Larger studies are needed to further clarify the role of these factors for donor selection in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  4. A 47-year-old stem cell transplant recipient with fever, cough and chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Salh, Omar S; Nadhem, Omar N; Thakore, Sanket R; Halloush, Ruba A; Khasawneh, Faisal A

    2015-01-01

    Infections and malignancies are among the most serious complications that follow organ or stem cell transplantation. They may have a mild course, and nonspecific and overlapping manifestations. The present article describes a case of symptomatic nodular pulmonary disease that complicated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It was diagnosed to be post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, a potential sequela of immunosuppression and a very difficult entity to treat in profoundly immunosuppressed patients. PMID:26057372

  5. EBV-associated, extranodal NK-cell lymphoma, nasal type of the breast, after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Lawrence; Draoua, Hediya Y; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2004-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are predominantly Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferations. PTLDs of T-cell lineage are rare, mostly reported after renal transplantation and show less frequent association with EBV. NK-cell lymphomas after transplantation (NK-cell PTLDs) are very rare; only five cases are reported so far in the English literature, all developed after renal transplantation. We describe a case of EBV-associated, extranodal NK-cell lymphoma of nasal type, involving the breast in a cardiac allograft recipient 5 years after transplantation. The neoplastic cells are positive for CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, CD7, CD43, CD56, TIA-1 and p53; and negative for surface CD3 and CD57. Analysis of T-cell receptor beta and gamma genes fails to show clonal rearrangement. EBV studies show clonal episomal integration of EBV and latency II pattern (EBER-1+, LMP-1+, EBNA-1+, EBNA-2-). In conclusion, NK-cell PTLDs are rare complications that arise relatively late after solid organ transplantation, show strong association with EBV, and can follow an aggressive clinical course. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first reported case of NK-cell PTLD after cardiac transplantation and the unifying clinical and diagnostic features of NK-cell PTLDs occurring after solid organ transplantation.

  6. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity. PMID:27406328

  7. High-grade cytomegalovirus antigenemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Asano-Mori, Y; Oshima, K; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Nakagawa, M; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Hangaishi, A; Motokura, T; Chiba, S; Kurokawa, M; Hirai, H; Kanda, Y

    2005-11-01

    Clinical impact of high-grade (HG) cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has not been clarified. Therefore, in order to investigate the risk factors and outcome for HG-CMV antigenemia, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 154 Japanese adult patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the first time from 1995 to 2002 at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Among 107 patients who developed positive CMV antigenemia at any level, 74 received risk-adapted preemptive therapy with ganciclovir (GCV), and 17 of these developed HG-antigenemia defined as > or = 50 positive cells per two slides. The use of systemic corticosteroids at > or = 0.5 mg/kg/day at the initiation of GCV was identified as an independent significant risk factor for HG-antigenemia. Seven of the 17 HG-antigenemia patients developed CMV disease, with a cumulative incidence of 49.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the low-grade antigenemia patients (4%, P<0.001). However, overall survival was almost equivalent in the two groups. In conclusion, the development of HG-antigenemia appeared to depend on the profound immune suppression of the recipient. Although CMV disease frequently developed in HG-antigenemia patients, antiviral therapy could prevent a fatal outcome.

  8. Transplantation of Human Neural Progenitor Cells Expressing IGF-1 Enhances Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Caiwei; Sun, Yu; Liao, Tiffany; Beattie, Ursula; López, Francisco J.; Chen, Dong Feng; Lashkari, Kameran

    2015-01-01

    We have previously characterized human neuronal progenitor cells (hNP) that can adopt a retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-like morphology within the RGC and nerve fiber layers of the retina. In an effort to determine whether hNPs could be used a candidate cells for targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs), we evaluated whether hNPs transfected with an vector that expresses IGF-1 in the form of a fusion protein with tdTomato (TD), would increase RGC survival in vitro and confer neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of glaucoma. RGCs co-cultured with hNPIGF-TD cells displayed enhanced survival, and increased neurite extension and branching as compared to hNPTD or untransfected hNP cells. Application of various IGF-1 signaling blockers or IGF-1 receptor antagonists abrogated these effects. In vivo, using a model of glaucoma we showed that IOP elevation led to reductions in retinal RGC count. In this model, evaluation of retinal flatmounts and optic nerve cross sections indicated that only hNPIGF-TD cells effectively reduced RGC death and showed a trend to improve optic nerve axonal loss. RT-PCR analysis of retina lysates over time showed that the neurotrophic effects of IGF-1 were also attributed to down-regulation of inflammatory and to some extent, angiogenic pathways. This study shows that neuronal progenitor cells that hone into the RGC and nerve fiber layers may be used as vehicles for local production and delivery of a desired NTF. Transplantation of hNPIGF-TD cells improves RGC survival in vitro and protects against RGC loss in a rodent model of glaucoma. Our findings have provided experimental evidence and form the basis for applying cell-based strategies for local delivery of NTFs into the retina. Application of cell-based delivery may be extended to other disease conditions beyond glaucoma. PMID:25923430

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases at All Children's Hospital/University of South Florida.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, A; Dorsey, M; Miotke, J; Shepherd, C; Day, N

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the transplantation outcomes of 31 patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases treated at our center (All Children's Hospital, University of South Florida) since its inception in 1986. The primary immune diseases included severe combined immunodeficiency, Wiscott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease. The age of the patient's at the time of transplant ranged from 1 month to 19 years, and conditioning regimens varied based on the patients underlying disease. In 23 patients, the graft source was bone marrow, 4 patients received umbilical cord blood grafts and 4 patients received peripheral blood stem cell grafts. Better survival rates were observed in those patients transplanted at a younger age and free of infections, demonstrating that transplantation at an early age before significant infections, autoimmune manifestation and malignant transformation have occurred is beneficial.

  10. Survival Advantage and Comparable Toxicity in Reduced-Toxicity Treosulfan-Based versus Reduced-Intensity Busulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen in Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sakellari, Ioanna; Mallouri, Despina; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Batsis, Ioannis; Kaliou, Maria; Constantinou, Varnavas; Papalexandri, Apostolia; Lalayanni, Chrysavgi; Vadikolia, Chrysanthi; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Yannaki, Evangelia; Sotiropoulos, Damianos; Smias, Christos; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles

    2017-03-01

    Treosulfan has been incorporated in conditioning regimens for sustained remission without substantial toxicity and treatment-related mortality (TRM). We aimed to analyze the safety and efficacy of a fludarabine 150 mg/m(2) and treosulfan 42 g/m(2) (FluTreo) conditioning regimen in medically infirm patients. Outcomes were compared with those of a similar historical group treated with fludarabine 150 mg/m(2) to 180 mg/m(2), busulfan 6.4 mg/kg, and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) 5 mg/kg to 7.5 mg/kg (FluBuATG). Thirty-one consecutive patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 21), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 6), or treatment-related AML (n = 4) received FluTreo conditioning. The historical group consisted of 26 consecutive patients treated with FluBuATG. In the FluTreo group, engraftment was prompt in all patients and 74% achieved >99% donor chimerism by day +30. No grades III or IV organ toxicities were noted. One-year cumulative incidences (CI) of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 19.4% and 58.4%. The groups were similar for age, disease risk, lines of treatment, hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index, and acute or chronic GVHD incidence, except that there were more matched unrelated donor recipients in the FluTreo group (P < .001). With 20 (range, 2 to 36) months follow-up for FluTreo and 14 (range, 2 to 136) for FluBuATG, the 1-year cumulative overall survival (OS) probability was 76% versus 57%, respectively (P = .026); 1-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 79% versus 38% (P < .001). In multivariate analysis, the only significantly favorable factor for OS and DFS was FluTreo (P = .010 and P = .012). The CI of relapse mortality was markedly decreased in FluTreo versus FluBuATG (7.4% versus 42.3%, P < .001). In conclusion, the treosulfan-based regimen resulted in favorable OS and DFS with acceptable toxicity and low relapse rates compared with busulfan-based conditioning.

  11. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma Marzouq; Alsaleh, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10–40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between <1 and 16% and varies considerably according to the type of transplant and the geographical location. Approximately 80% of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients have been reported in patients receiving allografts. Several risk factors predispose to M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies in addition to the transplant procedure and its own complications. These infections can develop as early as day 11 and as late as day 3337 post-transplant. The course may become rapidly progressive and the patient may develop life-threatening complications. The diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients is usually made on clinical grounds, cultures obtained from clinical specimens, tissues biopsies in addition to serology and molecular tests. Unfortunately, a definitive diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in these patients may occasionally be difficult to be established. However, M. tuberculosis infections in transplant recipients usually respond well to treatment with anti-tuberculosis agents provided the diagnosis is made early. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in recipients of stem cell transplantation living in endemic areas and presenting with compatible clinical and radiological manifestations. High mortality rates are associated with infections caused by multidrug

  12. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma Marzouq; Alsaleh, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10-40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between <1 and 16% and varies considerably according to the type of transplant and the geographical location. Approximately 80% of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients have been reported in patients receiving allografts. Several risk factors predispose to M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies in addition to the transplant procedure and its own complications. These infections can develop as early as day 11 and as late as day 3337 post-transplant. The course may become rapidly progressive and the patient may develop life-threatening complications. The diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients is usually made on clinical grounds, cultures obtained from clinical specimens, tissues biopsies in addition to serology and molecular tests. Unfortunately, a definitive diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in these patients may occasionally be difficult to be established. However, M. tuberculosis infections in transplant recipients usually respond well to treatment with anti-tuberculosis agents provided the diagnosis is made early. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in recipients of stem cell transplantation living in endemic areas and presenting with compatible clinical and radiological manifestations. High mortality rates are associated with infections caused by multidrug-resistant strains

  13. Long-term results of related myeloablative stem-cell transplantation to cure sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bernaudin, Françoise; Socie, Gérard; Kuentz, Mathieu; Chevret, Sylvie; Duval, Michel; Bertrand, Yves; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Yakouben, Karima; Thuret, Isabelle; Bordigoni, Pierre; Fischer, Alain; Lutz, Patrick; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Dhedin, Nathalie; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Margueritte, Geneviève; Bories, Dominique; Verlhac, Suzanne; Esperou, Hélène; Coic, Lena; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Gluckman, Eliane

    2007-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment for sickle cell disease (SCD); nevertheless, its use has been limited by the risk of transplantation-related mortality (TRM). Between November 1988 and December 2004, 87 consecutive patients with severe SCD ranging from 2 to 22 years of age received transplants in France. Cerebral vasculopathy was the principal indication for transplantation (55 patients). All the patients received grafts from a sibling donor after a myeloablative conditioning regimen (CR). The only change in the CR during the study period was the introduction of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in March 1992. The rejection rate was 22.6% before the use of ATG but 3% thereafter. With a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2.0 to 17.9 years), the overall and event-free survival (EFS) rates were 93.1% and 86.1%, respectively. Graft versus host disease (GVHD) was the main cause of TRM. Importantly, cord blood transplant recipients did not develop GVHD. No new ischemic lesions were detected after engraftment, and cerebral velocities were significantly reduced. The outcome improved significantly with time: the EFS rate among the 44 patients receiving transplants after January 2000 was 95.3%. These results indicate that HLA-identical sibling HSCT after myeloablative conditioning with ATG should be considered as a standard of care for SCD children who are at high risk for stroke.

  14. In Vivo Transplantation of Autogenous Marrow-Derived Cells Following Rapid Intraoperative Magnetic Separation Based on Hyaluronan to Augment Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Fleury, Sean; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Shinohara, Kentaro; Pan, Hui; Boehm, Cynthia; Vasanji, Amit; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Walker, Esteban; Yaszemski, Michael; Hascall, Vincent; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This project was designed to test the hypothesis that rapid intraoperative processing of bone marrow based on hyaluronan (HA) could be used to improve the outcome of local bone regeneration if the concentration and prevalence of marrow-derived connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) could be increased and nonprogenitors depleted before implantation. Methods HA was used as a marker for positive selection of marrow-derived CTPs using magnetic separation (MS) to obtain a population of HA-positive cells with an increased CTP prevalence. Mineralized cancellous allograft (MCA) was used as an osteoconductive carrier scaffold for loading of HA-positive cells. The canine femoral multidefect model was used and four cylindrical defects measuring 10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in length were grafted with MCA combined with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow that was enriched in HA+ CTPs and depleted in red blood cells and nonprogenitors. Outcome was assessed at 4 weeks using quantitative 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of bone formation and histomorphological assessment. Results Histomorphological assessment showed a significant increase in new bone formation and in the vascular sinus area in the MS-processed defects. Robust bone formation was found throughout the defect area in both groups (defects grafted with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow.) Percent bone volume in the defects, as assessed by micro-CT, was greater in defects engrafted with MS processed cells, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Rapid intraoperative MS processing to enrich CTPs based on HA as a surface marker can be used to increase the concentration and prevalence of CTPs. MCA grafts supplemented with heparinized bone marrow or MS processed cells resulted in a robust and advanced stage of bone regeneration at 4 weeks. A greater new bone formation and vascular sinus area was found in defects grafted with MS processed cells

  15. A survey on patient perception of reduced-intensity transplantation in adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Bareford, D

    2007-04-01

    The development of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and the success of BMT for paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) have raised the possibility of revisiting this prospect in adults as well. In a chronic debilitating disorder managed with supportive therapy, the patients' perception is critical in the advancement of any potential curative therapy. To explore this aspect, we undertook a questionnaire-based survey on 30 adults with SCD. Sixty two per cent of the patients were ready to accept a transplant-related mortality (TRM) >10%; 30% of them a TRM >30%. A risk of graft failure (GF) >10% was acceptable to 64%, with a risk >30% acceptable to 41%. Infertility was acceptable to only 50%. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was unacceptable to the majority (80%). Seventy six per cent% of patients had a full sibling and 60% were willing to participate in a clinical trial of RIC transplantation. This survey suggests that the majority of adults with SCD might be willing to consider a curative option such as RIC transplantation even with a high TRM or GF. The major concerns relate to chronic GVHD and infertility. There is an urgent need to explore RIC transplants in SCD patients within the framework of a clinical trial, considering patient perception regarding cure and complications.

  16. Hairy cell leukemia in kidney transplantation: lesson from a rare disorder.

    PubMed

    Vinante, Fabrizio; Tomei, Paola; Zaza, Gianluigi; Zamò, Alberto; Lupo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We report here on the diagnosis and successful treatment of a case of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) that arose 15 years after kidney transplantation in a 51-year-old patient. As soon as the diagnosis was made, HCL was treated with 2-CDA, obtaining complete hematological remission. Immunosuppression with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin was maintained, and the graft was preserved. In kidney transplant recipients supported with immunosuppressive drugs, post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLDs) are frequent and typically related to immunosuppression via a loss of control of infectious/EBV-related proliferative stimuli. To date, HCL has not been considered among PTLDs. Recently, however, the oncogenic mutation V600E of the BRAF protein kinase has been found to be a hallmark of HCL, and calcineurin inhibitors have been shown to interfere with signaling downstream of V600E BRAF early on by counteracting senescence-associated mechanisms that protect against the oncogenic potential of the mutated kinase. Such a biochemical link between the oncogene-dependent signaling and calcineurin inhibitor activities suggests that HCL in transplanted patients might be a peculiar type of PTLD based on the presence of a specific mutation. This mechanism might also be involved in other neoplasias bearing the same or similar mutations, such as melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

  17. Dramatic improvement of POEMS syndrome following autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rovira, M; Carreras, E; Bladé, J; Graus, F; Valls, J; Fernández-Avilés, F; Montserrat, E

    2001-11-01

    POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, serum monoclonal protein and skin changes) is a rare plasma cell disorder of unknown pathogenesis and is diagnosed by the demonstration of a plasma cell proliferation at the biopsy of an osteoesclerotic lesion. When the lesions are in a limited area, radiation therapy is usually highly effective. Patients with disseminated disease require systemic chemotherapy, which is not effective in most cases. A patient with severe widespread POEMS syndrome resistant to melphalan who experienced a dramatic improvement after high-dose melphalan followed by autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) is reported. We believe that this is the first reported case of POEMS syndrome treated with AHCT, a procedure that could be considered in similarly affected patients.

  18. Determination of the prime electrostatic endothelial cell transplantation procedure for e-PTFE vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, G L; Rittgers, S E; Schmidt, S P; Alexander, T; Sheffer, D B; Milsted, A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of cellular adhesion (density and morphological maturation), cellular membrane damage, and cellular viability after an electrostatic transplantation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) onto 6-cm segments of 4-mm I.D. e-PTFE (GORE-TEX) vascular prostheses using a prototype electrostatic endothelial cell transplantation device (EECTD). The electrostatic transplantation parameters evaluated were the apparatus-applied voltage and transplantation time. By our definition, the combination of applied voltage and transplantation time that met the a priori criteria of: 1) maximum transplanted cellular viability, 2) maximum transplantation density, 3) maximum morphological maturation (degree of cellular flattening), and 4) minimal cellular membrane damage would be the prime transplantation procedure. The results of the experimentation indicated that the prime conditions for HUVEC transplantation were obtained when +1.0 V was applied for a transplantation time of 16 min. These conditions achieved an average viable graft surface coverage of 97.4+/-1.6% with an average transplantation density of 73,540+/-8.514 HUVECs/cm2. Furthermore, the transplanted HUVECs were morphologically mature (flattened) with minimal apparent cellular membrane damage (lysis or pitting). The overall clinical significance of this study is that viable endothelial cell transplantation to synthetic vascular grafts can be accomplished at high cellular densities and morphological maturation in 16 min using the EECTD. With the promising in vitro transplantation results, the next logical investigations will include additional in vitro evaluations (cellular retention upon shear stress exposure and biochemical assays) followed by in vivo evaluations to examine thromboresistance and influence on intimal/anastomotic hyperplasia.

  19. Management of respiratory viral infections in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Mulanovich, Victor E; Ariza-heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2012-01-01

    Advances in stem cell transplantation procedures and the overall improvement in the clinical management of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients over the past 2 decades have led to an increase in survival duration, in part owing to better strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant complications, including opportunistic infections. However, post-HCT infections remain a concern for HCT recipients, particularly infections caused by community respiratory viruses (CRVs), which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These viruses can potentially cause lower respiratory tract illness, which is associated with a higher mortality rate among HCT recipients. Clinical management of CRV infections in HCT recipients includes supportive care and antiviral therapy, especially in high-risk individuals, when available. Directed antiviral therapy is only available for influenza infections, where successful use of neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir or zanamivir) and/or M2 inhibitors (amantadine or rimantadine) has been reported. Data on the successful use of ribavirin, with or without immunomodulators, for respiratory syncytial virus infections in HCT recipients has emerged over the past 2 decades but is still controversial at best because of a lack of randomized controlled trials. Because of the lack of directed antiviral therapy for most of these viruses, prevention should be emphasized for healthcare workers, patients, family, and friends and should include the promotion of the licensed inactivated influenza vaccine for HCT recipients, when indicated. In this review, we discuss the clinical management of respiratory viruses in this special patient population, focusing on commercially available antivirals, adjuvant therapy, and novel drugs under investigation, as well as on available means for prevention. PMID:23226621

  20. Multi-state analysis illustrates treatment success after stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia followed by donor lymphocyte infusion.

    PubMed

    Eefting, Matthias; de Wreede, Liesbeth C; Halkes, Constantijn J M; von dem Borne, Peter A; Kersting, Sabina; Marijt, Erik W A; Veelken, Hendrik; Putter, Hein; Schetelig, Johannes; Falkenburg, J H Frederik

    2016-04-01

    In the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the common approach is to focus outcome analyses on time to relapse and death, without assessing the impact of post-transplant interventions. We investigated whether a multi-state model would give insight into the events after transplantation in a cohort of patients who were transplanted using a strategy including scheduled donor lymphocyte infusions. Seventy-eight consecutive patients who underwent myeloablative T-cell depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome were studied. We constructed a multi-state model to analyze the impact of donor lymphocyte infusion and graft-versus-host disease on the probabilities of relapse and non-relapse mortality over time. Based on this model we introduced a new measure for outcome after transplantation which we called 'treatment success': being alive without relapse and immunosuppression for graft-versus-host disease. All relevant clinical events were implemented into the multi-state model and were denoted treatment success or failure (either transient or permanent). Both relapse and non-relapse mortality were causes of failure of comparable magnitude. Whereas relapse was the dominant cause of failure from the transplantation state, its rate was reduced after graft-versus-host disease, and especially after donor lymphocyte infusion. The long-term probability of treatment success was approximately 40%. This probability was increased after donor lymphocyte infusion. Our multi-state model helps to interpret the impact of post-transplantation interventions and clinical events on failure and treatment success, thus extracting more information from observational data.

  1. BDNF improves the efficacy ERG amplitude maintenance by transplantation of retinal stem cells in RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunyu; Weng, Chuan Chuang; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of subretinal transplantation of rat retinal stem cell when combined with Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a rat model of retinal degeneration - Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Retinal stem cells were derived from embryonic day 17 Long-Evans rats and pre-labeled with fluorescence pigment-DiI prior to transplant procedures. RCS rats received injections of retinal stem cells, stem cells+BDNF, phosphate buffered saline or BNDF alone (n = 3 eyes for each procedure). At 1, 2 and 3 months after transplantation, the electroretinogram (ERG) was assessed and the outer nuclear layer thickness measured. The eyes receiving retinal stem cell and stem cell+BDNF transplants showed better photoreceptor maintenance than the other groups (P < 0.01) at all time points. One month after retina transplantation, the amplitudes of rod-ERG and Max-ERG b waves were significantly higher the eyes with stem cells+BDNF (P < 0.01), however, this difference was not seen at two and three months post transplantation. BDNF treatment alone group (without transplanted cells) had no effect when compared to buffer injections. The present results indicate that BDNF can enhance the short-term efficacy of the retinal stem cell transplantation in treating retinal degenerative disease.

  2. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory–inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster

  3. Low-dose rapamycin treatment increases the ability of human regulatory T cells to inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hester, J; Schiopu, A; Nadig, S N; Wood, K J

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are currently being tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in cell and solid organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin has been shown to preferentially promote T(reg) expansion. Here, we hypothesized that adjunctive rapamycin therapy might potentiate the ability of ex vivo expanded human T(reg) to inhibit vascular allograft rejection in a humanized mouse model of arterial transplantation. We studied the influence of combined treatment with low-dose rapamycin and subtherapeutic T(reg) numbers on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) in human arterial grafts transplanted into immunodeficient BALB/cRag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) mice reconstituted with allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In addition, we assessed the effects of the treatment on the proliferation and apoptosis of naïve/effector T cells. The combined therapy efficiently suppressed T-cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Neointima formation in the human arterial allografts was potently inhibited compared with each treatment alone. Interestingly, CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T lymphocytes were sensitive to T(reg) and rapamycin-induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data support the concept that rapamycin can be used as an adjunctive therapy to improve efficacy of T(reg)-based immunosuppressive protocols in clinical practice. By inhibiting TA, T(reg) and rapamycin may prevent chronic transplant dysfunction and improve long-term allograft survival.

  4. Therapeutic potential for mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation for the treatment of ischemic conditions such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and stroke has been explored in animal models and early-phase clinical trials. A substantial database documents the safety profile of MSC administration to humans in a large number of disease states. The mechanism of the therapeutic effect of MSC transplantation in ischemic disease has been postulated to be due to paracrine, immunomodulatory, and differentiation effects. This review provides an overview of the potential role of MSC-based therapy for critical limb ischemia (CLI), the comparison of MSC cellular therapy with angiogenesis gene therapy in CLI, and the proposed mechanism of action of MSC therapy. Preclinical efficacy data in animal models of hindlimb ischemia, current early-phase human trial data, and considerations for future MSC-based therapy in CLI will also be discussed. PMID:22846185

  5. Engineered HA hydrogel for stem cell transplantation in the brain: Biocompatibility data using a design of experiment approach.

    PubMed

    Nih, Lina R; Moshayedi, Pouria; Llorente, Irene L; Berg, Andrew R; Cinkornpumin, Jessica; Lowry, William E; Segura, Tatiana; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2017-02-01

    This article presents data related to the research article "Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain" (P. Moshayedi, L.R. Nih, I.L. Llorente, A.R. Berg, J. Cinkornpumin, W.E. Lowry et al., 2016) [1] and focuses on the biocompatibility aspects of the hydrogel, including its stiffness and the inflammatory response of the transplanted organ. We have developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel for stem cell culture and transplantation, to promote brain tissue repair after stroke. This 3D biomaterial was engineered to bind bioactive signals such as adhesive motifs, as well as releasing growth factors while supporting cell growth and tissue infiltration. We used a Design of Experiment approach to create a complex matrix environment in vitro by keeping the hydrogel platform and cell type constant across conditions while systematically varying peptide motifs and growth factors. The optimized HA hydrogel promoted survival of encapsulated human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs) after transplantation into the stroke cavity and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. The highlights of this article include: (1) Data of cell and bioactive signals addition on the hydrogel mechanical properties and growth factor diffusion, (2) the use of a design of Experiment (DOE) approach (M.W. 2 Weible and T. Chan-Ling, 2007) [2] to select multi-factorial experimental conditions, and (3) Inflammatory response and cell survival after transplantation.

  6. Stem cell derived interneuron transplants as a treatment for schizophrenia: preclinical validation in a rodent model

    PubMed Central

    Donegan, Jennifer J.; Tyson, Jennifer A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Beckstead, Michael J.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Lodge, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing literature suggests that schizophrenia is associated with a reduction in hippocampal interneuron function. Thus, we posit that stem cell-derived interneuron transplants may be an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce hippocampal hyperactivity and attenuate behavioral deficits in schizophrenia. Here we used a dual-reporter embryonic stem cell line to generate enriched populations of parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SST)-positive interneurons, which were transplanted into the ventral hippocampus of the methylazoxymethanol (MAM) rodent model of schizophrenia. These interneuron transplants integrate within the existing circuitry, reduce hippocampal hyperactivity, and normalize aberrant dopamine neuron activity. Further, interneuron transplants alleviate behaviors that model negative and cognitive symptoms, including deficits in social interaction and cognitive inflexibility. Interestingly, PV- and SST-enriched transplants produced differential effects on behavior, with PV-enriched populations effectively normalizing all the behaviors examined. These data suggest that stem cell-derived interneuron transplants may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for schizophrenia. PMID:27480492

  7. Quality control and assurance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation data registries in Japan and other countries.

    PubMed

    Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies from national and international registries with large volumes of patients are commonly performed to identify superior strategies for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Major international and national stem cell transplant registries collect outcome data using electronic data capture systems, and a systematic study support process has been developed. Statistical support for studies is available from some major international registries, and international and national registries also mutually collaborate to promote stem cell transplant outcome studies and transplant-related activities. Transplant registries additionally take measures to improve data quality to further improve the quality of outcome studies by utilizing data capture systems and manual data management. Data auditing can potentially even further improve data quality; however, human and budgetary resources can be limiting factors in system construction and audits of the Japanese transplant registry are not currently performed.

  8. Autologous Transplantation of Adult Mice Spermatogonial Stem Cells into Gamma Irradiated Testes

    PubMed Central

    Koruji, Morteza; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Gourabi, Hamid; Pour-Beiranvand, Shahram; Jabbari Arfaee, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated structural and functional changes of fresh and frozen-thawed adult mouse spermatogonial stem cells following auto-transplantation into gamma-irradiated testes. Materials and Methods: In this experimental research, the right testes from adult mice (n=25) were collected, then Sertoli and spermatogonial cells were isolated using two-step enzymatic digestion, lectin immobilization and differential plating. Three weeks after cultivation, the Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled spermatogonial cells were transplanted, via rete testis, into the other testis of the same mouse, which had been irradiated with 14Gy. The mice were transplanted with: fresh cells (control 1), fresh cells co-cultured with Sertoli cells (control 2), the frozen-thawed cells (experimental 1) and frozen-thawed cells co-cultured with Sertoli cells (experimental 2). The morphological changes between different transplanted testes groups were compared in 8 weeks after transplantation. The statistical significance between mean values was determined by Kruskal Wallis and one-way analysis of variance in efficiency of transplantation. Results: The statistical analysis revealed significant increases in the mean percentage of testis weight and normal seminiferous tubules following spermatogonial stem cells transplantation in the recipient'fs testes. The normal seminiferous tubules percentage in the co-culture system with fresh cells and frozen-thawed groups were more than those in non-transplanted and fresh cell transplanted groups (p≤0.001). Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that spermatogonial stem cells in the colonies could result sperm production in the recipient’s testes after autologous transplantation. PMID:23507977

  9. Intramyocardial transplantation of circulating CD34+ cells: source of stem cells for myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after acute myocardial infarction (MI) and the differentiation of these cells to cardiomyocytes after transplantation into infarcted myocardium. The study involved five donor groups: MI (n=27), sham (n=26), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) (n=26), MI+GCSF (n=25), and control (n=25). Acute MI was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary arteries (LAD) of donor rats, and LAD of recipient rats were ligated on the same day. Seven days after ligation, CD34+ cells in donor rats were counted and then were directly injected into the infarcted myocardium of recipient rats. Eight weeks after the transplantation, significant differences (p<0.001) were observed in the CD34+cell counts among the 5 donor groups with the greatest increase in the MI+GCSF donor group. In rats receiving CD34+ cells, the size of the scar area smaller (p<0.001) and the thickness of the scar was greater (p=0.001) than in CD34- and saline-transplanted rats. The transplanted CD34+ cells differentiated into cardiomyocytes in the scar. This study suggests that CD34+ cells may be a potential source of stem cells and that they may be useful in strategies aimed at the regeneration of infarcted myocardium. PMID:14676434

  10. Late Effects Surveillance Recommendations among Survivors of Childhood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Children's Oncology Group Report.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric J; Anderson, Lynnette; Baker, K Scott; Bhatia, Smita; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Huang, Jennifer T; Pelletier, Wendy; Perkins, Joanna L; Rivard, Linda S; Schechter, Tal; Shah, Ami J; Wilson, Karla D; Wong, Kenneth; Grewal, Satkiran S; Armenian, Saro H; Meacham, Lillian R; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Castellino, Sharon M

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an important curative treatment for children with high-risk hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, and, increasingly, nonmalignant diseases. Given improvements in care, there are a growing number of long-term survivors of pediatric HCT. Compared with childhood cancer survivors who did not undergo transplantation, HCT survivors have a substantially increased burden of serious chronic conditions and impairments involving virtually every organ system and overall quality of life. This likely reflects the joint contributions of pretransplantation treatment exposures and organ dysfunction, the transplantation conditioning regimen, and any post-transplantation graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In response, the Children's Oncology Group (COG) has created long-term follow-up guidelines (www.survivorshipguidelines.org) for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer, including those who were treated with HCT. Guideline task forces, consisting of HCT specialists, other pediatric oncologists, radiation oncologists, organ-specific subspecialists, nurses, social workers, other health care professionals, and patient advocates systematically reviewed the literature with regards to late effects after childhood cancer and HCT since 2002, with the most recent review completed in 2013. For the most recent review cycle, over 800 articles from the medical literature relevant to childhood cancer and HCT survivorship were reviewed, including 586 original research articles. Provided herein is an organ system-based overview that emphasizes the most relevant COG recommendations (with accompanying evidence grade) for the long-term follow-up care of childhood HCT survivors (regardless of current age) based on a rigorous review of the available evidence. These recommendations cover both autologous and allogeneic HCT survivors, those who underwent transplantation for nonmalignant diseases, and those with a history of chronic GVHD.

  11. Fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Webb, B J; Brunner, A; Ford, C D; Gazdik, M A; Petersen, F B; Hoda, D

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a consequence of intestinal dysbiosis and is particularly common following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective method of treating CDI by correcting intestinal dysbiosis by passive transfer of healthy donor microflora. FMT has not been widely used in immunocompromised patients, including HSCT recipients, owing to concern for donor-derived infection. Here, we describe initial results of an FMT program for CDI at a US HSCT center. Seven HSCT recipients underwent FMT between February 2015 and February 2016. Mean time post HSCT was 635 days (25-75 interquartile range [IQR] 38-791). Five of the patients (71.4%) were on immunosuppressive therapy at FMT; 4 had required long-term suppressive oral vancomycin therapy because of immediate recurrence after antibiotic cessation. Stool donors underwent comprehensive health and behavioral screening and laboratory testing of serum and stool for 32 potential pathogens. FMT was administered via the naso-jejunal route in 6 of the 7 patients. Mean follow-up was 265 days (IQR 51-288). Minor post-FMT adverse effects included self-limited bloating and urgency. One patient was suspected of having post-FMT small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. No serious adverse events were noted and all-cause mortality was 0%. Six of 7 (85.7%) patients had no recurrence; 1 patient recurred at day 156 post FMT after taking an oral antibiotic and required repeat FMT, after which no recurrence has occurred. Diarrhea was improved in all patients and 1 patient with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease was able to taper off systemic immunosuppression after FMT. With careful donor selection and laboratory screening, FMT appears to be a safe and effective therapy for CDI in HSCT patients and may confer additional benefits. Larger studies are necessary to confirm safety and efficacy and explore other possible effects.

  12. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  13. Alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Margaret L; DeFor, Todd E; Young, Jo-Anne H; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Blazar, Bruce R; Slungaard, Arne; Zierhut, Heather; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Wagner, John E

    2015-06-11

    Historically, alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) patients resulted in excessive morbidity and mortality. To improve outcomes, we made sequential changes to the HCT conditioning regimen. A total of 130 FA patients (median age, 9.0 years; range, 1-48) underwent alternative donor HCT at the University of Minnesota between 1995 and 2012. All patients received cyclophosphamide (CY), single fraction total body irradiation (TBI), and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) with or without fludarabine (FLU), followed by T-cell-depleted bone marrow or unmanipulated umbilical cord blood transplantation. The addition of FLU enhanced engraftment 3-fold. The incidence of grades 2-4 acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was 20% and 10%, respectively. Severe toxicity was highest in patients >10 years of age or those with a history of opportunistic infections or transfusions before HCT. Mortality was lowest in patients without a history of opportunistic infection or transfusions and who received conditioning with TBI 300 cGy, CY, FLU, and ATG. These patients had a probability of survival of 94% at 5 years. Alternative donor HCT is now associated with excellent survival for patients without prior opportunistic infections or transfusions and should be considered for all FA patients after the onset of marrow failure. These studies were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005898, NCT00167206, and NCT00352976.

  14. Rhesus monkey neural stem cell transplantation promotes neural regeneration in rats with hippocampal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Li-Juan; Bian, Hui; Fan, Yao-Dong; Wang, Zheng-Bo; Yu, Hua-Lin; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Rhesus monkey neural stem cells are capable of differentiating into neurons and glial cells. Therefore, neural stem cell transplantation can be used to promote functional recovery of the nervous system. Rhesus monkey neural stem cells (1 × 10(5) cells/μL) were injected into bilateral hippocampi of rats with hippocampal lesions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that green fluorescent protein-labeled transplanted cells survived and grew well. Transplanted cells were detected at the lesion site, but also in the nerve fiber-rich region of the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum. Some transplanted cells differentiated into neurons and glial cells clustering along the ventricular wall, and integrated into the recipient brain. Behavioral tests revealed that spatial learning and memory ability improved, indicating that rhesus monkey neural stem cells noticeably improve spatial learning and memory abilities in rats with hippocampal lesions.

  15. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Multilevel Intraspinal Stem Cell Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting (Boston, October...NM. Preclinical Validation of Multilevel Intraspinal Stem Cell Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Submitted. Appendix 3...transplant and serially post-transplant. Furthermore, plasma was collected from six patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis enrolled in the Phase 1

  16. Restoration of spermatogenesis after transplantation of c-Kit positive testicular cells in the fowl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transplantation of male germ line cells into sterilized recipients has been used in mammals for conventional breeding as well as for transgenesis. This study presents an improvement in the approach for germ cell transplantation between fowl males by using an enriched subpopulation of c-Kit positive ...

  17. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mawatari, Momoko; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kei; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein.

  18. INTRANIGRAL TRANSPLANTS OF A GABAERGIC CELL LINE PRODUCE LONG-TERM ALLEVIATION OF ESTABLISHED MOTOR SEIZURES

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Claudia G.; Mendoza-Trejo, Soledad; Aguilar, Manuel B.; Freed, William J.; Giordano., Magda

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that intranigral transplants of immortalized GABAergic cells decrease the number of kainic acid-induced seizures [5] in an animal model. In the present study, recurrent spontaneous behavioral seizures were established by repeated systemic injections of this excitotoxin into male Sprague Dawley rats. After the seizures had been established, cells were transplanted into the substantia nigra. Animals with transplants of control cells (without hGAD67 expression) or with sham transplants showed a death rate of more than 40% over the 12 weeks of observation, whereas in animals with M213-2O Cl4 transplants, the death rate was reduced to less than 20%. The M213-2O Cl4 transplants significantly reduced the percentage of animals showing behavioral seizures; animals with these transplants also showed a lower occurrence of stage V seizures than animals in the other groups. In vivo and in vitro analyses provided evidence that the GABAergic cells show sustained expression of both GAD67 and hGAD67cDNA, as well as increased GABA levels in the ventral mesencephalon of transplanted animals. Therefore, transplantation of GABA-producing cells can produce long-term alleviation of behavioral seizures in an animal model. PMID:18571743

  19. Transplantation of betatrophin-expressing adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells induces β-cell proliferation in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang-Liang; Liu, Tian-Jin; Li, Limei; Tang, Wei; Zou, Jun-Jie; Chen, Xiang-Fang; Zheng, Jiao-Yang; Jiang, Bei-Ge; Shi, Yong-Quan

    2017-04-01

    Recent progress in regenerative medicine has suggested that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a novel potential cure for diabetes. Betatrophin is a newly identified hormone that can increase the production and expansion of insulin-secreting β-cells when administered to mice. In this study, we evaluated the effect of betatrophin overexpression by human adipose-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) by in vitro experiments, as well as following their transplantation into a mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. The overexpression of betatrophin did not affect the ADMSCs in terms of proliferation, differentiation and morphology. However, the co-culture of human islets with ADMSCs overexpressing betatrophin (ADMSCs-BET) induced islet proliferation, β-cell specific transcription factor expression, and the islet production of insulin under the stimulation of glucose or KCl and Arg. In addition, ADMSCs-BET enhanced the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the co-cultured islets compared with ADMSCs cultured alone. In mice with STZ-induced diabetes, the transplantation of ADMSCs-BET ameliorated the hyperglycemia and weight loss associated with STZ-induced diabetes; ADMSCs-BET also significantly enhanced the ratio of β-cells per islet compared to the transplantation of ADMSCs alone. Thus, our study demonstrates a novel strategy for inducing β-cell regeneration. ADMSCs-BET may replace insulin injections by increasing the number of endogenous insulin-producing cells in patients with diabetes. This combined strategy of ADMSC transplantation and gene therapy may prove to be a useful therapy for the treatment of diabetes.

  20. Transplantation of betatrophin-expressing adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells induces β-cell proliferation in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang-Liang; Liu, Tian-Jin; Li, Limei; Tang, Wei; Zou, Jun-Jie; Chen, Xiang-Fang; Zheng, Jiao-Yang; Jiang, Bei-Ge; Shi, Yong-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in regenerative medicine has suggested that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a novel potential cure for diabetes. Betatrophin is a newly identified hormone that can increase the production and expansion of insulin-secreting β-cells when administered to mice. In this study, we evaluated the effect of betatrophin overexpression by human adipose-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) by in vitro experiments, as well as following their transplantation into a mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. The overexpression of betatrophin did not affect the ADMSCs in terms of proliferation, differentiation and morphology. However, the co-culture of human islets with ADMSCs overexpressing betatrophin (ADMSCs-BET) induced islet proliferation, β-cell specific transcription factor expression, and the islet production of insulin under the stimulation of glucose or KCl and Arg. In addition, ADMSCs-BET enhanced the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the co-cultured islets compared with ADMSCs cultured alone. In mice with STZ-induced diabetes, the transplantation of ADMSCs-BET ameliorated the hyperglycemia and weight loss associated with STZ-induced diabetes; ADMSCs-BET also significantly enhanced the ratio of β-cells per islet compared to the transplantation of ADMSCs alone. Thus, our study demonstrates a novel strategy for inducing β-cell regeneration. ADMSCs-BET may replace insulin injections by increasing the number of endogenous insulin-producing cells in patients with diabetes. This combined strategy of ADMSC transplantation and gene therapy may prove to be a useful therapy for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:28290605

  1. Human γδ T cells are quickly reconstituted after stem-cell transplantation and show adaptive clonal expansion in response to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ravens, Sarina; Schultze-Florey, Christian; Raha, Solaiman; Sandrock, Inga; Drenker, Melanie; Oberdörfer, Linda; Reinhardt, Annika; Ravens, Inga; Beck, Maleen; Geffers, Robert; von Kaisenberg, Constantin; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Ganser, Arnold; Förster, Reinhold; Koenecke, Christian; Prinz, Immo

    2017-02-20

    To investigate how the human γδ T cell pool is shaped during ontogeny and how it is regenerated after transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), we applied an RNA-based next-generation sequencing approach to monitor the dynamics of the repertoires of γδ T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) before and after transplantation in a prospective cohort study. We found that repertoires of rearranged genes encoding γδ TCRs (TRG and TRD) in the peripheral blood of healthy adults were stable over time. Although a large fraction of human TRG repertoires consisted of public sequences, the TRD repertoires were private. In patients undergoing HSC transplantation, γδ T cells were quickly reconstituted; however, they had profoundly altered TCR repertoires. Notably, the clonal proliferation of individual virus-reactive γδ TCR sequences in patients with reactivation of cytomegalovirus revealed strong evidence for adaptive anti-viral γδ T cell immune responses.

  2. Oral Ciprofloxacin Prophylaxis in Patients Undergoing High DoseTherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tabarraee, Mahdi; Tavakoli-Ardakani, Maria; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Ghadiani, Mojtaba; Rezvani, Hamid; Hajifathali, Abbas; khamsi, Samiyeh

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is usually used in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, but its use in Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT) is controversial. We evaluated the efficacy of ciprofloxacin prophylaxis in ASCT. To identify the efficacy of ciprofloxacin on the incidence of neutropenic fever and its complications, 72 patients that had been admitted to Taleghani Hospital for ASCT between 2010 and 2012 were evaluated in our study. Oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg every 12 h was administered to 30 patients on the same day of high dose chemotherapy until the first febrile episode or until the recovery of neutropenia and the results were analyzed and compared with the historical control group 42 other transplanted patients who had not previously received ciprofloxacin. The incidence of neutropenic fever was 80% with no difference between the two groups. But in ciprofloxacin group, duration of fever (1.7 days VS 3.5 days P=0.017), hospitalization due to stem cell transfusion (18.2 days VS 12.2 days p=0.03), incidence of bacteremia 3.3 % VS 33.3%, p=0.002) and platelet recovery (13.9 VS 17.7 days= 0.035) and platelet transfusions (P=0.04) were significantly lower than the control group no side effects and no delay in. Based on this study oral ciprofloxacin prophylaxis is rational, efficacious and economic in ASCT. PMID:28228813

  3. Tolerogenic dendritic cells and negative vaccination in transplantation: from rodents to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Varey, Emilie; Bériou, Gaëlle; Hill, Marcelo; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Segovia, Mercedes; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The use of immunosuppressive (IS) drugs to treat transplant recipients has markedly reduced the incidence of acute rejection and early graft loss. However, such treatments have numerous adverse side effects and fail to prevent chronic allograft dysfunction. In this context, therapies based on the adoptive transfer of regulatory cells are promising strategies to induce indefinite transplant survival. The use of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) has shown great potential, as preliminary experiments in rodents have demonstrated that administration of tolerogenic DC prolongs graft survival. Recipient DC, Donor DC, or Donor Ag-pulsed recipient DC have been used in preclinical studies and administration of these cells with suboptimal immunosuppression increases their tolerogenic potential. We have demonstrated that autologous unpulsed tolerogenic DC injected in the presence of suboptimal immunosuppression are able to induce Ag-specific allograft tolerance. We derived similar tolerogenic DC in different animal models (mice and non-human primates) and confirmed their protective abilities in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms involved in the tolerance induced by autologous tolerogenic DC were also investigated. With the aim of using autologous DC in kidney transplant patients, we have developed and characterized tolerogenic monocyte-derived DC in humans. In this review, we will discuss the preclinical studies and describe our recent results from the generation and characterization of tolerogenic monocyte-derived DC in humans for a clinical application. We will also discuss the limits and difficulties in translating preclinical experiments to theclinic. PMID:22908013

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for adult and adolescent hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a single center analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Wang, Jingshi; Wei, Na; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yini; Huang, Wenqiu; Zhang, Jia; Liu, Jinli; Wang, Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Myeloablative conditioning-based allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in the treatment of adult and adolescent hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is rarely reported. We conducted a retrospective study of 30 adult and adolescent HLH transplanted for primary HLH (n = 4), tumor-HLH (n = 8), EBV-HLH (n = 14), and underlying disease-unknown (UDU)-HLH (n = 4). Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) were the stem-cell source in all patients. Twenty-three patients were transplanted from HLA-haploidentical family donors, six from HLA-identical sibling donors, and one from a matched unrelated donor. Four patients appeared with mixed chimerism (MC), and no patient presented with graft failure. There was a high risk for EBV reactivation with an incidence of 47 %. Two patients developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and three were considered primary disease recurrent. With a median follow-up of 26 months, 19 patients survived and 11 patients died. The estimated 2-year overall survival (OS) was 63.3 ± 8.8 % in all patients, 100 % in primary HLH, 64.3 ± 12.8 % in EBV-HLH, 50.0 ± 17.7 % in tumor-HLH, and 50.0 ± 25.0 % in UDU-HLH. Myeloablative conditioning-based allo-HSCT is an effective treatment for adult and adolescent HLH to achieve complete remission and long-term survival.

  5. Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation: joint recommendations of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, and the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre; Lee, Stephanie J; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Burns, Linda J; Davies, Stella M; Ferrara, James L M; Socié, Gérard

    2006-02-01

    More than 40000 hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) are performed worldwide each year. With improvements in transplant technology, larger numbers of transplant recipients survive free of the disease for which they were transplanted. However, there are late complications that can cause substantial morbidity. Many survivors are no longer under the care of transplant centers, and many community health care providers may be unfamiliar with health matters relevant to HCT. The Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), and American Society for Bone Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) have developed these recommendations to offer care providers suggested screening and prevention practices for autologous and allogeneic HCT survivors.

  6. Application of cell sheet technology to bone marrow stromal cell transplantation for rat brain infarct.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplantation enhances functional recovery after cerebral infarct, but the optimal delivery route is undetermined. This study was aimed to assess whether a novel cell-sheet technology non-invasively serves therapeutic benefits to ischemic stroke. First, the monolayered cell sheet was engineered by culturing rat BMSCs on a temperature-responsive dish. The cell sheet was analysed histologically and then transplanted onto the ipsilateral neocortex of rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion at 7 days after the insult. Their behaviours and histology were compared with those in the animals treated with direct injection of BMSCs or vehicle over 4 weeks post-transplantation. The cell sheet was 27.9 ± 8.0 μm thick and was composed of 9.8 ± 2.4 × 10(5) cells. Cell sheet transplantation significantly improved motor function when compared with the vehicle-injected animals. Histological analysis revealed that the BMSCs were densely distributed to the neocortex adjacent to the cerebral infarct and expressed neuronal phenotype in the cell sheet-transplanted animals. These findings were almost equal to those for the animals treated with direct BMSC injection. The attachment of the BMSC sheet to the brain surface did not induce reactive astrocytes in the adjacent neocortex, although direct injection of BMSCs profoundly induced reactive astrocytes around the injection site. These findings suggest that the BMSCs in cell sheets preserve their biological capacity of migration and neural differentiation. Cell-sheet technology may enhance functional recovery after ischaemic stroke, using a less invasive method. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Nutritional status of patients submitted to transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Érika Elias; Guerra, Daiane Cristina; Baluz, Kátia; de Resende Furtado, Wander; da Silva Bouzas, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the nutritional status of adult patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at two different time points (admission and discharge). Methods A retrospective, descriptive and quantitative study was performed based on clinical, laboratory and nutritional data obtained from medical records of adult patients of both genders submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a bone marrow transplantation reference center in Rio de Janeiro in the period from 2010 to 2013. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software (version 22.0). Results Sixty-four patients were evaluated. The mean age was 42.1 ± 3.2 years and the most prevalent disease was acute myeloid leukemia (39%). There was a high prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea (100%), vomiting (97%) and mucositis (93%). Between admission and discharge there was a significant decrease in the median weight (−2.5 kg; 71.5 vs. 68.75 kg; p-value < 0.001), body mass index (−0.9 kg/m2; 24.8 vs. 24.4 kg/m2; p-value < 0.001), and serum albumin levels (−0.2 g/dL; 3.7 vs. 3.6 g/dL; p-value = 0.024). The survival time after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation correlated negatively with C-reactive protein at discharge (CC = −0.72; p-value < 0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (CC = 0.56; p-value = 0.004) and with high total protein level at discharge (CC = 0.53; p-value = 0.006). Conclusion Our results suggest that patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have compromised nutritional status during the hospital stay for transplantation. PMID:25453651

  8. Increased Numbers of Circulating CD8 Effector Memory T Cells before Transplantation Enhance the Risk of Acute Rejection in Lung Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    San Segundo, David; Ballesteros, María Ángeles; Naranjo, Sara; Zurbano, Felipe; Miñambres, Eduardo; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The effector and regulatory T cell subpopulations involved in the development of acute rejection episodes in lung transplantation remain to be elucidated. Twenty-seven lung transplant candidates were prospectively monitored before transplantation and within the first year post-transplantation. Regulatory, Th17, memory and naïve T cells were measured in peripheral blood of lung transplant recipients by flow cytometry. No association of acute rejection with number of peripheral regulatory T cells and Th17 cells was found. However, effector memory subsets in acute rejection patients were increased during the first two months post-transplant. Interestingly, patients waiting for lung transplant with levels of CD8+ effector memory T cells over 185 cells/mm3 had a significant increased risk of rejection [OR: 5.62 (95% CI: 1.08-29.37), p=0.04]. In multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender the odds ratio for rejection was: OR: 5.89 (95% CI: 1.08-32.24), p=0.04. These data suggest a correlation between acute rejection and effector memory T cells in lung transplant recipients. The measurement of peripheral blood CD8+ effector memory T cells prior to lung transplant may define patients at high risk of acute lung rejection. PMID:24236187

  9. Early central nervous system complications after reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Yukiko; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Kami, Masahiro; Ikeda, Masayuki; Katayama, Yuta; Murashige, Naoko; Kusumi, Eiji; Yuji, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Kato, Daisuke; Hamaki, Tamae; Matsumura, Tomoko; Kim, Sung-Won; Morinaga, Shinichi; Mori, Shinichiro; Kanemaru, Mineo; H