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  1. Stromal cell-based immunotherapy in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Ronald; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang; Fung, John J

    2012-01-01

    Organs are composed of parenchymal cells that characterize organ function and nonparenchymal cells that are composed of cells in transit, as well as tissue connective tissue, also referred to as tissue stromal cells. It was originally thought that these tissue stromal cells provided only structural and functional support for parenchymal cells and were relatively inert. However, we have come to realize that tissue stromal cells, not restricted to in the thymus and lymphoid organs, also play an active role in modulating the immune system and its response to antigens. The recognition of these elements and the elucidation of their mechanisms of action have provided valuable insight into peripheral immune regulation. Extrapolation of these principles may allow us to utilize their potential for clinical application. In this article, we will summarize a number of tissue stromal elements/cell types that have been shown to induce hyporesponsiveness to transplants. We will also discuss the mechanisms by which these stromal cells create a tolerogenic environment, which in turn results in long-term allograft survival. PMID:22091683

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but its implementation is limited by organ shortage and immune rejection. Side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs, such as nephrotoxicity, opportunistic infection, and tumorigenic potential, influence long-term graft outcomes. In recent years, continued research and subsequent discoveries concerning the properties and potential utilization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have aroused considerable interest and expectations. Biological characteristics of MSCs, including multi-lineage differentiation, homing potential, paracrine effect and immunomodulation, have opened new horizons for applications in kidney transplantation. However, many studies have shown that the biological activity of MSCs depends on internal inflammatory conditions, and the safety and efficacy of the clinical application of MSCs remain controversial. This review summarizes the findings of a large number of studies and aims to provide an objective viewpoint based on a comprehensive analysis of the presently established benefits and obstacles of implementing MSC-based therapy in kidney transplantation, and to promote its clinical translation. PMID:26852923

  3. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body use glucose for energy. Islet cell transplantation transfers cells from an organ donor into the ... to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with type 1 diabetes live ...

  4. [Regulatory T cell based transplant tolerance--freedom from immunosuppression].

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Takaaki; Ito, Atsushi; Li, Ying; Wu, Yanling; Takemura, Mami; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2007-03-01

    Tolerance after clinical transplantation (Tx) is still extremely rare. However, Kyoto elective protocol enabled a substantial number of patients to weaned off immunosuppression after liver Tx. This is referred to as an immunoprivilege. Nevertheless, the operating mechanisms for liver Tx tolerance remain elusive. The authors demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are likely to play an important role in liver Tx tolerance. In addition, we found that precursor like Tregs exist in the human peripheral blood. This can propagate upon stimulation with allo-antigen, in contrast to anergic property of Tregs. Thus, the exploitation of precursor like Tregs as a cellular source of ex vivo and in vivo expansion may lead to the widespread clinical use of Tregs for Tx.

  5. Hepatic tissue engineering: from transplantation to customized cell-based liver directed therapies from the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, Henning C; Kaufmann, Peter M; Bruns, Helge; Kluth, Dietrich; Horch, Raymund E; Vacanti, Joseph P; Kneser, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Today, liver transplantation is still the only curative treatment for liver failure due to end-stages liver diseases. Donor organ shortage, high cost and the need of immunosuppressive medications are still the major limitations in the field of liver transplantation. Thus, alternative innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, are under investigation with the aim, that in future an artificial liver tissue could be created and be used for the replacement of the liver function in patients. Using cells instead of organs in this setting should permit (i) expansion of cells in an in vitro phase, (ii) genetic or immunological manipulation of cells for transplantation, (iii) tissue typing and cryopreservation in a cell bank, and (iv) the ex vivo genetic modification of patient's own cells prior re-implantation. Function and differentiation of liver cells are influenced by the three-dimensional organ architecture. The use of polymeric matrices permits the three dimensional formation of a neo-tissue and specific stimulation by adequate modification of the matrix-surface which might be essential for appropriate differentiation of transplanted cells. Additionally, culturing hepatocytes on three dimensional matrices permits culture in a flow bioreactor system with increased function and survival of the cultured cells. Based on bioreactor technology, bioartificial liver devices (BAL) are developed for extracorporeal liver support. Although BALs improved clinical and metabolic conditions, increased patient survival rates have not been proven yet. For intra-corporeal liver replacement, a concept which combines Tissue Engineering using three-dimensional, highly porous matrices with cell transplantation could be useful. In such a concept, whole liver mass transplantation, long term engraftment and function as well as correction of a metabolic defect in animal models could be achieved with a principally reversible procedure. Future studies have to

  6. Concise Review: Immunologic Lessons From Solid Organ Transplantation for Stem Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Csete, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Clinical organ transplantation became possible only after powerful immunosuppressive drugs became available to suppress the alloimmune response. After decades of solid organ transplantation, organ rejection is still a major challenge. However, significant insight into allorecognition has emerged from this vast experience and should be used to inform future stem cell-based therapies. For this reason, we review the current understanding of selected topics in transplant immunology that have not been prominent in the stem cell literature, including immune responses to ischemia/reperfusion injuries, natural killer cells, the adaptive immune response, some unresolved issues in T-cell allorecognition, costimulatory molecules, and the anticipated role of regulatory T cells in graft tolerance. PMID:23349327

  7. Islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, P; Huang, G C; Amiel, S A; Heaton, N D

    2007-04-01

    People with type 1 diabetes have normal exocrine pancreatic function, making islet cell rather than whole organ transplantation an attractive option. Achieving insulin independence in type 1 diabetes was the perceived goal of islet cell transplantation. The success of the Edmonton group in achieving this in a selected group of type 1 patients has led to renewed optimism that this treatment could eventually replace whole organ pancreas transplantation. However the long-term results of this treatment indicate that insulin independence is lost with time in a significant proportion of patients, although they may retain glycaemic stability. In this context, the indications for islet cell transplantation, which have evolved over the last 5 years, indicate that the patients who benefit most are those who experience severe hypoglycaemic reactions despite optimal insulin therapy. This review will summarise the history of islet cell transplantation, islet isolation techniques, the transplant procedure, immunosuppressive therapy, indications for islet cell transplantation, current clinical trials, the early UK islet cell transplant experience using the Edmonton protocol, and some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:17403947

  8. Upper-Extremity Transplantation Using a Cell-Based Protocol to Minimize Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Stefan; Gorantla, Vijay S.; Brandacher, Gerald; Zeevi, Adriana; Demetris, Anthony J.; Lunz, John G.; Metes, Diana M.; Donnenberg, Albert D.; Shores, Jaimie T.; Dimartini, Andrea F.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Imbriglia, Joseph E.; Azari, Kodi; Goitz, Robert J.; Manders, Ernest K.; Nguyen, Vu T.; Cooney, Damon S.; Wachtman, Galen S.; Keith, Jonathan D.; Fletcher, Derek R.; Macedo, Camila; Planinsic, Raymond; Losee, Joseph E.; Shapiro, Ron; Starzl, Thomas E.; Andrew Lee, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To minimize maintenance immunosuppression in upper-extremity transplantation to favor the risk-benefit balance of this procedure. Background Despite favorable outcomes, broad clinical application of reconstructive transplantation is limited by the risks and side effects of multidrug immunosuppression. We present our experience with upper-extremity transplantation under a novel, donor bone marrow (BM) cell-based treatment protocol (“Pittsburgh protocol”). Methods Between March 2009 and September 2010, 5 patients received a bilateral hand (n = 2), a bilateral hand/forearm (n = 1), or a unilateral (n = 2) hand transplant. Patients were treated with alemtuzumab and methylprednisolone for induction, followed by tacrolimus monotherapy. On day 14, patients received an infusion of donor BM cells isolated from 9 vertebral bodies. Comprehensive follow-up included functional evaluation, imaging, and immunomonitoring. Results All patients are maintained on tacrolimus monotherapy with trough levels ranging between 4 and 12 ng/mL. Skin rejections were infrequent and reversible. Patients demonstrated sustained improvements in motor function and sensory return correlating with time after transplantation and level of amputation. Side effects included transient increase in serum creatinine, hyperglycemia managed with oral hypoglycemics, minor wound infection, and hyperuricemia but no infections. Immunomonitoring revealed transient moderate levels of donor-specific antibodies, adequate immunocompetence, and no peripheral blood chimerism. Imaging demonstrated patent vessels with only mild luminal narrowing/occlusion in 1 case. Protocol skin biopsies showed absent or minimal perivascular cellular infiltrates. Conclusions Our data suggest that this BM cell-based treatment protocol is safe, is well tolerated, and allows upper-extremity transplantation using low-dose tacrolimus monotherapy. PMID:23001085

  9. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  10. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Chung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Jang Woon; Ha, Kee Yong

    2016-09-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  11. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  12. Magnetic Cell Labeling of Primary and Stem Cell-Derived Pig Hepatocytes for MRI-Based Cell Tracking of Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R.; Garrett, Wesley M.; Welch, Glenn; Caperna, Thomas J.; Talbot, Neil C.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP) and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF). The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO) that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility. PMID:25856627

  13. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  14. Enhanced infarct myocardium repair mediated by thermosensitive copolymer hydrogel-based stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Lang, Meidong; Xiao, Yan; Lian, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation by intramyocardial injection has been proposed as a promising therapy strategy for cardiac repair after myocardium infarction. However, low retention and survival of grafted MSCs hinder its further application. In this study, copolymer with N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylic acid/2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) ratio of 88:9.6:2.4 was bioconjugated with type I collagen to construct a novel injectable thermosensitive hydrogel. The injectable and biocompatible hydrogel-mediated MSC transplantation could enhance the grafted cell survival in the myocardium, which contributed to the increased neovascularization, decreased interstitial fibrosis, and ultimately improved heart function to a significantly greater degree than regular MSC transplantation. We suggest that this novel hydrogel has the potential for future stem cell transplantation. PMID:25432986

  15. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  16. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Ronsyn, Mark W; Daans, Jasmijn; Spaepen, Gie; Chatterjee, Shyama; Vermeulen, Katrien; D'Haese, Patrick; Van Tendeloo, Viggo FI; Van Marck, Eric; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N; Jorens, Philippe G; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC) are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (h)MSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neurotrophin (NT)3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP) were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. Results First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i) was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii) did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii) was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrate that genetically

  17. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Congenital Hemoglobinopathies Using a Tailored Busulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen: Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Zaidman, Irina; Rowe, Jacob M; Khalil, Abdalla; Ben-Arush, Myriam; Elhasid, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only proven curative option for patients with hemoglobinopathies, both thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA). A busulfan-based myeloablative conditioning regimen is the standard of care for HSCT in these patients, although increased treatment-related morbidity, including veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been demonstrated. Thirty-eight pediatric patients, median age 8 years (range, 6 months to 22 years), suffering from hemoglobinopathy were treated at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, between 1998 and 2011. Thirty-four patients had thalassemia major and 4 had SCA. The 38 patients underwent 40 HSCTs, 34 of which were first transplants and 6 second transplants. Most transplants (32/40) were from matched sibling donors. Sources of stem cells were peripheral blood in 30 transplants, bone marrow in 7 transplants, and cord blood in 3 transplants. All received different customized busulfan-based conditioning regimens tailored by pharmacokinetic analysis of busulfan levels. Primary engraftment occurred in 37 of 40 transplants. Neutrophil engraftment (>.5 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 15.3 days post-transplantation (range, 10 to 45). Platelet transfusion independence (>20 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 22.3 days (range, 11 to 60). The rate of 5-year overall survival for thalassemia patients after first transplantation was 90.5% ± 5.3%. The rate of 5-year thalassemia-free survival was 81.7% ± 6.8%. Cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 17.6%. Rate of grades III to IV GVHD was 8.8%. Cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 23.5%, with 11.8% incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. One patient developed VOD. Full donor chimerism occurred in 36.4% of patients with class 1 + 2 thalassemia, compared with 78.6% in class 3 thalassemia (P = .049). Overall survival above 90% in patients undergoing their first transplant was demonstrated using busulfan-based

  18. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  19. Use of stem cell transplantation to treat epilepsy: A Web of Science-based literature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhongmin; Dong, Yushu; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Li

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends in the use of stem cell transplantation to treat epilepsy. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on the use of stem cell transplantation to treat epilepsy during 2002–2011, retrieved from Web of Science, using the key words epilepsy or epileptic or epilepticus or seizure and “stem cell”. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed published articles on the use of stem cell transplantation to treat epilepsy indexed in Web of Science; (b) original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial material, and news items. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (a) Annual publication output; (b) type of publication; (c) publication by research field; (d) publication by journal; (e) publication by author; (f) publication by country and institution; (g) publications by institution in China; (h) most-cited papers; and (i) papers published by Chinese authors or institutions. RESULTS: A total of 460 publications on the use of stem cell transplantation to treat epilepsy were retrieved from Web of Science, 2002–2011. The number of publications gradually increased over the 10-year study period. Articles and reviews constituted the major types of publications. More than half of the studies were in the field of neuroscience/neurology. The most prolific journals for this topic were Epilepsia, Bone Marrow Transplantation, and Journal of Neuroscience. Of the 460 publications, almost half came from American authors and institutions; relatively few papers were published by Chinese authors or institutions. CONCLUSION: Literature on stem cell transplantation for epilepsy includes many reports of basic research, but few of clinical trials or treatments. Exact effects are not yet evaluated. Epilepsy rehabilitation is a long-term, complex, and comprehensive system engineering. With advances in medical development, some effective medical, social and educational measures

  20. Flow Cytometry and Transplantation-Based Quantitative Assays for Satellite Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arpke, Robert W; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In response to muscle damage, satellite cells proliferate and undertake both differentiation and self-renewal, generating new functional muscle tissue and repopulating this new muscle with stem cells for future injury responses. For many questions relating to the physiological regulation of satellite cells, quantitative readouts of self-renewal and differentiation can be very useful. There is a particular need for a quantitative assay for satellite cell self-renewal that does not rely solely upon sectioning, staining and counting cells in sections. In this chapter, we provide detailed methods for quantifying the self-renewal and differentiation potential of a given population of satellite cells using an assay involving transplantation into injured, regenerating muscle together with specific markers for donor cell identity and state of differentiation. In particular, using the Pax7-ZsGreen transgene as a marker of satellite cell state, self-renewal can be quantified by FACS on transplanted muscle to actually count the total number of resident satellite cells at time points following transplantation.

  1. Five decades of progress in hematopoietic cell transplantation based on the preclinical canine model

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, Marilena; Storb, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The preclinical canine model has proved valuable for the development of principles and techniques of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) applicable to human patients. Studies in random-bred dogs concerning the impact of histocompatibility barriers on engraftment and graft-versus-host disease, the kinetics of immunological reconstitution, the efficacy of various pre-transplant conditioning regimens, post-transplantation immunosuppression protocols, treatment of malignant diseases, and graft-versus-tumor effects have advanced HCT from an investigational therapy with uncertain clinical benefit half a century ago to an important treatment choice for thousands of patients treated annually in transplantation centers worldwide. More recent preclinical canine studies have resulted in the clinical translation of nonmyeloablative, minimally invasive transplantation protocols that have extended allogeneic HCT to include older human patients with malignant and non-malignant, acquired or inherited hematological disorders, and those with comorbid conditions. Here we review the contributions of the canine model to modern HCT and describe the usefulness of HCT for the treatment of canine hematological disorders. PMID:19754798

  2. Total Body Irradiation-Based Myeloablative Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation Is a Safe and Effective Alternative to Unrelated Donor Transplantation in Patients Without Matched Sibling Donors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Scott R; Sizemore, Connie A; Sanacore, Melissa; Zhang, Xu; Brown, Stacey; Holland, H Kent; Morris, Lawrence E; Bashey, Asad

    2015-07-01

    We enrolled 30 patients on a prospective phase II trial utilizing a total body irradiation (TBI)-based myeloablative preparative regimen (fludarabine 30 mg/m2/day × 3 days and TBI 150 cGy twice per day on day -4 to -1 [total dose 1200 cGy]) followed by infusion of unmanipulated peripheral blood stem cells from a haploidentical family donor (haplo). Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg/day on days 3 and 4, mycophenolate mofetil through day 35, and tacrolimus through day 180. Median patient age was 46.5 years (range, 24 to 60). Transplantation diagnosis included acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 16), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), chronic myelogenous leukemia (n = 5), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 2). Using the Dana Farber/Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research/Disease Risk Index (DRI), patients were classified as low (n = 4), intermediate (n = 12), high (n = 11), and very high (n = 3) risk. All patients engrafted with a median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery of 16 and 25 days, respectively. All evaluable patients achieved sustained complete donor T cell and myeloid chimerism by day +30. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades II to IV and III and IV was seen in 43% and 23%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 56% (severe in 10%). After a median follow-up of 24 months, the estimated 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), nonrelapse mortality, and relapse rate were 78%, 73%, 3%, and 24%, respectively. Two-year DFS and relapse rate in patients with low/intermediate risk disease was 100% and 0%, respectively, compared with 39% and 53% for patients with high/very high risk disease. When compared with a contemporaneously treated cohort of patients at our institution receiving myeloablative HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation (acute myelogenous leukemia [n = 17], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [n = 15

  3. Magentic Cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of heptocytes transplantation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this wo...

  4. Difficult Decisions: Fetal Cell Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.; Parakh, Jal S.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, techniques used, and details of the issues involved in the controversial issue of fetal cell transplantation are discussed. Questions for use in class discussion are provided. Suggestions for beginning a discussion are provided with accompanying questions. (CW)

  5. [Hepatic cell transplantation. Technical and methodological aspects].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Martínez, Amparo; Cortés, Miriam; Bonora, Ana; Moya, Angel; Sanjuán, Fernando; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Mir, José

    2010-03-01

    Hepatic cell transplantation consists of grafting already differentiated cells such as hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes are viable and functionally active. Liver cell transplantation is carried out by means of a 3-step method: isolation of hepatocytes from donor liver rejected for orthotopic transplantation, preparing a cell suspension for infusion and, finally, hepatocytes are implanted into the recipient. There are established protocols for the isolation of human hepatocytes from unused segments of donor livers, based on collagenase digestion of cannulated liver tissue at 37 degrees C. The hepatocytes can be used fresh or cryopreserved. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes would then be available for planned use. In cell transplant, the important aspects are: infusion route, number of cells, number of infusions and viability of the cells. The cells are infused into the patient through a catheter inserted via portal vein or splenic artery. Liver cell transplantation allows liver tissue to be used that would, otherwise, be discarded, enabling multiple patients to be treated with hepatocytes from a single tissue donor.

  6. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of neutropenia following outpatient hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    West, Fran; Mitchell, Sandra A

    2004-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) involves the transfer of stem cells to establish hematopoiesis in patients who have received myeloablative chemotherapy with or without whole body irradiation. Following high-dose therapy and HSCT, all patients experience a period of neutropenia. Outpatient care delivery models place expanded responsibilities on patients and their families for the management of this treatment side effect. Proactive management of neutropenia is critical to decrease the depth and duration of neutropenia following HSCT, limit exposure to opportunistic and nosocomial pathogens, and ensure prompt intervention should febrile neutropenia or infection develop. Patient and family education, psychosocial support, and coordination of care are key nursing responsibilities.

  7. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells on Transplantation: Immunotherapy Based on Second Signal Blockage

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila de Matos; Bier, Julia; Paiatto, Lisiery Negrini; Galdino Albuquerque, Cassia; Lopes Souza, Caique; Fernandes, Luis Gustavo Romani; Tamashiro, Wirla Maria da Silva Cunha; Simioni, Patricia Ucelli

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most important professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), play crucial role in both immunity and tolerance. It is well known that DCs are able to mount immune responses against foreign antigens and simultaneously tolerate self-antigens. Since DCs can be modulated depending on the surrounding microenvironment, they can act as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the mechanisms that support this dual role are not entirely clear. Recent studies have shown that DCs can be manipulated ex vivo in order to trigger their tolerogenic profile, what can be a tool to be used in clinical trials aiming the treatment of various diseases and the prevention of transplant rejection. In this sense, the blockage of costimulatory molecules on DC, in the attempt of inhibiting the second signal in the immunological synapse, can be considered as one of the main strategies under development. This review brings an update on current therapies using tolerogenic dendritic cells modulated with costimulatory blockers with the aim of reducing transplant rejection. However, although there are current clinical trials using tolerogenic DC to treat allograft rejection, the actual challenge is to modulate these cells in order to maintain a permanent tolerogenic profile. PMID:26543876

  8. Economics of hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khera, Nandita; Zeliadt, Steven B; Lee, Stephanie J

    2012-08-23

    Given the rapidly rising healthcare costs, it is important to understand the economic costs of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), a procedure that is being used more frequently in the treatment of various hematologic disorders. Studies have reported a wide range of costs for HCT, from $36 000 to $88 000 (USD) for a single autologous transplantation for the initial hospitalization, to $200 000 (USD) or more for a myeloablative allogeneic procedure involving an unrelated donor. Common posttransplantation complications, such as infections and GVHD, have been shown to be significant cost drivers. Comparisons across studies are limited by differences in patient populations, cost ascertainment methods, and length of follow-up. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge about costs and cost-effectiveness of HCT, highlighting the challenges in conducting these studies and identifying important areas for future research. We discuss the need for more value-based assessments of HCT using high-quality approaches to measuring costs and outcomes so that potential future efforts to contain costs are well informed and appropriate.

  9. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  10. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  11. Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewska, Anna; Nowakowski, Adam; Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff WM; Gilad, Assaf A; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification. PMID:26366076

  12. High incidence of post-transplant cytomegalovirus reactivations in myeloma patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation after treatment with bortezomib-based regimens: a survey from the Rome transplant network.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, F; Mengarelli, A; Giannotti, F; Tendas, A; Anaclerico, B; Porrini, R; Picardi, A; Cerchiara, E; Dentamaro, T; Chierichini, A; Romeo, A; Cudillo, L; Montefusco, E; Tirindelli, M C; De Fabritiis, P; Annino, L; Petti, M C; Monarca, B; Arcese, W; Avvisati, G

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivations in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) receiving autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is relatively low. However, the recent increased use of novel agents, such as bortezomib and/or immunomodulators, before transplant, has led to an increasing incidence of Herpesviridae family virus infections. The aim of the study was to establish the incidence of post-engraftment symptomatic CMV reactivations in MM patients receiving ASCT, and to compare this incidence with that of patients treated with novel agents or with conventional chemotherapy before transplant. The study was a survey of 80 consecutive patients who underwent ASCT after treatment with novel agents (Group A). These patients were compared with a cohort of 89 patients treated with VAD regimen (vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone) before ASCT (Group B). Overall, 7 patients (4.1%) received an antiviral treatment for a symptomatic CMV reactivation and 1 died. The incidence of CMV reactivations was significantly higher in Group A than in Group B (7.5% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.048). When compared with Group B, the CMV reactivations observed in Group A were significantly more frequent in patients who received bortezomib, whether or not associated with immunomodulators (9.4% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.019), but not in those treated with immunomodulators only (3.7% vs. 1.1%; P = 0.396). These results suggest that MM patients treated with bortezomib-based regimens are at higher risk of developing a symptomatic CMV reactivation after ASCT. PMID:24215479

  13. Personalized Home-based Interval Exercise Training May Improve Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Cancer Patients Preparing to Undergo Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A; Phillips, Brett; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Wilson, Doug; Deal, Allison M; Bailey, Charlotte; Meeneghan, Mathew; Reeve, Bryce B; Basch, Ethan M; Bennett, Antonia V; Shea, Thomas C; Battaglini, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Impaired cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with inferior survival in patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Exercise training based on short, higher-intensity intervals has the potential to efficiently improve cardiorespiratory fitness. We studied home-based interval exercise training (IET) in 40 patients prior to autologous (N=20) or allogeneic (N=20) HCT. Each session consisted of 5, three-minute intervals of walking, jogging, or cycling at 65-95% maximal heart rate (MHR) with 3 minutes of low intensity exercise (<65% MHR) between intervals. Participants were asked to perform sessions at least 3 times weekly. The duration of the intervention was at least 6 weeks, depending on each patient’s scheduled transplantation date. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed from a peak oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) and a 6 minute walk (6MWD) before and after the intervention period. For the autologous HCT cohort, improvements in VO2peak (p=0.12) and 6MWD (p=0.19) were not statistically significant. For the allogeneic cohort, the median VO2peak improvement was 3.7ml/kg*min (p=0.005) and the median 6MWD improvement was 34 meters (p=0.006). Home-based, interval exercise training can be performed prior to HCT and has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26999467

  14. Personalized home-based interval exercise training may improve cardiorespiratory fitness in cancer patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wood, W A; Phillips, B; Smith-Ryan, A E; Wilson, D; Deal, A M; Bailey, C; Meeneghan, M; Reeve, B B; Basch, E M; Bennett, A V; Shea, T C; Battaglini, C L

    2016-07-01

    Impaired cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with inferior survival in patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Exercise training based on short, higher intensity intervals has the potential to efficiently improve cardiorespiratory fitness. We studied home-based interval exercise training (IET) in 40 patients before autologous (N=20) or allogeneic (N=20) HCT. Each session consisted of five, 3 min intervals of walking, jogging or cycling at 65-95% maximal heart rate (MHR) with 3 min of low-intensity exercise (<65% MHR) between intervals. Participants were asked to perform sessions at least three times weekly. The duration of the intervention was at least 6 weeks, depending on each patient's scheduled transplantation date. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed from a peak oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) and a 6 min walk (6MWD) before and after the intervention period. For the autologous HCT cohort, improvements in VO2peak (P=0.12) and 6MWD (P=0.19) were not statistically significant. For the allogeneic cohort, the median VO2peak improvement was 3.7 ml/kg min (P=0.005) and the median 6MWD improvement was 34 m (P=0.006). Home-based IET can be performed before HCT and has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26999467

  15. Regulatory cells and transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Waldmann, Herman

    2013-06-01

    Transplantation tolerance is a continuing therapeutic goal, and it is now clear that a subpopulation of T cells with regulatory activity (Treg) that express the transcription factor foxp3 are crucial to this aspiration. Although reprogramming of the immune system to donor-specific transplantation tolerance can be readily achieved in adult mouse models, it has yet to be successfully translated in human clinical practice. This requires that we understand the fundamental mechanisms by which donor antigen-specific Treg are induced and function to maintain tolerance, so that we can target therapies to enhance rather than impede these regulatory processes. Our current understanding is that Treg act via numerous molecular mechanisms, and critical underlying components such as mTOR inhibition, are only now emerging. PMID:23732858

  16. Process-Based Expansion and Neural Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Transplantation and Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Alexander E.; Brick, David J.; Nethercott, Hubert E.; Banuelos, Maria G.; Sun, Lei; O’Dowd, Diane K.; Schwartz, Philip H.

    2014-01-01

    Robust strategies for developing patient-specific, human, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based therapies of the brain require an ability to derive large numbers of highly defined neural cells. Recent progress in iPSC culture techniques includes partial-to-complete elimination of feeder layers, use of defined media, and single-cell passaging. However, these techniques still require embryoid body formation or coculture for differentiation into neural stem cells (NSCs). In addition, none of the published methodologies has employed all of the advances in a single culture system. Here we describe a reliable method for long-term, single-cell passaging of PSCs using a feeder-free, defined culture system that produces confluent, adherent PSCs that can be differentiated into NSCs. To provide a basis for robust quality control, we have devised a system of cellular nomenclature that describes an accurate genotype and phenotype of the cells at specific stages in the process. We demonstrate that this protocol allows for the efficient, large-scale, cGMP-compliant production of transplantable NSCs from all lines tested. We also show that NSCs generated from iPSCs produced with the process described are capable of forming both glia defined by their expression of S100β and neurons that fire repetitive action potentials. PMID:23893392

  17. Treosulfan-based conditioning regimens for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with non-malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Slatter, M A; Boztug, H; Pötschger, U; Sykora, K-W; Lankester, A; Yaniv, I; Sedlacek, P; Glogova, E; Veys, P; Gennery, A R; Peters, C

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of children with non-malignant diseases can be cured by allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Treosulfan (L-treitol-1,4-bis-methanesulfonate) is being used more frequently for conditioning, owing to its' lower toxicity profile compared with conventional myeloablative regimens. A retrospective analysis was performed of children registered in the EBMT database, who received treosulfan before HSCT between January 2005 and 2010, to identify possible dose-related toxicity and determine the incidence of engraftment, treatment-related mortality and overall survival (OS). Results from 316 transplants from 11 different countries are presented. Ninety-five (30%) were under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. OS was 83% and event-free survival was 76%; 3-year OS and event-free survival of infants below 1 year were 79% and 73%, respectively. No association was found with age at transplant, dose of treosulfan given, other agents used in combination with treosulfan, donor type, stem cell source, or second or subsequent transplant. In this report of the largest number of children to date receiving treosulfan for non-malignant diseases, treosulfan is shown to be a safe and effective agent even for those under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. Further prospective studies are needed using precisely defined protocols with pharmacokinetic monitoring and detailed chimerism analysis. In addition, long-term studies will be vital to determine long-term effects, for example, on fertility in comparison with other regimens.

  18. A population-based cohort study of late mortality in adult autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Lesley J; Le Marsney, Renate E; Dodds, Anthony J; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Wilcox, Leonie; O'Brien, Tracey A; Vajdic, Claire M

    2014-07-01

    We assessed overall and cause-specific mortality and risk factors for late mortality in a nation-wide population-based cohort of 4547 adult cancer patients who survived 2 or more years after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in Australia between 1992 and 2005. Deaths after HSCT were identified from the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry and through data linkage with the National Death Index. Overall, the survival probability was 56% at 10 years from HSCT, ranging from 34% for patients with multiple myeloma to 90% for patients with testicular cancer. Mortality rates moved closer to rates observed in the age- and sex-matched Australian general population over time but remained significantly increased 11 or more years from HSCT (standardized mortality ratio, 5.9). Although the proportion of deaths from nonrelapse causes increased over time, relapse remained the most frequent cause of death for all diagnoses, 10 or more years after autologous HSCT. Our findings show that prevention of disease recurrence remains 1 of the greatest challenges for autologous HSCT recipients, while the increasing rates of nonrelapse deaths due to the emergence of second cancers, circulatory diseases, and respiratory diseases highlight the long-term health issues faced by adult survivors of autologous HSCT. PMID:24631736

  19. Cost of Stem Cell-Based Tissue-Engineered Airway Transplants in the United Kingdom: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Mason, Katrina; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Carvalho, Carla; Partington, Leanne; Crowley, Claire; Hamilton, Nick J; Toll, Ed C; Butler, Colin R; Elliott, Martin J; Birchall, Martin A; Lowdell, Mark W; Mason, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based tissue-engineered tracheas are at an early stage in their product development cycle. Tens of patients have been treated worldwide in predominantly compassionate use settings, demonstrating significant promise. This potentially life-saving treatment is complex, and the cost and its implications for such treatments are yet to be fully understood. The costs are compounded by varying strategies for graft preparation and transplant, resulting in differing clinical and laboratory costs from different research groups. In this study, we present a detailed breakdown of the clinical and manufacturing costs for three of the United Kingdom (UK) patients treated with such transplants. All three patients were treated under Compassionate Use legislation, within the UK National Health Service (NHS) hospital setting. The total costs for the three UK patients treated ranged from $174,420 to $740,500. All three patients were in a state of poor health at time of treatment and had a number of complexities in addition to the restricted airway. This is the first time a cost analysis has been made for a tissue-engineered organ and provides a benchmark for future studies, as well as comparative data for use in reimbursement considerations.

  20. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  1. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as "off-the-shelf" therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  2. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients.

  3. Development of a novel carrier optimized for cell sheet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amagai, Yosuke; Karasawa, Kaoru; Kyungsook, Jung; Matsuda, Akira; Kojima, Masanori; Watanabe, Jun; Hibi, Toyoji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly advancing technology in the field of regenerative medicine. For the transplantation of cell sheets, a carrier must maintain the shape of a cell sheet from a culture dish to affected sites as well as release the sheet easily onto the lesion. In this study, we examined the utility of a novel, poly(lactic acid)-based carrier for cell sheets transplantation to the cornea of dogs and the skin of rats. The poly(lactic acid)-based carrier easily picked a cell sheet up from the dish, fit to the shape of the transplantation sites, and saved time for cell sheets detachment comparing to a conventional carrier. Thus, the poly(lactic acid)-based carrier would be useful for easy cell sheet transplantations. PMID:25869322

  4. A Hyaluronan-Based Injectable Hydrogel Improves the Survival and Integration of Stem Cell Progeny following Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ballios, Brian G.; Cooke, Michael J.; Donaldson, Laura; Coles, Brenda L.K.; Morshead, Cindi M.; van der Kooy, Derek; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The utility of stem cells and their progeny in adult transplantation models has been limited by poor survival and integration. We designed an injectable and bioresorbable hydrogel blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC) and tested it with two cell types in two animal models, thereby gaining an understanding of its general applicability for enhanced cell distribution, survival, integration, and functional repair relative to conventional cell delivery in saline. HAMC improves cell survival and integration of retinal stem cell (RSC)-derived rods in the retina. The pro-survival mechanism of HAMC is ascribed to the interaction of the CD44 receptor with HA. Transient disruption of the retinal outer limiting membrane, combined with HAMC delivery, results in significantly improved rod survival and visual function. HAMC also improves the distribution, viability, and functional repair of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs). The HAMC delivery system improves cell transplantation efficacy in two CNS models, suggesting broad applicability. PMID:25981414

  5. Radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents an attractive strategy to deliver radiation selectively to tumor and other target organs while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. RIT with β-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in leukemia. Similarly, RIT directed against CD20 has shown promise in the setting of autologous and allogeneic HCT for B-cell lymphomas. α-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213, actinium-225 and astatinine-211 offers the possibility of more selective and efficient killing of target cells while sparing the surrounding normal cells. Pretargeting strategies may further improve target:normal organ dose ratios. While RIT has demonstrated significant antitumor activity, ultimately, randomized studies will be required to determine if conditioning regimens that include this therapeutic modality can improve patient outcomes after HCT. PMID:23557421

  6. Re-engineering Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fotino, Nicoletta; Fotino, Carmen; Pileggi, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    We are living exciting times in the field of beta cell replacement therapies for the treatment of diabetes. While steady progress has been recorded thus far in clinical islet transplantation, novel approaches are needed to make cell-based therapies more reproducible and leading to long-lasting success. The multiple facets of diabetes impose the need for a transdisciplinary approach to attain this goal, by targeting immunity, promoting engraftment and sustained functional potency. We discuss herein the emerging technologies applied to beta cell replacement therapies. PMID:25814189

  7. Management of Liver Failure: From Transplantation to Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Cervello, Melchiorre; Vizzini, Giovanni Battista; Pietrosi, Giada; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The severe shortage of deceased donor organs has driven a search for alternative methods of treating liver failure. In this context, cell-based regenerative medicine is emerging as a promising interdisciplinary field of tissue repair and restoration, able to contribute to improving health in a minimally invasive fashion. Several cell types have allowed long-term survival in experimental models of liver injury, but their therapeutic potential in humans should be regarded with deep caution, because few clinical trials are currently available and the number of patients enrolled so far is too small to assess benefits versus risks. This review summarizes the current literature on the physiological role of endogenous stem cells in liver regeneration and on the therapeutic benefits of exogenous stem cell administration with specific emphasis on the potential clinical uses of mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, critical points that still need clarification, such as the exact identity of the stem-like cell population exerting the beneficial effects, as well as the limitations of stem cell-based therapies, are discussed. PMID:26998399

  8. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups.

  9. Haematopoietic cell transplants in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Gale, R P; Seber, A; Bonfim, C; Pasquini, M

    2016-07-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done predominately in Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplant activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of >600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. These data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America. PMID:26999468

  10. Haematopoietic cell transplants in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Gale, R P; Seber, A; Bonfim, C; Pasquini, M

    2016-07-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done predominately in Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplant activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of >600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. These data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America.

  11. Haematopoietic Cell Transplants in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Robert Peter; Seber, Adriana; Bonfim, Carmem; Pasquini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly-distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done in predominately Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplants activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of more than 600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. The data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America. PMID:26999468

  12. [Blood stem cell transplantation in pediatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Mentkevich, G L; Dolgopolov, I S; Popa, A V; Boiarshinov, V K; Ravshanova, R S

    2001-01-01

    Large-dose chemotherapy (LDCT) with auto- and allogenic transplantation of blood stem cells (BSC) in pediatric oncology remains so far the last hope for many patients. The number of such procedures made in Europe increases by 10% every year. At the same time many issues of the place and role of transplantation in pediatric oncology remains unclear. Based on 240 sessions of cytopheresis, the author show that BSC can be sampled from severe pretreated patients despite the drug therapy regimen. The efficacy of G-KSF and GM-KSF used to stimulate BSC secretion is similar. After LDCT with BSC autotransplantation, the relapse-free survival rates in patients with Ewing's sarcoma and acute myeloblast-cell leukemia were 55.4 and 44.4%, respectively (in the first and second remissions). Consolidation as LDCT with BSC autotransplantation without cleansing the material from malignant cells is not a sufficient therapeutical measurement in disseminated neuroblastoma. Whether partial compatible related BSC transplantation can be possible made after non-myeloablative preparation regimens is shown.

  13. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  14. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  15. Hematopoietic Stem cell transplantation and lentiviral vector-based gene therapy for Krabbe's disease: Present convictions and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bi, Yanmin; Pan, Dao; Moore, Dominic; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Sands, Mark S; Miller, Ryan; Kafri, Tal

    2016-11-01

    Currently, presymtomatic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation (HSPCT) is the only therapeutic modality that alleviates Krabbe's disease (KD)-induced central nervous system damage. However, all HSPCT-treated patients exhibit severe deterioration in peripheral nervous system function characterized by major motor and expressive language pathologies. We hypothesize that a combination of several mechanisms contribute to this phenomenon, including 1) nonoptimal conditioning protocols with consequent inefficient engraftment and biodistribution of donor-derived cells and 2) insufficient uptake of donor cell-secreted galactocerebrosidease (GALC) secondary to a naturally low expression level of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate-receptor (CI-MPR). We have characterized the effects of a busulfan (Bu) based conditioning regimen on the efficacy of HSPCT in prolonging twi mouse average life span. There was no correlation between the efficiency of bone marrow engraftment of donor cells and twi mouse average life span. HSPCT prolonged the average life span of twi mice, which directly correlated with the aggressiveness of the Bu-mediated conditioning protocols. HSPC transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying the GALC cDNA under control of cell-specific promoters were efficiently engrafted in twi mouse bone marrow. To facilitate HSPCT-mediated correction of GALC deficiency in target cells expressing low levels of CI-MPR, a novel GALC fusion protein including the ApoE1 receptor was developed. Efficient cellular uptake of the novel fusion protein was mediated by a mannose-6-phosphate-independent mechanism. The novel findings described here elucidate some of the cellular mechanisms that impede the cure of KD patients by HSPCT and concomitantly open new directions to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of HSPCT protocols for KD. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638600

  16. Hematopoietic Stem cell transplantation and lentiviral vector-based gene therapy for Krabbe's disease: Present convictions and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bi, Yanmin; Pan, Dao; Moore, Dominic; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Sands, Mark S; Miller, Ryan; Kafri, Tal

    2016-11-01

    Currently, presymtomatic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation (HSPCT) is the only therapeutic modality that alleviates Krabbe's disease (KD)-induced central nervous system damage. However, all HSPCT-treated patients exhibit severe deterioration in peripheral nervous system function characterized by major motor and expressive language pathologies. We hypothesize that a combination of several mechanisms contribute to this phenomenon, including 1) nonoptimal conditioning protocols with consequent inefficient engraftment and biodistribution of donor-derived cells and 2) insufficient uptake of donor cell-secreted galactocerebrosidease (GALC) secondary to a naturally low expression level of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate-receptor (CI-MPR). We have characterized the effects of a busulfan (Bu) based conditioning regimen on the efficacy of HSPCT in prolonging twi mouse average life span. There was no correlation between the efficiency of bone marrow engraftment of donor cells and twi mouse average life span. HSPCT prolonged the average life span of twi mice, which directly correlated with the aggressiveness of the Bu-mediated conditioning protocols. HSPC transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying the GALC cDNA under control of cell-specific promoters were efficiently engrafted in twi mouse bone marrow. To facilitate HSPCT-mediated correction of GALC deficiency in target cells expressing low levels of CI-MPR, a novel GALC fusion protein including the ApoE1 receptor was developed. Efficient cellular uptake of the novel fusion protein was mediated by a mannose-6-phosphate-independent mechanism. The novel findings described here elucidate some of the cellular mechanisms that impede the cure of KD patients by HSPCT and concomitantly open new directions to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of HSPCT protocols for KD. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth KEY POINTS n Have a dental checkup before your transplant procedure. n See your ... problems . SEE YOUR DENTIST Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth BEFORE ...

  18. Outcomes of Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation for Lymphoma with Melphalan-Based Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Jonathan E; Khouri, Issa; Gaballa, Sameh; Anderlini, Paolo; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Ahmed, Sairah; Ledesma, Celina; Hosing, Chitra; Champlin, Richard E; Ciurea, Stefan O

    2016-03-01

    Haploidentical transplantation (Haplo-SCT) with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is increasingly utilized for the treatment of lymphoma and almost exclusively with the nonmyeloablative fludarabine (Flu)/cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation (TBI) conditioning regimen. We present early results of a reduced-intensity (RIC) regimen utilizing fludarabine and melphalan (FM) for the treatment of advanced lymphoma. All patients with a diagnosis of lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who received Haplo-SCT at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed (N = 22). Patients received Flu 160 mg/m(2) and melphalan 100 mg/m(2) to 140 mg/m(2) with thiotepa 5 mg/kg or 2 Gy TBI. Because of concerns of increased treatment-related mortality (TRM) with the melphalan 140 mg/m(2) regimen (FM140), a RIC regimen with melphalan 100 mg/m(2) (FM100) was devised. Rituximab was included for CD20(+) disease. Graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis consisted of PTCy 50 mg/kg on days +3 and + 4, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil. Sixty-eight percent of all patients were not in complete remission at the time of transplantation. The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort were 54%, 1-year TRM was 19%, and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 2 years was 27%. Two-year PFS for Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma were 57%, 51%, and 75%. Patients treated with FM100 compared to FM140 had equivalent PFS (71% versus 37%, P = .246) and OS (71% versus 58%, P = .32). These early results establish Flu and melphalan 100 mg/m(2) with 2 Gy TBI or thiotepa 5 mg/kg as a very promising conditioning regimen for the treatment of advanced lymphoma with Haplo-SCT and PTCy.

  19. Chimerism-based pre-emptive immunotherapy with fast withdrawal of immunosuppression and donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for pediatric hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Horn, Biljana; Petrovic, Aleksandra; Wahlstrom, Justin; Dvorak, Christopher C; Kong, Denice; Hwang, Jimmy; Expose-Spencer, Jueleah; Gates, Michael; Cowan, Morton J

    2015-04-01

    The presence of increasing host chimerism or persistent mixed chimerism (MC) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia in children is a predictor of relapse. To reduce the risk of relapse, we prospectively studied post-transplantation chimerism-based immunotherapy (IT) using fast withdrawal of immunosuppression (FWI) and donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) in children with early post-transplantation MC. Forty-three children with hematologic malignancies at 2 institutions were enrolled prospectively in this study from 2009 until 2012 and were followed for a mean of 42 (SD, 10) months. Twelve patients (28%) were assigned to the observation arm based on the presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or full donor chimerism (FDC), and 5 (12%) sustained early events and could not undergo intervention. Twenty-six (60%) patients with MC were assigned to IT with FWI, which started at a median of 49 days (range, 35 to 85 days) after transplantation. Fourteen patients proceeded to DLI after FWI. Toxicities of treatment included GVHD, which developed in 19% of patients undergoing intervention, with 1 of 26 (4%) dying from GVHD and 1 (4%) still requiring therapy for chronic GVHD 21 months after DLI. Patients with MC undergoing IT had similar 2-year event-free survival (EFS) (73%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 55% to 91%) compared with patients who achieved FDC spontaneously (83%; 95% CI, 62% to 100%); however, because 50% of all relapses in the IT occurred later than 2 years after transplantation, the EFS declined to 55% (95% CI, 34% to 76%) at 42 (SD, 11) months. There were no late relapses in the observation group. EFS in the entire cohort was 58% (95% CI, 42% to 73%) at 42 (SD, 11) months after transplantation. Evidence of disease before transplantation remained a significant predictor of relapse, whereas development of chronic GVHD was protective against relapse. PMID:25644958

  20. Chimerism analysis following nonmyeloablative stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lion, Thomas; Watzinger, Franz

    2006-01-01

    Molecular monitoring of hematopoietic chimerism has become a routine diagnostic approach in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Chimerism testing permits the documentation and surveillance of engraftment and facilitates early detection of impending graft rejection. In patients transplanted for treatment of malignant hematological disorders, monitoring of chimerism can provide an early indication of incipient disease relapse. The investigation of chimerism has therefore become an indispensable tool for the management of patients during the posttransplant period. Growing use of nonmyeloablative conditioning, which is associated with prolonged duration of mixed hematopoietic chimerism, has further increased the clinical importance of chimerism analysis. At present, the most commonly used technical approaches to the investigation of chimerism include microsatellite analysis by polymerase chain reaction and, in the gender-mismatched transplant setting, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of sex chromosomes. The investigation of chimerism within specific leukocyte subsets isolated from peripheral blood or bone marrow samples by flow-sorting or magnetic bead-based techniques provides more specific information on processes underlying the dynamics of donor/recipient chimerism. Moreover, cell subset-specific analysis permits the assessment of impending complications at a significantly higher sensitivity, thus providing a basis for earlier treatment decisions.

  1. Thrombosis in stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Emin

    2012-04-01

    Hemostatic changes and thrombotic events are frequent in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. Arterial and venous thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Thrombotic complications can be classified into four groups including: catheter-related thrombosis, venous thromboembolic (VTE) events, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS)/veno-occlusive disease, and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TAM). The incidence of catheter-related thrombosis is 8-20% in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and the incidence is low in syngeneic and allogeneic transplant patients. Venous duplex Doppler ultrasound, venogram, and computed tomography scan are required to visualize the venous thrombus. The treatment should be aimed at the prevention of pulmonary embolism, the avoidance of thrombus extension, and the preservation of catheter patency. Patients undergoing HSCT may have risk factors for VTE including underlying malignancy, traumatic brain injury, prolonged hospitalization, administration of conditioning regimens, and central venous catheters. Important risk factors are presence of history of VTE and graft-versus-host disease. One-year incidence of symptomatic VTE is 3.7%. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease, is a serious liver disease, seen in approximately 50-60% of HSCT patients. The mortality rate from the severe form of SOS is 84.3% and majority of the patients have multi-organ failure. The frequency is quite low after autologous transplantation. Risk factors for SOS include pre-existing hepatic damage, previous high-dose chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation, female gender and donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen disparity. Cyclophosphamide and busulphan are the most common agents with the highest incidence and fatal SOS. Histopathologic features of SOS include dilatation of sinusoids, necrosis of perivenular hepatocytes, and obstruction of small intrahepatic central venules by

  2. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  3. Fibrin patch-based insulin-like growth factor-1 gene-modified stem cell transplantation repairs ischemic myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhu, Kai; Yang, Shan; Wang, Yulin; Guo, Changfa; Yin, Kanhua; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), tissue-engineered cardiac patch, and therapeutic gene have all been proposed as promising therapy strategies for cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. In our study, BMSCs were modified with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene, loaded into a fibrin patch, and then transplanted into a porcine model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) myocardium injury. The results demonstrated that IGF-1 gene overexpression could promote proliferation of endothelial cells and cardiomyocyte-like differentiation of BMSCs in vitro. Four weeks after transplantation of fibrin patch loaded with gene-modified BMSCs, IGF-1 overexpression could successfully promote angiogenesis, inhibit remodeling, increase grafted cell survival and reduce apoptosis. In conclusion, the integrated strategy, which combined fibrin patch with IGF-1 gene modified BMSCs, could promote the histological cardiac repair for a clinically relevant porcine model of I/R myocardium injury. PMID:25767192

  4. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and Their Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Scalea, Joseph R.; Tomita, Yusuke; Lindholm, Christopher R.; Burlingham, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor-derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the induction regimen capable of achieving consistent tolerance, while avoiding unwanted sided effects, and which is scalable to the human patient, has yet to be identified. Here, we present the status of investigations of various tolerogenic cell types and the mechanistic rationale for their use in tolerance induction protocols. PMID:27014267

  5. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Akio; Nagai, Takayuki; Mandai, Michiko Takahashi, Masayo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2007-11-16

    The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy.

  6. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  7. Outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation in adult patients with acquired aplastic anemia using intermediate-dose alemtuzumab-based conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Nada; Del Bel, Ryan; Messner, Hans A; Kim, Dennis; Kuruvilla, John; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Uhm, Jieun; Seftel, Matthew; Alam, Naheed; Xu, Wei; Gupta, Vikas

    2014-11-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has no therapeutic benefit after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), and its prevention is highly desirable. We designed a conditioning regimen using an intermediate dose of alemtuzumab (50 to 60 mg) and describe our institutional experience of 41 patients who underwent HCT for AA. The median age at HCT was 37 years (range, 17 to 59). The conditioning regimen was high-dose cyclophosphamide (n = 9) or fludarabine based (n = 32). Additional GVHD prophylaxis was with cyclosporine. With a median follow-up of 3.6 years, overall survival at 3 years was 85%. Survival in patients <40 years and ≥40 years was 96% and 67%, respectively (P = .04). Graft failure occurred in 4 (10%) patients; 2 primary and 2 secondary. The cumulative incidences of acute (grades 1 to 2) and chronic GVHD were 27% and 15%, respectively. No patients developed grade 3 to 4 acute GVHD or severe chronic GVHD. The following viral complications were frequent: cytomegalovirus reactivation (79%), herpes simplex (18%), varicella zoster (25%), and BK virus hemorrhagic cystitis (8%). The majority of patients had no significant long-term health issues. This intermediate-dose alemtuzumab-based conditioning regimen results in excellent survival with a favorable impact on GVHD and long-term health outcomes, but close monitoring for viral complications is important.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem cell transplantation and lentiviral vector‐based gene therapy for Krabbe's disease: Present convictions and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Nikolaishvili‐Feinberg, Nana; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bi, Yanmin; Pan, Dao; Moore, Dominic; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Sands, Mark S.; Miller, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, presymtomatic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation (HSPCT) is the only therapeutic modality that alleviates Krabbe's disease (KD)‐induced central nervous system damage. However, all HSPCT‐treated patients exhibit severe deterioration in peripheral nervous system function characterized by major motor and expressive language pathologies. We hypothesize that a combination of several mechanisms contribute to this phenomenon, including 1) nonoptimal conditioning protocols with consequent inefficient engraftment and biodistribution of donor‐derived cells and 2) insufficient uptake of donor cell‐secreted galactocerebrosidease (GALC) secondary to a naturally low expression level of the cation‐independent mannose 6‐phosphate‐receptor (CI‐MPR). We have characterized the effects of a busulfan (Bu) based conditioning regimen on the efficacy of HSPCT in prolonging twi mouse average life span. There was no correlation between the efficiency of bone marrow engraftment of donor cells and twi mouse average life span. HSPCT prolonged the average life span of twi mice, which directly correlated with the aggressiveness of the Bu‐mediated conditioning protocols. HSPC transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying the GALC cDNA under control of cell‐specific promoters were efficiently engrafted in twi mouse bone marrow. To facilitate HSPCT‐mediated correction of GALC deficiency in target cells expressing low levels of CI‐MPR, a novel GALC fusion protein including the ApoE1 receptor was developed. Efficient cellular uptake of the novel fusion protein was mediated by a mannose‐6‐phosphate‐independent mechanism. The novel findings described here elucidate some of the cellular mechanisms that impede the cure of KD patients by HSPCT and concomitantly open new directions to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of HSPCT protocols for KD. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638600

  9. Cell replacement and visual restoration by retinal sheet transplants

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affect millions of people. Replacing lost cells with new cells that connect with the still functional part of the host retina might repair a degenerating retina and restore eyesight to an unknown extent. A unique model, subretinal transplantation of freshly dissected sheets of fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells, combined with its retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), has demonstrated successful results in both animals and humans. Most other approaches are restricted to rescue endogenous retinal cells of the recipient in earlier disease stages by a ‘nursing’ role of the implanted cells and are not aimed at neural retinal cell replacement. Sheet transplants restore lost visual responses in several retinal degeneration models in the superior colliculus (SC) corresponding to the location of the transplant in the retina. They do not simply preserve visual performance – they increase visual responsiveness to light. Restoration of visual responses in the SC can be directly traced to neural cells in the transplant, demonstrating that synaptic connections between transplant and host contribute to the visual improvement. Transplant processes invade the inner plexiform layer of the host retina and form synapses with presumable host cells. In a Phase II trial of RP and ARMD patients, transplants of retina together with its RPE improved visual acuity. In summary, retinal progenitor sheet transplantation provides an excellent model to answer questions about how to repair and restore function of a degenerating retina. Supply of fetal donor tissue will always be limited but the model can set a standard and provide an informative base for optimal cell replacement therapies such as embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived therapy. PMID:22771454

  10. Allograft Cancer Cell Transplantation in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Moore, John C; Langenau, David M

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic cell transplantation is the transfer of cells from one individual into another of the same species and has become an indispensable technique for studying development, immunology, regeneration and cancer biology. In experimental settings, tumor cell engraftment into immunologically competent recipients has greatly increased our understanding of the mechanisms that drive self-renewal, progression and metastasis in vivo. Zebrafish have quickly emerged as a powerful genetic model of cancer that has benefited greatly from allogeneic transplantation. Efficient engraftment can be achieved by transplanting cells into either early larval stage zebrafish that have not yet developed a functional acquired immune system or adult zebrafish following radiation or chemical ablation of the immune system. Alternatively, transplantation can be completed in adult fish using either clonal syngeneic strains or newly-generated immune compromised zebrafish models that have mutations in genes required for proper immune cell function. Here, we discuss the current state of cell transplantation as it pertains to zebrafish cancer and the available models used for dissecting important processes underlying cancer. We will also use the zebrafish model to highlight the power of cell transplantation, including its capacity to dynamically assess functional heterogeneity within individual cancer cells, visualize cancer progression and evolution, assess tumor-propagating potential and self-renewal, image cancer cell invasion and dissemination and identify novel therapies for treating cancer. PMID:27165358

  11. Insights in Behavior of Variably Formulated Alginate-Based Microcapsules for Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Montanucci, Pia; Terenzi, Silvia; Pennoni, Ilaria; Basta, Giuseppe; Calafiore, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Alginate-based microencapsulation of live cells may offer the opportunity to treat chronic and degenerative disorders. So far, a thorough assessment of physical-chemical behavior of alginate-based microbeads remains cloudy. A disputed issue is which divalent cation to choose for a high performing alginate gelling process. Having selected, in our system, high mannuronic (M) enriched alginates, we studied different gelling cations and their combinations to determine their eventual influence on physical-chemical properties of the final microcapsules preparation, in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that used of ultrapure alginate allows for high biocompatibility of the formed microcapsules, regardless of gelation agents, while use of different gelling cations is associated with corresponding variable effects on the capsules' basic architecture, as originally reported in this work. However, only the final application which the capsules are destined to will ultimately guide the selection of the ideal, specific gelling divalent cations, since in principle there are no capsules that are better than others. PMID:26078974

  12. Evolving approaches of hematopoietic stem cell-based therapies to induce tolerance to organ transplants: the long road to tolerance.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, J; Miller, J; Abecassis, M; Tollerud, D J; Ildstad, S T

    2013-01-01

    The immunoregulatory properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been recognized for more than 60 years, beginning in 1945, when Owen reported that genetically disparate freemartin cattle sharing a common placenta were red blood cell chimeras. In 1953, Billingham, Brent, and Medawar demonstrated that murine neonatal chimeras prepared by infusion of donor-derived hematopoietic cells exhibited donor-specific tolerance to skin allografts. Various approaches using HSCs in organ transplantation have gradually brought closer to reality the dream of inducing donor-specific tolerance in organ transplant recipients. Several hurdles needed to be overcome, especially the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the toxicity of ablative conditioning, and the need for close donor-recipient matching. For wide acceptance, HSC therapy must be safe and reproducible in mismatched donor-recipient combinations. Discoveries in other disciplines have often unexpectedly and synergistically contributed to progress in this area. This review presents a historic perspective of the quest for tolerance in organ transplantation, highlighting current clinical approaches.

  13. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation,; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  14. Immunological aspects of liver cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oldhafer, Felix; Bock, Michael; Falk, Christine S; Vondran, Florian W R

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, the liver is of major interest for adoption of regenerative strategies due to its well-known and unique regenerative capacity. Whereas therapeutic strategies such as liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can be considered standards of care for the treatment of a variety of liver diseases, the concept of liver cell transplantation (LCTx) still awaits clinical breakthrough. Success of LCTx is hampered by insufficient engraftment/long-term acceptance of cellular allografts mainly due to rejection of transplanted cells. This is in contrast to the results achieved for OLT where long-term graft survival is observed on a regular basis and, hence, the liver has been deemed an immune-privileged organ. Immune responses induced by isolated hepatocytes apparently differ considerably from those observed following transplantation of solid organs and, thus, LCTx requires refined immunological strategies to improve its clinical outcome. In addition, clinical usage of LCTx but also related basic research efforts are hindered by the limited availability of high quality liver cells, strongly emphasizing the need for alternative cell sources. This review focuses on the various immunological aspects of LCTx summarizing data available not only for hepatocyte transplantation but also for transplantation of non-parenchymal liver cells and liver stem cells. PMID:27011904

  15. Clinical-scale laser-based scanning and processing of live cells: selective photothermal killing of fluorescent tumor targets for autologous stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Manfred R.; Hanania, Elie G.; Eisfeld, Timothy; O'Neal, Robert A.; Khovananth, Kevin M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2001-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, is widely used for the treatment of cancer. However, contaminating tumor cells within HSC harvests continue to be of major concern since re-infused tumor cells have proven to contribute to disease relapse. Many tumor purging methods have been evaluated, but all leave detectable tumor cells in the transplant and result in significant loss of HSCs. These shortcomings cause engraftment delays and compromise the therapeutic value of purging. A novel approach integrating automated scanning cytometry, image analysis, and selective laser-induced killing of labeled cells within a cell mixture is described here. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cells were spiked into cell mixtures, and fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were used to label tumor cells within the mixture. Cells were then allowed to settle on a surface, and as the surface was scanned with a fluorescence excitation source, a laser pulse was fired at every detected tumor cell using high-speed beam steering mirrors. Tumor cells were selectively killed with little effect on adjacent non-target cells, demonstrating the feasibility of this automated cell processing approach. This technology has many potential research and clinical applications, one example of which is tumor cell purging for autologous HSC transplantation.

  16. Treatment of Parkinson's disease using cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lindvall, Olle

    2015-01-01

    The clinical trials with intrastriatal transplantation of human fetal mesencephalic tissue, rich in dopaminergic neurons, in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show that cell replacement can work and in some cases induce major, long-lasting improvement. However, owing to poor tissue availability, this approach can only be applied in very few patients, and standardization is difficult, leading to wide variation in functional outcome. Stem cells and reprogrammed cells could potentially be used to produce dopaminergic neurons for transplantation. Importantly, dopaminergic neurons of the correct substantia nigra phenotype can now be generated from human embryonic stem cells in large numbers and standardized preparations, and will soon be ready for application in patients. Also, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons are being considered for clinical translation. Available data justify moving forward in a responsible way with these dopaminergic neurons, which should be tested, using optimal patient selection, cell preparation and transplantation procedures, in controlled clinical studies. PMID:26416681

  17. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment ... are the donor’s stem cells matched to the patient’s stem cells in allogeneic ...

  18. Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for spinal cord injury: An 18-year bibliometric analysis based on the Web of Science★

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Zikuan; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Dong; Cao, Kai

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation is a promising new approach for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an increasing number of scientific publications are devoted to this treatment strategy. This bibliometric analysis was conducted to assess global research trends in OEC transplantation for SCI. DATA SOURCE: All of the data in this study originate from the Web of Science maintained by the Institute for Scientific Information, USA, and includes SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, A&HCI, CPCI-S, CPCI-SSH, BKCI-S, BKCI-SSH, CCR-EXPANDED and IC. The Institute for Scientific Information's Web of Science was searched using the keywords “olfactory ensheathing cells” or “OECs” or “olfactory ensheathing glia” or “OEG” or “olfactory ensheathing glial cells” or “OEGs” and “spinal cord injury” or “SCI” or “spinal injury” or “spinal transection” for literature published from January 1898 to May 2012. DATA SELECTION: Original articles, reviews, proceedings papers and meeting abstracts, book chapters and editorial materials on OEC transplantation for SCI were included. Simultaneously, unpublished literature and literature for which manual information retrieval was required were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All selected literatures addressing OEC transplantation for SCI were evaluated in the following aspects: publication year, document type, language, author, institution, times cited, Web of Science category, core source title, countries/territories and funding agency. RESULTS: In the Web of Science published by the Institute for Scientific Information, the earliest literature record was in April, 1995. Four hundred and fourteen publications addressing OEC transplantation for SCI were added to the data library in the past 18 years, with an annually increasing trend. Of 415 records, 405 publications were in English. Two hundred and fifty-nine articles ranked first in the distribution of document type, followed by 141

  19. National Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplant Registry in Poland: Nationwide Internet Reporting System and Results.

    PubMed

    Łęczycka, A; Dudkiewicz, M; Czerwiński, J; Malanowski, P; Żalikowska-Hołoweńko, J; Danielewicz, R

    2016-06-01

    History of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Poland begins in early 1980s; the 1st bone marrow allotransplantation was performed in 1983 in the Central Clinical Hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Warsaw. Following years brought the 1st autologous stem cell transplantations. Ten years later, unrelated bone marrow transplantation was performed for the 1st time by the team of the Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit in Katowice. Since then, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation developed to be standard procedure and one of the most important therapies applied in leukemia treatment. The number of allotransplantations in Poland has grown significantly in the past 2 decades, which generated new needs and problems. In 2005, based on a new Transplant Law, a National Transplants Registry was created. Its main role is to collect data (registration of procedures and follow-up data) related to every transplantation case for stem cells and tissues as well as for organs. We present statistics concerning stem cell transplantations performed in Poland, as collected in the National Transplants Registry in the years 2006-2014. There are 18 centers transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in Poland. The total number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations performed in 2006-2014 was 3,537, with allotransplantations from relatives accounted for 1,491 and from unrelated donors for 2,046. The main indication for allotransplantation in past years was acute leukemia. PMID:27496493

  20. National Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplant Registry in Poland: Nationwide Internet Reporting System and Results.

    PubMed

    Łęczycka, A; Dudkiewicz, M; Czerwiński, J; Malanowski, P; Żalikowska-Hołoweńko, J; Danielewicz, R

    2016-06-01

    History of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Poland begins in early 1980s; the 1st bone marrow allotransplantation was performed in 1983 in the Central Clinical Hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Warsaw. Following years brought the 1st autologous stem cell transplantations. Ten years later, unrelated bone marrow transplantation was performed for the 1st time by the team of the Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit in Katowice. Since then, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation developed to be standard procedure and one of the most important therapies applied in leukemia treatment. The number of allotransplantations in Poland has grown significantly in the past 2 decades, which generated new needs and problems. In 2005, based on a new Transplant Law, a National Transplants Registry was created. Its main role is to collect data (registration of procedures and follow-up data) related to every transplantation case for stem cells and tissues as well as for organs. We present statistics concerning stem cell transplantations performed in Poland, as collected in the National Transplants Registry in the years 2006-2014. There are 18 centers transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in Poland. The total number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations performed in 2006-2014 was 3,537, with allotransplantations from relatives accounted for 1,491 and from unrelated donors for 2,046. The main indication for allotransplantation in past years was acute leukemia.

  1. Immunosuppressive Total Lymphoid Irradiation-Based Reconditioning Regimens Enable Engraftment After Graft Rejection or Graft Failure in Patients Treated With Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzelmann, Frank; Lang, Peter J.; Ottinger, Hellmut; Faul, Christoph; Bethge, Wolfgang; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bamberg, Michael; Belka, Claus

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI)-based reconditioning regimens in patients with graft failure or graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: The results of 14 patients (7 adults and 7 children) with a variety of hematologic malignant diseases treated with a TLI-based reconditioning regimen with 7-Gy single-dose application plus anti-T-lymphocyte antibody OKT3 (n = 11) and/or antithymocyte globulin (n = 7)/fludarabine (n = 9), followed by an infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (n = 13) or bone marrow stem cells (n = 1) from related or unrelated donors, were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of the 14 recipients, the data from 11 were evaluable for engraftment after TLI-based reconditioning because 3 adults died early (at Day 2, 5, and 15) after the second transplantation of infectious complications. Engraftment in 4 adults was seen after a median of 12 days (range, 10-18) and occurred after a median of 10 days (range, 9-32) in the 7 children. TLI-based reconditioning was well-tolerated with no severe toxicity. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for the whole cohort was 140 days (range, 5-1,268). After a median follow-up of 681 days, the disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 85.7% and 85.7%, respectively, in the children. Despite engraftment in the 4 remaining adults, 1 died of fatal graft-vs.-host disease, 1 of infectious complications, 1 of disease relapse, and 1 of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Conclusions: In patients with graft failure or graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, TLI-based reconditioning regimens allow sustained engraftment, paralleled by a favorable toxicity profile, potentially leading to long-term survival.

  2. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Jeanty, Cerine; Walters, Mark C.; Vichinsky, Elliott; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx) is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application. PMID:25628564

  3. Male germ cell transplantation in livestock.

    PubMed

    Hill, J R; Dobrinski, I

    2006-01-01

    Male germ cell transplantation is a powerful approach to study the control of spermatogenesis with the ultimate goal to enhance or suppress male fertility. In livestock animals, applications can be expanded to provide an alternative method of transgenesis and an alternative means of artificial insemination (AI). The transplantation technique uses testis stem cells, harvested from the donor animal. These donor stem cells are injected into seminiferous tubules, migrate from the lumen to relocate to the basement membrane and, amazingly, they can retain the capability to produce donor sperm in their new host. Adaptation of the mouse technique for livestock is progressing, with gradual gains in efficiency. Germ cell transfer in goats has produced offspring, but not yet in cattle and pigs. In goats and pigs, the applications of germ cell transplantation are mainly in facilitating transgenic animal production. In cattle, successful male germ cell transfer could create an alternative to AI in areas where it is impractical. Large-scale culture of testis stem cells would enhance the use of elite bulls by providing a renewable source of stem cells for transfer. Although still in a developmental state, germ cell transplantation is an emerging technology with the potential to create new opportunities in livestock production. PMID:16478598

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted stem cell fate in stroke.

    PubMed

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Goodarzi, Parisa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, scientific findings in the field of regeneration of nervous system have revealed the possibility of stem cell based therapies for damaged brain tissue related disorders like stroke. Furthermore, to achieve desirable outcomes from cellular therapies, one needs to monitor the migration, engraftment, viability, and also functional fate of transplanted stem cells. Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely versatile technique for this purpose, which has been broadly used to study stroke and assessment of therapeutic role of stem cells. In this review we searched in PubMed search engine by using following keywords; "Stem Cells", "Cell Tracking", "Stroke", "Stem Cell Transplantation", "Nanoparticles", and "Magnetic Resonance Imaging" as entry terms and based on the mentioned key words, the search period was set from 1976 to 2012. The main purpose of this article is describing various advantages of molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells, with focus on translation of stem cell research to clinical research.

  5. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  6. Genetic Modification of Stem Cells for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Ian; Tang, Yao Liang

    2009-01-01

    Gene modification of cells for prior to their transplantation, especially stem cells, enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the Trojan horse, the gene modified cell has to gain entrance inside the host’s walls and survive and deliver its transgene products Using cellular, molecular and gene manipulation techniques the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves constructing modules of functional gene sequences. They can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell specific promoters and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and non viral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases,( including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and spinal cord injury repair), bone defects, hemophilia, and cancer. PMID:18031863

  7. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia.

  8. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  9. Mesenchymal stromal cells in renal transplantation: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, Federica; Perico, Norberto; Cortinovis, Monica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Lifelong immunosuppressive therapy is essential to prevent allograft rejection in transplant recipients. Long-term, nonspecific immunosuppression can, however, result in life-threatening complications and fail to prevent chronic graft rejection. Bone marrow (BM)-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have emerged as a potential candidate for cell-based therapy to modulate the immune response in organ transplantation. These cells can repair tissue after injury and downregulate many of the effector functions of immune cells that participate in the alloimmune response, converting them into regulatory cells. The findings of preclinical and initial clinical studies support the potential tolerance-inducing effects of MSCs and highlight the unanticipated complexity of MSC therapy in kidney transplantation. In animal models of transplantation MSCs promote donor-specific tolerance through the generation of regulatory T cells and antigen-presenting cells. In some settings, however, MSCs can acquire proinflammatory properties and contribute to allograft dysfunction. The available data from small clinical studies suggest that cell infusion is safe and well tolerated by kidney transplant recipients. Ongoing and future trials will provide evidence regarding the long-term safety of MSC therapy and determine the optimum cell source (either autologous or allogeneic) and infusion protocol to achieve operational tolerance in kidney transplant recipients. These studies will also provide additional evidence regarding the risks and benefits of MSC infusion and will hopefully offer definitive answers to the important questions of when, where, how many and which types of MSCs should be infused to fully exploit their immunomodulatory, pro-tolerogenic and tissue-repairing properties. PMID:26853275

  10. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-10-27

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3-6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2-5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2-5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted.

  11. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D.; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3–6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2–5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2–5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted. PMID:26360778

  12. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these cases. ...

  13. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  14. Role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ima N

    2015-02-01

    High-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been the standard frontline consolidative therapy for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) for > 2 decades. This approach has resulted in higher complete response (CR) rates and increased event-free survival and overall survival (OS) compared with conventional chemotherapy. The emergence of novel agent-based therapy combined with ASCT has revolutionized MM therapy by improving the CR rates and OS, raising questions concerning the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this setting.

  15. Isolation, culture, and transplantation of muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Yoko; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Muscle satellite cells are a stem cell population required for postnatal skeletal muscle development and regeneration, accounting for 2-5% of sublaminal nuclei in muscle fibers. In adult muscle, satellite cells are normally mitotically quiescent. Following injury, however, satellite cells initiate cellular proliferation to produce myoblasts, their progenies, to mediate the regeneration of muscle. Transplantation of satellite cell-derived myoblasts has been widely studied as a possible therapy for several regenerative diseases including muscular dystrophy, heart failure, and urological dysfunction. Myoblast transplantation into dystrophic skeletal muscle, infarcted heart, and dysfunctioning urinary ducts has shown that engrafted myoblasts can differentiate into muscle fibers in the host tissues and display partial functional improvement in these diseases. Therefore, the development of efficient purification methods of quiescent satellite cells from skeletal muscle, as well as the establishment of satellite cell-derived myoblast cultures and transplantation methods for myoblasts, are essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms behind satellite cell self-renewal, activation, and differentiation. Additionally, the development of cell-based therapies for muscular dystrophy and other regenerative diseases are also dependent upon these factors. However, current prospective purification methods of quiescent satellite cells require the use of expensive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) machines. Here, we present a new method for the rapid, economical, and reliable purification of quiescent satellite cells from adult mouse skeletal muscle by enzymatic dissociation followed by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). Following isolation of pure quiescent satellite cells, these cells can be cultured to obtain large numbers of myoblasts after several passages. These freshly isolated quiescent satellite cells or ex vivo expanded myoblasts can be transplanted

  16. Solid organ transplants following hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children.

    PubMed

    Bunin, Nancy; Guzikowski, Virginia; Rand, Elizabeth R; Goldfarb, Samuel; Baluarte, Jorge; Meyers, Kevin; Olthoff, Kim M

    2010-12-01

    SOT may be indicated for a select group of pediatric patients who experience permanent organ failure following HSCT. However, there is limited information available about outcomes. We identified eight children at our center who received an SOT following an HSCT. Patients were six months to 18 yr at HSCT. Diseases for which children underwent HSCT included thalassemia, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Shwachman-Diamond/bone marrow failure, sickle cell disease (SCD), erythropoietic porphyria (EP), ALL, chronic granulomatous disease, and neuroblastoma. Time from HSCT to SOT was 13 days to seven yr (median, 27 months. Lung SOT was performed for two patients with BO, kidney transplants for three patients, and liver transplants for three patients (VOD, chronic GVHD). Seven patients are alive with functioning allografts 6-180 months from SOT. Advances in organ procurement, operative technique, immunosuppressant therapy, and infection control may allow SOT for a select group of patients post-HSCT. However, scarcity of donor organs available in a timely fashion continues to be a limiting factor. Children who have undergone HSCT and develop single organ failure should be considered for an SOT if there is a high likelihood of cure of the primary disease.

  17. Supportive Care of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S. L.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Rizzo, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant survivors face a number of challenges including low energy and stamina, “chemo-brain” and emotional distress, and late effects that can compromise functioning or lead to early mortality. This session will review the most recent interventions and recommendations to avoid or mitigate these complications. PMID:22226095

  18. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  19. Interphotoreceptor matrix components in retinal cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Juliusson, B; Mieziewska, K; Bergström, A; Wilke, K; Van Veen, T; Ehinger, B

    1994-05-01

    To further investigate the functional potential of retinal transplants we have used immunocytochemistry to study the distribution of four different interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM)-specific components in rabbit retinal transplants. The different components were: interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP), chondroitin-6-sulfate, F22 antigen and peanut agglutinin (PNA) binding structures. IRBP acts as a retinoid-transport protein between the neural retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. Chondroitin-6-sulfate is a glycosaminoglycan and a part of the insoluble IPM skeleton. The identity and role of the F22 antigen is not known. However, it is a 250 kDa protein localized to specific extracellular compartments such as teh IPM. PNA is a lectin with a high binding affinity for D-galactose-beta (1-3) N-acetyl-D-galactosamine disaccharide linkages and binds to IPM domains surrounding cones, but not rods. The transplants (15-day-old embryonic rabbit retina) were placed between the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium in adult hosts. The transplants developed the typical rosette formations with photoreceptors toward the center. IRBP labeling was distinct in the IPM in the host retina. However, no IRBP labeling could be detected in the transplants. The chondroitin-6-sulfate and F22 antibodies strongly labeled the IPM in the host retina and corresponding structures in the center of rosettes. A cone-specific labeling with PNA could be seen in the host retina. In the transplants, however, PNA labeling appeared in association with many more photoreceptors than in the host retina. There is no previous study available on the IPM in retinal cell transplants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Limbal stem cell transplantation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Atallah, Marwan Raymond; Palioura, Sotiria; Perez, Victor L; Amescua, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the corneal surface after an epithelial insult involves division, migration, and maturation of a specialized group of stem cells located in the limbus. Several insults, both intrinsic and extrinsic, can precipitate destruction of the delicate microenvironment of these cells, resulting in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). In such cases, reepithelialization fails and conjunctival epithelium extends across the limbus, leading to vascularization, persistent epithelial defects, and chronic inflammation. In partial LSCD, conjunctival epitheliectomy, coupled with amniotic membrane transplantation, could be sufficient to restore a healthy surface. In more severe cases and in total LSCD, stem cell transplantation is currently the best curative option. Before any attempts are considered to perform a limbal stem cell transplantation procedure, the ocular surface must be optimized by controlling causative factors and comorbid conditions. These factors include adequate eyelid function or exposure, control of the ocular surface inflammatory status, and a well-lubricated ocular surface. In cases of unilateral LSCD, stem cells can be obtained from the contralateral eye. Newer techniques aim at expanding cells in vitro or in vivo in order to decrease the need for large limbal resection that may jeopardize the “healthy” eye. Patients with bilateral disease can be treated using allogeneic tissue in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Another emerging option for this subset of patients is the use of noncorneal cells such as mucosal grafts. Finally, the use of keratoprosthesis is reserved for patients who are not candidates for any of the aforementioned options, wherein the choice of the type of keratoprosthesis depends on the severity of the disease. In summary, limbal stem cell transplantation improves both vision and quality-of-life in patients with ocular surface disorders associated with LSCD, and overall, the use of autologous tissue offers

  1. Detection of Herpesviridae in whole blood by multiplex PCR DNA-based microarray analysis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Debaugnies, France; Busson, Laurent; Ferster, Alina; Lewalle, Philippe; Azzi, Nadira; Aoun, Mickael; Verhaegen, Godelieve; Mahadeb, Bhavna; de Marchin, Jérôme; Vandenberg, Olivier; Hallin, Marie

    2014-07-01

    Viral infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The monitoring by PCR of Herpesviridae loads in blood samples has become a critical part of posttransplant follow-up, representing mounting costs for the laboratory. In this study, we assessed the clinical performance of the multiplex PCR DNA microarray Clart Entherpex kit for detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) as a screening test for virological follow-up. Two hundred fifty-five blood samples from 16 transplanted patients, prospectively tested by routine PCR assays, were analyzed by microarray. Routine PCR detected single or multiple viruses in 42% and 10% of the samples, respectively. Microarray detected single or multiple viruses in 34% and 18% of the samples, respectively. Microarray results correlated well with CMV and EBV detections by routine PCR (kappa tests = 0.79 and 0.78, respectively), whereas a weak correlation was observed with HHV-6 (0.43). HHV-7 was also detected in 48 samples by microarray. In conclusion, the microarray is a reliable screening assay for a posttransplant virological follow-up to detect CMV and EBV infections in blood. However, positive samples must be subsequently confirmed and viral loads must be quantified by PCR assays. Limitations were identified regarding HHV-6 detection. Although it is promising, is easy to use as a first-line test, and allows a reduction in the cost of analysis without undue delay in the reporting of the final quantitative result to the clinician, some characteristics of this microarray should be improved, particularly regarding quality control and the targeted virus panel, such that it could then be used as a routine test.

  2. Iron overload in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Majhail, N S; Lazarus, H M; Burns, L J

    2008-06-01

    Iron overload, primarily related to RBC transfusions, is a relatively common complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Iron overload increases the risk of infections, veno-occlusive disease and hepatic dysfunction post transplant. Elevated pretransplant ferritin levels have been reported to increase the risk of nonrelapse mortality following HCT and might influence the risk of acute and chronic GVHD. Serum ferritin is sensitive but not specific for iron overload and is a poor predictor of body iron burden. Estimation of hepatic iron content with a liver biopsy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered prior to initiating therapy for post transplant iron overload. A subgroup of transplant survivors with mild iron overload and no end-organ damage may not need therapy. Phlebotomy is the treatment of choice with iron-chelation therapy reserved for patients not eligible for phlebotomy. Natural history, evolution and treatment of iron overload in transplant survivors have not been adequately investigated and more studies are needed to determine its impact on short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:18438425

  3. Hematopoietic cell transplantation: a curative option for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. Reduced intensity conditioning regimen have the potential to further reduce regimen related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments, such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimen may enable the safe use of alternate source of stem cells such as unrelated matched donors and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment. PMID:18092247

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Feeder Cells for Pancreatic Islet Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Sordi, Valeria; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation serves as a source of insulin-secreting beta-cells for the maintenance of normal glucose levels and treatment of diabetes. However, limited availability of islets, high rates of islet graft failure, and the need for life-long non-specific immunosuppressive therapy are major obstacles to the widespread application of this therapeutic approach. To overcome these problems, pancreatic islet transplantation was recently suggested as a potential target of the "therapeutic plasticity" of adult stem cells. In fact, new results suggest that stem/precursor cells, and mesenchymal stem cells in particular, co-transplanted with islets can promote tissue engraftment and beta-cell survival via bystander mechanisms, mainly exerted by creating a milieu of cytoprotective and immunomodulatory molecules. This evidence consistently challenges the limited view that stem/precursor cells work exclusively through beta-cell replacement in diabetes therapy. It proposes that stem cells also act as "feeder" cells for islets, and supporter of graft protection, tissue revascularization, and immune acceptance. This article reviews the experience of using stem cell co-transplantation as strategy to improve islet transplantation. It highlights that comprehension of the mechanisms involved will help to identify new molecular targets and promote development of new pharmacological strategies to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:21060972

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells as feeder cells for pancreatic islet transplants.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Valeria; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation serves as a source of insulin-secreting beta-cells for the maintenance of normal glucose levels and treatment of diabetes. However, limited availability of islets, high rates of islet graft failure, and the need for life-long non-specific immunosuppressive therapy are major obstacles to the widespread application of this therapeutic approach. To overcome these problems, pancreatic islet transplantation was recently suggested as a potential target of the "therapeutic plasticity" of adult stem cells. In fact, new results suggest that stem/precursor cells, and mesenchymal stem cells in particular, co-transplanted with islets can promote tissue engraftment and beta-cell survival via bystander mechanisms, mainly exerted by creating a milieu of cytoprotective and immunomodulatory molecules. This evidence consistently challenges the limited view that stem/precursor cells work exclusively through beta-cell replacement in diabetes therapy. It proposes that stem cells also act as "feeder" cells for islets, and supporter of graft protection, tissue revascularization, and immune acceptance. This article reviews the experience of using stem cell co-transplantation as strategy to improve islet transplantation. It highlights that comprehension of the mechanisms involved will help to identify new molecular targets and promote development of new pharmacological strategies to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:21060972

  6. iPS cell transplantation for traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Goulão, Miguel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of work has been published on transplantation of a wide range of neural stem and progenitor cell types derived from the developing and adult CNS, as well as from pluripotent embryonic stem cells, in models of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, many of these cell-based approaches present practical issues for clinical translation such as ethical cell derivation, generation of potentially large numbers of homogenously prepared cells, and immune rejection. With the advent of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell technology, many of these issues may potentially be overcome. To date, a number of studies have demonstrated integration, differentiation into mature CNS lineages, migration and long-term safety of iPS cell transplants in a variety of SCI models, as well as therapeutic benefits in some cases. Given the clinical potential of this advance in stem cell biology, we present a concise review of studies published to date involving iPS cell transplantation in animal models of SCI. PMID:26201863

  7. Regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Banas, Agnieszka; Teratani, Takumi; Iwaguro, Hideki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have an enormous potential; however, their potential clinical application is being arrested due to various limitations such as teratoma formation followed by tumorigenesis, emergent usage, and the quality control of cells, as well as safety issues regarding long-term culture are also delaying their clinical application. In addition, human ES cells have two crucial issues: immunogenicity and ethical issues associated with their clinical application. The efficient generation of human iPS cells requires gene transfer, yet the mechanism underlying pluripotent stem cell induction has not yet been fully elucidated. Otherwise, although human adult regenerative cells including mesenchymal stem cells have a limited capacity for differentiation, they are nevertheless promising candidates for tissue regeneration in a clinical setting. This review highlights the use of regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  9. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke.

  10. Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation as Platform for Post-transplant Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kongtim, Piyanuch; Lee, Dean A.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Haploidentical transplantation can extend the opportunity for transplantation to almost all patients who lack an HLA-matched donor. Advances in the field of haploidentical transplantation have led to a marked decrease in treatment-related mortality, allowing investigators to focus on developing rationale pre- and peri-remission therapies aimed at preventing disease relapse post-transplant. Due to widespread availability, low treatment-related mortality and cost, haploidentical donors may become the preferred “alternative” donors for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. One of the major advantages of using a related donor is the possibility to collect or generate additional cellular products from the same immediate available donor, which will not be rejected. Infusion of these cells in the peri-transplant period, derived from the same immune system, is opening the possibility to markedly enhance the anti-tumor effects of the graft and hasten immunologic reconstitution post-transplant. PMID:26172479

  11. Molecular imaging of stem cell transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with stem cells holds tremendous therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Over the last decade, molecular imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted cells and assessing the therapeutic efficacy. This current review summarizes the role and capabilities of different molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging, nuclear imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. We discuss current challenges and perspectives of these techniques and encompass updated information such as theranostic imaging and optogenetics in stem cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A John; Battiwalla, Minoo

    2012-01-01

    Since allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) represents an intensive curative treatment for high-risk malignancies, its failure to prevent relapse leaves few options for successful salvage treatment. While many patients have a high early mortality from relapse, some respond and have sustained remissions, and a minority has a second chance of cure with appropriate therapy. The prognosis for relapsed hematological malignancies after SCT depends on four factors: the time elapsed from SCT to relapse (with relapses occurring within 6 months having the worst prognosis), the disease type (with chronic leukemias and some lymphomas having a second possibility of cure with further treatment), the disease burden and site of relapse (with better treatment success if disease is treated early), and the conditions of the first transplant (with superior outcome for patients where there is an opportunity to increase either the alloimmune effect, the specificity of the antileukemia effect with targeted agents or the intensity of the conditioning in a second transplant). These features direct treatments toward either modified second transplants, chemotherapy, targeted antileukemia therapy, immunotherapy or palliative care. PMID:21083034

  13. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed.

  14. Emerging concepts in haematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao Wei; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the most widely used cellular therapy. It is the only known cure for some hematologic malignancies and has recently been used for additional indications, such as allograft tolerance induction and treatment of autoimmune diseases. Recent advances have enabled HCT in a wider range of patients with improved outcomes. This Review summarizes the latest developments in this therapy, focusing on issues that will impact future advancement. PMID:22627859

  15. The case for intrauterine stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2012-10-01

    The clinical burden imposed by the collective group of monogenic disorders demands novel therapies that are effective at achieving phenotypic cure early in the disease process before the development of permanent organ damage. This is important for lethal diseases and also for non-perinatally lethal conditions that are characterised by severe disability with little prospect of postnatal cure. Where postnatal treatments are limited to palliative options, intrauterine stem-cell therapies may offer the potential to arrest pathogenesis in the early undamaged fetus. Intrauterine stem-cell transplantation has been attempted for a variety of diseases, but has only been successful in immune deficiency states in the presence of a competitive advantage for donor cells. This disappointing clinical record requires preclinical investigations into strategies that improve donor cell engraftment, including optimising the donor cell source and manipulating the microenvironment to facilitate homing. This chapter aims to outline the current challenges of intrauterine stem-cell therapy. PMID:22809469

  16. Stem cell transplantation for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fish, J D; Grupp, S A

    2008-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma is a childhood malignancy with a poor prognosis. Gradual improvements in survival have correlated with therapeutic intensity, and the ability to harvest, process and store autologous hematopoietic stem cells has allowed for dose intensification beyond marrow tolerance. The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue in consolidation has resulted in improvements in survival, although further advances are still needed. Newer approaches to SCT and supportive care, most notably the transition to PBSC, have resulted in further improvement in survival and decreases in treatment-related mortality. Research into experimental approaches to hematopoietic SCT is ongoing.

  17. Bone marrow transplantation in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vermylen, C; Cornu, G; Philippe, M; Ninane, J; Borja, A; Latinne, D; Ferrant, A; Michaux, J L; Sokal, G

    1991-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia is still responsible for severe crippling and death in young patients living in developing countries. Apart from prophylaxis and treatment of infections, no active treatment can be safely proposed in such areas of the world. Therefore a bone marrow transplantation was performed in 12 patients staying in Belgium and planning to return to Africa. Twelve patients, aged between 11 months and 23 years (median 4 years), underwent a HLA identical bone marrow transplantation. The conditioning regimen included oral busulphan for four consecutive days (4 mg/kg) followed by four days of intravenous cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg). In 10 patients the engraftment was rapid and sustained. A further patient suffered transient red cell hypoplasia and another underwent a second bone marrow transplantation from the same donor at day 62 because of graft rejection. All patients are alive and well with a follow up ranging from 9-51 months (median 27 months). In all cases a complete cessation of vaso-occlusive episodes and haemolysis was observed as was a change in the haemoglobin pattern in accordance with the donor's electrophoretic pattern. PMID:1953001

  18. CMV in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de la Cámara, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Due to its negative impact on the outcome of stem cell transplant (SCT) and solid organ transplant patients (SOT) CMV has been called “the troll of transplantation”. One of the greatest advances in the management of SCT has been the introduction of the preemptive strategy. Since its introduction, the incidence of the viremia, as expected, remains unchanged but there has been a marked decline in the incidence of early CMV disease. However, in spite of the advances in prevention of CMV disease, CMV is still today an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Late CMV disease is still occurring in a significant proportion of patients and the so-called indirect effects of CMV are causing significant morbidity and mortality. Fortunately there have been several advances in the development of new antivirals, adoptive immunotherapy and DNA-CMV vaccines that might transform the management of CMV in the near future. PMID:27413524

  19. T Cell Cosignaling Molecules in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Mandy L

    2016-05-17

    The ultimate outcome of alloreactivity versus tolerance following transplantation is potently influenced by the constellation of cosignaling molecules expressed by immune cells during priming with alloantigen, and the net sum of costimulatory and coinhibitory signals transmitted via ligation of these molecules. Intense investigation over the last two decades has yielded a detailed understanding of the kinetics, cellular distribution, and intracellular signaling networks of cosignaling molecules such as the CD28, TNF, and TIM families of receptors in alloimmunity. More recent work has better defined the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which engagement of cosignaling networks serve to either dampen or augment alloimmunity. These findings will likely aid in the rational development of novel immunomodulatory strategies to prolong graft survival and improve outcomes following transplantation.

  20. Transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells into contusion-injured spinal cord of rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Kenji; Nakano, Norihiko; Noda, Toru; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Masayoshi; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukushima, Masanori; Ide, Chizuka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of the transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs) on locomotor improvement and tissue repair including axonal extension in spinal cord lesions was examined in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: CPECs were cultured from the choroid plexus of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats, and transplanted directly into the contusion-injured spinal cord lesions of rats of the same strain. Locomotor behaviors were evaluated based on BBB scores every week after transplantation until 4 weeks after transplantation. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed at 2 days, and every week until 5 weeks after transplantation. Results: Locomotor behaviors evaluated by the BBB score were significantly improved in cell-transplanted rats. Numerous axons grew, with occasional interactions with CPECs, through the astrocyte-devoid areas. These axons exhibited structural characteristics of peripheral nerves. GAP-43-positive axons were found at the border of the lesion 2 days after transplantation. Cavity formation was more reduced in cell-transplanted than control spinal cords. CPECs were found within the spinal cord lesion, and sometimes in association with astrocytes at the border of the lesion until 2 weeks after transplantation. Conclusion: The transplantation of CPECs enhanced locomotor improvement and tissue recovery, including axonal regeneration, in rats with SCI. PMID:26923614

  1. Dendritic cell-based vaccines in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized peripheral blood can serve as a source of potent dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, D; Perrin, M; Hoffmann, S; Chang, A E; Ratanatharathorn, V; Uberti, J; McDonagh, K T; Mulé, J J

    1998-11-01

    We are investigating the use of tumor-pulsed dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines in the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. In the current study, we evaluated the feasibility of obtaining both CD34+ hematopoietic stem/ progenitor cells (HSCs) and functional DCs from the same leukapheresis collection in adequate numbers for both peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) and immunization purposes, respectively. Leukapheresis collections of mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from normal donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (for allogeneic PBSCT) and from intermediate grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or multiple myeloma patients receiving cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF (for autologous PBSCT). High enrichment of CD34+ HSCs was obtained using an immunomagnetic bead cell separation device. After separation, the negative fraction of mobilized PBMCs from normal donors and cancer patients contained undetectable levels of CD34+ HSCs by flow cytometry. This fraction of cells was then subjected to plastic adherence, and the adherent cells were cultured for 7 days in GM-CSF (100 ng/ml) and interleukin 4 (50 ng/ml) followed by an additional 7 days in GM-CSF, interleukin 4, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (10 ng/ml) to generate DCs. Harvested DCs represented yields of 4.1+/-1.4 and 5.8+/-5.4% of the initial cells plated from the CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs of normal donors and cancer patients, respectively, and displayed a high level expression of CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, and CD11c but not CD14. This phenotypic profile was similar to that of DCs derived from non-CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs. DCs generated from CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs elicited potent antitetanus as well as primary allogeneic T-cell proliferative responses in vitro, which were equivalent to DCs derived from non-CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs. Collectively, these results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining both DCs and

  2. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program. PMID:25637051

  3. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  4. Use of hematopoietic cell transplants to achieve tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Strober, Samuel

    2016-03-24

    The goals of tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants are to eliminate the lifelong need for immunosuppressive (IS) drugs and to prevent graft loss due to rejection or drug toxicity. Tolerance with complete withdrawal of IS drugs has been achieved in recipients of HLA-matched and mismatched living donor kidney transplants in 3 medical centers using hematopoietic cell transplants to establish mixed or complete chimerism.

  5. Regulatory T cells and transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, S P

    2008-01-01

    Rodent models of transplantation have demonstrated that it is possible to induce specific immunological tolerance of donor antigens and indefinite graft survival in the absence of any continued immunosuppression. If this situation could be achieved clinically it would avoid many of the longer term complications of organ grafting, such as the increased risk of infection and cancer and the nephrotoxicity of many immunosuppressive agents. In this review we shall consider the interplay between regulatory T cells, dendritic cells and the graft itself and the resulting local protective mechanisms that are coordinated to maintain the tolerant state. We will discuss how both anti-inflammatory cytokines and negative costimulatory interactions can elicit a number of interrelated mechanisms to regulate both T cell and antigen-presenting cell activity. The induction and maintenance of tolerance via acquired local immune privilege has implications for the design of therapeutic regimens and the monitoring of the tolerant status of patients being weaned off immunosuppression. PMID:18651537

  6. Modeling the Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, Viviane; Miranda, José Garcia Vivas

    2009-04-01

    A recent model for Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation is extended for a three-dimensional multi-agent-based model. The computational model includes six different types of autonomous agents: inflammatory cell, fibrosis, cardiomyocyte, proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor- α, Trypanosoma cruzi, and bone marrow stem cell. Only fibrosis is fixed and the other types of agents can move randomly through the empty spaces using the three-dimensional Moore neighborhood. Bone marrow stem cells can promote apoptosis in inflammatory cells, fibrosis regression and can differentiate in cardiomyocyte. T. cruzi can increase the number of inflammatory cells. Inflammatory cells and tumor necrosis factor- α can increase the quantity of fibrosis. Our results were compared with experimental data giving a fairly fit and they suggest that the inflammatory cells are important for the development of fibrosis.

  7. Immune Tolerance for Autoimmune Disease and Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xunrong; Miller, Stephen D.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2016-01-01

    The undesired destruction of healthy cells, either endogenous or transplanted, by the immune system results in the loss of tissue function or limits strategies to restore tissue function. Current therapies typically involve non-specific immunosuppression that may prevent the appropriate response to an antigen, thereby decreasing humoral immunity and increasing the risks of patient susceptibility to opportunistic infections, viral reactivation, and neoplasia. The induction of antigen-specific immunological tolerance to block undesired immune responses to self- or allogeneic antigens, while maintaining the integrity of the remaining immune system, has the potential to transform the current treatment of autoimmune disease and serve as a key enabling technology for therapies based on cell transplantation. PMID:26928211

  8. The evolving roles of memory immune cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenhao; Ghobrial, Rafik M.; Li, Xian C.

    2015-01-01

    Memory cells are the products of immune responses but also exert significant impact on subsequent immunity and immune tolerance, thus placing them in a unique position in transplant research. Memory cells are heterogeneous, including not only memory T cells but also memory B cells and innate memory cells. Memory cells are a critical component of protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially in immunosuppressed patients, but they also mediate graft loss and tolerance resistance. Recent studies suggest that some memory cells unexpectedly act as regulatory cells, promoting rather than hindering transplant survival. This functional diversity makes therapeutic targeting of memory cells a challenging task in transplantation. In this article we highlight recent advances in our understanding of memory cells, focusing on diversity of memory cells and mechanisms involved in their induction and functions. We also provide a broad overview on the challenges and opportunities in targeting memory cells in the induction of transplant tolerance. PMID:26102615

  9. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  10. Haploidentical bone marrow transplantation without T-cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2012-12-01

    Approaches for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) without T-cell depletion have been designed using new transplant strategies, including anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) preparative regimens, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-primed grafts, post-transplantation rapamycin, or high-dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) in combination with other immunosuppressive agents for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. These strategies ensured fast hematologic engraftment across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) barrier with an acceptable incidence of GVHD. Long-term follow-up results from different transplant centers suggest that unmanipulated transplantation may provide an alternative strategy in the haploidentical setting without requiring the technical expertise and cost of ex vivo T-cell depletion. This review discusses immune reconstitution and factors associated with clinical outcomes following unmanipulated haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and compares outcomes between unmanipulated haploidentical transplant versus HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD) transplantation, HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation, or unrelated double umbilical cord blood (dUCB) transplantation. Advantages and disadvantages of unmanipulated haploidentical HSCT and strategies to improve outcome after haploidentical BMT without ex vivo T-cell depletion are discussed. PMID:23206842

  11. Stem cell research in cell transplantation: sources, geopolitical influence, and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eve, David J; Fillmore, Randolph W; Borlongan, Cesar V; Sanberg, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    If the rapidly progressing field of stem cell research reaches its full potential, successful treatments and enhanced understanding of many diseases are the likely results. However, the full potential of stem cell science will only be reached if all possible avenues can be explored and on a worldwide scale. Until 2009, the US had a highly restrictive policy on obtaining cells from human embryos and fetal tissue, a policy that pushed research toward the use of adult-derived cells. Currently, US policy is still in flux, and retrospective analysis does show the US lagging behind the rest of the world in the proportional increase in embryonic/fetal stem cell research. The majority of US studies being on either a limited number of cell lines, or on cells derived elsewhere (or funded by other sources than Federal) rather than on freshly isolated embryonic or fetal material. Neural, mesenchymal, and the mixed stem cell mononuclear fraction are the most commonly investigated types, which can generally be classified as adult-derived stem cells, although roughly half of the neural stem cells are fetal derived. Other types, such as embryonic and fat-derived stem cells, are increasing in their prominence, suggesting that new types of stem cells are still being pursued. Sixty percent of the reported stem cell studies involved transplantation, of which over three quarters were allogeneic transplants. A high proportion of the cardiovascular systems articles were on allogeneic transplants in a number of different species, including several autologous studies. A number of pharmaceutical grade stem cell products have also recently been tested and reported on. Stem cell research shows considerable promise for the treatment of a number of disorders, some of which have entered clinical trials; over the next few years it will be interesting to see how these treatments progress in the clinic.

  12. Bortezomib-based induction for transplant ineligible AL amyloidosis and feasibility of later transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cornell, R F; Zhong, X; Arce-Lara, C; Atallah, E; Blust, L; Drobyski, W R; Fenske, T S; Pasquini, M C; Rizzo, J D; Saber, W; Hari, P N

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies support the use of bortezomib-based therapies in light chain amyloidosis (AL). We performed a retrospective analysis of the safety, efficacy and long-term survival (median follow-up 3 years) after bortezomib-based treatment in 28 consecutive patients with de novo AL deemed ineligible at initial presentation. The first 14 patients received bortezomib and dexamethasone (VD), and the second 14 patients received cyclophosphamide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (CVD; CyBorD). Both regimens were well tolerated with no treatment-related mortality. The overall hematological response (HR) rate was 93% in both the groups. Median time to response was shorter in the CVD group (39 days vs 96 days in the VD group; P=0.002). Hematological and organ responses induced with bortezomib-based therapy enabled 8 (33%) of initially transplant ineligible patients to undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHCT), including 4 patients with cardiac stage III or IV. Seven of the eight patients (88%) who underwent subsequent AHCT achieved sustained HR at a median of 33 months posttransplant. These data suggest that bortezomib-based induction followed by AHCT is a viable therapeutic strategy for transplant-ineligible AL. Larger, multicenter prospective trials are necessary to confirm our findings.

  13. Protein-Based Urine Test Predicts Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Thursday, August 22, 2013 Protein-based urine test predicts kidney transplant outcomes NIH- ... supporting development of noninvasive tests. Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can ...

  14. The Use of Statins in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Schlösser, Hans; Kisner, Tulay; Stippel, Dirk L; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2013-01-14

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and solid organ transplantation have become established treatments offered to patients for whom there are otherwise no curative treatment options. Unfortunately, these therapeutic modalities are associated with severe complications that limit its applicability. Alloimmunity is an important cause of morbidity and mortality after both organ transplantation and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and represents a major barrier to the more wide-spread use of these treatment modalities. Statins are a class of lipid-lowering drugs, which also posses immunomodulatory effects. Results from preclinial research and early-stage clinical studies indicate that treatment with statins could be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease and transplant rejection. In addition to preventing graft-versus-host disease or graft rejection statins possess several other effects that might prove beneficial in the setting of transplantation, such as cardiovascular protection and antineoplastic activity. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the immunomodulatory effects of statins and discuss the clinical implications for their use in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation or solid organ transplantation.

  15. Optimizing Quality and Efficiency of Healthcare Delivery in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Majhail, Navneet S

    2015-09-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a complex and resource intense procedure that can be associated with high risks of treatment failure due to disease relapse or complications. There also exists considerable variability among transplant centers with respect to the number of procedures performed, available resources and personnel, patient selection, transplant practices, and supportive care. Hematopoietic cell transplantation as a specialty has been a pioneer in incorporating the constructs of quality and efficiency routinely in patient care. However, several challenges still remain. Harmonization of data collection and reporting, use of innovative technological tools, evidence-based practice supported by clinical trials, better efforts towards care coordination and transition of care, and reduction of variation will facilitate these efforts and will lead to improved experience and outcomes for hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

  16. Tissue typing for hematopoietic cell transplantation: newer techniques and newer antigens for which cross-matching is helpful.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Robert; Davies, Stella M

    2005-12-01

    Refinements in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing techniques for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have permitted a more precise assessment of donor-recipient histocompatibility, which has impacted transplantation outcomes. More recently, differences in transplant outcomes associated with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor compatibility have emphasized the potential importance of natural killer (NK) cell typing in HCT. This article reviews the current state of the art for HCT donor selection based on both HLA and NK cell typing. PMID:16305621

  17. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune reconstitution (IR). Therefore, detailed information on IR through immunomonitoring is crucial to improve survival chances after HCT. To date, information about the reconstituting immune system after allo-HCT in pediatric patients is mostly derived from routine standard-of-care measurements. More profound knowledge on IR may provide tools to better predict and modulate adverse reactions and, subsequently, improve survival chances. Here, we provide an overview of IR (eg, immune cell subsets and circulating chemokines/cytokines) after allo-HCT in children, taking into account different cell sources and serotherapy, and discuss strategies to enhance immunomonitoring. We conclude that available IR data after allo-HCT contain limited information on immune cell families (mostly only generic T, B, and NK cells), which would improve with more detailed information on reconstituting cell subsets or effector cell functionality at earlier time points (<1 month). In addition, secretome data (eg, multiplex cytokine/chemokine profiles) could add to the understanding of IR mechanisms and cell functionality and may even provide (early) biomarkers for individual disease outcome, such as viral reactivity, graft-versus-host disease, or graft-versus-leukemia. The present data and suggestions for more detailed, standardized, and harmonized immunomonitoring in future (pediatric) allo-HCT studies will pave the path to "precision transplantation:" an individualized HCT approach (including conditioning), based on detailed information on IR and biomarkers, aiming to reduce transplantation related mortality and relapse, and subsequently improve survival chances.

  18. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-09-26

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements.

  19. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements. PMID:25258662

  20. Pediatric hematology providers on referral for transplant evaluation for sickle cell disease: a regional perspective.

    PubMed

    Mikles, Bethany; Bhatia, Monica; Oyeku, Suzette O; Jin, Zhezhen; Green, Nancy S

    2014-10-01

    Hematology referral for evaluation is a key step for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease (SCD). Pediatric SCD providers in the US Northeast (New York-Mid-Atlantic and New England regions) were surveyed anonymously for perspectives and practices regarding transplant referral and compared by whether they practiced at SCD transplant centers. Data were analyzed using the Fisher exact test, χ test, and logistic regression. Half of the respondents practiced primarily at transplant sites. Most (79%) were enthusiastic about transplant for SCD and 78% had recently referred ≥1 child for evaluation. Overall, 77% limited referral to certain sickle hemoglobinopathies and 44% preferred referral for β-thalassemia to SCD. Indications selected for referral resembled current transplant criteria, plus family request or poor response to therapy. Referral for children on chronic transfusions predicted enthusiasm and prior referral. Many (66%) referred children with multiple SCD complications, even without matched sibling donors, 37% with sibling donors despite limited disease. Practitioners at transplant centers more commonly accepted event-free survival rates of ≤90% (P=0.002). Northeastern providers expressed varying enthusiasm for referral for evaluation based on eligibility, donor availability, and acceptable risk, with modestly more interest from practitioners at transplant centers. Differing provider perspectives may affect patient referral for transplant consideration.

  1. Update on islet cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Avinash; Brayman, Kenneth L

    2012-06-01

    Despite modern medical breakthroughs, diabetes mellitus is a worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Definitive surgical treatment of diabetes mellitus was established with the advent and refinement of clinical pancreas transplantation in the 1960s. During the following decades, critical discoveries involving islet isolation and engraftment took place. Clinical islet cell transplantation represents the potential for reduced insulin requirements and debilitating hypoglycemic episodes without the morbidity of surgery. Unfortunately, islet cell transplantation was unable to achieve comparable results with solid organ transplantation. This was until the Edmonton protocol (steroid-free immunosuppression) was described, which demonstrated that islet cell transplantation could be a viable alternative to pancreas transplantation. Significant advances in islet purification techniques and novel immunomodulatory agents have since renewed interest in islet cell transplantation. Yet the field is still challenged by a limited supply of islet cells, inadequate engraftment, and the deleterious effects of chronic immunosuppression. This article discusses the history and the current status of clinical islet cell transplantation. PMID:23729978

  2. Stem Cells Transplanted in Monkeys without Anti-Rejection Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160989.html Stem Cells Transplanted in Monkeys Without Anti-Rejection Drugs Scientists say goal is to create banks of stem cells that could be used for any human patient ...

  3. Transplantation of Heterospheroids of Islet Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Effective Angiogenesis and Antiapoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Youn; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Han, Jin; Bhang, Suk Ho; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Haque, Muhammad R.; Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Noh, Myungkyung

    2015-01-01

    Although islet transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for type 1 diabetes, there are efficiency concerns that are attributed to poor engraftment of transplanted islets. Hypoxic condition and delayed vasculogenesis induce necrosis and apoptosis of the transplanted islets. To overcome these limitations in islet transplantation, heterospheroids (HSs), which consist of rat islet cells (ICs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), were transplanted to the kidney and liver. The HSs cultured under the hypoxic condition system exhibited a significant increase in antiapoptotic gene expression in ICs. hMSCs in the HSs secreted angiogenic and antiapoptotic proteins. With the HS system, ICs and hMSCs were successfully located in the same area of the liver after transplantation of HSs through the portal vein, whereas the transplantation of islets and the dissociated hMSCs did not result in localization of transplanted ICs and hMSCs in the same area. HS transplantation resulted in an increase in angiogenesis at the transplantation area and a decrease in the apoptosis of transplanted ICs after transplantation into the kidney subcapsule compared with transplantation of islet cell clusters (ICCs). Insulin production levels of ICs were higher in the HS transplantation group compared with the ICC transplantation group. The HS system may be a more efficient transplantation method than the conventional methods for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25344077

  4. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families After Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families after Stem Cell Transplant What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)? Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ... weakened by medicines that you must take after stem cell transplant and by the transplant itself. Your body ...

  5. Cells transplanted onto the surface of the glial scar reveal hidden potential for functional neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Holley, Matthew C.; Hashido, Kento; Ono, Kazuya; Shimomura, Koichiro; Horie, Rie T.; Hamaguchi, Kiyomi; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-01-01

    Cell transplantation therapy has long been investigated as a therapeutic intervention for neurodegenerative disorders, including spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indeed, patients have high hopes for a cell-based therapy. However, there are numerous practical challenges for clinical translation. One major problem is that only very low numbers of donor cells survive and achieve functional integration into the host. Glial scar tissue in chronic neurodegenerative disorders strongly inhibits regeneration, and this inhibition must be overcome to accomplish successful cell transplantation. Intraneural cell transplantation is considered to be the best way to deliver cells to the host. We questioned this view with experiments in vivo on a rat glial scar model of the auditory system. Our results show that intraneural transplantation to the auditory nerve, preceded by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC)-treatment, is ineffective. There is no functional recovery, and almost all transplanted cells die within a few weeks. However, when donor cells are placed on the surface of a ChABC-treated gliotic auditory nerve, they autonomously migrate into it and recapitulate glia- and neuron-guided cell migration modes to repair the auditory pathway and recover auditory function. Surface transplantation may thus pave the way for improved functional integration of donor cells into host tissue, providing a less invasive approach to rescue clinically important neural tracts. PMID:26080415

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in China: current status and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    During the past four decades, a substantial progress has been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). From July, 2007 to December, 2010, a transplant survey from 42 HSCT units indicates that the types of transplantation performed are related identical (43%), related mismatched/haploidentical (28%), unrelated donor matched (11%), unrelated donor mismatched (7%), umbilical cord blood (UCB, 2%) and autologous (9%). The distribution of disease entities being transplanted in allogeneic settings is acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (34%), acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL) (24%), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (20%), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (8%), aplastic anemia (AA) (7%), Mediterranean anemia (MIA) (2%), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (3%), and other diseases (3%). Clinical data from Peking University Institute of Hematology and other transplant centers suggest that haploidentical transplantation has been a choice of the best alternative source of stem cells for individual patients without matched sibling donors. A modified donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) approach can be safely used for prophylaxis and treatment of leukemia relapse in patients with advanced leukemia following mismatched transplant. The number of transplants from unrelated donor or related mismatched/haploidentical donor has increased significantly during recent years. Double UCBT is a promising strategy for the therapy of hematological disease. In addition, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation may be a potential therapeutic approach for treating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PMID:22432069

  7. Bioluminescence tracking of alginate micro-encapsulated cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Tiernan, Aubrey R; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2014-07-22

    Cell-based therapies to treat loss-of-function hormonal disorders such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease are routinely coupled with encapsulation strategies, but an understanding of when and why grafts fail in vivo is lacking. Consequently, investigators cannot clearly define the key factors that influence graft success. Although bioluminescence is a popular method to track the survival of free cells transplanted in preclinical models, little is known of the ability to use bioluminescence for real-time tracking of microencapsulated cells. Furthermore, the impact that dynamic imaging distances may have, due to freely-floating microcapsules in vivo, on cell survival monitoring is unknown. This work addresses these questions by applying bioluminescence to a pancreatic substitute based on microencapsulated cells. Recombinant insulin-secreting cells were transduced with a luciferase lentivirus and microencapsulated in Ba(2+) crosslinked alginate for in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro quantitative bioluminescence monitoring was possible and viable microencapsulated cells were followed in real time under both normoxic and anoxic conditions. Although in vivo dispersion of freely-floating microcapsules in the peritoneal cavity limited the analysis to a qualitative bioluminescence evaluation, signals consistently four orders of magnitude above background were clear indicators of temporal cell survival. Strong agreement between in vivo and in vitro cell proliferation over time was discovered by making direct bioluminescence comparisons between explanted microcapsules and parallel in vitro cultures. Broader application of this bioluminescence approach to retrievable transplants, in supplement to currently used end-point physiological tests, could improve understanding and accelerate development of cell-based therapies for critical clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Allogeneic and autologous mode of stem cell transplantation in regenerative medicine: which way to go?

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Dutta, Susmita; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar; Pal, Rajarshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a generic term covering different techniques. However there is argument over the pros and cons of autologous and allogeneic transplants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative therapy. Given that the MSCs have already been proven to be safe in patients, we hypothesize that allogeneic transplantation could be more effective and cost-effective as compared to autologous transplantation specifically in older subjects who are the likely victims of degenerative diseases. This analysis is based on the scientific logic that allogeneic stem cells extracted in large numbers from young and healthy donors could be physiologically, metabolically and genetically more stable. Therefore stem cells from young donors may be expected to exhibit higher vigor in secreting trophic factors leading to activation of host tissue-specific stem cells and also be more efficient in remodeling the micro-environmental niche of damaged tissue.

  9. Melatonin improves spermatogonial stem cells transplantation efficiency in azoospermic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mohammadreza; Saki, Ghasem; Hemadi, Masoud; Khodadadi, Ali; Mohammadi-asl, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Transplantation quality improvement and reduction of cellular damage are important goals that are now considered by researchers. Melatonin is secreted from the pineal gland and some organs such as testes. According to beneficial effects of melatonin (such as its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties), researchers have proposed that the use of melatonin may improve transplantation quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on the spermatogonial stem cells transplantation in the azoospermic mice. Materials and Methods: The testes of the BALB/c mice pups (6-day-old) after vitrified-thawed, were digested with enzymes (collagenase, DNaseΙ, trypsin-EDTA) to disperse the cells. The SSCs, type A, were isolated from the rest of testicular cells by MACS. Spermatogonial stem cells were labeled with PKH26 fluorescent kit. Labeled spermatogonial stem cells were transplanted into the testes of infertile mice (busulfan 40 mg/kg). The mice died two months after transplantation and the efficiency of spermatogenesis was investigated. TNP2 and hematoxyline-eosin staining were used to detect the efficiency of cell transplantation. Results: TNP2 were detected in the samples that received melatonin and spermatogonial stem cells transplantation, simultaneously. TNP2 was not detectable in the transplant recipient mice that received placebo for 10 weeks (control group). According to hematoxyline-eosin staining, melatonin improved structure of testes. Conclusion: Administration of melatonin (20 mg/kg) simultaneously with transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells in azoospermia mouse testis increases the efficiency of transplantation and improves structural properties of the testes tissue. PMID:24711891

  10. Optimisation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based strategy for the detection and quantification of human herpesvirus 6 DNA in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Miriam YH; Alvarenga, Paulo G; Real, Juliana M; Moreira, Eloisa de Sá; Watanabe, Aripuanã; Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Vescovi, Matheus; Novis, Yana; Rocha, Vanderson; Seber, Adriana; Oliveira, Jose SR; Rodrigues, Celso A; Granato, Celso FH

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) may cause severe complications after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Monitoring this virus and providing precise, rapid and early diagnosis of related clinical diseases, constitute essential measures to improve outcomes. A prospective survey on the incidence and clinical features of HHV-6 infections after HSCT has not yet been conducted in Brazilian patients and the impact of this infection on HSCT outcome remains unclear. A rapid test based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been optimised to screen and quantify clinical samples for HHV-6. The detection step was based on reaction with TaqMan® hydrolysis probes. A set of previously described primers and probes have been tested to evaluate efficiency, sensitivity and reproducibility. The target efficiency range was 91.4% with linearity ranging from 10-106 copies/reaction and a limit of detection of five copies/reaction or 250 copies/mL of plasma. The qPCR assay developed in the present study was simple, rapid and sensitive, allowing the detection of a wide range of HHV-6 loads. In conclusion, this test may be useful as a practical tool to help elucidate the clinical relevance of HHV-6 infection and reactivation in different scenarios and to determine the need for surveillance. PMID:26038958

  11. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Vose, Julie M

    2014-12-01

    Up-front rituximab-based chemotherapy has improved outcomes in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); refractory or relapsed NHL still accounts for approximately 18,000 deaths in the United States. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) can improve survival in primary refractory or relapsed aggressive NHL and mantle cell lymphoma and in relapsed follicular or peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Autologous SCT as a consolidation therapy after first complete or partial remission in high-risk aggressive NHL, mantle cell lymphoma, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma may improve progression-free survival. Allogeneic SCT offers a lower relapse rate but a higher nonrelapse mortality resulting in overall survival similar to autologous SCT. PMID:25459180

  13. Recent Progress in Cell Reprogramming Technology for Cell Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, Toru; ABE, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells opened the gate for reprogramming technology with which we can change the cell fate through overexpression of master transcriptional factors. Now we can prepare various kinds of neuronal cells directly induced from somatic cells. It has been reported that overexpression of a neuron-specific transcriptional factors might change the cell fate of endogenous astroglia to neuronal cells in vivo. In addition, some research groups demonstrated that chemical compound can induce chemical-induced neuronal cells, without transcriptional factors overexpression. In this review, we briefly review recent progress in the induced neuronal (iN) cells, and discuss the possibility of application for cell transplantation therapy. PMID:26876902

  14. Chromaffin cell transplants: from the lab to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Ambriz-Tututi, Mónica; Monjaraz-Fuentes, Fernanda; Drucker-Colín, René

    2012-12-17

    Chromaffin cell transplants have been explored since the early 1980s as a promising alternative in different pathological states, mainly Parkinson's disease and chronic pain. Advances are significant since transplants have been performed in humans. The general mechanism of these transplants relies in the capacity of chromaffin cells to act as mini-pumps that release amines and peptides. Different strategies are being used to improve the efficacy of transplants. However, a remaining hurdle is to determine the viability across time and the interaction with the microenvironment of the graft. We analyzed previous and current results finding that although there is a lot of positive evidence, there is also a lack of molecular studies that support behavioral results. The present review gives an update on recent advances of chromaffin cell transplants and their future in the clinic. PMID:23123445

  15. Paracrine Mechanism of Angiogenesis in Adipose-derived Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hirotaka; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Sorkin, Michael; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have shown potential for cell-based therapy in the field of plastic surgery. However, the fate of ASCs after transplantation and the mechanism(s) of their biologic capabilities remain unclear. Methods We isolated and cultured ASCs from transgenic mice that express both luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) and injected the cells into the inguinal fat pads of wild-type mice. We tested four experimental groups: ischemic fat pads with/without ASCs and control fat pads with/without ASCs. Results Transplanted ASCs were tracked with bioluminescence imaging. The luminescence gradually decreased over 28 days, indicating cell death after transplantation. More ASCs were retained in ischemic fat pads on day 7 compared to control fat pads. On day 14, adipose tissue vascular density was higher in the ASC transplantation groups compared to those without ASCs. On day 28, there was decreased atrophy of adipose tissue in ASC-treated ischemic fat pads. Transplanted ASCs were detected as non-proliferating GFP+ cells, whereas native endothelial cells adjacent to the transplanted ASCs were proliferative. Protein analysis demonstrated higher expression of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the ASC transplantation groups, suggesting a paracrine mechanism, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments with conditioned media from ASCs. Conclusions Transplanted ASCs are preferentially retained in ischemic adipose tissue, although most of the cells eventually undergo cell death. They exert an angiogenic effect on adipose tissue mainly through a paracrine mechanism. Increased understanding of these effects will help develop ASCs as a tool for cell-based therapy. PMID:23636112

  16. Update of hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD) that is utilized very rarely because of limited allogeneic donor availability, limited healthcare resources needed to expand the treatment to regions in the world where most affected individuals reside, and by a view among SCD experts that HCT lacks the evidential rigor with short and long-term toxicity profiles that together might support its broader application. Recent findings In this update, recent advances focused on donor selection, reduced toxicity preparation for HCT, and treatment of young adults will be presented. The current status of conventional bone marrow transplantation with a human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling donor is summarized. Summary HCT for SCD is curative in almost all children who have a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling donor. The future of this therapy will hinge on expanding the number of individuals who might be treated. PMID:25767957

  17. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Steensma, David P

    2016-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers the only potential cure for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, with current approaches to HCT, many older patients with comorbidities are poor HCT candidates, and treatment-related morbidity and mortality may offset benefit for patients with lower-risk disease. Consequently, selection of patients with MDS for HCT should take into consideration disease risk category including mutational status, HCT comorbidity index, functional status, donor options, and available institutional resources. Formal geriatric assessment may further guide use of HCT and, if HCT is chosen, selection of conditioning intensity. Patients with higher-risk MDS should be considered for HCT at the time of diagnosis, whereas expectant nontransplant management is more appropriate for those with lower-risk disease. A high blast burden at the time of HCT increases the risk of subsequent relapse; however, the role of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy and the regimen of choice remain controversial. Patients with MDS younger than 65 years and with an HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 may benefit from more intense conditioning regimens. The presence of complex or monosomal karyotype or mutations in TP53, DNMT3A, or other genes identify patients with poorer outcomes following HCT. Patients with TP53 mutations have particularly poor survival, and should be enrolled in clinical trials whenever possible. Several important HCT studies are ongoing and will better define the role of HCT in MDS as well as the value of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy or post-transplant relapse-prevention strategies. Given the apparent underuse of HCT in eligible patients and low enrollment in MDS HCT clinical trials to date, timely referral of patients with MDS to such trials and HCT programs is critical. PMID:27621329

  18. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD. PMID:26861102

  19. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD.

  20. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, N N; Savani, B N; Shaw, B E; Abraham, A A; Ahmed, I A; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, K S; Basak, G W; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, T K; Greinix, H T; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, B K; Hayashi, R J; Jacobsohn, D A; Kamble, R T; Kasow, K A; Khera, N; Lazarus, H M; Malone, A K; Lupo-Stanghellini, M T; Margossian, S P; Muffly, L S; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, J R; Wirk, B; Wood, W A; Yong, A; Duncan, C N; Flowers, M E D; Majhail, N S

    2015-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients.

  1. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, NN; Savani, BN; Shaw, BE; Abraham, AA; Ahmed, IA; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, KS; Basak, GW; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, TK; Greinix, HT; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, BK; Hayashi, RJ; Jacobsohn, DA; Kamble, RT; Kasow, KA; Khera, N; Lazarus, HM; Malone, AK; Lupo-Stanghellini, MT; Margossian, SP; Muffly, LS; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, JR; Wirk, B; Wood, WA; Yong, A; Duncan, CN; Flowers, MED; Majhail, NS

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients. PMID:25822223

  2. The role of hematopoietic cell transplantation as therapy for myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2011-12-01

    A recent American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) position paper concluded that allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is recommended for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score of INT-2 at diagnosis who have a suitable donor and meet the transplant center's eligibility criteria and for selected patients at low risk at diagnosis who have poor prognostic features not included in the IPSS. While the ASBMT position is generally reasonable, given available data, physicians caring for MDS patients should be aware of the limitations of these conclusions. The position of the ASBMT is largely based on studies relying on the IPSS, which is imprecise, only applies to patients at diagnosis, ignores the impact of recent therapeutic advances, excludes patients with treatment-related MDS and certain subtypes of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and does not consider the influence of age and comorbidities on the decision-making process. The development of a revised IPSS for MDS provides us with an opportunity to reconsider the role of HCT in the treatment of MDS.

  3. Prenatal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Götherström, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) can be a severe disorder that can be diagnosed before birth. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has the potential to improve the bone structure, growth, and fracture healing. In this review, we give an introduction to OI and MSC, and the basis for pre- and postnatal transplantation in OI. We also summarize the two patients with OI who have received pre- and postnatal transplantation of MSC. The findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic MSC in OI is safe. The cell therapy is of likely clinical benefit with improved linear growth, mobility, and reduced fracture incidence. Unfortunately, the effect is transient. For this reason, postnatal booster infusions using same-donor MSC have been performed with clinical benefit, and without any adverse events. So far there is limited experience in this specific field and proper studies are required to accurately conclude on clinical benefits of MSC transplantation to treat OI. PMID:25346689

  4. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  5. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  6. Germ cell transplantation and testis tissue xenografting in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin; Rodriguez-Sosa, Jose Rafael; Dobrinski, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Germ cell transplantation was developed by Dr. Ralph Brinster and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania in 1994(1,2). These ground-breaking studies showed that microinjection of germ cells from fertile donor mice into the seminiferous tubules of infertile recipient mice results in donor-derived spermatogenesis and sperm production by the recipient animal(2). The use of donor males carrying the bacterial β-galactosidase gene allowed identification of donor-derived spermatogenesis and transmission of the donor haplotype to the offspring by recipient animals(1). Surprisingly, after transplantation into the lumen of the seminiferous tubules, transplanted germ cells were able to move from the luminal compartment to the basement membrane where spermatogonia are located(3). It is generally accepted that only SSCs are able to colonize the niche and re-establish spermatogenesis in the recipient testis. Therefore, germ cell transplantation provides a functional approach to study the stem cell niche in the testis and to characterize putative spermatogonial stem cells. To date, germ cell transplantation is used to elucidate basic stem cell biology, to produce transgenic animals through genetic manipulation of germ cells prior to transplantation(4,5), to study Sertoli cell-germ cell interaction(6,7), SSC homing and colonization(3,8), as well as SSC self-renewal and differentiation(9,10). Germ cell transplantation is also feasible in large species(11). In these, the main applications are preservation of fertility, dissemination of elite genetics in animal populations, and generation of transgenic animals as the study of spermatogenesis and SSC biology with this technique is logistically more difficult and expensive than in rodents. Transplantation of germ cells from large species into the seminiferous tubules of mice results in colonization of donor cells and spermatogonial expansion, but not in their full differentiation presumably due to incompatibility of the

  7. Hemophagocytic syndrome following haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with post-transplant cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sarita Rani; Chakrabarti, Aditi; Chatterjee, Sumita; Bhargava, Sneh; Ray, Kunal; Chakrabarti, Suparno

    2016-02-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is a rare but serious complication after allogeneic transplantation which has been reported to be particularly high after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We report on the incidence, risk factors and outcome of HPS in 51 patients (age 2-64 years) after haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY). The incidence of HPS was 12.2 %, occurring at a median of 18 days. The non-relapse mortality in patients with HPS was 83.3 % compared to 11.6 % in patients without HPS. Complete donor chimerism was documented in all patients with HPS. Definite infective etiology was identified in two patients only. The others were refractory to multiple lines of treatment and 3 patients underwent a second transplant. Even though the symptoms and biochemical markers of HPS showed prompt response in 2/3 patients undergoing a second allograft, they succumbed to infections before haematological recovery. The others succumbed to multi-organ failure or infections. Age < 10 years, transplantation for non-malignant disease and high CD34 content of the graft were identified as risk factors for HPS. Considering the fact that post-transplant HPS is usually a refractory and fatal condition, we discuss further attempts at deciphering the pathogenesis, developing modalities to prevent this complication and improve the outcome. PMID:26619832

  8. Transplantation of neural progenitor cells in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Bouyer, J; Shumsky, J S; Haas, C; Fischer, I

    2016-04-21

    Previous studies demonstrated that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) transplanted into a subacute contusion injury improve motor, sensory, and bladder function. In this study we tested whether transplanted NPCs can also improve functional recovery after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) alone or in combination with the reduction of glial scar and neurotrophic support. Adult rats received a T10 moderate contusion. Thirteen weeks after the injury they were divided into four groups and received either: 1. Medium (control), 2. NPC transplants, 3. NPC+lentivirus vector expressing chondroitinase, or 4. NPC+lentivirus vectors expressing chondroitinase and neurotrophic factors. During the 8 weeks post-transplantation the animals were tested for functional recovery and eventually analyzed by anatomical and immunohistochemical assays. The behavioral tests for motor and sensory function were performed before and after injury, and weekly after transplantation, with some animals also tested for bladder function at the end of the experiment. Transplant survival in the chronic injury model was variable and showed NPCs at the injury site in 60% of the animals in all transplantation groups. The NPC transplants comprised less than 40% of the injury site, without significant anatomical or histological differences among the groups. All groups also showed similar patterns of functional deficits and recovery in the 12 weeks after injury and in the 8 weeks after transplantation using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating score, the grid test, and the Von Frey test for mechanical allodynia. A notable exception was group 4 (NPC together with chondroitinase and neurotrophins), which showed a significant improvement in bladder function. This study underscores the therapeutic challenges facing transplantation strategies in a chronic SCI in which even the inclusion of treatments designed to reduce scarring and increase neurotrophic support produce only modest functional improvements. Further

  9. Factors associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) among patients in a population-based study of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela R; Warlick, Erica D; Roesler, Michelle A; Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Hirsch, Betsy; Ross, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by dysplastic changes in the bone marrow, ineffective erythropoiesis, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment planning for patients with MDS is a complex process, and we sought to better characterize hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes and the factors that play into decision-making regarding referral of adults with MDS for definitive therapy with HCT. Patients enrolled in a population-based study of MDS between April 2010 and January 2013 who underwent HCT within the first year after enrollment were included in this analysis. Age- and risk-matched MDS patient controls also enrolled during that time period were used as a comparison. Survival was significantly better in the HCT group (48 vs. 21 %, log-rank p value 0.009). Non-HCT patients were more likely to have comorbidities, and HCT patients were more likely to have a college degree and an income >$80,000. All three of these variables were independently associated with HCT, but none impacted survival. Patients with MDS in our study who underwent HCT had better survival than a comparable group of patients who did not undergo HCT. With refined treatment techniques, more patients may be able to be considered for this therapy. More work needs to be done to determine why education and income appear to impact the decision to pursue HCT, but these factors may impact referral to an academic center where aggressive therapy like HCT is more likely to be considered.

  10. Back to the future! The Evolving Role of Maintenance Therapy after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hourigan, Christopher S.; McCarthy, Philip; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Relapse is a devastating event for patients with hematologic cancers treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In most situations, relapse treatment options are limited. Maintenance therapy offers the possibility of delaying or avoiding disease recurrence, but its role remains unclear in most conditions we transplant. Here, Dr. Hourigan presents an overview of minimal residual disease (MRD) measurement in hematologic malignancies and the applicability of MRD-based post-transplant interventions. Dr. McCarthy reviews current knowledge of maintenance therapy in the autologous transplant context, with emphasis on immunologic interventions and immune modulation strategies designed to prevent relapse. Dr. de Lima discusses current lines of investigation in disease recurrence prevention after allogeneic transplantation, focusing on AML and MDS. PMID:24291784

  11. Stem Cell Transplantation for Pulpal Regeneration: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim M; Jakusz, Kimberley; Jochens, Arne; Dörfer, Christof; Schwendicke, Falk

    2015-10-01

    For treating pulpal pathological conditions, pulpal regeneration through transplanted stem/progenitor cells might be an alternative to conventional root canal treatment. A number of animal studies demonstrated beneficial effects of stem/progenitor cell transplantation for pulp-dentin complex regeneration, that is, pulpal tissue, neural, vascular, and dentinal regeneration. We systematically reviewed animal studies investigating stem/progenitor cell-mediated pulp-dentin complex regeneration. Studies quantitatively comparing pulp-dentin complex regeneration after transplantation of stem/progenitor cells versus no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls in intraoral in vivo teeth animal models were analyzed. The following outcomes were investigated: regenerated pulp area per root canal total area, capillaries per total surface, regenerated dentinal area per total defect area, and nerves per total surface. PubMed and EMBASE were screened for studies published until July 2014. Cross-referencing and hand searching were used to identify further articles. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. To assess possible bias, SYRCLE's risk of bias tool for animal studies was used. From 1364 screened articles, five studies (representing 64 animals) were included in the quantitative analysis. Risk of bias of all studies was high. Stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps showed significantly larger regenerated pulp area per root canal total area (SMD [95% CI]: 2.28 [0.35-4.21]) and regenerated dentin area per root canal total area (SMD: 6.91 [5.39-8.43]) compared with no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls. Only one study reported on capillaries per or nerves per total surface and found both significantly increased in stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps compared with controls. Stem/progenitor cell transplantation seems to enhance pulp-dentin complex regeneration in animal models

  12. Stem Cell Transplantation for Pulpal Regeneration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jakusz, Kimberley; Jochens, Arne; Dörfer, Christof; Schwendicke, Falk

    2015-01-01

    For treating pulpal pathological conditions, pulpal regeneration through transplanted stem/progenitor cells might be an alternative to conventional root canal treatment. A number of animal studies demonstrated beneficial effects of stem/progenitor cell transplantation for pulp–dentin complex regeneration, that is, pulpal tissue, neural, vascular, and dentinal regeneration. We systematically reviewed animal studies investigating stem/progenitor cell-mediated pulp–dentin complex regeneration. Studies quantitatively comparing pulp–dentin complex regeneration after transplantation of stem/progenitor cells versus no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls in intraoral in vivo teeth animal models were analyzed. The following outcomes were investigated: regenerated pulp area per root canal total area, capillaries per total surface, regenerated dentinal area per total defect area, and nerves per total surface. PubMed and EMBASE were screened for studies published until July 2014. Cross-referencing and hand searching were used to identify further articles. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. To assess possible bias, SYRCLE's risk of bias tool for animal studies was used. From 1364 screened articles, five studies (representing 64 animals) were included in the quantitative analysis. Risk of bias of all studies was high. Stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps showed significantly larger regenerated pulp area per root canal total area (SMD [95% CI]: 2.28 [0.35–4.21]) and regenerated dentin area per root canal total area (SMD: 6.91 [5.39–8.43]) compared with no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls. Only one study reported on capillaries per or nerves per total surface and found both significantly increased in stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps compared with controls. Stem/progenitor cell transplantation seems to enhance pulp–dentin complex regeneration in

  13. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Lones, M A; Kirov, I; Said, J W; Shintaku, I P; Neudorf, S

    2000-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Rare cases of PTLD after autologous BMT have been reported only in adults. This case report is the first to describe PTLD in a pediatric patient after autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (PSCT). This 2-year-old male with stage IV neuroblastoma underwent autologous PSCT. The post-PSCT course was complicated by fever with hematochezia and a lung mass. On day 94 post PSCT, colonoscopy revealed an ulcer due to a PTLD, monomorphic type, B cell phenotype, associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Fine needle aspiration identified the lung mass as neuroblastoma. PTLD can occur in pediatric autologous PSCT recipients, and may occur more frequently in autologous grafts manipulated by T cell depletion or CD34+ cell selection.

  14. National Survey of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Center Personnel, Infrastructure, and Models of Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Majhail, Navneet S; Mau, Lih-Wen; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Payton, Tammy; Eckrich, Michael; Joffe, Steven; Lee, Stephanie J; LeMaistre, Charles F; LeRademacher, Jennifer; Loberiza, Fausto; Logan, Brent; Parsons, Susan K; Repaczki-Jones, Ramona; Robinett, Pam; Rizzo, J Douglas; Murphy, Elizabeth; Denzen, Ellen M

    2015-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a complex procedure that requires availability of adequate infrastructure, personnel, and resources at transplantation centers. We conducted a national survey of transplantation centers in the United States to obtain data on their personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery models. A 42-item web-based survey was administered to medical directors of transplantation centers in the United States that reported any allogeneic HCT to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research in 2011. The response rate for the survey was 79% for adult programs (85 of 108 centers) and 82% for pediatric programs (54 of 66 centers). For describing results, we categorized centers into groups with similar volumes based on 2010 total HCT activity (adult centers, 9 categories; pediatric centers, 6 categories). We observed considerable variation in available resources, infrastructure, personnel, and care delivery models among adult and pediatric transplantation centers. Characteristics varied substantially among centers with comparable transplantation volumes. Transplantation centers may find these data helpful in assessing their present capacity and use them to evaluate potential resource needs for personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery and in planning for growth.

  15. Establishing a Population-Based HLA-Antibody Panel for Flow Cytometric Monitoring of Chimerism in HLA-Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Wonho; Hwang, Min-A; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Im, Ho Joon

    2016-01-01

    Determining the chimerism in stem cell transplantation (SCT) is important in the monitoring of engraftment. Conventional monitoring methods such as short tandem repeat polymerase chain reaction (STR-PCR) are labor intensive and difficult in showing the dynamics of cell subpopulations. In HLA-haploidentical SCT, flow cytometric analysis using anti-HLA antibody for the mismatched HLA can be useful in observing changes of cell subpopulations and determining chimerism. We designed a specific panel of HLA antibody reagents for the Korean population, and verified its clinical application in flow cytometric monitoring of chimerism after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. A total of 12 anti-HLA-A, -B-antibodies were selected, which could cover 82.5% of HLA-A and 16.5% of HLA-B in Korean population. This HLA panel distinguished donor and recipient cells in 22 of 23 HLA-haploidentical SCT cases. In one case, the patient had HLA-A*02/A*24, B*48/B*61 while the donor had HLA-A*02/A*33, B*44/B*48. The donor type HLA-B*44(+) and CD3(+) T cells, and HLA-B*44(+) and CD56(+) NK cells were seen at day 14 and day 8, respectively. Increased HLA-B*44(+) cells throughout the study period indicated the engraftment of donor stem cells. We were able to design a population specific panel of HLA-antibodies, and verified that flow cytometric analysis using HLA antibody for the detection of chimerism in HLA-haploidentical SCT was a simple and sensitive monitoring technique. This method allowed us to observe the dynamic changes in cell subpopulations after HLA-haploidentical SCT. Flow cytometric analysis can be considered as a strong tool for the monitoring of engraftment in HLA-haploidentical SCT.

  16. Stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal cells to treat autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M

    2016-06-01

    Since the start of the international stem cell transplantation project in 1997, over 2000 patients have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), mostly autologous, as treatment for a severe autoimmune disease, the majority being multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Crohn's disease. There was an overall 85% 5-year survival and 43% progression-free survival. Around 30% of patients in all disease subgroups had a complete response, often durable despite full immune reconstitution. In many cases, e.g. systemic sclerosis, morphological improvement such as reduction of skin collagen and normalization of microvasculature was documented, beyond any predicted known effects of intense immunosuppression alone. It is hoped that the results of the three running large prospective randomized controlled trials will allow modification of the protocols to reduce the high transplant-related mortality which relates to regimen intensity, age of patient, and comorbidity. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), often incorrectly called stem cells, have been the intense focus of in vitro studies and animal models of rheumatic and other diseases over more than a decade. Despite multiple plausible mechanisms of action and a plethora of positive in vivo animal studies, few randomised controlled clinical trials have demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit in any condition so far. This could be due to confusion in cell product terminology, complexity of clinical study design and execution or agreement on meaningful outcome measures. Within the rheumatic diseases, SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have received most attention. Uncontrolled multiple trial data from over 300 SLE patients have been published from one centre suggesting a positive outcome; one single centre comparative study in 172 RA was positive. In addition, small numbers of patients with Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, primary Sjögren's disease, polymyositis/dermatomyositis and type II diabetes

  17. Macroporous thin membranes for cell transplant in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Antolinos-Turpín, C M; Morales Román, R M; Rodenas-Rochina, J; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Gómez-Tejedor, J A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a method to produce macroporous thin membranes made of poly (ethyl acrylate-co-hydroxyethyl acrylate) copolymer network with varying cross-linking density for cell transplantation and prosthesis fabrication. The manufacture process is based on template techniques and anisotropic pore collapse. Pore collapse was produced by swelling the membrane in acetone and subsequently drying and changing the solvent by water to produce 100 microns thick porous membranes. These very thin membranes are porous enough to hold cells to be transplanted to the organism or to be colonized by ingrowth from neighboring tissues in the organism, and they present sufficient tearing stress to be sutured with surgical thread. The obtained pore morphology was observed by Scanning Electron Microscope, and confocal laser microscopy. Mechanical properties were characterized by stress-strain experiments in tension and tearing strength measurements. Morphology and mechanical properties were related to the different initial thickness of the scaffold and the cross-linking density of the polymer network. Seeding efficiency and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells inside the pore structure were determined at 2 h, 1, 7, 14 and 21 days from seeding.

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  19. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in the brains of Alzheimer's disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yufang; Ma, Tuo; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang; Zhang, Xiufang; Gong, Yandao

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we transplanted adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the hippocampi of APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the number of newly generated (BrdU+) cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus was significantly higher in Alzheimer's disease mice after adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, and there was also a significant increase in the number of BrdU+/DCX+ neuroblasts in these animals. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation enhanced neurogenic activity in the subventricular zone as well. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduced oxidative stress and alleviated cognitive impairment in the mice. Based on these findings, we propose that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation enhances endogenous neurogenesis in both the subgranular and subventricular zones in APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice, thereby facilitating functional recovery. PMID:25206892

  20. Transplantation tool integrated with MEMS manipulator for retinal pigment epithelium cell sheet.

    PubMed

    Wada, H; Konishi, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a transplantation tool for the retinal pigment epithelium in an eye. We have developed MEMS manipulator as an end-effector for transplantation of retinal pigment epithelium cell sheet. Typical size of MEMS manipulator is 3mm×3mm. MEMS manipulator was made of polydimethylsiloxane and driven by pneumatic balloon actuators. MEMS manipulator have been improved and integrated with several functions by sensors and actuators. MEMS manipulator is integrated into a transplantation tool. A whole tool also requires improvements based on our experimental results. We have improved our tool in terms of assembling, sealing, and operation. PMID:24109649

  1. Management of Uterine Bleeding During Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Purisch, Stephanie E.; Shanis, Dana; Zerbe, Christa; Merideth, Melissa; Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Stratton, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is an effective treatment strategy for a variety of hematologic disorders, but patients are at risk for dysfunctional coagulation and abnormal bleeding. Gynecologists are often consulted before transplant for management of abnormal uterine bleeding, which may be particularly challenging in this context. CASE A premenopausal woman with MonoMAC (a rare adult-onset immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by monocytopenia and Mycobacterium avium complex infections resulting from mutations in GATA2, a crucial gene in early hematopoiesis) presented with pancytopenia, evolving leukemia, and recent strokes, necessitating anticoagulation. During preparation for hematopoietic stem cell transplant, she experienced prolonged menorrhagia requiring transfusions. Surgical therapy was contraindicated, and medical management was successful only when combined with balloon tamponade. CONCLUSION Balloon tamponade may be a potentially life-saving adjunct to medical therapy for control of uterine hemorrhage before hematopoietic stem cell transplant. PMID:23344397

  2. Intraspinal transplantation of mouse and human neural precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Plaisted, Warren C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the preparation and transplantation of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and mouse neural precursor cells (mNPCs) into the thoracic region of the mouse spinal cord. The techniques in this unit also describe how to prepare the mouse for surgery by performing a laminectomy to expose the spinal cord for transplantation. Here we show NPCs genetically labeled with eGFP transplanted into the spinal cord of a mouse following viralmediated demyelination can efficiently be detected via eGFP expression. Transplantation of these cells into the spinal cord is an efficacious way to determine their effects in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and spinal cord injury. PMID:24510791

  3. Rehabilitation after cell transplantation for cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Deszczynski, J; Slynarski, K

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation is a key element of successful treatment of cartilage defects with cell transplantation. The process of graft maturation takes approximately 18 months and cannot be accelerated, but requires carefully introduced steps leading to early recovery of joint function. Rehabilitation starts at 8 hours after surgery with the continuous passive motion (CPM) exercises and physiotherapy. For the first 6 weeks, patients continue with CPM in the range of 0 degrees to 45 degrees for femoral and tibial defects and 0 degrees to 30 degrees for patellofemoral joint reconstruction. Isometric muscle training and scar manual therapy are introduced. Patients are allowed to weight-bear as tolerated from the second week after surgery. After this initial phase, from 6 to 8 weeks after surgery, rehabilitation is accelerated with increased load-bearing and progressive range of motion to full flexion. Usually patients are able to walk without crutches in this time. Proprioceptive training is introduced with the advance of pain-free full range of motion and no discomfort with full weight-bearing. At 6 months after surgery, most patients recover joint function, making it possible for them to return to daily living activities. However, they need to continue with muscle, proprioceptive, and sports-specific rehabilitation exercises. The rehabilitation process is complicated, requiring close cooperation between the patient and surgeon-physiotherapist team to understand the symptoms and address them in a timely fashion. PMID:16504734

  4. [Parenteral nutrition in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez, M E

    2004-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a sophisticated procedure used in the treatment of solid tumors, haematological diseases and autoimmune disorders, which were characterized by an extremely poor prognosis only a few years earlier. Thousands of patients receive high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy around the world every year in order to treat these diseases. Therapy can induce aggressive changes associated with multiple organ failure, which is usually reversible, that can lead to special nutritional and metabolic conditions. Artificial nutrition, total parenteral nutrition in particular, is provided to patients undergoing HSCT to help minimize nutritional consequences of both conditioning regimens (mucositis, malabsorption, etc.) as well as complications resulting from the procedure (graft versus host disease, venoocclusive disease of the liver). This study reviews published guidelines for the use of parenteral nutrition in HSCT and includes important aspects for nutritional support in children, including controversy on potential benefits of special nutrients (glutamine, antioxidants, etc.) and furthermore discusses future trends. This paper also addresses the pharmacists role and the necessity for multidisciplinary teams to develop specific protocols.

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hale, Gregory A

    2005-10-01

    While advances in the treatment of pediatric cancers have increased cure rates, children with metastatic or recurrent solid tumors have a dismal prognosis despite initial transient responses to therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation takes advantage of the steep dose-response relationship observed with many chemotherapeutic agents. While clearly demonstrated to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic neuroblastoma, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also frequently used to treat patients with other high-risk diseases such as Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms' tumor, retinoblastoma, germ cell tumors, lymphomas and brain tumors. Most published experience consists of retrospective, single-arm studies; randomized clinical trials are lacking, due in part to the rarity of pediatric cancers treatable by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These published literature demonstrate that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation results in most cases in equivalent or superior outcomes when compared with conventional therapies. However, patient heterogeneity, patient selection, graft characteristics and processing and the varied conditioning regimens are additional factors to consider. Since the inception of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, regimen-related toxicity has markedly decreased and the vast majority of treatment failures are now due to disease recurrence. Prospective clinical trials are needed to identify specific high-risk patient populations, with randomization (when possible) to compare outcomes of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with those receiving standard therapy. In addition, investigators need to better define the role of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in these solid tumors, particularly in combination with other therapeutic modalities such as immunotherapy and novel cell processing methodologies.

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Europe 2014: more than 40 000 transplants annually.

    PubMed

    Passweg, J R; Baldomero, H; Bader, P; Bonini, C; Cesaro, S; Dreger, P; Duarte, R F; Dufour, C; Kuball, J; Farge-Bancel, D; Gennery, A; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Nagler, A; Sureda, A; Mohty, M

    2016-06-01

    A record number of 40 829 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 36 469 patients (15 765 allogeneic (43%), 20 704 autologous (57%)) were reported by 656 centers in 47 countries to the 2014 survey. Trends include: continued growth in transplant activity, more so in Eastern European countries than in the west; a continued increase in the use of haploidentical family donors (by 25%) and slower growth for unrelated donor HSCT. The use of cord blood as a stem cell source has decreased again in 2014. Main indications for HSCT were leukemias: 11 853 (33%; 96% allogeneic); lymphoid neoplasias; 20 802 (57%; 11% allogeneic); solid tumors; 1458 (4%; 3% allogeneic) and non-malignant disorders; 2203 (6%; 88% allogeneic). Changes in transplant activity include more allogeneic HSCT for AML in CR1, myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) and aplastic anemia and decreasing use in CLL; and more autologous HSCT for plasma cell disorders and in particular for amyloidosis. In addition, data on numbers of teams doing alternative donor transplants, allogeneic after autologous HSCT, autologous cord blood transplants are presented.

  7. Changing Epidemiology of Respiratory Viral Infections in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Christian; Campbell, Angela P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review New respiratory viruses have been discovered in recent years and new molecular diagnostic assays have been developed that improve our understanding of respiratory virus infections. This article will review the changing epidemiology of these viruses after hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation. Recent findings Respiratory viruses are frequently detected in transplant recipients. A number of viruses have been newly discovered or emerged in the last decade, including human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus, new human coronaviruses and rhinoviruses, human polyomaviruses, and a new 2009 pandemic strain of influenza A/H1N1. The potential for these viruses to cause lower respiratory tract infections after transplantation varies, and is greatest for human metapneumovirus and H1N1 influenza, but appears to be limited for the other new viruses. Acute and long term complications in hematopoietic and solid organ transplant recipients are active areas of research. Summary Respiratory viral infections are frequently associated with significant morbidity following transplantation and are therefore of great clinical and epidemiologic interest. As new viruses are discovered, and more sensitive diagnostic methods are developed, defining the full impact of emerging respiratory viruses in transplant recipients must be elucidated by well-designed clinical studies. PMID:21666460

  8. HLA mismatches and hematopoietic cell transplantation: structural simulations assess the impact of changes in peptide binding specificity on transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yanover, Chen; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Malkki, Mari; Gooley, Ted; Spellman, Stephen; Velardi, Andrea; Bardy, Peter; Madrigal, Alejandro; Bignon, Jean-Denis; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic cell transplantation from an unrelated donor depends in part on the degree of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching between donor and patient. We present a structure-based analysis of HLA mismatching, focusing on individual amino acid mismatches and their effect on peptide binding specificity. Using molecular modeling simulations of HLA-peptide interactions, we find evidence that amino acid mismatches predicted to perturb peptide binding specificity are associated with higher risk of mortality in a large and diverse dataset of patient-donor pairs assembled by the International Histocompatibility Working Group in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation consortium. This analysis may represent a first step toward sequence-based prediction of relative risk for HLA allele mismatches. PMID:24482668

  9. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  10. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Afonso José Pereira; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Saboya, Rosaura; Mendrone Júnior, Alfredo; Amigo Filho, Ulisses; Coracin, Fabio Luiz; Buccheri, Valéria; Linardi, Camila da Cruz Gouveia; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Background Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. Objectives To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. Methods A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. Results The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. Conclusion Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not been previously reported

  11. Transplanted Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Contribute to Human Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rydén, Mikael; Uzunel, Mehmet; Hård, Joanna L; Borgström, Erik; Mold, Jeff E; Arner, Erik; Mejhert, Niklas; Andersson, Daniel P; Widlund, Yvonne; Hassan, Moustapha; Jones, Christina V; Spalding, Kirsty L; Svahn, Britt-Marie; Ahmadian, Afshin; Frisén, Jonas; Bernard, Samuel; Mattsson, Jonas; Arner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Because human white adipocytes display a high turnover throughout adulthood, a continuous supply of precursor cells is required to maintain adipogenesis. Bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells may contribute to mammalian adipogenesis; however, results in animal models are conflicting. Here we demonstrate in 65 subjects who underwent allogeneic BM or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation that, over the entire lifespan, BM/PBSC-derived progenitor cells contribute ∼10% to the subcutaneous adipocyte population. While this is independent of gender, age, and different transplantation-related parameters, body fat mass exerts a strong influence, with up to 2.5-fold increased donor cell contribution in obese individuals. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of single adipocytes suggests that BM/PBSC-derived progenitors contribute to adipose tissue via both differentiation and cell fusion. Thus, at least in the setting of transplantation, BM serves as a reservoir for adipocyte progenitors, particularly in obese subjects. PMID:26190649

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted stem cell fate in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Goodarzi, Parisa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, scientific findings in the field of regeneration of nervous system have revealed the possibility of stem cell based therapies for damaged brain tissue related disorders like stroke. Furthermore, to achieve desirable outcomes from cellular therapies, one needs to monitor the migration, engraftment, viability, and also functional fate of transplanted stem cells. Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely versatile technique for this purpose, which has been broadly used to study stroke and assessment of therapeutic role of stem cells. In this review we searched in PubMed search engine by using following keywords; “Stem Cells”, “Cell Tracking”, “Stroke”, “Stem Cell Transplantation”, “Nanoparticles”, and “Magnetic Resonance Imaging” as entry terms and based on the mentioned key words, the search period was set from 1976 to 2012. The main purpose of this article is describing various advantages of molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells, with focus on translation of stem cell research to clinical research. PMID:25097631

  13. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-03-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft.

  14. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  15. Prediction of T-cell reconstitution by assessment of T-cell receptor excision circle before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Barfield, Raymond; Benaim, Ely; Leung, Wing; Knowles, James; Lawrence, Dawn; Otto, Mario; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Neale, Geoffrey A M; Behm, Frederick G; Turner, Victoria; Handgretinger, Rupert

    2005-01-15

    The extent and rapidity with which T cells are regenerated from graft-derived precursor cells directly influences the incidence of infection and the T-cell-based graft-versus-tumor effect. Measurement of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in peripheral blood is a means of quantifying recent thymic T-cell production and has been used after transplantation in many studies to estimate thymus-dependent T-cell reconstitution. We hypothesized that the quality of thymic function before transplantation affects thymus-dependent T-cell reconstitution after transplantation. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to quantify signal-joint TRECs (sjTRECs) before and after transplantation. T-cell reconstitution was evaluated by T-cell receptor beta (TCRbeta) CDR3 size spectratyping. We tested 77 healthy sibling donors and 244 samples from 26 pediatric recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Blood from the healthy donors contained 1200 to 155,000 sjTREC copies/mL blood. Patients who had greater than 1200 copies/mL blood before transplantation showed early recovery of sjTREC numbers and TCRbeta repertoire diversity. In contrast, patients who had fewer than 1200 copies/mL blood before transplantation demonstrated significantly slower restoration of thymus-dependent T cells. We conclude that the rate of reconstitution of thymus-dependent T cells is dependent on the competence of thymic function in the recipients before transplantation. Therefore, pretransplantation measurement of sjTREC may provide an important tool for predicting thymus-dependent T-cell reconstitution after transplantation.

  16. Schwann Cell Transplantation and Descending Propriospinal Regeneration after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ling-Xiao; Walker, Chandler; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), poor ability of damaged axons of the central nervous system (CNS) to regenerate causes very limited functional recovery. Schwann cells (SCs) have been widely explored as promising donors for transplantation to promote axonal regeneration in the CNS including the spinal cord. Compared with other CNS axonal pathways, injured propriospinal tracts display the strongest regenerative response to SC transplantation. Even without providing additional neurotrophic factors, propriospinal axons can grow into the SC environment which is rarely seen in supraspinal tracts. Propriospinal tract has been found to respond to several important neurotrophic factors secreted by SCs. Therefore, the SC is considered to be one of the most promising candidates for cell-based therapies for SCI. Since many reviews have already appeared on topics of SC transplantation in SCI repair, this review will focus particularly on the rationale of SC transplantation in mediating descending propriospinal axonal regeneration as well as optimizing such regeneration by using different combinatorial strategies. PMID:25257034

  17. Interdisciplinary modular teaching for patients undergoing progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Jackie; Dickerson, Jill

    2002-01-01

    Patient-education information provided to patients undergoing progenitor cell transplantation (PCT) is complex. Patients' and caregivers' inability to process this information and apply principles of self-care can result in poor outcomes. An interdisciplinary team developed a three-part modular teaching program and documentation tool to address the complex informational needs of patients undergoing PCT. The modules were designed to reflect information relative to the three phases of PCT: pretransplantation, transplantation, and post-transplantation. The structured content of the documentation tool allows for consistent documentation that systematically reflects the content of the patient-education modules.

  18. The Emerging Role of Nanotechnology in Cell and Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tasciotti, Ennio; Cabrera, Fernando J; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Martinez, Jonathan O; Thekkedath, Usha R; Kloc, Malgorzata; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation is often the only choice many patients have when suffering from end-stage organ failure. Although the quality of life improves after transplantation, challenges, such as organ shortages, necessary immunosuppression with associated complications, and chronic graft rejection, limit its wide clinical application. Nanotechnology has emerged in the past 2 decades as a field with the potential to satisfy clinical needs in the area of targeted and sustained drug delivery, noninvasive imaging, and tissue engineering. In this article, we provide an overview of popular nanotechnologies and a summary of the current and potential uses of nanotechnology in cell and organ transplantation. PMID:27257995

  19. Peri-transplant clostridium difficile infections in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Agha, Aya; Sehgal, Alison; Lim, Matthew J; Weber, David; Hou, Jing-Zhou; Farah, Rafic; Raptis, Anastasios; Im, Annie; Dorritie, Kathleen; Marks, Stanley; Agha, Mounzer; Lim, Seah H

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) remain the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients in this country. Patients with hematologic malignancies, especially those who undergo hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants are particularly at risk for developing CDI. One hundred and forty seven consecutive allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants were analyzed for peri-transplant Clostridium difficile infections (PT-CDI). Sixteen patients (11%) developed PT-CDI (Median time = 7 days after transplant). The probability for developing PT-CDI during the peri-transplant period was 12.3%. History of CDI was strongly associated with the development of PT-CDI (P = 0.008) (OR = 5.48) (P = 0.017). These patients also developed PT-CDI much earlier than in those without a history (median 1 day vs. 8 days, P = 0.03). The probability for developing PT-CDI for those with a history was 39%. There was a trend toward significance (P = 0.065) between matched related donor grafts and the development of PT-CDI (OR = 0.245) (P = 0.08). Age, sex, diagnosis, transplant preparative regimens, Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, grade 3/4 acute GVHD, or use of antimicrobials within 8 weeks of transplant were not associated with PT-CDI. Non-CDI-related deaths occurred in one patient in the PT-CDI group and nine in the group without PT-CDI. In the remaining 139 patients, the length of hospital stay for those with PT-CDI was significantly longer than those without (mean 27 days vs. 22 days; P = 0.02). PMID:26661725

  20. Gene-marking and haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Heslop, H E; Rooney, C M; Brenner, M K

    1995-12-01

    Gene transfer has allowed a number of biological issues in haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation to be addressed. Gene-marking studies have shown that residual malignant cells in infused marrow may contribute to relapse in acute myeloid leukaemia, neuroblastoma and chronic myeloid leukaemia. Double gene-marking techniques with distinguishable retroviral vectors are being used to compare purging techniques and the reconstitution of different sources of stem cells. In allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation, gene-marking has demonstrated that adoptively transferred cytotoxic T cells can persist and reconstitute antiviral immunity.

  1. Cell transplantation in lumbar spine disc degeneration disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohaus, C.; Ganey, T. M.; Minkus, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common symptom, affecting nearly three-quarters of the population sometime in their life. Given that disc herniation is thought to be an extension of progressive disc degeneration that attends the normal aging process, seeking an effective therapy that staves off disc degeneration has been considered a logical attempt to reduce back pain. The most apparent cellular and biochemical changes attributable to degeneration include a decrease in cell density in the disc that is accompanied by a reduction in synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. With this in mind, one therapeutic strategy would be to replace, regenerate, or augment the intervertebral disc cell population, with a goal of correcting matrix insufficiencies and restoring normal segment biomechanics. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. We designed an animal study using the dog as our model to investigate this hypothesis by transplantation of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes into degenerated intervertebral discs. As a result we demonstrated that disc cells remained viable after transplantation; transplanted disc cells produced an extracellular matrix that contained components similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue; a statistically significant correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height could displayed. Following these results the Euro Disc Randomized Trial was initiated to embrace a representative patient group with persistent symptoms that had not responded to conservative treatment where an indication for surgical treatment was given. In the interim analyses we evaluated that patients who received autologous disc cell transplantation had greater pain reduction at 2 years compared with patients who did not receive cells following their discectomy surgery and discs in patients that

  2. A Novel Health Information Technology Communication System to Increase Caregiver Activation in the Context of Hospital-Based Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Molly; Hanauer, David A; Kaziunas, Elizabeth; Ackerman, Mark S; Derry, Holly; Forringer, Rachel; Miller, Kristen; O'Reilly, Dennis; An, Lawrence; Tewari, Muneesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), commonly referred to as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT), is an intense treatment modality that requires the involvement of engaged caregivers during the patient’s (child’s) prolonged hospitalization. The ubiquity of electronic health records (EHRs) and a trend toward patient-centered care could allow a novel health information technology (IT) system to increase parental engagement. The paucity of research on acute care, hospital-based (inpatient) health IT applications for patients or caregivers provides an opportunity for testing the feasibility of such applications. The pediatric BMT population represents an ideal patient group to conduct an evaluation due to the lengthy inpatient stays and a heightened need for patient activation. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of implementing the BMT Roadmap in caregivers as an intervention during their child’s inpatient hospitalization. The BMT Roadmap is an inpatient portal prototype optimized for tablet with a user-centered design. It integrates patient-specific laboratory and medication data from the EHR in real-time and provides support in terms of discharge goals, home care education, and other components. Feasibility will be proven if (1) the BMT Roadmap functions and can be managed by the study team without unexpected effort, (2) the system is accessed by users at a defined minimum threshold, and (3) the qualitative and quantitative research conducted provides quality data that address the perceived usefulness of the BMT Roadmap and could inform a study in a larger sample size. Methods This will be a single-arm, nonrandomized feasibility study. We aim to enroll 10 adult caregivers (age ≥ 18 years) of pediatric patients (aged 0-25 years) undergoing autologous (self-donor) or allogeneic (alternative donor) BMT. Assenting minors (aged 10-18) will also be invited to participate. Recruitment of study

  3. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation: induction of donor specific immune tolerance and postnatal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Peranteau, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) is a non-myeloablative non-immunosuppressive transplant approach that allows for donor cell engraftment across immunologic barriers. Successful engraftment is associated with donor-specific tolerance. IUHCT has the potential to treat a large number of congenital hematologic, immunologic, and genetic diseases either by achieving high enough engraftment levels following a single IUHCT or by inducing donor specific tolerance to allow for non-toxic same-donor postnatal transplants. This review evaluates donor specific tolerance induction achieved by IUHCT. Specifically it addresses the need to achieve threshold levels of donor cell engraftment following IUHCT to consistently obtain immunologic tolerance. The mechanisms of tolerance induction including partial deletion of donor reactive host T cells by direct and indirect antigen presentation and the role of regulatory T cells in maintaining tolerance are reviewed. Finally, this review highlights the promising clinical potential of in utero tolerance induction to provide a platform on which postnatal cellular and organ transplants can be performed without myeloablative or immunosuppressive conditioning. PMID:25429269

  4. New directions for rabbit antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin(®)) in solid organ transplants, stem cell transplants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mohty, Mohamad; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Saliba, Faouzi; Zuckermann, Andreas; Morelon, Emmanuel; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2014-09-01

    In the 30 years since the rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) Thymoglobulin(®) was first licensed, its use in solid organ transplantation and hematology has expanded progressively. Although the evidence base is incomplete, specific roles for rATG in organ transplant recipients using contemporary dosing strategies are now relatively well-identified. The addition of rATG induction to a standard triple or dual regimen reduces acute cellular rejection, and possibly humoral rejection. It is an appropriate first choice in patients with moderate or high immunological risk, and may be used in low-risk patients receiving a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-sparing regimen from time of transplant, or if early steroid withdrawal is planned. Kidney transplant patients at risk of delayed graft function may also benefit from the use of rATG to facilitate delayed CNI introduction. In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, rATG has become an important component of conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, following demonstration of reduced acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. More recently, a role for rATG has also been established in reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. In autoimmunity, rATG contributes to the treatment of severe aplastic anemia, and has been incorporated in autograft projects for the management of conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and systemic sclerosis. Finally, research is underway for the induction of tolerance exploiting the ability of rATG to induce immunosuppresive cells such as regulatory T-cells. Despite its long history, rATG remains a key component of the immunosuppressive armamentarium, and its complex immunological properties indicate that its use will expand to a wider range of disease conditions in the future.

  5. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma without Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered the standard of care for multiple myeloma patients who are eligible for transplantation. The process of autografting comprises the following steps: control of the primary disease by using a certain induction therapeutic protocol, mobilization of stem cells, collection of mobilized stem cells by apheresis, cryopreservation of the apheresis product, administration of high-dose pretransplant conditioning therapy, and finally infusion of the cryopreserved stem cells after thawing. However, in cancer centers that treat patients with multiple myeloma and have transplantation capabilities but lack or are in the process of acquiring cryopreservation facilities, alternatively noncryopreserved autologous stem cell therapy has been performed with remarkable success as the pretransplant conditioning therapy is usually brief. PMID:22693672

  6. Harnessing FOXP3+ regulatory T cells for transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Herman; Hilbrands, Robert; Howie, Duncan; Cobbold, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Early demonstrations that mice could be tolerized to transplanted tissues with short courses of immunosuppressive therapy and that with regard to tolerance to self, CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) appeared to play a critical role, have catalyzed strategies to harness FOXP3-dependent processes to control rejection in human transplantation. This review seeks to examine the scientific underpinning for this new approach to finesse immunosuppression. PMID:24691478

  7. Overview of bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Poliquin, C M

    1997-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are treatments used with increasing frequency for a growing number of cancers. As technology develops, so, too, does the complexity of nursing care. In addition, as the number of patients who receive BMT or PBSCT increases, more and more nurses will be involved in their care. Knowledge of what problems to anticipate, comprehensive assessment, clear patient and family education, and strong emotional support provide the key to successful patient management.

  8. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells transplantation protects against rat pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Guohua; Liu, Hongmei; Gu, Naibing; Zhang, Huilan; Xu, Yongjian; Zhang, Zhenxiang

    2008-05-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is characterized by loss of alveolar structure. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to differentiate into alveolar epithelial cells. However, the effect of MSCs transplantation on pulmonary emphysema is unknown. To address this question, cultured bone marrow MSCs from male donor rats were infused into female recipients treated with irradiation and instillation of papain. We found that the emphysematous changes in rats received MSCs transplantation were ameliorated when compared with the rats without MSCs transplantation. Y chromosome fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemical staining for SP-C, confirmed that MSCs engrafted in recipient lungs and differentiated into type II alveolar epithelial cells. Additionally, MSCs transplantation reduced the extent of irradiation and papain-induced alveolar cell apoptosis, likely due to the up-regulation of the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax gene. We conclude that MSCs transplantation protects against the irradiation and papain-induced pulmonary emphysema. The mechanisms of protection may involve the engraftment of MSCs in the lungs, differentiation of MSCs into type II alveolar epithelial cells and suppression of alveolar cell apoptosis.

  10. Plasma cell neoplasms in US solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Clarke, Christina A; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Lynch, Charles F; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Gibson, Todd M; Landgren, Ola; Morton, Lindsay M

    2013-06-01

    Transplant recipients have elevated risk for plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs, comprising multiple myeloma and plasmacytoma), but little is known about risk factors in the transplant setting. Through linkage of the US solid organ transplant registry with 15 state/regional cancer registries, we identified 140 PCNs in 202 600 recipients (1987-2009). PCN risk was 1.8-fold increased relative to the general population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 1.80, 95%CI 1.51-2.12). Among cases, 102 were multiple myeloma (SIR 1.41) and 38 were plasmacytoma (SIR 7.06). PCN incidence increased with age, but due to the rarity of PCNs in younger people in the general population, SIRs were highest in younger transplant recipients (p = 0.03). PCN risk was especially high in recipients who were Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seronegative at transplantation (SIR 3.93). EBV status was known for 18 tumors, of which 7 (39%) were EBV positive. Following liver transplantation, PCN risk was higher in recipients with cholestatic liver disease (SIR 2.78); five of these cases had primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). A role for primary EBV infection after transplantation is supported by the increased PCN risk in young EBV seronegative recipients and the presence of EBV in tumors. PBC may be another risk factor, perhaps by causing chronic immune activation. PMID:23635036

  11. Stem Cell Microencapsulation for Phenotypic Control, Bioprocessing, and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jenna L.

    2014-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation has been utilized for decades as a means to shield cells from the external environment while simultaneously permitting transport of oxygen, nutrients, and secretory molecules. In designing cell therapies, donor primary cells are often difficult to obtain and expand to appropriate numbers, rendering stem cells an attractive alternative due to their capacities for self-renewal, differentiation, and trophic factor secretion. Microencapsulation of stem cells offers several benefits, namely the creation of a defined microenvironment which can be designed to modulate stem cell phenotype, protection from hydrodynamic forces and prevention of agglomeration during expansion in suspension bioreactors, and a means to transplant cells behind a semi-permeable barrier, allowing for molecular secretion while avoiding immune reaction. This review will provide an overview of relevant microencapsulation processes and characterization in the context of maintaining stem cell potency, directing differentiation, investigating scalable production methods, and transplanting stem cells for clinically relevant disorders. PMID:23239279

  12. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method

    PubMed Central

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies. PMID:26330231

  13. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method.

    PubMed

    Ngen, Ethel J; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-09-02

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies.

  14. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found. PMID:26749337

  15. Stem cells: a promising source of pancreatic islets for transplantation in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Street, Cale N; Rajotte, Ray V; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease that affects millions and causes a major burden on the health care system. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been managed with exogenous insulin therapy, however factors such as cost, lifestyle restriction, and life threatening complications necessitate the development of a more efficient treatment alternative. Pancreas transplantation, and more recently transplant of purified pancreatic islets, has offered the potential for independence from insulin injections. Islet transplantation is gaining acceptance as it has been shown to be effective for certain patients with type 1 diabetes. One obstacle, however, is the fact that there is an inadequate supply of cadaveric human islets to implement this procedure on a widespread clinical basis. A promising source of transplantable islets in the future will come through the use of adult or embryonic stem cells. This chapter presents an overview of the advancements made in the development of a stem cell based application to islet transplantation. Advantages and limitations are discussed regarding the use of embryonic stem cells, adult pancreatic stem/progenitor cells, and the use of nonpancreatic tissues based on current experimental models in the literature. It is concluded that stem cells offer the greatest potential for the development of an abundant source of pancreatic islets, although specific obstacles must be overcome before this can become a reality. PMID:14711014

  16. Islet and Stem Cell Encapsulation for Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster 3rd, Clarence E.; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  17. Antibody-based immunosuppressive agents for corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thiel, M A; Kaufmann, C; Coster, D J; Williams, K A

    2009-10-01

    The progress in antibody engineering over the last 20 years has created the tools for the development of novel antibody-based drugs and constructs, such as small antibody fragments, suitable for topical administration. In rheumatology, oncology, transplantation medicine and ophthalmology, therapeutic antibody constructs, and antibody fragments have been responsible for the clinical progress seen over the last decade. Although antibody-based therapies have become a well-established immunosuppressive option in solid organ transplantation, there are only very few reports with regard to corneal transplantation. The following review explains some of the important aspects of engineered antibody-based therapeutic agents and summarises the current use of such immunosuppressive therapies in transplantation medicine and corneal transplantation.

  18. European research on cell and organ transplantation: towards novel opportunities?

    PubMed

    Goldman, Michel; Wood, Kathryn

    2007-12-01

    Recent developments in basic and translational immunology open new exciting perspectives for clinical cell and organ transplantation, including the development of novel immunosuppressive agents, new diagnostic tools and validation of biomarkers for the prediction of rejection as well as the induction of tolerance. With respect to tolerance, a number of hurdles still need to be overcome before immunosuppressive drugs can be safely minimized or withdrawn in solid organ transplant recipients. Indeed, the human immune system appears more resistant to tolerance induction than expected from experimental studies in animals. Furthermore, the basic ethical principle 'primum non-nocere' prevents the implementation of clinical protocols endowed with a significant risk for graft and/or patient survival. With this background, the European Commission recently launched several initiatives to tackle unmet needs in transplantation medicine. Herein, we focus attention on the ongoing collaborative effort across the European Union aiming at identifying the current priorities requiring better integration of resources dedicated to transplantation research. PMID:17803662

  19. Analyzing center specific outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Logan, Brent R; Nelson, Gene O; Klein, John P

    2008-12-01

    Reporting transplant center-specific survival rates after hematopoietic cell transplantation is required in the United States. We describe a method to report 1-year survival outcomes by center, as well as to quantify center performance relative to the transplant center network average, which can be reliably used with censored data and for small center sizes. Each center's observed 1-year survival outcome is compared to a predicted survival outcome adjusted for patient characteristics using a pseudovalue regression technique. A 95% prediction interval for 1-year survival assuming no center effect is computed for each center by bootstrapping the scaled residuals from the regression model, and the observed 1-year survival is compared to this prediction interval to determine center performance. We illustrate the technique using a recent center specific analysis performed by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, and study the performance of this method using simulation. PMID:18836830

  20. Late cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sâmara Grapiuna; de Matos, Sócrates Bezerra; Botura, Mônica Borges; Meyer, Roberto; Lima, Fernanda Washington de Mendonça

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is related to high rates of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report highlights the importance of adequate monitoring and management of this infection. We report on two cases of patients with late subclinical cytomegalovirus infection. These patients were monitored for antigenemia by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Active cytomegalovirus infection is most common in the first three months after transplantation however the cases reported herein show the importance of monitoring for active infection after Day +100 post-transplantation. Early detection of active infection enables quick preemptive therapy. In conclusion, we emphasize that patients with risk factors for developing severe or late cytomegalovirus disease should be monitored for more than 100 post-transplant days as late active infection is a reality. PMID:24478611

  1. [Human herpesvirus-6 associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-10-01

    Reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6B is a relatively common occurrence after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and it is associated with the development of various post-transplant complications. HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be a significant, life-threatening complication caused by HHV-6B reactivation. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops 2-6 weeks after SCT, and the symptoms are characterized by memory loss, seizures, and consciousness loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Recent large-scale studies and a prospective study showed a similar incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis development, with 7.9-9.9% in cord blood transplant recipients and 0.5-1.2% in bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients. Epidemiological studies suggest that post-transplant immune reactions such as GVHD, pre-engraftment immune reaction, or engraftment syndrome play important roles in the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. The mortality rate remains high, and even among survivors, many patients are left with serious neurological impairments, such as memory disturbance and seizures. Elucidation of the pathophysiology and establishment of appropriate prophylactic measures are necessary to overcome this serious complication. Besides encephalitis, associations between HHV-6 and various post-transplant complications have been reported, including pneumonitis, gastroenterocolitis, hepatitis, bone marrow suppression, and GVHD. Further investigations are needed to determine the role of HHV-6 in these complications.

  2. Evaluation of immunomodulatory treatment based on conventional and lineage-specific chimerism analysis in patients with myeloid malignancies after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeiser, R; Spyridonidis, A; Wäsch, R; Ihorst, G; Grüllich, C; Bertz, H; Finke, J

    2005-05-01

    Both conventional chimerism analysis (CCA) and lineage-specific chimerism analysis (LCA) have potential pitfalls as diagnostic means for the detection of minimal residual disease after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (aHCT). Therefore, the present study examines the results of both methods in order to determine how predictive consecutive evaluations were, with respect to the risk that the patient would relapse during post-transplant follow-up and with respect to responsiveness to immunomodulatory treatment. A total of 168 individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 137) and myelo dysplastic syndrome (n = 31) were investigated with CCA and LCA at mean intervals of 24 days (range: 11-116). The median follow-up after myeloablative aHCT was 22 months (range: 4-49). Of 168 patients, 65 experienced a clinical relapse after aHCT. CCA and LCA were comparatively sensitive and specific for relapse at the intervals of chimerism testing employed in this study. Of 32 patients, 10 who were offered donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) treatment for increasing (n = 29) or stable (n = 3) mixed chimerism (MC) achieved at least transitory CC. The observation that all patients with increasing MC relapsed despite DLI treatment (54%) or withdrawal of immune suppression (24%) indicates that novel strategies to deal with rapidly evolving relapse in AML patients, such as shortening of chimerism monitoring intervals, need to be evaluated.

  3. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: is it an immunologic therapy?].

    PubMed

    Olaya Vargas, Alberto; Pérez Gonzáles, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    The graft-versus-tumor effect occurring after allogeneic (genetically different) haematopoietic cell transplantation for treating human malignancies, represents the clearest example of the power of the human immune system to eradicate cancer. Recent advances in our understanding of the immunobiology of stem-cell engraftment, tolerance and tumor eradication are allowing clinicians to better harness this powerful effect.

  4. Advances in haploidentical stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Juan; Sanz, Jaime; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel A

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important advances in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the use of alternative donors and cell sources, such as haploidentical transplants (haplo-HSCT) from family donors. Several approaches have been developed to overcome the challenging bidirectional alloreactivity. We discuss these approaches, including ex vivo T-cell-depleted grafts with megadose of CD34(+) cells, not requiring immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, and other strategies using unmanipulated T-cell-replete grafts with intensive immunosuppression or post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to minimize the GVHD. We also address the role of other strategies developed in the context of the haplo-HSCT platforms, such as ex vivo selective depletion of alloreactive donor T-cell subpopulations, infusion of antigen-specific T-cells against several pathogens, and infusion of regulatory T-cells, among other experimental approaches. Finally, some considerations about the selection of the most suitable donor, when more than one family member is available, are also addressed.

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E.Graham; Davis, Jeffery; Duval, Michel; Eames, Gretchen; Farinha, Nuno; Filopovich, Alexandra; Fischer, Alain; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Gennery, Andrew; Heilmann, Carsten; Landais, Paul; Horwitz, Mitchell; Porta, Fulvio; Sedlacek, Petr; Seger, Reinhard; Slatter, Mary; Teague, Lochie; Eapen, Mary; Veys, Paul

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) is a rare primary immune disorder caused by defects of the CD18 β-integrin molecule on immune cells. The condition usually presents in early infancy and is characterised by deep tissue infections, leukocytosis with impaired formation of pus and delayed wound healing. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers the possibility of curative therapy, and with patient numbers at any individual centre being limited, we surveyed the transplant experience at 14 centres worldwide. PATIENTS & METHODS The course of 36 children with a confirmed diagnosis of LAD who underwent HSCT between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analysed. Data was collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID)/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) RESULTS At median followup of 62 months (extending to 14 years) overall survival was 75%. Myeloablative conditioning regimens were used in 28 patients, and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in 8 patients, with no deaths in this subgroup. Survival after matched family donor and unrelated donor transplants was similar, with 11/14 matched family donor and 12/14 unrelated donor recipients alive; mortality was greatest following haplo-identical transplants, where 4/8 children did not survive. Twenty seven transplant recipients are alive, with full donor engraftment in 17 cases, mixed multi-lineage chimerism in 7 patients, and mononuclear cell restricted chimerism in a further 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS HSCT offers long term benefit in LAD and should be considered as an early therapeutic option if a suitable HLA-matched stem cell donation is available. Reduced intensity conditioning was particularly safe, and mixed donor chimersim appears sufficient to prevent significant symptoms, although careful long term monitoring will be required for these patients. PMID

  6. A new immunodeficient pigmented retinal degenerate rat strain to study transplantation of human cells without immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.; Jones, Melissa K.; Ferguson, Dave L.; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to develop an immunodeficient rat model of retinal degeneration (RD nude rats) that will not reject transplanted human cells. Methods SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav females homozygous for a mutated mouse rhodopsin transgene were mated with NTac:NIH-Whn (NIH nude) males homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele. Through selective breeding, a new stock, SD-Foxn1 Tg(S334ter)3Lav (RD nude) was generated such that all animals were homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele and either homo- or hemizygous for the S334ter transgene. PCR-based assays for both the Foxn1rnu mutation and the S334ter transgene were developed for accurate genotyping. Immunodeficiency was tested by transplanting sheets of hESC-derived neural progenitor cells to the subretinal space of RD nude rats, and, as a control, NIH nude rats. Rats were killed between 8 and 184 days after surgery, and eye sections were analyzed for human, neuronal, and glial markers. Results After transplantation to RD nude and to NIH nude rats, hESC-derived neural progenitor cells differentiated to neuronal and glial cells, and migrated extensively from the transplant sheets throughout the host retina. Migration was more extensive in RD nude than in NIH nude rats. Already 8 days after transplantation, donor neuronal processes were found in the host inner plexiform layer. In addition, host glial cells extended processes into the transplants. The host retina showed the same photoreceptor degeneration pattern as in the immunocompetent SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav rats. Recipients survived well after surgery. Conclusions This new rat model is useful for testing the effect of human cell transplantation on the restoration of vision without interference of immunosuppression. PMID:24817311

  7. Transplantation of CXCR4 Overexpressed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augments Regeneration in Degenerated Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji-Nan; Cai, Feng; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao; Liu, Lei; Hong, Xin; Tang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals play important roles in regulating the stem cell-based tissue regeneration. The aim of this research is to evaluate whether high expression of CXCR4 enhances the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and increases the efficiency of intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. MSCs overexpressing CXCR (CXCR4-MSC) were created by lentiviral-CXCR4-vect transfection, labeled with SPIO, and transplanted into rabbit degenerative IVD induced by annulus puncture. X-ray and T2-weighted MR images of the spine were obtained at 0, 8, and 16 weeks post-transplantation. The transplanted stem cells were traced by both MR imaging and Prussian blue staining. The stem cell-based IVD degeneration was evaluated by quantifying the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen. The in vitro chemotaxis test was performed to study the migration of CXCR4-MSCs to the supplement of SDF-1. The CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs stably elevated the expression of CXCR4 and increased the migration to SDF-1. The SPIO-labeled CXCR4-MSC could be detected within the IVD by MRI till 16 weeks post-transplantation. Prussian blue staining evidenced more SPIO-positive cells within the IVD transplanted with CXCR4-MSCs. Compared to the control group, loss of disc height was slowed while the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was increased by MSC transplantation, especially in the IVD supplemented with CXCR4-MSCs. CXCR4 overexpression promoted MSC retention within the IVD and enhanced the stem cell-based IVD regeneration. The SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals might help provide a new perspective to understand stem cell migration and infiltration within the degenerated IVD. PMID:26788981

  8. Stem cell transplantation in strategies for curing HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hütter, Gero

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 can persist in a latent form in resting memory CD4+ cells and macrophages carrying an integrated copy of the HIV genome. Because of the presence of these stable reservoir cells, eradication by antiretroviral therapy is unlikely and in order to achieve eradication, alternative treatment options are required. Stem cell transplantation has been considered previously to effect the clinical course of HIV-infection but in practice eradication or virus control was not achievable. However, modifications of stem cell transplantation using natural or artificial resistant cell sources, combination with new techniques of gene editing or generating cytotoxic anti HIV effector cells have stimulated this field of HIV cell therapy substantially. Here, we look back on 30 years of stem cell therapy in HIV patients and discuss most recent developments in this direction. PMID:27625700

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Primary Immune Deficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Neena; Raj, Revathi

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provides a curative option for children with primary immune deficiency disorders. Increased awareness and rapid diagnosis of these conditions has resulted in early referral and the chance to offer a curative option for affected children. Management of these children involves a multidisciplinary team including infectious disease specialists and intensivists. The use of reduced intensity conditioning chemotherapy, advances in detection and therapy of viral and fungal infections, optimal supportive care and techniques in stem cell processing, including T cell depletion has enabled doctors to transplant children with co-morbid conditions and no matched donors. Transplantation for these children has also brought in deep insights into the world of immunology and infectious diseases. PMID:26920397

  10. Bioengineering tools to elucidate and control the fate of transplanted stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Rukmani; Karp, Jeffrey M; Zhao, Weian

    2014-06-01

    For the last decade, stem cell therapies have demonstrated enormous potential for solving some of the most tragic illnesses, diseases and tissue defects worldwide. Currently, more than 1300 clinical trials use stem cell therapy to solve a spectrum of cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, Jan 2014, search term: stem cell therapy; only currently recruiting and completed studies are included in the search). However, the efficacy of stem cell transplantation in patients has not been well established, and recent clinical trials have produced mixed results. We attribute this lack of efficacy in part to an incomplete understanding of the fate of stem cells following transplantation and the lack of control over cell fate, especially cell-homing and therapeutic functions. In the present review, we present two of our recently developed technologies that aim to address the above-mentioned bottlenecks in stem cell therapy specifically in the areas of MSCs (mesenchymal stem cells): (i) aptamer-based cell-surface sensors to study cellular microenvironments, and (ii) mRNA engineering technology to enhance the homing and immunomodulatory efficacy of transplanted stem cells. The first engineering strategy aims to elucidate the basic cellular signalling that occurs in the microenvironment of transplanted stem cells in real time. The second technique involves a simple mRNA transfection that improves the homing and anti-inflammatory capability of MSCs. Although we have specifically applied these engineering techniques to MSCs, these strategies can be incorporated for almost any cell type to determine and control the fate of transplanted stem cells.

  11. Current status of haploidentical stem cell transplantation for leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-jun

    2008-01-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has made tremendous progress over the past 20 years and has become a feasible option for leukemia patients without a HLA identical sibling donor. The early complications of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), graft failure and delayed engraftment, as well as disease recurrence have limited the use of this approach. Newer strategies have been applied and overcome some of the problems, including the use of T-cell depleted graft, "mega" dose of stem cells, intensive post-transplant immunosuppression and manipulation of the graft. These have decreased the transplant related mortality and GVHD associated with haploidentical transplantation, however, the major problems of disease relapse and infection, which related to late immune reconstitution, limit the development of haploidentical HSCT. Future challenges remain in improving post-transplant immune reconstitution and finding the best approach to reduce the incidence and severity of GVHD, while preserving graft-versus-leukemia effect to prevent the recurrence of underlying malignancy. PMID:19117511

  12. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering the incidence and severity of rejection and reducing patients’ dependence on anti-rejection drugs. Generation of donor- or recipient-derived DCreg that suppress T cell responses and prolong transplant survival in rodents or non-human primates has been well-described. Recently, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade DCreg have been produced at our Institution for prospective use in human organ transplantation. We briefly review experience of regulatory immune therapy in organ transplantation and describe our experience generating and characterizing human monocyte-derived DCreg. We propose a phase I/II safety study in which the influence of donor-derived DCreg combined with conventional immunosuppression on subclinical and clinical rejection and host alloimmune responses will be examined in detail. PMID:26858719

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Battiwalla, Minoo; Hematti, Peiman

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) of bone marrow (BM) origin not only provide the supportive microenvironmental niche for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but are also capable of differentiating into various cell types of mesenchymal origin, such as bone, fat, and cartilage. In vitro and in vivo data suggest that MSCs have low inherent immunogenicity, modulate/suppress immunological responses through interactions with immune cells, and home to damaged tissues to participate in regeneration processes through their diverse biological properties. MSCs derived from BM are being evaluated for a wide range of clinical applications including disorders as diverse as myocardial infarction or newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus type-1. However, their use in HSC transplantation, either for enhancement of hematopoietic engraftment or for treatment/prevention of graft versus host disease, is far ahead of other indications. Ease of isolation and ex vivo expansion of MSCs, combined with their intriguing immunomodulatory properties, and their impressive record of safety in a wide variety of clinical trials make these cells promising candidates for further investigation. PMID:19728189

  14. What to Expect After a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... What To Expect After a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant You’ll stay in the hospital for ... or even months after your blood and marrow stem cell transplant. Your doctors will want to be sure ...

  15. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  16. Synthetic molecules that protect cells from anoikis and their use in cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frisco-Cabanos, Heidie L; Watanabe, Mizuki; Okumura, Naoki; Kusamori, Kosuke; Takemoto, Naohiro; Takaya, Junichiro; Sato, Shin-ichi; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Makiya; Koizumi, Noriko; Uesugi, Motonari

    2014-10-13

    One of the major problems encountered in cell transplantation is the low level of survival of transplanted cells due to detachment-induced apoptosis, called anoikis. The present study reports on the chemical synthesis and biological evaluation of water-soluble molecules that protect suspended cells from anoikis. The synthetic molecules bind to and induce clusters of integrins and heparan-sulfate-bound syndecans, two classes of receptors that are important for extracellular matrix-mediated cell survival. Molecular biological analysis indicates that such molecules prolong the survival of suspended NIH3T3 cells, at least in part, by promoting clustering of syndecan-4 and integrin β1 on the cell surface, leading to the activation of small GTPase Rac-1 and Akt. In vivo experiments using animal disease models demonstrated the ability of the molecules to improve cell engraftment. The cluster-inducing molecules may provide a starting point for the design of new synthetic tools for cell-based therapy. PMID:25196666

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Fibbe, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of multipotent cells that can be isolated from various human tissues and culture-expanded ex vivo for clinical use. Due to their immunoregulatory properties and their ability to secrete growth factors, MSCs play a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and in the modulation of immune responses against allo- and autoantigens. In light of these properties, MSCs have been employed in clinical trials in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and to prevent graft failure, as well as to treat steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The available clinical evidence derived from these studies indicates that MSC administration is safe. Moreover, promising preliminary results in terms of efficacy have been reported in some clinical trials, especially in the treatment of acute GvHD. In this review we critically discuss recent advances in MSC therapy by reporting on the most relevant studies in the field of HSCT.

  18. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Washio, Kaoru; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy. PMID:22315604

  19. Clinical perspectives for regulatory T cells in transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hippen, Keli L; Riley, James L; June, Carl H; Blazar, Bruce R

    2011-12-01

    Three main types of CD4+ regulatory T cells can be distinguished based upon whether they express Foxp3 and differentiate naturally in the thymus (natural Tregs) or are induced in the periphery (inducible Tregs); or whether they are FoxP3 negative but secrete IL-10 in response to antigen (Tregulatory type 1, Tr1 cells). Adoptive transfer of each cell type has proven highly effective in mouse models at preventing graft vs. host disease (GVHD) and autoimmunity. Although clinical application was initially hampered by low Treg frequency and unfavorable ex vivo expansion properties, several phase I trials are now being conducted to assess their effect on GVHD following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and in type I diabetes. Human Treg trials for HSCT recipients have preceded other indications because GVHD onset is precisely known, the time period needed for prevention relatively short, initial efficacy is likely to provide life-long protection, and complications of GVHD can be lethal. This review will summarize the clinical trials conducted to date that have employed Tregs to prevent GVHD following HSCT and discuss recent advances in Treg cellular therapy. PMID:21820917

  20. Endometrial stem cell transplantation in MPTP- exposed primates: an alternative cell source for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Erin F; Mutlu, Levent; Massasa, Efi E; Elsworth, John D; Eugene Redmond, D; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Cell-replacement therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to slow down or replace neuronal loss. Compared to other stem cell types, endometrium-derived stem cells (EDSCs) are an attractive source of stem cells for cellular therapies because of their ease of collection and vast differentiation potential. Here we demonstrate that endometrium-derived stem cells may be transplanted into an MPTP exposed monkey model of PD. After injection into the striatum, endometrium-derived stem cells engrafted, exhibited neuron-like morphology, expressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and increased the numbers of TH positive cells on the transplanted side and dopamine metabolite concentrations in vivo. Our results suggest that endometrium-derived stem cells may provide a therapeutic benefit in the primate model of PD and may be used in stem cell based therapies.

  1. Sleep disturbance in hospitalized recipients of stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Laura; Harden, Karen; Jarvis, Sarah; Palmer, Stephanie; Kavanaugh-Carveth, Pam; Barnett, Joe; Friese, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    Disrupted sleep is considered a patient outcome sensitive to oncology nursing care and can lead to a variety of physical and psychologic dysfunctions, such as insomnia, chronic pain, respiratory distress, obesity, stress, and anxiety. Although sleep disturbances have been studied in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs), these studies have not examined the acute phase of transplantation. The current study aimed to identify the level of sleep disturbance in this patient population, identify factors contributing to decreased ability to sleep for hospitalized recipients of HSCT, and compare the differences in sleep disturbance between age, gender, type of transplantation, and initial stem cell transplantation versus readmission for transplantation-associated complications. Among the 69 patients studied, 26% reported clinical insomnia, as measured by the Insomnia Severity Index, and 74% had some degree of insomnia. Patient characteristics were not significantly associated with insomnia scores. Patients reported bathroom use as the most frequent reason for sleep disruption (85%). These findings suggest that sleep disturbances are common in hospitalized patients undergoing HSCT, and strategies to reduce disruptions are needed to improve patient outcomes. PMID:21624862

  2. Proceedings: Immune Tolerance and Stem Cell Transplantation: A CIRM Mini-Symposium and Workshop Report

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Maria T.; Jorgenson, Rebecca L.; Shepard, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) is to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs. Immune rejection is one hurdle that stem cell therapies must overcome to achieve a durable and effective therapeutic benefit. In July 2014, CIRM convened a group of clinical investigators developing stem cell therapeutics, immunologists, and transplantation biologists to consider strategies to address this challenge. Workshop participants discussed current approaches for countering immune rejection in the context of organ transplant and cellular therapy and defined the risks, challenges, and opportunities for adapting them to the development of stem cell-based therapeutics. This effort led to the development of a Roadmap to Tolerance for allogeneic stem cell therapy, with four fundamental steps: (a) the need to identify “tolerance-permissive” immune-suppressive regimens to enable the eventual transition from current, drug-based approaches to a newer generation of technologies for inducing tolerance; (b) testing new biologics and small molecules for inducing tolerance in stem cell-based preclinical and clinical studies; (c) stimulation of efforts to develop novel therapeutic approaches to induce central and peripheral tolerance, including manipulation of the thymus, transplantation of purified stem cells, and cell therapy with T-regulatory cells; and (d) development of robust and sensitive immune monitoring technologies for identifying biomarkers of tolerance and rejection after allogeneic stem cell treatments in the clinical setting. PMID:25473085

  3. Identification of Barriers to Retinal Engraftment of Transplanted Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Bull, Natalie D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Intraocular stem cell transplantation may be therapeutic for retinal neurodegenerative diseases such as glaucoma via neuronal replacement and/or neuroprotection. However, efficacy is hindered by extremely poor retinal graft integration. The purpose was to identify the major barrier to retinal integration of intravitreally transplanted stem cells, which was hypothesized to include the cellular and/or extracellular matrix (ECM) components of the inner limiting membrane (ILM). Methods. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cocultured on the vitreal surface of retinal explants. Retinal MSC migration was compared between control explants and explants in which portions of the ILM were removed by mechanical peeling; the inner basal lamina was digested with collagenase; and glial cell reactivity was selectively modulated with α-aminoadipic acid (AAA). In vivo, the MSCs were transplanted after intravitreal AAA or saline injection into glaucomatous rat eyes. Results. Retinal MSC migration correlated positively with the amount of peeled ILM, whereas enzymatic digestion of the basal lamina was robust but did not enhance MSC entry. In contrast, AAA treatment suppressed glial cell reactivity and facilitated a >50-fold increase in MSC migration into retinal explants. In vivo analysis showed that AAA treatment led to a more than fourfold increase in retinal engraftment. Conclusions. The results demonstrated that the ECM of the inner basal lamina is neither necessary nor sufficient to prevent migration of transplanted cells into the neural retina. In contrast, glial reactivity was associated with poor graft migration. Targeted disruption of glial reactivity dramatically improved the structural integration of intravitreally transplanted cells. PMID:19850833

  4. Alternative-Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for Nonmalignant Disorders.

    PubMed

    Klein, Orly R; Chen, Allen R; Gamper, Christopher; Loeb, David; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas; Huo, Jeffrey; Dezern, Amy E; Steppan, Diana; Robey, Nancy; Holuba, Mary Jo; Cooke, Kenneth R; Symons, Heather J

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for many nonmalignant pediatric disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and immunodeficiencies. There is great success using HLA-matched related donors for these patients; however, the use of alternative donors has been associated with increased graft failure, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and transplant-related mortality (TRM). HSCT using alternative donors with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) for GVHD prophylaxis has been performed for hematologic malignancies with engraftment, GVHD, and TRM comparable with that seen with HLA-matched related donors. There are limited reports of HSCT in nonmalignant pediatric disorders other than hemoglobinopathies using alternative donors and PT/Cy. We transplanted 11 pediatric patients with life-threatening nonmalignant conditions using reduced-intensity conditioning, alternative donors, and PT/Cy alone or in combination with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We observed limited GVHD, no TRM, and successful engraftment sufficient to eliminate manifestations of disease in all patients. Allogeneic HSCT using alternative donors and PT/Cy shows promise for curing nonmalignant disorders; development of prospective clinical trials to confirm these observations is warranted. PMID:26860634

  5. Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Despite improvement in median life expectancy and overall health, some children with cystic fibrosis (CF) progress to end-stage lung or liver disease and become candidates for transplant. Transplants for children with CF hold the promise to extend and improve the quality of life, but barriers to successful long-term outcomes include shortage of suitable donor organs; potential complications from the surgical procedure and immunosuppressants; risk of rejection and infection; and the need for lifelong, strict adherence to a complex medical regimen. This article reviews the indications and complications of lung and liver transplantation in children with CF. PMID:27469184

  6. Does hematopoietic stem cell transplantation benefit infants with acute leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Edward Allan R.; Brown, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). She has completed induction therapy and is currently in first complete remission (CR1). You are asked by your resident if hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) would benefit infants with acute leukemia. PMID:24319238

  7. Membranous glomerulonephritis after haematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, L; Cardarelli, F; Vampa, M L; Buzio, C; Olivetti, G

    2001-07-01

    Renal involvement during graft-versus-host disease following haematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma has never been described. We report a case of a recipient who developed nephrotic syndrome and membranous glomerulonephritis 22 months after the graft and 6 months after cyclosporine withdrawal. Symptoms resolved when immunosuppressive therapy was reinstituted.

  8. Actinomycosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation despite penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Barraco, F; Labussière-Wallet, H; Valour, F; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Ferry, T; Dumitrescu, O; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-08-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare chronic and multifaceted disease caused by Actinomyces species frequently mimicking malignancy or other chronic granulomatous lung diseases. We report 4 original presentations of actinomycosis arising under supposed penicillin prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. PMID:27203624

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for CD3δ deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Nufar; Takada, Hidetoshi; Law, Jason; Cowan, Morton J; Gil, Juana; Regueiro, Jose; Lopez de Sabando, Diego Plaza; Lopez-Granados, Eduardo; Dalal, Jignesh; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Manfred, Hoenig; Hanson, I. Celine; Grunebaum, Eyal; Shearer, William T; Roifman, Chaim M.

    2012-01-01

    Background CD3δ deficiency is a fatal form of severe combined immunodeficiency which can be cured by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The presence of a thymus loaded with T cell progenitors in these patients may require special considerations in choosing the regimen of conditioning and the type of HSCT. Objectives To study the outcome of CD3δ deficiency using various modalities of stem cell transplantation. Methods We analyzed data on 13 patients with CD3δ deficiency who underwent HSCT in 7 centers. HSCT was performed using different sources of donor stem cells as well as various conditioning regimens. Results Two patients who received stem cells from matched related donors and survived, both needed substantial conditioning in order to engraft. Only one of six other patients who received a related mismatched donor (MMRD) transplant survived, two of them had no conditioning while the others received various combinations of conditioning regimens. Three other patients received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor (MUD), survived and enjoyed full immune reconstitution. Two other patients received unrelated cord blood without conditioning. One of them has had a partial but stable engraftment, while the other engrafted well but is only 12 months after HSCT. We also report here for the first time that patients with CD3δ deficiency can present with typical features of Omenn syndrome. Conclusions HSCT is a successful treatment for patients with CD3δ deficiency. The small number of patients in this report prevent definitive statements on the importance of survival factors, but several are suggested: 1) HLA matched donor transplants are associated with superior reconstitution and survival than mismatched donor transplants; 2) substantial conditioning appears necessary; 3) early diagnosis and absence of opportunistic infections. PMID:21757226

  10. Cartilage Repair With Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Mera, Hisashi; Itokazu, Maki; Hashimoto, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials of various procedures, including bone marrow stimulation, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation, have been explored to treat articular cartilage defects. However, all of them have some demerits. We focused on autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), which can proliferate without losing their capacity for differentiation. First, we transplanted BMSC into the defective articular cartilage of rabbit and succeeded in regenerating osteochondral tissue. We then applied this transplantation in humans. Our previous reports showed that treatment with BMSC relieves the clinical symptoms of chondral defects in the knee and elbow joint. We investigated the efficacy of BMSC for osteoarthritic knee treated with high tibial osteotomy, by comparing 12 BMSC-transplanted patients with 12 cell-free patients. At 16-month follow-up, although the difference in clinical improvement between both groups was not significant, the arthroscopic and histological grading score was better in the cell-transplanted group. At the over 10-year follow-up, Hospital for Special Surgery knee scores improved to 76 and 73 in the BMSC-transplanted and cell-free groups, respectively, which were better than preoperative scores. Additionally, neither tumors nor infections were observed in all patients, and in the clinical study, we have never observed hypertrophy of repaired tissue, thereby guaranteeing the clinical safety of this therapy. Although we have never observed calcification above the tidemark in rabbit model and human histologically, the repair cartilage was not completely hyaline cartilage. To elucidate the optimum conditions for cell therapy, other stem cells, culture conditions, growth factors, and gene transfection methods should be explored. PMID:26069698

  11. Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Lepski, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    Cell transplantation, as a therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury (SCI), has been extensively studied by researchers in recent years. A number of different kinds of stem cells, neural progenitors, and glial cells have been tested in basic research, and most have been excluded from clinical studies because of a variety of reasons, including safety and efficacy. The signaling pathways, protein interactions, cellular behavior, and the differentiated fates of experimental cells have been studied in vitro in detail. Furthermore, the survival, proliferation, differentiation, and effects on promoting functional recovery of transplanted cells have also been examined in different animal SCI models. However, despite significant progress, a “bench to bedside” gap still exists. In this paper, we comprehensively cover publications in the field from the last years. The most commonly utilized cell lineages were covered in this paper and specific areas covered include survival of grafted cells, axonal regeneration and remyelination, sensory and motor functional recovery, and electrophysiological improvements. Finally we also review the literature on the in vivo tracking techniques for transplanted cells. PMID:23484157

  12. Conversion of monkey fibroblasts to transplantable telencephalic neuroepithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zongyong; Xiang, Zheng; Li, Yuemin; Liu, Guoku; Wang, Hong; Zheng, Yun; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Shumei; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yanhua; Ji, Weizhi; Li, Tianqing

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates provide optimal models for the development of stem cell therapies. Although somatic cells have been converted into neural stem/progenitor cells, it is unclear whether telencephalic neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs) with stable properties can be generated from fibroblasts in primate. Here we report that a combination of transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4) with a new culture medium induces rhesus monkey fibroblasts into NESCs, which can develop into miniature neural tube (NT)-like structures at a cell level. Furthermore, single induced NESCs (iNESCs) can generate later-stage 3D-NTs after grown on matrigel in suspension culture. iNESCs express NT cell markers, have a unique gene expression pattern biasing towards telencephalic patterning, and give rise to cortical neurons. Via transplantation, single iNESCs can extensively survive, regenerate myelinated neuron axons and synapse structures in adult monkey striatum and cortex, and differentiate into cortical neurons. Successful transplantation is closely associated with graft regions and grafted cell identities. The ability to generate defined and transplantable iNESCs from primate fibroblasts under a defined condition with predictable fate choices will facilitate disease modeling and cell therapy.

  13. Efficacy and Safety of a Preemptive Antiviral Therapy Strategy Based on Combined Virological and Immunological Monitoring for Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, David; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; López, Javier; Vázquez, Lourdes; Serrano, David; Nieto, José; Rovira, Monserrat; Piñana, José Luis; Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preemptive antiviral therapy for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT) results in overtreatment and a high rate of recurrences. Monitoring of CMV-specific T-cell immunity may help to individualize treatments and minimize these problems. Methods. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, matched comparison-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel strategy that consisted of interrupting anti-CMV therapy upon CMV DNAemia clearance and concurrent detection of phosphoprotein 65/immediate-early-1-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells at levels of >1 cell/µL (within 30 days after the initiation of therapy). Immunological monitoring was performed on days +7, +14, +21, and +28 after treatment initiation. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of recurrent DNAemia within 2 months after treatment cessation. Secondary endpoints were the length of antiviral treatment courses and the incidence of hematological toxicity. Results. Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study group. Fifty-six patients were included in the matched-control group. Eleven patients (18%) fulfilled the criteria for antiviral treatment interruption. The cumulative incidence of recurrent CMV DNAemia was significantly lower (P = .02) in these patients than in patients in the comparative groups. Likewise, the length of antiviral treatment courses was significantly shorter in these patients than that in patients in the matched-control group (P = .003). No significant differences in the incidence of hematological toxicity was observed between the comparative groups. Conclusions. Our data support the clinical utility of combining immunological and virological monitoring for the management of CMV infection in a subset of Allo-SCT recipients. PMID:27419179

  14. Sexual Health in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S.M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S.; Savani, Bipin N.; Rovó, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  15. The hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Indonesia: an unsolved dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hariman, H

    2008-08-01

    Allogeneic BMT was performed in Indonesia, but had to be stopped prematurely because of the small number of patients. In the beginning, only patients with sufficient financial resources to travel to western countries could undergo transplant procedures. When neighbouring countries (Singapore and Malaysia) began performing transplant, patients were referred to those centres. In both countries, the procedure is more economical and therefore patients come from a broader range of economic classes. The Indonesian hematologist must deal with the post-transplantation side effects, such as GVHD, which are mostly of the chronic type of GVHD. The types of the post-transplant complications do not differ too much from other centres and need the same treatment used in the transplant centres. Hematologists in Indonesia also treat complications of HSCT performed in other countries. When there is no recovery of HSCT development in Indonesia so far, many commercially oriented companies or centres from other countries see Indonesia as a good commercial market and offer services, some of which are not scientifically sound. One of the main problems is umbilical cord blood stem cell banking from foreign countries, which is eagerly offered to parents expecting a baby. Moreover, parents are not fully protected by law. In conclusion, Indonesia needs to revive its own HSCT program to serve and protect its own patients of being used as commercial targets by other countries. PMID:18724313

  16. Treating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease with transplantation of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pantcheva, Paolina; Reyes, Stephanny; Hoover, Jaclyn; Kaelber, Sussannah; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment-based research has focused on developing therapies for the management of motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms do not respond to treatments targeting motor deficits, thus necessitating an urgent need to develop new modalities that cater to both motor and non-motor deficits. Stem cell transplantation is potentially therapeutic for PD, but the disease non-motor symptoms have been primarily neglected in such cell therapy regimens. Many types of stem cells are currently available for transplantation therapy, including adult tissue (e.g., bone marrow, placenta)-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The fact that mesenchymal stem cells can replace and rescue degenerated dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic cells suggests their potential for the treatment of motor as well as non-motor symptoms of PD, which is discussed in this article.

  17. Cell transplantation for cardiac regeneration: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, E.J.; van der Giessen, W.J.; Duncker, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade transplantation of cells into the heart has emerged as a novel therapy for the prevention and treatment of heart failure. Although various cell types have been used, most experience has been obtained with the progenitor cells of skeletal muscle, also called myoblasts, and a wide array of bone marrow-derived cell types. The first preclinical studies demonstrated an improvement in global and regional heart function that was attributed mainly to a direct contractile effect of the transplanted cells. Furthermore, it was suggested that multiple cell types are able to form true cardiomyocytes and truly ‘regenerate’ the myocardium. More recent studies have questioned these early findings. Other mechanisms such as paracrine effects on the infarct and remote myocardium, a reduction in adverse remodelling and improvement of mechanical properties of the infarct tissue likely play a more important role. On the basis of encouraging preclinical studies, multiple early-phase clinical trials and several randomised controlled trials have been conducted that have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and potential efficacy of this novel therapy in humans. This review summarises the available evidence on cardiac cell transplantation and provides an outlook on future preclinical and clinical research that has to fill in the remaining gaps. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:88-95.) PMID:18364985

  18. A model utilizing adult murine stem cells for creation of personalized islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Song, L J; Gerber, D A; Fair, J H; Rice, L; LaPaglia, M; Andreoni, K A

    2004-05-01

    Clinical islet cell transplantation has demonstrated great promise for diabetes treatment. Two major obstacles are the organ donor shortage and the immunoresponse. The purpose of this study was to create a model using the patient's own adult stem cell sources, possibly in combination with non-self cells, such as pancreatic, hepatic, or embryonic stem cells, to create "personalized" islets. We hypothesize that the reconstructed islets have the normal capability to produce insulin and glucagon with reduced immunoresponses after transplantation. Stem cells are a proliferating population of master cells that have the ability for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. The recently developed photolithograph-based, biologic, microelectromechanic system (BioMEMS) technique supplies a useful tool for biomedical applications. Our lab has developed a novel method that integrates the adult stem cell and BioMEMS to reconstruct personalized islets. We selected islet-derived progenitor cells (IPC) for repairing and reconstructing STZ-diabetic islets. A6(+)/PYY(+) or A6(+)/ngn3(+) cells were selected to manipulate the neoislets. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, the reconstructed cells formed islet-like clusters containing insulin or glucagon producing cells. The pilot results showed the ability of these reconstructed islets to correct hyperglycemia when transplanted into a STZ-diabetic isograft mouse model. Although several technical problems remain with the mouse model, namely, the difficulty to collect enough islets from a single mouse because of animal size, the mouse isograft model is suitable for personalized islet development.

  19. Accelerating immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pharmacologic agents are effective against some pathogens, but they are costly and can be associated with significant toxicities. Thus, many groups have investigated adoptive T-cell transfer as a means of hastening immune reconstitution and preventing and treating viral infections. This review discusses the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been explored. PMID:25505959

  20. Development of interspecies testicular germ-cell transplantation in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarini, Tiziana; Sarasquete, Carmen; Cabrita, Elsa

    2014-06-01

    Interspecific testicular germ cell (TGC) transplantation was investigated in two commercial flatfish species. Testes from donor species (Senegalese sole) were evaluated using classical histological techniques (haematoxylin-eosin staining and haematoxylin-light green-orange G-acid fuchsine staining), in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical analysis. Both Ssvasa1-2 mRNAs and SsVasa protein allowed the characterisation of TGCs, confirming the usefulness of the vasa gene in the detection of Senegalese sole TGCs. Xenogenic transplants were carried out using TGCs from one-year-old Senegalese sole into turbot larvae. Propidium iodide-SYBR-14 and 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining showed that 87.98% of the extracted testicular cells were viable for microinjection and that 15.63% of the total recovered cells were spermatogonia. The vasa gene was characterised in turbot recipients using cDNA cloning. Smvasa mRNA was confirmed as a germ cell-specific molecular marker in this species. Smvasa expression analysis during turbot ontogeny was carried out before Senegalese sole TGC transplants into turbot larvae. Turbot larvae at 18 days after hatching (DAH) proved to be susceptible to manipulation procedures. High survival rates (83.75±15.90-100%) were obtained for turbot larvae at 27, 34 and 42 DAH. These data highlight the huge potential of this species for transplantation studies. Quantitative PCR was employed to detect Senegalese sole vasa mRNAs (Ssvasa1-2) in the recipient turbot larvae. The Ssvasa mRNAs showed a significant increase in relative expression in 42-DAH microinjected larvae three weeks after treatment, showing the proliferation of Senegalese sole spermatogonia in transplanted turbot larvae.

  1. Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans in children: lessons from bronchiolitis obliterans after lung transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is an irreversible obstructive lung disease characterized by subepithelial inflammation and fibrotic narrowing of the bronchioles after lower respiratory tract infection during childhood, especially early childhood. Although diagnosis of PIBO should be confirmed by histopathology, it is generally based on history and clinical findings. Irreversible airway obstruction is demonstrated by decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 second with an absent bronchodilator response, and by mosaic perfusion, air trapping, and/or bronchiectasis on computed tomography images. However, lung function tests using spirometry are not feasible in young children, and most cases of PIBO develop during early childhood. Further studies focused on obtaining serial measurements of lung function in infants and toddlers with a risk of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) after lower respiratory tract infection are therefore needed. Although an optimal treatment for PIBO has not been established, corticosteroids have been used to target the inflammatory component. Other treatment modalities for BO after lung transplantation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been studied in clinical trials, and the results can be extrapolated for the treatment of PIBO. Lung transplantation remains the final option for children with PIBO who have progressed to end-stage lung disease. PMID:26770220

  2. NKT cells, Treg, and their interactions in bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Pillai, Asha B.; Lowsky, Robert; Strober, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Tumor eradication is promoted by the anti-tumor activity of donor T cells contained in the transplant; however, donor T cells also mediate the serious side effect of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Separation of GVHD from graft anti-tumor activity is an important goal of research in improving transplant outcome. One approach is to take advantage of the immunomodulatory activity of regulatory NKT cells and CD4+ CD25+ Treg of host and/or donor origin. Both host and donor NKT cells and donor Treg are able to prevent GVHD in murine models. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of NKT cell- and Treg-mediated protection against GVHD in mice while maintaining graft anti-tumor activity. In addition, we also examine the interactions between NKT cells and Treg in the context of BMT, and integrate the data from murine experimental models with the observations made in humans. PMID:20583031

  3. SUCCESSFUL TRANSPLANTATION OF MOTONEURONS INTO THE PERIPHERAL NERVE DEPENDS ON THE NUMBER OF TRANSPLANTED CELLS

    PubMed Central

    KATO, SHUICHI; KURIMOTO, SHIGERU; NAKANO, TOMONORI; YONEDA, HIDEMASA; ISHII, HISAO; MITA-SUGIURA, SATOKA; HIRATA, HITOSHI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transplantation of motoneurons (MN) into the peripheral nerve to provide a source of neurons for muscle reinnervation, termed motoneuron integrated striated muscle (MISM), may provide the potential to restore functional muscle activity, when combined with computer-programmed functional electrical stimulation (FES). The number of MNs required to restore innervation to denervated muscles in adult Fischer 344 rats was investigated by comparing two groups, one transplanted with 2 × 105 cells (group A) and the other with 1 × 106 cells (group B). Twelve weeks after transplantation, electrophysiological analysis, muscle function analysis, and tissue analysis were performed. The mean motor nerve conduction velocity was faster (12.4 ± 1.0 m/s vs. 8.5 ± 0.7 m/s, P = 0.011) and the mean amplitude of compound muscle action potential was larger (1.6 ± 0.4 mV vs. 0.7 ± 0.2 mV, P = 0.034) in group B. The dorsiflexed ankle angle was larger in group B (27 ± 5° vs. 75 ± 8°, P = 0.02). The mean myelinated axon number in the peroneal nerve and the proportion of reinnervated motor end plates were also greater in group B (317 ± 33 vs. 104 ± 17, 87.5 ± 3.4% vs. 40.6 ± 7.7%; P < 0.01, respectively). When sufficient MNs are transplanted into the peripheral nerve, MISM forms functional motor units. MISM, in conjunction with FES, provides a new treatment strategy for paralyzed muscles. PMID:25797991

  4. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Strong, D Michael; Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with mis-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  5. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with miss-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  6. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section. PMID:25191223

  7. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  8. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  9. Haploidentical Natural Killer Cells Infused before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myeloid Malignancies: A Phase I Trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean A; Denman, Cecele J; Rondon, Gabriela; Woodworth, Glenda; Chen, Julianne; Fisher, Tobi; Kaur, Indreshpal; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Cao, Kai; Ciurea, Stefan; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for high-risk myeloid malignancies, but relapse remains the major post-transplantation cause of treatment failure. Alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells mediate a potent antileukemic effect and may also enhance engraftment and reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Haploidentical transplantations provide a setting in which NK cell alloreactivity can be manipulated, but they are associated with high rates of GVHD. We performed a phase I study infusing escalating doses of NK cells from an HLA haploidentical-related donor-selected for alloreactivity when possible-as a component of the preparative regimen for allotransplantation from a separate HLA-identical donor. The goal of infusing third-party alloreactive NK cells was to augment the antileukemic effect of the transplantation without worsening GVHD and, thus, improve the overall outcome of hematopoietic transplantation. Twenty-one patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or chronic myelogenous leukemia refractory or beyond first remission received a preparative regimen with busulfan and fludarabine followed by infusion of apheresis-derived, antibody-selected, and IL-2-activated NK cells. Doses were initially based on total nucleated cell (TNC) content and later based on CD56(+) cells to reduce variability. CD56(+) content ranged from .02 to 8.32 × 10(6)/kg. IL-2, .5 × 10(6) units/m(2) subcutaneously was administered daily for 5 days in the final cohort (n = 10). CD3(+) cells in the NK cell product were required to be < 10(5)/kg. Median relapse-free, overall, and GVHD-free/relapse-free survival for all patients enrolled was 102, 233, and 89 days, respectively. Five patients are alive, 5 patients died of transplantation-related causes, and 11 patients died of relapse. Despite the small sample size, survival was highly associated with CD56(+) cells delivered (P = .022) and development of

  10. Treating Parkinson's disease in the 21st century: can stem cell transplantation compete?

    PubMed

    Buttery, Philip C; Barker, Roger A

    2014-08-15

    The characteristic and selective degeneration of a unique population of cells-the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons-that occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD) has made the condition an iconic target for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic cells into the DA-deficient striatum was first trialled nearly 30 years ago, at a time when other treatments for the disease were less well developed. Over recent decades standard treatments for PD have advanced, and newer biological therapies are now emerging. In the 21st century, stem cell technology will have to compete alongside other sophisticated treatments, including deep brain stimulation and gene therapies. In this review we examine how stem cell-based transplantation therapies compare with these novel and emerging treatments in the management of this common condition. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2802-2816, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Treating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease with transplantation of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pantcheva, Paolina; Reyes, Stephanny; Hoover, Jaclyn; Kaelber, Sussannah; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Parkinson’s disease (PD) treatment-based research has focused on developing therapies for the management of motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms do not respond to treatments targeting motor deficits, thus necessitating an urgent need to develop new modalities that cater to both motor and non-motor deficits. Stem cell transplantation is potentially therapeutic for PD, but the disease non-motor symptoms have been primarily neglected in such cell therapy regimens. Many types of stem cells are currently available for transplantation therapy, including adult tissue (e.g., bone marrow, placenta)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The fact that MSCs can replace and rescue degenerated dopaminergic, and non-dopaminergic cells suggest their potential for the treatment of motor, as well as non-motor symptoms of PD, which is we discuss here. PMID:26394528

  12. Therapeutic Efficacy of Stem Cells Transplantation in Diabetes: Role of Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Marco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio A.; Vanella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The growing data obtained from in vivo studies and clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of adult stem cells transplantation in diabetes; although an important limit is represented by their survival after the transplant. To this regard, recent reports suggest that genetic manipulation of stem cells prior to transplantation can lead to enhanced survival and better engraftment. The following review proposes to stimulate interest in the role of heme oxygenase-1 over-expression on transplantation of stem cells in diabetes, focusing on the clinical potential of heme oxygenase protein and activity to restore tissue damage and/or to improve the immunomodulatory properties of transplanted stem cells. PMID:27547752

  13. CD31(+) cell transplantation promotes recovery from peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, YongNan; Zhang, ZhuoBo; Kim, Han-Soo; Han, Seongho; Kim, Sung-Whan

    2014-09-01

    Recently, we reported that human peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD31(+) cells are highly angiogenic. In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of CD31(+) cells on peripheral neuropathy in mice. CD31(+) cells were collected from the peripheral blood using magnetic activated cell sorting. CD31(+) cells exhibited higher levels of expression of angiogenic genes on real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Peripheral neuropathy was induced by crushing the sciatic nerve with a hemostat, and CD31(+) cells were then injected intramuscularly along the sciatic nerve. CD31(+) cell transplantation restored motor nerve conduction velocity and voltage amplitude and improved motor coordination. In addition, CD31(+) cell transplantation significantly improved blood perfusion and increased intraneural vascularity in the sciatic nerve. Whole-mount fluorescent imaging and dot blot analysis showed that CD31(+) cells in the nerve possessed high engraftment and anti-apoptotic properties. Additionally, injected CD31(+) cells displayed neurovascular tropism and are highly incorporated with vasculature. Angiogenic cytokines were augmented in CD31(+)-injected nerve tissue, suggesting increased neovascularization. Taken together, these results indicate that CD31(+) cells might be a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25128805

  14. Bone marrow processing for transplantation using Cobe Spectra cell separator.

    PubMed

    Veljković, Dobrila; Nonković, Olivera Šerbić; Radonjić, Zorica; Kuzmanović, Miloš; Zečević, Zeljko

    2013-06-01

    Concentration of bone marrow aspirates is an important prerequisite prior to infusion of ABO incompatible allogeneic marrow and prior to cryopreservation and storage of autologous marrow. In this paper we present our experience in processing 15 harvested bone marrow for ABO incompatible allogeneic and autologous bone marrow (BM) transplantation using Cobe Spectra® cell separator. BM processing resulted in the median recovery of 91.5% CD34+ cells, erythrocyte depletion of 91% and volume reduction of 81%. BM processing using cell separator is safe and effective technique providing high rate of erythrocyte depletion and volume reduction, and acceptable recovery of the CD34+ cells.

  15. Pros and cons of stem cell transplantation for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E D

    1997-05-01

    The data and discussion at this symposium have provided a most useful analysis of the autoimmune diseases and their potential for therapy by stem cell transplantation. These diseases are characterized by threat to life and particularly by chronic, painful and debilitating courses that warrant aggressive therapy. Selection of patients will be difficult because of the variable disease course and the necessity to choose patients who still have reversible disease. The safety of both autologous and allogeneic stem cell grafting has progressed to the point where, in many cases, the risks of the disease far outweigh those of transplantation. In my opinion the data presented at this symposium show that we should proceed cautiously with both autologous and allogeneic stem cell grafts. Purified stem cells, which have the advantage of being free of lymphocytes, should be used for the first series of autologous studies. These studies are attractive because of the low risk of transplant related complications but are less likely to be curative. Allogeneic grafts from perfectly matched donors have the advantage of providing a completely new immunological environment. For this reason, I believe that curative results are most probable after allogeneic stem cell engraftment. Emphasis should be on the identification of patients with HLA matched siblings. Initially, these studies will be carried out in patients with advanced disease, as was the case in the early days of transplantation for leukemia. In considering more aggressive treatment for autoimmune diseases it appears there are 3 possible approaches. First, and most conservative, is to store peripheral blood stem cells for possible future marrow rescue and then to give higher doses of immunosuppressive agents, especially in combination, to see whether there is an improvement over conventional doses. Second, for those who prefer a conservative approach to stem cell transplantation, is to give myeloablative and lymphoablative

  16. Performance status and comorbidity predict transplant-related mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Artz, Andrew S; Pollyea, Daniel A; Kocherginsky, Masha; Stock, Wendy; Rich, Elizabeth; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Zimmerman, Todd; Smith, Sonali; Godley, Lucy; Thirman, Michael; Daugherty, Christopher; Extermann, Martine; Larson, Richard; van Besien, Koen

    2006-09-01

    Comorbidity measurements have recently been used to improve estimation of tolerance to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We sought to determine the independent effect of comorbidity and performance status on HCT outcome and to devise a simple risk classification system for transplant-related mortality. We analyzed 105 consecutively enrolled patients who underwent HCT and received reduced intensity conditioning with fludarabine, melphalan, and alemtuzumab. Comorbid conditions were tabulated using 2 scales, the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and the Kaplan-Feinstein Scale (KFS). Comorbid conditions were found in 47% of patients by the KFS and in 27% by the CCI (P < .001). Using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (PS) scale, 34% had a PS score >0 (range, 0-2). A simple scale combining the KFS and PS enabled separation of high- from low-risk patients, with 6-month cumulative incidences 50% and 15%, respectively for transplant-related mortality (P = .001) and enhanced prognostic power over the CCI alone (P = .018). Prospective studies evaluating more comprehensive functional and comorbidity measurements are warranted.

  17. Current progress in stem cell research and its potential for islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leung, P S; Ng, K Y

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency concomitant with hyperglycemia due to reduced islet cell mass and/or dysfunction. Currently, insulin replacement is the first-line treatment option for patients with type 1 and a severe form of type 2 diabetes. Treatment by insulin injection is generally effective but nonphysiological, and has the potential of producing chronic complications. On the other hand, islet transplantation can maintain normoglycemia without hypoglycemic side effects, potentially freeing diabetic patients of insulin dependence. In practice, islet transplantation remains hindered by the lack of organ donors and transplant rejection concerns. Recent advances in stem cell research and regenerative medicine, however, offer promise for the clinical application of islet cell transplantation. This review article offers a critical appraisal of current molecular induction approaches, such as directed differentiation, microenvironment induction, and genetic modification, which mimic islet cell development by inducing a variety of stem cells; they include embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and various tissue-derived stem cells to become functional and transplantable insulin-producing islet cells. Despite good progress, several obstacles remain to be overcome before islet transplantation can be translated into a therapy for human patients, including, but are not limited to, immunogenicity and risk of tumorogenesis. PMID:22834839

  18. Nonparametric methods for analyzing recurrent gap time data with application to infections after hematopoietic cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyun; Huang, Chiung-Yu; DeFor, Todd E.; Brunstein, Claudio G.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Infection is one of the most common complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Many patients experience infectious complications repeatedly after transplant. Existing statistical methods for recurrent gap time data typically assume that patients are enrolled due to the occurrence of an event of interest, and subsequently experience recurrent events of the same type; moreover, for one-sample estimation, the gap times between consecutive events are usually assumed to be identically distributed. Applying these methods to analyze the post-transplant infection data will inevitably lead to incorrect inferential results because the time from transplant to the first infection has a different biological meaning than the gap times between consecutive recurrent infections. Some unbiased yet inefficient methods include univariate survival analysis methods based on data from the first infection or bivariate serial event data methods based on the first and second infections. In this paper, we propose a nonparametric estimator of the joint distribution of time from transplant to the first infection and the gap times between consecutive infections. The proposed estimator takes into account the potentially different distributions of the two types of gap times and better uses the recurrent infection data. Asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are established. PMID:26575402

  19. Optimal timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo G Della; Malcovati, Luca; Jackson, Christopher H; Pascutto, Cristiana; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Teresa van Lint, Maria; Falda, Michele; Bernardi, Massimo; Onida, Francesco; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Angelucci, Emanuele; Oneto, Rosi; Ripamonti, Francesco; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the only curative treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but involves non-negligible morbidity and mortality. Registry studies have shown that advanced disease stage at transplantation is associated with inferior overall survival. To define the optimal timing of allogeneic HSCT, we carried out a decision analysis by studying 660 patients who received best supportive care and 449 subjects who underwent transplantation. Risk assessment was based on both the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We used a continuous-time multistate Markov model to describe the natural history of disease and evaluate the effect of allogeneic HSCT on survival. This model estimated life expectancy from diagnosis according to treatment policy at different risk stages. Relative to supportive care, estimated life expectancy increased when transplantation was delayed from the initial stages until progression to intermediate-1 IPSS-risk or to intermediate WPSS-risk stage, and then decreased for higher risks. Modeling decision analysis on WPSS versus IPSS allowed better estimation of the optimal timing of transplantation. These observations indicate that allogeneic HSCT offers optimal survival benefits when the procedure is performed before MDS patients progress to advanced disease stages. Am. J. Hematol. 88:581–588, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23606215

  20. Transplantation of bovine adrenocortical cells encapsulated in alginate

    PubMed Central

    Balyura, Mariya; Gelfgat, Evgeny; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Ludwig, Barbara; Gendler, Zohar; Barkai, Uriel; Zimerman, Baruch; Rotem, Avi; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Bornstein, Stefan R.

    2015-01-01

    Current treatment options for adrenal insufficiency are limited to corticosteroid replacement therapies. However, hormone therapy does not replicate circadian rhythms and has unpleasant side effects especially due to the failure to restore normal function of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. Adrenal cell transplantation and the restoration of HPA axis function would be a feasible and useful therapeutic strategy for patients with adrenal insufficiency. We created a bioartificial adrenal with 3D cell culture conditions by encapsulation of bovine adrenocortical cells (BACs) in alginate (enBACs). We found that, compared with BACs in monolayer culture, encapsulation in alginate significantly increased the life span of BACs. Encapsulation also improved significantly both the capacity of adrenal cells for stable, long-term basal hormone release as well as the response to pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and hypothalamic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist, [D-Trp6]LHRH. The enBACs were transplanted into adrenalectomized, immunodeficient, and immunocompetent rats. Animals received enBACs intraperitoneally, under the kidney capsule (free cells or cells encapsulated in alginate slabs) or s.c. enclosed in oxygenating and immunoisolating βAir devices. Graft function was confirmed by the presence of cortisol in the plasma of rats. Both types of grafted encapsulated cells, explanted after 21–25 d, preserved their morphology and functional response to ACTH stimulation. In conclusion, transplantation of a bioartificial adrenal with xenogeneic cells may be a treatment option for patients with adrenocortical insufficiency and other stress-related disorders. Furthermore, this model provides a microenvironment that ensures 3D cell–cell interactions as a unique tool to investigate new insights into cell biology, differentiation, tissue organization, and homeostasis. PMID:25675525

  1. Myocardial survival signaling in response to stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhe; Malhotra, Deepak; Yeh, Che-chung; Tu, Richard; Zhu, Bo-Qing; Birger, Noy; Wisneski, Andrew; Cha, John; Karliner, Joel S.; Mann, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental human stem cell transplantation to the heart has begun, but the mechanisms underlying benefits seen in pre-clinical models, both at the site of cell injection and at more distant regions, remain uncertain. We hypothesize that these benefits may be best understood first at the level of key intracellular signaling cascades in the host myocardium that may be responsible for functional and structural preservation of the heart. STUDY DESIGN: Western blot and ELISA were used to assess key pathways that regulate cardiac myocyte survival and hypertrophy in both the infarct/borderzone (I/BZ) and remote myocardium (RM) of C57/B6 mouse hearts subjected to coronary artery ligation, with subsequent injection of either vehicle or bone marrow-derived adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). RESULTS: Improved left ventricular function with MSC transplantation was associated with a relative preservation of Akt phosphorylation (activation) and of phosphorylation of downstream mediators of cell survival and hypertrophy. There was no significant difference in activation of MAP kinase p38, and activation of the anti-apoptotic MAP kinase ERK was lower at one week after MSC treatment but rose above controls by week 2. Similar changes were observed in both the I/BZ and the RM. CONCLUSION: Stem cell transplantation in the post-MI murine myocardium is associated with preservation of Akt signaling. Together with a possible later increase in ERK activation, this signaling change may be responsible for cardioprotection. Further focused investigation may identify elements in transplantation regimens that optimize this mechanism of benefit, and that may increase the likelihood of human clinical success. PMID:19476797

  2. SHIPi Enhances Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sandra; Brooks, Robert; Gumbleton, Matthew; Park, Mi-Young; Russo, Christopher M.; Howard, Kyle T.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective procedure enabling long-term survival for patients with hematologic malignancy or heritable defects. Although there has been a dramatic increase in the success rate of HSCT over the last two decades, HSCT can result in serious, sometimes untreatable disease due to toxic conditioning regimens and Graft-versus-Host-Disease. Studies utilizing germline knockout mice have discovered several candidate genes that could be targeted pharmacologically to create a more favorable environment for transplant success. SHIP1 deficiency permits improved engraftment of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HS-PCs) and produces an immunosuppressive microenvironment ideal for incoming allogeneic grafts. The recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors has opened a different therapeutic approach by creating transient SHIP1-deficiency. Here we show that SHIP1 inhibition (SHIPi) mobilizes functional HS-PC, accelerates hematologic recovery, and enhances donor HS-PC engraftment in both allogeneic and autologous transplant settings. We also observed the expansion of key cell populations known to suppress host-reactive cells formed during engraftment. Therefore, SHIPi represents a non-toxic, new therapeutic that has significant potential to improve the success and safety of therapies that utilize autologous and allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26052545

  3. Factors affecting long-term outcome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukaemia: a retrospective study of 172 adult patients reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry.

    PubMed

    Greinix, Hildegard T; Nachbaur, David; Krieger, Otto; Eibl, Margit; Knöbl, Paul; Kalhs, Peter; Lutz, Dieter; Linkesch, Werner; Niederwieser, Dietger; Hinterberger, Wolfgang; Lechner, Klaus; Rosenmayr, Agathe; Gritsch, Beate

    2002-06-01

    Between 1982 and 2000, 172 patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) received haematopoietic stem cell transplants (SCT) from related (n = 132) or unrelated (n = 40) donors at four Austrian transplant centres and their results were reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry. Conditioning for SCT consisted of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation in 156 (91%) patients. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was with standard cyclosporine and methotrexate in 95 (55%) patients. Median post-transplant follow-up was 5.6 years (range, 0.2--16.7). Multivariate analysis of transplant-related mortality (TRM) identified four variables associated with a lower risk: disease status of first complete remission (CR) at SCT, patient age of 45 years and younger, transplant performed during or after 1995, and lack of acute GVHD. Variables associated with significantly improved leukaemia-free survival were: bone marrow as the stem cell source, disease status of first CR at SCT, and occurrence of chronic GVHD. In multivariate analysis, transplantation performed during or after 1995, first CR at SCT, occurrence of limited chronic GVHD and lack of acute GVHD grades III to IV were associated with increased overall survival. Based on these analyses, options for the improvement of results obtained with allogeneic SCT in patients with AML could be defined. PMID:12060131

  4. The Co-Transplantation of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduced Inflammation in Intramuscular Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Gumpei; Sakata, Naoaki; Tsuchiya, Haruyuki; Minowa, Takashi; Takemura, Taro; Morita, Hiromi; Hata, Tatsuo; Fukase, Masahiko; Aoki, Takeshi; Ishida, Masaharu; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Although the muscle is one of the preferable transplant sites in islet transplantation, its transplant efficacy is poor. Here we attempted to determine whether an intramuscular co-transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could improve the outcome. Methods We co-cultured murine islets with MSCs and then analyzed the morphological changes, viability, insulin-releasing function (represented by the stimulation index), and gene expression of the islets. We also transplanted 500 islets intramuscularly with or without 5 × 105 MSCs to diabetic mice and measured their blood glucose level, the glucose changes in an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, and the plasma IL-6 level. Inflammation, apoptosis, and neovascularization in the transplantation site were evaluated histologically. Results The destruction of islets tended to be prevented by co-culture with MSCs. The stimulation index was significantly higher in islets co-cultured with MSCs (1.78 ± 0.59 vs. 7.08 ± 2.53; p = 0.0025). In terms of gene expression, Sult1c2, Gstm1, and Rab37 were significantly upregulated in islets co-cultured with MSCs. Although MSCs were effective in the in vitro assays, they were only partially effective in facilitating intramuscular islet transplantation. Co-transplanted MSCs prevented an early inflammatory reaction from the islets (plasma IL-6; p = 0.0002, neutrophil infiltration; p = 0.016 inflammatory area; p = 0.021), but could not promote neovascularization in the muscle, resulting in the failure of many intramuscular transplanted islets to engraft. Conclusions In conclusion, co-culturing and co-transplanting MSCs is potentially useful in islet transplantation, especially in terms of anti-inflammation, but further augmentation for an anti-apoptosis effect and neovascularization is necessary. PMID:25679812

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, M J; Lazarus, H M; Carreras, J; Laport, G G; Cutler, C S; Wiernik, P H; Hale, G A; Maharaj, D; Gale, R P; Rowlings, P A; Freytes, C O; Miller, A M; Vose, J M; Maziarz, R T; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Hari, P N

    2014-11-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant from 2000-2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4-206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/ refractory disease. The majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared with myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs 44 years, P=0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12-27%) and 22% (95% CI 15-31%), respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41-60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50-71%) at 5 years. PFS at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22-40%) and 17% (95% CI 9-26%), respectively. OS at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45-63%) and 32% (95% CI 22-44%), respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5-year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  6. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  7. Airborne elements, cell membranes, and chlorophyll in transplanted lichens

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, J.; Cohen, Y.; Kloog, N.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the concentration of airborne mineral elements in the lichen Ramalina lacera (with.) J.R. Laund. in comparison with its physiological status. Thalli of Ramalina lacera were collected in a remote unpolluted site and transplanted in a polluted region for 10 mo. An analysis of 20 elements in addition to an analysis of the status of cell membranes and the integrity of chlorophyll was performed after this period of transplantation. The lichen manifested a great potential for the accumulation of Pb, V, Ni, Zn, and Cu. Potassium and P were found to leach out. High concentrations of Ni, Mg, and B coincided with damage caused to cell membranes. The integrity of chlorophyll correlated with the concentration of K and correlated inversely with the concentration of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and B.

  8. Sleep disruption impairs hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Asya; Pang, Wendy W.; Ibarra, Ingrid; Colas, Damien; Bonnavion, Patricia; Korin, Ben; Heller, H. Craig; Weissman, Irving L.; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting the success of hematopoietic cell transplantation are still unknown. Here we show in mice that donor’s sleep deprivation reduces the ability of its hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to engraft and reconstitute the blood and bone marrow of an irradiated recipient by more than 50%. We demonstrate that sleep deprivation downregulates the expression of microRNA (miR)-19b, a negative regulator of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) genes, which inhibit HSC migration and homing. Accordingly, HSCs from sleep-deprived mice have higher levels of SOCS genes expression, lower migration capacity in vitro and reduced homing to the bone marrow in vivo. Recovery of sleep after sleep deprivation restored the reconstitution potential of the HSCs. Taken together, this study provides insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep deprivation on HSCs, emphasizing the potentially critical role of donor sleep in the success of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26465715

  9. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells improves type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Lisha; Li, Furong; Gao, Feng; Yang, Yali; Liu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Pingping; Li, Yulin

    2016-05-01

    Bone-marrow-derived stem cells can regenerate pancreatic tissue in a model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) form the main part of bone marrow. We show that the intrapancreatic transplantation of MSCs elevates serum insulin and C-peptide, while decreasing blood glucose. MSCs engrafted into the damaged rat pancreas become distributed into the blood vessels, acini, ducts, and islets. Renascent islets, islet-like clusters, and a small number of MSCs expressing insulin protein have been observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. Intrapancreatic transplantation of MSCs triggers a series of molecular and cellular events, including differentiation towards the pancreas directly and the provision of a niche to start endogenous pancreatic regeneration, which ameliorates hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia caused by streptozotocin. These data establish the many roles of MSCs in the restoration of the function of an injured organ. PMID:26650464

  10. Sleep disruption impairs haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Asya; Pang, Wendy W; Ibarra, Ingrid; Colas, Damien; Bonnavion, Patricia; Korin, Ben; Heller, H Craig; Weissman, Irving L; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting the success of haematopoietic cell transplantation are still unknown. Here we show in mice that donor sleep deprivation reduces the ability of its haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to engraft and reconstitute the blood and bone marrow of an irradiated recipient by more than 50%. We demonstrate that sleep deprivation downregulates the expression of microRNA (miR)-19b, a negative regulator of the suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) genes, which inhibit HSC migration and homing. Accordingly, HSCs from sleep-deprived mice have higher levels of SOCS genes expression, lower migration capacity in vitro and reduced homing to the bone marrow in vivo. Recovery of sleep after sleep deprivation restored the reconstitution potential of the HSCs. Taken together, this study provides insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep deprivation on HSCs, emphasizing the potentially critical role of donor sleep in the success of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26465715

  11. Analyzing In Vivo Cell Migration using Cell Transplantations and Time-lapse Imaging in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Giger, Florence A; Dumortier, Julien G; David, Nicolas B

    2016-04-29

    Cell migration is key to many physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis. The cellular and molecular bases of cell migration have been thoroughly analyzed in vitro. However, in vivo cell migration somehow differs from in vitro migration, and has proven more difficult to analyze, being less accessible to direct observation and manipulation. This protocol uses the migration of the prospective prechordal plate in the early zebrafish embryo as a model system to study the function of candidate genes in cell migration. Prechordal plate progenitors form a group of cells which, during gastrulation, undergoes a directed migration from the embryonic organizer to the animal pole of the embryo. The proposed protocol uses cell transplantation to create mosaic embryos. This offers the combined advantages of labeling isolated cells, which is key to good imaging, and of limiting gain/loss of function effects to the observed cells, hence ensuring cell-autonomous effects. We describe here how we assessed the function of the TORC2 component Sin1 in cell migration, but the protocol can be used to analyze the function of any candidate gene in controlling cell migration in vivo.

  12. Solid organ transplantation in survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation: a single institution case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Beitinjaneh, Amer; Burns, Linda J; Majhail, Navneet S

    2010-01-01

    For selected hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) survivors with severe organ dysfunction, solid organ transplantation (SOT) may offer the best chance for better quality of life and extended survival. However, SOT following HCT has not been well described. We report our institutional experience of SOT in 12 HCT recipients and present a review of the published literature of this procedure in HCT survivors. Our experience with transplanted organs included kidney (n=7), lung (n=3), liver (n=2) and heart (n=1). Age at HCT ranged from 2 to 56 yr. Median time between HCT and SOT was 7.9 yr (range 1.2-15.9 yr). Among the 11 patients with post-SOT follow-up information, 10 had normal function of the transplanted solid organ at the time of last contact or death. Infections and secondary malignancy were the most common complications. Four other institutional experiences with kidney transplant, 21 case reports of liver transplant, 11 case reports of lung transplant and one cardiac transplant are also summarized. SOT is feasible for selected HCT survivors with organ failure and may be associated with favorable long-term survival and graft function. More research is needed to further delineate the subset of survivors who will benefit the most from SOT with the least risk of complications.

  13. Hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. A reduced-intensity conditioning regimen has the potential to further reduce regimen-related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications, such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage, are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimens may enable the safe use of an alternative source of stem cells, such as unrelated matched donors, and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment. PMID:17250455

  14. Fate of Transplanted Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Following Spinal Cord Injury in Rats by Transplantation Routes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eun-Sun; Ha, Kee-Yong

    2012-01-01

    This research was performed to investigate the differences of the transplanted cells' survival and differentiation, and its efficacy according to the delivery routes following spinal cord injury. Allogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were transplanted intravenously (IV group) or intralesionally (IL group) at post-injury 1 day in rats. Behavioral improvement, engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells and the expression of neurotrophic factors of the transplanted groups were analyzed and compared with those of the control group. At 6 weeks post-injury, the mean BBB motor scales in the control, IV and IL groups were 6.5 ± 1.8, 11.1 ± 2.1, and 8.5 ± 2.8, respectively. Regardless of the delivery route, the MSCs transplantation following spinal cord injuries presented better behavioral improvement. The differentiations of the engrafted cells were different according to the delivery routes. The engrafted cells predominantly differentiated into astrocytes in the IV group and on the other hand, engrafted cells of the IL group demonstrated relatively even neural and glial differentiation. The expressions of neuronal growth factor were significantly higher in the IL group (mean relative optical density, 2.4 ± 0.15) than those in the control (2.16 ± 0.04) or IV group (1.7 ± 0.23). Transplantation of MSCs in the early stage of spinal cord injury gives a significant clinical improvement. However, the fate of the transplanted MSCs and expression of neuronal growth factors are different along the transplantation route. PMID:22690088

  15. [Research and application of cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes mellitus: a review].

    PubMed

    Wei, Lingling; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2009-10-01

    In the conventional treatments of type I diabetes, there are various problems. As a new adequate treatment of diabetes, cell replacement therapy of diabetes has been applied and given research priority. We have investigated the applications of cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes and have retrieved the relevant articles on cells transplantation for the treatment of diabetes. In this paper, we review the history, development, merits and demerits of cell transplantation and the recent advances in pancreatic islet transplantation research. The latest progress in the induction of stem cell to differentiate into the insulin-producing cells was also introduced. PMID:19947503

  16. Transplanting Retinal Cells using Bucky Paper for Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J.; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, Meyya; Fishman, Harvey; Leng, Ted; Huie, Philip; Bilbao, Kalayaan

    2004-01-01

    A novel treatment for retinal degenerative disorders involving transplantation of cells into the eye is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University School of Medicine. The technique uses bucky paper as a support material for retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells, and/or stem cells. This technology is envisioned as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in persons over age 65 in Western nations. Additionally, patients with other retinal degenerative disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, may be treated by this strategy. Bucky paper is a mesh of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as shown in Figure 1, that can be made from any of the commercial sources of CNTs. Bucky paper is biocompatible and capable of supporting the growth of biological cells. Because bucky paper is highly porous, nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and waste can readily diffuse through it. The thickness, density, and porosity of bucky paper can be tailored in manufacturing. For transplantation of cells into the retina, bucky paper serves simultaneously as a substrate for cell growth and as a barrier for new blood vessel formation, which can be a problem in the exudative type of macular degeneration. Bucky paper is easily handled during surgical implantation into the eye. Through appropriate choice of manufacturing processes, bucky paper can be made relatively rigid yet able to conform to the retina when the bucky paper is implanted. Bucky paper offers a distinct advantage over other materials that have been investigated for retinal cell transplantation - lens capsule and Descemet's membrane - which are difficult to handle during surgery because they are flimsy and do not stay flat.

  17. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  18. High-Dose Therapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Chemoresistant Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Seattle Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajay K; Metcalfe, Tracee L; Gooley, Ted A; Pagel, John M; Petersdorf, Stephen H; Bensinger, William I; Holmberg, Leona; Maloney, David G; Press, Oliver W

    2009-01-01

    Background High-dose therapy (HDT) with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard treatment for patients with chemosensitive relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), but this therapy is commonly denied to patients with resistant disease. We explored the utility of HDT and ASCT for chemoresistant HL since there are few established therapies for these patients. Patients and Methods Sixty-four chemoresistant HL patients underwent HDT followed by ASCT at our center. Baseline characteristics included: median age = 35 years (range, 14–59 yrs), stage III/IV = 49 (77%), nodular sclerosis histology = 51 (80%), and prior radiation = 32 (50%). Twenty-six patients (41%) received total body irradiation (TBI)-based regimens and 38 (59%) underwent non-TBI conditioning. Results The estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 31% and 17%, respectively, (median follow-up = 4.2 years). Multivariable analysis only identified year of transplant as independently associated with improved OS (p=.008) and PFS (p=.04), with patients transplanted in later years having better outcome. The probabilities of 3-year PFS for patients transplanted between 1986–1989, 1990–July 1993, August 1993–1999, and 2000–2005 were 9%, 21%, 33%, and 31%, respectively. Conclusions These data suggest that HDT and ASCT may result in prolonged remissions and survival for a subset of chemoresistant HL pts, with improved outcomes in patients transplanted more recently. PMID:18623377

  19. Hydrogel matrix to support stem cell survival after brain transplantation in stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jin; Chan, Albert; Morad, Leeron; Kornblum, Harley I; Fan, Guoping; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of adult disability. Stem/progenitor cell transplantation improves recovery after stroke in rodent models. These studies have 2 main limitations to clinical translation. First, most of the cells in stem/progenitor transplants die after brain transplantation. Second, intraparenchymal approaches target transplants to normal brain adjacent to the stroke, which is the site of the most extensive natural recovery in humans. Transplantation may damage this tissue. The stroke cavity provides an ideal target for transplantation because it is a compartmentalized region of necrosis, can accept a high volume transplant without tissue damage, and lies directly adjacent to the most plastic brain area in stroke. However, direct transplantation into the stroke cavity has caused massive death in the transplant. To overcome these limitations, the authors tested stem/progenitor transplants within a specific biopolymer hydrogel matrix to create a favorable environment for transplantation into the infarct cavity after stroke, and they tested this in comparison to stem cell injection without hydrogel support. A biopolymer hydrogel composed of cross-linked hyaluronan and heparin sulfate significantly promoted the survival of 2 different neural progenitor cell lines in vitro in conditions of stress and in vivo into the infarct cavity. Quantitative analysis of the transplant and surrounding tissue indicates diminished inflammatory infiltration of the graft with the hydrogel transplant. This result indicates that altering the local environment in stem cell transplantation enhances survival and diminishes cell stress. Stem cell transplantation into the infarct cavity within a pro-survival hydrogel matrix may provide a translational therapy for stroke recovery. PMID:20424193

  20. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-09-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  1. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J.; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Wright, Megan C.; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  2. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  3. Autologous transplant: microbial contamination of hematopoietic stem cell products.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Igor Dullius; Schmalfuss, Tissiana; Röhsig, Liane Marise; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells from peripheral blood (HPCPB) are commonly used for autologous and allogenic transplants in patients with most various onco-hematological diseases, and despite the utilization of sterile techniques during collection and processing of these products, bacterial contamination can occur. This study aimed to investigate the microbial contamination of HPCPB products. Microbial cultures of 837 HPCPB products between the year 2000 and 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to determine the incidence of culture positivity and identify the main organisms that cause contamination. The microbiological studies were performed with an automated system (BacT/Alert(®) bioMérieux Corporate). Thirty-six (4.3%) of 837 microbial cultures were contaminated. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most frequent bacteria isolated from HPCPB products (20 [56%] of the 36 positive microbial cultures). Considering the 36 contaminated samples, 22 HPCPB products were infused and 14 discarded. Pre- and post-infusion antibiotic therapy of the patients transfused with contaminated products was established based on the isolated microorganism and its antibiogram. Microbial contamination rate of HPCPB products was low. Clinically significant outcomes after infusion of contaminated HPCPB products were not observed. PMID:22846122

  4. Alefacept and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic-granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Fanconi Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia

  5. Transplantation-based gene therapy for inflammatory diseases: focus on glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, T; Ohashi, T

    2001-07-01

    Over the past decade, bone marrow transplantation has come to be considered an ideal therapeutic strategy for the treatment of certain diseases affecting the hematopoietic system such as hemophilia, and several clinical trials have been performed. Although traditionally used for the treatment of lethal diseases, it is speculated that this approach could also be used in the treatment of non-lethal but much more common diseases, which are resistant to conventional therapies, and affect a large number of patients physically and even financially. Inflammation may be one target for transplantation-based gene therapy, since macrophages and neutrophils, which are basically derived from hematopoietic stem cells, have been identified as key determinants in the development of diseases. This article focuses on the glomerulonephritis as a model of local inflammation and reviews recent investigations on transplantation-based gene therapy for inflammatory diseases.

  6. Immune Reconstitution After Antithymocyte Globulin-Conditioned Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Mark; Dhadda, Manveer; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Liu, Yiping; Hagel, Laura M; Podgorny, Peter; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Khan, Faisal M.; Luider, Joanne; Auer-Grzesiak, Iwona; Mansoor, Adnan; Russell, James A; Daly, Andrew; Stewart, Douglas A.; Maloney, David; Boeckh, Michael; Storek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) has been increasingly used to prevent graft-vs-host disease (GVHD), however, its impact on immune reconstitution is relatively unknown. Here we studied (1) immune reconstitution after ATG-conditioned hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), (2) determined factors influencing the reconstitution, and (3) compared it to non-ATG-conditioned HCT. Methods Immune cell subset counts were determined at 1–24 months posttransplant in 125 HCT recipients who received ATG during conditioning. The subset counts were also determined in 46 non-ATG-conditioned patients (similarly treated). Results (1) Reconstitution after ATG-conditioned HCT was fast for innate immune cells, intermediate for B cells and CD8 T cells, and very slow for CD4 T cells and invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. (2) Faster reconstitution after ATG-conditioned HCT was associated with higher number of cells of the same subset transferred with the graft in case of memory B cells, naïve CD4 T cells, naïve CD8 T cells, iNKT cells and myeloid dendritic cells; lower recipient age in case of naïve CD4 T cells and naïve CD8 T cells; cytomegalovirus recipient seropositivity in case of memory/effector T cells; absence of GVHD in case of naïve B cells; lower ATG serum levels in case of most T cell subsets including iNKT cells, and higher ATG levels in case of NK cells and B cells. (3) Compared to non-ATG-conditioned HCT, reconstitution after ATG-conditioned HCT was slower for CD4 T cells, and faster for NK cells and B cells. Conclusions ATG worsens reconstitution of CD4 T cells but improves reconstitution of NK and B cells. PMID:22985195

  7. Tracking Fusion of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transplantation to the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Brian T.; Kouris, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aid recovery of damaged myocardium caused by myocardial infarction. One possible mechanism for MSC-mediated recovery is reprogramming after cell fusion between transplanted MSCs and recipient cardiac cells. We used a Cre/LoxP-based luciferase reporter system coupled to biophotonic imaging to detect fusion of transplanted human pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs to cells of organs of living mice. Human MSCs, with transient expression of a viral fusogen, were delivered to the murine heart via a collagen patch. At 2 days and 1 week later, living mice were probed for bioluminescence indicative of cell fusion. Cell fusion was detected at the site of delivery (heart) and in distal tissues (i.e., stomach, small intestine, liver). Fusion was confirmed at the cellular scale via fluorescence in situ hybridization for human-specific and mouse-specific centromeres. Human cells in organs distal to the heart were typically located near the vasculature, suggesting MSCs and perhaps MSC fusion products have the ability to migrate via the circulatory system to distal organs and engraft with local cells. The present study reveals previously unknown migratory patterns of delivered human MSCs and associated fusion products in the healthy murine heart. The study also sets the stage for follow-on studies to determine the functional effects of cell fusion in a model of myocardial damage or disease. Significance Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are transplanted to the heart, cartilage, and other tissues to recover lost function or at least limit overactive immune responses. Analysis of tissues after MSC transplantation shows evidence of fusion between MSCs and the cells of the recipient. To date, the biologic implications of cell fusion remain unclear. A newly developed in vivo tracking system was used to identify MSC fusion products in living mice. The migratory patterns of fusion products were determined both in the

  8. T Cell Repertoire Development in XSCID Dogs Following Non-conditioned Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vernau, William; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Douglas R.; Moore, Peter F.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) can be successfully treated by bone marrow transplants (BMT) resulting in full immunologic reconstitution and engraftment of both donor B and T cells without the need for pre-transplant conditioning. In this study, we evaluated the T cell diversity in XSCID dogs 4 months to 10 1/2 years following BMT. At 4 months post transplantation, when the number of CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells had peaked and plateaued, the T cells in the transplanted dogs showed the same complex, diverse repertoire as those of normal young adult dogs. A decline in T cell diversity became evident approximately 3 1/2 years post transplant, but the proportion of Vβ families showing a polyclonal Gaussian spectratype still predominated up to 7 1/2 years post transplant. In two dogs evaluated at 7 1/2 and 10 1/2 years post transplant, >75% of the Vβ families consisted of a skewed or oligoclonal spectratype that was associated with a CD4/CD8 ratio of <0.5. The decline in the complexity of T cell diversity in the transplanted XSCID dogs is similar to that reported for XSCID patients following BMT. However, in contrast to transplanted XSCID boys who show a significant decline in their T cell diversity by 10 to 12 years following BMT, transplanted XSCID dogs maintain a polyclonal, diverse T cell repertoire through mid-life. PMID:17697962

  9. Imparting regenerative capacity to limbs by progenitor cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gufa; Chen, Ying; Slack, Jonathan M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The frog Xenopus can normally regenerate its limbs at early developmental stages but loses the ability during metamorphosis. This behavior provides a potential gain-of-function model for measures that can enhance limb regeneration. Here we show that frog limbs can be caused to form multidigit regenerates after receiving transplants of larval limb progenitor cells. It is necessary to activate Wnt/β -catenin signaling in the cells, and to add Sonic hedgehog, FGF10 and thymosin β4. These factors promote survival and growth of the grafted cells and also provide pattern information. The eventual regenerates are not composed solely of donor tissue; the host cells also make a substantial contribution despite their lack of regeneration-competence. Cells from adult frog legs or from regenerating tadpole tails do not promote limb regeneration, demonstrating the necessity for limb progenitor cells. These findings have obvious implications for the development of a technology to promote limb regeneration in mammals. PMID:23273877

  10. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease.

  11. Secondary Malignant Neoplasms Following Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Bomken, Simon; Skinner, Roderick

    2015-01-01

    Improving survival rates in children with malignancy have been achieved at the cost of a high frequency of late adverse effects of treatment, especially in intensively treated patients such as those undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many of whom suffer the high burden of chronic toxicity. Secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are one of the most devastating late effects, cause much morbidity and are the most frequent cause of late (yet still premature) treatment-related mortality. They occur in up to 7% of HSCT recipients by 20 years post-HSCT, and with no evidence yet of a plateau in incidence with longer follow-up. This review describes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and risk factors of the three main categories of post-HSCT SMNs. A wide range of solid SMNs has been described, usually occurring 10 years or more post-HSCT, related most often to previous or conditioning radiotherapy. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplasia occurs earlier, typically three to seven years post-HSCT, mainly in recipients of autologous transplant and is related to previous alkylating agent or topoisomerase II inhibitor chemotherapy. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders occur early (usually within two years) post-HSCT, usually presenting as Epstein-Barr virus-related B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27417356

  12. Dopamine release from transplanted neural stem cells in Parkinsonian rat striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xinjiang; Xu, Huadong; Teng, Sasa; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Deng, Zijun; Zhou, Li; Zuo, Panli; Liu, Bing; Liu, Bin; Wu, Qihui; Wang, Li; Hu, Meiqin; Dou, Haiqiang; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Feipeng; Li, Qing; Guo, Shu; Gu, Jingli; Lei, Qian; Lü, Jing; Mu, Yu; Jin, Mu; Wang, Shirong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Kun; Wang, Changhe; Li, Wenlin; Zhang, Kang; Zhou, Zhuan

    2014-11-01

    Embryonic stem cell-based therapies exhibit great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) because they can significantly rescue PD-like behaviors. However, whether the transplanted cells themselves release dopamine in vivo remains elusive. We and others have recently induced human embryonic stem cells into primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) that are self-renewable for massive/transplantable production and can efficiently differentiate into dopamine-like neurons (pNSC-DAn) in culture. Here, we showed that after the striatal transplantation of pNSC-DAn, (i) pNSC-DAn retained tyrosine hydroxylase expression and reduced PD-like asymmetric rotation; (ii) depolarization-evoked dopamine release and reuptake were significantly rescued in the striatum both in vitro (brain slices) and in vivo, as determined jointly by microdialysis-based HPLC and electrochemical carbon fiber electrodes; and (iii) the rescued dopamine was released directly from the grafted pNSC-DAn (and not from injured original cells). Thus, pNSC-DAn grafts release and reuptake dopamine in the striatum in vivo and alleviate PD symptoms in rats, providing proof-of-concept for human clinical translation.

  13. Haploidentical transplantation. Importance of histocompatibility testing and chimerism studies in allogeneic bone marrow/stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rebellato, L M; Dobbs, L J

    2001-01-01

    The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is sometimes the only treatment option for certain types of malignancies and hematological disorders. The best way to ensure a positive outcome from this type of procedure is to secure an identical human lymphocyte antigen-matched donor or use an autologous graft. This article reviews the indications for transplantation, the recipient and donor selection process, and posttransplant follow-up. The advantages of using haploidentical donors and the typing process also will be discussed.

  14. The Cell Biology of Cytomegalovirus: Implications for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, H; Fishman, J A

    2016-08-01

    Interpretation of clinical data regarding the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on allograft function is complicated by the diversity of viral strains and substantial variability of cellular receptors and viral gene expression in different tissues. Variation also exists in nonspecific (monocytes and dendritic cells) and specific (NK cells, antibodies) responses that augment T cell antiviral activities. Innate immune signaling pathways and expanded pools of memory NK cells and γδ T cells also serve to amplify host responses to infection. The clinical impact of specific memory T cell anti-CMV responses that cross-react with graft antigens and alloantigens is uncertain but appears to contribute to graft injury and to the abrogation of allograft tolerance. These responses are modified by diverse immunosuppressive regimens and by underlying host immune deficits. The impact of CMV infection on the transplant recipient reflects cellular changes and corresponding host responses, the convergence of which has been termed the "indirect effects" of CMV infection. Future studies will clarify interactions between CMV infection and allograft injury and will guide interventions that may enhance clinical outcomes in transplantation.

  15. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cells onto a partially wounded human cornea in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Charles; Hardarson, Thorir; Ellerström, Catharina; Nordberg, Markus; Caisander, Gunilla; Rao, Mahendra; Hyllner, Johan; Stenevi, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate whether cells originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could be successfully transplanted onto a partially wounded human cornea. A second aim was to study the ability of the transplanted cells to differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells. Methods Spontaneously, differentiated hESCs were transplanted onto a human corneal button (without limbus) with the epithelial layer partially removed. The cells were cultured on Bowman’s membrane for up to 9 days, and the culture dynamics documented in a time-lapse system. As the transplanted cells originated from a genetically engineered hESC line, they all expressed green fluorescent protein, which facilitated their identification during the culture experiments, tissue preparation and analysis. To detect any differentiation into human corneal epithelial-like cells, we analysed the transplanted cells by immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for CK3, CK15 and PAX6. Results The transplanted cells established and expanded on Bowman’s membrane, forming a 1–4 cell layer surrounded by host corneal epithelial cells. Expression of the corneal marker PAX6 appeared 3 days after transplantation, and after 6 days, the cells were expressing both PAX6 and CK3. Conclusion This shows that it is possible to transplant cells originating from hESCs onto Bowman’s membrane with the epithelial layer partially removed and to get these cells to establish, grow and differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells in vitro. PMID:22280565

  16. Treatment of systemic sclerosis: potential role for stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wen; Derk, Chris T

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may “reset” the immune reconstitution and induce self tolerance of autoreactive lymphocytes, and has been explored in the treatments for systemic sclerosis. Phase I/II trials have shown a satisfactory risk benefit ratio. The true benefit will be identified by two ongoing prospective, randomized phase III trials. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and immunosuppressive properties. The use of MSCs has showed successful responses in patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft versus host disease in phase II trials, and may be a potentially promising option for patients with systemic sclerosis. PMID:24198505

  17. Comparison of Outcomes for Pediatric Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission and Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation With Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens Based on Either Intravenous Busulfan or Total Body Irradiation: A Report From the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Motohiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Miyamura, Takako; Goto, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Jiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Terui, Kiminori; Ogawa, Atsushi; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Inoue, Masami; Sawada, Akihisa; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Takuya; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly receive myeloablative conditioning regimens based on busulfan (BU) or total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT); however, the optimal conditioning regimen remains unclear. To identify which of these regimens is better for pediatric patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of nationwide registration data collected in Japan between 2006 and 2011 to assess the outcomes of patients receiving these regimens before a first allo-HCT. Myeloablative conditioning regimens based on i.v. BU (i.v. BU-MAC) (n = 69) or TBI (TBI-MAC) (n = 151) were compared in pediatric AML patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2). The incidences of sinusoid obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, and early nonrelapse mortality (NRM) before day 100 were similar for both conditioning groups; however, the incidence of bacterial infection during the acute period was higher in the TBI-MAC group (P = .008). Both groups showed a similar incidence of NRM, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of relapse between the groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no significant differences in the 2-year relapse-free survival rates for the i.v. BU-MAC and TBI-MAC groups in the CR1/CR2 setting (71% versus 67%, P = .36; hazard ratio, .73; 95% CI, .43 to 1.24, respectively). TBI-MAC was no better than i.v. BU-MAC for pediatric AML patients in remission. Although this retrospective registry-based analysis has several limitations, i.v. BU-MAC warrants further evaluation in a prospective trial. PMID:26271192

  18. Comparison of Outcomes for Pediatric Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission and Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation With Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens Based on Either Intravenous Busulfan or Total Body Irradiation: A Report From the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Motohiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Miyamura, Takako; Goto, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Jiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Terui, Kiminori; Ogawa, Atsushi; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Inoue, Masami; Sawada, Akihisa; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Takuya; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly receive myeloablative conditioning regimens based on busulfan (BU) or total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT); however, the optimal conditioning regimen remains unclear. To identify which of these regimens is better for pediatric patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of nationwide registration data collected in Japan between 2006 and 2011 to assess the outcomes of patients receiving these regimens before a first allo-HCT. Myeloablative conditioning regimens based on i.v. BU (i.v. BU-MAC) (n = 69) or TBI (TBI-MAC) (n = 151) were compared in pediatric AML patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2). The incidences of sinusoid obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, and early nonrelapse mortality (NRM) before day 100 were similar for both conditioning groups; however, the incidence of bacterial infection during the acute period was higher in the TBI-MAC group (P = .008). Both groups showed a similar incidence of NRM, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of relapse between the groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no significant differences in the 2-year relapse-free survival rates for the i.v. BU-MAC and TBI-MAC groups in the CR1/CR2 setting (71% versus 67%, P = .36; hazard ratio, .73; 95% CI, .43 to 1.24, respectively). TBI-MAC was no better than i.v. BU-MAC for pediatric AML patients in remission. Although this retrospective registry-based analysis has several limitations, i.v. BU-MAC warrants further evaluation in a prospective trial.

  19. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  20. Changes in natural killer cell subsets in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pham, Betty; Piard-Ruster, Karine; Silva, Richard; Gallo, Amy; Esquivel, Carlos O; Martinez, Olivia M; Krams, Sheri M

    2012-03-01

    NK cells are important in the immune response against tumors and virally infected cells. A balance between inhibitory and activating receptors controls the effector functions of NK cells. We examined the fate of circulating NK cells and the expression of the NK cell-activating receptors in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Blood specimens were collected from 38 pediatric liver transplant recipients before transplant, and at one wk, one, three, six, and nine months, and one yr post-transplant. PBMCs were isolated and analyzed for the levels of NK cell activation receptors NKp30, NKp46, and NKG2D in the CD56(dim) CD16(+) and CD56(bright) CD16(+/-) subsets of NK cells. We demonstrated that there is a significant decrease in the percentage of circulating NK cells post-transplant (pretransplant 7.69 ± 1.54 vs. one wk post-transplant 1.73 ± 0.44) in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Interestingly, NKp30 expression is significantly increased, while NKp46 and NKG2D levels remain stable on the NK cells that persist at one wk post-transplant. These data indicate that the numbers and subsets of circulating NK cells are altered in children after liver transplantation.

  1. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  2. Scripts for TRUMP data analyses. Part II (HLA-related data): statistical analyses specific for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The Transplant Registry Unified Management Program (TRUMP) made it possible for members of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (JSHCT) to analyze large sets of national registry data on autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, as the processes used to collect transplantation information are complex and differed over time, the background of these processes should be understood when using TRUMP data. Previously, information on the HLA locus of patients and donors had been collected using a questionnaire-based free-description method, resulting in some input errors. To correct minor but significant errors and provide accurate HLA matching data, the use of a Stata or EZR/R script offered by the JSHCT is strongly recommended when analyzing HLA data in the TRUMP dataset. The HLA mismatch direction, mismatch counting method, and different impacts of HLA mismatches by stem cell source are other important factors in the analysis of HLA data. Additionally, researchers should understand the statistical analyses specific for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, such as competing risk, landmark analysis, and time-dependent analysis, to correctly analyze transplant data. The data center of the JSHCT can be contacted if statistical assistance is required.

  3. Pancreatic islet and stem cell transplantation: new strategies in cell therapy of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bretzel, R G; Eckhard, M; Brendel, M D

    2004-03-01

    Long-term studies strongly suggest that tight control of blood glucose can prevent the development and retard the progression of chronic complications of type 1 diabetes mellitus. In contrast to conventional insulin treatment, replacement of a patient's islets of Langerhans either by pancreas organ transplantation of by isolated islet transplantation is the only treatment to achieve a constant normoglycemic state and avoiding hypoglycemic episodes, a typical adverse event of multiple daily insulin injections. However, the expense of this benefit is still the need for immunosuppressive treatment of the recipient with all its potential risks. Islet cell transplantation offers the advantage of being performed as a minimally invasive procedure, in which islets can be perfused percutaneously into the liver via the portal vein. As of June 2003, 705 pancreatic islet transplants worldwide have been reported to the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR) at our Third Medical Department, University of Giessen/Germany. Data analysis shows at 1 year after adult islet transplantation a patient survival rate of 97%, a functioning islet graft in 54% of the cases, whereas insulin independence was meanwhile achieved in 20% of the cases. However, using a novel protocol established by the Edmonton Center/Canada, the insulin independence rates have improved significantly reaching meanwhile a 50-80% level. Finally, the concept of islet cell or stem cell transplantation is most attractive since it offers many perspectives: islet cell availability could become unlimited and islet or stem cells my be transplanted without life-long immunosuppressive treatment of the recipient, just to mention 2 of them. PMID:15238879

  4. NK Cells and Other Innate Lymphoid Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Paola; Montaldo, Elisa; Croxatto, Daniele; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Vitale, Chiara; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3) are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILCs provide host defenses against viruses, bacteria, and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodeling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defenses that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILCs may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodeling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILCs. Of note, CD34+ cells isolated from different sources of HSC may differentiate in vitro toward various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g., IL-1β) may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT. PMID:27242795

  5. NK Cells and Other Innate Lymphoid Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Paola; Montaldo, Elisa; Croxatto, Daniele; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Vitale, Chiara; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3) are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILCs provide host defenses against viruses, bacteria, and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodeling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defenses that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILCs may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodeling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILCs. Of note, CD34(+) cells isolated from different sources of HSC may differentiate in vitro toward various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g., IL-1β) may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT.

  6. [Cell therapy using stem cells: trophic factor, differentiation, and cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Hida, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Our research of stem cell transplantation using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent (iPS) cells was carried out from the aspect of trophic factor, cell differentiation, and better survival of grafted cells. Pleiotrophin, an enhanced trophic factor in the dopamine (DA)-depleted striatum, increased the number of DAergic neurons from ES-derived neural stem cells (ES-NSCs), increased cell survival of cultured DAergic neurons, and affected cell survival of grafted DAergic cells in Parkinson model rats. It was shown that DAergic differentiation from ES-NSCs was mediated by hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha. Our challenges of the transplantation of ES-NSCs and iPS-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (iPS-OPCs) into periventricular leukomalasia (PVL) model rats are also presented. It was found that grafted ES-NSCs survived better in the corpus callosum without immunosuppressant and most of them differentiated into neurons near the grafted site. It was also revealed that only a few of the grafted iPS-OPCs induced by a stepwise culture method with no use of serum could survive in PVL model rats, indicating that trophic factor (s) and improvement of graft techniques will be needed for better survival of grafted iPS-OPCs.

  7. Granulomatous amebic encephalitis following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Rozansky, Gregory; Nguyen, Ha Son; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Mueller, Wade; Johnson, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) is rare, but often fatal. The infection has been documented predominantly among the immunocompromised population or among those with chronic disease. To date, however, there have only been eight cases regarding the infection following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Case Description: A 62-year-old female with a history of relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, recently underwent peripheral blood autologous stem cell transplant after BEAM conditioning (day 0). On day +15, she began to exhibit worsening fatigue, generalized weakness, and fever. Symptoms progressed to nausea, emesis, somnolence, confusion, and frontal headaches over the next few days. Imaging demonstrated multifocal ill-defined vasogenic edema with patchy enhancement. The patient was started on broad antibiotics, antifungals, and seizure prophylaxis. Evaluation for bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial, and viral etiologies was fruitless. Her mental status progressively deteriorated. On day +22, she exhibited severe lethargy and went into pulseless electrical activity arrest, requiring chest compressions. The episode lasted <2 min and her pulse was restored. She was taken to the operating room for a brain biopsy. Postoperatively, her right pupil began to dilate compared to the left; she demonstrated extensor posturing in her upper extremities and withdrawal in her lower extremities. Repeat computed tomography demonstrated progressive edema. Given poor prognosis and poor neurological examination, the family opted for withdrawal of care. Final pathology was consistent with Acanthamoeba GAE. Conclusion: The authors report the third case of GAE after autologous stem cell transplant, and the ninth case overall after HSCT. This case is unusual due to its rapid clinical presentation after HSCT compared to prior literature. The case highlights the need for high suspicion of Acanthamoeba infection in this patient population. PMID:26539322

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C.; Osborne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    abstract A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long‐term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft‐induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM‐MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis‐mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin‐2 (Lcn‐2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft‐induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM‐MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM‐MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell‐induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation‐based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve. Stem Cells 2015;33:3006–3016 PMID:26175331

  9. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation restores damaged ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shao-Fang; Hu, Hong-Bo; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Xia-Fei; Peng, Dong-Xian; Su, Wei-Yan; He, Yuan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian injury because of chemotherapy can decrease the levels of sexual hormones and potentia generandi of patients, thereby greatly reducing quality of life. The goal of this study was to investigate which transplantation method for human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) can recover ovarian function that has been damaged by chemotherapy. A rat model of ovarian injury was established using an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide. Membrane-labelled HUMSCs were subsequently injected directly into ovary tissue or tail vein. The distribution of fluorescently labelled HUMSCs, estrous cycle, sexual hormone levels, and potentia generandi of treated and control rats were then examined. HUMSCs injected into the ovary only distributed to the ovary and uterus, while HUMSCs injected via tail vein were detected in the ovary, uterus, kidney, liver and lung. The estrous cycle, levels of sex hormones and potentia generandi of the treated rats were also recovered to a certain degree. Moreover, in some transplanted rats, fertility was restored and their offspring developed normally. While ovary injection could recover ovarian function faster, both methods produced similar results in the later stages of observation. Therefore, our results suggest that transplantation of HUMSCs by tail vein injection represents a minimally invasive and effective treatment method for ovarian injury. PMID:25922900

  10. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed.

  11. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  12. Transplantation of Neural Stem Cells Clonally Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells Promotes Recovery After Murine Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Ryan P.; Mitchell, Robert A.; Shen, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of spinal cord injury (SCI) makes it appropriate for cell-based therapies. Treatments using neural stem cells (NSCs) in animal models of SCI have shown positive outcomes, although uncertainty remains regarding the optimal cell source. Pluripotent cell sources such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide a limitless supply of therapeutic cells. NSCs derived using embryoid bodies (EB) from ESCs have shown tumorigenic potential. Clonal neurosphere generation is an alternative method to generate safer and more clinically relevant NSCs without the use of an EB stage for use in cell-based therapies. We generated clonally derived definitive NSCs (dNSCs) from ESC. These cells were transplanted into a mouse thoracic SCI model. Embryonic stem cell-derived definitive neural stem cell (ES-dNSC)-transplanted mice were compared with controls using behavioral measures and histopathological analysis of tissue. In addition, the role of remyelination in injury recovery was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The SCI group that received ES-dNSC transplantation showed significant improvements in locomotor function compared with controls in open field and gait analysis. The cell treatment group had a significant enhancement of spared neural tissue. Immunohistological assessments showed that dNSCs differentiated primarily to oligodendrocytes. These cells were shown to express myelin basic protein, associate with axons, and support nodal architecture as well as display proper compact, multilayer myelination in electron microscopic analysis. This study provides strong evidence that dNSCs clonally derived from pluripotent cells using the default pathway of neuralization improve motor function after SCI and enhance sparing of neural tissue, while remaining safe and clinically relevant. PMID:25119334

  13. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  14. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged.

  15. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  16. 75 FR 62843 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Times: November 15, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Place: Hyatt Regency... Act, as amended) the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises...

  17. 76 FR 19101 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Times: May 11, 2011, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Place: Georgetown University... Health Service Act, as amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT)...

  18. 77 FR 22791 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Times: May 9, 2012, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Place: Georgetown University... Health Service Act, as amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT)...

  19. 78 FR 23571 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Time: May 16, 2013, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. EST. Place: The meeting will... amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises the Secretary of...

  20. 75 FR 14175 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Times: May 5, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Place: Bethesda North..., HRSA, on matters related to the activities of the C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplantation Program...

  1. 76 FR 3913 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Time: February 4, 2011, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. EST. ACTION: Notice of Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) Meeting to be Held by Conference Call....

  2. 76 FR 62814 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT). Date and Time: November 08, 2011, 10 am to 4 pm EDT. Place: The meeting... amended,) the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises the Secretary of...

  3. 78 FR 47714 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Time: September 13, 2013, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time... Health Service Act, as amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT)...

  4. 76 FR 11491 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... requesting nominations to fill expected vacancies on the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. The Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation was established pursuant to Public Law...

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gratwohl, A; Passweg, J; Bocelli-Tyndall, C; Fassas, A; van Laar, J M; Farge, D; Andolina, M; Arnold, R; Carreras, E; Finke, J; Kötter, I; Kozak, T; Lisukov, I; Löwenberg, B; Marmont, A; Moore, J; Saccardi, R; Snowden, J A; van den Hoogen, F; Wulffraat, N M; Zhao, X W; Tyndall, A

    2005-05-01

    Experimental data and early phase I/II studies suggest that high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can arrest progression of severe autoimmune diseases. We have evaluated the toxicity and disease response in 473 patients with severe autoimmune disease treated with autologous HSCT between 1995 and 2003, from 110 centers participating in the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) autoimmune disease working party database. Survival, transplant-related mortality, treatment response and disease progression were assessed. In all, 420 patients (89%; 86+/-4% at 3 years, median follow-up 20 months) were alive, 53 (11%) had died from transplant-related mortality (N=31; 7+/-3% at 3 years) or disease progression (N=22; 9+/-4% at 3 years). Of 370 patients, 299 evaluable for response (81%) showed a treatment response, which was sustained in 213 (71% of responders). Response was associated with disease (P<0.001), was better in patients who received cyclophosphamide during mobilization (relative risk (RR)3.28 (1.57-6.83)) and was worse with increasing age (>40 years, RR0.29 (0.11-0.82)). Disease progression was associated with disease (P<0.001) and conditioning intensity (high intensity, RR1; intermediate intensity, RR1.81 (0.96-3.42)); low intensity, RR2.34 (1.074-5.11)). These data from the collective EBMT experience support the hypothesis that autologous HSCT can alter disease progression in severe autoimmune disease.

  6. Direct and Indirect Effects of Cytomegalovirus-Induced γδ T Cells after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Couzi, Lionel; Pitard, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Merville, Pierre; Déchanet-Merville, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Despite effective anti-viral therapies, cytomegalovirus (CMV) is still associated with direct (CMV disease) and indirect effects (rejection and poor graft survival) in kidney transplant recipients. Recently, an unconventional T cell population (collectively designated as Vδ2neg γδ T cells) has been characterized during the anti-CMV immune response in all solid-organ and bone-marrow transplant recipients, neonates, and healthy people. These CMV-induced Vδ2neg γδ T cells undergo a dramatic and stable expansion after CMV infection, in a conventional “adaptive” manner. Similarly, as CMV-specific CD8+ αβ T cells, they exhibit an effector/memory TEMRA phenotype and cytotoxic effector functions. Activation of Vδ2neg γδ T cells by CMV-infected cells involves the γδ T cell receptor (TCR) and still ill-defined co-stimulatory molecules such as LFA-1. A multiple of Vδ2neg γδ TCR ligands are apparently recognized on CMV-infected cells, the first one identified being the major histocompatibility complex-related molecule endothelial protein C receptor. A singularity of CMV-induced Vδ2neg γδ T cells is to acquire CD16 expression and to exert an antibody-dependent cell-mediated inhibition on CMV replication, which is controlled by a specific cytokine microenvironment. Beyond the well-demonstrated direct anti-CMV effect of Vδ2neg γδ T cells, unexpected indirect effects of these cells have been also observed in the context of kidney transplantation. CMV-induced Vδ2neg γδ T cells have been involved in surveillance of malignancy subsequent to long-term immunosuppression. Moreover, CMV-induced CD16+ γδ T cells are cell effectors of antibody-mediated rejection of kidney transplants, and represent a new physiopathological contribution to the well-known association between CMV infection and poor graft survival. All these basic and clinical studies paved the road to the development of a future γδ T cell-based immunotherapy. In the meantime, γδ T cell

  7. Targeting CD8 T-Cell Metabolism in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Michelle; Brouard, Sophie; Pecqueur, Claire; Degauque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Infiltration of effector CD8 T cells plays a major role in allograft rejection, and increases in memory and terminally differentiated effector memory CD8 T cells are associated with long-term allograft dysfunction. Alternatively, CD8 regulatory T cells suppress the inflammatory responses of effector lymphocytes and induce allograft tolerance in animal models. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the field of immunometabolics and its important role in CD8 function and differentiation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the key metabolic pathways involved in CD8 T cells and to discuss how manipulating these metabolic pathways could lead to new immunosuppressive strategies for the transplantation field. PMID:26557123

  8. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease - current practice and new approaches.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Staci D; Bhatia, Monica; Horan, John; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2016-08-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited disorder that affects over 5 million people worldwide. Current maintenance therapy has been successful in reducing complications and enhancing life expectancy; yet subclinical complications persist. To date, allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) remains the only available curative therapy for sickle cell disease. With declining incidences of rejection and transplant- related mortality, disease-free survival after human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling transplant exceeds 90%. However, the majority of individuals with sickle cell disease do not have an human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling; therefore, research is expanding to focus on new approaches to alternative donor transplant. Advances in supportive care and conditioning regimens have led to expansion of the pool of donors to unrelated donors and haploidentical donors. Challenges remain in improving the safety and efficacy of HSCT from alternate donors. Early results from gene therapy may provide another curative option in patients with sickle cell disease. These approaches show early promise, but larger, longitudinal studies are needed to better determine the optimal clinical circumstances for transplant in sickle cell disease.

  9. Optimal stem cell source for allogeneic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Cheuk, Daniel KL

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is a standard treatment for many hematological malignancies. Three different sources of stem cells, namely bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and cord blood (CB) can be used for HSCT, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that there is no significant survival advantage of PBSC over BM in Human Leukocyte Antigen-matched sibling transplant for adult patients with hematological malignancies. PBSC transplant probably results in lower risk of relapse and hence better disease-free survival, especially in patients with high risk disease at the expense of higher risks of both severe acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the unrelated donor setting, the only RCT available suggests that PBSC and BM result in comparable overall and disease-free survivals in patients with hematological malignancies; and PBSC transplant results in lower risk of graft failure and higher risk of chronic GVHD. High level evidence is not available for CB in comparison to BM or PBSC. The risks and benefits of different sources of stem cells likely change with different conditioning regimen, strategies for prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD and manipulation of grafts. The recent success and rapid advance of double CB transplant and haploidentical BM and PBSC transplants further complicate the selection of stem cell source. Optimal selection requires careful weighing of the risks and benefits of different stem cell source for each individual recipient and donor. Detailed counseling of patient and donor regarding risks and benefits in the specific context of the patient and transplant method is essential for informed decision making. PMID:24392314

  10. Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in a Parkinsonian Model Exerts Neuroprotection via Regulation of the Host Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Fu-Xing; Bao, Xin-Jie; Sun, Xi-Cai; Wu, Jun; Bai, Qing-Ran; Chen, Guo; Li, Xue-Yuan; Zhou, Qiang-Yi; Yang, Yuan-Fan; Shen, Qin; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2015-11-05

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and consequent dopamine (DA) deficit, and current treatment still remains a challenge. Although neural stem cells (NSCs) have been evaluated as appealing graft sources, mechanisms underlying the beneficial phenomena are not well understood. Here, we investigate whether human NSCs (hNSCs) transplantation could provide neuroprotection against DA depletion by recruiting endogenous cells to establish a favorable niche. Adult mice subjected to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were transplanted with hNSCs or vehicle into the striatum. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrated significant neurorescue response observed in hNSCs-treated animals compared with the control mice. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived, proliferated, and migrated within the astrocytic scaffold. Notably, more local astrocytes underwent de-differentiation, acquiring the properties of NSCs or neural precursor cells (NPCs) in mice given hNSCs. Additionally, we also detected significantly higher expression of host-derived growth factors in hNSCs-transplanted mice compared with the control animals, together with inhibition of local microglia and proinflammatory cytokines. Overall, our results indicate that hNSCs transplantation exerts neuroprotection in MPTP-insulted mice via regulating the host niche. Harnessing synergistic interaction between the grafts and host cells may help optimize cell-based therapies for PD.

  11. Thiotepa-based versus total body irradiation-based myeloablative conditioning prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eder, Sandra; Labopin, Myriam; Arcese, William; Or, Reuven; Majolino, Ignazio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; de Rosa, Gennaro; Volin, Liisa; Beelen, Dietrich; Veelken, Hendrik; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kuball, Jurgen; Cornelissen, Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Thiotepa is an alkylating compound with an antineoplastic and myeloablative activity and can mimic the effect of radiation. However, it is unknown whether this new regimen could safely replace the long-established ones. This retrospective matched-pair analysis evaluated the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission who received myeloablative conditioning either with a thiotepa-based (n = 121) or a cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation-based (TBI; n = 358) regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling or an unrelated donor. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the outcome was similar in both groups. Acute graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was observed in 25% after thiotepa-containing regimen versus 35% after TBI (P = 0.06). The 2-yr cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 40.5% for thiotepa and 41% for TBI (P = 0.98). At 2 yrs, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 23.9% (thiotepa) vs. 22.4% (TBI; P = 0.66) and 17.2% (thiotepa) vs. 23.3% (TBI; P = 0.77), respectively. The probabilities of leukaemia-free and overall survival at 2 yrs were not significantly different between the thiotepa and TBI groups, at 58.9% vs. 54.2% (P = 0.95) and 61.4% vs. 58% (P = 0.72), respectively. Myeloablative regimens using combinations including thiotepa can provide satisfactory outcomes, but the optimal conditioning remains unclear for the individual patient in this setting.

  12. Hematopoetic and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the treatment of refractory systemic lupus erythematosus--where are we now?

    PubMed

    Collins, Erin; Gilkeson, Gary

    2013-09-01

    Cell based therapies are of increasing interest in the treatment of systemic lupus due to their potential for long term suppression or cure of disease. Two methods for stem cell transplantation are currently being investigated/performed for treatment of lupus. Autologous hematopoetic stem cell transplantation is used in patients refractory to standard therapy. The morbidity and mortality of the procedure limit its use to select patients. Results indicate 50% long term disease free survival. The technical difficulty of the procedure requires it to be performed only in experienced centers. Mesenchymal stem cell transplants are a new emerging therapy for the treatment of lupus. Studies in murine models of lupus provide evidence of efficacy with safety. Limited uncontrolled trials in humans provide evidence of efficacy as well. Controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy of both these therapies compared to standard therapy.

  13. [Varicella-zoster virus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, H; Inoue, T; Okoshi, Y; Mori, S; Ohashi, K; Maeda, Y; Sasaki, T; Okuyama, Y; Hiruma, K; Sakamaki, H

    2000-01-01

    Of 264 patients aged 15 years or more who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 1989 and September 1998 at the Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 47 were infected by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). In 2 patients, visceral disease preceded cutaneous dissemination. One of these patients exhibited gastrointestinal symptoms followed by disseminated skin rash 6 days later. In the other patient, epigastralgia developed and was followed by seizures secondary to meningitis; the appearance of a skin rash 5 days after these initial symptoms yielded the diagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment of VZV infection are important, especially for patients who present with visceral symptoms suspected to be due to VZV. PMID:10695394

  14. Serial orthotopic transplantation of epithelial tumors in single-cell suspension

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Heather A.; Guasch, Géraldine

    2014-01-01

    Orthotopic transplantation of tumor tissue into recipient mice has long been established to study the role of the microenvironment in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Many of these transplantation assays involve the surgical implantation of an undissociated piece of tumor tissue. However, dissociation of tumor tissue into a single cell suspension prior to orthotopic transplantation enables the injection of fewer cell numbers, the selection of tumor-initiating populations by specific purification using antibody staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting and the analysis of tumor-forming efficiency. In this chapter, we provide a method to perform serial transplantation of tumor cells into their niche of origin. Visualization of the location of transplanted tumor cells is essential to confirm the success of the transplant as well as the viability of transplanted cells. We also describe an optimized immunofluorescence protocol to visualize tumor cells shortly after transplantation. This serial transplantation protocol allows for an experimental tumorigenesis assay to more closely mimic spontaneous tumor formation and is applicable to many microenvironments. PMID:23959996

  15. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P Daniel; Hoffman, William Y; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-09-01

    Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2-4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50-70 fiber-associated, or 1,000-5,000 FACS-enriched CD56(+)/CD29(+) human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  16. New frontiers in pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talano, Julie-An M.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Symons, Heather J.; Militano, Olga; Shereck, Evan B.; Giller, Roger H.; Hancock, Laura; Morris, Erin; Cairo, Mitchell S.

    2015-01-01

    The inaugural meeting of “New Frontiers in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation” organized by the Pediatric Blood and Transplant Consortium (PBMTC) was held at the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Annual Meeting. This meeting provided an international platform for physicians and investigators active in the research and utilization of pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloSCT) in children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant disease, to share information and develop future collaborative strategies. The primary objectives of the conference included: 1) to present advances in AlloSCT in pediatric ALL and novel pre- and post-immunotherapy; 2) to highlight new strategies in alternative allogeneic stem cell donor sources for children and adolescents with non-malignant hematological disorders; 3) to discuss timing of immune reconstitution after AlloSCT and methods of facilitating more rapid recovery of immunity; 4) to identify strategies of utilizing AlloSCT in pediatric myeloproliferative disorders (MPD); 5) to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to hematological complications post pediatric AlloSCT; 6) to enhance the understanding of new novel cellular therapeutic approaches to pediatric malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders; and 7) to discuss optimizing drug therapy in pediatric recipients of AlloSCT. This paper will provide a brief overview of the conference. PMID:24820213

  17. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-07-13

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity.

  18. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity. PMID:27406328

  19. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity. PMID:27406328

  20. A Study of Noncultured Extracted Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath Cell Suspension for Transplantation in Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aarti N; Marfatia, Ritu K; Saikia, Siddhartha S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vitiligo surgeries have come a long way from tissue grafts to cultured and non cultured cell transplantation. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell transplantation (EHF ORS) suspension is more enriched with melanocyte. In a hair bulb, there is one melanocyte for every five keratinocytes which is much higher than the epidermal melanin unit. Aims: To analyse the effectiveness of cultured EHF ORS and to perform objective evaluation based on clinical improvement & photographic evidence. To observe any untoward events or side effects. Settings and Design: The study was open and uncontrolled. All the patients were screened at preliminary visit. Reviews were done every two weeks. The endpoint selected was six months post procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients of stable Vitiligo were included in the study and follicular unit were harvested by Follicular Unit Extraction method. Outer root sheath cells were extracted by trypsinization. The solution was transplanted over dermabraded recipient site. Pressure dressing was given. Patients were followed up regularly. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive Statistics, Chi-Square. Results: Mean ± SD repigmentation was 80.15% ± 22.9% with excellent repigmentation (90-100%) in 60% of patients. Conclusions: This method is safe, effective, and simpler than the other methods involving cell culturing and requiring a laboratory set-up but selection of patients is crucial for the success of the outcome. PMID:27601859

  1. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; P<0.001). A 4-fold increase of PGF was observed in myeloproliferative disorders compared to acute leukemia (P<0.001). Other risk factors for PGF included recipient age below 30, HLA-mismatch, male recipients of female donor grafts, ABO-incompatibility, busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning, and cryopreservation. In bone marrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; P<0.001). The use of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were associated with decreased PGF risk. These data, allow clinicians to do more informed choices with respect to graft source, donor selection, conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens to reduce the risk of PGF. Moreover, a novel risk score determined on day 21 post-transplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell and derived exosome as small RNA carrier and Immunomodulator to improve islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Di; Peng, Yang; Liu, Di; Weizmann, Yossi; Mahato, Ram I

    2016-09-28

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) and their exosomes can suppress immune reaction and deliver small RNAs. Thus, they may improve islet transplantation by delivering small RNAs for promoting islet function and inhibiting immune rejection. Here, we proposed an hBMSC and its exosome-based therapy to overcome immune rejection and poor islet function, both of which hinder the success of islet transplantation. We found overexpressed siFas and anti-miR-375 in plasmid encoding shFas and anti-miR-375 transfected hBMSC-derived exosomes, which silenced Fas and miR-375 of human islets and improved their viability and function against inflammatory cytokines. This plasmid transfected hBMSCs downregulated Fas and miR-375 of human islets in a humanized NOD scid gamma (NSG) mouse model, whose immune reaction was inhibited by injecting hBMSC and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) co-cultured exosomes. These exosomes suppressed immune reaction by inhibiting PBMC proliferation and enhancing regulatory T cell (Treg) function. Collectively, our studies elucidated the mechanisms of RNA delivery from hBMSCs to human islets and the immunosuppressive effect of hBMSC and peripheral blood mononuclear cell co-cultured exosomes for improving islet transplantation. PMID:27475298

  3. A Study of Noncultured Extracted Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath Cell Suspension for Transplantation in Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aarti N; Marfatia, Ritu K; Saikia, Siddhartha S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vitiligo surgeries have come a long way from tissue grafts to cultured and non cultured cell transplantation. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell transplantation (EHF ORS) suspension is more enriched with melanocyte. In a hair bulb, there is one melanocyte for every five keratinocytes which is much higher than the epidermal melanin unit. Aims: To analyse the effectiveness of cultured EHF ORS and to perform objective evaluation based on clinical improvement & photographic evidence. To observe any untoward events or side effects. Settings and Design: The study was open and uncontrolled. All the patients were screened at preliminary visit. Reviews were done every two weeks. The endpoint selected was six months post procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients of stable Vitiligo were included in the study and follicular unit were harvested by Follicular Unit Extraction method. Outer root sheath cells were extracted by trypsinization. The solution was transplanted over dermabraded recipient site. Pressure dressing was given. Patients were followed up regularly. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive Statistics, Chi-Square. Results: Mean ± SD repigmentation was 80.15% ± 22.9% with excellent repigmentation (90-100%) in 60% of patients. Conclusions: This method is safe, effective, and simpler than the other methods involving cell culturing and requiring a laboratory set-up but selection of patients is crucial for the success of the outcome.

  4. A 47-year-old stem cell transplant recipient with fever, cough and chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Salh, Omar S; Nadhem, Omar N; Thakore, Sanket R; Halloush, Ruba A; Khasawneh, Faisal A

    2015-01-01

    Infections and malignancies are among the most serious complications that follow organ or stem cell transplantation. They may have a mild course, and nonspecific and overlapping manifestations. The present article describes a case of symptomatic nodular pulmonary disease that complicated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It was diagnosed to be post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, a potential sequela of immunosuppression and a very difficult entity to treat in profoundly immunosuppressed patients. PMID:26057372

  5. Tackling Cell Transplantation Anoikis: An Injectable, Shape Memory Cryogel Microcarrier Platform Material for Stem Cell and Neuronal Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Welzel, Petra B; Newland, Heike; Renneberg, Claudia; Kolar, Petr; Tsurkan, Mikhail; Rosser, Anne; Freudenberg, Uwe; Werner, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    Highly macroporous semisynthetic cryogel microcarriers can be synthesized for culturing stem cells and neuronal type cells. Growth factors loaded to heparin-containing microcarriers show near zero-order release kinetics and cell-loaded microcarriers can be injected through a fine gauge cannula without negative effect on the cells. These carriers can be applied for cell transplantation applications.

  6. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma Marzouq; Alsaleh, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10–40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between <1 and 16% and varies considerably according to the type of transplant and the geographical location. Approximately 80% of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients have been reported in patients receiving allografts. Several risk factors predispose to M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies in addition to the transplant procedure and its own complications. These infections can develop as early as day 11 and as late as day 3337 post-transplant. The course may become rapidly progressive and the patient may develop life-threatening complications. The diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients is usually made on clinical grounds, cultures obtained from clinical specimens, tissues biopsies in addition to serology and molecular tests. Unfortunately, a definitive diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in these patients may occasionally be difficult to be established. However, M. tuberculosis infections in transplant recipients usually respond well to treatment with anti-tuberculosis agents provided the diagnosis is made early. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in recipients of stem cell transplantation living in endemic areas and presenting with compatible clinical and radiological manifestations. High mortality rates are associated with infections caused by multidrug

  7. Management of respiratory viral infections in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Mulanovich, Victor E; Ariza-heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2012-01-01

    Advances in stem cell transplantation procedures and the overall improvement in the clinical management of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients over the past 2 decades have led to an increase in survival duration, in part owing to better strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant complications, including opportunistic infections. However, post-HCT infections remain a concern for HCT recipients, particularly infections caused by community respiratory viruses (CRVs), which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These viruses can potentially cause lower respiratory tract illness, which is associated with a higher mortality rate among HCT recipients. Clinical management of CRV infections in HCT recipients includes supportive care and antiviral therapy, especially in high-risk individuals, when available. Directed antiviral therapy is only available for influenza infections, where successful use of neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir or zanamivir) and/or M2 inhibitors (amantadine or rimantadine) has been reported. Data on the successful use of ribavirin, with or without immunomodulators, for respiratory syncytial virus infections in HCT recipients has emerged over the past 2 decades but is still controversial at best because of a lack of randomized controlled trials. Because of the lack of directed antiviral therapy for most of these viruses, prevention should be emphasized for healthcare workers, patients, family, and friends and should include the promotion of the licensed inactivated influenza vaccine for HCT recipients, when indicated. In this review, we discuss the clinical management of respiratory viruses in this special patient population, focusing on commercially available antivirals, adjuvant therapy, and novel drugs under investigation, as well as on available means for prevention. PMID:23226621

  8. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma: stem cell transplantation methods that enhance stemness.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Tajima, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2015-11-05

    Because of their ease of isolation and relative abundance, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are a particularly attractive autologous cell source for various therapeutic purposes. ASCs retain a high proliferation capacity in vitro and have the ability to undergo extensive differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Moreover, ASCs secrete a wide range of growth factors that can stimulate tissue regeneration. Therefore, the clinical use of ASCs is feasible. However, the potential of ASCs differs depending on the donor's medical condition, including diseases such as diabetes. Recent studies demonstrated that ASCs from diabetic donors exhibit reduced proliferative potential and a smaller proportion of stem cell marker-positive cells. Therefore, to ensure the success of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering methods must be improved by the incorporation of factors that increase the proliferation and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells when autologous cells are used. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which contains high levels of diverse growth factors that can stimulate stem cell proliferation and cell differentiation in the context of tissue regeneration, has recently been identified as a biological material that could be applied to tissue regeneration. Thus, co-transplantation of ASCs and PRP represents a promising novel approach for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. In this review, we describe the potential benefits of adding PRP to ASCs and preclinical and clinical studies of this approach in various medical fields. We also discuss the mechanisms of PRP action and future cell-based therapies using co-transplantation of ASCs and PRP.

  9. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory–inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster

  10. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network.

  11. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network. PMID:27425612

  12. Hematopoietic "stem cell" transplantation: are there any clouds on an expanding horizon?

    PubMed

    Lowry, P A

    1996-01-01

    Clinicians contemplating stem cell transplantation for the treatment of their patients are faced with an increasing number and complexity of options for the source of the stem cells and their manipulation prior to transplant. Many of these strategies focus on the traditional concept of the "hematopoietic stem cell" as a unitary and independent source of reconstitution. Evolving animal studies suggest that the stem cell concept is incompletely defined and that the stem cell compartment retains significant heterogeneity of function. These findings should be combined with the increasingly heterogeneous goals of stem cell transplantation to induce caution in proceeding forward with new technologies.

  13. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells.

  14. Fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Webb, B J; Brunner, A; Ford, C D; Gazdik, M A; Petersen, F B; Hoda, D

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a consequence of intestinal dysbiosis and is particularly common following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective method of treating CDI by correcting intestinal dysbiosis by passive transfer of healthy donor microflora. FMT has not been widely used in immunocompromised patients, including HSCT recipients, owing to concern for donor-derived infection. Here, we describe initial results of an FMT program for CDI at a US HSCT center. Seven HSCT recipients underwent FMT between February 2015 and February 2016. Mean time post HSCT was 635 days (25-75 interquartile range [IQR] 38-791). Five of the patients (71.4%) were on immunosuppressive therapy at FMT; 4 had required long-term suppressive oral vancomycin therapy because of immediate recurrence after antibiotic cessation. Stool donors underwent comprehensive health and behavioral screening and laboratory testing of serum and stool for 32 potential pathogens. FMT was administered via the naso-jejunal route in 6 of the 7 patients. Mean follow-up was 265 days (IQR 51-288). Minor post-FMT adverse effects included self-limited bloating and urgency. One patient was suspected of having post-FMT small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. No serious adverse events were noted and all-cause mortality was 0%. Six of 7 (85.7%) patients had no recurrence; 1 patient recurred at day 156 post FMT after taking an oral antibiotic and required repeat FMT, after which no recurrence has occurred. Diarrhea was improved in all patients and 1 patient with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease was able to taper off systemic immunosuppression after FMT. With careful donor selection and laboratory screening, FMT appears to be a safe and effective therapy for CDI in HSCT patients and may confer additional benefits. Larger studies are necessary to confirm safety and efficacy and explore other possible effects.

  15. Dietary recommendations for immunosuppressed patients of 17 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vicenski, Paola Pasini; Alberti, Paloma; do Amaral, Denise Johnsson Campos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Low-microbial diets are recommended to reduce the risk of foodborne infections when hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients have neutropenia. However there is no pattern concerning the composition of such a diet. Objective To collect information concerning the structure of nutrition departments and the diets recommended for immunosuppressed patients in transplant centers in Brazil. Methods Questionnaires were sent to the 45 Bone Marrow Transplantation Centers listed by the Sociedade Brasileira de Transplante de Medula Óssea (SBTMO). Completed questionnaires were returned by 17 centers. The questions were related to the profile and the structure of the nutrition department, at what point a general diet is allowed after transplantation, and which food is allowed during the critical period of immunosuppression and soon after transplantation. Results Of the 17 centers that participated, 82% have a professional nutritionist exclusively for the Transplant Department but only 41% have an area specifically for the preparation of diets for immunosuppressed patients. The patients are released from the low-microbial diet to general diets 90-100 days after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation by 29% of the centers and only after suspension of immunosuppressive drugs in 24%. Most centers (88%) restrict the consumption of raw fruits, all restrict the consumption of raw vegetables and 88% forbid the consumption of yogurt in the critical period of immunosuppression. There was no consensus on forbidden foods soon after transplantation. Conclusion Major differences in diets recommended to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients were observed between the different centers. PMID:23049398

  16. Preclinical modeling of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Stolfi, Jessica L; Pai, Chien-Chun S; Murphy, William J

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which was first successfully performed in the 1950s, remains a critical therapeutic modality for treatment of a diverse array of diseases, including a multitude of hematological malignancies, autoimmune disorders, amyloidosis and inherited genetic hematological disorders. Although great advances have been made in understanding and application of this therapy, significant complications still exist, warranting further investigation. Of critical importance, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in both acute and chronic forms, remains a major complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, responsible for both the development of chronic illness and morbidity, as well as mortality. Use of an appropriate preclinical model may provide significant insight into the mechanistic pathways leading to the development and progression of graft-versus-host disease, as well as cancer in general. However, existing preclinical modeling systems exhibit significant limitations, and development of models that recapitulate the complex and comprehensive clinical scenario and provide a tool by which therapeutic intervention may be developed and assessed is of utmost importance. Here, we review the present status of the field of graft-versus-host disease research. We discuss and summarize the preclinical models currently in use, as well as their advantages and limitations.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical use and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Francisco; Ramírez, Pablo; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the accepted therapy of choice for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases in children and adults. Initially developed as rescue therapy for a patient with cancer after high doses of chemotherapy and radiation as well as the correction of severe deficiencies in the hematopoietic system, it has evolved into an adoptive immune therapy for malignancies and autoimmune disorders. The procedure has helped to obtain key information about the bone marrow environment, the biology of hematopoietic stem cells and histocompatibility. The development of this new discipline has allowed numerous groups working around the world to cure patients of diseases previously considered lethal. Together with the ever growing list of volunteer donors and umbilical cord blood banks, this has resulted in life saving therapy for thousands of patients yearly. We present an overview of the procedure from its cradle to the most novel applications, as well as the results of the HSC transplant program developed at our institution since 1989. PMID:23283440

  18. Late Effects Surveillance Recommendations among Survivors of Childhood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Children's Oncology Group Report.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric J; Anderson, Lynnette; Baker, K Scott; Bhatia, Smita; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Huang, Jennifer T; Pelletier, Wendy; Perkins, Joanna L; Rivard, Linda S; Schechter, Tal; Shah, Ami J; Wilson, Karla D; Wong, Kenneth; Grewal, Satkiran S; Armenian, Saro H; Meacham, Lillian R; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Castellino, Sharon M

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an important curative treatment for children with high-risk hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, and, increasingly, nonmalignant diseases. Given improvements in care, there are a growing number of long-term survivors of pediatric HCT. Compared with childhood cancer survivors who did not undergo transplantation, HCT survivors have a substantially increased burden of serious chronic conditions and impairments involving virtually every organ system and overall quality of life. This likely reflects the joint contributions of pretransplantation treatment exposures and organ dysfunction, the transplantation conditioning regimen, and any post-transplantation graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In response, the Children's Oncology Group (COG) has created long-term follow-up guidelines (www.survivorshipguidelines.org) for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer, including those who were treated with HCT. Guideline task forces, consisting of HCT specialists, other pediatric oncologists, radiation oncologists, organ-specific subspecialists, nurses, social workers, other health care professionals, and patient advocates systematically reviewed the literature with regards to late effects after childhood cancer and HCT since 2002, with the most recent review completed in 2013. For the most recent review cycle, over 800 articles from the medical literature relevant to childhood cancer and HCT survivorship were reviewed, including 586 original research articles. Provided herein is an organ system-based overview that emphasizes the most relevant COG recommendations (with accompanying evidence grade) for the long-term follow-up care of childhood HCT survivors (regardless of current age) based on a rigorous review of the available evidence. These recommendations cover both autologous and allogeneic HCT survivors, those who underwent transplantation for nonmalignant diseases, and those with a history of chronic GVHD. PMID

  19. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mawatari, Momoko; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kei; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein.

  20. Restoration of spermatogenesis after transplantation of c-Kit positive testicular cells in the fowl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transplantation of male germ line cells into sterilized recipients has been used in mammals for conventional breeding as well as for transgenesis. This study presents an improvement in the approach for germ cell transplantation between fowl males by using an enriched subpopulation of c-Kit positive ...

  1. Effect of Astragaloside IV on Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Alzheimer's Disease Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Haiyan, Hu; Rensong, Yang; Guoqin, Jin; Xueli, Zhang; Huaying, Xia; Yanwu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying the maintenance of renewal and replacement capabilities of endogenous progenitor cells or engrafted stem cells in a pathological environment remains elusive. To investigate the effect of astragaloside IV (ASI) on the proliferation and differentiation of the engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs), we cultured NSCs from the hippocampus of E14 rat embryos, treated the cells with ASI, and then transplanted the cells into the hippocampus of rat AD models. In vitro experimentation showed that 10−5 M ASI induced NSCs to differentiate into β-tubulin III+ and GFAP+ cells. NSCs transplantation into rat AD models resulted in improvements in learning and memory, especially in the ASI-treated groups. ASI treatment resulted in an increase in the number of β-tubulin III+ cells in the hippocampus. Further investigation showed that ASI inhibited PS1 expression in vitro and in vivo. The high-dose ASI downregulated the Notch intracellular domain, whereas the low-dose ASI increased Notch-1 and NICD. In conclusion, ASI treatment resulted in improvements in learning and memory of AD models by promoting NSC proliferation and differentiation partly through the Notch signal pathway. PMID:27034688

  2. Dissociated Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve Transplants for Spinal Cord Injury Repair: A Comprehensive Assessment of Their Effects on Regeneration and Functional Recovery Compared to Schwann Cell Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Brodak, Danika M.; Bartlett Bunge, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Several recent studies suggest that predegenerated nerves (PDNs) or dissociated PDNs (dPDNs) can improve behavioral and histological outcomes following transplantation into the injured rat spinal cord. In the current study we tested the efficacy of dPDN transplantation by grafting cells isolated from the sciatic nerve 7 days after crush. We did not replicate one study, but rather assessed what appeared, based on five published reports, to be a reported robust effect of dPDN grafts on corticospinal tract (CST) regeneration and locomotor recovery. Using a standardized rodent spinal cord injury model (200 kD IH contusion) and transplantation procedure (injection of GFP+ cells 7 days post-SCI), we demonstrate that dPDN grafts survive within the injured spinal cord and promote the ingrowth of axons to a similar extent as purified Schwann cell (SC) grafts. We also demonstrate for the first time that while both dPDN and SC grafts promote the ingrowth of CGRP axons, neither graft results in mechanical or thermal hyperalgesia. Unlike previous studies, dPDN grafts did not promote long-distance axonal growth of CST axons, brainstem spinal axons, or ascending dorsal column sensory axons. Moreover, using a battery of locomotor tests (Basso Beattie Bresnahan [BBB] score, BBB subscore, inked footprint, Catwalk, and ladderwalk), we failed to detect any beneficial effects of dPDN transplantation on the recovery of locomotor function after SCI. We conclude that dPDN transplants are not sufficient to promote CST regeneration or locomotor recovery after SCI. PMID:22655857

  3. Tolerogenic dendritic cells and negative vaccination in transplantation: from rodents to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Varey, Emilie; Bériou, Gaëlle; Hill, Marcelo; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Segovia, Mercedes; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The use of immunosuppressive (IS) drugs to treat transplant recipients has markedly reduced the incidence of acute rejection and early graft loss. However, such treatments have numerous adverse side effects and fail to prevent chronic allograft dysfunction. In this context, therapies based on the adoptive transfer of regulatory cells are promising strategies to induce indefinite transplant survival. The use of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) has shown great potential, as preliminary experiments in rodents have demonstrated that administration of tolerogenic DC prolongs graft survival. Recipient DC, Donor DC, or Donor Ag-pulsed recipient DC have been used in preclinical studies and administration of these cells with suboptimal immunosuppression increases their tolerogenic potential. We have demonstrated that autologous unpulsed tolerogenic DC injected in the presence of suboptimal immunosuppression are able to induce Ag-specific allograft tolerance. We derived similar tolerogenic DC in different animal models (mice and non-human primates) and confirmed their protective abilities in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms involved in the tolerance induced by autologous tolerogenic DC were also investigated. With the aim of using autologous DC in kidney transplant patients, we have developed and characterized tolerogenic monocyte-derived DC in humans. In this review, we will discuss the preclinical studies and describe our recent results from the generation and characterization of tolerogenic monocyte-derived DC in humans for a clinical application. We will also discuss the limits and difficulties in translating preclinical experiments to theclinic. PMID:22908013

  4. GVHD after haploidentical transplantation: a novel, MHC-defined rhesus macaque model identifies CD28− CD8+ T cells as a reservoir of breakthrough T-cell proliferation during costimulation blockade and sirolimus-based immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Weston P.; Srinivasan, Swetha; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Singh, Karnail; Sen, Sharon; Hamby, Kelly; Deane, Taylor; Stempora, Linda; Beus, Jonathan; Turner, Alexa; Wheeler, Caleb; Anderson, Daniel C.; Sharma, Prachi; Garcia, Anapatricia; Strobert, Elizabeth; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Crenshaw, Timothy; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Ward, Thea; Song, Mingqing; Horan, John; Larsen, Christian P.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a major histocompatibility complex–defined primate model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and have determined the effect that CD28/CD40-directed costimulation blockade and sirolimus have on this disease. Severe GVHD developed after haploidentical transplantation without prophylaxis, characterized by rapid clinical decline and widespread T-cell infiltration and organ damage. Mechanistic analysis showed activation and possible counter-regulation, with rapid T-cell expansion and accumulation of CD8+ and CD4+ granzyme B+ effector cells and FoxP3pos/CD27high/CD25pos/CD127low CD4+ T cells. CD8+ cells down-regulated CD127 and BCl-2 and up-regulated Ki-67, consistent with a highly activated, proliferative profile. A cytokine storm also occurred, with GVHD-specific secretion of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-18, and CCL4. Costimulation Blockade and Sirolimus (CoBS) resulted in striking protection against GVHD. At the 30-day primary endpoint, CoBS-treated recipients showed 100% survival compared with no survival in untreated recipients. CoBS treatment resulted in survival, increasing from 11.6 to 62 days (P < .01) with blunting of T-cell expansion and activation. Some CoBS-treated animals did eventually develop GVHD, with both clinical and histopathologic evidence of smoldering disease. The reservoir of CoBS-resistant breakthrough immune activation included secretion of interferon-γ, IL-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-12/IL-23 and proliferation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 immunoglobulin-resistant CD28− CD8+ T cells, suggesting adjuvant treatments targeting this subpopulation will be needed for full disease control. PMID:20833977

  5. The Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network: An Effective Infrastructure for Addressing Important Issues in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a rapidly evolving field with active preclinical and clinical development of new strategies for patient assessment, graft selection and manipulation, and pre- and post-transplantation drug and cell therapy. New strategies require evaluation in definitive clinical trials; however, HCT trials face unique challenges, including the relatively small number of transplantations performed at any single center, the diverse indications for HCT requiring dissimilar approaches, the complex nature of the intervention itself, the risk of multiple complications in the immediate post-transplantation period, and the risk of important, though infrequent, late effects. The Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) was established by the US National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and the National Cancer Institute to meet these challenges. In its 15 years as a network, the BMT CTN has proven to be a successful infrastructure for planning, implementing, and completing such trials and for providing definitive answers to questions leading to improvements in the understanding and practice of HCT. It has opened 37 trials, about one-half phase 2 and one-half phase 3, enrolled more than 8000 patients, and published 57 papers addressing important issues in the treatment of patients with life-threatening malignant and nonmalignant blood disorders. This review describes the network's accomplishments, key components of its success, lessons learned over the past 15 years, and challenges for the future.

  6. Nutritional status of patients submitted to transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Érika Elias; Guerra, Daiane Cristina; Baluz, Kátia; de Resende Furtado, Wander; da Silva Bouzas, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the nutritional status of adult patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at two different time points (admission and discharge). Methods A retrospective, descriptive and quantitative study was performed based on clinical, laboratory and nutritional data obtained from medical records of adult patients of both genders submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a bone marrow transplantation reference center in Rio de Janeiro in the period from 2010 to 2013. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software (version 22.0). Results Sixty-four patients were evaluated. The mean age was 42.1 ± 3.2 years and the most prevalent disease was acute myeloid leukemia (39%). There was a high prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea (100%), vomiting (97%) and mucositis (93%). Between admission and discharge there was a significant decrease in the median weight (−2.5 kg; 71.5 vs. 68.75 kg; p-value < 0.001), body mass index (−0.9 kg/m2; 24.8 vs. 24.4 kg/m2; p-value < 0.001), and serum albumin levels (−0.2 g/dL; 3.7 vs. 3.6 g/dL; p-value = 0.024). The survival time after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation correlated negatively with C-reactive protein at discharge (CC = −0.72; p-value < 0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (CC = 0.56; p-value = 0.004) and with high total protein level at discharge (CC = 0.53; p-value = 0.006). Conclusion Our results suggest that patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have compromised nutritional status during the hospital stay for transplantation. PMID:25453651

  7. EBV-negative monomorphic B-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are pathologically distinct from EBV-positive cases and frequently contain TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Courville, Elizabeth L; Yohe, Sophia; Chou, David; Nardi, Valentina; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Thakral, Beenu; Nelson, Andrew C; Ferry, Judith A; Sohani, Aliyah R

    2016-10-01

    Monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder commonly resembles diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma, and most are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive. We retrospectively identified 32 cases of monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder from two institutions and evaluated EBV in situ hybridization; TP53 mutation status; p53, CD30, myc, and BCL2 expression by immunohistochemistry; proliferation index by Ki67; and germinal center vs non-germinal center immunophenotype by Hans criteria. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder arose after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in five and solid organ transplant in 27 patients, a median of 4 and 96 months after transplant, respectively (overall median latency 71 months, range 2-295). The most common morphology was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (28 cases), with three cases of Burkitt lymphoma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. Ten cases (31%) were EBV negative. Of those with the morphology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the EBV-negative cases were more frequently TP53-mutated (P<0.001), p53 positive by immunohistochemistry (P<0.001), CD30 negative (P<0.01), and of germinal center immunophenotype (P=0.01) compared with EBV-positive cases. No statistically significant difference in overall survival was identified based on EBV, TP53 mutation status, germinal center vs non-germinal center immunophenotype, or other immunohistochemical parameters evaluated. Patients who died of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder were older with a longer latency from time of transplant to diagnosis (P<0.05). Our study demonstrates that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma-related immunohistochemical prognostic markers have limited relevance in the post-transplant setting and underscores differences between EBV-positive and EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in terms of immunophenotype and TP53 mutation frequency, supporting an alternative pathogenesis for EBV-negative post-transplant

  8. Zhichan decoction induces differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease rats after neural stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huifen; Song, Jie; Yang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to increase the dopamine content and reduce dopaminergic metabolites in the brain of Parkinson's disease rats. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we found that dopamine and dopaminergic metabolite (dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) content in the midbrain of Parkinson's disease rats was increased after neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction, compared with neural stem cell transplantation alone. Our genetic algorithm results show that dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels achieve global optimization. Neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction increased dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels up to 10-fold, while transplantation alone resulted in a 3-fold increment. Homovanillic acid levels showed no apparent change. Our experimental findings show that after neural stem cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease rats, Zhichan decoction can promote differentiation of neural stem cells into dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25206914

  9. Stem cell transplantation strategies for the restoration of cognitive dysfunction caused by cranial radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Roa, Dante E; Bosch, Omar; Lan, Mary L; Limoli, Charles L

    2011-10-18

    Radiotherapy often provides the only clinical recourse for those afflicted with primary or metastatic brain tumors. While beneficial, cranial irradiation can induce a progressive and debilitating decline in cognition that may, in part, be caused by the depletion of neural stem cells. Given the increased survival of patients diagnosed with brain cancer, quality of life in terms of cognitive health has become an increasing concern, especially in the absence of any satisfactory long-term treatments. To address this serious health concern we have used stem cell replacement as a strategy to combat radiation-induced cognitive decline. Our model utilizes athymic nude rats subjected to cranial irradiation. The ionizing radiation is delivered as either whole brain or as a highly focused beam to the hippocampus via linear accelerator (LINAC) based stereotaxic radiosurgery. Two days following irradiation, human neural stem cells (hNSCs) were stereotaxically transplanted into the hippocampus. Rats were then assessed for changes in cognition, grafted cell survival and for the expression of differentiation-specific markers 1 and 4-months after irradiation. Our cognitive testing paradigms have demonstrated that animals engrafted with hNSCs exhibit significant improvements in cognitive function. Unbiased stereology reveals significant survival (10-40%) of the engrafted cells at 1 and 4-months after transplantation, dependent on the amount and type of cells grafted. Engrafted cells migrate extensively, differentiate along glial and neuronal lineages, and express a range of immature and mature phenotypic markers. Our data demonstrate direct cognitive benefits derived from engrafted human stem cells, suggesting that this procedure may one day afford a promising strategy for the long-term functional restoration of cognition in individuals subjected to cranial radiotherapy. To promote the dissemination of the critical procedures necessary to replicate and extend our studies, we have

  10. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance. II. maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Tutschka, P.J.; Ki, P.F.; Beschorner, W.E.; Hess, A.D.; Santos, G.W.

    1981-10-01

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods.

  11. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance II. Maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Tutschka, P.J.; Ki, P.F.; Beschorner, W.E.; Hess, A.D.; Santos, G.W.

    1981-10-01

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods.

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without fluconazole and fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, D; Kreil, S; Nolte, F; Reinwald, M; Hofmann, W-K; Klein, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) and fluconazole prophylaxis is recommended for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). However, due to an uncertain scientific basis and the increasing emergence of resistant germs, this policy should be questioned. Therefore, FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis was omitted in alloHCT at our center. In this retrospective analysis, all consecutive patients (n = 63) who underwent first alloHCT at our institution from September 2010 to September 2013 were included. Patients neither received FQ nor fluconazole prophylaxis. Day 100 mortality, incidence of febrile neutropenia, bacterial infections, and invasive fungal diseases (IFD) were assessed. Sixteen patients who started conditioning under antimicrobial treatment/prophylaxis due to pre-existing neutropenia (3/16), IFD (12/16), or aortic valve replacement (1/16) were excluded from the analysis. Finally, 47 patients were transplanted without prophylaxis as intended. Day 100 mortality was 9 %. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 62 % (29/47); 17/47 patients (36 %) experienced a blood stream infection (BSI) with detection of Gram-positive bacteria in 14 patients, Gram-negative bacteria in five patients, and candida in one patient, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacteria; 12/21 isolated Gram-positive and 3/6 Gram-negative bacteria were FQ resistant. In 21 % (10/47) of the patients, IFD (1x proven, 1x probable, and 8x possible) were diagnosed. To conclude, all three criteria, day 100 mortality, the incidence of IFD, and BSI, are in the range of published data for patients transplanted with FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis. These data demonstrate that alloHCT is feasible without FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis.

  13. REDUCED INTENSITY CONDITIONING FOR ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mackinnon, Stephen; Childs, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after myeloablative conditioning is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. In an attempt to extend this therapy to older patients or those with comorbidities, reduced intensity or truly nonmyeloablative regimens have been developed over the last decade. The principle underlying reduced intensity regimens is to provide some tumor kill with lessened regimen-related morbidity and mortality, then rely on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects to eradicate remaining malignant cells, while nonmyeloablative regimens rely primarily on GVT effects. In this article, three representative approaches are described, demonstrating the clinical application for both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies. Current challenges include controlling graft-versus-host disease while allowing GVT to occur. In the future, clinical trials using reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative conditioning will be compared to myeloablative conditioning in selected malignancies to extend the application to standard risk patients. PMID:17222778

  14. Germ cell transplantation: a potential treatment of severe testicular failure.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, D J; Lamb, D J

    2000-12-01

    Although the process of spermatogenesis is relatively efficient and resistant to damage, male infertility can result from exposure to toxic agents such as chemotherapeutic regimes, radiation, or occupational exposures to chemicals. Other types of infertility may result from migratory defects or poor survival of primordial germ cells during development, abnormal repopulation of the tubules by spermatogonia during development, or low cellularity of the testis (hypospermatogenesis). Presently, there are no effective therapies available to treat these patients. Recent studies in animal models have demonstrated that isolated testicular germ cells collected from testes may be transplanted into sterile recipient mice to regenerate spermatogenesis. This technology will have widespread applications in efforts to manipulate the genome and produce transgenic offspring, to improve agricultural species, to enhance sperm production in endangered species, to improve our understanding of the control mechanisms regulating spermatogenesis, and to treat male infertility.

  15. Transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Yannick D; Seebach, Jörg D; Bühler, Leo H; Pascual, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The major challenge in transplantation medicine remains long-term allograft acceptance, with preserved allograft function under minimal chronic immunosuppression. To safely achieve the goal of sustained donor-specific T and B cell non-responsiveness, research efforts are now focusing on therapies based on cell subsets with regulatory properties. In particular the transfusion of human regulatory T cells (Treg) is currently being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of graft versus host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is also under consideration for solid organ transplantation. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate current knowledge on naturally occurring as well as induced human Treg, with emphasis on their specific phenotype, suppressive function and how these cells can be manipulated in vitro and/or in vivo for therapeutic purposes in transplantation medicine. We highlight the potential but also possible limitations of Treg-based strategies to promote long-term allograft survival. It is evident that the bench-to-beside translation of these protocols still requires further understanding of Treg biology. Nevertheless, current data already suggest that Treg therapy alone will not be sufficient and needs to be combined with other immunomodulatory approaches in order to induce allograft tolerance. PMID:21776332

  16. Genetic control of wayward pluripotent stem cells and their progeny after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Boyer, Julie L; O'Connor, Timothy P; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-04-01

    The proliferative capacity of pluripotent stem cells and their progeny brings a unique aspect to therapeutics, in that once a transplant is initiated the therapist no longer has control of the therapy. In the context of the recent FDA approval of a human ESC trial and report of a neuronal-stem-cell-derived tumor in a human trial, strategies need to be developed to control wayward pluripotent stem cells. Here, we focus on one approach: direct genetic modification of the cells prior to transplantation with genes that can prevent the adverse events and/or eliminate the transplanted cells and their progeny.

  17. The Power and the Promise of Cell Reprogramming: Personalized Autologous Body Organ and Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Ana Belen Alvarez; Lucas, Michaela; Dilley, Rodney J; McLenachan, Samuel; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Requena, Jordi; Sal, Marti Farrera; Lucas, Andrew; Alvarez, Inaki; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Edel, Michael J

    2014-04-04

    Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or direct reprogramming to desired cell types are powerful and new in vitro methods for the study of human disease, cell replacement therapy, and drug development. Both methods to reprogram cells are unconstrained by the ethical and social questions raised by embryonic stem cells. iPSC technology promises to enable personalized autologous cell therapy and has the potential to revolutionize cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. Potential applications of iPSC technology are rapidly increasing in ambition from discrete cell replacement applications to the iPSC assisted bioengineering of body organs for personalized autologous body organ transplant. Recent work has demonstrated that the generation of organs from iPSCs is a future possibility. The development of embryonic-like organ structures bioengineered from iPSCs has been achieved, such as an early brain structure (cerebral organoids), bone, optic vesicle-like structures (eye), cardiac muscle tissue (heart), primitive pancreas islet cells, a tooth-like structure (teeth), and functional liver buds (liver). Thus, iPSC technology offers, in the future, the powerful and unique possibility to make body organs for transplantation removing the need for organ donation and immune suppressing drugs. Whilst it is clear that iPSCs are rapidly becoming the lead cell type for research into cell replacement therapy and body organ transplantation strategies in humans, it is not known whether (1) such transplants will stimulate host immune responses; and (2) whether this technology will be capable of the bioengineering of a complete and fully functional human organ. This review will not focus on reprogramming to iPSCs, of which a plethora of reviews can be found, but instead focus on the latest developments in direct reprogramming of cells, the bioengineering of body organs from iPSCs, and an analysis of the immune response induced by i

  18. Tracking Transplanted Stem Cells Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Nanoparticle Labeling Method in Urology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong J.; Song, Yun Seob

    2015-01-01

    A reliable in vivo imaging method to localize transplanted cells and monitor their viability would enable a systematic investigation of cell therapy. Most stem cell transplantation studies have used immunohistological staining, which does not provide information about the migration of transplanted cells in vivo in the same host. Molecular imaging visualizes targeted cells in a living host, which enables determining the biological processes occurring in transplanted stem cells. Molecular imaging with labeled nanoparticles provides the opportunity to monitor transplanted cells noninvasively without sacrifice and to repeatedly evaluate them. Among several molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution and sensitivity of transplanted cells. MRI is a powerful noninvasive imaging modality with excellent image resolution for studying cellular dynamics. Several types of nanoparticles including superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles have been used to magnetically label stem cells and monitor viability by MRI in the urologic field. This review focuses on the current role and limitations of MRI with labeled nanoparticles for tracking transplanted stem cells in urology. PMID:26413510

  19. T cell tolerance in transplantation: possibilities for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P

    2002-10-01

    It is now possible to induce donor-specific transplantation tolerance in adult rodents using a number of therapeutic strategies. These include the use of non-depleting monoclonal antibodies against T cell co-receptor and costimulation molecules, and immunisation with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells. It is a common finding to all of these models of peripheral tolerance, as well as to various mouse models of autoimmune disease, that regulatory CD4(+) T cells are the principle mediators. There are currently no specific markers for regulatory T cells and their activity has been associated with different T cell subsets defined by the expression of activation markers, such as CD25 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), or anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. Differential gene expression analyses have been used to identify potential new markers for regulatory T cells and to find novel targets for therapeutic manipulation of the immune system. The challenge now is to understand the biological principles that allow such immune reprogramming so that they can be safely applied to clinical situations. PMID:12387682

  20. Racial disparities in hematopoietic cell transplantation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Majhail, N S; Nayyar, S; Santibañez, M E Burton; Murphy, E A; Denzen, E M

    2012-11-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a highly specialized, expensive and resource-intense medical procedure that can be associated with racial disparities. We review the prevailing literature on racial disparities in HCT in the United States and describe areas for future research and interventions. We discuss the complexity of interpreting race as a biological and social determinant of disease in biomedical research, especially as it relates to HCT. In the United States, race is often a surrogate for socioeconomic, education and health insurance status. We also discuss some of the nuances to consider while reviewing the literature on racial disparities. Disparities by race exist in three areas related to HCT: donor availability, access to HCT and outcomes of HCT. African-Americans/Blacks have a lower likelihood of finding an unrelated donor. Race and ethnicity definitions are country-specific and reconciling race data can represent significant challenges to unrelated donor registries worldwide. African-Americans/Blacks do not have the same access to autologous and allogeneic HCT as Whites. Racial disparities in outcomes of HCT are more prevalent among allogeneic HCT than autologous HCT recipients. More research is required to understand the biological, social, cultural, medical and financial aspects of race that may influence access to HCT and survival after transplantation. Better understanding of racial disparities will minimize inequities, inform health policy, guide development of interventions targeted to eliminate disparities and ensure equitable access to HCT for all populations.

  1. Prostaglandin-modulated umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Corey; Multani, Pratik; Robbins, David; Kim, Haesook T; Le, Thuy; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Pelus, Louis M; Desponts, Caroline; Chen, Yi-Bin; Rezner, Betsy; Armand, Philippe; Koreth, John; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T; Alyea, Edwin; Isom, Marlisa; Kao, Grace; Armant, Myriam; Silberstein, Leslie; Hu, Peirong; Soiffer, Robert J; Scadden, David T; Ritz, Jerome; Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E; Mendlein, John; Ballen, Karen; Zon, Leonard I; Antin, Joseph H; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2013-10-24

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a valuable source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for use in allogeneic transplantation. Key advantages of UCB are rapid availability and less stringent requirements for HLA matching. However, UCB contains an inherently limited HSC count, which is associated with delayed time to engraftment, high graft failure rates, and early mortality. 16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) was previously identified to be a critical regulator of HSC homeostasis, and we hypothesized that brief ex vivo modulation with dmPGE2 could improve patient outcomes by increasing the "effective dose" of HSCs. Molecular profiling approaches were used to determine the optimal ex vivo modulation conditions (temperature, time, concentration, and media) for use in the clinical setting. A phase 1 trial was performed to evaluate the safety and therapeutic potential of ex vivo modulation of a single UCB unit using dmPGE2 before reduced-intensity, double UCB transplantation. Results from this study demonstrated clear safety with durable, multilineage engraftment of dmPGE2-treated UCB units. We observed encouraging trends in efficacy, with accelerated neutrophil recovery (17.5 vs 21 days, P = .045), coupled with preferential, long-term engraftment of the dmPGE2-treated UCB unit in 10 of 12 treated participants.

  2. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  3. Dyslipidemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Michelle L; Savani, Bipin N; Boord, Jeffrey B

    2010-08-26

    Currently, approximately 15,000 to 20,000 patients undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually throughout the world, with the number of long-term survivors increasing rapidly. In long-term follow-up after transplantation, the focus of care moves beyond cure of the original disease to the identification and treatment of late effects after HSCT. One of the more serious complications is therapy-related cardiovascular disease. Long-term survivors after HSCT probably have an increased risk of premature cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular complications related to dyslipidemia and other risk factors account for a significant proportion of late nonrelapse morbidity and mortality. This review addresses the risk and causes of dyslipidemia and impact on cardiovascular complications after HSCT. Immunosuppressive therapy, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and other long-term complications influence the management of dyslipidemia. There are currently no established guidelines for evaluation and management of dyslipidemia in HSCT patients; in this review, we have summarized our suggested approach in the HSCT population.

  4. Clinical guide to fertility preservation in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, S; Savani, BN; Chow, EJ; Gilleece, MH; Halter, J; Jacobsohn, DA; Pidala, J; Quinn, GP; Cahn, J-Y; Jakubowski, AA; Kamani, NR; Lazarus, HM; Rizzo, JD; Schouten, HC; Socie, G; Stratton, P; Sorror, ML; Warwick, AB; Wingard, JR; Loren, AW; Majhail, NS

    2014-01-01

    With broadening indications, more options for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and improvement in survival, the number of long-term HCT survivors is expected to increase steadily. Infertility is a frequent problem that long-term HCT survivors and their partners face and it can negatively impact on the quality of life. The most optimal time to address fertility issues is before the onset of therapy for the underlying disease; however, fertility preservation should also be addressed before HCT in all children and patients of reproductive age, with referral to a reproductive specialist for patients interested in fertility preservation. In vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation and ovarian tissue banking are acceptable methods for fertility preservation in adult women/pubertal females. Sperm banking is the preferred method for adult men/pubertal males. Frequent barriers to fertility preservation in HCT recipients may include the perception of lack of time to preserve fertility given an urgency to move ahead with transplant, lack of patient–physician discussion because of several factors (for example, time constraints, lack of knowledge), inadequate access to reproductive specialists, and costs and lack of insurance coverage for fertility preservation. There is a need to raise awareness in the medical community about fertility preservation in HCT recipients. PMID:24419521

  5. Endocrinopathies after allogeneic and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Orio, Francesco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90-99% of women and 60-90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40-50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  6. Autologous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Kidney Transplantation: A Pilot Study of Safety and Clinical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Perico, Norberto; Casiraghi, Federica; Introna, Martino; Gotti, Eliana; Todeschini, Marta; Cavinato, Regiane Aparecida; Capelli, Chiara; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cassis, Paola; Rizzo, Paola; Cortinovis, Monica; Marasà, Maddalena; Golay, Josee; Noris, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) abrogate alloimmune response in vitro, suggesting a novel cell-based approach in transplantation. Moving this concept toward clinical application in organ transplantation should be critically assessed. Design, setting, participants & measurements A safety and clinical feasibility study (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00752479) of autologous MSC infusion was conducted in two recipients of kidneys from living-related donors. Patients were given T cell–depleting induction therapy and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. On day 7 posttransplant, MSCs were administered intravenously. Clinical and immunomonitoring of MSC-treated patients was performed up to day 360 postsurgery. Results Serum creatinine levels increased 7 to 14 days after cell infusion in both MSC-treated patients. A graft biopsy in patient 2 excluded acute graft rejection, but showed a focal inflammatory infiltrate, mostly granulocytes. In patient 1 protocol biopsy at 1-year posttransplant showed a normal graft. Both MSC-treated patients are in good health with stable graft function. A progressive increase of the percentage of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127− Treg and a marked inhibition of memory CD45RO+RA−CD8+ T cell expansion were observed posttransplant. Patient T cells showed a profound reduction of CD8+ T cell activity. Conclusions Findings from this study in the two patients show that MSC infusion in kidney transplant recipients is feasible, allows enlargement of Treg in the peripheral blood, and controls memory CD8+ T cell function. Future clinical trials with MSCs to look with the greatest care for unwanted side effects is advised. PMID:20930086

  7. Comparison of therapeutic characteristics of islet cell transplantation simultaneous with pancreatic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in rats with Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Ilknur Ozturk; Ginis, Zeynep; Pinarli, Ferda Alparslan; Albayrak, Aynur; Cakal, Erman; Sahin, Mustafa; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2015-06-01

    Although, pancreas islet call transplantation is a new, promising method for type 1 diabetic patients, it remains as an experimental procedure applied in selected patients. The present study aimed to investigate effect of pancreatic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation simultaneous with islet cell transplantation on islet liveliness and thus on the treatment of diabetes in type 1 diabetic rats. The study used Wistar Albino Rats and was performed in a total of four groups [control (G1), mesenchymal stem cell (G2), islet (G3) and islet + mesencymal stem cell (G4)] each including 8 rats. Blood glucose level of the rats, in which diabetes model has been created using streptozotocin, was measured after 72 h. Blood samples were obtained from the rats 30 days after transplantation and then, their livers and pancreases were kept in 10% formaldehyde and the experiment was ended. Following staining with H&E, they were morphologically evaluated under a light microscope. Change in mean blood glucose level was statistically significant in G3 and G4 versus G1 and G2 (p = 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001 respectively). Histological examination revealed that mean number of islet cells in the pancreases of the rats was higher in G4; difference between the groups was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Transplantation of islet cells together with mesenchymal stem cells showed beneficial effects in terms of prolonging survival of islet grafts suggesting that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells together with islet cells during clinical islet transplantation may be beneficial in increasing the number of noninsulin-dependent patients in Type 1 diabetes.

  8. Isolation and transplantation of corneal endothelial cell-like cells derived from in-vitro-differentiated human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Pang, Kunpeng; Wu, Xinyi

    2014-06-15

    The maintenance of corneal dehydration and transparency depends on barrier and pump functions of corneal endothelial cells (CECs). The human CECs have no proliferation capacity in vivo and the ability to divide in vitro under culture conditions is dramatically limited. Thus, the acquisition of massive cells analogous to normal human CECs is extremely necessary whether from the perspective of cellular basic research or from clinical applications. Here we report the derivation of CEC-like cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) through the periocular mesenchymal precursor (POMP) phase. Using the transwell coculture system of hESCs with differentiated human corneal stromal cells, we induced hESCs to differentiate into POMPs. Then, CEC-like cells were derived from POMPs with lens epithelial cell-conditioned medium. Within 1 week, CEC-like cells that expressed the corneal endothelium (CE) differentiation marker N-cadherin and transcription factors FoxC1 and Pitx2 were detectable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based isolation of the N-cadherin/vimentin dual-positive population enriches for CEC-like cells. The isolated CEC-like cells were labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFDA SE) and seeded onto posterior acellular porcine corneal matrix lamellae to construct the CEC-like cell sheets. Pump function parameters of the CEC-like cell sheets approximated those of human donor corneas. Importantly, when the CEC-like cell sheets were transplanted into the eyes of rabbit CE dysfunction models, the corneal transparency was restored gradually. In conclusion, CEC-like cells derived from hESCs displayed characteristics of native human CECs. This renewable source of human CECs offers massive cells for further studies of human CEC biological characteristics and potential applications of replacement therapies as substitution for donor CECs in the future. PMID:24499373

  9. Concise review: transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells for treating limbal stem cell deficiency-current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-06-01

    A number of diseases and external factors can deplete limbal stem cells, causing pain and visual loss. Ten years have passed since the first transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells in humans, representing the first autologous cell-based therapy for severe bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Its steady increase in popularity since then can be attributed to the accumulating evidence of its efficacy in reverting limbal stem cell deficiency. In this review, the focus is on clinical, and to a lesser degree laboratory, features of cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplants over the past 10 years. Comparisons with other available technologies are made. Avenues for research to stimulate further improvements in clinical results and allow worldwide distribution of limbal stem cell therapy based on oral mucosal cells are discussed. These include storage and transportation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial sheets and in vivo culture of oral mucosal epithelial cells.

  10. Phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes during post-transplant adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Erbacher, Annika; Haufe, Susanne; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hofbeck, Michael; Kerst, Gunter

    2015-05-01

    Phagocytosis of granulocytes and monocytes presents a major mechanism that contributes to the clearance of pathogens and cell debris. We analyzed the phagocytic activity of the peripheral blood cell monocytes, three monocyte subpopulations and granulocytes before and up to one year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as well as during transplant-related adverse events. 25 pediatric patients and young adults (median age of 11.0 years) with hemato-oncological malignancies and non malignancies were enrolled in the prospective study. Ingestion of fluorescence-labeled Escherichia coli bacteria was used to assess the phagocytic activity of monocytes and their subpopulations and granulocytes by means of flow cytometry in the patient group as well as in a control group (n=36). During sepsis, a significant increase of phagocytic activity of monocytes (P=0.0003) and a significant decrease of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes (P=0.0003) and the CD14+ CD16++ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0020) occurred. At the onset of a veno-occlusive disease, a significant increase of phagocytic activity in the CD14++ CD16+ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.001) and a significant decrease in the phagocytic activity of the CD14++ CD16- monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0048) were observed. In conclusion, the phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes might be a useful and easy determinable parameter that enables identification of post-transplant complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The alterations of phagocytic activity contribute to the altered immune response that accompanies adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  11. Hydroxyurea treatment for sickle cell disease: impact on haematopoietic stem cell transplantation's outcome.

    PubMed

    Brachet, C; Azzi, N; Demulder, A; Devalck, C; Gourdin, A; Gulbis, B; Klein, A; Le, P Q; Loop, M; Sariban, E; Ferster, A

    2004-04-01

    Since 1988, 24 children have undergone haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for severe sickle cell disease (SCD) in our unit, 13 being grafted after having been exposed to hydroxyurea (HU) to control SCD-related complications. Different pre-transplant conditioning regimens were given over time: Bu14/Cy200 in six patients (group 1), Bu16/Cy200/antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in five (group 2) and Bu16/Cy200/ATG with HU prior to HSCT in 13 (group 3). The aim of this study is to compare the outcome after HSCT of these groups of patients, which differ according to pre-transplant drug exposure. Overall, 20 of the 24 transplanted children had stable engraftment and have remained free of SCD-related symptoms after HSCT; 19 of them are currently alive and cured of SCD. In group 1 (HU-, ATG-), we observed one unexplainable late death, one absent engraftment, one late rejection and one mixed stable chimerism. In group 2 (HU-, ATG+), we observed the absence of engraftment in two patients and one early rejection. In group 3 (HU+, ATG+), we observed no cases of either absent engraftment, mixed stable chimerism or late rejection. In our experience, pre-transplant treatment with HU seems to be associated with a lower incidence of rejection/absent engraftment in severe SCD patients. These results need to be confirmed with a larger number of patients. PMID:14767501

  12. Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Refractory Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Outcome by Intensity of Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Veys, Paul A.; Nanduri, Vasanta; Baker, K. Scott; He, Wensheng; Bandini, Giuseppe; Biondi, Andrea; Dalissier, Arnaud; Davis, Jeffrey H.; Eames, Gretchen M.; Egeler, R. Maarten; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fischer, Alain; Jürgens, Herbert; Krance, Robert; Lanino, Edoardo; Leung, Wing H.; Matthes, Susanne; Michel, Gérard; Orchard, Paul J.; Pieczonka, Anna; Ringdén, Olle; Schlegel, Paul G.; Sirvent, Anne; Vettenranta, Kim; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) refractory to conventional chemotherapy have a poor outcome. There are currently two promising treatment strategies for high-risk patients: the first involves the combination of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine and cytarbine; the other approach is allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here we evaluated 87 patients with high-risk LCH who were transplanted between 1990–2013. Prior to the year 2000, most patients underwent HSCT following myeloablative conditioning (MAC): only 5 of 20 patients (25%) survived with a high rate (55%) of transplant-related mortality (TRM). After the year 2000 an increasing number of patients underwent HSCT with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC): 49/67 (73%) patients survived, however, the improved survival was not overtly achieved by the introduction of RIC regimens with similar 3-year probability of survival after MAC (77%) and RIC transplantation (71%). There was no significant difference in TRM by conditioning regimen intensity but relapse rates were higher after RIC compared to MAC regimens (28% vs. 8%, p=0.02), although most patients relapsing after RIC transplantation could be salvaged with further chemotherapy. HSCT may be a curative approach in 3 out of 4 patients with high risk LCH refractory to chemotherapy: the optimal choice of HSCT conditioning remains uncertain. PMID:25817915

  13. Some aspects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: advances and controversy

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders. MDS remains a disease of elderly patients; moreover, the incidence of high risk MDS is proportionally greater in elderly patients, with increased frequency of secondary acute myeloid leukemia, as well as adverse cytogenetic abnormalities. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic approach with known curative potential for patients with MDS that allows the achievement of long-term disease control. Numerous controversies still exist regarding transplantation in MDS: timing of transplantation, disease status at transplantation and comorbidity, conditioning intensity, pretransplant therapy, and stem cell source. Various transplant modalities of different intensities and alternative donor sources are now in use. Current advances in transplant technology are allowing the consideration of older patients. This should result in a greater number of older patients benefiting from this potentially curative treatment modality. Despite advances in transplantation technology, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality associated with this approach. Nevertheless, with the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning and thereby reduced early mortality, transplant numbers in MDS patients have significantly increased. Moreover, recent new developments with innovative drugs, including hypomethylating agents, have extended the therapeutic alternatives for MDS patients. Hypomethylating agents allow the delay of allogeneic stem cell transplantation by serving as an effective and well-tolerated means to reduce disease burden. PMID:25506229

  14. Intrastriatal transplantation of neurotrophic factor-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells improves motor function and extends survival in R6/2 transgenic mouse model for Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sadan, Ofer; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell-based treatment for Huntington's disease (HD) is an expanding field of research. Although various stem cells have been shown to be beneficial in vivo, no long standing clinical effect has been demonstrated. To address this issue, we are developing a stem cell-based therapy designed to improve the microenvironment of the diseased tissue via delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Previously, we established that bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be differentiated using medium based cues into NTF-secreting cells (NTF+ cells) that express astrocytic markers. NTF+ cells were shown to alleviate neurodegeneration symptoms in several disease models in vitro and in vivo, including the model for excitotoxicity. In the present study, we explored if the timing of intrastriatal transplantation of hNTF+ cells into the R6/2 transgenic mouse model for HD influences motor function and survival. One hundred thousand cells were transplanted bilaterally into the striatum of immune-suppressed mice at 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5 weeks of age. Contrary to our expectations, early transplantation of NTF+ cells did not improve motor function or overall survival. However, late (6.5 weeks) transplantation resulted in a temporary improvement in motor function and an extension of life span relative to that observed for PBS treated mice. We conclude that late transplantation of NTF+ cells induces a beneficial effect in this transgenic model for HD. Since no transplanted NTF+ cells could be detected in vivo, we suspect that the temporary nature of the beneficial effect is due to poor survival of transplanted cells. In general, we submit that NTF+ cells should be further evaluated for the therapy of HD. PMID:22953237

  15. Augmentation of Neovascularizaiton in Hindlimb Ischemia by Combined Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Endothelial and Mural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Homma, Koichiro; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Park, Kwijun; Oyamada, Naofumi; Sawada, Naoya; Taura, Daisuke; Fukunaga, Yasutomo; Tamura, Naohisa; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2008-01-01

    Background We demonstrated that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells-derived vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2) positive cells could differentiate into both endothelial cells (EC) and mural cells (MC), and termed them as vascular progenitor cells (VPC). Recently, we have established a method to expand monkey and human ES cells-derived VPC with the proper differentiation stage in a large quantity. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of human VPC-derived EC and MC for vascular regeneration. Methods and Results After the expansion of human VPC-derived vascular cells, we transplanted these cells to nude mice with hindlimb ischemia. The blood flow recovery and capillary density in ischemic hindlimbs were significantly improved in human VPC-derived EC-transplanted mice, compared to human peripheral and umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (pEPC and uEPC) transplanted mice. The combined transplantation of human VPC-derived EC and MC synergistically improved blood flow of ischemic hindlimbs remarkably, compared to the single cell transplantations. Transplanted VPC-derived vascular cells were effectively incorporated into host circulating vessels as EC and MC to maintain long-term vascular integrity. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the combined transplantation of human ES cells-derived EC and MC can be used as a new promising strategy for therapeutic vascular regeneration in patients with tissue ischemia. PMID:18301744

  16. Intracerebral transplants of primary muscle cells: a potential 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    After the transplantation of rat primary muscle cells into the caudate or cortex of recipient rats, the muscle cells were able to persist for at least 6 months. Muscle cells transfected with expression plasmids prior to transplantation were able to express reporter genes in the brains for at least 2 months. These results suggest that muscle cells might be a useful 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain.

  17. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for GATA2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Hsu, Amy P.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Calvo, Katherine R.; Wilder, Jennifer; Kurlander, Roger; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Holland, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    We performed nonmyeloablative HSCT in 6 patients with a newly described genetic immunodeficiency syndrome caused by mutations in GATA2—a disease characterized by nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, monocytopenia, B- and NK-cell deficiency, and the propensity to transform to myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelogenous leukemia. Two patients received peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from matched-related donors, 2 received PBSCs from matched-unrelated donors, and 2 received stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) donors. Recipients of matched-related and -unrelated donors received fludarabine and 200 cGy of total body irradiation (TBI); UCB recipients received cyclophosphamide in addition to fludarabine and TBI as conditioning. All patients received tacrolimus and sirolimus posttransplantation. Five patients were alive at a median follow-up of 17.4 months (range, 10-25). All patients achieved high levels of donor engraftment in the hematopoietic compartments that were deficient pretransplantation. Adverse events consisted of delayed engraftment in the recipient of a single UCB, GVHD in 4 patients, and immune-mediated pancytopenia and nephrotic syndrome in the recipient of a double UCB transplantation. Nonmyeloablative HSCT in GATA2 deficiency results in reconstitution of the severely deficient monocyte, B-cell, and NK-cell populations and reversal of the clinical phenotype. Registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00923364. PMID:21816832

  18. Outcomes in relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Pablo; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Garcia, Maria Jose; Sarmiento, Mauricio; Ernst, Daniel; Jara, Veronica; Bertin, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hodgkin's lymphoma is a highly curable disease. Autologous and reduced intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations are alternatives to treat relapsed patients. Here, we report on the results of one service using these procedures. Methods All patients who underwent transplantations in our institution between 1996 and 2014 were retrospectively studied and demographics, toxicities and survival rate were analyzed. Results This study evaluated 24 autologous and five reduced intensity allogeneic transplantations: the median ages of the patients were 29 and 32 years, respectively. At the time of autologous transplantation, ten patients were in complete remission, nine had chemosensitive disease but were not in complete remission, three had refractory disease and the status of two is unknown. In the allogeneic group, two were in complete remission and three had chemosensitive disease. The 5-year overall survival after autologous transplantation was 42% (66% patients were in complete remission, 37% had chemosensitive disease with incomplete remission and 0% had refractory disease) and 1-year overall survival after allogeneic transplantation was 80%. Transplant-related mortality was 0% in patients conditioned with the ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide (ICE), carmustine/etoposide/cyclophosphamide (BEC) and carmustine/etoposide/cytarabine/melphalan (BEAM) regimens, 37% in patients conditioned with busulfan-based regimens and 20% in allogeneic transplantations. Conclusions Hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma is a potentially curative procedure especially in patients in complete remission at the time of autologous transplantations, and possibly after allogeneic transplantations. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of allogeneic transplantations in the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:26041421

  19. Early establishment of hematopoietic chimerism following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in comparison with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, S; Zeng, W; Yamazaki, H; Wang, H; Takami, A; Sugimori, N; Miura, Y; Shiobara, S; Matsuda, T; Shinagawa, Y; Harada, M

    1999-04-01

    To characterize the process of the establishment of complete chimerism after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT), we determined the origin of leukocytes in peripheral blood (PB) obtained from 23 patients in the very early period after allo-PBSCT using amplification of mini- or microsatellite regions of genomic DNA. Donor-specific alleles were amplified from the PB obtained at day 8 post-transplant for 19 allo-PBSCT patients. Among the 19 patients, 12 showed only donor-specific alleles (complete chimerism) while 7 did both donor and host-specific alleles (mixed chimerism). Although donor specific alleles were amplified in 10 of 12 patients who received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) similarly to allo-PBSCT, all of these ten showed mixed chimerism. When the chimeric state was examined in PB samples obtained serially at 2-3-day intervals post-transplant, host-specific alleles in allo-PBSCT patients were not detectable in the PB much earlier than those in allo-BMT patients. These findings indicate that the appearance of donor-derived cells associated with the disappearance of host-derived cells in the circulation occurs earlier after allo-PBSCT as compared with allo-BMT, leading to the rapid establishment of complete chimerism.

  20. Transplant services

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseased body part with a healthy one. SOLID ORGAN TRANSPLANTS Auto islet cell transplant is done after a ... selected experts, including: Surgeons who specialize in performing ... doctors Radiologists and medical imaging technologists Nurses ...

  1. Novel Strategies for the Improvement of Stem Cells' Transplantation in Degenerative Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nicoară, Simona Delia; Șușman, Sergiu; Tudoran, Oana; Bărbos, Otilia; Cherecheș, Gabriela; Aștilean, Simion; Potara, Monica; Sorițău, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no cure for the permanent vision loss caused by degenerative retinal diseases. One of the novel therapeutic strategies aims at the development of stem cells (SCs) based neuroprotective and regenerative medicine. The main sources of SCs for the treatment of retinal diseases are the embryo, the bone marrow, the region of neuronal genesis, and the eye. The success of transplantation depends on the origin of cells, the route of administration, the local microenvironment, and the proper combinative formula of growth factors. The feasibility of SCs based therapies for degenerative retinal diseases was proved in the preclinical setting. However, their translation into the clinical realm is limited by various factors: the immunogenicity of the cells, the stability of the cell phenotype, the predilection of SCs to form tumors in situ, the abnormality of the microenvironment, and the association of a synaptic rewiring. To improve SCs based therapies, nanotechnology offers a smart delivery system for biomolecules, such as growth factors for SCs implantation and differentiation into retinal progenitors. This review explores the main advances in the field of retinal transplantology and applications of nanotechnology in the treatment of retinal diseases, discusses the challenges, and suggests new therapeutic approaches in retinal transplantation. PMID:27293444

  2. Results of a phase I/II clinical trial: standardized, non-xenogenic, cultivated limbal stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine if a standardized, non-xenogenic, reduced manipulation cultivation and surgical transplantation of limbal stem cell grafts is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with total and partial limbal stem cell deficiency. Methods In vitro cellular outgrowth and phenotype of the limbal epithelial cell and composite grafts were validated using a new protocol. Patients received either autologous (n = 15) or allogenic (n = 3) explants cultured using a standardized protocol free from xenogenic products. The resulting grafts were transplanted using a reduced manipulation surgical technique. Results The majority of cells (>50%) displayed a progenitor phenotype typified by positive immunofluorescence for ∆Np63, CK14 and ABCG2 and low immunofluorescence for CK3/12 and desmoglein 3 proteins. The surgical protocol was designed to minimize manipulation and the graft itself was secured without sutures. The transplant recipients were followed for a mean of 24 months. Twelve of the 18 transplant recipients were graded as anatomically successful (67%), based on the defined success parameters. There was a significant reduction in corneal neovascularization, which was accompanied by an improvement in pain though not photophobia or central corneal opacity post transplant. The transplantation protocol showed no measureable effect on visual acuity. Conclusion We conclude that this standardized culture system and surgical approach is safe and effective in reducing corneal neovascularization. The technique is free from animal contaminants and maintains a large proportion of progenitor cells. Although this technique did not improve visual function, restoring a functional epithelial cell layer and reducing corneal neovascularization provides an improved platform for a penetrating keratoplasty to ultimately improve visual function. PMID:24589151

  3. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in de novo liver regeneration in liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Gyu; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Je; Lee, Ji Yoon; Park, Soon-Jung; Chung, Hyung-Min; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Hojong; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2015-09-01

    The study was designed (1) to examine the hypothesis that circulating progenitor cells play a role in the process of de novo regeneration in human liver transplants and that these cells arise from a cell population originating in, or associated with, the bone marrow and (2) to investigate whether the transplanted liver volume has an effect on the circulating recipient-derived progenitor cells that generate hepatocytes during this process. Clinical data and liver tissue characteristics were analyzed in male individuals who underwent sex-mismatched adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation using dual left lobe grafts. Dual left lobe grafts were examined at the time of transplantation and 19 to 27 days after transplantation. All recipients showed recovery of normal liver function and a significant increase in the volume of the engrafted left lobes after transplantation. Double staining for a Y-chromosome probe and the CD31 antigen showed the presence of hybrid vessels composed of recipient-derived cells and donor cells within the transplanted liver tissues. Furthermore, CD34-expressing cells were observed commingling with Y-chromosome+ cells. The ratio of recipient-derived vessels and the number of Y+ CD34+ cells tended to be higher when smaller graft volumes underwent transplantation. These findings suggest that the recruitment of circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells could contribute to vessel formation and de novo regeneration in human liver transplants. Moreover, graft volume may be an important determinant for the active mobilization of circulating recipient-derived progenitor cells and their contribution to liver regeneration.

  4. Nanoparticle-based monitoring of cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenjie; Mu, Luye; Roes, Isaac; Miranda-Nieves, David; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Ankrum, James A; Zhao, Weian; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous cell therapy aims to replace/repair diseased or dysfunctional cells and promises to revolutionize medicine by restoring tissue and organ function. To develop effective cell therapy, the location, distribution and long-term persistence of transplanted cells must be evaluated. Nanoparticle (NP) based imaging technologies have the potential to track transplanted cells non-invasively. Here we summarize the most recent advances in NP-based cell tracking with emphasis on (1) the design criteria for cell tracking NPs, (2) protocols for cell labeling, (3) a comparison of available imaging modalities and their corresponding contrast agents, (4) a summary of preclinical studies on NP-based cell tracking and finally (5) perspectives and future directions. PMID:22101191

  5. Peri-Transplant Psychosocial Factors and Neutrophil Recovery following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jennifer M.; Moynihan, Jan A.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.; Xia, Yinglin; Tu, Xin; Messing, Susan; Hunter, Bryan C.; Huang, Li-Shan; Obi, Rosemary O.; Gaisser, D'Arcy; Liesveld, Jane L.; Sahler, Olle Jane Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multiple psychosocial factors appear to affect cancer progression in various populations; however, research investigating the relationship between psychosocial factors and outcomes following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is scarce. Subject to adverse immunological and psychological conditions, HCT patients may be especially vulnerable to psychosomatic health sequelae; therefore, we studied whether optimism and anxiety influence the pertinent clinical outcome of days to neutrophil engraftment (DTE). Method 54 adults undergoing either autologous or allogeneic HCT completed self-report questionnaires measuring optimism and anxiety. We assessed the association between these psychosocial variables and DTE. Results Greater optimism and less anxiety were associated with the favorable outcome of fewer DTE in autologous HCT recipients, though this relationship was no longer significant when reducing the sample size to only subjects who filled out their baseline survey by the time of engraftment. Conclusion Our findings are suggestive that optimism and anxiety may be associated with time to neutrophil recovery in autologous, but not allogeneic, adult HCT recipients. Further investigation in larger, more homogeneous subjects with consistent baseline sampling is warranted. PMID:24915544

  6. The origin of biliary ductular cells that appear in the spleen after transplantation of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kenji; Sugihara, Ayako; Nakasho, Keiji; Tsujimura, Tohru; Yamada, Naoko; Okaya, Atsuhito; Sakagami, Masafumi; Terada, Nobuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Transplantation of rat hepatocytes into the syngeneic rat spleen results in the appearance of cytokeration (CK)-19-positive biliary cells that form ductules. The exact origin of CK-19-positive cells is not known and the possibility that they are derived from biliary cells or precursors of oval cells in transplanted hepatocyte preparations has been raised. In the present study, we found that the number of CK-19-positive biliary cells increased rapidly after transplantation of hepatocytes, reached the maximum at 4 weeks, and then gradually decreased. However, a Ki-67 labeling index of CK-19-positive biliary cells was low and showed no significant changes throughout the experimental period. In addition, no or few CK-19-positive cells appeared in the spleen after transplantation of nonparenchymal liver cells enriched with biliary cells. These results showed that biliary cells were not the source of CK-19-positive cells in the spleen. Impairment of precursors of oval cells in the liver by administration of 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane 24 h before transplantation of hepatocytes did not prevent the appearance of CK-19-positive biliary cells in the spleen. Moreover, transplantation of nonparenchymal cells carrying an increased number of oval cells by means of treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial hepatectomy resulted in no appearance of CK-19-positive biliary cells in the spleen. These results ruled out oval cells as the origin of CK-19-positive biliary cells in the spleen. Because CK-19-positive biliary cells appeared in the spleen only when hepatocyte fractions were transplanted, we suggest transdifferentiation of heptocytes may be the mechanism by which CK-19-positive biliary cells are generated.

  7. Treatment of multiple sclerosis by transplantation of neural stem cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cao, Jiani; Li, Xiaoyan; Xu, Haoyu; Wang, Weixu; Wang, Libin; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Li, Wei; Jiao, Jianwei; Hu, Baoyang; Zhou, Qi; Zhao, Tongbiao

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), with focal T lymphocytic infiltration and damage of myelin and axons. The underlying mechanism of pathogenesis remains unclear and there are currently no effective treatments. The development of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation provides a promising strategy to treat neurodegenerative disease. However, the limited availability of NSCs prevents their application in neural disease therapy. In this study, we generated NSCs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and transplanted these cells into mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. The results showed that transplantation of iPSC-derived NSCs dramatically reduced T cell infiltration and ameliorated white matter damage in the treated EAE mice. Correspondingly, the disease symptom score was greatly decreased, and motor ability was dramatically rescued in the iPSC-NSC-treated EAE mice, indicating the effectiveness of using iPSC-NSCs to treat MS. Our study provides pre-clinical evidence to support the feasibility of treating MS by transplantation of iPSC-derived NSCs. PMID:27233903

  8. Stem cell transplantation improves aging-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ikehara, Susumu; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process of damage accumulation, and has been viewed as experimentally and medically intractable. The number of patients with age-associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, atherosclerosis, and cancer has increased recently. Aging-related diseases are related to a deficiency of the immune system, which results from an aged thymus and bone marrow cells. Intra bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) is a useful method to treat intractable diseases. This review summarizes findings that IBM-BMT can improve and treat aging-related diseases, including T2DM, osteoporosis and AD, in animal models. PMID:25364723

  9. Bullous pemphigoid after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Keisuke; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kobayashi, Chie; Iijima, Shigeruko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Tsuchida, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune skin disorder characterized by subepidermal blisters due to deposit of autoantibody against dermal basement membrane protein. It has been reported that BP can occur after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe a patient with BP having autoantibody against BP180 after unrelated-donor HSCT against T lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated with steroid leading to complete resolution of BP, but T lymphoblastic leukemia progressed rapidly after steroid hormone treatment. Given that immunosuppressant may reduce graft-versus-tumor effect, immunomodulatory agents such as nicotinamide and tetracycline, erythromycin, and immunoglobulin may be appropriate as soon as typical blister lesions are seen after HSCT. PMID:26113316

  10. Cellular therapy following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective approach for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse remains the most common cause of death after allogeneic HSCT, and the prognosis of relapsed disease is poor for most patients. Induction of a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL), or graft-versus-tumor, effect through the use of donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), or donor lymphocyte infusion, has been remarkably successful for relapsed chronic myelogenous leukemia. Unfortunately, response to DLI in other hematologic malignancies is much less common and depends on many factors including histology, pace and extent of relapse, and time from HSCT to relapse. Furthermore, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is common after DLI and often limits successful immunotherapy. Ultimately, manipulations to minimize GVHD while preserving or enhancing GVL are necessary to improve outcomes for relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:23556106

  11. Improving Outcome of Thalassemia with Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplantation: An Experience of Gujarat Cancer Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Raut, Shreeniwas; Shah, Sandip; Shah, Kamalesh; Patel, Kinnari; Talati, Shailesh; Parikh, Sonia; Anand, Asha; Panchal, Harsha; Patel, Apurva

    2016-09-01

    Total 26 children of thalassemia underwent hematopoetic stem cell transplantation from September 2006 to December 2014. Out of these 17 were matched sibling transplantation (MST) and 9 were unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCT). Median age was 4 years. At a median follow up of 46.5 months, 12 of 17 (70 %) MST and 3 out of 9 (33.33 %) UCT were cured of thalassemia. Three (11.53 %) patients died due to transplant related mortality. Average cost of MST was 6 lakhs and that of UCT was 20 lakhs. PMID:27429520

  12. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Annaloro, Claudio; Onida, Francesco; Lambertenghi Deliliers, Giorgio

    2009-12-01

    The term 'autoimmune diseases' encompasses a spectrum of diseases whose clinical manifestations and, possibly, biological features vary widely. The results of conventional treatment are considered unsatisfactory in aggressive forms, with subsets of patients having short life expectancies. Relying on wide experimental evidence and more feeble clinical data, some research groups have used autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in the most disabling autoimmune diseases with the aim of resetting the patient's immune system. Immunoablative conditioning regimens are preferred over their myeloablative counterparts, and some form of in vivo and/or ex vivo T-cell depletion is generally adopted. Despite 15 years' experience, published controlled clinical trials are still lacking, with the evidence so far available coming from pilot studies and registry surveys. In multiple sclerosis, clinical improvement, or at least lasting disease stabilization, can be achieved in the majority of the patients; nevertheless, the worst results are observed in patients with progressive disease, where no benefit can be expected from conventional therapy. Concerning rheumatologic diseases, wide experience has been acquired in systemic sclerosis, with long-term improvements in cutaneous disease being frequently reported, although visceral involvement remains unchanged at best. Autografting has proved to be barely effective in rheumatoid arthritis and quite toxic in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whereas it leads to clinical remission and the reversal of visceral impairment in the majority of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. A promising indication is Crohn's disease, in which long-term endoscopic remission is frequently observed. Growing experience with autologous HCST in autoimmune diseases has progressively reduced concerns about transplant-related mortality and secondary myelodysplasia/leukemia. Therefore, a sustained complete remission seems to be within the

  13. Orthotopic liver transplantation in liver-based metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Mowat, A P

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in the management of more common liver-based metabolic disorders associated with severe liver damage, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (PIZZ), Wilson disease and tyrosinaemia has been demonstrated and indications defined. An early mortality in excess of 15% and finite resources limit its use. Phenotypic heterogeneity make the precise indication in other disorders less certain. In disorders in which endstage liver disease is less frequent such as cystic fibrosis, haemochromatosis and galacosaemia it has been a very effective therapy. It has been used with encouraging results in disorders in which the liver is structurally normal such as Crigler-Najjar type I, primary hyperoxaluria type I and primary hypercholesterolaemia. In these it should be performed before there is permanent damage to brain, kidneys or heart. OLT in the short term prevents hyperammonaemic coma in urea cycle defects and may prevent extrahepatic disease in glycogen storage disease type IV. Its limitation in reversing all metabolic effects in these and other disorders is discussed. It is ineffective in protoporphyria or Niemann Pick disease type II (Sea Blue Histiocyte syndrome) in which the transplanted liver acquires the lesions of the initial disorder and extrahepatic features progress. Early referral provides optimum circumstances to assess the benefits of OLT as compared with those of other forms of management and to achieve transplantation at the ideal time. The place of OLT in management will require constant review as metabolic disorders are better defined, new forms of therapy evolve and as techniques of liver transplantation and modes of immunosuppression improve.

  14. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder in transplant recipients: a report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Katkoori, Devendar; Cohen, Brian L.; Soloway, Mark S.; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2010-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the urinary bladder is a rare disease accounting for 0.5% to 0.7% of all primary bladder cancers. Transplant recipients are a special subset of patients with increased risk for various urologic malignancies, including transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. However, to the best of our knowledge, a SCC of the urinary bladder has not been reported in transplant recipients. We report what we believe are the first 2 reported cases of transplant recipients with SCC of the bladder. Small cell carcinoma was diagnosed 5 years after transplantation in both patients and they died due to metastatic SCC. Our report emphasizes the highly aggressive nature of SCC and also the rapid progression seen in transplant recipients. PMID:20174486

  15. Is there still a role for allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed Central

    Bensinger, William I.

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in survival for multiple myeloma patients through autologous stem-cell transplantation (SCT) and the introduction of novel drugs, the disease remains incurable for all but a small fraction of patients. Only allogeneic SCT is potentially curative, due in part to a graft-versus-myeloma effect. High transplant-related mortality with allogeneic SCT is currently the major limitation to wider use of this potentially curative modality. Mortality can be reduced through the use of lower-intensity conditioning regimens which allow engraftment of allogeneic stem cells, but this comes at a cost of higher rates of disease progression and relapse. Promising studies to improve outcomes of allogeneic transplants include the use of more intensive non-myeloablative conditioning regimens, tandem transplants, peripheral blood cells, graft engineering to improve the graft-versus-myeloma activity while reducing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), post-transplant maintenance, and targeted conditioning therapies such as bone-seeking radioisotopes. PMID:18070719

  16. Preventing stem cell transplantation-associated viral infections using T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic malignancies and genetic diseases. However, viral infections continue to account for substantial post-transplant morbidity and mortality. While antiviral drugs are available against some viruses, they are associated with significant side effects and are frequently ineffective. This review focuses on the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been used to prevent and treat infections over the past 20 years and outlines different refinements that have been introduced with the goal of moving this therapy beyond specialized academic centers. PMID:26250410

  17. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26759047

  18. A novel method of mouse ex utero transplantation of hepatic progenitor cells into the fetal liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, Mima; Asahina, Kinji; Iseki, Sachiko Teramoto, Kenichi; Nishida, Tomohiro; Shimizu-Saito, Keiko; Ota, Masato; Eto, Kazuhiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2009-04-03

    Avoiding the limitations of the adult liver niche, transplantation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells into fetal liver is desirable to analyze immature cells in a hepatic developmental environment. Here, we established a new monitor tool for cell fate of hepatic progenitor cells transplanted into the mouse fetal liver by using ex utero surgery. When embryonic day (ED) 14.5 hepatoblasts were injected into the ED14.5 fetal liver, the transplanted cells expressed albumin abundantly or {alpha}-fetoprotein weakly, and contained glycogen in the neonatal liver, indicating that transplanted hepatoblasts can proliferate and differentiate in concord with surrounding recipient parenchymal cells. The transplanted cells became mature in the liver of 6-week-old mice. Furthermore, this method was applicable to transplantation of hepatoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. These data indicate that this unique technique will provide a new in vivo experimental system for studying cell fate of hepatic stem/progenitor cells and liver organogenesis.

  19. Recommended Screening and Preventive Practices for Long-term Survivors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Lee, Stephanie J; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda J; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri- and post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:22178693

  20. Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet Singh; Rizzo, James Douglas; Lee, Stephanie Joi; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda Jean; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John Reid; Tichelli, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, periand post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:23049402

  1. Recommended Screening and Preventive Practices for Long-term Survivors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Lee, Stephanie J; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda J; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri- and post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:22446607

  2. Recommended Screening and Preventive Practices for Long-term Survivors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Lee, Stephanie J; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda J; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri- and post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:22395764

  3. Effectiveness of Partner Social Support Predicts Enduring Psychological Distress after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rini, Christine; Redd, William H.; Austin, Jane; Mosher, Catherine E.; Meschian, Yeraz Markarian; Isola, Luis; Scigliano, Eileen; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza; Labay, Larissa E.; Rowley, Scott; Burkhalter, Jack E.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; DuHamel, Katherine N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors who are 1 to 3 years posttransplant are challenged by the need to resume valued social roles and activities--a task that may be complicated by enduring transplant-related psychological distress common in this patient population. The present study investigated whether transplant…

  4. Behavioural consequences of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplantation into experimental demyelinating lesions in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, N D; Crang, A J; O'leary, M T; Hodge, S J; Blakemore, W F

    1999-05-01

    Glial cell transplantation has the potential to be developed into a clinical treatment for human demyelinating diseases because of its demonstrated efficacy in remyelinating experimentally demyelinated axons. As a step towards clinical application it is necessary to demonstrate that the procedure is safe and efficacious in promoting behavioural recovery. In this study we transplanted glial cell progenitors into demyelinating lesions induced by intraspinal injection of ethidium bromide in the rat. Locomotor function after transplantation was assessed using a beam-walking test that has previously been shown able to detect deficits associated with demyelination in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord. Two groups of animals with transplants were examined. In one group, spontaneous remyelination was prevented by exposure of the lesion to 40 Gy of X-irradiation; in the other, male glial cells were transplanted into nonirradiated female recipients, permitting their identification by use of a probe specific to the rat Y chromosome. Following transplantation, there was severe axon loss in a large proportion of the irradiated animals and those affected did not recover normal behavioural function. In contrast, both the small proportion of the irradiated group that sustained only mild axon loss and the nonirradiated recipients of transplants recovered normal function on our behavioural test. We conclude that glial cell transplantation is able to reverse the functional deficits associated with demyelination, provided axonal loss is minimal. PMID:10215903

  5. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation in malignant lymphoma: current status

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Zhang, Yi-Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potential cure for patients with malignant lymphoma that is based on the graft-versus-lymphoma (GVL) effect. Myeloablative conditioning allo-SCT is associated with high mortality and morbidity, particularly in patients older than 45 years, heavily pretreated patients (prior hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or more than two lines of conventional chemotherapy) or patients affected by other comorbidities. Therefore, conventional allo-SCT is restricted to younger patients (<50 to 55 years) in good physical condition. Over the last decade, allo-SCT with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-allo-SCT) has been increasingly used to treat patients with lymphoma. This treatment is associated with lower toxicity and substantial decrease in the incidence of transplant-related mortality, and has the potential to lead to long-term remissions. Therefore, patients who are not suitable to undergo conventional allo-SCT can benefit from the potentially curative GVL effects of allo-SCT. Although RIC-allo-SCT has improved the survival of lymphoma patients, high post-transplant relapse rates or disease progression mainly results in treatment failure. Thus, further improvement is clearly needed. The role and timing of RIC-allo-SCT in the treatment of lymphoma remains unclear. Therefore, more prospective studies should clarify the effectiveness of this method. In this article, we review the recent literature on RIC-allo-SCT as a treatment for major lymphoma subtypes. Areas that require further investigation in the context of clinical trials are also highlighted. PMID:23691438

  6. The Use of Cell Transplantation in Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    Acute spinal cord injuries are life-changing events that lead to substantial morbidity and mortality, but the role of cell-based treatment for these injuries is unclear. Cell therapy is a rapidly evolving treatment methodology, with basic science and early phase I/II human trials showing promise. Multiple cell lines can be used in cell therapy, including adult or embryonic stem cells, Schwann cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Adult stem cells, Schwann cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells are readily available but lack the ability to differentiate into cells of the central nervous system. Mesenchymal stem cells can decrease cell death by modifying the local environment into which they are introduced. Peripheral nerve cells, such as Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing cells, can myelinate existing axons and foster axonal growth in the central nervous system, and embryonic stem cells can differentiate into neural progenitor stem cells of the central nervous system. Induced pluripotent stem cells are the basis of an emerging technology that has yet to be implemented in human trials but may offer a means of cell therapy without the ethical dilemmas associated with embryonic cells. PMID:26945167

  7. Transplantation of rat hepatic stem-like (HSL) cells with collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yasuharu; Nagai, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Go; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Koizumi, Yukio; Kameda, Takashi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2005-12-01

    Organ restitution using somatic stem cells is of great clinical interest. Recent advances in the field of tissue engineering have demonstrated that the use of collagen matrices as scaffolds facilitates tissue reconstruction. Here, we examine the efficacy of transplantation of HSL cells, a previously established liver epithelial cell line with a potential for differentiation, using collagen scaffolds. To this end, HSL cells were transplanted into Nagase's analbuminemic rat with spongy or gelatinous type I collagen matrices. Consequently, immunohistochemical analyses and genomic PCR experiments revealed engraftment of the transplanted cells. Furthermore, the levels of serum albumin in recipient rats were found to increase up to 2.5-fold relative to controls after transplantation. These findings suggest that HSL cells are able to differentiate into functional hepatocytes in vivo, and that biodegradable collagen matrices enhance this phenomenon by providing an appropriate microenvironment for hepatocytic repopulation.

  8. Pregnancy after kidney transplantation: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Mezza, E; Oggé, G; Attini, R; Rossetti, M; Soragna, G; Consiglio, V; Burdese, M; Vespertino, E; Tattoli, F; Gai, M; Motta, D; Segoloni, G P; Todros, T; Piccoli, G B

    2004-12-01

    Despite the relatively little space for transplantation in most medical schools, this issue is considered interesting by the students both for its clinical and ethical implications. The students were asked to choose a particular aspect of nephrology for a 2-hour case discussion. They chose the case of a 35-year-old female, kidney transplant recipient now 1.5 years postoperatively, who was coming to seek advice about pregnancy. The aim of the present work is to report an integration between narrative and evidence-based medicine (EBM) approaches. The search strategy was developed within a multidisciplinary working group, two of whose members were also masters in the methodology of systematic revisions. The first step in the discussion was the identification of ethical and methodological problem. In a rapidly developing field, books are unlikely to be able to give updated information. One needs to interact with electronic databases. In this context, no randomized controlled trial on pregnancy is expected. The evidence is likely to be heterogeneous. Prenatal care delivery differs around the world in part related to attitudes toward pregnancy, which depend upon religion and traditions. The second step was the definition of the search strategy. The third step, was selecting and cataloging the evidence. The titles and abstracts retrieved by the search strategy (272 items) were examined to identify full papers to be retrieved. The evidence retrieved was screened for the type of paper (reviews, primary studies, case reports, case series) and for the authors to give an indirect idea of duplicate publication bias. Teaching a complex and ever-changing subject, such as kidney transplantation, is a difficult task. The case of a young woman seeking information on the probability to undergo a successful pregnancy was particularly likely to exemplify the importance of being aware of the biases of the book-based information and on the need to interact with the internet. The search

  9. Cellular transplant therapies for globoid cell leukodystrophy: Preclinical and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Maher, Keri R; Yeager, Andrew M

    2016-11-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the deficiency of galactocerebrosidase (GALC), resulting in accumulation of toxic metabolites in neural tissues. Clinically variable based on age of onset, infantile GLD is generally a rapidly fatal syndrome of progressive neurologic and cognitive decline, whereas later-onset GLD has a more indolent, protracted clinical course. Animal models, particularly the twitcher mouse, have allowed investigation of both the pathophysiology of and the potential treatment modalities for GLD. Cellular therapy for GLD, notably hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT; transplantation of bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells, or umbilical cord blood cells) from a normal related or unrelated allogeneic donor provides a self-renewing source of GALC in donor-derived cells. The only currently available treatment option in human GLD, allogeneic HCT, can slow the progression of the disease and improve survival, especially when performed in presymptomatic infants. Because persistent neurologic dysfunction still occurs after HCT in GLD, preclinical studies are evaluating combinations of HCT with other treatment modalities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638602

  10. Human amniotic epithelial cells induce localized cell-mediated immune privilege in vitro: implications for pancreatic islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Khalid M; Oliver, Robert J; Paget, Michelle B; Murray, Hilary E; Bailey, Clifford J; Downing, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chronic systemic immunosuppression in cell replacement therapy restricts its clinical application. This study sought to explore the potential of cell-based immune modulation as an alternative to immunosuppressive drug therapy in the context of pancreatic islet transplantation. Human amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) possess innate anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties that were utilized to create localized immune privilege in an in vitro islet cell culture system. Cellular constructs composed of human islets and AEC (islet/AEC) were bioengineered under defined rotational cell culture conditions. Insulin secretory capacity was validated by glucose challenge and immunomodulatory potential characterized using a peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation assay. Results were compared to control constructs composed of islets or AEC cultured alone. Studies employing AEC-conditioned medium examined the role of soluble factors, and fluorescence immunocytochemistry was used to identify putative mediators of the immunosuppressive response in isolated AEC monocultures. Sustained, physiologically appropriate insulin secretion was observed in both islets and islet/AEC constructs. Activation of resting PBL proliferation occurred on exposure to human islets alone but this response was significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated by the presence of AEC and AEC-conditioned medium. Mitogen (phytohaemagglutinin, 5 μg/ml)-induced PBL proliferation was sustained on contact with isolated islets but abrogated by AEC, conditioned medium, and the islet/AEC constructs. Immunocytochemical analysis of AEC monocultures identified a subpopulation of cells that expressed the proapoptosis protein Fas ligand. This study demonstrates that human islet/AEC constructs exhibit localized immunosuppressive properties with no impairment of β-cell function. The data suggest that transplanted islets may benefit from the immune privilege status conferred on them as a consequence of their close

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles for oligodendrocyte precursor cell transplantation therapies: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stuart I; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Chari, Divya M

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have shown high promise as a transplant population to promote regeneration in the central nervous system, specifically, for the production of myelin - the protective sheath around nerve fibers. While clinical trials for these cells have commenced in some areas, there are currently key barriers to the translation of neural cell therapies. These include the ability to (a) image transplant populations in vivo; (b) genetically engineer transplant cells to augment their repair potential; and (c) safely target cells to sites of pathology. Here, we review the evidence that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are a 'multifunctional nanoplatform' that can aid in safely addressing these translational challenges in neural cell/OPC therapy: by facilitating real-time and post-mortem assessment of transplant cell biodistribution, and biomolecule delivery to transplant cells, as well as non-invasive 'magnetic cell targeting' to injury sites by application of high gradient fields. We identify key issues relating to the standardization and reporting of physicochemical and biological data in the field; we consider that it will be essential to systematically address these issues in order to fully evaluate the utility of the MNP platform for neural cell transplantation, and to develop efficacious neurocompatible particles for translational applications. PMID:26056590

  12. Natural Killer Cells and Liver Transplantation: Orchestrators of Rejection or Tolerance?

    PubMed

    Harmon, C; Sanchez-Fueyo, A; O'Farrelly, C; Houlihan, D D

    2016-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are highly heterogeneous innate lymphocytes with a diverse repertoire of phenotypes and functions. Their role in organ transplantation has been poorly defined due to conflicting clinical and experimental data. There is evidence that NK cells can contribute to graft rejection and also to tolerance induction. In most solid organ transplantation settings, the role of NK cells is only considered from the perspective of the recipient immune system. In contrast to other organs, the liver contains major resident populations of immune cells, particularly enriched with innate lymphocytes such as NK cells, NKT cells, and gamma-delta T cells. Liver transplantation therefore results in a unique meeting of donor and recipient immune systems. The unusual immune repertoire and tolerogenic environment of the liver may explain why this potentially inflammatory "meeting" often results in attenuated immune responses and reduced requirement for immunosuppression. Recent trials of immunosuppression withdrawal in liver transplant patients have identified NK cell features as possible predictors of tolerance. Here we propose that hepatic NK cells play a key role in the induction of tolerance post-liver transplant and examine potential mechanisms by which these cells influence liver transplant outcome.

  13. Stem Cell-Paved Biobridges Facilitate Stem Transplant and Host Brain Cell Interactions for Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S.; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5 hours of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke, thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. PMID:25770817

  14. Tolerization of a type I allergic immune response through transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Ulrike; Linhart, Birgit; Pilat, Nina; Gattringer, Martina; Bagley, Jessamyn; Muehlbacher, Ferdinand; Iacomini, John; Valenta, Rudolf; Wekerle, Thomas

    2008-06-15

    Allergy represents a hypersensitivity disease that affects >25% of the population in industrialized countries. The underlying type I allergic immune reaction occurs in predisposed atopic individuals in response to otherwise harmless Ags (i.e., allergens) and is characterized by the production of allergen-specific IgE, an allergen-specific T cell response, and the release of biologically active mediators such as histamine from mast cells and basophils. Regimens permanently tolerizing an allergic immune response still need to be developed. We therefore retrovirally transduced murine hematopoietic stem cells to express the major grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 on their cell membrane. Transplantation of these genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells led to durable multilineage molecular chimerism and permanent immunological tolerance toward the introduced allergen at the B cell, T cell, and effector cell levels. Notably, Phl p 5-specific serum IgE and IgG remained undetectable, and T cell nonresponsiveness persisted throughout follow-up (40 wk). Besides, mediator release was specifically absent in in vitro and in vivo assays. B cell, T cell, and effector cell responses to an unrelated control allergen (Bet v 1) were unperturbed, demonstrating specificity of this tolerance protocol. We thus describe a novel cell-based strategy for the prevention of allergy.

  15. Transplanted microvascular endothelial cells promote oligodendrocyte precursor cell survival in ischemic demyelinating lesions.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Keiya; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Puentes, Sandra; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed that transplantation of brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) greatly stimulated remyelination in the white matter infarct of the internal capsule (IC) induced by endothelin-1 injection and improved the behavioral outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of MVEC transplantation on the infarct volume using intermittent magnetic resonance image and on the behavior of oligodendrocyte lineage cells histochemically. Our results in vivo show that MVEC transplantation reduced the infarct volume in IC and apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). These results indicate that MVECs have a survival effect on OPCs, and this effect might contribute to the recovery of the white matter infarct. The conditioned-medium from cultured MVECs reduced apoptosis of cultured OPCs, while the conditioned medium from cultured fibroblasts did not show such effect. These results suggest a possibility that transplanted MVECs increased the number of OPCs through the release of humoral factors that prevent their apoptotic death. Identification of such humoral factors may lead to the new therapeutic strategy against ischemic demyelinating diseases.

  16. Transplanted microvascular endothelial cells promote oligodendrocyte precursor cell survival in ischemic demyelinating lesions.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Keiya; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Puentes, Sandra; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed that transplantation of brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) greatly stimulated remyelination in the white matter infarct of the internal capsule (IC) induced by endothelin-1 injection and improved the behavioral outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of MVEC transplantation on the infarct volume using intermittent magnetic resonance image and on the behavior of oligodendrocyte lineage cells histochemically. Our results in vivo show that MVEC transplantation reduced the infarct volume in IC and apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). These results indicate that MVECs have a survival effect on OPCs, and this effect might contribute to the recovery of the white matter infarct. The conditioned-medium from cultured MVECs reduced apoptosis of cultured OPCs, while the conditioned medium from cultured fibroblasts did not show such effect. These results suggest a possibility that transplanted MVECs increased the number of OPCs through the release of humoral factors that prevent their apoptotic death. Identification of such humoral factors may lead to the new therapeutic strategy against ischemic demyelinating diseases. PMID:26212499

  17. An injectable spheroid system with genetic modification for cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Nomoto, Takahiro; Endo, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Yu; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    The new methodology to increase a therapeutic potential of cell transplantation was developed here by the use of three-dimensional spheroids of transplanting cells subsequent to the genetic modification with non-viral DNA vectors, polyplex nanomicelles. Particularly, spheroids in regulated size of 100-μm of primary hepatocytes transfected with luciferase gene were formed on the micropatterned culture plates coated with thermosensitive polymer, and were recovered in the form of injectable liquid suspension simply by cooling the plates. After subcutaneously transplanting these hepatocyte spheroids, efficient transgene expression was observed in host tissue for more than a month, whereas transplantation of a single-cell suspension from a monolayer culture resulted in an only transient expression. The spheroid system contributed to the preservation of innate functions of transplanted hepatocytes in the host tissue, such as albumin expression, thereby possessing high potential for expressing transgene. Intravital observation of transplanted cells showed that those from spheroid cultures had a tendency to localize in the vicinity of blood vessels, making a favorable microenvironment for preserving cell functionality. Furthermore, spheroids transfected with erythropoietin-expressing DNA showed a significantly higher hematopoietic effect than that of cell suspensions from monolayer cultures, demonstrating high potential of this genetically-modified spheroid transplantation system for therapeutic applications. PMID:24388386

  18. Transplantation of Adult Monkey Neural Stem Cells into A Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Model in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hajinasrollah, Mostafa; Zare Mehrjerdi, Nargess; Azizi, Hossein; Hemmesi, Katayoun; Moghiminasr, Reza; Azhdari, Zahra; Talebi, Ardeshir; Mohitmafi, Soroush; Vosough Taqi Dizaj, Ahmad; Sharifi, Giuve; Baharvand, Hossein; Rezaee, Omidvar; Kiani, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Objective Currently, cellular transplantation for spinal cord injuries (SCI) is the subject of numerous preclinical studies. Among the many cell types in the adult brain, there is a unique subpopulation of neural stem cells (NSC) that can self-renew and differentiate into neurons. The study aims, therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analysis. Animals were clinically observed for 6 months. Results Analysis confirmed homing of mNSCs into the injury site. Transplanted cells expressed neuronal markers (TubIII). Hind limb performance improved in trans- planted animals based on Tarlov’s scale and our established behavioral tests for monkeys. Conclusion Our findings have indicated that mNSCs can facilitate recovery in contusion SCI models in rhesus macaque monkeys. Additional studies are necessary to determine the im- provement mechanisms after cell transplantation. PMID:24567941

  19. Reversal of diabetes following transplantation of an insulin-secreting human liver cell line: Melligen cells.

    PubMed

    Lawandi, Janet; Tao, Chang; Ren, Binhai; Williams, Paul; Ling, Dora; Swan, M Anne; Nassif, Najah T; Torpy, Fraser R; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Simpson, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    As an alternative to the transplantation of islets, a human liver cell line has been genetically engineered to reverse type 1 diabetes (TID). The initial liver cell line (Huh7ins) commenced secretion of insulin in response to a glucose concentration of 2.5 mmol/l. After transfection of the Huh7ins cells with human islet glucokinase, the resultant Melligen cells secreted insulin in response to glucose within the physiological range; commencing at 4.25 mmol/l. Melligen cells exhibited increased glucokinase enzymatic activity in response to physiological glucose concentrations, as compared with Huh7ins cells. When transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, Melligen cells restored normoglycemia. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that both cell lines expressed a range of β-cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones. Exposure of Melligen and Huh7ins cells to proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) affected neither their viability nor their ability to secrete insulin to glucose. Gene expression (microarray and qRT-PCR) analyses indicated the survival of Melligen cells in the presence of known β-cell cytotoxins was associated with the expression of NF-κB and antiapoptotic genes (such as BIRC3). This study describes the successful generation of an artificial β-cell line, which, if encapsulated to avoid allograft rejection, may offer a clinically applicable cure for T1D. PMID:26029722

  20. Lymphocyte subset recovery and outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for plasma cell myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rueff, Jessica; Medinger, Michael; Heim, Dominik; Passweg, Jakob; Stern, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Rapid immune reconstitution--particularly of natural killer cells (NK cells)--after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with protection from relapse. Whether such an association also exists after autologous stem cell transplantation is less clear. We retrospectively assessed lymphocyte subsets after autologous HSCT in 114 patients and correlated lymphocyte recovery with outcome. CD8 T cell and NK cell counts recovered rapidly to pretransplantation levels, whereas B cell and CD4 T cell recovery were delayed. Compared with patients with low NK cells (<100/uL), high NK cell count at 1 month after HSCT was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival: for NK cells 100 to 200/uL hazard ratio [HR], .33 (95% confidence interval [CI]; .16 to .80; P = .004); for NK cells > 200/μL HR, .27 (95% CI, .13 to .58; P = .001). No significant protective effects were associated with rapid recovery of any other lymphocyte subset. None influenced overall survival (OS) or time to next treatment. Early NK cell recovery is associated with better progression-free survival after autologous HSCT. The failure to detect an effect on OS might be due to the salvage strategies available to these patients.

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in sickle cell disease: patient selection and special considerations.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Monica; Sheth, Sujit

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative treatment currently in use for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The first successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed in 1984. To date, approximately 1,200 transplants have been reported. Given the high prevalence of this disorder in Africa, and its emergence in the developed world through immigration, this number is relatively small. There are many reasons for this; primary among them are the availability of a donor, the risks associated with this complex procedure, and the cost and availability of resources in the developing world. Of these, it is fair to say that the risks associated with the procedure have steadily decreased to the point where, if currently performed in a center with experience using a matched sibling donor, overall survival is close to 100% and event-free survival is over 90%. While there is little con